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Sample records for formate epr dosimetry

  1. Lithium formate EPR dosimetry for verifications of planned dose distributions prior to intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, H.; Lund, E.; Olsson, S.

    2008-09-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry for measurement of dose distributions in phantoms prior to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Lithium formate monohydrate tablets were carefully prepared, and blind tests were performed in clinically relevant situations in order to determine the precision and accuracy of the method. Further experiments confirmed that within the accuracy of the current method, the dosimeter response was independent of beam energies and dose rates used for IMRT treatments. The method was applied to IMRT treatment plans, and the dose determinations were compared to ionization chamber measurements. The experiments showed that absorbed doses above 3 Gy could be measured with an uncertainty of less than 2.5% of the dose (coverage factor k = 1.96). Measurement time was about 15 min using a well-calibrated dosimeter batch. The conclusion drawn from the investigation was that lithium formate EPR dosimetry is a promising new tool for absorbed dose measurements in external beam radiation therapy, especially for doses above 3 Gy.

  2. Lithium formate EPR dosimetry for verifications of planned dose distributions prior to intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, H; Lund, E [Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, S-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Olsson, S [Division of Radiation Physics, Linkoeping University Hospital, S-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden)], E-mail: hakgu@imv.liu.se

    2008-09-07

    The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry for measurement of dose distributions in phantoms prior to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Lithium formate monohydrate tablets were carefully prepared, and blind tests were performed in clinically relevant situations in order to determine the precision and accuracy of the method. Further experiments confirmed that within the accuracy of the current method, the dosimeter response was independent of beam energies and dose rates used for IMRT treatments. The method was applied to IMRT treatment plans, and the dose determinations were compared to ionization chamber measurements. The experiments showed that absorbed doses above 3 Gy could be measured with an uncertainty of less than 2.5% of the dose (coverage factor k = 1.96). Measurement time was about 15 min using a well-calibrated dosimeter batch. The conclusion drawn from the investigation was that lithium formate EPR dosimetry is a promising new tool for absorbed dose measurements in external beam radiation therapy, especially for doses above 3 Gy.

  3. EPR Dosimetry for ageing effect in NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hoon; Lim, Young Ki; Kim, Jong Seog; Jung, Sun Chul

    2005-01-01

    As one of the retrospective dosimetry method, EPR spectroscopy has been studied by many research up to theses days. As a dosimeter for EPR spectroscopy, Alanine is already a well known dosimeter in the field of radiation therapy and dose assessment in radiological accident by its characteristics as good linearity in a wide range of energy level and extremely low signal fading on time. Through technical document of IAEA, the EPR dosimetry method using alanine sample was published in 2000 after research by coordinated project on management of ageing of in-containment I and C cables. Although alanine sample is regarded as a good EPR dosimeter like above ageing assessment field, actually the assessment of radiation should be done at least for two fuel cycles, because of its relatively low irradiation environment in almost all spots in power plant. So, for getting more accurate detection value of radiation, another material is tested for being put in simultaneously inside the power plant with alanine. The test result for lithium formate monohydrate (HCO 2 LiH 2 0) was presented below for checking its possibility for being applied as EPR dosimeter for this project

  4. EPR dosimetry - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as co-ordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as biomarkers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (ASTM), and the International Organisation of Standards (ISO) as well as those of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (author)

  5. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regulla, D.F. [GSF - National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  6. EPR Dosimetry - Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    In the past, IAEA has played a central role in stipulating research and development in EPR high-dose standardisation as well as in coordinating and organising international dose intercomparison programs, within the Member States of the United Nations from the mid-seventies till today. The future tasks of EPR dosimetry seem to tend towards different subjects such as bio markers, biological radiation effects, post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and retrospective human dosimetry. The latter may be considered a promising tool for epidemiology on the way to re-define radiation risk of man for chronicle radiation exposures, based on e.g. South Ural civil population and radiation workers. There are on-going international activities in the field of standardising high-level dosimetry by the American Standards on Testing and Materials (Astm), and by the International Organisation of Standards (ISO). The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) is considering the establishment of relevant recommendations concerning industrial radiation processing, but also human dose reconstruction. (Author)

  7. Alanine EPR dosimetry of therapeutic irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugay, O.; Bartchuk, V.; Kolesnik, S.; Mazin, M.; Gaponenko, H.

    1999-01-01

    The high-dose alanine EPR dosimetry is a very precise method in the dose range 1-100 kGy. The system is used generally as the standard high-dose transfer dosimetry in many laboratories. This is comparatively expensive technique so it is important to use it as a more universal dosimetry system also in the middle and low dose ranges. The problems of the middle-dose alanine dosimetry are discussed and the solution of several problems is proposed. The alanine EPR dosimetry has been applied to the dose measurements of medical irradiators in the Kiev City Oncology Center. (author)

  8. EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattibene, Paola; Callens, Freddy

    2010-01-01

    When tooth enamel is exposed to ionizing radiation, radicals are formed, which can be detected using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel is based on the (presumed) correlation between the intensity or amplitude of some of the radiation-induced signals with the dose absorbed in the enamel. In the present paper a critical review is given of this widely applied dosimetric method. The first part of the paper is fairly fundamental and deals with the main properties of tooth enamel and some of its model systems (e.g., synthetic apatites). Considerable attention is also paid to the numerous radiation-induced and native EPR signals and the radicals responsible for them. The relevant methods for EPR detection, identification and spectrum analyzing are reviewed from a general point of view. Finally, the needs for solid-state modelling and studies of the linearity of the dose response are investigated. The second part is devoted to the practical implementation of EPR dosimetry using enamel. It concerns specific problems of preparation of samples, their irradiation and spectrum acquisition. It also describes how the dosimetric signal intensity and dose can be retrieved from the EPR spectra. Special attention is paid to the energy dependence of the EPR response and to sources of uncertainties. Results of and problems encountered in international intercomparisons and epidemiological studies are also dealt with. In the final section the future of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel is analyzed.

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in medical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, David A.; Iwasaki, Akinori; Romanyukha, Alexander A.; Swartz, Harold M.; Onori, Sandro

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the fundamentals of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and its application to retrospective measurements of clinically significant doses of ionizing radiation. X-band is the most widely used in EPR dosimetry because it represents a good compromise between sensitivity, sample size and water content in the sample. Higher frequency bands (e.g., W and Q) provide higher sensitivity, but they are also greatly influenced by water content. L and S bands can be used for EPR measurements in samples with high water content but they are less sensitive than X-band. Quality control for therapeutic radiation facilities using X-band EPR spectrometry of alanine is also presented

  10. EPR-dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Mariia; Vakhnin, Dmitrii; Tyshchenko, Igor

    2017-09-01

    This article discusses the problems that arise during the radiation sterilization of medical products. It is propose the solution based on alanine EPR-dosimetry. The parameters of spectrometer and methods of absorbed dose calculation are given. In addition, the problems that arise during heavy particles irradiation are investigated.

  11. Factors influencing EPR dosimetry in fingernails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubner, D.L.; Spinella, M.R.; Bof, E.

    2010-01-01

    The technique based on the detection of ionizing radiation induced radicals by EPR in tooth enamel is an established method for the dosimetry of exposed persons in radiological emergencies. Dosimetry based on EPR spectral analysis of fingernail clippings, currently under development, has the practical advantage of the easier sample collection. A limiting factor is that overlapping the radiation induced signal (RIS), fingernails have shown the presence of two mechanically induced signals, called MIS1 and MIS2, due to elastic and plastic deformation respectively, at the time of fingernails cutting. With a water treatment, MIS1 is eliminated while MIS2 is considerably reduced. The calibration curves needed for radiation accident dosimetry should have 'universal' characteristics, ie. Represent the variability that can be found in different individuals. Early studies were directed to the analysis of factors affecting the development of such universal calibration curves. The peak to peak amplitude of the signal before and after the water treatment as well as the effect of size and number of clippings were studied. Furthermore, the interpersonal and intrapersonal variability were analyzed. Taking into account these previous studies, the optimal conditions for measurement were determined and EPR spectra of samples irradiated at different doses were used for the developing of dose-response curves. This paper presents the analysis of the results.(authors) [es

  12. EPR Dosimetry in Irradiated Fingernails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinella, M.R.; Dubner, D.L.; Bof, E.

    2010-01-01

    The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is being transformed in a complementary tool of biologically-based methods for evaluation of dose after accidental radiation exposure. Many efforts are being carried out in laboratories to evaluate the performance of different materials for its use in EPR doses measurements and for improving the current methods for spectrum analysis and calibration curves determinations. In our country the EPR techniques have been used in different areas with dosimetric (alanine) and non dosimetric purposes. Now we are performing the first studies to obtain properly dose response curves to be used for accidental dose assessments through irradiated fingernails. It is by now well known that the fingernails present two types of signals, a background one (BKS), originated in elastic and inelastic mechanical deformations and the radio induced one (RIS), object of interest (I). In this work we will present some of the previous studies performed to characterize the fingernail samples and we analyse the additive dose method for data obtained employing the technique of the substraction of the spectrum recorded at two different microwave powers in order to reduce the BKS signal. Fingernail samples collected from different donors were treated by soaking in water during 10 min and 5 min drying on paper towel and the BKS signals were studied previously its irradiation. The statistical analysis (R statistics) show a distribution with a Standard Deviation of 24% respects to its media. During these studies we also conserved in freezer for more than 6 months irradiated fingernails that, were periodically measured and the statistical analysis of the peak to peak amplitude show a normal distribution through the Quantile correlation test with a SD 11% respected to its median. (authors)

  13. ISS protocol for EPR tooth dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onori, S.; Aragno, D.; Fattibene, P.; Petetti, E.; Pressello, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    The accuracy in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dose reconstruction with tooth enamel is affected by sample preparation, dosimetric signal amplitude evaluation and unknown dose estimate. Worldwide efforts in the field of EPR dose reconstruction with tooth enamel are focused on the optimization of the three mentioned steps in dose assessment. In the present work, the protocol implemented at ISS in the framework of the European Community Nuclear Fission Safety project 'Dose Reconstruction' is presented. A combined mechanical-chemical procedure for ground enamel sample preparation is used. The signal intensity evaluation is carried out with powder spectra simulation program. Finally, the unknown dose is evaluated individually for each sample with the additive dose method. The unknown dose is obtained by subtracting a mean native dose from the back-extrapolated dose. As an example of the capability of the ISS protocol in unknown dose evaluation, the results obtained in the framework of the 2nd International Intercomparison on EPR tooth enamel dosimetry are reported

  14. EPR TOOTH DOSIMETRY OF SNTS AREA INHABITANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholom, Sergey; Desrosiers, Marc; Bouville, André; Luckyanov, Nicholas; Chumak, Vadim; Simon, Steven L

    2007-07-01

    The determination of external dose to teeth of inhabitants of settlements near the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) was conducted using the EPR dosimetry technique to assess radiation doses associated with exposure to radioactive fallout from the test site. In this study, tooth doses have been reconstructed for 103 persons with all studied teeth having been formed before the first nuclear test in 1949. Doses above those received from natural background radiation, termed "accident doses", were found to lie in the range from zero to approximately 2 Gy, with one exception, a dose for one person from Semipalatinsk city was approximately 9 Gy. The variability of reconstructed doses within each of the settlements demonstrated heterogeneity of the deposited fallout as well as variations in lifestyle. The village mean external gamma doses for residents of nine[ settlements were in the range from a few tens of mGy to approximately 100 mGy.

  15. EPR tooth dosimetry of SNTS area inhabitants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sholom, Sergey [Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine, Melnikova str., 53, Kiev (Ukraine); Desrosiers, Marc [Ionizing Radiation Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Bouville, Andre; Luckyanov, Nicholas [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD (United States); Chumak, Vadim [Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine, Melnikova str., 53, Kiev (Ukraine); Simon, Steven L. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: ssimon@mail.nih.gov

    2007-07-15

    The determination of external dose to teeth of inhabitants of settlements near the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) was conducted using the EPR dosimetry technique to assess radiation doses associated with exposure to radioactive fallout from the test site. In this study, tooth doses have been reconstructed for 103 persons with all studied teeth having been formed before the first nuclear test in 1949. Doses above those received from natural background radiation, termed 'accident doses', were found to lie in the range from zero to approximately 2 Gy, with one exception, a dose for one person from Semipalatinsk city was approximately 9 Gy. The variability of reconstructed doses within each of the settlements demonstrated heterogeneity of the deposited fallout as well as variations in lifestyle. The village mean external gamma doses for residents of nine settlements were in the range from a few tens of mGy to approximately 100 mGy.

  16. Software for evaluation of EPR-dosimetry performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkina, E.A.; Timofeev, Yu.S.; Ivanov, D.V.

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with tooth enamel is a method extensively used for retrospective external dosimetry. Different research groups apply different equipment, sample preparation procedures and spectrum processing algorithms for EPR dosimetry. A uniform algorithm for description and comparison of performances was designed and implemented in a new computer code. The aim of the paper is to introduce the new software 'EPR-dosimetry performance'. The computer code is a user-friendly tool for providing a full description of method-specific capabilities of EPR tooth dosimetry, from metrological characteristics to practical limitations in applications. The software designed for scientists and engineers has several applications, including support of method calibration by evaluation of calibration parameters, evaluation of critical value and detection limit for registration of radiation-induced signal amplitude, estimation of critical value and detection limit for dose evaluation, estimation of minimal detectable value for anthropogenic dose assessment and description of method uncertainty. (authors)

  17. Retrospective individual dosimetry using EPR of tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skvortzo, V.; Ivannikov, A.; Stepanenko, V.; Wieser, A.; Bougai, A.; Brick, A.; Chumak, V.; Radchuk, V.; Repin, V.; Kirilov, V.

    1996-01-01

    The results of joint investigations (in the framework of ECP-10 program) aimed on the improvement of the sensitivity and accuracy of the procedure of dose measurement using tooth enamel EPR spectroscopy are presented. It is shown, what the sensitivity of method may be increased using special physical-chemical procedure of the enamel samples treatment, which leads to the reducing of EPR signal of organic components in enamel. Tooth diseases may have an effect on radiation sensitivity of enamel. On the basis of statistical analysis of the results of more then 2000 tooth enamel samples measurements it was shown, what tooth enamel EPR spectroscopy gives opportunity to register contribution into total dose, which is caused by natural environmental radiation and by radioactive contamination. EPR response of enamel to ultraviolet exposure is investigated and possible influences to EPR dosimetry is discussed. The correction factors for EPR dosimetry in real radiation fields are estimated

  18. Assessment of performance parameters for EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Fattibene, P.; Shishkina, E.A.; Ivanov, D.V.; De Coste, V.; Guettler, A.; Onori, S.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of a comparison between three laboratories, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal-to-dose response curves were measured for sets of 30 tooth enamel samples and the variance of EPR measurements in dependence on absorbed dose was evaluated, in nine combinations of laboratory of sample preparation and EPR evaluation, respectively. As a test for benchmarking of EPR evaluation, the parameters 'critical dose' and 'limit of detection' were proposed as performance parameters following definitions from chemical-metrology, and a model function was suggested for analytical formulation of the dependence of the variance of EPR measurement on absorbed dose. First estimates of limits of detection by weighted and unweighted fitting resulted in the range 101-552 and 67-561 mGy, respectively, and were generally larger with weighted than with unweighted fitting. Indication was found for the influence of methodology of sample preparation and applied EPR measurement parameters on performance of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel

  19. Selective saturation method for EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, E.A.; Romanyukha, A.A.; Koshta, A.A.; Wieser, A.

    1996-01-01

    The method of selective saturation is based on the difference in the microwave (mw) power dependence of the background and radiation induced EPR components of the tooth enamel spectrum. The subtraction of the EPR spectrum recorded at low mw power from that recorded at higher mw power provides a considerable reduction of the background component in the spectrum. The resolution of the EPR spectrum could be improved 10-fold, however simultaneously the signal-to-noise ratio was found to be reduced twice. A detailed comparative study of reference samples with known absorbed doses was performed to demonstrate the advantage of the method. The application of the selective saturation method for EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel reduced the lower limit of EPR dosimetry to about 100 mGy. (author)

  20. Decomposition of spectra in EPR dosimetry using the matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sholom, S.V.; Chumak, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    The matrix method of EPR spectra decomposition is developed and adapted for routine application in retrospective EPR dosimetry with teeth. According to this method, the initial EPR spectra are decomposed (using methods of matrix algebra) into several reference components (reference matrices) that are specific for each material. Proposed procedure has been tested on the example of tooth enamel. Reference spectra were a spectrum of an empty sample tube and three standard signals of enamel (two at g=2.0045, both for the native signal and one at g perpendicular =2.0018, g parallel =1.9973 for the dosimetric signal). Values of dosimetric signals obtained using the given method have been compared with data obtained by manual manipulation of spectra, and good coincidence was observed. This allows considering the proposed method as potent for application in routine EPR dosimetry

  1. EPR dosimetry of irradiated human teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodas Duran, J.E.; Panzeri, H.; Mascarenhas, S.

    1985-01-01

    The determination of the absorbed radiation dose in man may be made by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of dental enamel. We analysed the EPR signals for dental enamel submitted to gamma radiation in doses between 1 Gy and 25 Gy. We conclude that independent of the type of tooth analysed there exists a linear relation between the EPR signals and the absorbed doses. These studies were extended to enamel irradiated with gamma rays and with X rays in doses between 0.1 Gy and 0.6 Gy. The graph of the intensity of the EPR signals as a function of the dose has a slope of 0.22. This calibration may be used to calculate the absorbed dose for humans from a measurement of the EPR signal from small samples of enamel taken from any permanent tooth. Finally we comment on some EPR studies of effects of radiation of milk teeth. (author)

  2. Limits in EPR dosimetry for irradiated dried fruits discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasoveanu, Mirela M. E-mirela@alpha.infim.ro; Nemtanu, R.; Minea, R.; Grecu, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    Irradiation of food induces free radical species. EPR dosimetry in irradiated goods puts in evidence if these radicals are stable in environmental condition. Irradiation of dried fruits has been carried out. Their behaviour under irradiation was investigated and correlation between EPR signal and irradiation dose was determined. Electrons of 6 MeV (mean energy) and doses up to 10 kGy were used. EPR spectra were recorded with a Jeol spectrometer, JES-ME-3X tip, with a 100 kHz modulation. The dried fruits can be separated into categories depending on the EPR signal intensity. Strong signals are observed in those fruits in which possible crystalline-like phases exist. As the amount of crystallized sugar decreases, the EPR signals become weaker. Dependencies on irradiation dose give a linear correlation below 10 kGy. The spectra are compared to irradiated sugar and differences and similarities are discussed. (authors)

  3. Medical reference dosimetry using EPR measurements of alanine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Rosendal, F.; Kofoed, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Electron spin resonance (EPR) is used to determine the absorbed dose of alanine dosimeters exposed to clinical photon beams in a solid-water phantom. Alanine is potentially suitable for medical reference dosimetry, because of its near water equivalence over a wide energy spectrum, low...... methods the proposed algorithm can be applied without normalisation of phase shifts caused by changes in the g-value of the cavity. The study shows that alanine dosimetry is a suitable candidate for medical reference dosimetry especially for quality control applications.......Background. Electron spin resonance (EPR) is used to determine the absorbed dose of alanine dosimeters exposed to clinical photon beams in a solid-water phantom. Alanine is potentially suitable for medical reference dosimetry, because of its near water equivalence over a wide energy spectrum, low...

  4. A transferability study of the EPR-tooth-dosimetry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sholom, S.; Chumak, V.; Desrosiers, M.; Bouville, A.

    2006-01-01

    The transferability of a measurement protocol from one laboratory to another is an important feature of any mature, standardised protocol. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-tooth dosimetry technique that was developed in Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine, AMS (Ukraine) (SCRM) for routine dosimetry of Chernobyl liquidators has demonstrated consistent results in several inter-laboratory measurement comparisons. Transferability to the EPR dosimetry laboratory at the National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST) was examined. Several approaches were used to test the technique, including dose reconstruction of SCRM-NIST inter-comparison samples. The study has demonstrated full transferability of the technique and the possibility to reproduce results in a different laboratory environment. (authors)

  5. EPR dosimetry in a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompier, F; Fattibene, P; Tikunov, D; Bartolotta, A; Carosi, A; Doca, M C

    2004-01-01

    Suitability of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for criticality dosimetry was evaluated for tooth enamel, mannose and alanine pellets during the 'international intercomparison of criticality dosimetry techniques' at the SILENE reactor held in Valduc in June 2002, France. These three materials were irradiated in neutron and gamma-ray fields of various relative intensities and spectral distributions in order to evaluate their neutron sensitivity. The neutron response was found to be around 10% for tooth enamel, 45% for mannose and between 40 and 90% for alanine pellets according their type. According to the IAEA recommendations on the early estimate of criticality accident absorbed dose, analyzed results show the EPR potentiality and complementarity with regular criticality techniques.

  6. Retrospective dosimetry using EPR and TL techniques: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskell, E.H.

    1996-01-01

    Methods of retrospective dosimetry, including luminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), rely on measurement of accident dose absorbed by naturally occurring materials - ceramics in the case of both thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and organic materials and bio- minerals in the case of EPR. Each of these methods relies on measurement of radiation defects resulting from accidental exposure. Since defects also result from natural sources of radiation over the lifetime of a sample, analysis is usually restricted to materials for which the natural dose may be determined and subtracted from the measured cumulative dose. Luminescence dating techniques rely heavily on an accurate assessment of cumulative dose from natural radiation sources, and dating research has provided us with the bulk of our knowledge in this area. Virtually all of the work on natural dose determination can be directly applied to retrospective techniques. With EPR techniques the cumulative dose from diagnostic x- rays is also of importance

  7. Retrospective dosimetry using EPR and TL techniques: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskell, E.H.

    1996-12-31

    Methods of retrospective dosimetry, including luminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), rely on measurement of accident dose absorbed by naturally occurring materials - ceramics in the case of both thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and organic materials and bio- minerals in the case of EPR. Each of these methods relies on measurement of radiation defects resulting from accidental exposure. Since defects also result from natural sources of radiation over the lifetime of a sample, analysis is usually restricted to materials for which the natural dose may be determined and subtracted from the measured cumulative dose. Luminescence dating techniques rely heavily on an accurate assessment of cumulative dose from natural radiation sources, and dating research has provided us with the bulk of our knowledge in this area. Virtually all of the work on natural dose determination can be directly applied to retrospective techniques. With EPR techniques the cumulative dose from diagnostic x- rays is also of importance.

  8. Boron dose determination for BNCT using Fricke and EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielopolski, L.; Ciesielski, B.

    1995-01-01

    In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) the dominant dose delivered to the tumor is due to α and 7 Li charged particles resulting from a neutron capture by 10 B and is referred to herein as the boron dose. Boron dose is directly attributable to the following two independent factors, one boron concentration and the neutron capture energy dependent cross section of boron, and two the energy spectrum of the neutrons that interact with boron. The neutron energy distribution at a given point is dictated by the incident neutron energy distribution, the depth in tissue, geometrical factors such as beam size and patient's dimensions. To account for these factors can be accommodated by using Monte Carlo theoretical simulations. However, in conventional experimental BNCT dosimetry, e.g., using TLDs or ionization chambers, it is only possible to estimate the boron dose. To overcome some of the limitations in the conventional dosimetry, modifications in ferrous sulfate dosimetry (Fricke) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry in alanine, enable to measure specifically boron dose in a mixed gamma neutron radiation fields. The boron dose, in either of the dosimeters, is obtained as a difference between measurements with boronated and unboronated dosimeters. Since boron participates directly in the measurements, the boron dosimetry reflects the true contribution, integral of the neutron energy spectrum with boron cross section, of the boron dose to the total dose. Both methods are well established and used extensively in dosimetry, they are presented briefly here

  9. Optimal registration conditions for tooth EPR dosimetry at low accumulated dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galtsev, V.E.; Galtseva, E.V.; Lebedev, Y.S.

    1997-01-01

    The spectrum registration under rapid passage conditions (the second harmonic phase quadrature of the absorption signal) allows one to enhance substantially the sensitivity of tooth enamel and bone EPR dosimetry at a low accumulated dose. In the present work the dependencies of the radiation and background signals on EPR spectrometer parameters are described and the optimal conditions in RPM for EPR dosimetry are obtained. (Author)

  10. Alanine-EPR dosimetry system for high industrial as well radiotherapeutic dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrovodsky, J.; Bukovjan, J.

    2005-01-01

    Slovak Institute of Metrology is developing new metrology standard for high doses, based on the alanine-EPR as a reference dosimetry system. A Bruker e-scan EPR analyser developed specifically for alanine dosimetry has improved stability of EPR measurement, especially at lower dose range. The standard e-scan system provides sensitivity below 1 Gray. After further improvement of the system and lowering of dose determination expanded uncertainty down below 1 %, its utilisation for radiotherapy field is expected (authors)

  11. Retrospective dosimetry by electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in dental enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubner, D.; Gisone, P.; Perez, M.R.; Davila, F.A.; Boveris, A.; Puntarulo, S.

    1998-01-01

    Biophysical dosimetry based on EPR in biological solid samples (like bone and teeth) or in organic materials (like textile fibres, sugar, etc.) is a complementary technique that could contribute, along with the biological dosimetry, to the retrospective evaluation of the absorbed dose in accidental situations. Dental enamel could be considered as the only tissue with structure and composition essentially constant over time: this characteristic feature allows its use as an index of radiation exposure since tooth retains indefinitely its radiation history. Samples of human molars were exposed to gamma-Rays (Co 60) with doses between 0,5 Gy to 10 Gy. After a chemical treatment of samples, enamel was removed by grinding with a dental drill and reduced to a fine powder. A characteristic EPR signal was detected at g=2.002. The dose effect curves were done using 20 mw of microwave power. Measurements were done both, with flat cells and disposable Pasteur pipettes allowing the use of lower amounts of sample. The intensity of the signal was proportional to the dose and linearity was verified in both cases. We discuss the applicability of this technique in evaluating radiation dose in accidental overexposures. (author) [es

  12. The sensitivity analysis of tooth enamel to the absorbed dose for the application to EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Dae Seok; Lee, Kun Jai; Cho, Young Hwan

    2002-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is one of the methods applicable to retrospective dosimetry. The retrospective dosimetry is a process that is a part of dose reconstruction for estimation of exposed dose occurred years before the estimation. Many techniques can be used to the retrospective dosimetry. As a physical method, EPR analysis of biological material measures the quantity of free radicals generated in the material from the interaction of radiation and material. Since the later 80s, in many countries, EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel has been studied and applied for the retrospective dosimetry. In the consideration of the biological materials for EPR dosimetry, human fingernail, hair, bone and tooth are generally considered. The tooth can be separated as enamel, dentine and cementum. Among the three parts, enamel shows the best sensitivity to the absorbed dose and is most widely used. In this study, the characteristics of tooth enamel for EPR dosimetry is examined and experimented. At the experiment, for easy separation, tooth was cut into 4 parts and then each part is treated by ultrasonic vibration in NaOH liquid to reduce mechanically induced noise in the corresponding signal. After the separation of the enamel from dentine, background EPR signal is measured and then radiation-induced EPR spectrum is estimated

  13. Alanine-EPR dosimetry system. Why we like it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuglik, Z.

    2007-01-01

    To develop a new high-dose dosimeter we should: (1) to find material with radiation effect monotonically (if possible linearly) dependent on an absorbed dose; (2) to investigate its dosimetric characteristics (sensitivity, dose range, repeatability, accuracy, post-effects); (3) to evaluate economical parameters of new method (cost and availability of dosimetric material, cost of analytical instrument and its services); (4) to evaluate operational features of new dosimeter (sensitivity for environmental conditions, time from irradiation to the read-out); (5) to perform a calibration curve, i.e. functional dependence between radiation effect (dosimetric signal) and absorbed dose. On the base of this very stable stable ammonium radical (SAR) generated in crystalline α-alanine was established in the INCT as an alanine-EPR dosimetry system. Presented lecture describes the main features of this dosimeter

  14. EPR dosimetry of radiation background in the Urals region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkina, E.A.; Degteva, M.O.; Shved, V.A. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, 48-A Vorovsky, Chelyabinsk 454076 (Russian Federation); Fattibene, P.; Onori, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Wieser, A. [GSF, Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Ingolstaedter Landstr (Germany); Ivanov, D.V.; Bayankin, S.N. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Knyazev, V.A.; Vasilenko, E.I.; Gorelov, M. [ZAO, Closed Corporation ' Company GEOSPETSECOLOGIA' (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    Method of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is extensively applied to individual retrospective dosimetry. The background dose is unavoidable component of cumulative absorbed dose in the tooth enamel accumulated during the lifetime of donor. Estimation of incidental radiation dose using tooth enamel needs in extraction of background dose. Moreover, the variation of background doses in the population is a limited factor for reliable detection of additional irradiation especially for low dose level. Therefore the accurate knowledge of the natural background radiation dose is a critical element of EPR studies of exposed populations. In the Urals region the method applies for such two large cohorts as the workers of Mayak (Ozersk citizens) and Techa River riverside inhabitants (rural population). Current study aimed to investigate the Urals radiation background detected by EPR spectrometry. For this aim two group of unexposed Urals residents were separated, viz: citizens of Ozersk and rural inhabitants of Chelyabinsk region. Comparison of two investigated territories has demonstrated that from the point of view of radiation background it is impossible to assume the Urals population as uniform. The reliable difference between the urban and rural residents has been found. The average background doses of Ozersk donors is in average 50 mGy higher than those detected for rural residents. The individual variability of background doses for Osersk has been higher than in the rural results. The difference in background dose levels between two population results in different limits of accidental dose detection and individualization. The doses for 'Mayak' workers (Ozyorsk citizens) can be classed as anthropogenic if the EPR measurements exceed 120 mGy for teeth younger than 40 years, and 240 mGy for teeth older than 70 years. The anthropogenic doses for Techa River residents (rural population) would be higher than 95 mGy for teeth younger than 50 years and 270 mGy for

  15. EPR dosimetry of radiation background in the Urals region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkina, E.A.; Degteva, M.O.; Shved, V.A.; Fattibene, P.; Onori, S.; Wieser, A.; Ivanov, D.V.; Bayankin, S.N.; Knyazev, V.A.; Vasilenko, E.I.; Gorelov, M.

    2006-01-01

    Method of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is extensively applied to individual retrospective dosimetry. The background dose is unavoidable component of cumulative absorbed dose in the tooth enamel accumulated during the lifetime of donor. Estimation of incidental radiation dose using tooth enamel needs in extraction of background dose. Moreover, the variation of background doses in the population is a limited factor for reliable detection of additional irradiation especially for low dose level. Therefore the accurate knowledge of the natural background radiation dose is a critical element of EPR studies of exposed populations. In the Urals region the method applies for such two large cohorts as the workers of Mayak (Ozersk citizens) and Techa River riverside inhabitants (rural population). Current study aimed to investigate the Urals radiation background detected by EPR spectrometry. For this aim two group of unexposed Urals residents were separated, viz: citizens of Ozersk and rural inhabitants of Chelyabinsk region. Comparison of two investigated territories has demonstrated that from the point of view of radiation background it is impossible to assume the Urals population as uniform. The reliable difference between the urban and rural residents has been found. The average background doses of Ozersk donors is in average 50 mGy higher than those detected for rural residents. The individual variability of background doses for Osersk has been higher than in the rural results. The difference in background dose levels between two population results in different limits of accidental dose detection and individualization. The doses for 'Mayak' workers (Ozyorsk citizens) can be classed as anthropogenic if the EPR measurements exceed 120 mGy for teeth younger than 40 years, and 240 mGy for teeth older than 70 years. The anthropogenic doses for Techa River residents (rural population) would be higher than 95 mGy for teeth younger than 50 years and 270 mGy for teeth older

  16. The Third International Intercomparison on EPR Tooth Dosimetry: Part 2, final analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Debuyst, R.; Fattibene, P.; Meghzifene, A.; Onori, S.; Bayankin, S. N.; Brik, A.; Bugay, A.; Chumak, V.; Ciesielski, B.; Hoshi, M.; Imata, H.; Ivannikov, A.; Ivanov, D.; Junczewska, M.; Miyazawa, C.; Penkowski, M.; Pivovarov, S.; Romanyukha, A.; Romanyukha, L.; Schauer, D.; Scherbina, O.; Schultka, K.; Sholom, S.; Skvortsov, V.; Stepanenko, V.; Thomas, J. A.; Tielewuhan, E.; Toyoda, S.; Trompier, F.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the Third International Intercomparison on EPR Tooth Dosimetry was to evaluate laboratories performing tooth enamel dosimetry <300 mGy. Final analysis of results included a correlation analysis between features of laboratory dose reconstruction protocols and dosimetry performance. Applicability of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tooth dosimetry at low dose was shown at two applied dose levels of 79 and 176 mGy. Most (9 of 12) laboratories reported the dose to be within 50 mGy of the delivered dose of 79 mGy, and 10 of 12 laboratories reported the dose to be within 100 mGy of the delivered dose of 176 mGy. At the high-dose tested (704 mGy) agreement within 25% of the delivered dose was found in 10 laboratories. Features of EPR dose reconstruction protocols that affect dosimetry performance were found to be magnetic field modulation amplitude in EPR spectrum recording, EPR signal model in spectrum deconvolution and duration of latency period for tooth enamel samples after preparation. (authors)

  17. Calibration of helical tomotherapy machine using EPR/alanine dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perichon, Nicolas; Garcia, Tristan; François, Pascal; Lourenço, Valérie; Lesven, Caroline; Bordy, Jean-Marc

    2011-03-01

    Current codes of practice for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams in conventional radiotherapy recommend using a 10 x 10 cm2 square field, with the detector at a reference depth of 10 cm in water and 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD) (AAPM TG-51) or 100 cm source-to-axis distance (SAD) (IAEA TRS-398). However, the maximum field size of a helical tomotherapy (HT) machine is 40 x 5 cm2 defined at 85 cm SAD. These nonstandard conditions prevent a direct implementation of these protocols. The purpose of this study is twofold: To check the absorbed dose in water and dose rate calibration of a tomotherapy unit as well as the accuracy of the tomotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) calculations for a specific test case. Both topics are based on the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using alanine as transfer dosimeter between the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) 60Co-gamma-ray reference beam and the Institut Curie's HT beam. Irradiations performed in the LNHB reference 60Co-gamma-ray beam allowed setting up the calibration method, which was then implemented and tested at the LNHB 6 MV linac x-ray beam, resulting in a deviation of 1.6% (at a 1% standard uncertainty) relative to the reference value determined with the standard IAEA TRS-398 protocol. HT beam dose rate estimation shows a difference of 2% with the value stated by the manufacturer at a 2% standard uncertainty. A 4% deviation between measured dose and the calculation from the tomotherapy TPS was found. The latter was originated by an inadequate representation of the phantom CT-scan values and, consequently, mass densities within the phantom. This difference has been explained by the mass density values given by the CT-scan and used by the TPS which were not the true ones. Once corrected using Monte Carlo N-Particle simulations to validate the accuracy of this process, the difference between corrected TPS calculations and alanine measured dose values was then

  18. EPR/alanine dosimetry for two therapeutic proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrale, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.marrale@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Gruppo V Sezione INFN di Catania, Via Santa Sofia, 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Carlino, Antonio [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); EBG MedAustron GmbH, Marie Curie-Straße 5, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Gallo, Salvatore [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Gruppo V Sezione INFN di Catania, Via Santa Sofia, 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Laboratorio PH3DRA, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Longo, Anna; Panzeca, Salvatore [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Gruppo V Sezione INFN di Catania, Via Santa Sofia, 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Bolsi, Alessandra; Hrbacek, Jan; Lomax, Tony [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-02-01

    In this work the analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets exposed to two different clinical proton beams employed for radiotherapy is performed. One beam is characterized by a passive delivery technique and is dedicated to the eyes treatment (OPTIS2 beam line). Alanine pellets were irradiated with a 70 MeV proton beam corresponding to 35 mm range in eye tissue. We investigated how collimators with different sizes and shape used to conform the dose to the planned target volume influence the delivered dose. For this purpose we performed measurements with varying the collimator size (Output Factor) and the results were compared with those obtained with other dosimetric techniques (such as Markus chamber and diode detector). This analysis showed that the dosimeter response is independent of collimator diameter if this is larger than or equal to 10 mm. The other beam is characterized by an active spot-scanning technique, the Gantry1 beam line (maximum energy 230 MeV), and is used to treat deep-seated tumors. The dose linearity of alanine response in the clinical dose range was tested and the alanine dose response at selected locations in depth was measured and compared with the TPS planned dose in a quasi-clinical scenario. The alanine response was found to be linear in the dose in the clinical explored range (from 10 to 70 Gy). Furthermore, a depth dose profile in a quasi-clinical scenario was measured and compared to the dose computed by the Treatment Planning System PSIPLAN. The comparison of calibrated proton alanine measurements and TPS dose shows a difference under 1% in the SOBP and a “quenching” effect up to 4% in the distal part of SOBP. The positive dosimetric characteristics of the alanine pellets confirm the feasibility to use these detectors for “in vivo” dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

  19. EPR/alanine dosimetry for two therapeutic proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Carlino, Antonio; Gallo, Salvatore; Longo, Anna; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bolsi, Alessandra; Hrbacek, Jan; Lomax, Tony

    2016-01-01

    In this work the analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response of alanine pellets exposed to two different clinical proton beams employed for radiotherapy is performed. One beam is characterized by a passive delivery technique and is dedicated to the eyes treatment (OPTIS2 beam line). Alanine pellets were irradiated with a 70 MeV proton beam corresponding to 35 mm range in eye tissue. We investigated how collimators with different sizes and shape used to conform the dose to the planned target volume influence the delivered dose. For this purpose we performed measurements with varying the collimator size (Output Factor) and the results were compared with those obtained with other dosimetric techniques (such as Markus chamber and diode detector). This analysis showed that the dosimeter response is independent of collimator diameter if this is larger than or equal to 10 mm. The other beam is characterized by an active spot-scanning technique, the Gantry1 beam line (maximum energy 230 MeV), and is used to treat deep-seated tumors. The dose linearity of alanine response in the clinical dose range was tested and the alanine dose response at selected locations in depth was measured and compared with the TPS planned dose in a quasi-clinical scenario. The alanine response was found to be linear in the dose in the clinical explored range (from 10 to 70 Gy). Furthermore, a depth dose profile in a quasi-clinical scenario was measured and compared to the dose computed by the Treatment Planning System PSIPLAN. The comparison of calibrated proton alanine measurements and TPS dose shows a difference under 1% in the SOBP and a “quenching” effect up to 4% in the distal part of SOBP. The positive dosimetric characteristics of the alanine pellets confirm the feasibility to use these detectors for “in vivo” dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

  20. Alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, H.J.; Silva, E.J. da; Mehta, K.; Barros, V.S. de; Asfora, V.K.; Guzzo, P.L.; Parker, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of alanine-EPR as a transfer standard dosimetry system for low energy X radiation, such as that in RS-2400, which operates in the range from 25 to 150 kV and 2 to 45 mA. Two types of alanine dosimeters were investigated. One is a commercial alanine pellets from Aérial-Centre de Ressources Technologiques, France and one was prepared in our laboratory (LMRI-DEN/UFPE). The EPR spectra of the irradiated dosimeters were recorded in the Nuclear Energy Department of UFPE, using a Bruker EMX10 EPR spectrometer operating in the X-band. The alanine-EPR dosimetry system was calibrated in the range of 20–220 Gy in this X-ray field, against an ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant X-ray energy with traceability to PTB. The results showed that both alanine dosimeters presented a linear dose response the same sensitivity, when the EPR signal was normalized to alanine mass. The total uncertainty in the measured dose was estimated to be about 3%. The results indicate that it is possible to use the alanine-EPR dosimetry system for validation of a low-energy X ray irradiator, such as RS-2400.

  1. EPR dosimetry of teeth in past and future accidents: a prospective look at a retrospective method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskell, E.H.; Kenner, G.H.; Hayes, R.B. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Center for Applied Dosimetry; Chumak, V.; Shalom, S. [All-Union Scientific Centre of Radiation Medicine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1996-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) of tooth enamel is a relatively new technique for retrospective dosimetry that in the past two years has seen increasing effort towards its development and evaluation. Efforts have centered on determining the accuracy which may be achieved with current measurement techniques as well as the minimum doses detectable. The study was focused on evaluating some factors which influence the accuracy of EPR dosimetry of enamel. Reported are studies on sample intercomparisions, instrumental considerations, and effects of dental x-rays, environmental sunlight and ultraviolet radiation.

  2. EPR dosimetry of teeth in past and future accidents: a prospective look at a retrospective method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskell, E.H.; Kenner, G.H.; Hayes, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) of tooth enamel is a relatively new technique for retrospective dosimetry that in the past two years has seen increasing effort towards its development and evaluation. Efforts have centered on determining the accuracy which may be achieved with current measurement techniques as well as the minimum doses detectable. The study was focused on evaluating some factors which influence the accuracy of EPR dosimetry of enamel. Reported are studies on sample intercomparisions, instrumental considerations, and effects of dental x-rays, environmental sunlight and ultraviolet radiation

  3. Metabolism in tooth enamel and reliability of retrospective EPR dosimetry connected with Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brik, A.; Radchuk, V.; Scherbina, O.; Matyash, M.; Gaver, O.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the results of retrospective EPR dosimetry by tooth enamel are essentially determined by the fact that tooth enamel is the mineral of biological origin. The structure of tooth enamel, properties of radiation defects and the role of metabolism in tooth enamel are discussed. It is shown that at deep metamorphic modifications tooth enamel don't save information about its radiation history. The reliability and accuracy of retrospective EPR dosimetry are discussed. Because after Chernobyl accident have passed 10 years the application of tooth enamel for reconstruction of doses which are connected with Chernobyl accident need care and additional investigations

  4. Electron paramagnetic resonance radiation dosimetry: possible inorganic alternatives to the EPR/alanine dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keizer, P.N.; Morton, J.R.; Preston, K.F.

    1991-01-01

    The intensity of the EPR spectrum of γ-irradiated L-α-alanine has been accepted by the International Atomic Energy Agency as a secondary standard for high-dose (10-100 000 Gy) dosimetry. The alanine dosimeter is not without its disadvantages, however, and in this article alternative EPR dosimeters are explored. These include SO 3 - in irradiated K 2 CH 2 (SO 3 ) 2 and CO 2 - in irradiated sodium formate (NaHCO 2 ), both of which have some advantages over CH 3 CHCO 2 - in L-α-alanine. Using as a readout parameter the peak-to-peak excursion of the strongest line, these systems have a four-fold sensitivity advantage over alanine. The radicals SO 3 - and CO 2 - are, moreover, found in a wide variety of matrices, and it may be possible to find one in which they are even stronger. The need to discover a dosimeter material sensitive enough to function in the 'clinical' dose range (below 10 Gy) is emphasized. (author)

  5. New developed cylindrical TM010 mode EPR cavity for X-band in vivo tooth dosimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Junwang

    Full Text Available EPR tooth in vivo dosimetry is an attractive approach for initial triage after unexpected nuclear events. An X-band cylindrical TM010 mode resonant cavity was developed for in vivo tooth dosimetry and used in EPR applications for the first time. The cavity had a trapezoidal measuring aperture at the exact position of the cavity's cylindrical wall where strong microwave magnetic field H1 concentrated and weak microwave electric field E1 distributed. Theoretical calculations and simulations were used to design and optimize the cavity parameters. The cavity features were evaluated by measuring DPPH sample, intact incisor samples embed in a gum model and the rhesus monkey teeth. The results showed that the cavity worked at designed frequency and had the ability to make EPR spectroscopy in relative high sensitivity. Sufficient modulation amplitude and microwave power could be applied into the aperture. Radiation induced EPR signal could be observed remarkably from 1 Gy irradiated intact incisor within only 30 seconds, which was among the best in scan time and detection limit. The in vivo spectroscopy was also realized by acquiring the radiation induced EPR signal from teeth of rhesus monkey whose teeth was irradiated by dose of 2 Gy. The results suggested that the cavity was sensitive to meet the demand to assess doses of significant level in short time. This cavity provided a very potential option for the development of X-band in vivo dosimetry.

  6. EPR dosimetry for actual and suspected overexposures during radiotherapy treatments in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trompier, F.; Sadlo, J.; Michalik, J.; Stachowicz, W.; Mazal, A.; Clairand, I.; Rostkowska, J.; Bulski, W.; Kulakowski, A.; Sluszniak, J.; Gozdz, S.; Wojcik, A.

    2007-01-01

    EPR dosimetry on bone samples was recently used for actual and suspected overexposures during radiotherapy treatments performed in Poland. In 2001 five breast-cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy in the Bialystok Oncology Center, Poland, were overexposed. The overexposure was due to a defective safety interlock and an obsolete safety system of the linear accelerator. For the three most exposed patients, pieces of rib bones removed during surgical reconstruction of the chest wall and skin transplantation allowed an estimation of the accident doses by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. The doses delivered during the accident were as high as 60-80 Gy. In 2005, a patient treated in Kielce Holy Cross Cancer Center exhibited similar deep necroses of the chest wall but 6 years following a 'standard upper mantel fields' radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. In order to investigate the possible late effect of an overexposure as necrosis origin, the delivered dose was afterward estimated by EPR dosimetry performed on a rib sample

  7. Emergency EPR and OSL dosimetry with table vitamins and minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholom, S; McKeever, S W S

    2016-12-01

    Several table vitamins, minerals and L-lysine amino acid have been preliminarily tested as potential emergency dosemeters using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) techniques. Radiation-induced EPR signals were detected in samples of vitamin B2 and L-lysine while samples of multivitamins of different brands as well as mineral Mg demonstrated prominent OSL signals after exposure to ionizing radiation doses. Basic dosimetric properties of the radiation-sensitive substances were studied, namely dose response, fading of the EPR or OSL signals and values of minimum measurable doses (MMDs). For EPR-sensitive samples, the EPR signal is converted into units of dose using a linear dose response and correcting for fading using the measured fading dependence. For OSL-sensitive materials, a multi-aliquot, enhanced-temperature protocol was developed to avoid the problem of sample sensitization and to minimize the influence of signal fading. The sample dose in this case is also evaluated using the dose response and fading curves. MMDs of the EPR-sensitive samples were below 2 Gy while those of the OSL-sensitive materials were below 500 mGy as long as the samples are analyzed within 1 week after exposure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A High Sensitivity EPR Technique for Alanine Dosimetry (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskell, E.H.; Hayes, R.B.; Kenner, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainties of ± 5 mGy were achieved in the measurement of alanine dosemeters using optimised EPR parameters, instrumentation, spectral manipulation and subtraction techniques. Modulation amplitude and microwave power were adjusted to combine resonances of two neighbouring alanine signals. Instrumental variations were minimised by combining and subtracting pre- and post-measurement spectra of the empty EPR tube. A spectrum of the native signal of non-dosed alanine was generated from a single batch of dosemeters and subtracted from spectra of the irradiated dosemeters, also from the same batch. Field alignment was adjusted with the use of an in-cavity Mn ++ standard. A constant rotation goniometer was used to eliminate anisotropies in the EPR tube and alanine samples. Finally, digital filters were applied to the resulting spectra. (author)

  9. EPR of gamma irradiated solid sucrose and UV spectra of its solution. An attempt for calibration of solid state/EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yordanov, N.D.; Karakirova, Y.

    2007-01-01

    A simple new approach for independent calibration of solid state/EPR (SS/EPR) dosimetry system is reported. It is based on the fact that: (i) gamma-irradiation of solid sucrose (sugar) induces stable EPR detectable free radicals accompanied by UV detectable brown colour stable in the solid state and in solution; (ii) both the EPR intensity of gamma-irradiated solid sucrose and its solution UV absorbance linearly depend on the absorbed dose high energy radiation and may be independently used for dosimetric purpose; (iii) UV spectrometers are calibrated. The correlation between EPR response and absorbed dose radiation of solid sucrose and UV absorption of its solutions is used in the present communication for calibration purpose. The procedure of sucrose extraction from sucrose-paraffin dosimeters is described. The calibration procedure may be applied to any other (alanine, self-calibrated, etc.) SS/EPR dosimeters, simultaneously irradiated with sucrose

  10. Review of the correlation between results of cytogenetic dosimetry from blood lymphocytes and EPR dosimetry from tooth enamel for victims of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostunov, I.K.; Ivannikov, A.I.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Golub, E.V.; Nugis, V. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare dose estimates from electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry with teeth and cytogenetic dosimetry with blood lymphocytes for 30 victims of radiation accidents. The whole-body exposures estimated by tooth enamel EPR dosimetry were ranging from 0.01 to 9.3 Gy. Study group comprised victims exposed to acute and prolonged irradiation at high and low dose rate in different accidents. Blood samples were taken from each of them for cytogenetic analysis. Aberrations were scored and analysed according to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guidelines for conventional and FISH analysis. Tooth samples were collected in dental clinics after they had been extracted during ordinary practice. EPR dosimetry was performed according to the IAEA protocol. EPR dosimetry showed good correlation with dosimetry based on chromosomal analysis. All estimations of cytogenetic dose below detection limit coincide with EPR dose estimates within the ranges of uncertainty. The differences between cytogenetic and EPR assays may occur in a case of previous unaccounted exposure, non-homogeneous irradiation and due to contribution to absorbed dose from neutron irradiation. (authors)

  11. The Chernobyl accident: EPR dosimetry on dental enamel of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualtieri, G.; Colacicchi, S.; Sgattoni, R.; Giannoni, M.

    2001-01-01

    The radiation dose on tooth enamel of children living close to Chernobyl has been evaluated by EPR. The sample preparation was reduced to a minimum of mechanical steps to remove a piece of enamel. A standard X-ray tube at low energy was used for additive irradiation. The filtration effect of facial soft tissue was taken into account. The radiation dose for a group of teeth slightly exceeds the annual dose, whereas for another group the dose very much exceeds the annual dose. Since the higher dose is found in teeth whose enamel have much lower EPR sensitivity to the radiation, it can be suggested that for these teeth the native signal could alter the evaluation of the smaller radiation signal

  12. The NIM alanine-EPR dosimetry system: its application in NDAS programme and others

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Jun-Cheng

    1999-01-01

    In 1983, National Institute of Metrology (NIM) began to study alanine-EPR dosimetry system. From 1988 on, the system has been used as a transfer standard to launch into the National Dose Assurance Service (NDAS) programme for cobalt-60 facilities in China. In this paper, the eleven years implementation of NDAS programme are presented by statistics. In 1991, under an IAEA coordinated research programme, NIM had studied to extend the range of the system to therapy level. In recent years, the NIM in cooperation with other institutes has been developing film-alanine dosimeter for electron beam dosimetry. (author)

  13. Contribution of Harold M. Swartz to In Vivo EPR and EPR Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallez, Bernard

    2016-12-01

    In 2015, we are celebrating half a century of research in the application of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) as a biodosimetry tool to evaluate the dose received by irradiated people. During the EPR Biodose 2015 meeting, a special session was organized to acknowledge the pioneering contribution of Harold M. (Hal) Swartz in the field. The article summarizes his main contribution in physiology and medicine. Four emerging themes have been pursued continuously along his career since its beginning: (1) radiation biology; (2) oxygen and oxidation; (3) measuring physiology in vivo; and (4) application of these measurements in clinical medicine. The common feature among all these different subjects has been the use of magnetic resonance techniques, especially EPR. In this article, you will find an impressionist portrait of Hal Swartz with the description of the 'making of' this pioneer, a time-line perspective on his career with the creation of three National Institutes of Health-funded EPR centers, a topic-oriented perspective on his career with a description of his major contributions to Science, his role as a mentor and his influence on his academic children, his active role as founder of scientific societies and organizer of scientific meetings, and the well-deserved international recognition received so far. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Contribution of Harold M. Swartz to In Vivo EPR and EPR Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallez, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, we are celebrating half a century of research in the application of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) as a biodosimetry tool to evaluate the dose received by irradiated people. During the EPR Biodose 2015 meeting, a special session was organized to acknowledge the pioneering contribution of Harold M. (Hal) Swartz in the field. The article summarizes his main contribution in physiology and medicine. Four emerging themes have been pursued continuously along his career since its beginning: (1) radiation biology; (2) oxygen and oxidation; (3) measuring physiology in vivo; and (4) application of these measurements in clinical medicine. The common feature among all these different subjects has been the use of magnetic resonance techniques, especially EPR. In this article, you will find an impressionist portrait of Hal Swartz with the description of the 'making of' this pioneer, a time-line perspective on his career with the creation of three National Institutes of Health-funded EPR centers, a topic-oriented perspective on his career with a description of his major contributions to Science, his role as a mentor and his influence on his academic children, his active role as founder of scientific societies and organizer of scientific meetings, and the well-deserved international recognition received so far. (author)

  15. Analysis of SCRM experience in the area of quality assurance for retrospective EPR dosimetry technique with teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sholom, S. V.; Chumak, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel is commonly accepted as one of most precise and accurate methods for retrospective dosimetry. At the same time, regularly conducted international Intercomparisons and Inter-calibrations of EPR dosimetry techniques demonstrate the significant scatter of results among laboratories operation in this area. This is mainly caused by the lack of commonly adopted unified technique which would be based on clear and efficient scheme of quality assurance. In the present work we will summarize more than ten-year experience of Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine in the area of EPR dosimetry from the point of view of quality assurance. EPR dosimetry technique with teeth, which was developed and being used in SCRM for routine dosimetry of liquidators is characterized by two-level system of quality assurance. In-house level covers all steps of the technique and allows control and minimizing of uncertainties that arise on separate steps. Extramural level provides the control of reliability and accuracy of technique in whole by means of regular participation in bi- and multi-lateral intercomparisons. Cumulative uncertainty of EPR dosimetry technique determined based on the results of 6 different intercomparisons is 21 mGy for dose below 300 and 11% for dose higher that 300 mGy. (authors)

  16. EPR response characterization of drugs excipients for applying in accident dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczewski, Barbara S.; Rodrigues Junior, Orlando; Galante, Ocimar L.; Costa, Zelia M. da; Campos, Leticia L.

    2002-01-01

    Some drugs are widely used by the population and can be employed to dose retrospective. The carbohydrates (saccharides), commonly used as excipients in the pharmaceutical industry, produce a quantity of free radicals after gamma irradiation, making them useful for dosimetry in emergency or accident situations that imply in dose evaluation from the materials found nearly or in contact with victims. In general, EPR signal from pulverized pills of some drugs are very complex due to the variety of components in the formulation. Because of this fact, some pharmaceutical excipients identified in the pill composition were also analysed by EPR spectrometry. On the counter drugs were studied: Cebion glucose, AAS, Aspirina, Conmel, Lacto-Purga and sugar substitutive ZeroCal. The excipients were: lactose, amide, anhydrous glucose and magnesium stearate. In some samples the number of radicals produced increased with the dose, showing a linear response for a dose range of interest and an adequate sensibility for dosimetry in accident cases

  17. Retrospective individual dosimetry using luminescence and EPR after radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeksu, H.Y.; Wieser, A.; Ulanovsky, A.

    2007-01-01

    requires further investigation. Applicability of suggested procedure need to be tested under factory conditions using the latest material and card technology. Feasibility of production of such cards on an industrial scale is discussed. Alternatively individual dose after emergency situations can be reconstructed by assessment of absorbed dose in human tooth enamel by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. From absorbed dose in tooth enamel the effective dose and dose in organs can be reconstructed in consideration of photon energy response characteristic of teeth, and photon energy spectrum and geometry of the exposure field. In this project the applicability of EPR measurements with teeth was extended by reducing the detection threshold and computation of the photon energy response characteristic of deciduous teeth. It is shown that current limitation of EPR measurement with teeth at low absorbed dose is caused by incomplete consideration of the EPR spectrum of nonradiation induced (initial) radicals. By adding further components for simulation of the initial EPR spectrum in the dose evaluation procedure, the critical value for detection of absorbed dose in tooth enamel could be decreased to 19 mGy. Dose conversion coefficients for deciduous teeth in dependence of photon energy and exposure geometry were computed by Monte Carlo simulation using a mathematical child phantom. For use with luminescence measurements with chip cards and EPR measurements with teeth a software was established that allows conversion of the measured dose to integral free-in-air kerma, tissue dose or dose water in dependence on exposure scenario. (orig.)

  18. EPR-dosimetry for radiation processing of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peimel-Stuglik, Z.; Fabisiak, S.

    2002-01-01

    The usefulness of two, easy accessible alanine-polymer dosimeters to low (D ≤ 10 kGy) ionizing radiation dose measurements, were investigated. In both cases (ALANPOL from IChTJ and foil dosemeters from Gamma Service, Radeberg, Germany) the results were positive. EPR-alanine method based on the described dosimeters meets the requirements to use it in radiation processing of food. Thin foil dosemeters from Gamma Service are recommended mainly for dose distribution measurements. ALANPOL - for routine use. The advantage of ALANPOL is lower price, higher sensitivity and high resistance to unfavourable environmental conditions, including water. (author)

  19. EPR dosimetry of glass substrate of mobile phone LCDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trompier, F.; Della Monaca, S.; Fattibene, P.; Clairand, I.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mineral glass from watches, windows and displays of personal electronic devices could be a suitable restrospective dosimeter in case of radiation accident. In this paper glass substrates of the window display of 100 mobile phones of different trademarks were analized by X-band cw-EPR before and after irradiation at 100 Gy. The objective of this study was to highlight some issues of EPR measurements of glass related to inter-sample variability of: i) signal line shape in irradiated and unirradiated glass; ii) signal intensity loss and line shape change with post-irradiation time; iii) signal changes induced by sample preparation and iv) signal changes induced by thermal annealing. Scope of the paper is to provide a phenomenological picture of the observed effects in order to give a warning about possible problems and to provide suggestions for future work. Explanation of the mechanisms and the causes leading to the observed effects was beyond the scope of this work. These preliminary results confirm that glass substrate of mobile phone displays should be considered as a fortuitous dosimeter in radiation accidents. However, albeit very promising, mineral glass presents a number of issues that should be thoroughly investigated and addressed in future work.

  20. Potential use of wallboard (drywall) for EPR retrospective dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Jeroen W. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. West, Hamilton ON L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: thompjw@mcmaster.ca; Atiya, Ibrahim Abu [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. West, Hamilton ON L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: abuatii@mcmaster.ca; Rink, W. Jack [School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. West, Hamilton ON L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: rinkwj@mcmaster.ca; Boreham, Doug [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. West, Hamilton ON L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: boreham@mcmaster.ca

    2009-03-15

    Concern regarding the possibility of criminal or terrorist use of nuclear materials has led to an interest in developing the capability to measure radiation dose in a variety of natural and manufactured materials. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of radiation dose following a radiological incident may aid in screening affected populations (triage) and in reconstruction of doses following accidents. One such EPR dosimeter is wallboard (drywall), a common construction material composed largely of gypsum (calcium sulphate dihydrate). We have identified the CO{sub 3}{sup -} and SO{sub 3}{sup -} dose-sensitive lines in drywall and developed a measurement protocol using the intensity of CO{sub 3}{sup -} line. Proper background subtraction is a major difficulty, and we demonstrate a procedure based on alignment of a contaminant Mn{sup 2+} line. As a proof-of-concept, a wallboard panel was irradiated with a {sup 60}Co source, and a two-dimensional map of the absorbed dose was measured. While most aliquots yielded reasonably accurate doses, a spatially contiguous region of apparent dose-insensitivity in one panel was identified.

  1. An investigation of the photon energy dependence of the EPR alanine dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrand, Eva Stabell; Shortt, Ken R; Ross, Carl K; Hole, Eli Olaug

    2003-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) alanine dosimetry system is based on EPR measurements of radicals formed in alanine by ionizing radiation. The system has been studied to determine its energy dependence for photons in the 10-30 MV region relative to those of 60 Co and to find out if the system would be suitable for dosimetry comparisons. The irradiations were carried out at the National Research Council, Ottawa, Canada and the doses ranged from 8 to 54 Gy. The EPR measurements were performed at the University of Oslo, Norway. The ratio of the slope of the alanine reading versus dose-to-water curve for a certain linac photon beam quality and the corresponding slope for a reference 60 Co γ-radiation gives an experimental measure of the relative dose-to-water response of the EPR alanine dosimetry system. For calculating the linear regression coefficients of these alanine reading versus dose curves, the method of weighted least squares was used. This method is assumed to produce more accurate regression coefficients when applied to EPR dosimetry than the common method of standard least squares. The overall uncertainty on the ratio of slopes was between 0.5 and 0.6% for all three linac energies. The relative response for all the linac beams compared to cobalt was less than unity: by about 0.5% for the 20 and 30 MV points but by more than 1% for the 10 MV point. The given standard uncertainties negate concluding that there is any significant internal variation in the measured response as a function of beam quality between the three linac energies. Thus, we calculated the average dose response for all three energies and found that the alanine response is 0.8% (±0.5%) lower for high energy x-rays than for 60 Co γ-rays. This result indicates a small energy dependence in the alanine response for the high-energy photons relative to 60 Co which may be significant. This result is specific to our dosimetry system (alanine with 20% polyethylene binder pressed into a

  2. Effect of the shape and size of dosimeters on the response of solid state/EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Fabisiak, Slawomir; Lagunov, Oleg

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the shape and size of dosimeters used in solid state-EPR (SS/EPR) dosimetry on their response is reported. It is shown that for commonly used cylindrical (rod) shaped dosimeters of equal height, prepared of low (ε=<3) dielectric constant materials, linearity between their volume and the EPR response is observed when their diameter varies between 3 and 5mm. Further increase of the dosimeter's diameter is not recommended since the increased penetration of the dosimeter material into the electric component of the microwave field in the EPR cavity increases the dielectric losses and decreases the EPR response. In an attempt to improve the sensitivity of the SS/EPR dosimetry we have prepared and tested new, flat-shaped, dosimeters of low (ε∼2) dielectric constant materials which were found to exhibit: (i) linear EPR response within 1-5mm thickness; (ii) higher sensitivity than cylindrical dosimeters at equal sample volume; (iii) increased by ca. 270% EPR sensitivity at 5mm thickness compared to the cylindrical dosimeters with the same diameter (ca. 1.7 times increased sample volume). Using flat shape dosimeters of suitable size provides 2.7 times higher EPR sensitivity of single estimation

  3. Flexible, wireless, inductively coupled surface coil resonator for EPR tooth dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, Wilson; Petryakov, Sergey V.; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Feldman, Matthew A.; Wood, Victoria A.; Boyle, Holly K.; Flood, Ann Barry; Williams, Benjamin B.; Swartz, Harold M.; Meaney, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Managing radiation injuries following a catastrophic event where large numbers of people may have been exposed to life-threatening doses of ionizing radiation relies on the availability of biodosimetry to assess whether individuals need to be triaged for care. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) tooth dosimetry is a viable method to accurately estimate the amount of ionizing radiation to which an individual has been exposed. In the intended measurement conditions and scenario, it is essential that the measurement process be fast, straightforward and provides meaningful and accurate dose estimations for individuals in the expected measurement conditions. The sensing component of a conventional L-band EPR spectrometer used for tooth dosimetry typically consists of a surface coil resonator that is rigidly, physically attached to the coupler. This design can result in cumbersome operation, limitations in teeth geometries that may be measured and hinder the overall utility of the dosimeter. A novel surface coil resonator has been developed for the currently existing L-band (1.15 GHz) EPR tooth dosimeter for the intended use as a point of care device by minimally trained operators. This resonator development provides further utility to the dosimeter, and increases the usability of the dosimeter by non-expert operators in the intended use scenario. (authors)

  4. Radiation dose estimation by tooth enamel EPR dosimetry for residents of Dolon and Bodene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhumadilov, Kassym; Ivannikov, Alexander; Apsalikov, Kazbek N.

    2006-01-01

    The method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry was applied to the enamel of the teeth extracted from the residents of the Dolon and Bodene settlements of the Beskaragay district, which is the area adjacent to the radioactive fallout of the most contaminating nuclear test of 1949. The individual accidental radiation doses due to the fallout were obtained from the amplitude of the radiation induced EPR signal from the CO 2- radical using the calibration method, after determining the parameters of EPR measurements to obtain the best reproducibility of the signal intensities. It was shown that after subtracting the natural background dose from the total absorbed dose obtained by EPR the residents of Dolon and Bodene received accidental radiation doses up to 356 mGy with an average value of 74.1 ± 45.5 mGy before 1949 while the younger population received up to about 100 mGy with an average value of 11.5 ± 37.7 mGy. (author)

  5. Application of EPR retrospective dosimetry for large-scale accidental situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skvortsov, V.G.; Ivannikov, A.I.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Tsyb, A.F.; Khamidova, L.G.; Kondrashov, A.E.; Tikunov, D.D.

    2000-01-01

    Above 3000 tooth enamel samples, collected at population of radioactive contaminated territories after Chernobyl accident, the Chernobyl liquidators, the retired military of high radiation risk and the population of control radiation free territories were investigated by EPR spectroscopy method in order to obtain accumulated individual exposure doses. Results of EPR spectra measurements are stored in data bank; enamel samples are also stored in order to provide the possibility to repeat the measurements in future. Statistical analysis of results has allowed to detect the contribution into EPR signal in tooth enamel due to the action of the natural background radiation, and the radioactive contamination of territory. In general, the average doses of external exposure of the population obtained with EPR spectroscopy of teeth enamel are consistent with results based on other methods of direct and retrospective dosimetry. Essential exceeding of the individual doses above the average level within the population groups was observed for some persons. That gave the possibility to detect the individuals with overexposure, which were included into groups for medical monitoring

  6. Retrospective EPR dosimetry on the basis of tooth enamel analyses of Techa river area residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Romanyukha, A.A.; Kozheurov, V.P.; Degteva, M.O.

    2000-01-01

    The dose in tooth enamel from residents of villages along the Techa river was measured by EPR dosimetry. The results were correlated to the 90 Sr whole body burden as measured about 30 years after ingestion. Based on the results of this preliminary investigation the ingestion dose coefficient of tooth enamel for 90 Sr is estimated and compared with the value for bone surface given in ICRP. The results of the preliminary study suppose a similar metabolism of strontium for tooth dentine and the skeleton. (author)

  7. EPR dosimetry intercomparison using smart phone touch screen glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattibene, Paola; Trompier, Francois; Wieser, Albrecht; Brai, Maria; Ciesielski, Bartlomej; De Angelis, Cinzia; Della Monaca, Sara; Garcia, Tristan; Gustafsson, H; Hole, Eli Olag; Juniewicz, M; Krefft, K; Longo, Anna; Leveque, Philippe; Lund, Eva; Marrale, Maurizio; Michalec, Barbara; Mierzwińska, Gabriela; Rao, J L; Romanyukha, Alexander A; Tuner, Hasan

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the results of an interlaboratory comparison of retrospective dosimetry using the electron paramagnetic resonance method. The test material used in this exercise was glass coming from the touch screens of smart phones that might be used as fortuitous dosimeters in a large-scale radiological incident. There were 13 participants to whom samples were dispatched, and 11 laboratories reported results. The participants received five calibration samples (0, 0.8, 2, 4, and 10 Gy) and four blindly irradiated samples (0, 0.9, 1.3, and 3.3 Gy). Participants were divided into two groups: for group A (formed by three participants), samples came from a homogeneous batch of glass and were stored in similar setting; for group B (formed by eight participants), samples came from different smart phones and stored in different settings of light and temperature. The calibration curves determined by the participants of group A had a small error and a critical level in the 0.37-0.40-Gy dose range, whereas the curves determined by the participants of group B were more scattered and led to a critical level in the 1.3-3.2-Gy dose range for six participants out of eight. Group A were able to assess the dose within 20 % for the lowest doses (<1.5 Gy) and within 5 % for the highest doses. For group B, only the highest blind dose could be evaluated in a reliable way because of the high critical values involved. The results from group A are encouraging, whereas the results from group B suggest that the influence of environmental conditions and the intervariability of samples coming from different smart phones need to be further investigated. An alongside conclusion is that the protocol was easily transferred to participants making a network of laboratories in case of a mass casualty event potentially feasible.

  8. EPR dosimetry intercomparison using smart phone touch screen glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattibene, Paola; De Angelis, Cinzia; Della Monaca, Sara; Trompier, Francois; Rao, J.L.; Wieser, Albrecht; Brai, Maria; Longo, Anna; Marrale, Maurizio; Ciesielski, Bartlomej; Juniewicz, M.; Krefft, K.; Garcia, Tristan; Gustafsson, H.; Lund, Eva; Hole, Eli Olag; Leveque, Philippe; Michalec, Barbara; Mierzwinska, Gabriela; Rao, J.L.; Romanyukha, Alexander A.; Tuner, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an interlaboratory comparison of retrospective dosimetry using the electron paramagnetic resonance method. The test material used in this exercise was glass coming from the touch screens of smart phones that might be used as fortuitous dosimeters in a large-scale radiological incident. There were 13 participants to whom samples were dispatched, and 11 laboratories reported results. The participants received five calibration samples (0, 0.8, 2, 4, and 10 Gy) and four blindly irradiated samples (0, 0.9, 1.3, and 3.3 Gy). Participants were divided into two groups: for group A (formed by three participants), samples came from a homogeneous batch of glass and were stored in similar setting; for group B (formed by eight participants), samples came from different smart phones and stored in different settings of light and temperature. The calibration curves determined by the participants of group A had a small error and a critical level in the 0.37-0.40-Gy dose range, whereas the curves determined by the participants of group B were more scattered and led to a critical level in the 1.3-3.2-Gy dose range for six participants out of eight. Group A were able to assess the dose within 20 % for the lowest doses (≤1.5 Gy) and within 5 % for the highest doses. For group B, only the highest blind dose could be evaluated in a reliable way because of the high critical values involved. The results from group A are encouraging, whereas the results from group B suggest that the influence of environmental conditions and the inter-variability of samples coming from different smart phones need to be further investigated. An alongside conclusion is that the protocol was easily transferred to participants making a network of laboratories in case of a mass casualty event potentially feasible. (authors)

  9. Internal in vitro dosimetry for fish using hydroxyapatite-based EPR detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, D.V. [Urals Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Shishkina, E.A.; Osipov, D.I.; Pryakhin, E.A. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Razumeev, R.A. [Ural Federal University, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    A number of aquatic ecosystems were exposed to ionizing radiation as a result of the activities of the Mayak Production Association in the Southern Urals, former Soviet Union, in the 1950s. Currently, fishes inhabiting contaminated lakes are being actively studied. These investigations need dosimetric support. In the present paper the results of a pilot study for elaborating an EPR dosimeter which can be used for internal dosimetry in vitro are described. Biological hydroxyapatite is proposed here to be used as a detecting substance. More specifically, small hydroxyapatite grains are proposed for use as point detectors fixed in a solid matrix. After having been pelletized, the detectors were covered by Mylar and placed in the body of a fish to be stored in the fridge for several months. Application of the detectors for internal fish dosimetry demonstrated that the enamel sensitivity is sufficient for passive detection of ionizing radiation in fishes inhabiting contaminated lakes in the Southern Urals. (orig.)

  10. Study for applying microwave power saturation technique on fingernail/EPR dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byeong Ryong; Choi, Hoon; Nam, Hyun Ill; Lee, Byung Ill [Radiation Health Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    There is growing recognition worldwide of the need to develop effective uses of dosimetry methods to assess unexpected exposure to radiation in the event of a large scale event. One of physically based dosimetry methods electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been applied to perform retrospective radiation dosimetry using extracted samples of tooth enamel and nail(fingernail and toenail), following radiation accidents and exposures resulting from weapon use, testing, and production. Human fingernails are composed largely of a keratin, which consists of {alpha} helical peptide chains that are twisted into a left handed coil and strengthened by disulphide cross links. Ionizing radiation generates free radicals in the keratin matrix, and these radicals are stable over a relatively long period (days to weeks). Most importantly, the number of radicals is proportional to the magnitude of the dose over a wide dose range (0{approx}30 Gy). Also, dose can be estimated at four different locations on the human body, providing information on the homogeneity of the radiation exposure. And The results from EPR nail dosimetry are immediately available However, relatively large background signal (BKS) converted from mechanically induced signal (MIS) after cutting process of fingernail, normally overlaps with the radiation induced signal (RIS), make it difficult to estimate accurate dose accidental exposure. Therefore, estimation method using dose response curve was difficult to ensure reliability below 5 Gy. In this study, In order to overcome these disadvantages, we measured the reactions of RIS and BKS (MIS) according to the change of Microwave power level, and researched about the applicability of the Power saturation technique at low dose.

  11. Use of aspartame-based sweetener tablets in emergency dosimetry using EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghraby, A.; Salama, E.

    2010-01-01

    Accident dosimetry aims to evaluate the unplanned radiation doses delivered to individuals through one of the objects exist in the area of the accident. The gamma dose response of free radicals generated in irradiated aspartame tablets and its usability for emergency dosimetry was studied. EPR spectra of unirradiated and irradiated aspartame-based sweetener were recorded. Two signals arise after irradiating, S 1 at g (S 1 ) = 2.00229 ± 0.00097 and S 2 at g (S 2 ) = 2.00262 ± 0.00088. Some EPR parameters were studied for radiation-induced radicals in aspartame sweeteners tablets, such as the microwave saturation behaviour, the effect of magnetic field modulation amplitude on the peak-to-peak height and peak-to-peak line width for both of S 1 and S 2 . Responses of S 1 and S 2 to different radiation doses were studied and resulted in linear relationships, radicals persistence curves were plotted over a 49-d storage period. It was found that Aspartame sweeteners tablets are useful in the range from 0.96 to 39.96 Gy. Radiation-induced radicals possess reasonable stability. (authors)

  12. The 4th international comparison on EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattibene, P., E-mail: paola.fattibene@iss.it [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Department of Technology and Health, Viale Regina Elena 299, I-00162 Rome (Italy); Wieser, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Neuherberg D-85764 (Germany); Adolfsson, E. [Linkoeping University, SE-58185 Linkoeping (Sweden); Benevides, L.A. [Naval Dosimetry Center, Bethesda MD 20889-5600 (United States); Brai, M. [University of Palermo, I-90128 Palermo (Italy); Callens, F. [Ghent University, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Chumak, V. [Research Center for Radiation Medicine AMS, 04050 Kiev (Ukraine); Ciesielski, B. [Medical University of Gdansk, 80-211 Gdansk (Poland); Della Monaca, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Department of Technology and Health, Viale Regina Elena 299, I-00162 Rome (Italy); Regina Elena Institute, I-00144 Rome (Italy); Emerich, K. [Medical University of Gdansk, 80-211 Gdansk (Poland); Department of Paediatric Dentistry, 80-208 Gdansk (Poland); Gustafsson, H. [Linkoeping University, SE-58185 Linkoeping (Sweden); Hirai, Y. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 732-0815 (Japan); Hoshi, M. [Hiroshima University, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Israelsson, A. [Linkoeping University, SE-58185 Linkoeping (Sweden); Ivannikov, A. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk, Kaluga region (Russian Federation); Ivanov, D. [Institute of Metal Physics, Yekaterinburg 620041 (Russian Federation); Kaminska, J. [Medical University of Gdansk, 80-211 Gdansk (Poland); Ke, Wu [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Lund, E. [Linkoeping University, SE-58185 Linkoeping (Sweden); Marrale, M. [University of Palermo, I-90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    This paper presents the results of the 4th International Comparison of in vitro electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel, where the performance parameters of tooth enamel dosimetry methods were compared among sixteen laboratories from all over the world. The participating laboratories were asked to determine a calibration curve with a set of tooth enamel powder samples provided by the organizers. Nine molar teeth extracted following medical indication from German donors and collected between 1997 and 2007 were prepared and irradiated at the Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen. Five out of six samples were irradiated at 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 Gy air kerma; and one unirradiated sample was kept as control. The doses delivered to the individual samples were unknown to the participants, who were asked to measure each sample nine times, and to report the EPR signal response, the mass of aliquots measured, and the parameters of EPR signal acquisition and signal evaluation. Critical dose and detection limit were calculated by the organizers on the basis of the calibration-curve parameters obtained at every laboratory. For calibration curves obtained by measuring every calibration sample three times, the mean value of the detection limit was 205 mGy, ranging from 56 to 649 mGy. The participants were also invited to provide the signal response and the nominal dose of their current dose calibration curve (wherever available), the critical dose and detection limit of which were also calculated by the organizers.

  13. Use of aspartame-based sweetener tablets in emergency dosimetry using EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghraby, A; Salama, E

    2010-06-01

    Accident dosimetry aims to evaluate the unplanned radiation doses delivered to individuals through one of the objects exist in the area of the accident. The gamma dose response of free radicals generated in irradiated aspartame tablets and its usability for emergency dosimetry was studied. EPR spectra of unirradiated and irradiated aspartame-based sweetener were recorded. Two signals arise after irradiating, S(1) at g (S(1)) = 2.00229 +/- 0.00097 and S(2) at g (S(2)) = 2.00262 +/- 0.00088. Some EPR parameters were studied for radiation-induced radicals in aspartame sweeteners tablets, such as the microwave saturation behaviour, the effect of magnetic field modulation amplitude on the peak-to-peak height and peak-to-peak line width for both of S(1) and S(2). Responses of S(1) and S(2) to different radiation doses were studied and resulted in linear relationships, radicals persistence curves were plotted over a 49-d storage period. It was found that Aspartame sweeteners tablets are useful in the range from 0.96 to 39.96 Gy. Radiation-induced radicals possess reasonable stability.

  14. Three-dimensional high dose rate dosimetry of electron beams. A combined radiochromic film, EPR and calorimetric dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secerov, B.; Milosavljevic, B.H.; Bacic, G.; Belgrade Univ.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Aim. To examine the suitability of radiochromic film (RCF) dosimeters in determining 3D dose distribution from a pulsed electron beam source by comparing their response with alanine EPR dosimetry and calorimetry. Experimental. A FWT-60 radiochromic films (Far West Technology Inc) were used while alanine films were home made. To obtain the dose vs. penetration depth relationship, a stack of 13 films separated by aluminium plates and/or alanine films was placed perpendicular to the electron beam (Febetron, 20 ns, 1.8 MeV, 10 12 Gy/s, dose range up to 100 kGy). RC films were calibrated using 60-Co source and Fricke dosimetry. The absorbance of irradiated films was measured using 2D microdensitometry. Calorimetry was performed with a homemade quasy-adiabatic aluminum calorimeter. Results and Discussion. Microdensitometry of films (5 x 5 cm) enabled the 3D mapping of the entire radiation field with in plane resolution of 0.12 mm. The total dose for each film was obtained by image segmentation to correct for the non-linear response of films. Integrated dose for the entire stack was in good agreement (within 5%) with total absorbed energy as determined with calorimetry. The dose distribution along the beam center was determined using alanine films (1 x 1 cm) and EPR spectroscopy, and again a good agreement with the dose determined by microdensitometry of the central portion of RC films. In conclusion, the results indicate that RC films can be used for determination of 3D dose distribution even at very high dose rates

  15. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesteraas, Bjoern Helge [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway); Hole, Eli Olaug [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Olsen, Dag Rune [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway); Malinen, Eirik [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway)

    2006-12-21

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 {mu}m thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1-15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media.

  16. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesteraas, Bjoern Helge; Hole, Eli Olaug; Olsen, Dag Rune; Malinen, Eirik

    2006-01-01

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 μm thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1-15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media

  17. The investigation of lithium formate hydrate, sodium dithionate and N-methyl taurine as clinical EPR dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelie, S.; Hole, E.O.; Duchateau, M.; Schroeyers, W.; Schreurs, S.; Verellen, D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: EPR-dosimetry using L-α-alanine is an established method for measuring high doses of ionizing radiation. However, since a minimum dose of approximately 4 Gy is required to achieve sufficient low uncertainties (1–2%) for clinical application, alternative dosimeter materials are being inquired. Lithium formate (LiFo) monohydrate has been studied by several groups and has revealed several promising properties in the low dose region (<4 Gy). The fading properties, however, are somewhat unpredictable, and depend on properties not yet fully uncovered. This paper reports the results from a study of lithium formate hydrate and N-methyl taurine as potential low dose EPR dosimeters. Methods and materials: Pellet shaped dosimeters of lithium formate monohydrate, lithium formate hydrate, sodium dithionate and N-methyl taurine were produced using a manual Weber press, L-α-alanine was obtained from Harwell dosimeters and irradiated using 60 kV and 6 MV X-ray beams, and Co-60 gamma-rays to a dose of 30 Gy and dose ranges of 0.5–100 Gy and 2–20 Gy respectively. The dosimeters were measured using an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR)-spectrometer. The detector responses for 6 MV and Co-60 radiation beams, the fading behaviors and signal shape in time were investigated. Results: Lithium formate monohydrate and lithium formate hydrate are apparently associated with near identical EPR-spectra (mainly one broad line), and the same spectrum arises for all radiation energies investigated. The shape of the EPR resonance remains constant with time, but the intensities decreases, and the fading is more prominent for the monohydrate than for the hydrate. The EPR resonance associated with N-methyl taurine is more complex than the resonance associated with LiFo and it changes with time, implying radical transitions and growth. Conclusions: The study showed that lithium formate hydrate is a strong candidate for EPR dosimetry with slightly better fading characteristics

  18. EPR dosimetry teeth in past and future accidents: A prospective look at a retrospective method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskell, E.; Kenner, G.; Hayes, R. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Center for Applied Dosimetry; Chumak, V.; Shalom, S. [Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-03-01

    Accurate assessments of doses received by individuals exposed to radiation from nuclear accidents and incidents such as those at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Nevada test site, Cheliabinsk and Mayak are required for epidemiological studies seeking to establish relationships between radiation dose and health effects. One method of retrospective dosimetry which allows for measurement of cumulative gamma ray doses received by exposed individuals is electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) of tooth enamel. Tooth enamel stores and retains, indefinitely, information on absorbed radiation dose. And teeth are available in every population as a result of dental extraction for medical reasons including periodontal disease and impacted wisdom teeth. In the case of children, deciduous teeth, which are shed between the ages of 7 and 13, can be a very important dosimetric source if documented collection is implemented shortly following an accident.

  19. Dosimetry study of East Kazakhstan residents by tooth enamel EPR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhumadilov Kassym

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The tooth enamel electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR dosimetry method was used to determine accidental doses of population of settlements in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS, Kazakhstan. The influence of four explosions to the populations was included into this report. The distances between investigated settlements and Ground Zero (SNTS are in the range of 70-200 km from SNTS. Most of settlements (Dolon, Mostik, Bodene, Cheremushki, Kanonerka are located near the central axis of radioactive fallout trace from the most contaminating surface nuclear test, which was conducted in 29, August 1949. The other settlements located close to radioactive fallout trace result in a surface nuclear tests in 24, August 1956 (Ust-Kamenogorsk, Znamenka, Shemonaikha, Glubokoe, Tavriya, Gagarino, in 12 august 1953 (Sarzhal and in 7, August 1962 (Akzhar, Kurchatov, Begen, Semenovka, Buras, Grachi. Tooth samples were extracted according to medical recommendations in a course of ordinary dental treatment.

  20. EPR dosimetry teeth in past and future accidents: A prospective look at a retrospective method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskell, E.; Kenner, G.; Hayes, R.

    1997-01-01

    Accurate assessments of doses received by individuals exposed to radiation from nuclear accidents and incidents such as those at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Nevada test site, Cheliabinsk and Mayak are required for epidemiological studies seeking to establish relationships between radiation dose and health effects. One method of retrospective dosimetry which allows for measurement of cumulative gamma ray doses received by exposed individuals is electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) of tooth enamel. Tooth enamel stores and retains, indefinitely, information on absorbed radiation dose. And teeth are available in every population as a result of dental extraction for medical reasons including periodontal disease and impacted wisdom teeth. In the case of children, deciduous teeth, which are shed between the ages of 7 and 13, can be a very important dosimetric source if documented collection is implemented shortly following an accident

  1. EPR dosimetry of teeth in past and future accidents. A prospective look at a retrospective method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskell, E.; Kenner, G.; Hayes, R. [Center for Applied Dosimetry, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Chumak, V.; Shalom, S.

    1996-12-31

    Accurate assessments of doses received by individuals exposed to radiation from nuclear accidents and incidents such as those at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Nevada test site, Chelyabinsk and Mayak are required for epidemiological studies seeking to establish relationships between radiation dose and health effects. One method of retrospective dosimetry which allows for measurement of cumulative gamma ray doses received by exposed individuals is electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) of tooth enamel. Tooth enamel stores and retains, indefinitely, information on absorbed radiation dose; and teeth are available in every population as a result of dental extraction for medical reasons including periodontal disease and impacted wisdom teeth. In the case of children, deciduous teeth, which are shed between the ages of 7 and 13, can be a very important dosimetric source if documented collection is implemented shortly following an accident. (author)

  2. Dosimetry study of East Kazakhstan residents by tooth enamel EPR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhumadilov, Kassym; Ivannikov, Alexander; Skvortsov, Valeriy; Stepanenko, Valeriy; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2017-11-01

    The tooth enamel electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry method was used to determine accidental doses of population of settlements in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS), Kazakhstan. The influence of four explosions to the populations was included into this report. The distances between investigated settlements and Ground Zero (SNTS) are in the range of 70-200 km from SNTS. Most of settlements (Dolon, Mostik, Bodene, Cheremushki, Kanonerka) are located near the central axis of radioactive fallout trace from the most contaminating surface nuclear test, which was conducted in 29, August 1949. The other settlements located close to radioactive fallout trace result in a surface nuclear tests in 24, August 1956 (Ust-Kamenogorsk, Znamenka, Shemonaikha, Glubokoe, Tavriya, Gagarino), in 12 august 1953 (Sarzhal) and in 7, August 1962 (Akzhar, Kurchatov, Begen, Semenovka, Buras, Grachi). Tooth samples were extracted according to medical recommendations in a course of ordinary dental treatment.

  3. Signal processing for radiation dosimetry using EPR in dental enamel: comparison of three methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pass, B. Barry.; Shames, A.I. Alexander I.

    2000-01-01

    We are reporting an alternative method of extracting useful dose information from complex EPR spectra of dental enamel. Digital differentiation of the initial first derivative spectrum followed by filtering is used to clearly distinguish the radiation-induced signal from the native background signal. The peak-to-peak height of the resulting second derivative of the signal is then measured as an indication of absorbed dose. This method does not require preliminary elimination of the native background signal, and is not effected by any uncertainty in the determination of the background signal or by errors resulting from the subtraction of two signals of comparable magnitude. Ten enamel samples were irradiated with known doses in the range of 250-10 5 mGy. There was agreement for all the samples, within the typical experimental error of ±10% for EPR dosimetry in dental enamel, between the doses determined by two common techniques using native signal subtraction and the doses determined by the new second derivative method proposed here

  4. The 3rd international intercomparison on EPR tooth dosimetry: Part 1, general analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Debuyst, R.; Fattibene, P.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the 3rd International Intercomparison on Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Tooth Dosimetry was the evaluation of laboratories performing tooth enamel dosimetry below 300 mGy. Participants had to reconstruct the absorbed dose in tooth enamel from 11 molars, which were cut into two halves. One half of each tooth was irradiated in a 60 Co beam to doses in the ranges of 30-100 mGy (5 samples), 100-300 mGy (5 samples), and 300-900 mGy (1 sample). Fourteen international laboratories participated in this intercomparison programme. A first analysis of the results and an overview of the essential features of methods applied in different laboratories are presented. The relative standard deviation of results of all methods was better than 27% for applied doses in the range of 79-704 mGy. In the analysis of the unirradiated tooth halves 8% of the samples were identified as outliers with additional absorbed dose above background dose

  5. The photon energy dependence of the alanine/EPR dosimetry system, an experimental investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrand, E.S.; Hole, E.O.; Shortt, K.R.; Ross, C.K.

    2002-01-01

    The energy dependence of a dosimetry system based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of alanine has been studied to determine its suitability for use in dose verification for radiotherapy. A few experiments with high-energy photon irradiation of alanine have been reported in the literature. However, the reported results disagree whether the ratio of dose in alanine to dose in water is independent of the radiation energy or whether there is a small dependence for photon energies of relevance to radiotherapy. The concentration of free radicals in alanine is proportional to the absorbed dose in alanine over a wide dose range covering three decades. The relative number of radicals may be determined by examining the EPR spectrum, and hence it is possible to determine the dose with a system that has been calibrated using a known dose of 60 Co radiation. In the present work, irradiations of alanine dosimeters were performed at the National Research Council (NRC), in Ottawa, Canada. The radiation qualities investigated were 10, 20 and 30 MV x-rays using the NRC linac. For each radiation quality, 30 dosimeters were irradiated in a water phantom with a level of absorbed dose to water ranging from 10 to 50 Gy. For reference purposes, irradiations using the NRC 60 Co source were performed on more or less the same day as the irradiations at each specific linac quality. In all beams, the dose to water was measured using a graphite-walled NE2571 ionisation chamber that was originally calibrated by comparison with a sealed-water calorimeter. The alanine dosimeters were evaluated at the EPR laboratory at the University of Oslo, Norway, using an X-band Bruker ESP300E spectrometer with a rectangular double resonator. One of the resonators contained a Mn 2+ /MgO sample that was read after each dosimeter reading, in order to provide independence from short-term sensitivity fluctuations in the spectrometer. All dosimeters irradiated at one specific linac quality were

  6. Dosimetry of an accident in mixed field (neutrons, photons) using the spectrometry by electronic paramagnetic resonance(EPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve, M.L.

    2006-03-01

    In a radiological accident, the assessment of the dose received by the victim is relevant information for the therapeutic strategy. Two complementary dosimetric techniques based on physical means are used in routine practice in the laboratory: EPR spectroscopy performed on materials removed from the victim or gathered from the vicinity of the victim and Monte Carlo calculations. EPR dosimetry, has been used successfully several times in cases of photon or electron overexposures. Accidental exposure may also occur with a neutron component. The aim of this work is to investigate the potentiality of EPR dosimetry for mixed photon and neutron field exposure with different organic materials (ascorbic acid, sorbitol, glucose, galactose, fructose, mannose, lactose and sucrose). The influence of irradiation parameters (dose, dose rate, photon energy) and of environmental parameters (temperature of heating, light exposure) on the EPR signal amplitude was studied. To assess the neutron sensitivity, the materials were exposed to a mixed radiation field of experimental reactors with different neutron to photon ratios. The relative neutron sensitivity was found to range from 10% to 43% according to the materials. Prior knowledge of the ratio between the dose in samples measured by EPR spectrometry and organ or whole body dose obtained by calculations previously performed for these different configurations, makes it possible to give a first estimation of the dose received by the victim in a short delay. The second aim of this work is to provide data relevant for a quick assessment of the dose distribution in case of accidental overexposure based on EPR measurements performed on one or several points of the body. The study consists in determining by calculation the relation between the dose to the organs and whole body and the dose to specific points of the body, like teeth, bones or samples located in the pockets of victim clothes, for different external exposures corresponding

  7. Results of tooth enamel EPR dosimetry for population living in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhumadilov, K. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 734-8553 (Japan)], E-mail: kassym@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Ivannikov, A. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 734-8553 (Japan); Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk, 249036 (Russian Federation); Apsalikov, K. [Scientific-Research Institute for Radiation Medicine and Ecology, Semipalatinsk 490050 (Kazakhstan); Zhumadilov, Zh. [Semipalatinsk State Medical Academy, Semipalatinsk 490050 (Kazakhstan); Zharlyganova, D. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 734-8553 (Japan); Stepanenko, V.; Skvortsov, V. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk, 249036 (Russian Federation); Berekenova, G. [Scientific-Research Institute for Radiation Medicine and Ecology, Semipalatinsk 490050 (Kazakhstan); Toyoda, S. [Department of Applied Physics Faculty of Science Okayama University of Science, 700-0005 (Japan); Endo, S.; Tanaka, K. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 734-8553 (Japan); Miyazawa, C. [School of Dentistry, Ohu University, Koriyama-shi, Fukushima Pref. 963-8611 (Japan); Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 734-8553 (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    The method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry was used on human tooth enamel to obtain individual absorbed doses of residents of settlements in the vicinity of the Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) in Semipalatinsk region, Kazakhstan. Measured teeth were extracted according to medical indications. In total, 105 tooth enamel samples were analyzed, including eight tooth samples from control settlement Kokpekty, which is located 400 km to the Southeast from SNTS and was not subjected to any radioactive contamination. It was found that the excess doses obtained after subtraction of the contribution of natural background radiation ranged up to about 440 mGy for residents of Dolon, whose tooth enamel was formed before 1949, and do not exceed 100 mGy for younger residents. For residents of Mostik, excess doses do not exceed 100 mGy for all ages except in one resident, for whom an extremely high dose of 1250 mGy was registered. For Bodene settlement, excess doses higher than 100 mGy were obtained for two samples from the residents having enamel formed before 1949. An extremely high dose (2800{+-}400 mGy) was obtained for one resident of Semipalatinsk City. The average excess dose for Semipalatinsk samples with enamel formation before 1949 was determined close to the average excess dose for tooth enamel samples from Dolon village.

  8. EPR and TL-based beta dosimetry measurements in various tooth components contaminated by 90Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronese, I.; Fattibene, P.; Cantone, M.C.; De Coste, V.; Giussani, A.; Onori, S.; Shishkina, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermoluminescence-based beta dosimetry, previously proposed for the estimate of the internal contamination in teeth, and EPR has been used in this paper to investigate the homogeneity of 90 Sr contamination and of dose within nine teeth of one person born in the year of the onset of waterborne radioactive releases of the Mayak plutonium facility. A large deviation of dose and activity distributions in both enamel and radical dentine of the various teeth was observed. Average dose was 27±7Gy in enamel and 0.90±0.31Gy in radical dentine. Average 90 Sr concentration was 52±8Bq/g in enamel and 5±2Bq/g in radical dentine. The observed deviation around the mean value of dose and 90 Sr concentration can be explained due to the specific mineral evolution of each tooth at the time of Sr intake. In the same donor, a negative correlation was also observed between radical dentine and enamel for the 90 Sr specific activity as well for the dose. Similar analyses performed on one massive molar belonging to a second donor revealed absence of correlation between dose and 90 Sr concentration in the same tissue, indicating a dose contribution from 90 Sr present in neighbouring tissue compartments. Systematic differences in cumulated dose and activity levels between the lingual and the buccal parts of crown dentine and of enamel were also observed

  9. Testing and linearity calibration of films of phenol compounds exposed to thermal neutron field for EPR dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, S; Panzeca, S; Longo, A; Altieri, S; Bentivoglio, A; Dondi, D; Marconi, R P; Protti, N; Zeffiro, A; Marrale, M

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results obtained by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements on films of IRGANOX® 1076 phenols with and without low content (5% by weight) of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) exposed in the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor of LENA (Laboratorio Energia Nucleare Applicata) of Pavia (Italy). Thanks to their size, the phenolic films here presented are good devices for the dosimetry of beams with high dose gradient and which require accurate knowledge of the precise dose delivered. The dependence of EPR signal as function of neutron dose was investigated in the fluence range between 10(11) cm(-2) and 10(14) cm(-2). Linearity of EPR response was found and the signal was compared with that of commercial alanine films. Our analysis showed that gadolinium oxide (5% by weight) can enhance the thermal neutron sensitivity more than 18 times. Irradiated dosimetric films of phenolic compound exhibited EPR signal fading of about 4% after 10 days from irradiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Preliminary evaluation of second harmonic direct detection scheme for low-dose range in alanine/EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Felipe; Graeff, Carlos F.O.; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2002-01-01

    The usefulness of a direct detection scheme of the second harmonic (2h) overmodulated signal from irradiated alanine in EPR dosimetry was studied. For this purpose, a group of DL-alanine/paraffin cylindrical pellets was produced. The dosimeters were irradiated with a 60 Co radiotherapy gamma source with doses of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 Gy. The EPR measurements were carried out in a VARIAN-E4 spectrometer operating in X-band with optimized parameters to obtain highest amplitude signals of both harmonics. The 2h signal was detected directly at twice the modulation frequency. In preliminary results, the 2h showed some advantages over the 1h such as better resolution for doses below 1 Gy, better repeatability results and better linear behaviour in the dose range indicated. (author)

  11. K-band EPR dosimetry: small-field beam profile determination with miniature alanine dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Felipe; Graeff, Carlos F.O.; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2005-01-01

    The use of small-size alanine dosimeters presents a challenge because the signal intensity is less than the spectrometer sensitivity. K-band (24 GHz) EPR spectrometer seems to be a good compromise between size and sensitivity of the sample. Miniature alanine pellets were evaluated for small-field radiation dosimetry. Dosimeters of DL-alanine/PVC with dimensions of 1.5 mm diameter and 2.5 mm length with 5 mg mass were developed. These dosimeters were irradiated with 10 MV X-rays in the dose range 0.05-60 Gy and the first harmonic (1 h) spectra were recorded. Microwave power, frequency and amplitude of modulation were optimized to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). For beam profile determination, a group of 25 dosimeters were placed in an acrylic device with dimensions of (7.5x2.5x1) cm 3 and irradiated with a (3x3) cm 2 10 MV X-rays beam field size. The dose at the central region of the beam was 20 Gy at a depth of 2.2 cm (build up for acrylic). The acrylic device was oriented perpendicular to the beam axis and to the gantry rotation axis. For the purposes of comparison of the spatial resolution, the beam profile was also determined with a radiographic film and 2 mm aperture optical densitometer; in this case the dose was 1 cGy. The results showed a similar spatial resolution for both types of dosimeters. The dispersion in dose reading was larger for alanine in comparison with the film, but alanine dosimeters can be read faster and more directly than film over a wide dose range

  12. EPR dosimetry of whole deciduous tooth using a constant rotation goniometer and background subtraction with a dentine standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskell, E.H.; Hayes, R.B.; Kenner, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    We report here a rapid method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of dental enamel which will allow screening of whole deciduous teeth of children following a nuclear accident. The technique requires virtually no sample preparation and is capable of measuring doses of less than 100 mGy. Teeth may be scanned for threshold dose levels without the need for added calibration doses and those of particular interest may be more accurately examined using the additive dose method. The success of the technique lies in the elimination of anisotropic effects by rotation of spectra from the empty cavity and a standard background tooth. Normalization using in- cavity Mn++ standards is also employed

  13. Assessment of an alanine EPR dosimetry technique with enhanced precision and accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, R B; Wieser, A; Romanyukha, A A; Hardy, B L; Barrus, J K

    2000-01-01

    Dose reconstruction in the course of a series of blind tests demonstrated that an accuracy of 10 mGy for low doses and 1% for high doses can be achieved using EPR spectroscopy. This was accomplished using a combination of methodologies including polynomial filtration of the EPR spectrum, dosimeter rotation during scanning, use of an EPR standard fixed into the resonator and subtraction of all nonradiogenic signals. Doses were reconstructed over the range of 0.01-1000 Gy using this compound spectral EPR analysis. This EPR technique, being equally applicable to fractionated doses (such as those delivered during multiple radiotherapy treatments), was verified to exhibit dose reciprocity. Irradiated alanine dosimeters which were stored exhibited compound spectral EPR signal fading of ca 3% over 9 months. All error estimates given in this paper are given at the 1 standard deviation level and unless otherwise specified do not account for uncertainties in source calibration.

  14. Assessment of an alanine EPR dosimetry technique with enhanced precision and accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Robert B.; Haskell, E.H.; Wieser, Albrecht; Romanyukha, Alexander A.; Hardy, Byron L.; Barrus, Jeffrey K.

    2000-01-01

    Dose reconstruction in the course of a series of blind tests demonstrated that an accuracy of 10 mGy for low doses and 1% for high doses can be achieved using EPR spectroscopy. This was accomplished using a combination of methodologies including polynomial filtration of the EPR spectrum, dosimeter rotation during scanning, use of an EPR standard fixed into the resonator and subtraction of all nonradiogenic signals. Doses were reconstructed over the range of 0.01-1000 Gy using this compound spectral EPR analysis. This EPR technique, being equally applicable to fractionated doses (such as those delivered during multiple radiotherapy treatments), was verified to exhibit dose reciprocity. Irradiated alanine dosimeters which were stored exhibited compound spectral EPR signal fading of ca 3% over 9 months. All error estimates given in this paper are given at the 1 standard deviation level and unless otherwise specified do not account for uncertainties in source calibration

  15. Dependencies of the radiation sensitivity of human tooth enamel in EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; El-Faramawy, N.; Meckbach, R.

    2001-01-01

    The EPR dose response of tooth enamel was determined for human molars collected in Egypt. The influence of age, gender and residence of the tooth donors as well as tooth position and sample preparation on EPR sensitivity and its variability over the enamel samples was investigated. The EPR sensitivity and its variability were found to depend only on the sample preparation procedure. The variability in EPR sensitivity of enamel from Egyptian teeth was maximally 10% and the mean sensitivity was in good agreement with that of German teeth

  16. Alanine dosimetry for clinical applications. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M.

    2006-05-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Therapy level alanine dosimetry at the UK Nationational Physical Laboratory, alanine as a precision validation tool for reference dosimetry, composition of alanine pellet dosimeters, the angular dependence of the alanine ESR spectrum, the CIAE alanine dosimeter for radiotherapy level, a correction for temporal evolution effects in alanine dosimetry, next-generation services foe e-traceability to ionization radiation national standards, establishing e-traceability to HIST high-dose measurement standards, alanine dosimetry of dose delivery from clinical accelerators, the e-scan alanine dosimeter reader, alanine dosimetry at ISS, verification of the integral delivered dose for IMRT treatment in the head and neck region with ESR/alanine dosimetry, alanine dosimetry in helical tomotherapy beams, ESR dosimetry research and development at the University of Palermo, lithium formate as a low-dose EPR radiation dosimeter, sensitivity enhancement of alanine/EPR dosimetry. (HSI)

  17. Medical reference dosimetry using EPR measurements of alanine: Development of an improved method for clinical dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Andersen, Claus Erik; Rosendal, Flemming; Kofoed, Inger Matilde

    2009-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (EPR) is used to determine the absorbed dose of alanine dosimeters exposed to clinical photon beams in a solid-water phantom. Alanine is potentially suitable for medical reference dosimetry, because of its near water equivalence over a wide energy spectrum, low signal fading, non-destructive measurement and small dosimeter size. Material and Methods. A Bruker EMX-micro EPR spectrometer with a rectangular cavity and a measurement time of two minutes per dosimeter was used for reading of irradiated alanine dosimeters. Under these conditions a new algorithm based on scaling of known spectra was developed to extract the alanine signal. Results. The dose accuracy, including calibration uncertainty, is less than 2% (k=1) above 4 Gy (n=4). The measurement uncertainty is fairly constant in absolute terms (∼30 mGy) and the relative uncertainty therefore rises for dose measurements below 4 Gy. Typical reproducibility is <1% (k=1) above 10 Gy and <2% between 4 and 10 Gy. Below 4 Gy the uncertainty is higher. A depth dose curve measurement was performed in a solid-water phantom irradiated to a dose of 20 Gy at the maximum dose point (dmax) in 6 and 18 MV photon beams. The typical difference between the dose measured with alanine in solid water and the dose measured with an ion chamber in a water tank was about 1%. A difference of 2% between 6 and 18 MV was found, possibly due to non-water equivalence of the applied phantom. Discussion. Compared to previously published methods the proposed algorithm can be applied without normalisation of phase shifts caused by changes in the g-value of the cavity. The study shows that alanine dosimetry is a suitable candidate for medical reference dosimetry especially for quality control applications

  18. EPR dosimetry in tooth enamel by x radiation; Dosimetria EPR en esmalte dental irradiado con rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubner, Diana; Perez, Maria del Rosario; Gisone, P. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] E-mail: ddubner@cae.arn.gov.ar; Fainstein, C.; Winkler, E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche]|[Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina). Inst. Balseiro; Saravi, Margarita [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) (Argentina). Centro Atomico Ezeiza; Davila, Francisco [Ateneo Argentino de Odontologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    Tooth enamel, extracted from molars, was irradiated with 66 keV X-rays, with doses up to 1 Gy. The preparation of the powder samples is described, as well as the protocol for the acquisition and processing of the spectra. The radiation induced paramagnetism is measured, at room temperature, by ESR spectroscopy. The ESR spectra is well described considering two paramagnetic species, with magnetic moments (in units of Bohr magnetrons) g=2,0041, and g1=2,0018, g2=1,9972. The ESR data (peak-to-peak amplitude per mg, hpp/mg, vs dose D), for doses 0 Gydosimetry. (author)

  19. An experimental and Monte Carlo investigation of the energy dependence of alanine/EPR dosimetry: I. Clinical x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, G G; McEwen, M R; Rogers, D W O; Klassen, N V

    2004-01-01

    The energy dependence of alanine/EPR dosimetry, in terms of absorbed dose-to-water for clinical 6, 10, 25 MV x-rays and 60 Co rays was investigated by measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. The dose rates were traceable to the NRC primary standard for absorbed dose, a sealed water calorimetry. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of irradiated pellets were measured using a Bruker EMX 081 EPR spectrometer. The DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code of the EGSnrc system was used to simulate the experimental conditions with BEAM code calculated input spectra of x-rays and γ-rays. Within the experimental uncertainty of 0.5%, the alanine EPR response to absorbed dose-to-water for x-rays was not dependent on beam quality from 6 MV to 25 MV, but on average, it was about 0.6% lower than its response to 60 Co gamma rays. Combining experimental data with Monte Carlo calculations, it is found that the alanine/EPR response per unit absorbed dose-to-alanine is the same for clinical x-rays and 60 Co gamma rays within the uncertainty of 0.6%. Monte Carlo simulations showed that neither the presence of PMMA holder nor varying the dosimeter thickness between 1 mm and 5 mm has significant effect on the energy dependence of alanine/EPR dosimetry within the calculation uncertainty of 0.3%

  20. Towards improving the detection limit of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of drywall (wallboard)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, R.; Thompson, J.W. [Dept. of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Rink, W.J. [School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Boreham, D. [Dept. of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The intensity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line corresponding to the carbonate free radical (CO{sub 3}{sup -}) in gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) drywall was previously shown to be proportional to absorbed dose. Heating irradiated drywall reduces the radiosensitive signal of the CO{sub 3}{sup -} radical. The response of the CO{sub 3}{sup -} EPR line to heat treatments is being studied in order to determine a background for an arbitrary drywall sample. Ultimately this is expected to improve the precision of dose measurements with drywall and to reduce the detection limit. Controlled heating of irradiated drywall was performed at temperatures between 50{sup o}C and 100{sup o}C. Although higher temperatures reduce the radiosensitive signal rapidly, the non-radiosensitive EPR signals are affected dramatically as well, presumably due to a phrase change from gypsum to plaster of Paris to anhydrite. (author)

  1. Dosimetry in non-homogeneous media with alanine/EPR mini dosemeters and simulation with PENELOPE Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega Ramirez, J.L.; Chen, F.; Nicolucci, P.; Baffa, O.

    2009-01-01

    The dosimetric system of L-alanine mini dosimeter and K-Band EPR spectrometer was tested for the dosimetry in non-homogeneous media through the determination of the Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curve for a small radiation field. The alanine mini dosimeters were produced by mechanical pressure of a mixture of L-alanine (95%) and PVA (5%) to nominal dimensions of 1 mm diameter and 3 mm length and 3 - 4 mg. For detecting the EPR signal of the mini dosimeters irradiated to 25 Gy, a K-Band (24 GHz) spectrometer was used. The dosimeters were irradiated in a 60 Co radiotherapy unit using 80 cm source skin distance and field sizes of 2.5 x 2.5 cm 2 . The inhomogeneous phantom consisted of acrylic and cork sheets of 30 x 30 x 1 cm 3 ; six cork sheets were sandwiched between five and nine acrylic sheets, which were placed at the top and bottom regions respectively. PDD curves with radiographic film and PENELOPE simulation were also determined. The PDD results for alanine mini dosimeters agreed better than 5.9% with film and PENELOPE. (author)

  2. Irradiated bivalve mollusks: Use of EPR spectroscopy for identification and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberti, Angelo, E-mail: aalberti@isof.cnr.it [CNR-ISOF, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy); Chiaravalle, Eugenio [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata, Via Manfredonia 20, Foggia I-71100 (Italy); Fuochi, Piergiorgio; Macciantelli, Dante [CNR-ISOF, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy); Mangiacotti, Michele, E-mail: michelemangiacotti@libero.it [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata, Via Manfredonia 20, Foggia I-71100 (Italy); Marchesani, Giuliana [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata, Via Manfredonia 20, Foggia I-71100 (Italy); Plescia, Elena [CNR-ISOF, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    High energy radiation treatment of foodstuff for microbial control and shelf-life extension is being used in many countries. However, for consumer protection and information, the European Union has adopted the Directives 1999/2/EC and 1999/3/EC to harmonize the rules concerning the treatment and trade of irradiated foods in EU countries. Among the validated methods to detect irradiated foods the EU directives also include Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR/ESR) spectroscopy. We describe herein the use of EPR for identification of four species of bivalve mollusks, i.e. brown Venus shells (Callista chione), clams (Tapes semidecussatus), mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and oysters (Ostrea edulis) irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. EPR could definitely identify irradiated seashells due to the presence of long-lived free radicals, primarily CO{sub 2}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 3-}, SO{sub 2}{sup -} and SO{sub 3}{sup -} radical anions. The presence of other organic free radicals, believed to originate from conchiolin, a scleroprotein present in the shells, was also ascertained. The use of one of these radicals as a marker for irradiation of brown Venus shells and clams can be envisaged. We also propose a dosimetric protocol for the reconstruction of the administered dose in irradiated oysters. - Highlights: > EPR spectroscopy is confirmed a valuable identification tool for irradiated mollusks. > A conchiolin-derived radical can be used as irradiation marker for some mollusks. > A reliable protocol is outlined for dose reconstruction of irradiated oysters.

  3. EPR spectroscopy as a potential approach to identify irradiated food and radiation dosimetry - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, Bhaskar; Chawla, S.P.

    2017-01-01

    The need for reliable and routine tests to determine whether or not food has been irradiated has arisen as a result of the progress made in commercialization of the food irradiation technology. The effectiveness of food irradiation depends on proper delivery of absorbed dose and its reliable measurement. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been established as an essential tool both for detection of irradiated food and radiation measurements. This presentation demonstrates the behavior of the radicals produced in irradiated cashew nut and orange. In addition the role of EPR spectroscopy will be discussed to understand thermoluminescence behavior of CaSO 4 dosimeter. Cashew nut and orange samples were exposed to gamma radiation in the dose range of 0.25 to 2 kGy. CaSO 4 crystals were irradiated at 0.5-7 kGy. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was carried out using EMX model EPR spectrometer (BRUKER, Germany) with a microwave frequency of 9.42 GHz

  4. Tissue interfaces dosimetry in small field radiotherapy with alanine/EPR mini dosimeters and Monte Carlo-Penelope simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega R, J. L.; Nicolucci, P.; Baffa, O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, FFCLRP, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, Bairro Monte Alegre, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Chen, F. [Universidade Federale do ABC, CCNH, Rua Santa Adelia 166, Bangu, 09210-170 Santo Andre, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Apaza V, D. G., E-mail: josevegaramirez@yahoo.es [Universidad Nacional de San Agustin de Arequipa, Departamento de Fisica, Arequipa (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    The dosimetry system based on alanine mini dosimeters plus K-Band EPR spectrometer was tested in the tissue-interface dosimetry through the percentage depth-dose (Pdd) determination for 3 x 3 cm{sup 2} and 1 x 1 cm{sup 2} radiation fields sizes. The alanine mini dosimeters were produced by mechanical pressure from a mixture of 95% L-alanine and 5% polyvinyl alcohol (Pva) acting as binder. Nominal dimensions of these mini dosimeters were 1 mm diameter and 3 mm length as well as 3 - 4 mg mass. The EPR spectra of the mini dosimeters were registered using a K-Band (24 GHz) EPR spectrometer. The mini dosimeters were placed in a nonhomogeneous phantom and irradiated with 20 Gy in a 6 MV PRIMUS Siemens linear accelerator, with a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm using the small fields previously mentioned. The cylindrical non-homogeneous phantom was comprised of several disk-shaped plates of different materials in the sequence acrylic-bone cork-bone-acrylic, with dimensions 15 cm diameter and 1 cm thick. The plates were placed in descending order, starting from top with four acrylic plates followed by two bone plates plus eight cork plates plus two bone plates and finally, four acrylic plates (4-2-8-2-4). Pdd curves from the treatment planning system and from Monte Carlo simulation with Penelope code were determined. Mini dosimeters Pdd results show good agreement with Penelope, better than 95% for the cork homogeneous region and 97.7% in the bone heterogeneous region. In the first interface region, between acrylic and bone, it can see a dose increment of 0.6% for mini dosimeters compared to Penelope. At the second interface, between bone and cork, there is 9.1% of dose increment for mini dosimeter relative to Penelope. For the third (cork-bone) and fourth (bone-acrylic) interfaces, the dose increment for mini dosimeters compared to Penelope was 4.1% both. (Author)

  5. Tissue interfaces dosimetry in small field radiotherapy with alanine/EPR mini dosimeters and Monte Carlo-Penelope simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega R, J. L.; Nicolucci, P.; Baffa, O.; Chen, F.; Apaza V, D. G.

    2014-08-01

    The dosimetry system based on alanine mini dosimeters plus K-Band EPR spectrometer was tested in the tissue-interface dosimetry through the percentage depth-dose (Pdd) determination for 3 x 3 cm 2 and 1 x 1 cm 2 radiation fields sizes. The alanine mini dosimeters were produced by mechanical pressure from a mixture of 95% L-alanine and 5% polyvinyl alcohol (Pva) acting as binder. Nominal dimensions of these mini dosimeters were 1 mm diameter and 3 mm length as well as 3 - 4 mg mass. The EPR spectra of the mini dosimeters were registered using a K-Band (24 GHz) EPR spectrometer. The mini dosimeters were placed in a nonhomogeneous phantom and irradiated with 20 Gy in a 6 MV PRIMUS Siemens linear accelerator, with a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm using the small fields previously mentioned. The cylindrical non-homogeneous phantom was comprised of several disk-shaped plates of different materials in the sequence acrylic-bone cork-bone-acrylic, with dimensions 15 cm diameter and 1 cm thick. The plates were placed in descending order, starting from top with four acrylic plates followed by two bone plates plus eight cork plates plus two bone plates and finally, four acrylic plates (4-2-8-2-4). Pdd curves from the treatment planning system and from Monte Carlo simulation with Penelope code were determined. Mini dosimeters Pdd results show good agreement with Penelope, better than 95% for the cork homogeneous region and 97.7% in the bone heterogeneous region. In the first interface region, between acrylic and bone, it can see a dose increment of 0.6% for mini dosimeters compared to Penelope. At the second interface, between bone and cork, there is 9.1% of dose increment for mini dosimeter relative to Penelope. For the third (cork-bone) and fourth (bone-acrylic) interfaces, the dose increment for mini dosimeters compared to Penelope was 4.1% both. (Author)

  6. Analysis of various modifications in spectra analysis on accuracy of dose reconstructions in EPR dosimetry in tooth enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciesielski, B., E-mail: bciesiel@gumed.edu.pl [Department of Physics and Biophysics, Medical University of Gdansk, Debinki 1, 80-211 Gdansk (Poland); Kaminska, J. [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdansk, Debinki 7, 80-211 Gdansk (Poland); Emerich, K. [Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Medical University of Gdansk, Orzeszkowej 18, 80-208 Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-09-15

    The results of EPR measurements performed due to our participation in the 4th International Comparison of EPR Dosimetry using tooth enamel were used to analyze the effects of modifications in numerical analysis of the measured spectra on precision and accuracy of reconstructed doses. The studied modifications included effects of: (1) a use of Mn{sup 2+} standard, (2) variations in experimental native background signals of tooth enamel used for dose reconstructions, (3) signal filtration, (4) subtraction of empty tube spectra, and (5) variations in the spectra ranges used for calculations (fitting windows). It was shown, that the use of a Mn standard, for normalization of intensities of the recorded signals in the spectra processing, strongly increased the dosimetric accuracy. The regression lines of the doses reconstructed using different background spectra against nominal doses, obtained without Mn standard, had slopes about 30% higher and their scatter range was about 2 times higher than the same parameters obtained when Mn standard was applied in the spectra processing. Accuracy of the measured doses characterized by root mean square deviations from the nominal doses was 71 mGy for calculations with Mn standard and 241 mGy without normalization to Mn lines. Despite the large beneficial effect of the use of Mn standard on accuracy (root mean square deviations of the data, slope of the regression lines), it did not significantly improve the dosimetry performance characterized by the critical dose and detection limit. The smoothing of the spectra by 9 point filtration resulted in 1.6% increase of the reconstructed doses. The subtraction of empty tube spectrum had no effect on precision and accuracy of the dose reconstruction. The performance parameters were also practically insensitive to a choice of a width of the spectral window used for the analysis, provided it encompassed the {approx}1.6 mT range covering the main peaks of the radiation induced signal in

  7. Spectra processing at tooth enamel dosimetry: Analytical description of EPR spectrum at different microwave power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tieliewuhan, E.; Ivannikov, A.; Zhumadilov, K.; Nalapko, M.; Tikunov, D.; Skvortsov, V.; Stepanenko, V.; Toyoda, S.; Tanaka, K.; Endo, S.; Hoshi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Variation of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the human tooth enamel recorded at different microwave power is investigated. The analytical models describing the native and the radiation-induced signals in the enamel are proposed, which fit the experimental spectra in wide range of microwave power. These models are designed to use for processing the spectra of irradiated enamel at determination of the absorbed dose from the intensity of the radiation-induced signal

  8. UV EFFECTS IN TOOTH ENAMEL AND THEIR POSSIBLE APPLICATION IN EPR DOSIMETRY WITH FRONT TEETH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholom, S.; Desrosiers, M.; Chumak, V.; Luckyanov, N.; Simon, S.L.; Bouville, A.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on ionizing radiation biodosimetry were studied in human tooth enamel samples using the technique of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in X-band. For samples in the form of grains, UV-specific EPR spectra were spectrally distinct from that produced by exposure to gamma radiation. From larger enamel samples, the UV penetration depth was determined to be in the 60–120 μm range. The difference in EPR spectra from UV exposure and from exposure to gamma radiation samples was found to be a useful marker of UV equivalent dose (defined as the apparent contribution to the gamma dose in mGy that results from UV radiation absorption) in tooth enamel. This concept was preliminarily tested on front teeth from inhabitants of the region of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (Kazakhstan) who might have received some exposure to gamma radiation from the nuclear tests conducted there as well as from normal UV radiation in sunlight. The technique developed here to quantify and subtract the UV contribution to the measured tooth is currently limited to cumulative dose measurements with a component of UV equivalent dose equal to or greater than 300 mGy. PMID:20065706

  9. EPR response characterization of drugs excipients for applying in accident dosimetry; Caracterizacao da resposta RPE dos excipientes dos medicamentos para aplicacao em dosimetria de acidente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczewski, Barbara S.; Rodrigues Junior, Orlando; Galante, Ocimar L.; Costa, Zelia M. da; Campos, Leticia L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    Some drugs are widely used by the population and can be employed to dose retrospective. The carbohydrates (saccharides), commonly used as excipients in the pharmaceutical industry, produce a quantity of free radicals after gamma irradiation, making them useful for dosimetry in emergency or accident situations that imply in dose evaluation from the materials found nearly or in contact with victims. In general, EPR signal from pulverized pills of some drugs are very complex due to the variety of components in the formulation. Because of this fact, some pharmaceutical excipients identified in the pill composition were also analysed by EPR spectrometry. On the counter drugs were studied: Cebion glucose, AAS, Aspirina, Conmel, Lacto-Purga and sugar substitutive ZeroCal. The excipients were: lactose, amide, anhydrous glucose and magnesium stearate. In some samples the number of radicals produced increased with the dose, showing a linear response for a dose range of interest and an adequate sensibility for dosimetry in accident cases.

  10. The analogy in the formation of hardness salts and gallstones according to the EPR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichugina, Alina; Tsyro, Larisa; Unger, Felix

    2017-11-01

    The article shows that the hardness salts contain the same crystalline phases as the bile stone pigment. The identity of EPR spectra of hardness salts and pigment of gallstones containing calcium carbonate was established. An analogy between the processes of formation of hardness salts and gallstones is played, in which particles with open spin-orbitals (fermions) play a decisive role.

  11. The 1st Nuclear Test in the former USSR of 29 August 1949: Comparison of individual dose estimates by modeling with EPR retrospective dosimetry and luminescence retrospective dosimetry data for Dolon village, Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, V.F.; Hoshi, M.; Ivannikov, A.I.; Bailiff, I.K.; Zhumadilov, K.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Argembaeva, R.; Tsyb, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    Three methods of individual dose reconstruction, namely dose calculations based on the available archive data and on the individual questioning of inhabitants, EPR dosimetry in human tooth enamel, and retrospective luminescence dosimetry (RLD) with quartz inclusions in the bricks were applied for assessment of accumulated external doses in Dolon village (Kazakhstan), which is one of the most affected settlements as a result of 29.08.1949 nuclear test at Semipalatinsk nuclear test site. Dose values obtained by EPR and RLD methods were compared with computed dose values. The available data on soil contamination with 137 Cs and 239+240 Pu in the vicinity and inside Dolon village were used for interpretation of the results of comparison. Based on a calculated value of 2260 mGy for the dose in the air along the central axis of the trace located NW of Dolon, the doses in the air over whole village and for the south-eastern part of the village containing the RLD sampling points were estimated as 775±40 and 645±70mGy, respectively, the latter correlates well with the RLD dose value of 460±92mGy. The 'upper level' of the mean 'shielding and behavior' factor of dose reduction for inhabitants of Dolon village was estimated as 0.28±0.07; this was performed by comparing the individual EPR tooth enamel doses with the calculated mean dose for the settlement. The individual dose estimates by EPR dosimetry were compared with individual dose values obtained by modeling. Uncertainties of the calculated individual doses were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. The individual dose estimates by EPR method are lower in comparison with mean computed doses and with RLD data, but they are in a good consistency with computed individual dose values in Dolon village based on the results of individual questioning with account of individual 'shielding and behavior' factors

  12. The 1st Nuclear Test in the former USSR of 29 August 1949: Comparison of individual dose estimates by modeling with EPR retrospective dosimetry and luminescence retrospective dosimetry data for Dolon village, Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanenko, V.F. [Medical Radiological Research Center of RAMS, 4 Korolev Str., Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation); Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan)], E-mail: mrrc@obninsk.ru; Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Ivannikov, A.I. [Medical Radiological Research Center of RAMS, 4 Korolev Str., Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation); Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Bailiff, I.K. [Luminescence Dating and Dosimetry Laboratory, University of Durham, South Road, Durham, DHI 3LE (United Kingdom); Zhumadilov, K. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Skvortsov, V.G. [Medical Radiological Research Center of RAMS, 4 Korolev Str., Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation); Argembaeva, R. [Scientifical Research Institute for Radiation Medicine, 258, Gagarina Str., P.B. 49, Semipalatinsk 490026 (Kazakhstan); Tsyb, A.F. [Medical Radiological Research Center of RAMS, 4 Korolev Str., Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-15

    Three methods of individual dose reconstruction, namely dose calculations based on the available archive data and on the individual questioning of inhabitants, EPR dosimetry in human tooth enamel, and retrospective luminescence dosimetry (RLD) with quartz inclusions in the bricks were applied for assessment of accumulated external doses in Dolon village (Kazakhstan), which is one of the most affected settlements as a result of 29.08.1949 nuclear test at Semipalatinsk nuclear test site. Dose values obtained by EPR and RLD methods were compared with computed dose values. The available data on soil contamination with {sup 137}Cs and {sup 239+240}Pu in the vicinity and inside Dolon village were used for interpretation of the results of comparison. Based on a calculated value of 2260 mGy for the dose in the air along the central axis of the trace located NW of Dolon, the doses in the air over whole village and for the south-eastern part of the village containing the RLD sampling points were estimated as 775{+-}40 and 645{+-}70mGy, respectively, the latter correlates well with the RLD dose value of 460{+-}92mGy. The 'upper level' of the mean 'shielding and behavior' factor of dose reduction for inhabitants of Dolon village was estimated as 0.28{+-}0.07; this was performed by comparing the individual EPR tooth enamel doses with the calculated mean dose for the settlement. The individual dose estimates by EPR dosimetry were compared with individual dose values obtained by modeling. Uncertainties of the calculated individual doses were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. The individual dose estimates by EPR method are lower in comparison with mean computed doses and with RLD data, but they are in a good consistency with computed individual dose values in Dolon village based on the results of individual questioning with account of individual 'shielding and behavior' factors.

  13. Study of new compounds for their application on free radicals EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condes N, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    L- α alanine is an amino acid which has been used for electron and γ ray dosimetric purposes, when crystallites of L-α alanine are irradiated with ionizing radiation free radicals are produced. The yield of free radicals produced by irradiation of alanine crystals can be evaluated by EPR spectrometry, however when L- α alanine crystals are irradiated with thermal neutrons the yield of the free radicals produced is very low and in consequence it's EPR-signal response is poor. In this work we mixed L-α alanine together with some lithium compounds such as LiF, LiBO 2 , LiOH and Li 2 CO 3 . In this way when we irradiate the respective mixture of alanine-lithium with thermal neutrons, the nuclear reactions 6 Li (n,α)T and 10 B (n, α) 7 Li can be produced with a high probability. As a consequence α particles and recoil atoms emerging from the nuclear reactions can impinge on alanine molecules, producing extra free radicals. From the alanine-lithium mixtures obtained, we made dosemeters (30 mm long., 3.9 mm diameter) which were irradiated in the thermal column of the TRIGA Mark III Nuclear Reactor with a flux of thermal neutrons of 5 x 10 7 n/ cm 2 s. Irradiations were made at different periods. Experimental evaluations indicate that the mixtures can be used for dosimetric purposes. (Author)

  14. Direct detection of second harmonic and its use in alanine/EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.; Guzman, C.S.; Graeff, C.F.O.; Baffa, O.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, the possible use of the second harmonic EPR signal from irradiated alanine for low radiation dose (∼1 Gy) was explored, aiming applications to HDR brachytherapy and teletherapy. The second harmonic signal was directly detected after overmodulation. A batch of DL-alanine/paraffin small cylindrical pellets was made. A VARIAN E-4 X-Band EPR spectrometer with optimized operation parameters like microwave power and modulation amplitude to obtain a signal with the highest amplitude was used. The modulation frequency and modulation amplitude were 100 kHz and 1.25 mT (to overmodulate the signal) respectively. The second harmonic signal was directly detected at twice the modulation frequency. One group of dosimeters was irradiated with a 192 Ir brachytherapy source and the other in a 10 MeV X-rays linear accelerator, both group at a dose range: 0.5 - 15 Gy. The second harmonic signal showed better resolution than the first harmonic one making possible a more easy localization of the signal. Moreover, for both types of radiation, the dose-response curve showed a good linear behavior for the dose range indicated. (author)

  15. Dosimetry of an accident in mixed field (neutrons, photons) using the spectrometry by electronic paramagnetic resonance(EPR); Dosimetrie d'accident en champ mixte (neutrons, photons) utilisant la spectrometrie par resonance paramagnetique electronique (RPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve, M.L

    2006-03-15

    In a radiological accident, the assessment of the dose received by the victim is relevant information for the therapeutic strategy. Two complementary dosimetric techniques based on physical means are used in routine practice in the laboratory: EPR spectroscopy performed on materials removed from the victim or gathered from the vicinity of the victim and Monte Carlo calculations. EPR dosimetry, has been used successfully several times in cases of photon or electron overexposures. Accidental exposure may also occur with a neutron component. The aim of this work is to investigate the potentiality of EPR dosimetry for mixed photon and neutron field exposure with different organic materials (ascorbic acid, sorbitol, glucose, galactose, fructose, mannose, lactose and sucrose). The influence of irradiation parameters (dose, dose rate, photon energy) and of environmental parameters (temperature of heating, light exposure) on the EPR signal amplitude was studied. To assess the neutron sensitivity, the materials were exposed to a mixed radiation field of experimental reactors with different neutron to photon ratios. The relative neutron sensitivity was found to range from 10% to 43% according to the materials. Prior knowledge of the ratio between the dose in samples measured by EPR spectrometry and organ or whole body dose obtained by calculations previously performed for these different configurations, makes it possible to give a first estimation of the dose received by the victim in a short delay. The second aim of this work is to provide data relevant for a quick assessment of the dose distribution in case of accidental overexposure based on EPR measurements performed on one or several points of the body. The study consists in determining by calculation the relation between the dose to the organs and whole body and the dose to specific points of the body, like teeth, bones or samples located in the pockets of victim clothes, for different external exposures corresponding

  16. Alanine-EPR dosimetry in 10 MeV electron beam to optimize process parameters for food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, B.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, M.; Mittal, K.C.; Sharma, A.

    2011-01-01

    Absorbed dose in a food product is determined and controlled by several components of the LINAC irradiation facility as well as the product. Standardization of the parameters characterizing the facility components, process load and the irradiation conditions collectively termed as 'process parameters' are of paramount importance for successful dose delivery to the food products. In the present study alanine-EPR dosimetry system was employed to optimize the process parameters of 10 MeV electron beam of a LINAC facility for commercial irradiation of food. Three sets of experiments were carried out with different food commodities namely, mango, potato and rawa with the available product conveying system of different irradiation geometry like one sided or both sided mode of irradiation. Three dimensional dose distributions into the process load for low dose requiring food commodities (0.25 to 1 kGy) were measured in each experiment. The actual depth dose profile in food product and useful scan width of the electron beam were found out to be satisfactory for commercial radiation processing of food. Finally a scaled up experiment with commercial food product (packets of Rawa) exhibited adequate dose uniformity ratio of 3 proving the feasibility of the facility for large scale radiation processing of food commodities. (author)

  17. EPR DOSIMETRY STUDY FOR POPULATION RESIDING IN THE VICINITY OF FALLOUT TRACE FOR NUCLEAR TEST ON 7 AUGUST 1962.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhumadilov, Kassym Sh; Ivannikov, Alexander I; Stepanenko, Valeriy F; Toyoda, Shin; Skvortsov, Valeriy G; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2016-12-01

    The method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry using extracted teeth has been applied to human tooth enamel to obtain individual absorbed doses of residents of settlements in the vicinity of the central axis of radioactive fallout trace from the contaminating surface nuclear test on 7 August 1962. Most of the settlements (Kurchatov, Akzhar, Begen, Buras, Grachi, Mayskoe, Semenovka) are located from 70 to 120 km to the North-East from the epicenter of the explosion at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS). This region is basically an agricultural region. A total of 57 teeth samples were collected from these sites. Eight teeth from residents of the Kokpekty settlement, which was not subjected to any radioactive contamination and located 400 km to the Southeast from SNTS, were chosen as a control. The principal findings, using this method, were that the average excess dose obtained after subtraction of the natural background radiation was 13 mGy and ranged up to about 100 mGy all for residents in this region. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Radiation dosimetry of an accidental overexposure using EPR spectrometry and imaging of human bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, D.A.; Desrosiers, M.F.; Kuppusamy, P.; Zweier, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    On 11 December 1991 a radiation accident occurred at an industrial accelerator facility. 'A description of the facility and details of the accident are reported in Schauer et al., 1993a)'?. In brief, during maintenance on the lower window pressure plate of a 3 MV potential drop accelerator, an operator placed his hands, head, and feet in the radiation beam. The filament voltage of the electron source was turned ''off'', but the full accelerating potential was on the high voltage terminal. The operator's body, especially his extremities and head, were exposed to electron dark current. At approx. 3 months post-irradiation, the four digits of the victim's right hand and most of the four digits of his left hand were amputated. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry was used to estimate the radiation dose to the victim's extremities. Extremity dose estimates ranged from 55.0 Gy (±4.7 Gy) to 108 Gy (±24.1 Gy). (Author)

  19. Development of physical and numerical techniques of Alanine/EPR dosimetry in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, F.; Ponte, F.; Pereira, L.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, a set of 50 alanine dosimeters has been used in a radiotherapy context, simulating a two-dimensional treatment in a non-overlapping dosimeter configuration. The dose is reconstructed from physical and numerical simulation of the electron paramagnetic resonance signal, calculating the spin density. Thus, it can be used to better adjust the error in the calibration curve to give a final accuracy of <0.03 Gy. A complete set of experimental test parameters have been used with a standard dosimeter in order to obtain the best analysis configuration. These results indicate that for a conventional treatment of some hundreds of mGy, this method can be useful with a correct signal validation. A numerical test and fitting software has been developed. The general use of alanine/electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry in radiotherapy context is discussed. (authors)

  20. Dose response of xylitol and sorbitol for epr retrospective dosimetry with applications to chewing gum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israelsson, A.; Gustafsson, H.; Lund, E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the radiation-induced electron paramagnetic resonance signal in sweeteners xylitol and sorbitol for use in retrospective dosimetry. For both sweeteners and chewing gum, the signal changed at an interval of 1-84 d after irradiation with minimal changes after 4-8 d. A dependence on storage conditions was noticed and the exposure of the samples to light and humidity was therefore minimised. Both the xylitol and sorbitol signals showed linearity with dose in the measured dose interval, 0-20 Gy. The dose-response measurements for the chewing gum resulted in a decision threshold of 0.38 Gy and a detection limit of 0.78 Gy. A blind test illustrated the possibility of using chewing gums as a retrospective dosemeter with an uncertainty in the dose determination of 0.17 Gy (1 SD). (authors)

  1. Ir-192 HDR transit dose and radial dose function determination using alanine/EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcina, Carmen S Guzman; Almeida, Adelaide de; Rocha, Jose R Oliveira; Abrego, Felipe Chen; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2005-01-01

    Source positioning close to the tumour in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is not instantaneous. An increment of dose will be delivered during the movement of the source in the trajectory to its static position. This increment is the transit dose, often not taken into account in brachytherapeutic treatment planning. The transit dose depends on the prescribed dose, number of treatment fractions, velocity and activity of the source. Combining all these factors, the transit dose can be 5% higher than the prescribed absorbed dose value (Sang-Hyun and Muller-Runkel, 1994 Phys. Med. Biol. 39 1181-8, Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34). However, it cannot exceed this percentage (Nath et al 1995). In this work, we use the alanine-EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetric system using analysis of the first derivative of the signal. The transit dose was evaluated for an HDR system and is consistent with that already presented for TLD dosimeters (Bastin et al 1993 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 26 695-702). Also using the same dosimetric system, the radial dose function, used to evaluate the geometric dose degradation around the source, was determined and its behaviour agrees better with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations (Nath et al 1995, Williamson and Nath 1991 Med. Phys. 18 434-48, Ballester et al 1997 Med. Phys. 24 1221-8, Ballester et al 2001 Phys. Med. Biol. 46 N79-90) than with TLD measurements (Nath et al 1990 Med. Phys. 17 1032-40)

  2. Alanine/epr pellet dosimeter using poly(vinyl butyral-co-vinyl alcohol-co-vinyl acetate) copolymer as a binder for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beshir, W.B.; Ezz El-Din, H.M.; Abdel-fatth, A.A.; Ebraheem, S.

    2005-01-01

    A new alanine pellet dosimeter was developed for gamma and electron beam radiation dosimetry. Alanine powder was mixed with a new binding material, poly(vinyl butyral-co-vinyl alcohol-co-vinyl acetate) copolymer. Pellets were prepared by pressing fine powder alanine with 60% copolymer binder by using hydraulic press and a specially designed pressing die. The radiation-formed stable free radicals were analysed by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The useful dose range of these pellets was found to ranges from 1 to 80 kGy. The stability of the radiation- induced response was also studied

  3. Considerations regarding the implementation of EPR dosimetry for the population in the vicinity of Semipalatinsk nuclear test site based on experience from other radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skvortsov, Valeriy; Ivannikov, Alexander; Tikunov, Dimitri; Stepanenko, Valeriy; Borysheva, Natalie; Orlenko, Sergey; Nalapko, Mikhail; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2006-01-01

    General aspects of applying the method of retrospective dose estimation by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of human tooth enamel (EPR dosimetry) to the population residing in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site are analyzed and summarized. The analysis is based on the results obtained during 20 years of investigations conducted in the Medical Radiological Research Center regarding the development and practical application of this method for wide-scale dosimetrical investigation of populations exposed to radiation after the Chernobyl accident and other radiation accidents. (author)

  4. Characterization of lithium formate EPR dosimeters for high dose applications – comparison with alanine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldeland, Einar; Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Lithium formate and l-α-alanine (alanine) EPR dosimeters were irradiated to doses from 100 Gy to 100 kGy. The irradiations were mainly performed at a Gammacell irradiator with dose rate of approximately 5.5 kGy h−1. Both the peak-to-peak amplitude of the first derivative EPR spectrum and the area...... irradiated to 1 kGy at temperatures from 11ºC to 40ºC were analyzed. By fitting an ‘exponential rise to maximum'-function to the dependence of the area under the EPR absorption spectrum on the dose, saturation doses of 53 kGy and 87 kGy for lithium formate and alanine, respectively, were found. Lower...... estimates were found when analyzing the dose dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude. Furthermore, the peak-to-peak width was found to increase for doses above 10 kGy. No dose rate dependence for any of the studied materials was observed and the temperature coefficients at 25ºC (i.e. change in dosimeter...

  5. A system for remote dosimetry audit of 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT based on lithium formate dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolfsson, Emelie; Gustafsson, Håkan; Lund, Eva; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Olsson, Sara; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Summary: The aim of this work was to develop and test a remote end-to-end audit system using lithium formate EPR dosimeters. Four clinics were included in a pilot study, absorbed doses determined in the PTV agreed with TPS calculated doses within ±5% for 3D-CRT and ±7% (k = 1) for IMRT/VMAT dose plans

  6. EPR study of N+-ion-induced free radical formation in antibiotic-producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Liqing; Zhang Yinfen; Chen Ruyi; Gao Juncheng; Zhang Peiling; Ying Hengfeng.

    1995-01-01

    Under the room temperature, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer was used to study free radical formation in antibiotic-producers in order to investigate antibiotic-producer mutagenic breeding, which were induced by N + ion implanting into antibiotic-producers (e.g., Streptomyces ribosidificus, Streptomyces kanamyceticus and the phage-resistant culture of Streptomyces kanamyceticus). The results show that a lot of free radicals can be induced by N + ion implanting into antibiotic-producers, and the yields of the free radicals increase with implanting dose. The death rate of antibiotic-producers rises due to the increase of N + -ion-induced free radical yields. (author)

  7. Dosimetry in non-homogeneous media with alanine/EPR mini dosemeters and simulation with PENELOPE Monte Carlo code;Dosimetria em meios nao-homogeneos com minidosimetros de alanina/EPR e simulacao Monte Carlo com o codigo PENELOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega Ramirez, J.L.; Chen, F.; Nicolucci, P.; Baffa, O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2009-07-01

    The dosimetric system of L-alanine mini dosimeter and K-Band EPR spectrometer was tested for the dosimetry in non-homogeneous media through the determination of the Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curve for a small radiation field. The alanine mini dosimeters were produced by mechanical pressure of a mixture of L-alanine (95%) and PVA (5%) to nominal dimensions of 1 mm diameter and 3 mm length and 3 - 4 mg. For detecting the EPR signal of the mini dosimeters irradiated to 25 Gy, a K-Band (24 GHz) spectrometer was used. The dosimeters were irradiated in a {sup 60}Co radiotherapy unit using 80 cm source skin distance and field sizes of 2.5 x 2.5 cm{sup 2}. The inhomogeneous phantom consisted of acrylic and cork sheets of 30 x 30 x 1 cm{sup 3}; six cork sheets were sandwiched between five and nine acrylic sheets, which were placed at the top and bottom regions respectively. PDD curves with radiographic film and PENELOPE simulation were also determined. The PDD results for alanine mini dosimeters agreed better than 5.9% with film and PENELOPE. (author)

  8. BiodosEPR-2006 Meeting: Acute dosimetry consensus committee recommendations on biodosimetry applications in events involving uses of radiation by terrorists and radiation accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, George A. [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Preparedness and Emergency Operations, 200 Independence Avenue, SW, Room 403B-1, Washington, DC 20201 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Dept. of Radiology and Physiology Dept., Dartmouth Medical School, HB 7785, Vail 702, Rubin 601, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Amundson, Sally A. [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 W. 168th Street, VC11-215, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Blakely, William F. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)], E-mail: blakely@afrri.usuhs.mil; Buddemeier, Brooke [Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC 20528 (United States); Gallez, Bernard [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit and Lab. of Medicinal Chemistry and Radiopharmacy, Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Dainiak, Nicholas [Dept. of Medicine, Bridgeport Hospital, 267 Grant Street, Bridgeport, CT 06610 (United States); Goans, Ronald E. [MJW Corporation, 1422 Eagle Bend Drive, Clinton, TN 37716-4029 (United States); Hayes, Robert B. [Remote Sensing Lab., MS RSL-47, P.O. Box 98421, Las Vegas, NV 89193 (United States); Lowry, Patrick C. [Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), Oak Ridge Associated Universities, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 (United States); Noska, Michael A. [Food and Drug Administration, FDA/CDRH, 1350 Piccard Drive, HFZ-240, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Okunieff, Paul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology (Box 647), Univ. of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Salner, Andrew L. [Helen and Harry Gray Cancer Center, Hartford Hospital, 80 Seymour Street, Hartford, CT 06102 (United States); Schauer, David A. [National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 400, Bethesda, MD 20814-3095 (United States)] (and others)

    2007-07-15

    In the aftermath of a radiological terrorism incident or mass-casualty radiation accident, first responders and receivers require prior guidance and pre-positioned resources for assessment, triage and medical management of affected individuals [NCRP, 2005. Key elements of preparing emergency responders for nuclear and radiological terrorism. NCRP Commentary No. 19, Bethesda, Maryland, USA]. Several recent articles [Dainiak, N., Waselenko, J.K., Armitage, J.O., MacVittie, T.J., Farese, A.M., 2003. The hematologist and radiation casualties. Hematology (Am. Soc. Hematol. Educ. Program) 473-496; Waselenko, J.K., MacVittie, T.J., Blakely, W.F., Pesik, N., Wiley, A.L., Dickerson, W.E., Tsu, H., Confer, D.L., Coleman, C.N., Seed, T., Lowry, P., Armitage, J.O., Dainiak, N., Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group, 2004. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome: recommendations of the Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group. Ann. Intern. Med. 140(12), 1037-1051; Blakely, W.F., Salter, C.A., Prasanna, P.G., 2005. Early-response biological dosimetry-recommended countermeasure enhancements for mass-casualty radiological incidents and terrorism. Health Phys. 89(5), 494-504; Goans, R.E., Waselenko, J.K., 2005. Medical management of radiation casualties. Health Phys. 89(5), 505-512; Swartz, H.M., Iwasaki, A., Walczak, T., Demidenko, E., Salikhov, I., Lesniewski, P., Starewicz, P., Schauer, D., Romanyukha, A., 2005. Measurements of clinically significant doses of ionizing radiation using non-invasive in vivo EPR spectroscopy of teeth in situ. Appl. Radiat. Isot. 62, 293-299; . Acute radiation injury: contingency planning for triage, supportive care, and transplantation. Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant. 12(6), 672-682], national [. Management of persons accidentally contaminated with radionuclides. NCRP Report No. 65, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; . Management of terrorist events involving radioactive material. NCRP Report No. 138, Bethesda, Maryland

  9. BiodosEPR-2006 Meeting: Acute dosimetry consensus committee recommendations on biodosimetry applications in events involving uses of radiation by terrorists and radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, George A.; Swartz, Harold M.; Amundson, Sally A.; Blakely, William F.; Buddemeier, Brooke; Gallez, Bernard; Dainiak, Nicholas; Goans, Ronald E.; Hayes, Robert B.; Lowry, Patrick C.; Noska, Michael A.; Okunieff, Paul; Salner, Andrew L.; Schauer, David A.

    2007-01-01

    In the aftermath of a radiological terrorism incident or mass-casualty radiation accident, first responders and receivers require prior guidance and pre-positioned resources for assessment, triage and medical management of affected individuals [NCRP, 2005. Key elements of preparing emergency responders for nuclear and radiological terrorism. NCRP Commentary No. 19, Bethesda, Maryland, USA]. Several recent articles [Dainiak, N., Waselenko, J.K., Armitage, J.O., MacVittie, T.J., Farese, A.M., 2003. The hematologist and radiation casualties. Hematology (Am. Soc. Hematol. Educ. Program) 473-496; Waselenko, J.K., MacVittie, T.J., Blakely, W.F., Pesik, N., Wiley, A.L., Dickerson, W.E., Tsu, H., Confer, D.L., Coleman, C.N., Seed, T., Lowry, P., Armitage, J.O., Dainiak, N., Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group, 2004. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome: recommendations of the Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group. Ann. Intern. Med. 140(12), 1037-1051; Blakely, W.F., Salter, C.A., Prasanna, P.G., 2005. Early-response biological dosimetry-recommended countermeasure enhancements for mass-casualty radiological incidents and terrorism. Health Phys. 89(5), 494-504; Goans, R.E., Waselenko, J.K., 2005. Medical management of radiation casualties. Health Phys. 89(5), 505-512; Swartz, H.M., Iwasaki, A., Walczak, T., Demidenko, E., Salikhov, I., Lesniewski, P., Starewicz, P., Schauer, D., Romanyukha, A., 2005. Measurements of clinically significant doses of ionizing radiation using non-invasive in vivo EPR spectroscopy of teeth in situ. Appl. Radiat. Isot. 62, 293-299; . Acute radiation injury: contingency planning for triage, supportive care, and transplantation. Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant. 12(6), 672-682], national [. Management of persons accidentally contaminated with radionuclides. NCRP Report No. 65, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; . Management of terrorist events involving radioactive material. NCRP Report No. 138, Bethesda, Maryland

  10. Elimination of the background signal in tooth enamel samples for EPR-dosimetry by means of physical-chemical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivannikov, A.I.; Tikunov, D.D.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Khomichyonok, V.V.; Khamidova, L.G.; Skripnik, D.D.; Bozadjiev, L.L.; Hoshi, M.

    2001-01-01

    A method of elimination of the background EPR signal in tooth enamel is proposed. This method implies treatment of enamel powder by highly active reduction reagent hydrazine with subsequent washing out by ethanol-water solution. Such treatment results in reducing both the native background signal (which is assumed to be originated by the organic component) and the mechanical induced EPR signal in enamel. Testing of the efficiency of hydrazine treatment is made for different sizes of enamel powder. It is shown that the optimal results are obtained for a powder fraction of about 100-200 μm. The radiation-induced EPR signal in enamel is practically not changed after treatment by hydrazine

  11. Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of ionizing radiation dosimetry is the measurement of the physical and biological consequences of exposure to radiation. As these consequences are proportional to the local absorption of energy, the dosimetry of ionizing radiation is based on the measurement of this quantity. Owing to the size of the effects of ionizing radiation on materials in all of these area, dosimetry plays an essential role in the prevention and the control of radiation exposure. Its use is of great importance in two areas in particular where the employment of ionizing radiation relates to human health: radiation protection, and medical applications. Dosimetry is different for various reasons: owing to the diversity of the physical characteristics produced by different kinds of radiation according to their nature (X- and γ-photons, electrons, neutrons,...), their energy (from several keV to several MeV), the orders of magnitude of the doses being estimated (a factor of about 10 5 between diagnostic and therapeutic applications); and the temporal and spatial variation of the biological parameters entering into the calculations. On the practical level, dosimetry poses two distinct yet closely related problems: the determination of the absorbed dose received by a subject exposed to radiation from a source external to his body (external dosimetry); and the determination of the absorbed dose received by a subject owing to the presence within his body of some radioactive substance (internal dosimetry)

  12. In vivo EPR dosimetry of accidental exposures to radiation: experimental results indicating the feasibility of practical use in human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Minoru; Liu, K.J.; Walczak, T.M.; Swartz, H.M.

    2000-01-01

    Low frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) provides the potential advantage of making accurate and sensitive measurements of absorbed radiation dose in teeth in situ, i.e. without removing the teeth from the potential victim. The potential limiting factors for making such measurements are: (1) whether low frequency EPR is sufficiently sensitive to detect radiation-induced signal in human teeth; (2) whether sufficient sensitivity can be maintained under in vivo conditions. In this manuscript, we summarize results indicating that this approach is feasible. Using 1.2 GHz EPR spectroscopy, we found that the lower limit for these measurements in isolated human teeth is 0.2 Gy or lower. Measurements of radiation-induced EPR signals in the teeth of living rats were achieved with sufficient sensitivity to indicate that, when taking into consideration the larger mass of human teeth, similar measurements in human teeth in situ would provide sensitivity in the dose range for potential accidental exposures. We estimate that the current lower limit for detecting radiation doses in human teeth in situ (in vivo) is 0.5-1.0 Gy; this would be sufficient for determining if a person has been exposed to potentially life threatening doses of ionizing radiation. The limiting factor for sensitivity appears to be background signals rather than signal/noise, and there are feasible means to overcome this problem and further increase sensitivity. The additional instrumental developments required to make an effective in vivo EPR dosimetric spectrometer for the measurements in teeth in human subjects in situ, seem quite achievable

  13. Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, D.A.O. de

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental units of dosimetry are defined, such as exposure rate, absorbed dose and equivalent dose. A table is given of relative biological effectiveness values for the different types of radiation. The relation between the roentgen and rad units is calculated and the concepts of physical half-life, biological half-life and effective half-life are discussed. Referring to internal dosimetry, a mathematical treatment is given to β particle-and γ radiation dosimetry. The absorbed dose is calculated and a practical example is given of the calculation of the exposure and of the dose rate for a gama source [pt

  14. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) biodosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrosiers, Marc; Schauer, David A.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation-induced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals were first reported by Gordy et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 41 (1955) 983]. The application of EPR spectroscopy to ionizing radiation dosimetry was later proposed by Brady et al. [Health Phys. 15 (1968) 43]. Since that time EPR dosimetry has been applied to accident and epidemiologic dose reconstruction, radiation therapy, food irradiation, quality assurance programs and archaeological dating. Materials that have been studied include bone, tooth enamel, alanine and quartz. This review paper presents the fundamentals and applications of EPR biodosimetry. Detailed information regarding sample collection and preparation, EPR measurements, dose reconstruction, and data analysis and interpretation will be reviewed for tooth enamel. Examples of EPR biodosimetry application in accidental overexposures, radiopharmaceutical dose assessment and retrospective epidemiologic studies will also be presented

  15. EPR dosimetry of cortical bone and tooth enamel irradiated with X and gamma rays: Study of energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, D.A.; Links, J.M.; Desrosiers, M.F.; Le, F.G.; Seltzer, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Previous investigators have reported that the radiation-induced EPR signal intensity in compact or cortical bone increases up to a factor of two with decreasing photon energy for a given absorbed dose. If the EPR signal intensity was dependent on energy, it could limit the application of EPR spectrometry and the additive reirradiation method to obtain dose estimates. We have recently shown that errors in the assumptions governing conversion of measured exposure to absorbed dose can lead to similar open-quotes apparentclose quotes energy-dependence results. We hypothesized that these previous results were due to errors in the estimated dose in bone, rather than the effects of energy dependence per se. To test this hypothesis we studied human adult cortical bone from male and female donors ranging in age from 23 to 95 years, and bovine tooth enamel, using 34 and 138 keV average energy X-ray beams and 137 Cs (662 keV) and 60 Co (1250 keV) γ rays. In a femur from a 47-year-old male (subject 1), there was a difference of borderline significance at the α = 0.05 level in the mean radiation-induced hydroxyapatite signal intensities as a function of photon energy. No other statistically significant differences in EPR signal intensity as a function of photon energy were observed in this subject, or in the tibia from a 23-year-old male (subject 2) and the femur from a 75-year-old female (subject 3). However, there was a trend toward a decrease (12-15%) in signal intensity at the lowest energy compared with the highest energy in subjects 1 and 3. Further analysis of the data from subject 1 revealed that this trend, which is in the opposite direction of previous reports but is consistent with theory, is statistically significant. There were no efforts of energy dependence in the tooth samples. 16 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  16. IN-VIVO RADIATION DOSIMETRY USING PORTABLE L BAND EPR: ON-SITE MEASUREMENT OF VOLUNTEERS IN FUKUSHIMA PREFECTURE, JAPAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Minoru; Nakai, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Hirata, Hiroshi; Kunugita, Naoki; Williams, Benjamin B.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to make direct measurements of the possible radiation-induced EPR signals in the teeth of volunteers who were residents in Fukushima within 80 km distance from the Fukushima Nuclear Power plant at the time of the disaster, and continued to live there for at least 3 month after the disaster. Thirty four volunteers were enrolled in this study. These measurements were made using a portable L-band EPR spectrometer, which was originally developed in the EPR Center at Dartmouth. All measurements were performed using surface loop resonators that have been specifically designed for the upper incisor teeth. Potentially these signals include not only radiation-induced signals induced by the incident but also background signals including those from prior radiation exposure from the environment and medical exposure. We demonstrated that it is feasible to transport the dosimeter to the measurement site and make valid measurements. The intensity of the signals that were obtained was not significantly above those seen in volunteers who had not had potential radiation exposures at Fukushima. PMID:27522046

  17. In-vivo radiation dosimetry using portable L band EPR: on-site measurement of volunteers in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Minoru; Nakai, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Kunugita, Naoki; Hirata, Hiroshi; Williams, Benjamin B.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to make direct measurements of the possible radiation-induced EPR signals in the teeth of volunteers who were residents in Fukushima within 80 km distance from the Fukushima Nuclear Power plant at the time of the disaster, and continued to live there for at least 3 month after the disaster. Thirty four volunteers were enrolled in this study. These measurements were made using a portable L-band EPR spectrometer, which was originally developed in the EPR Center at Dartmouth. All measurements were performed using surface loop resonators that have been specifically designed for the upper incisor teeth. Potentially these signals include not only radiation-induced signals induced by the incident but also background signals including those from prior radiation exposure from the environment and medical exposure. We demonstrated that it is feasible to transport the dosimeter to the measurement site and make valid measurements. The intensity of the signals that were obtained was not significantly above those seen in volunteers who had not had potential radiation exposures at Fukushima. (authors)

  18. EPR study of complex formation between copper (II) ions and sympathomimetic amines in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preoteasa, E.A. [Inst. of Atomic Physics, IFIN, Bucharest (Romania); Duliu, O.G.; Grecu, V.V. [Bucharest, Univ. (Romania). Dept. of Atomic and Nuclear Physics

    1997-07-01

    The complex formation between sympathomimetic amines (SA): adrenaline (AD), noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), ephedrine (ED) and p-tyramine (pTA), and Cu(II) ion in aqueous solution has been studied by X-band EPR at room temperature. Excepting pTA, all investigated SA yielded two types of complexes in different pH domains. All complexes consistent with a ligand fields having a distorted octahedral symmetry, i.e., hexacoordination of Cu(II). The covalence coefficient calculated from the isotropic g and A values has shown strong ionic sigma-type ligand bonds. A structural model with the Cu(II) ion bound by four catecholic O(hydroxy) atoms for the low pH complexes of AD, NA and DA is proposed. For the high pH complexes of the former compounds as well as for both Ed complexes, the authors suppose Cu(II) bound by two N (amino) and two O (hydroxy) atoms. The spectra are consistent to water binding on the longitudinal octahedron axis in all compounds excepting the high pH complex of Ed, where OH2- ions are bound. Possible implications for the SA-cell receptors interactions are discussed.

  19. Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, G S; Ritchie, R H; Sanders, F W; Reinhardt, P W; Auxier, J A; Wagner, E B; Callihan, A D; Morgan, K Z [Health Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1962-03-15

    The methods of dosimetry used for investigation of the doses received by the individuals exposed in the Yugoslav accident were essentially those used in connection with the Oak Ridge Y-12 accident. An outline of the general scheme is as follows: When fast neutrons enter the human body, most of these are moderated to thermal energy and a small fraction of these are captured by a (n, gamma) process in Na sup 2 sup 3 , giving rise to Na sup 2 sup 4 , which by virtue of its emission of high-energy gamma rays with a half life of 14.8 h, is easily detected. It has been shown that the probability of capture, making Na sup 2 sup 4 , is not a strong function of the energy of the fast neutrons and that the probability of capture for neutrons is higher in the fast region than in the thermal region. Thus, the uniform distribution of Na sup 2 sup 3 in the human body provides an excellent means of normalizing the neutron exposure of an individual. in particular, for a given neutron energy spectrum the fast neutron dose is proportional to the ratio Na sup 2 sup 4 /Na sup 2 sup 3 in the body or in the blood system. This method of normalization is quite important in the dosimetry of radiation accidents since no assumptions need be made about the exact location of an individual at the time of the energy release. The importance of this fact can be made clear by reference to the Y-12 accident where it was shown by calculation of the neutron dose based on the known number of fissions and the stated location of the individual that one of the surviving individuals would have received a dose several times the lethal value. To accomplish the measurements described, the zero power R sub B reactor was operated in two ranges of power level, 'low' power and 'high 'power. Neutron leakage spectrum was obtained by multigroup approximation of the Boltzmann transport equation. Prompt gamma rays from fission products, from capture in the moderator and fuel cladding as well as in tank walls are given

  20. Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, G S; Ritchie, R H; Sanders, F W; Reinhardt, P W; Auxier, J A; Wagner, E B; Callihan, A D; Morgan, K Z [Health Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1962-03-01

    The methods of dosimetry used for investigation of the doses received by the individuals exposed in the Yugoslav accident were essentially those used in connection with the Oak Ridge Y-12 accident. An outline of the general scheme is as follows: When fast neutrons enter the human body, most of these are moderated to thermal energy and a small fraction of these are captured by a (n, {gamma}) process in Na{sup 23}, giving rise to Na{sup 24}, which by virtue of its emission of high-energy gamma rays with a half life of 14.8 h, is easily detected. It has been shown that the probability of capture, making Na{sup 24}, is not a strong function of the energy of the fast neutrons and that the probability of capture for neutrons is higher in the fast region than in the thermal region. Thus, the uniform distribution of Na{sup 23} in the human body provides an excellent means of normalizing the neutron exposure of an individual. in particular, for a given neutron energy spectrum the fast neutron dose is proportional to the ratio Na{sup 24}/Na{sup 23} in the body or in the blood system. This method of normalization is quite important in the dosimetry of radiation accidents since no assumptions need be made about the exact location of an individual at the time of the energy release. The importance of this fact can be made clear by reference to the Y-12 accident where it was shown by calculation of the neutron dose based on the known number of fissions and the stated location of the individual that one of the surviving individuals would have received a dose several times the lethal value. To accomplish the measurements described, the zero power R{sub B} reactor was operated in two ranges of power level, 'low' power and 'high 'power. Neutron leakage spectrum was obtained by multigroup approximation of the Boltzman transport equation. Prompt gamma rays from fission products, from capture in the moderator and fuel cladding as well as in tank walls are given. A summary of the 4{pi

  1. Field dosimetry on sterilization area of medical-hospitable materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariano, C.S.T.P.; Campos, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    The calcium sulfate doped with dysprosium, used in high dose dosimetry by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), is studied on field dosimetry for medical-hospitable materials sterilization. The calibration curves of EPR signal in function of absorbed dose in air and the thermal decay of EPR signal at room temperature are also presented. (C.G.C)

  2. Applications of EPR in radiation research

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Applications of EPR in Radiation Research is a multi-author contributed volume presented in eight themes: I. Elementary radiation processes (in situ and low temperature radiolysis, quantum solids); II: Solid state radiation chemistry (crystalline, amorphous and heterogeneous systems); III: Biochemistry, biophysics and biology applications (radicals in biomaterials, spin trapping, free-radical-induced DNA damage); IV: Materials science (polymeric and electronic materials, materials for treatment of nuclear waste, irradiated food); V: Radiation metrology (EPR-dosimetry, retrospective and medical

  3. Identification of mitochondrial electron transport chain-mediated NADH radical formation by EPR spin-trapping techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi; Kotake, Yashige; Humphries, Kenneth M

    2011-12-20

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) is a major source of free radical production. However, due to the highly reactive nature of radical species and their short lifetimes, accurate detection and identification of these molecules in biological systems is challenging. The aim of this investigation was to determine the free radical species produced from the mitochondrial ETC by utilizing EPR spin-trapping techniques and the recently commercialized spin-trap, 5-(2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propoxycyclophosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (CYPMPO). We demonstrate that this spin-trap has the preferential quality of having minimal mitochondrial toxicity at concentrations required for radical detection. In rat heart mitochondria and submitochondrial particles supplied with NADH, the major species detected under physiological pH was a carbon-centered radical adduct, indicated by markedly large hyperfine coupling constant with hydrogen (a(H) > 2.0 mT). In the presence of the ETC inhibitors, the carbon-centered radical formation was increased and exhibited NADH concentration dependency. The same carbon-centered radical could also be produced with the NAD biosynthesis precursor, nicotinamide mononucleotide, in the presence of a catalytic amount of NADH. The results support the conclusion that the observed species is a complex I derived NADH radical. The formation of the NADH radical could be blocked by hydroxyl radical scavengers but not SOD. In vitro experiments confirmed that an NADH-radical is readily formed by hydroxyl radical but not superoxide anion, further implicating hydroxyl radical as an upstream mediator of NADH radical production. These findings demonstrate the identification of a novel mitochondrial radical species with potential physiological significance and highlight the diverse mechanisms and sites of production within the ETC.

  4. The EPR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacoste, A.C.; Dupuy, Ph.; Gupta, O.; Perez, J.R.; Emond, D.; Cererino, G.; Rousseau, J.M.; Jeffroy, F.; Evrard, J.M.; Seiler, J.M.; Azarian, G.; Chaumont, B.; Dubail, A.; Fischer, M.; Tiippana, P.; Hyvarinen, J.; Zaleski, C.P.; Meritet, S.; Iglesias, F.; Vincent, C.; Massart, S.; Graillat, G.; Esteve, B.; Mansillon, Y.; Gatinol, C.; Carre, F.

    2005-01-01

    This document reviews economical and environmental aspects of the EPR project. The following topics are discussed: role and point of view of the French Nuclear Safety Authority on EPR, control of design and manufacturing of EPR by the French Nuclear Safety Authority, assessment by IRSN of EPR safety, research and development in support of EPR, STUK safety review of EPR design, standpoint on EPR, the place of EPR in the French energy policy, the place of EPR in EDF strategy, EPR spearhead of nuclear rebirth, the public debate, the local stakes concerning the building of EPR in France at Flamanville (Manche) and the research on fourth generation reactors. (A.L.B.)

  5. Alanine-EPR dosimetry for measurements of ionizing radiation absorbed doses in the range 0.5-10 kGy

    CERN Document Server

    Peimel-Stuglik, Z

    2001-01-01

    The usefulness of two, easy accessible alanine dosimeters (ALANPOL from IChTJ and foil dosimeter from Gamma Service, Radeberg, Germany) to radiation dose measurement in the range of 0.5-10 kGy, were investigated. In both cases, the result of the test was positive. The foil dosemeter from Gamma Service is recommended for dose distribution measurements in fantoms or products, ALANPOL - for routine measurements. The EPR-alanine method based on the described dosimeters can be successfully used, among others, in the technology of radiation protection of food.

  6. Gamma-Irradiated seafoods: identification and dosimetry by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrosiers, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure the production of free radicals induced by 60Co γ-rays in shrimp exoskeleton, mussel shells, and fish bones. The EPR spectrum for irradiated shrimp shell was dose dependent and appeared to be derived from more than one radical. The major component of the radiation-induced spectrum resulted from radical formation in chitin, assigned by comparison with irradiated N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Other measurements include the total yield of radicals formed as a function of dose and the longevity of the radiation-induced EPR signal. Similar measurements were made for mussel shells and fish bones, and the results are compared and discussed. It was concluded that irradiated shrimp (with shell attached) could definitely be identified by this technique; however, precise determination of absorbed dose was less straightforward. Positive identification of irradiated fish bones was also clearly distinguishable, and dosimetry by EPR appeared to be feasible. (author)

  7. Study of EPR/ESR Dosimetry in Fingernails as a Method for Assessing Dose of Victims of Radiological Accidents/Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-17

    Dosimetry for Population in the Vicinity of the Most Contaminating Radioactive Fallout Trace After the First Nuclear Test in the Semipalatinsk Test Site ...collection, preparation, and measurements at an accident site can be met with techniques illustrated in this study. v “STUDY OF ELECTRON...the value of Bo at the predicted resonance site . At this site , the direction of magnetic moment of unpaired electrons and their spin state change

  8. Direct detection of second harmonic and its use in alanine/EPR dosimetry; Deteccao direta do segundo harmonico e seu uso na dosimetria alanina/RPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, F.; Guzman, C.S.; Graeff, C.F.O.; Baffa, O. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica]. E-mail: chen@dfm.ffclrp.usp.br

    2001-07-01

    In this work, the possible use of the second harmonic EPR signal from irradiated alanine for low radiation dose ({approx}1 Gy) was explored, aiming applications to HDR brachytherapy and teletherapy. The second harmonic signal was directly detected after overmodulation. A batch of DL-alanine/paraffin small cylindrical pellets was made. A VARIAN E-4 X-Band EPR spectrometer with optimized operation parameters like microwave power and modulation amplitude to obtain a signal with the highest amplitude was used. The modulation frequency and modulation amplitude were 100 kHz and 1.25 mT (to overmodulate the signal) respectively. The second harmonic signal was directly detected at twice the modulation frequency. One group of dosimeters was irradiated with a {sup 192} Ir brachytherapy source and the other in a 10 MeV X-rays linear accelerator, both group at a dose range: 0.5 - 15 Gy. The second harmonic signal showed better resolution than the first harmonic one making possible a more easy localization of the signal. Moreover, for both types of radiation, the dose-response curve showed a good linear behavior for the dose range indicated. (author)

  9. Results of EPR dosimetry for population in the vicinity of the most contaminating radioactive fallout trace after the first nuclear test in the Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivannikov, Alexander; Zhumadilov, Kassym; Tieliewuhan, Eldana

    2006-01-01

    The method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for tooth enamel is applied to individual radiation dose determination to residents of two villages (Dolon and Mostik) in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan. These villages are located near the central axis of the radioactive fallout trace of the most contaminating surface nuclear test conducted in 1949. It is found that excess doses obtained by subtraction of natural background dose from dose absorbed in enamel range up to 440 mGy to residents of Dolon, whose enamel was formed before 1949, and do not exceed 120 mGy to younger residents. To residents of Mostik, excess doses do not exceed 100 mGy regardless of age except for one resident with an extremely high dose of 1.25 Gy. These results are in agreement with the pattern of radioactive contamination of the territory after the nuclear test of 1949 except one case of extremely high dose, which should be additionally investigated. (author)

  10. The effect of thermal treatment on radiation-induced EPR signals in tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorona, I.P.; Ishchenko, S.S.; Baran, N.P.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of thermal treatment on the radiation-induced EPR spectrum of tooth enamel was studied. Annealing before sample irradiation was found to increase enamel radiation sensitivity by more than 40%. Depending on the annealing conditions the EPR signals of three supplementary radiation radicals were observed in addition to the main signal caused by CO 2 - radicals. It was found that the presence of these signals in the enamel EPR spectra provides evidence of sample annealing. The possibility of obtaining information about sample history by studying the additional EPR signals is discussed. It can be important to EPR dating and EPR dosimetry

  11. Dosimetry of ionizing radiations by Electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, some historical and theoretical aspects about the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), its characteristics, the resonance detection, the paramagnetic species, the radiation effects on inorganic and organic materials, the diagrams of the instrumentation for the EPR detection, the performance of an EPR spectrometer, the coherence among EPR and dosimetry and, practical applications as well as in the food science there are presented. (Author)

  12. Clinical EPR: Unique Opportunities and Some Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Harold M.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Zaki, Bassem I.; Hartford, Alan C.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Chen, Eunice; Comi, Richard J.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Swarts, Steven G.; Flood, Ann B.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been well established as a viable technique for measurement of free radicals and oxygen in biological systems, from in vitro cellular systems to in vivo small animal models of disease. However, the use of EPR in human subjects in the clinical setting, although attractive for a variety of important applications such as oxygen measurement, is challenged with several factors including the need for instrumentation customized for human subjects, probe and regulatory constraints. This paper describes the rationale and development of the first clinical EPR systems for two important clinical applications, namely, measurement of tissue oxygen (oximetry), and radiation dose (dosimetry) in humans. The clinical spectrometers operate at 1.2 GHz frequency and use surface loop resonators capable of providing topical measurements up to 1 cm depth in tissues. Tissue pO2 measurements can be carried out noninvasively and repeatedly after placement of an oxygen-sensitive paramagnetic material (currently India ink) at the site of interest. Our EPR dosimetry system is capable of measuring radiation-induced free radicals in the tooth of irradiated human subjects to determine the exposure dose. These developments offer potential opportunities for clinical dosimetry and oximetry, which include guiding therapy for individual patients with tumors or vascular disease, by monitoring of tissue oxygenation. Further work is in progress to translate this unique technology to routine clinical practice. PMID:24439333

  13. TL and EPR dating: some applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The intensity of thermoluminescence light emitted by a crystal is a function of radiation dose. The number of defects or of radicals in a crystal or organic substances is also a function of radiation dose. Since such defects or radicals present EPR signals, the EPR intensity is also a function of radiation dose. These facts are basis for radiation dosimetry and can be applied in dating of archaeological potteries or other materials, as well as in dating geological substances such as sediments, caves speleothemes, animal teeth and bones. Recent investigation on sensitized quartz based dosimeters and dating calcite covering ancient wall painting to find early settlers in Brazil will be presented. (Author)

  14. International intercomparison of dose measurements using EPR spectrometry of tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Chumak, V.; Pasalskaya, L.; Pavlenko, J.; Sholom, S.; Bailiff, I.; Baran, N.; Bougai, A.; Kolesnik, S.; Maksimenko, V.; Brik, A.; Matyash, M.; Scherbina, O.; Dubovsky, S.; Kirillov, V.; Minenko, V.; Finin, V.; Haskell, E.; Hayes, R.; Kenner, G.; Ivannikov, A.; Skvortsov, V.; Stepanenko, V.; Liidja, G.; Lippmaa, E.; Past, J.; Puskar, J.; Meijer, A.; Radchuk, V.; Vaher, Ue.

    1996-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry with teeth is the only solid state dosimetry method that allows for direct measurement of the individual dose. It is considered to be a very promising tool for retrospective individual dosimetry after accidental radioactive releases. It will help to make a reliable assessment of the radiation risk. A number of laboratories are engaged in retrospective EPR dosimetry with teeth. There is consequently a need to develop a programme of intercalibration and intercomparison to check whether the results produced by different laboratories are either consistent or accurate. The Commission of the European Communities has initiated the project ECP10 entitled, Retrospective Dosimetry and Dose reconstruction. Within the joint Eu/CIS project the 1st International Intercomparison of EPR Dosimetry with Teeth' was started in 1994. Nine research laboratories were involved from Germany, Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Estonia and USA

  15. EPR and Bell Locality

    OpenAIRE

    Norsen, Travis

    2004-01-01

    A new formulation of the EPR argument is presented, one which uses John Bell's mathematically precise local causality condition in place of the looser locality assumption which was used in the original EPR paper and on which Niels Bohr seems to have based his objection to the EPR argument. The new formulation of EPR bears a striking resemblance to Bell's derivation of his famous inequalities. The relation between these two arguments -- in particular, the role of EPR as part one of Bell's two-...

  16. Dosimetry; La dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Couteulx, I.; Apretna, D.; Beaugerie, M.F. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    Eight articles treat the dosimetry. Two articles evaluate the radiation doses in specific cases, dosimetry of patients in radiodiagnosis, three articles are devoted to detectors (neutrons and x and gamma radiations) and a computer code to build up the dosimetry of an accident due to an external exposure. (N.C.)

  17. Thermal induced EPR signals in tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattibene, P.; Aragno, D.; Onori, S.; Pressello, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to detect the effects of temperature on powdered human tooth enamel, not irradiated in the laboratory. Samples were heated at temperature between 350 and 450, at 600 and at 1000 deg. C, for different heating times, between 6 min and 39 h. Changes in the EPR spectra were detected, with the formation of new signals. Possible correlation between the changes in EPR spectra and modifications in the enamel and in the mineral phase of bone detected with other techniques is discussed. The implications for dosimetric applications of signals induced by overheating due to mechanical friction during sample preparation are underlined

  18. In Quest of the Alanine R3 Radical: Multivariate EPR Spectral Analyses of X-Irradiated Alanine in the Solid State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jåstad, Eirik O; Torheim, Turid; Villeneuve, Kathleen M; Kvaal, Knut; Hole, Eli O; Sagstuen, Einar; Malinen, Eirik; Futsaether, Cecilia M

    2017-09-28

    The amino acid l-α-alanine is the most commonly used material for solid-state electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry, due to the formation of highly stable radicals upon irradiation, with yields proportional to the radiation dose. Two major alanine radical components designated R1 and R2 have previously been uniquely characterized from EPR and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) studies as well as from quantum chemical calculations. There is also convincing experimental evidence of a third minor radical component R3, and a tentative radical structure has been suggested, even though no well-defined spectral signature has been observed experimentally. In the present study, temperature dependent EPR spectra of X-ray irradiated polycrystalline alanine were analyzed using five multivariate methods in further attempts to understand the composite nature of the alanine dosimeter EPR spectrum. Principal component analysis (PCA), maximum likelihood common factor analysis (MLCFA), independent component analysis (ICA), self-modeling mixture analysis (SMA), and multivariate curve resolution (MCR) were used to extract pure radical spectra and their fractional contributions from the experimental EPR spectra. All methods yielded spectral estimates resembling the established R1 spectrum. Furthermore, SMA and MCR consistently predicted both the established R2 spectrum and the shape of the R3 spectrum. The predicted shape of the R3 spectrum corresponded well with the proposed tentative spectrum derived from spectrum simulations. Thus, results from two independent multivariate data analysis techniques strongly support the previous evidence that three radicals are indeed present in irradiated alanine samples.

  19. A fast method for ionized food identification: EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffi, J.; Rubel, G.

    1990-01-01

    Electronic paramagnetic resonance allows the detection of ionized food only after dry storage, avoiding reaction of radicals with water. Dry and solid parts are used for analysis (bones for meat and fish, kernels for fruits). Dosimetry is possible by EPR spectrometry of alanine-L fixed on products treated in industrial irradiators [fr

  20. Dosimetry of ionizing radiations by Electron paramagnetic resonance; Dosimetria de radiaciones ionizantes por resonancia paramagnetica electronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin N, J [UAM-I, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this work, some historical and theoretical aspects about the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), its characteristics, the resonance detection, the paramagnetic species, the radiation effects on inorganic and organic materials, the diagrams of the instrumentation for the EPR detection, the performance of an EPR spectrometer, the coherence among EPR and dosimetry and, practical applications as well as in the food science there are presented. (Author)

  1. EPR Spectroscopy in Environmental Lichen-Indication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, P. V.; Nguyet, Le Thi Bich; Zhuravleva, S. E.; Trukhan, E. M.

    2017-09-01

    The paramagnetic properties of lichens were investigated using EPR spectroscopy and Xanthoria parietina (L.) Th. Fr. as a case study. It was found that the concentration of paramagnetic centers in lichen thalli increased as the air-pollution level increased. Possible formation mechanisms of the paramagnetic centers in lichens were discussed. The efficiency of using EPR spectroscopy to study lichens as environmental quality indicators was demonstrated.

  2. Chemical light emission and formation of C=O radicals accompanying thermal deterioration of irradiated pure EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masayuki

    1991-01-01

    The Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan proposed the method of successively applying radiation and heat as the environmental test method for the electric wires and cables for nuclear power stations. In this study, the method of applying radiation first and heat next was examined. In the case of trying to give by the successive application the deterioration equivalent to that by the simultaneous application of radiation and heat, it becomes an important problem whether the activation energy of thermal deterioration changes due to irradiation or not. In this study, the samples were irradiated and subsequently exposed to heat, and the chemical light emission arose at that time which reflects the oxidizing reaction was measured. Besides, the concentration of C=O radicals which were accumulated as the result of the oxidizing reaction was measured, and the temperature dependence of the constant of the concentration increase rate was examined. The experiment on chemical light emission and on the formation of C=O radicals and the results are reported. It was clarified that the concentraiton of C=O radicals formed by irradiation and heat treatment thereafter can be represented as the functions of dose and heat treatment temperature. (K.I.)

  3. Medical application of EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhoff, Uwe; Hoefer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Selected applications of continuous-wave EPR in medicine are reviewed. This includes detection of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, pH measurements and oxymetry. Applications of EPR imaging are demonstrated on selected examples and future developments to faster imaging methods are discussed

  4. Dosimetry for electron beam sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.

    2007-01-01

    According to ISO 11137-1 (sect 4.3.4) dosimetry used in the development, validation and routine control of the sterilization process shall have measurement traceability to national or international standards and shall have a known level of uncertainty. It can only be obtained through calibration of the dosimeters. In presented lecture different types of dosimeter systems for electron beams (calorimeters, radiochromic film dosimeters, alanine / EPR) and their calibration are described

  5. Development of a new dosimeter of EPR based on lactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz C, L.; Torijano C, E.; Azorin N, J.; Aguirre G, F.; Cruz Z, E.

    2014-08-01

    50 years have passed since was proposed using the amino acid alanine as dosimeter advantage the phenomenon of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR); this dosimetric method has reached a highly competitive level regarding others dosimetry classic methods, for example the thermoluminescence or the use of Fricke dosimeters, to measure high dose of radiation. In this type of materials, the free radicals induced by the radiation are stable and their concentration is proportional to the absorbed dose may be determined by the amplitude pick to pick of the first derived of the EPR absorption spectrum. The obtained results studying the EPR response of lactose tablets elaborated in the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa are presented. The tablets were irradiated with gamma radiation of 60 Co in the irradiator Gamma beam 651-Pt of the Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico to a dose rate of 8 kGy-h -1 and their EPR response in a EPR spectrometer e-scan Bruker. The obtained response in function of the dose was lineal in the interval of 1 at 10 kGy. The lactose sensibility was compared with the l-alanine, used as reference, and the result was consistently 0.25 of this. Due to the linearity shown in the interval of used dose and their low production cost, we conclude that the lactose is a promissory option for the dosimetry of high dose of radiation. (author)

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry using synthetic hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kwon; Kim, Hwi Young; Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hirata, Hiroshi [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Park, Jong Min [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The victims exposed doses under 3.5-4.0 Gy have chance to survive if treated urgently. To determine the priority of treatment among a large number of victims, the triage – distinguishing patients who need an urgent treatment from who may not be urgent – is necessary based on radiation biodosimetry. A current gold standard for radiation biodosimetry is the chromosomal assay using human lymphocytes. But this method requires too much time and skilled labors to cover the mass victims in radiation emergencies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been known for its capability of quantifying radicals in matters. EPR dosimetry is based on the measurement of stable radiation-induced radicals in tooth enamel. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) contained in tooth enamel is a major probe for radiation dose reconstruction. This HAP dosimetry study was performed using a novel EPR spectrometer in Hokkaido University, Japan. The EPR dose-response curve was made using HAP samples. The blind test using 250 cGy samples showed the feasibility of EPR dosimetry for the triage purpose.

  7. One-way EPR steering and genuine multipartite EPR steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiongyi; Reid, Margaret D.

    2012-11-01

    We propose criteria and experimental strategies to realise the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering nonlocality. One-way steering can be obtained where there is asymmetry of thermal noise on each system. We also present EPR steering inequalities that act as signatures and suggest how to optimise EPR correlations in specific schemes so that the genuine multipartite EPR steering nonlocality (EPR paradox) can also possibly be realised. The results presented here also apply to the spatially separated macroscopic atomic ensembles.

  8. EPR: Evidence and fallacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Joseph W; Bae, You Han

    2014-09-28

    The enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) of nanoparticles in tumors has long stood as one of the fundamental principles of cancer drug delivery, holding the promise of safe, simple and effective therapy. By allowing particles preferential access to tumors by virtue of size and longevity in circulation, EPR provided a neat rationale for the trend toward nano-sized drug carriers. Following the discovery of the phenomenon by Maeda in the mid-1980s, this rationale appeared to be well justified by the flood of evidence from preclinical studies and by the clinical success of Doxil. Clinical outcomes from nano-sized drug delivery systems, however, have indicated that EPR is not as reliable as previously thought. Drug carriers generally fail to provide superior efficacy to free drug systems when tested in clinical trials. A closer look reveals that EPR-dependent drug delivery is complicated by high tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), irregular vascular distribution, and poor blood flow inside tumors. Furthermore, the animal tumor models used to study EPR differ from clinical tumors in several key aspects that seem to make EPR more pronounced than in human patients. On the basis of this evidence, we believe that EPR should only be invoked on a case-by-case basis, when clinical evidence suggests the tumor type is susceptible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Verification of dosimetry planning in brachytherapy in format Dicom and EUD calculation of Risk in bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Hernandez, M. J.; Sendon del Rio, J. R.; Ayala Lazaro, R.; Jimenez Rojas, M. R.; Gomez Cores, S.; Polo Cezon, R.; Lopez Bote, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    This work Describes a program that automates the verification of the schedules in brachytherapy (configuration and dosimetric treatment parameters) for sources of Ir-192 (mHDR v2) and Co-60 (Co0.A86) from the plan exported in DICOM format data. (Author)

  10. The EPR paradox revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, C.D.; Scully, M.O.

    1978-01-01

    Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) argued in 1935 that quantum mechanics fails to give an adequate description of physical reality, and also cannot give a consistent wave-function description of certain phenomena. The authors show that a calculation based upon the reduced density matrix removes the formal inconsistency pointed out by EPR. The spirit of the present paper is that of a pedagogical review. (Auth.)

  11. EPR paradox revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, C.D.; Scully, M.O.

    1978-07-01

    Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) argued in 1935 that quantum mechanics fails to give an adequate description of physical reality, and also cannot give a consistent wave-function description of certain phenomena. It is shown that a calculation based upon the reduced density matrix removes the formal inconsistency pointed out by EPR. The spirit of the present paper is that of a pedagogical review.

  12. Comparative study of some new EPR dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzimami, K.S.; Maghraby, Ahmed M.; Bradley, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations have been made of four new radiation dosimetry EPR candidates from the same family of materials: sulfamic acid, sulfanillic acid, homotaurine, and taurine. Mass energy attenuation coefficients, mass stopping power values and the time dependence of the radiation induced radicals are compared. Also investigated are the microwave saturation behavior and the effect of applied modulation amplitude on both peak-to-peak line width (W PP ) and peak-to-peak signal height (H PP ). The dosimeters are characterized by simple spectra and stable radiation-induced radicals over reasonable durations, especially in taurine dosimeters. Sulfamic acid dosimeters possessed the highest sensitivity followed by taurine and homotaurine and sulfanillic. - Highlights: ► Several EPR dosimeters were suggested based on SO 3 − radical. ► Taurine, homotaurine, sulfanilic, and sulfamic acid all possess simple EPR spectra. ► Dosimeters were compared to each other in terms of the dosimetric point of view. ► Energy dependence curves of the selected dosimeters were compared to eachother

  13. SO4--SO3- radical pair formation in Ce doped and Ce, U co-doped K3Na(SO4)2: EPR evidence and its role in TSL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, V.; Seshagiri, T.K.; Kadam, R.M.; Sastry, M.D.

    2002-01-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies were carried out on cerium doped and cerium-uranium co-doped K 3 Na(SO 4 ) 2 samples after γ-irradiation. Three glow peaks around 352, 415 and 475 K were observed and their spectral characteristics have shown that Ce 3+ and UO 2 2+ act as the emission centres in K 3 Na(SO 4 ) 2 :Ce and K 3 Na(SO 4 ) 2 :Ce, U, respectively. In Ce-U co-doped sample, energy transfer from cerium to uranium takes place. The commonly occurring radiation-induced centres in sulphates, viz SO 3 - and SO 4 - were observed by EPR and SO 4 - radical ion was found to take part in the TSL emission at 415 K. The hitherto unknown information, however, is the formation of SO 4 - -SO 3 - radical pair creating deep traps in these lattices, apparently assisted by the dopants. This is the first observation of such radical pair formation leading to the identification of deep traps in this lattice. The radical pair, (SO 3 - -SO 4 - ) which is stable up to 970 K, decreases the intensity of the peak at 415 K due to the depletion of SO 4 - centres

  14. EPR spectra of some irradiated polycrystalline perrhenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitseva, N.G.; Constantinescu, M.; Georgescu, R.; Constantinescu, O.

    1978-10-01

    An EPR study of the paramagnetic centers formed by γ, electron and neutron irradiation of the NaReO 4 and KReO 4 was made. In the EPR spectra of the powder samples irradiated γ, with electrons and neutrons, the presence of three types of paramagnetic centers was observed. From the EPR parameters, the centers were attributed to the ReOsub(4)sup(.), ReOsub(3)sup(.) and ReOsub(2)sup(.) radicals respectively. The lower intensity of the spectra observed by KReO 4 samples irradiation showed a higher radioresistance of the KReO 4 than that of NaReO 4 . A radiolitical scheme taking into account the paramagnetic centers formation was proposed. (author)

  15. γ radiation level simulation and analysis with MCNP in EPR containment during severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Jun; Liu Shuhuan; Wang Yang; Zhai Liang

    2013-01-01

    The γ dosimetry model based on the EPR core structure, material composition and the designed shielding system was established. The γ-ray dose rate distributions in EPR containment under different conditions including normal operation state, loss-of-coolant accident and core melt severe accident were simulated with MCNP5, and the calculation results under normal operation state and severe accident were compared and analyzed respectively with that of the designed limit. The study results may provide some relative data reference for EPR core accident prediction and reactor accident emergency decision making. (authors)

  16. Introduction to the special issue of Radiation Protection Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2016-01-01

    This special issue is a collection of peer-reviewed articles derived from presentations at the fourth EPR BioDose Meeting, held in Hanover, NH, USA in 4-8 October 2015. Organised by The International Association of Biological and EPR Radiation Dosimetry (IABERD), this meeting was held in combination with two international conferences (The International Symposium on EPR Dosimetry and Dating and The International Conference on Biodosimetry) and a symposium (The International EPR Society). The primary focus of this conference was on medical response to events in which large numbers of individuals may be exposed to significant levels of ionising radiation; topics included biodosimetry techniques, radiation mitigators, model systems to develop countermeasures, new data from different exposure events and the implication of these methods in a radiological emergency or in terrorist attack scenarios. (authors)

  17. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Cern Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00. Closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after the use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel. 7 2155 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  18. Biomolecular EPR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Wilfred Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive, Up-to-Date Coverage of Spectroscopy Theory and its Applications to Biological SystemsAlthough a multitude of books have been published about spectroscopy, most of them only occasionally refer to biological systems and the specific problems of biomolecular EPR (bioEPR). Biomolecular EPR Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to bioEPR and demonstrates how this remarkable tool allows researchers to delve into the structural, functional, and analytical analysis of paramagnetic molecules found in the biochemistry of all species on the planet. A Must-Have Reference in an Intrinsically Multidisciplinary FieldThis authoritative reference seamlessly covers all important bioEPR applications, including low-spin and high-spin metalloproteins, spin traps and spin lables, interaction between active sites, and redox systems. It is loaded with practical tricks as well as do's and don'ts that are based on the author's 30 years of experience in the field. The book also comes with an unprecedented set of...

  19. THE VIEW FROM THE TRENCHES: PART 2–TECHNICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR EPR SCREENING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolalde, Roberto J.; Gougelet, Robert M.; Rea, Michael; Williams, Benjamin B.; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Lesniewski, Piotr N.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing awareness of the need for methodologies that can be used retrospectively to provide the biodosimetry needed to carry out screening and triage immediately after an event in which large numbers of people have potentially received clinically significant doses of ionizing radiation. The general approach to developing such methodologies has been a technology centric one, often ignoring the system integrations considerations that are key to their effective use. In this study an integrative approach for the evaluation and development of a physical biodosimetry technology was applied based on in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry. The EPR measurements are based on physical changes in tissues whose magnitudes are not affected by the factors that can confound biologically-based assessments. In this study the use of a pilot simulation exercise to evaluate an experimental EPR system and gather stakeholders’ feedback early on in the development process is described. The exercise involved: ten non-irradiated participants, representatives from a local fire department; Department of Homeland Security certified exercise evaluators, EPR experts, physicians; and a human factors engineer. Stakeholders were in agreement that the EPR technology in its current state of development could be deployed for the screening of mass casualties. Furthermore, stakeholders’ recommendations will be prioritized and incorporated in future developments of the EPR technique. While the results of this exercise were aimed specifically at providing feedback for the development of EPR dosimetry for screening mass casualties, the methods and lessons learned are likely to be applicable to other biodosimetric methods. PMID:20065674

  20. EPR paradox revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klippert, R. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1999-07-01

    In a seminal paper from 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen produced one of the most powerful weapon against the unpredictability of the world ensured by quantum mechanics. The recent production of entangled states, with all its possible future applications in quantum computation, re-open the possibility of testing EPR states on physical grounds. The present intends to present a challenge to the wedding of classical (special) relativity with quantum mechanics, the so called relativistic quantum mechanics. Making use of the same apparatus devised in EPR, it is shown that non local quantum states are incompatible with either their possibility of being measured or else with Lorentz invariance (or even with both). (author)

  1. Effects of water on fingernail electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tengda; Zhao, Zhixin; Zhang, Haiying; Zhai, Hezheng; Ruan, Shuzhou; Jiao, Ling; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a promising biodosimetric method, and fingernails are sensitive biomaterials to ionizing radiation. Therefore, kinetic energy released per unit mass (kerma) can be estimated by measuring the level of free radicals within fingernails, using EPR. However, to date this dosimetry has been deficient and insufficiently accurate. In the sampling processes and measurements, water plays a significant role. This paper discusses many effects of water on fingernail EPR dosimetry, including disturbance to EPR measurements and two different effects on the production of free radicals. Water that is unable to contact free radicals can promote the production of free radicals due to indirect ionizing effects. Therefore, varying water content within fingernails can lead to varying growth rates in the free radical concentration after irradiation-these two variables have a linear relationship, with a slope of 1.8143. Thus, EPR dosimetry needs to be adjusted according to the water content of the fingernails of an individual. When the free radicals are exposed to water, the eliminating effect will appear. Therefore, soaking fingernail pieces in water before irradiation, as many researchers have previously done, can cause estimation errors. In addition, nails need to be dehydrated before making accurately quantitative EPR measurements. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  2. Polymer therapeutics and the EPR effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hiroshi

    History of the EPR (enhanced permeability and retention) effect is discussed, which goes back to the analyses of molecular pathology in bacterial infection and edema (extravasation) formation. The first mediator we found for extravasation was bradykinin. Later on, were found nitric oxide and superoxide, then formation of peroxynitrite, that activates procollagenase. In this inflammatory setting many other vascular mediators are involved that are also common to cancer vasculature. Obviously cancer vasculature is defective architechtally, and this makes macromolecular drugs more permeable through the vascular wall. The importance of this pathophysiological event of EPR effect can be applied to macromolecular drug-delivery, or tumor selective delivery, which takes hours to achieve in the primary as well as metastatic tumors, not to mention of the inflamed tissues. The retention of the EPR means that such drugs will be retained in tumor tissues more than days to weeks. This was demonstrated initially, and most dramatically, using SMANCS, a protein-polymer conjugated-drug dissolved in lipid contrast medium (Lipiodol) by administering intraarterially. For disseminating the EPR concept globally, or in the scientific community, Professor Ruth Duncan played a key role at the early stage, as she worked extensively on polymer- therapeutics, and knew its importance.

  3. EPR: the nuclear impasse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marillier, F.

    2008-01-01

    The questions relative to the climatic change constitute crucial challenges for the next ten years. In this context the author aims to show how the EPR project illustrates the nuclear french ''autism''. He presents and analyzes the international and environmental impacts of this obsolete technology, as a project useless and dangerous. (A.L.B.)

  4. JENDL Dosimetry File

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Masaharu; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Katsuhei; Iwasaki, Shin; Sakurai, Kiyoshi; Ikeda, Yujiro; Nakagawa, Tsuneo.

    1992-03-01

    The JENDL Dosimetry File based on JENDL-3 was compiled and integral tests of cross section data were performed by the Dosimetry Integral Test Working Group of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. Data stored in the JENDL Dosimetry File are the cross sections and their covariance data for 61 reactions. The cross sections were mainly taken from JENDL-3 and the covariances from IRDF-85. For some reactions, data were adopted from other evaluated data files. The data are given in the neutron energy region below 20 MeV in both of point-wise and group-wise files in the ENDF-5 format. In order to confirm reliability of the data, several integral tests were carried out; comparison with the data in IRDF-85 and average cross sections measured in fission neutron fields, fast reactor spectra, DT neutron fields and Li(d, n) neutron fields. As a result, it has been found that the JENDL Dosimetry File gives better results than IRDF-85 but there are some problems to be improved in future. The contents of the JENDL Dosimetry File and the results of the integral tests are described in this report. All of the dosimetry cross sections are shown in a graphical form. (author) 76 refs

  5. JENDL Dosimetry File

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, Masaharu; Iguchi, Tetsuo [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kobayashi, Katsuhei [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Iwasaki, Shin [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Sakurai, Kiyoshi; Ikeda, Yujior; Nakagawa, Tsuneo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1992-03-15

    The JENDL Dosimetry File based on JENDL-3 was compiled and integral tests of cross section data were performed by the Dosimetry Integral Test Working Group of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. Data stored in the JENDL Dosimetry File are the cross sections and their covariance data for 61 reactions. The cross sections were mainly taken from JENDL-3 and the covariances from IRDF-85. For some reactions, data were adopted from other evaluated data files. The data are given in the neutron energy region below 20 MeV in both of point-wise and group-wise files in the ENDF-5 format. In order to confirm reliability of the data, several integral tests were carried out; comparison with the data in IRDF-85 and average cross sections measured in fission neutron fields, fast reactor spectra, DT neutron fields and Li(d,n) neutron fields. As a result, it has been found that the JENDL Dosimetry File gives better results than IRDF-85 but there are some problems to be improved in future. The contents of the JENDL Dosimetry File and the results of the integral tests are described in this report. All of the dosimetry cross sections are shown in a graphical form.

  6. Physically-based biodosimetry using in vivo EPR of teeth in patients undergoing total body irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin B.; Dong, Ruhong; Nicolalde, Roberto J.; Matthews, Thomas P.; Gladstone, David J.; Demidenko, Eugene; Zaki, Bassem I.; Salikhov, Ildar K.; Lesniewski, Piotr N.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The ability to estimate individual exposures to radiation following a large attack or incident has been identified as a necessity for rational and effective emergency medical response. In vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of tooth enamel has been developed to meet this need. Materials and methods A novel transportable EPR spectrometer, developed to facilitate tooth dosimetry in an emergency response setting, was used to measure upper incisors in a model system, in unirradiated subjects, and in patients who had received total body doses of 2 Gy. Results A linear dose response was observed in the model system. A statistically significant increase in the intensity of the radiation-induced EPR signal was observed in irradiated versus unirradiated subjects, with an estimated standard error of dose prediction of 0.9 + 0.3 Gy. Conclusions These results demonstrate the current ability of in vivo EPR tooth dosimetry to distinguish between subjects who have not been irradiated and those who have received exposures that place them at risk for acute radiation syndrome. Procedural and technical developments to further increase the precision of dose estimation and ensure reliable operation in the emergency setting are underway. With these developments EPR tooth dosimetry is likely to be a valuable resource for triage following potential radiation exposure of a large population. PMID:21696339

  7. Application of an alanine dosimetry system for industrial irradiation and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohs, U.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the application of alanine dosimetry in radiation processing. Continuous checks of the EPR measuring conditions as well as using high-quality alanine dosimeters and consistent technique for dose determination guarantee an accuracy of about ± 3% intermediate dose levels. The alanine dosimetry system was applied for dose mapping measurements during irradiator qualification and performance qualification of different products, routine dosimetry, and special radiation protection applications within the gamma irradiator. (author)

  8. ESR Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baffa, Oswaldo; Rossi, Bruno; Graeff, Carlos; Kinoshita, Angela; Chen Abrego, Felipe; Santos, Adevailton Bernardo dos

    2004-01-01

    ESR dosimetry is widely used for several applications such as dose assessment in accidents, medical applications and sterilization of food and other materials. In this work the dosimetric properties of natural and synthetic Hydroxyapatite, Alanine, and 2-Methylalanine are presented. Recent results on the use of a K-Band (24 GHz) ESR spectrometer in dosimetry are also presented

  9. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once a month. Regular read-outs are vital to ensure that your personal dose is periodically monitored. Dosimeters should be read even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Dosimetry Service - Tel. 7 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  10. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once a month. Regular read-outs are vital to ensure that your personal dose is periodically monitored. Dosimeters should be read even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Dosimetry Service Tel. 7 2155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  11. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Please remember to read your dosimeter at least once a month. Regular read-outs are vital to ensure that your personal dose is periodically monitored. Dosimeters should be read even if you have not visited the controlled areas. Dosimetry Service - Tel. 72155 http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  12. EPR (European Pressurized Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the EPR (European Pressurized Reactor), a modernised version of PWRs which uses nuclear fission. It indicates to which category it belongs (third generation). It briefly describes its operation: recalls on nuclear fission, electricity production in a nuclear reactor. It presents and comments its characteristics: power, thermal efficiency, redundant systems for safety control, double protective enclosure, expected lifetime, use of MOX fuel, modular design. It discusses economic stakes (expected higher nuclear electricity competitiveness, but high construction costs), and safety challenges (design characteristics, critics by nuclear safety authorities about the safety data processing system). It presents the main involved actors (Areva, EDF) and competitors in the field of advanced reactors (Rosatom with its VVER 1200, General Electric with its ABWR and its ESBWR, Mitsubishi with its APWR, Westinghouse with its AP100) while outlining the importance of certifications and delays to obtain them. After having evoked key data on EPR fuel consumption, it indicates reactors under construction, evokes potential markets and perspectives

  13. EPR, kvantemekanik og Bohr

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Morten Klockmann

    2007-01-01

    Dette projekt omhandler området hvor filosofi og fysik smelter sammen. Kvantemekanikkens tilblivelse fik en hård medfart hvilket diskussionerne mellem især Albert Einstein og Niels Bohr vidner om. De var hovedpersoner i striden om hvordan kvantemekanikken skulle fortolkes, og diskussionen kulminerede i 1935 hvor Einstein sammen med kollegerne Podolsky og Rosen offentliggjorde en artikel med titlen “Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete?” (EPR-artiklen)....

  14. EPR a strategic choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    How can we answer to the increasing demand of electric power, resulting of the demographic evolution and needed to the economic development, without exhausting the fossil resources? The answers are function of the countries and imply an optimization of the production and the consumption. This document published by the Areva Group aims to show the advantages of the nuclear energy: economical and environmental advantages. A special chapter is devoted to the European Pressurized Reactor, EPR. (A.L.B.)

  15. EPR spectroscopy of spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Тimakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From 01 January 2017 you enter the interstate standard GOST 33271-2015 “Dry Spices, herbs and vegetable seasonings. Manual exposure in order to combat pathogens and other microorganisms” which States that the absorbed dose of radiation to the spices should be from 3 to 30 kGy. The study found that before the introduction of permissive legislative framework in the consumer market of Russia there are irradiated food products (chili, ground chili, ground spicy chili, black pepper. For radiation monitoring of food safety, we used the method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR, which allows quickly and with a high degree of reliability to establish the fact of irradiation. It is established that all samples of spices irradiated with dose of 12 kGy (technology radappertization gave typical spectra of the signals established by the method of electron paramagnetic resonance in the domestic EPR spectrometer, the intensity, amplitude and peak width of the EPR signal of samples of spices with the increase of irradiation dose increases. It is proven that repeated exposure no effect accumulation. Integration with 2017 Russia in the global practi ce of using radiation technologies of processing of food products and food raw materials with the purpose of extending shelf life confirms the need for a data Bank on the radiation sensitivity of various food products to determine the optimal doses and the eff ect of radiation doses on the shelf life and quality of products.

  16. EPR spectroscopy at DNP conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckmann, J.; Goertz, St.; Meyer, W.; Radtke, E.; Reicherz, G.

    2004-01-01

    In terms of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) studies and systematic target material research it is crucial to know the EPR lineshape of the DNP relevant paramagnetic centers. Therefore in Bochum an EPR spectrometer has been implemented into the 4 He evaporation DNP facility in order to perform EPR studies at DNP conditions (B=2.5 T, T=1 K). The spectrometer hardware and performance as well as first results are presented

  17. Quantitative EPR A Practitioners Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Eaton, Gareth R; Barr, David P; Weber, Ralph T

    2010-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive yet practical guide for people who perform quantitative EPR measurements. No existing book provides this level of practical guidance to ensure the successful use of EPR. There is a growing need in both industrial and academic research to provide meaningful and accurate quantitative EPR results. This text discusses the various sample, instrument and software related aspects required for EPR quantitation. Specific topics include: choosing a reference standard, resonator considerations (Q, B1, Bm), power saturation characteristics, sample positioning, and finally, putting all the factors together to obtain an accurate spin concentration of a sample.

  18. In Vivo Imaging of Tissue Physiological Function using EPR Spectroscopy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a technique for studying chemical species that have one or more unpaired electrons.  The current invention describes Echo-based Single Point Imaging (ESPI), a novel EPR image formation strategy that allows in vivo imaging of physiological function.  The National Cancer Institute's Radiation Biology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing an in vivo imaging using Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to measure active oxygen species.

  19. Influence of glycemic control on some real-time biomarkers of free radical formation in type 2 diabetic patients: An EPR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadjeva, Veselina Georgieva; Goycheva, Petia; Nikolova, Galina; Zheleva, Antoaneta

    2017-11-01

    The pathology of diabetes is associated with several mechanisms, one of which is oxidative stress (OS). The relationship between OS and diabetic complications has been extensively investigated. OS has been suggested to be involved in the genesis of both macroand microangiopathy. In contrast, the relationship between OS and insulin action is a neglected research area. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients by following the serum levels of some real-time oxidative stress biomarkers. The study group consisted of 53 type 2 diabetic patients (31 with poor glycemic control and 22 with good glycemic control) and 24 healthy control subjects. The oxidative stress biomarkers (ROS, Asc• and •NO) were measured by using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) methods and compared with clinical parameters. The statistically significantly higher levels of ROS products and •NO in type 2 diabetic patients in both groups compared to controls mean that the oxidation processes take place at the time the survey is performed. Free radical overproduction persists after the normalization of the glucose levels, and oxidative stress may be involved in the "metabolic memory" effect. This is confirmed by the positive correlation between ROS levels/•NO and average blood glucose levels, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Furthermore, the low level of the ascorbate radical in both diabetes groups compared to controls confirmed an increase in oxidation processes. Higher levels of real-time biomarkers show that intensive insulin treatment does not lead to the expected decrease in oxidative processes involving ROS and •NO, probably due to "metabolic memory".

  20. Geographic Variations in the EPR Spectrum of Tooth Enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanyukha, A.A.; Hayes, R.B.; Haskell, E.H.; Kenner, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    The presence of stable radiation-induced radicals in the mineral component of tooth enamel allows use of this material as a biological dosemeter. Estimation of the dose absorbed in tooth enamel can be done by EPR. Generally, for the purpose of dose reconstruction, the EPR spectrum of tooth enamel is interpreted in terms of two main components. The first is a broad background signal often called the native signal centered at a g value of 2.0045. The origin of this signal is not precisely known. The second main component in the tooth enamel spectrum is purely radiation induced and can be used for retrospective dosimetry. Internal structure of the native signal and variations of its amplitude and linewidth were investigated for the samples prepared from modern teeth obtained from different geographic locations (USA and Russia). Possible reasons for the variations observed are discussed as are the potential effects of the variations on the reliability of dose estimation. (author)

  1. Dosimetry methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, A.; Kovacs, A.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application....

  2. EPR design for maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krugmann, U.

    1998-01-01

    Preventive maintenance is very important in achieving high plant availability. For the European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) preventive maintenance has been carefully addressed in the design stage. This is particularly necessary because of the traditionally different maintenance strategies employed in France and Germany. This paper emphasizes the following features introduced in the ERP design to minimize the duration of the refueling outage: (1) containment accessibility during power operation; (2) overall plant layout to facilitate inspections and maintenances within the containment; and (3) safety system design for enabling preventive maintenance during power operation. (author)

  3. Foundations of ionizing radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisenko, O.N.; Pereslegin, I.A.

    1985-01-01

    Foundations of dosimetry in application to radiotherapy are presented. General characteristics of ionizing radiations and main characteristics of ionizing radiation sources, mostly used in radiotherapy, are given. Values and units for measuring ionizing radiation (activity of a radioactive substance, absorbed dose, exposure dose, integral dose and dose equivalent are considered. Different methods and instruments for ionizing radiation dosimetry are discussed. The attention is paid to the foundations of clinical dosimetry (representation of anatomo-topographic information, choice of radiation conditions, realization of radiation methods, corrections for a configuration and inhomogeneity of a patient's body, account of biological factors of radiation effects, instruments of dose field formation, control of irradiation procedure chosen)

  4. TH-CD-BRA-10: Towards Reference Dosimetry of MR-Linacs Using a Clinical Probe-Format Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaud, J; Seuntjens, J [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Sarfehnia, A [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Woodings, S; Kok, J; Asselen, B van; Wolthaus, J; Raaymakers, B [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of a 1.5 T magnetic field (B-field) on the response of a small-scale graphite calorimeter probe (GPC) developed for use as a novel clinical reference dosimeter. Characterization of the GPC was also assessed in a hybrid MRI-linac (MRL) clinical prototype by performing absolute dosimetry in multiple detector orientations. Methods: B-field influence was characterized using a variable-strength electromagnet system located 280 cm from the source of a clinical linac. The GPC was used to perform a total of 160 absolute dose measurements (6 MV, 920 MU/min) in a water phantom placed between the poles of the electromagnet. The magnitude of the B-field between the poles was varied in the range of 0 – 1.5 T. The relative response of the GPC was determined and compared to that of a thimble type ionization chamber (Exradin A1SL, Standard Imaging). Next, 65 dose measurements were performed using the GPC in a clinical MRL field (7 MV, 620 MU/min) to quantify the rotational dependence of the detector in the presence of a 1.5 T B-field. The GPC was rotated in steps of 90° inside a graphite phantom (SSD 140 cm, depth 2.5 cm) for two detector orientations (parallel and perpendicular to the B field). Results: Relative to the zero B-field condition, the A1SL chamber exhibited an average overresponse of +1.2 % ± 0.03 % at a B-field of 1.5 T, while the GPC under-responded on average by −0.5 % ± 0.9 %. For the MRL measurements, no significant differences were observed between the parallel and perpendicular orientations. In both cases, a rotational dependence of approximately ±1 % was measured. Conclusion: This work suggests that the B-field has minimal influence on the response of the GPC, making it a potentially attractive solution for clinical MRL reference dosimetry. This work has been supported in part by the CREATE Medical Physics Research Training Network NSERC grant RGPIN 432290, as well as NSERC grants RGPIN 298191 & 435608. JR is a

  5. Clinical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassow, J.

    1973-01-01

    The main point of this paper on clinical dosimetry which is to be understood here as application of physical dosimetry on accelerators in medical practice, is based on dosimetric methodics. Following an explanation of the dose parameters and description of the dose distribution important for clinical practice as well as geometric irradiation parameters, the significance of a series of physical parameters such as accelerator energy, surface energy of average stopping power etc. is dealt with in detail. Following a section on field homogenization with bremsstrahlung and electron radiation, details on dosimetry in clinical practice are given. Finally, a few problems of dosemeter or monitor calibration on accelerators are described. The explanations are supplemented by a series of diagrams and tables. (ORU/LH) [de

  6. Glucinium dosimetry in beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremer, M.

    1949-05-01

    The application of the method developed by Kolthoff and Sandell (1928) for the dosimetry of glucinium (beryllium) in beryl gives non-reproducible results with up to 20% discrepancies. This method recommends to separate beryllium and aluminium using 8 hydroxyquinoline and then to directly precipitate glucinium in the filtrate using ammonia. One possible reason of the problems generated by this method should be the formation of a volatile complex between beryllium and the oxine. This work shows that when the oxine is eliminated before the precipitation with ammonia the dosimetry of beryllium becomes accurate. The destruction of the oxine requires the dry evaporation of the filtrate, which is a long process. Thus the search for a reagent allowing the quantitative precipitation of beryllium in its solutions and in presence of oxine has been made. It has been verified also that the quantitative precipitation of the double beryllium and ammonium phosphate is not disturbed by the oxine in acetic buffer. This method, which gives good results, has also the advantage to separate beryllium from the alkaline-earth compounds still present in the filtrate. The report details the operation mode of the method: beryllium dosimetry using ammonium phosphate, aluminium-beryllium separation, application to beryl dosimetry (ore processing, insolubilization of silica, precipitation with ammonia, precipitation with oxine, precipitation of PO 4 NH 4 Gl, preciseness). (J.S.)

  7. EPR of uranium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursu, I.; Lupei, V.

    1984-02-01

    A review of the electron paramagnetic resonance data on the uranium ions is given. After a general account of the electronic structure of the uranium free atoms and ions, the influence of the external fields (magnetic field, crystal fields) is discussed. The main information obtained from EPR studies on the uranium ions in crystals are emphasized: identification of the valence and of the ground electronic state, determination of the structure of the centers, crystal field effects, role of the intermediate coupling and of the J-mixing, role of the covalency, determination of the nuclear spin, maqnetic dipole moment and electric quadrupole moment of the odd isotopes of uranium. These data emphasize the fact that the actinide group has its own identity and this is accutely manifested at the beginning of the 5fsup(n) series encompassed by the uranium ions. (authors)

  8. Free radical EPR in delineating oil bearing zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.K.; Kumar, V.; Das, T.K.; Gundu Rao, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    Presence of naturally occurring gamma ray activity has long been detected in oil/gas wells is invariably carried out for formation evaluation. Similarly, presence of free radicals in oil bearing formations has also been known for quite sometime. Present paper deals with a systematic study of detecting these free radicals in oil wells and correlations of these with x-ray and other logs for identification of hydrocarbon bearing zones. Present study attempts to establish EPR as as inexpensive and reliable tool in comparison with gamma ray and neutron density logs recorded in exploratory oil wells. EPR studies have been carried out in an exploratory well between depth intervals 1600 m-1400 m located in south of existing producing field in Bombay Offshore region. Based on these results, an EPR log has been prepared and compared with gamma ray and neutron density logs. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  9. Use of electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel for retrospective dose assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry is a physical method for the assessment of absorbed dose from ionising radiation. It is based on the measurement of stable radiation induced radicals in human calcified tissues (primarily in tooth enamel). EPR dosimetry with teeth is now firmly established in retrospective dosimetry. It is a powerful method for providing information on exposure to ionising radiation many years after the event, since the 'signal' is 'stored' in the tooth or the bone. This technique is of particular relevance to relatively low dose exposures or when the results of conventional dosimetry are not available (e.g. in accidental circumstances). The use of EPR dosimetry, as an essential tool for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure is an important part of radioepidemiological studies and also provides data to select appropriate countermeasures based on retrospective evaluation of individual doses. Despite well established regulations and protocols for maintaining radiation pro...

  10. EPR spectroscopy on irradiated nickel tetracyanide in NaCl host lattice: mechanism for the simultaneous formation of reduced and oxidized species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga de Araujo, M.; Pinhal, Nelson Moreira; Vugman, Ney Vernon

    2002-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidized and reduced Ni 2+ complexes produced by X-ray irradiation on single crystals of NaCl doped with [Ni(CN) 4 ] 2- is studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance at room temperature. The interdependent generation of these two complexes is attributed to migration of the charge compensating vacancy from the reduced to the oxidized complex in a reversible reaction. At higher X-ray doses, there is a predominant formation of the reduced complex

  11. Study on the EPR/dosimetric properties of some substituted alanines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gancheva, Veselka; Sagstuen, Einar; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2006-01-01

    Polycrystalline phenyl-alanine and perdeuterated l-α-alanine (l-α-alanine-d 4 ) were studied as potential high-energy radiation-sensitive materials (RSM) for solid state/EPR dosimetry. It was found that phenyl-alanine exhibits a linear dose response in the dose region 0.1-17kGy. However, phenyl-alanine is about 10 times less sensitive to γ-irradiation than standard l-α-alanine irradiated at the same doses. Moreover, the EPR response from phenyl-alanine is unstable and, independent of the absorbed dose, decreases by about 50% within 20 days after irradiation upon storage at room temperature. γ-irradiated polycrystalline perdeuterated l-α-alanine (CD 3 CD(NH 2 )COOH) has not previously been studied at room temperature by EPR spectroscopy. The first part of the present analysis was with respect to the structure of the EPR spectrum. By spectrum simulations, the presence of at least two radiation induced free radicals, R 1 =CH 3 C*(H)COOH and R 2 =H 3 N + -C*(CH 3 )COO - , was confirmed very clearly. Both these radicals were suggested previously from EPR and ENDOR studies of standard alanine crystals. The further investigations into the potential use of alanine-d 4 as RSM, after choosing optimal EPR spectrometer settings parameters for this purpose, show that it is ca. two times more sensitive than standard l-α-alanine

  12. EPR Flamanville 3, Site Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menager, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Antoine Menager, the EPR Flamanville 3 Site Manager described the organization and the management of the Flamanville site during the construction phase. He placed emphasis on Health and Safety, Environmental and Social Responsibility and on Nuclear Safety and Quality

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance biophysical radiation dosimetry with tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Rao F.H.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with the advancements made in the field of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) for biophysical dosimetry with tooth enamel for accident, emergency, and retrospective radiation dose reconstruction. A methodology has been developed to measure retrospective radiation exposures in human tooth enamel. This entails novel sample preparation procedures with minimum mechanical treatment to reduce the preparation induced uncertainties, establish optimum measurement conditions inside the EPR cavity, post-process the measured spectrum with functional simulation of dosimetric and other interfering signals, and reconstruct dose. By using this technique, retrospective gamma exposures as low as 80±30 mGy have been successfully deciphered. The notion of dose modifier was introduced in EPR biodosimetry for low dose measurements. It has been demonstrated that by using the modified zero added dose (MZAD) technique for low radiation exposures, doses in 100 mGy ranges can be easily reconstructed in teeth that were previously thought useless for EPR dosimetry. Also, the use of a dose modifier makes robust dose reconstruction possible for higher radiation exposures. The EPR dosimetry technique was also developed for tooth samples extracted from rodents, which represent small tooth sizing. EPR doses in the molars, extracted from the mice irradiated with whole body exposures, were reassessed and shown to be correct within the experimental uncertainty. The sensitivity of human tooth enamel for neutron irradiation, obtained from the 3 MV McMaster K.N. Van de Graaff accelerator, was also studied. For the first time this work has shown that the neutron sensitivity of the tooth enamel is approximately 1/10th of the equivalent gamma sensitivity. Parametric studies for neutron dose rate and neutron energy within the available range of the accelerator, showed no impact on the sensitivity of the tooth enamel. Therefore, tooth enamel can be used as a dosimeter for both neutrons

  14. Environmental dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1977-01-01

    For more than 60 years, natural radiation has offered broad opportunities for basic research as evidenced by many fundamental discoveries. Within the last decade, however, dramatic changes have occurred in the motivation and direction of this research. The urgent need for economical energy sources entailing acceptably low levels of environmental impact has compelled the applied aspects of our radiation environment to become overriding considerations. It is within this general framework that state-of-the-art environmental dosimetry techniques are reviewed. Although applied motivation and relevance underscores the current milieu for both reactor and environmental dosimetry, a perhaps even more unifying force is the broad similarity of reactor and environmental radiation fields. In this review, a comparison of these two mixed radiation fields is presented stressing the underlying similarities that exist. On this basis, the evolution of a strong inner bond between dosimetry methods for both reactor and environmental radiation fields is described. The existence of this bond will be illustrated using representative examples of observed spectra. Dosimetry methods of particularly high applicability for both of these fields are described. Special emphasis is placed on techniques of high sensitivity and absolute accuracy which are capable of resolving the components of these mixed radiation fields

  15. EPR spin trapping of protein radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Hawkins, Clare Louise

    2004-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping was originally developed to aid the detection of low-molecular-mass radicals formed in chemical systems. It has subsequently found widespread use in biology and medicine for the direct detection of radical species formed during oxidative stress...... tumbling radicals are often broad and relatively poor in distinctive features, a number of techniques have been developed that allow a wealth of information to be obtained about the nature, site, and reactions of such radicals. This article summarizes recent developments in this area and reviews selected...... examples of radical formation on proteins....

  16. Towards EPR (European pressurized reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2003-01-01

    According to the French industry minister, it is nonsense continuing delaying the construction of an EPR prototype because France needs it in order to renew timely its park of nuclear reactors. The renewing is expected to begin in 2020 and will be assured with third generation reactors like EPR. A quick launching of the EPR prototype is necessary to have it being in service by 2012, the feedback operating experience that will be accumulated over the 8 years that will follow will be necessary to optimize the industrial version and to have it ready by 2020. The EPR reactor has indisputable assets: modern, safer, more competitive and it will produce less wastes than present nuclear reactors. The construction cost of an EPR prototype is estimated to 3 milliard Euros and the nuclear industry operators propose to finance it completely. The EPR prototype does not jeopardize the ambitious French program about renewable energy sources, France is committed to produce 21% of its electricity from renewable energies by 2010 and 10 milliard Euros will be invested over this period on wind energy. Nuclear energy and alternative energies must be considered as 2 aspects of a diversified energy policy. (A.C.)

  17. Radiation processing dosimetry - past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    Since the two United Nations Conferences were held in Geneva in 1955 and 1958 on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy and the concurrent foundation of the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1957, the IAEA has fostered high-dose dosimetry and its applications. This field is represented in industrial radiation processing, agricultural programmes, and therapeutic and preventative medicine. Such dosimetry is needed specifically for pest and quarantine control and in the processing of medical products, pharmaceuticals, blood products, foodstuffs, solid, liquid and gaseous wastes, and a variety of useful commodities, e.g. polymers, composites, natural rubber and elastomers, packaging, electronic, and automotive components, as well as in radiotherapy. Improvements and innovations of dosimetry materials and analytical systems and software continue to be important goals for these applications. Some of the recent advances in high-dose dosimetry include tetrazolium salts and substituted polydiacetylene as radiochromic media, on-line real-time as well as integrating semiconductor and diamond-detector monitors, quantitative label dosimeters, photofluorescent sensors for broad dose range applications, and improved and simplified parametric and computational codes for imaging and simulating 3D radiation dose distributions in model products. The use of certain solid-state devices, e.g. optical quality LiF, at low (down to 4K) and high (up to 500 K) temperatures, is of interest for materials testing. There have also been notable developments in experimental dose mapping procedures, e.g. 2D and 3D dose distribution analyses by flat-bed optical scanners and software applied to radiochromic and photofluorescent images. In addition, less expensive EPR spectrometers and new EPR dosimetry materials and high-resolution semiconductor diode arrays, charge injection devices, and photostimulated storage phosphors have been introduced. (author)

  18. Overview of physical dosimetry methods for triage application integrated in the new European network RENEB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompier, François; Burbidge, Christopher; Bassinet, Céline; Baumann, Marion; Bortolin, Emanuela; De Angelis, Cinzia; Eakins, Jonathan; Della Monaca, Sara; Fattibene, Paola; Quattrini, Maria Cristina; Tanner, Rick; Wieser, Albrecht; Woda, Clemens

    2017-01-01

    In the EC-funded project RENEB (Realizing the European Network in Biodosimetry), physical methods applied to fortuitous dosimetric materials are used to complement biological dosimetry, to increase dose assessment capacity for large-scale radiation/nuclear accidents. This paper describes the work performed to implement Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry techniques. OSL is applied to electronic components and EPR to touch-screen glass from mobile phones. To implement these new approaches, several blind tests and inter-laboratory comparisons (ILC) were organized for each assay. OSL systems have shown good performances. EPR systems also show good performance in controlled conditions, but ILC have also demonstrated that post-irradiation exposure to sunlight increases the complexity of the EPR signal analysis. Physically-based dosimetry techniques present high capacity, new possibilities for accident dosimetry, especially in the case of large-scale events. Some of the techniques applied can be considered as operational (e.g. OSL on Surface Mounting Devices [SMD]) and provide a large increase of measurement capacity for existing networks. Other techniques and devices currently undergoing validation or development in Europe could lead to considerable increases in the capacity of the RENEB accident dosimetry network.

  19. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments

  20. EPR by Areva. EPR the 1600+ MWe reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This brochure presents the GEN III+ EPR reactor designed by the Areva and Siemens consortium. The EPR reactor is a direct descendent of the well-proven N4 and KONVOI reactors, the most modern reactors in France and Germany. The EPR was designed by teams from KWU/Siemens and Framatome, EDF in France and the major German utilities, working in collaboration with both French and German safety authorities. The EPR integrates the results of decades of R and D programs, in particular those performed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission) and the Karlsruhe Research Center in Germany. The EPR benefits from the experience of several thousand reactor-years of operation of pressurized water reactor technology. This experience has put 87 AREVA PWRs online throughout the world. Innovative Features: - An outer shell covering the reactor building, the spent fuel building and two of the four safeguard buildings provides protection against large commercial or military aircraft crash. - A heavy neutron reflector that surrounds the reactor core lowers uranium consumption. - An axial economizer inside the steam generator allows a high level of steam pressure and therefore high plant efficiency. - A core catcher allows passive collection and retention of the molten core should the reactor vessel fail in the highly unlikely event of a core melt. - A digital technology and a fully computerized control room with an operator friendly man-machine interface improve the reactor protection system.

  1. EPR by Areva. EPR the 1600+ MWe reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This brochure presents the GEN III+ EPR reactor designed by the Areva and Siemens consortium. The EPR reactor is a direct descendent of the well-proven N4 and KONVOI reactors, the most modern reactors in France and Germany. The EPR was designed by teams from KWU/Siemens and Framatome, EDF in France and the major German utilities, working in collaboration with both French and German safety authorities. The EPR integrates the results of decades of R and D programs, in particular those performed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission) and the Karlsruhe Research Center in Germany. The EPR benefits from the experience of several thousand reactor-years of operation of pressurized water reactor technology. This experience has put 87 AREVA PWRs online throughout the world. Innovative Features: - An outer shell covering the reactor building, the spent fuel building and two of the four safeguard buildings provides protection against large commercial or military aircraft crash. - A heavy neutron reflector that surrounds the reactor core lowers uranium consumption. - An axial economizer inside the steam generator allows a high level of steam pressure and therefore high plant efficiency. - A core catcher allows passive collection and retention of the molten core should the reactor vessel fail in the highly unlikely event of a core melt. - A digital technology and a fully computerized control room with an operator friendly man-machine interface improve the reactor protection system

  2. Study of growth of polyaniline chain by EPR method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulikov, A V [Inst. of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Kogan, Ya L [Inst. of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Fokeeva, L S [Inst. of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    1993-03-22

    Chemical aniline polymerization has been studied by the EPR method. After a long delay a weak EPR signal I is appeared and transformed rapidly into a strong Lorentzian line. Constants of spin exchange of signals I and II with paramagnetic probes Fe(CN)[sub 6][sup 3-], Co[sup 2+] and O[sub 2], freely diffusing in solution, have been determined. Effect of ferricyanide ions and urea, a breaker of hydrogen bonds, has been measured for signals I and II. Data obtained show the formation of an array of positive charges in PANI at early stage of doping. Constants of spin exchange depend on prehistory of samples. Averaging of EPR line widths of different paramagnetic centers in polyaniline was found. (orig.)

  3. Photochemical reduction of water-soluble C60 derivatives (EPR study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezova, V.; Stasko, A.; Dvoranova, D.; Asmus, K.D.; Guldi, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    The photochemical reduction of three bis-functionalized C 60 derivatives resulted in the formation of a single radical product, characterized by relatively narrow EPR line (g M = 2.0007, pp < 0.02 mT). In the irradiated aqueous solutions containing L-ascorbic acid, in the addition to the EPR line related to bis-adduct mono-anion, also 6-line EPR spectrum of ascorbyl radical was observed. Consequently, the photoinduced formation of ascorbyl radical was attributed to the intermolecular quenching of fullerenes excited states. (authors)

  4. Hematological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluery-Herard, A.

    1991-01-01

    The principles of hematological dosimetry after acute or protracted whole-body irradiation are reviewed. In both cases, over-exposure is never homogeneous and the clinical consequences, viz medullary aplasia, are directly associated with the mean absorbed dose and the seriousness and location of the overexposure. The main hematological data required to assess the seriousness of exposure are the following: repeated blood analysis, blood precursor cultures, as indicators of whole-body exposure; bone marrow puncture, medullary precursor cultures and medullary scintigraphy as indicators of the importance of a local over-exposure and capacity for spontaneous repair. These paraclinical investigations, which are essential for diagnosis and dosimetry, are also used for surveillance and for the main therapeutic issues [fr

  5. On the Correlation between EPR and Positron Annihilation Measurements on gamma-Irradiated Acetyl Methionine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Lund-Thomsen, E.; Mogensen, O. E.

    1972-01-01

    The dose dependence of the relative EPR signal intensity and positron lifetime spectrum was measured for γ‐irradiated acetyl methionine in the dose range from 0 to 30 Mrad. Angular correlation measurements were performed for the doses 0 and 30 Mrad. The result of the irradiation was the creation...... of EPR centers and inhibition of positronium formation. For one sample, irradiated with a dose of 30 Mrad, EPR and positron lifetime spectra were followed over a period of 50 days after the irradiation. The inhibiting effect and the EPR signal intensity decreased with time. No simple correlation could...... be established between the number of EPR centers and the positron annihilation data, but other possible explanations are discussed....

  6. The EPR layout design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast, U.; Le Carrer, P.Y.

    2001-01-01

    General: The European Pressurised Water Reactor (EPR) is a French - German development for the next generation of Pressurised Water Reactor. The new reactor design is based on the experiences of operation and design of nuclear power plants in both countries. The EPR fulfils enhanced safety standards, higher availability and a longer service life. Utilities aspects: For the Utilities one important requirement is the reduction of personnel exposure during maintenance and in-service inspection. The other significant requirement is of economic nature. The main points influencing costs, which have also impact on the layout, are: outage times, accessibility of the reactor building and the available maintenance and set down areas. The Utilities have also required to load the spent fuel assemblies into the shipping cask from the bottom of the fuel pool, because of the exclusion of the drop of the cask and in order to avoid contamination at the outer cask shell. Layout and safety aspects: All safety relevant Nuclear Island (NI) buildings are designed against design earthquake as well as explosion pressure wave. The protection against Airplane Crash (APC) is realised by civil and layout dispositions. The Reactor Building, the Safeguard Buildings division 2 and 3 and the Fuel Building are protected by concrete structures. The other safety relevant nuclear buildings are protected by geographical separation. Important safety requirements are the further reduction of the probability of severe accidents and the mitigation of such an accident on the plant area. For that, a spreading area for molten corium, a channel from the reactor pit to the spreading area and the In Containment Refuelling Water Storage Tank (IRWST) for flooding and initial cooling of the corium, were implemented in the design of the Reactor Building. Layout results: The following buildings are arranged on a common raft to protect them against design earthquake: Reactor Building (RB), Safeguard Buildings (SAB

  7. Use of rapid-scan EPR to improve detection sensitivity for spin-trapped radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Deborah G; Rosen, Gerald M; Tseitlin, Mark; Symmes, Breanna; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2013-07-16

    The short lifetime of superoxide and the low rates of formation expected in vivo make detection by standard continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) challenging. The new rapid-scan EPR method offers improved sensitivity for these types of samples. In rapid-scan EPR, the magnetic field is scanned through resonance in a time that is short relative to electron spin relaxation times, and data are processed to obtain the absorption spectrum. To validate the application of rapid-scan EPR to spin trapping, superoxide was generated by the reaction of xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine with rates of 0.1-6.0 μM/min and trapped with 5-tert-butoxycarbonyl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (BMPO). Spin trapping with BMPO to form the BMPO-OOH adduct converts the very short-lived superoxide radical into a more stable spin adduct. There is good agreement between the hyperfine splitting parameters obtained for BMPO-OOH by CW and rapid-scan EPR. For the same signal acquisition time, the signal/noise ratio is >40 times higher for rapid-scan than for CW EPR. Rapid-scan EPR can detect superoxide produced by Enterococcus faecalis at rates that are too low for detection by CW EPR. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. EPR: what has it taught us

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    This symposium commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the paper of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen is a fitting place to review what that work and its sequels have taught us. Prima facie, the EPR paper appears to have been exceedingly counter-productive for the following reasons: (1) The work was quickly rebutted by Bohr, and this rebuttal was apparently accepted by most workers in the field. (2) Scientists who adopted the position advocated by Bohr have produced, in the intervening fifty years, a marvelous body of useful theory, whereas those following the course suggested by EPR have produced nothing of any certified practical value. (3) It has been shown by Bell that the conclusion reached by EPR is incompatible with their assumptions. Chemists and physicists have recently begun to examine the behavior of quantum mechanical systems that are very small, yet large enough to influence their environment in ways that appreciably modify their own behavior, vis-a-vis the behavior they would have if isolated. Because these systems are neither small enough to be treated as isolated (or as residing in a classically described environment) between preparation and detection, nor large enough to be treated classically, they do not conform to the format demanded by the Copenhagen interpretation. Indeed, the behavior of these systems depends on ontological considerations that were irrelevant in the situations covered by the Copenhagen interpretation, and that were systematically ignored in that interpretation. Scientists now face the task of enlarging the scope of quantum theory to cover these new situations, and comparing the empirical consequences of various ontological assumptions. 17 refs

  9. The EPR in a few words: all you need to know about the EPR nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the EPR (European - or Evolutionary - Pressurized Reactor) type nuclear reactor, this paper, proposed by the collective group 'Stop EPR', develops the following points: EPR is as dangerous as other reactors; EPR flouts democracy; France's energy demand do not need the construction of EPRs; the construction of EPRs is not a factor of economical and social development; EPR should not be constructed neither in France nor elsewhere and the present building sites should be cancelled; the EPR will not help France to increase its energy independence and protect itself from oil price increases; choosing the EPR is incompatible with the large investments to be made in energy conservation and renewable energies; the EPR is not a solution to climate change; the VHV line corridor that will starts at Flamanville is not justified and poses risks to the environment and public health

  10. Rapid-scan EPR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sandra S; Shi, Yilin; Woodcock, Lukas; Buchanan, Laura A; McPeak, Joseph; Quine, Richard W; Rinard, George A; Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J; Eaton, Gareth R

    2017-07-01

    In rapid-scan EPR the magnetic field or frequency is repeatedly scanned through the spectrum at rates that are much faster than in conventional continuous wave EPR. The signal is directly-detected with a mixer at the source frequency. Rapid-scan EPR is particularly advantageous when the scan rate through resonance is fast relative to electron spin relaxation rates. In such scans, there may be oscillations on the trailing edge of the spectrum. These oscillations can be removed by mathematical deconvolution to recover the slow-scan absorption spectrum. In cases of inhomogeneous broadening, the oscillations may interfere destructively to the extent that they are not visible. The deconvolution can be used even when it is not required, so spectra can be obtained in which some portions of the spectrum are in the rapid-scan regime and some are not. The technology developed for rapid-scan EPR can be applied generally so long as spectra are obtained in the linear response region. The detection of the full spectrum in each scan, the ability to use higher microwave power without saturation, and the noise filtering inherent in coherent averaging results in substantial improvement in signal-to-noise relative to conventional continuous wave spectroscopy, which is particularly advantageous for low-frequency EPR imaging. This overview describes the principles of rapid-scan EPR and the hardware used to generate the spectra. Examples are provided of its application to imaging of nitroxide radicals, diradicals, and spin-trapped radicals at a Larmor frequency of ca. 250MHz. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. EPR: Some History and Clarification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Arthur

    2002-04-01

    Locality, separation and entanglement 1930s style. We’ll explore the background to the 1935 paper by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen, how it was composed, the actual argument of the paper, the principles used, and how the paper was received by Schroedinger, and others.We’ll also look at Bohr’s response: the extent to which Bohr connects with what Einstein was after in EPR and the extent to EPR marks a shift in Bohr’s thinking about the quantum theory.

  12. Some ideas on the EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Facing the debate and controversial between partisans and opponents of the European Pressurized Reactor construction, the SFP energy Group aims to offer some reflexions. In this framework the following topics are discussed: the french nuclear park and its replacement, the energy costs, the nuclear reactors profitability, the generation IV reactors. The paper examines then the EPR technology and its cost to conclude on the advantage of an EPR construction, in the case of an energy policy based on the nuclear. This last point seems to be the real challenge of the problem. (A.L.B.)

  13. EPR in B physics and elsewhere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.; Tel Aviv Univ.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1997-01-01

    The application of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations in Υ(4s) → B anti B decays to research in CP violation is the first and probably only use of EPR as a technique for research in new physics. Elsewhere highly sophisticated EPR projects question EPR and test its predictions to look for violations of quantum mechanics, hidden variables, Bell''s inequalities, etc

  14. Radiation dosimetry in human bone using electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, S.L.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate measurements of dose in bone are required in order to improve the dosimetry of systemic radiotherapy for osseous metastases. Bone is an integrating dosimeter which records the radiation history of the skeleton. During irradiation, electrons become trapped in the crystalline component of bone mineral (hydroxyapatite). The traps are very stable; at room temperature, emptying of the traps occurs with a half-life of many years. The population of trapped unpaired electrons is proportional to the radiation dose administered to the bone and can be measured in excised bone samples using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). EPR spectra of synthetic hydroxyapatite, irradiated with Co-60, were obtained at room temperature and at 77 K. At room temperature, the radiation-induced signal, with a g-value of 2.001 ± 0.001 increased linearly with absorbed dose above a lower threshold of 3 Gy, up to doses of 200 Gy. In contrast with pure hydroxyapatite, EPR spectra of excised human bone showed a broad 'native' signal, due to the organic component of bone, which masks the dosimetrically important signal. This native signal is highly variable from sample to sample and precludes the use of EPR as an absolute dosimetry technique. However, after subtraction of the background signal, irradiated human bone showed a linear response with a lower limit of measurement similar to that of synthetic hydroxyapatite. Bone is an in vivo linear dosimeter which can be exploited to develop accurate estimates of the radiation dose delivered during systemic radiotherapy and teletherapy. However, improved sensitivity of the EPR dosimetry technique is necessary before it can be applied reliably in clinical situations. (author)

  15. EPR: the nuclear impasse; EPR: l'impasse nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marillier, F [Association Ecologiste Greenpeace (France)

    2008-07-01

    The questions relative to the climatic change constitute crucial challenges for the next ten years. In this context the author aims to show how the EPR project illustrates the nuclear french ''autism''. He presents and analyzes the international and environmental impacts of this obsolete technology, as a project useless and dangerous. (A.L.B.)

  16. EPR: the nuclear impasse; EPR: l'impasse nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marillier, F. [Association Ecologiste Greenpeace (France)

    2008-07-01

    The questions relative to the climatic change constitute crucial challenges for the next ten years. In this context the author aims to show how the EPR project illustrates the nuclear french ''autism''. He presents and analyzes the international and environmental impacts of this obsolete technology, as a project useless and dangerous. (A.L.B.)

  17. Development of a new dosimeter of EPR based on lactose; Desarrollo de un nuevo dosimetro de RPE basado en lactosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz C, L.; Torijano C, E.; Azorin N, J.; Aguirre G, F. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Cruz Z, E., E-mail: eftc@xanum.uam.mx [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    50 years have passed since was proposed using the amino acid alanine as dosimeter advantage the phenomenon of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR); this dosimetric method has reached a highly competitive level regarding others dosimetry classic methods, for example the thermoluminescence or the use of Fricke dosimeters, to measure high dose of radiation. In this type of materials, the free radicals induced by the radiation are stable and their concentration is proportional to the absorbed dose may be determined by the amplitude pick to pick of the first derived of the EPR absorption spectrum. The obtained results studying the EPR response of lactose tablets elaborated in the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa are presented. The tablets were irradiated with gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co in the irradiator Gamma beam 651-Pt of the Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico to a dose rate of 8 kGy-h{sup -1} and their EPR response in a EPR spectrometer e-scan Bruker. The obtained response in function of the dose was lineal in the interval of 1 at 10 kGy. The lactose sensibility was compared with the l-alanine, used as reference, and the result was consistently 0.25 of this. Due to the linearity shown in the interval of used dose and their low production cost, we conclude that the lactose is a promissory option for the dosimetry of high dose of radiation. (author)

  18. Harmonization of dosimetric information obtained by different EPR methods: Experience of the Techa river study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchkova, A. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, 68A, Vorovsky Str., 454076 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Shishkina, E.A., E-mail: ElenaA.Shishkina@gmail.com [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, 68A, Vorovsky Str., 454076 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Ivanov, D. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 18, S. Kovalevskoy Str., 620041 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Timofeev, Yu. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, 68A, Vorovsky Str., 454076 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Fattibene, P.; Della Monaca, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Wieser, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Degteva, M.O. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, 68A, Vorovsky Str., 454076 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    Between 1949 and 1956 the Techa River (Southern Urals, Russia) was contaminated as a result of releases of radioactive waste by the Mayak Production Association. EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel has been used to estimate the external exposure of Techa riverside residents over the last 17 years. The database 'Tooth' of the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM) has accumulated about 1000 EPR measurements of tooth enamel from the rural population of the Urals region. The teeth were investigated by laboratories of Russia, USA, Germany and Italy. Most of the enamel samples were measured several times in different laboratories. Each laboratory used different equipment and its own methods for sample preparation and EPR spectra analysis. Even measurements performed at the same laboratory over 10-15 years may not be assumed as uniform: methods change with time, and equipment is subject to aging. These two factors influenced EPR performance. The purpose of this study is, therefore, the harmonization of EPR data accumulated during long-term dosimetric investigations in the Southern Urals for further pooled analysis. The results will be used for external dose evaluation in the Techa River region.

  19. Neutron Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on neutron dosimetry is to improve the determination of neutron doses by studying neutron spectra, neutron dosemeters and shielding adaptations. In 2000, R and D focused on the contiued investigation of the bubble detectors type BD-PND and BDT, in particular their sensitivity and temperature dependence; the updating of SCK-CEN's criticality dosemeter, the investigation of the characteristics of new thermoluminescent materials and their use in neutron dosemetry; and the investigation of neutron shielding

  20. Neutron Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhavere, F

    2001-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on neutron dosimetry is to improve the determination of neutron doses by studying neutron spectra, neutron dosemeters and shielding adaptations. In 2000, R and D focused on the contiued investigation of the bubble detectors type BD-PND and BDT, in particular their sensitivity and temperature dependence; the updating of SCK-CEN's criticality dosemeter, the investigation of the characteristics of new thermoluminescent materials and their use in neutron dosemetry; and the investigation of neutron shielding.

  1. Topics in radiation dosimetry radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    1972-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry, Supplement 1: Topics in Radiation Dosimetry covers instruments and techniques in dealing with special dosimetry problems. The book discusses thermoluminescence dosimetry in archeological dating; dosimetric applications of track etching; vacuum chambers of radiation measurement. The text also describes wall-less detectors in microdosimetry; dosimetry of low-energy X-rays; and the theory and general applicability of the gamma-ray theory of track effects to various systems. Dose equivalent determinations in neutron fields by means of moderator techniques; as well as developm

  2. EPR correlations and EPW distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    In the case of two free spin-zero particles, the wave function originally considered by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen to exemplify EPR correlations has a non-negative Wigner distribution. This distribution gives an explicitly local account of the correlations. For an irreducible non-locality, more elaborate wave functions are required, with Wigner distributions which are not non-negative. (author)

  3. EPR measurements in irradiated polyacetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hola, O.; Foeldesova, M.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of γ-irradiation on the paramagnetic properties of polyacetylene, and the dependence of the EPR spectra on the radiation dose in samples of irradiated polyacetylene were studied. The measurements show that no essential changes of the spin mobility occurred during irradiation. (author) 3 refs.; 2 figs

  4. EPR study of human hair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížová, Jana; Káfuňková, Eva; Stopka, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 14 (2005), s. 217-218 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NL7567; GA MZd(CZ) NB7377 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : EPR Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.445, year: 2005

  5. Status of neutron dosimetry cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Several new cross section libraries, such as ENDF/B-VI(release 2), IRDF-90,JEF-2.2, and JENDL-3 Dosimetry, have recently been made available to the dosimetry community. the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Radiation Metrology Laboratory (RML) has worked with these libraries since pre-release versions were available. this paper summarizes the results of the intercomparison and testing of dosimetry cross sections. As a result of this analysis, a compendium of the best dosimetry cross sections was assembled from the available libraries for use within the SNL RML. this library, referred to as the SNLRML Library, contains 66 general dosimetry sensors and 3 special dosimeters unique to the RML sensor inventory. The SNLRML cross sections have been put into a format compatible with commonly used spectrum determination codes

  6. Use of EPR to Solve Biochemical Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Indra D.; McCarrick, Robert M.; Lorigan, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    EPR spectroscopy is a very powerful biophysical tool that can provide valuable structural and dynamic information on a wide variety of biological systems. The intent of this review is to provide a general overview for biochemists and biological researchers on the most commonly used EPR methods and how these techniques can be used to answer important biological questions. The topics discussed could easily fill one or more textbooks; thus, we present a brief background on several important biological EPR techniques and an overview of several interesting studies that have successfully used EPR to solve pertinent biological problems. The review consists of the following sections: an introduction to EPR techniques, spin labeling methods, and studies of naturally occurring organic radicals and EPR active transition metal systems which are presented as a series of case studies in which EPR spectroscopy has been used to greatly further our understanding of several important biological systems. PMID:23961941

  7. A study on the retrospective dosimetry using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Dae Seok

    2004-02-01

    Retrospective dosimetry is a process that is a part of dose reconstruction for estimation of exposed dose occurred years before the estimation. Dose reconstruction may be required in a variety of situations such as acute accidental exposure, suspected chronic overexposure and reassessment of occupational exposure. The techniques for retrospective can be classified as biological method and physical method. As a distinct physical technique for dose reconstruction, EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) or ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) dosimetry has been widely used. In EPR dosimetry, electrons generated by the interaction of material with radiation and trapped in lattice are measured by microwave absorption spectroscopy. Among the materials used for EPR dosimetry, tooth enamel has a high sensitivity for ionising radiation and since the tooth follows the carrier in all situations, it can act as a lifetime-dosimeter. And it is considered as one of the important biological samples. In many countries, there have been a lot of studies and practical applications on EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel. This technique has been applied for A-bomb survivors, Techa riverside population, Chernobyl cleanup workers and so on. Also there were two times of international comparison of the results of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel in 1996 and 2000 respectively. But the experts have yet to reach a consensus on the best method. So, a lot of methods have been used for the separation of enamel from teeth and this may influence the dose evaluation. With the factors affecting EPR spectrum, this can effect on the results of dose reconstructed. In this study, factors affecting the EPR spectrum of tooth are experimented first. Anisotropy of radiation induced CO 2 - radical is negligible at low doses, but it become important at high doses. It can induce errors in dose estimation up to 40% at dose range of 5Gy. So, crushing process is essential in dose estimation. But, since sample grinding can

  8. EPR-technical codes - a common basis for the EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaiss, W.; Appell, B.

    1997-01-01

    The design and construction of Nuclear Power Plants implies a full set of codes and standards to define the construction rules of components and equipment. Rules are existing and are currently implemented, respectively in France and Germany (mainly RCCs and KTA safety standards). In the frame of the EPR-project, the common objective requires an essential industrial work programme between engineers from both countries to elaborate a common set of codes and regulations. These new industrial rules are called the ETCs (EPR Technical Codes). In the hierarchy the ETCs are - in case of France - on the common level of basic safety rules (RFS), design and construction rules (RCC) and - in Germany - belonging to RSK guidelines and KTA safety standards. A set of six ETCs will be elaborated to cover: safety and process, mechanical components, electrical equipment, instrumentation and control, civil works, fire protection. (orig.)

  9. The Flamanville 3 EPR reactor; Le reacteur EPR Flamanville 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    On April 10. 2007, the french government authorized EDF to create on the site of Flamanville ( La Manche) a nuclear base installation containing a pressurized water EPR type reactor. This nuclear reactor, conceived by AREVA NP and EDF, is the first copy of a generation susceptible to replace later, at least partly, the French nuclear reactors at present in operation.Within the framework of its mission of technical support of the Authority of Nuclear Safety ( A.S.N.), the I.R.S.N. widely contributed successively: to define the general objectives of safety assigned to this new generation of pressurized water nuclear reactors; to analyze the options of safety proposed by EDF for the EPR project; To deepen, upstream to the authorization of creation, the evaluation of the step of safety and the measures of conception retained by EDF that have to allow to respect the objectives of safety which were notified to it. (N.C.)

  10. Accurate EPR radiosensitivity calibration using small sample masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, R. B.; Haskell, E. H.; Barrus, J. K.; Kenner, G. H.; Romanyukha, A. A.

    2000-03-01

    We demonstrate a procedure in retrospective EPR dosimetry which allows for virtually nondestructive sample evaluation in terms of sample irradiations. For this procedure to work, it is shown that corrections must be made for cavity response characteristics when using variable mass samples. Likewise, methods are employed to correct for empty tube signals, sample anisotropy and frequency drift while considering the effects of dose distribution optimization. A demonstration of the method's utility is given by comparing sample portions evaluated using both the described methodology and standard full sample additive dose techniques. The samples used in this study are tooth enamel from teeth removed during routine dental care. We show that by making all the recommended corrections, very small masses can be both accurately measured and correlated with measurements of other samples. Some issues relating to dose distribution optimization are also addressed.

  11. Accurate EPR radiosensitivity calibration using small sample masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, R.B.; Haskell, E.H.; Barrus, J.K.; Kenner, G.H.; Romanyukha, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate a procedure in retrospective EPR dosimetry which allows for virtually nondestructive sample evaluation in terms of sample irradiations. For this procedure to work, it is shown that corrections must be made for cavity response characteristics when using variable mass samples. Likewise, methods are employed to correct for empty tube signals, sample anisotropy and frequency drift while considering the effects of dose distribution optimization. A demonstration of the method's utility is given by comparing sample portions evaluated using both the described methodology and standard full sample additive dose techniques. The samples used in this study are tooth enamel from teeth removed during routine dental care. We show that by making all the recommended corrections, very small masses can be both accurately measured and correlated with measurements of other samples. Some issues relating to dose distribution optimization are also addressed

  12. Radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, M.W.; Thomas, B.; Conway, J.

    1977-01-01

    A dosemeter is described that is based on the TSCD principle (thermally stimulated current dosimetry). Basically this involves irradiating a responsive material and then heating it,whereby an electric current is produced. If the material is heated in an electric field the peak value of the thermally stimulated current or alternatively the total charge released by heating, can be related to the radiation dose received. The instrument described utilises a sheet coated with a thermoplastic polymer, such as a poly4-methylpent-l-ene. The polymer should have a softening point not lower than 150 0 C with an electrical resistivity of at least 10 16 chms/cm at 150 0 C. The polymer may also be PTFE. Heating should be in the range 150 0 C to 200 0 C and the electric field in the range 50 to 10,000V/mm. (U.K.)

  13. Organ dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, Dean C.; Egbert, Stephen D.; Otis, Mark D.; Kuhn, Thomas; Kerr, George D.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Cristy, Mark; Ryman, Jeffrey C.; Tang, Jabo S.; Maruyama, Takashi

    1987-01-01

    This chapter describes the technical approach, complicating factors, and sensitivities and uncertainties of calculations of doses to the organs of the A-bomb survivors. It is the object of the effort so described to provide data that enables the dosimetry system to determine the fluence, kerma, absorbed dose, and similar quantities in 14 organs and the fetus, specified as being of radiobiological interest. This object was accomplished through the use of adjoint Monte Carlo computations, which use a number of random particle histories to determine the relationship of incident neutrons and gamma rays to those transported to a target organ. The system uses these histories to correlate externally-incident energy- and angle-differential fluences with the fluence spectrum (energy differential only) within the target organ. In order for the system to work in the most efficient manner possible, two levels of data were provided. The first level, represented by approximately 6,000 random adjoint-particle histories, enables the computation of the fluence spectrum with sufficient precision to provide statistically reliable (± 6 %) mean doses within any given organ. With this limited history inventory, the system can be run rapidly for all survivors. Mean organ dose and dose uncertainty are obtainable in this mode. The second mode of operation enables the system to produce a good approximation to fluence spectrum within any organ or to produce the dose in each of an array of organ subvolumes. To be statistically reliable, this level of detail requires far more random histories, approximately 40,000 per organ. Thus, operation of the dosimetry system in this mode (i.e., with this data set) is intended to be on an as-needed, organ-specific basis, since the system run time is eight times that in the mean dose mode. (author)

  14. EPR compared to international requirements (Mainly EUR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broecker, B.

    1996-01-01

    A number of European Utilities have entered an agreement to write common requirements dedicated to future light water nuclear power plants to be built in Europe. The activities are known under the sign EUR (European Utilities Requirements). EPR, the future European Pressurized water Reactor, is the first installation of this type which will be operational from the year 2000 onwards, must fulfill the European requirements. EPR will serve as a test whether these requirements are realistic and well balanced. At the basic design stage of EPR, this paper concentrates on four main topics: the requirements which are new compared with existing reactors and which put a major challenge to the designer; the requirements today still open and the way they can be met by the EPR or not; the points for which already today the EPR special requirements exceed the EUR; the examples where the design of the EPR has given feedback which has led to a change of the EUR. EPR and EUR are different approaches to the reactor of the future. EUR is a set of requirements which leaves a flexibility to the designer while EPR is a real project which defines the technical solutions. EPR will fulfill the EUR and will at the same time serve as a test whether these requirements are realistic. EPR will also fulfill international requirements with minor changes. (J.S.). 7 figs

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry in fingernails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanyukha, Alex; Benevides, Luis A.; Reyes, Ricardo; Trompier, Francois; Clairand, Isabelle; Swartz, Harold M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Based on the capabilities of new instrumentation and the experience gained in the use of teeth for 'after-the-fact' dosimetry, we have undertaken a systematic electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of irradiated fingernails. There have been only a modest number of previous studies of radiation-induced signals in fingernails. While these have given us some promising aspects, overall results have been inconsistent. The most significant problem of EPR fingernail dosimetry is the presence of two signals of non-radiation origin that overlap the radiation-induced signal (RIS), making it almost impossible to do dose measurements below 5 Gy. Historically, these two non-radiation components were named mechanically-induced signal (MIS) and background signal (BKS). In order to investigate them in detail, three different methods of MIS and BKS mutual isolation have been developed and implemented. Having applied these methods, we were able to understand that fingernail tissue, after cut, can be modeled as a deformed sponge, where the MIS and BKS are associated with the stress from elastic and plastic deformations respectively. A sponge has a unique mechanism of mechanical stress absorption, which is necessary for fingernails in order to perform its everyday function of protecting the fingertips from hits and trauma. Like a sponge, fingernails are also known to be an effective water absorber. When a sponge is saturated with water, it tends to restore to its original shape, and when it looses water, it becomes deformed again. The same happens to fingernail tissue. Our suggested interpretation of the mechanical deformation in fingernails gives also a way to distinguish between the MIS and RIS. Obtained results show that the MIS in irradiated fingernails can be almost completely eliminated without a significant change to the RIS by soaking the sample for 10 minutes in water. This is an ongoing study but even at its present state of development, it has shown that it

  16. Time-resolved EPR study of singlet oxygen in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzzi, Marco; Sartori, Elena; Moscatelli, Alberto; Khudyakov, Igor V; Turro, Nicholas J

    2013-06-27

    X-band EPR spectra of singlet O2((1)Δg) and triplet O2((3)Σg(-)) were observed in the gas phase under low molecular-oxygen pressures PO2 = 0.175-0.625 Torr, T = 293-323 K. O2((1)Δg) was produced by quenching of photogenerated triplet sensitizers naphthalene C8H10, perdeuterated naphthalene, and perfluoronaphthalene in the gas phase. The EPR spectrum of O2((1)Δg) was also observed under microwave discharge. Integrated intensities and line widths of individual components of the EPR spectrum of O2((3)Σg(-)) were used as internal standards for estimating the concentration of O2 species and PO2 in the EPR cavity. Time-resolved (TR) EPR experiments of C8H10 were the main focus of this Article. Pulsed irradiation of C8H10 in the presence of O2((3)Σg(-)) allowed us to determine the kinetics of formation and decay for each of the four components of the O2((1)Δg) EPR signal, which lasted for only a few seconds. We found that the kinetics of EPR-component decay fit nicely to a biexponential kinetics law. The TR EPR 2D spectrum of the third component of the O2((1)Δg) EPR spectrum was examined in experiments using C8H10. This spectrum vividly presents the time evolution of an EPR component. The largest EPR signal and the longest lifetime of O2((1)Δg), τ = 0.4 s, were observed at medium pressure PO2 = 0.4 Torr, T = 293 K. The mechanism of O2((1)Δg) decay in the presence of photosensitizers is discussed. EPR spectra of O2((1)Δg) evidence that the spin-rotational states of O2((1)Δg) are populated according to Boltzmann distribution in the studied time range of 10-100 ms. We believe that this is the first report dealing with the dependence of O2((1)Δg) EPR line width on PO2 and T.

  17. Hydrogen Analyses in the EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worapittayaporn, S.; Eyink, J.; Movahed, M.

    2008-01-01

    In severe accidents with core melting large amounts of hydrogen may be released into the containment. The EPR provides a combustible gas control system to prevent hydrogen combustion modes with the potential to challenge the containment integrity due to excessive pressure and temperature loads. This paper outlines the approach for the verification of the effectiveness and efficiency of this system. Specifically, the justification is a multi-step approach. It involves the deployment of integral codes, lumped parameter containment codes and CFD codes and the use of the sigma criterion, which provides the link to the broad experimental data base for flame acceleration (FA) and deflagration to detonation transition (DDT). The procedure is illustrated with an example. The performed analyses show that hydrogen combustion at any time does not lead to pressure or temperature loads that threaten the containment integrity of the EPR. (authors)

  18. Retrospective dosimetry of Chernobyl liquidators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumak, V.V.; Bakhanova, E.V.; Sholom, S.V.; Pasalskaya, L.F.; Bouville, A.; Krjuchkov, V.P.

    2000-01-01

    sets and, clearly, may lead to conclusion regarding the adequacy of the data set in general, not on individual basis. Another possibility to verify existing dose records is application of reliable retrospective dosimetric techniques, which may be used as a reference. Dosimetric screening of the study cohort requires a tool, which should meet two basic requirements: to be cheap and practical, and to be applicable to all subjects (desirably even post mortem). Till recent time such tool was missing and none of the known methods of retrospective dosimetry matched these criteria. Therefore in the novel method of Soft Expert Assessment Dosimetry (SEAD) was developed by the International Dosimetric Group operating under auspices of Ukraine-USA-France and CEC-Russia-Byelarus collaboration. This method is based on the analysis of information acquired from interviewing of liquidators and exploits regularities of dose distributions. The main advantage of this method is applicability to all subjects making it good for the screening of the cohort. Case-control study requires closer consideration of fewer subjects and in this regard high precision techniques (like EPR) make use. High cost of analyses is acceptable in this case. Practical implementation of this approach is illustrated by some on-going studies. Pros and contras of selected methods, as well as implementation considerations will be discussed as well. (author)

  19. EPR studies of melanin from Cladosporium cladosporioides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilawa, B.; Buszman, E.; Latocha, M.; Wilczok, T.

    1996-01-01

    Free radical properties of Cladosporium cladosporioides mycelium and melanin, and synthetic eumelanin and pheomelanin were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance method. Single EPR line and complex EPR spectrum with hyperfine splitting were measured for model DOPA-melanin and cysteinyldopa-melanin, respectively. EPR spectra of Cladosporium cladosporioides samples and pheomelanin show the same character. The concentration of paramagnetic centers in melanins isolated from Cladosporium cladosporioides is considerably higher than that of crude mycelium, whereas the EPR line widths are lower for mycelium than for melanin samples. For all analyzed samples the increase of EPR signals intensity with the increase of microwave power, and the decrease of intensities after saturation were observed the low values of microwave power sufficient for EPR lines saturation demonstrate that the spin-lattice relaxation times of unpaired electrons in melanins are long. (author)

  20. Retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. I.; Kim, J. L.; Chang, I.; Kim, B. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Dicentric chromosome aberrations technique scoring of aberrations in metaphases prepared from human lymphocytes is most commonly used. This is considered as a reliable technique because the sample is extracted from the individual human body itself. There are other techniques in biological dosimetry such as Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) using translocations, premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and micronucleus assay. However the minimum detectable doses (MDD) are relatively high and sample preparation time is also relatively longer. Therefore, there is limitation in use of these techniques for the purpose of triage in a short time in case of emergency situation relating large number of persons. Electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique is based on the signal from unpaired electrons such as free radicals in irradiated materials especially tooth enamel, however it has also limitation for the purpose of triage because of difficulty of sample taking and its high MDD. Recently as physical methods, thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique have been attracted due to its lower MDD and simplicity of sample preparation. Density of the trapped charges is generally proportional to the radiation dose absorbed and the intensity of emitting light is also proportional to the density of trapped charges, thus it can be applied to measure radiation dose retrospectively. In this presentation, TL and OSL techniques are going to introduced and discussed as physical methods for retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges especially in electronic component materials. As a tool for dose reconstruction for emergency situation, thermoluminescece and optically stimulated luminescence techniques which are based on trapped charges during exposure of material are introduced. These techniques have several advantages such as high sensitivity, fast evaluation and ease to sample collection over common biological dosimetry and EPR

  1. Chemistry of artemisinin: an EPR study and nucleobases interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustafa, Damra Elhaj [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Education, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2000-10-01

    In the present, the radical transformations of artemisinin, a potent antimalarial drug have been examined using EPR and EPR spin trapping techniques. The effect of light on artemisinin has been investigated at 77 K as well as with the use of phenyl butyl nitrone (PBN) spin trapping agent. While no EPR signal was observed at 77 K, intense light irradiation of artemisinin/PBN gave EPR signal characteristic of radical transformation of the PBN. The reactions of artemisinin with iron (II), manganese (II), hemin and ferrocyanide ion have been investigated by spin trapping techniques. Artemisinin/iron (II) formed spin adducts with nitrosobenzene, nitroso-t-butane and PBN. The hypertine splittings of the spin adducts were a{sub N}=1.08 mT/a{sub N}=1.25 mT/a{sub N}=0.09 mT and a{sub N}=1.56 mT/a{sub N}=0.29 mT respectively. PBN trapping of artemether/iron (II) gave similar result to artemisinin/iron (II). These results are indicative of secondary carbon-centered radical formation. While artemisinin/hemin/PBN gave very weak EPR signal, ferrocyanide under the same condition gave no signal. Incubation of artemisinin with RNA at different reaction conditions, including irradiation with light, heat and mild acidic media, revealed no RNA damage when examined by agarose electrophoresis. However, artemisinin/iron (II) caused RNA damage in pH-dependant manner. In contrast, hemin did not show the same effect when it was used instead of iron (II). (Author)

  2. Chemistry of artemisinin: an EPR study and nucleobases interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, Damra Elhaj

    2000-10-01

    In the present, the radical transformations of artemisinin, a potent antimalarial drug have been examined using EPR and EPR spin trapping techniques. The effect of light on artemisinin has been investigated at 77 K as well as with the use of phenyl butyl nitrone (PBN) spin trapping agent. While no EPR signal was observed at 77 K, intense light irradiation of artemisinin/PBN gave EPR signal characteristic of radical transformation of the PBN. The reactions of artemisinin with iron (II), manganese (II), hemin and ferrocyanide ion have been investigated by spin trapping techniques. Artemisinin/iron (II) formed spin adducts with nitrosobenzene, nitroso-t-butane and PBN. The hypertine splittings of the spin adducts were a N =1.08 mT/a N =1.25 mT/a N =0.09 mT and a N =1.56 mT/a N =0.29 mT respectively. PBN trapping of artemether/iron (II) gave similar result to artemisinin/iron (II). These results are indicative of secondary carbon-centered radical formation. While artemisinin/hemin/PBN gave very weak EPR signal, ferrocyanide under the same condition gave no signal. Incubation of artemisinin with RNA at different reaction conditions, including irradiation with light, heat and mild acidic media, revealed no RNA damage when examined by agarose electrophoresis. However, artemisinin/iron (II) caused RNA damage in pH-dependant manner. In contrast, hemin did not show the same effect when it was used instead of iron (II). (Author)

  3. Preliminary study on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal properties of mobile phone components for dose estimation in radiation accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byeong Ryong; Ha, Wi Ho; Park, Sun Hoo; Lee, Jin Kyeong; Lee, Seung Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We have investigated the EPR signal properties in 12 components of two mobile phones (LCD, OLED) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer in this study.EPR measurements were performed at normal atmospheric conditions using Bruker EXEXSYS-II E500 spectrometer with X-band bridge, and samples were irradiated by {sup 137}C{sub s} gamma-ray source. To identify the presence of radiation-induced signal (RIS), the EPR spectra of each sample were measured unirradiated and irradiated at 50 Gy. Then, dose-response curve and signal intensity variating by time after irradiation were measured. As a result, the signal intensity increased after irradiation in all samples except the USIM plastic and IC chip. Among the samples, cover glass(CG), lens, light guide plate(LGP) and diffusion sheet have shown fine linearity (R{sup 2} > 0.99). Especially, the LGP had ideal characteristics for dosimetry because there were no signal in 0 Gy and high rate of increase in RIS. However, this sample showed weakness in fading. Signal intensity of LGP and Diffusion Sheet decreased by 50% within 72 hours after irradiation, while signals of Cover Glass and Lens were stably preserved during the short period of time. In order to apply rapidly EPR dosimetry using mobile phone components in large-scale radiation accidents, further studies on signal differences for same components of the different mobile phone, fading, pretreatment of samples and processing of background signal are needed. However, it will be possible to do dosimetry by dose-additive method or comparative method using unirradiated same product in small-scale accident.

  4. Pharmaceutical applications of in vivo EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, K.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the applications of in vivo EPR in the field of pharmacy. In addition to direct detection of free radical metabolites and measurement of oxygen, EPR can be used to characterize the mechanisms of drug release from biodegradable polymers. Unique information about drug concentration, the microenvironment (viscosity, polarity, pH) and biodistribution (by localized measurement or EPR Imaging) can be obtained. (author)

  5. EPR-based material modelling of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Asaad; Alani, Amir M.

    2013-04-01

    In the past few decades, as a result of the rapid developments in computational software and hardware, alternative computer aided pattern recognition approaches have been introduced to modelling many engineering problems, including constitutive modelling of materials. The main idea behind pattern recognition systems is that they learn adaptively from experience and extract various discriminants, each appropriate for its purpose. In this work an approach is presented for developing material models for soils based on evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR). EPR is a recently developed hybrid data mining technique that searches for structured mathematical equations (representing the behaviour of a system) using genetic algorithm and the least squares method. Stress-strain data from triaxial tests are used to train and develop EPR-based material models for soil. The developed models are compared with some of the well-known conventional material models and it is shown that EPR-based models can provide a better prediction for the behaviour of soils. The main benefits of using EPR-based material models are that it provides a unified approach to constitutive modelling of all materials (i.e., all aspects of material behaviour can be implemented within a unified environment of an EPR model); it does not require any arbitrary choice of constitutive (mathematical) models. In EPR-based material models there are no material parameters to be identified. As the model is trained directly from experimental data therefore, EPR-based material models are the shortest route from experimental research (data) to numerical modelling. Another advantage of EPR-based constitutive model is that as more experimental data become available, the quality of the EPR prediction can be improved by learning from the additional data, and therefore, the EPR model can become more effective and robust. The developed EPR-based material models can be incorporated in finite element (FE) analysis.

  6. Personnel neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankins, D.

    1982-04-01

    This edited transcript of a presentation on personnel neutron discusses the accuracy of present dosimetry practices, requirements, calibration, dosemeter types, quality factors, operational problems, and dosimetry for a criticality accident. 32 figs

  7. Primary Study about Intensity Signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in vivo Tooth Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon; Gang, Seo Gon; Kim, Jeong In; Lee, Byung Il [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance(EPR) dosimetry system using human tooth has been well introduced as one of the efficient tool to evaluate radiation exposure. But, EPR dosimetry, even in the case of classical in vitro EPR system using tooth sample(measured molars), was regarded as having big signal fluctuation. One of reason for such difficulty in getting accurate intensity was the big effect of organic materials mixed in enamel part of teeth samples. They are mainly caused by the adaptation process of system itself to the movement of measured human subject. Generally, when we measured human teeth in vivo, five of six teeth spectrum were gathered and averaged for real evaluation. The these spectrum are measured under very different environment like angle of external magnet making magnetic filed with teeth(incisor). Random movement of these signals should be considered in different view point to understand and compare each EPR in vivo EPR spectrum. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation. But, in overall view, the EPR signal, especially at no irradiation level, is almost same for every measurement trial which is mainly composed of big noise and very small signal from real free radicals. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation.

  8. Primary Study about Intensity Signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in vivo Tooth Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hoon; Gang, Seo Gon; Kim, Jeong In; Lee, Byung Il

    2017-01-01

    The signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance(EPR) dosimetry system using human tooth has been well introduced as one of the efficient tool to evaluate radiation exposure. But, EPR dosimetry, even in the case of classical in vitro EPR system using tooth sample(measured molars), was regarded as having big signal fluctuation. One of reason for such difficulty in getting accurate intensity was the big effect of organic materials mixed in enamel part of teeth samples. They are mainly caused by the adaptation process of system itself to the movement of measured human subject. Generally, when we measured human teeth in vivo, five of six teeth spectrum were gathered and averaged for real evaluation. The these spectrum are measured under very different environment like angle of external magnet making magnetic filed with teeth(incisor). Random movement of these signals should be considered in different view point to understand and compare each EPR in vivo EPR spectrum. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation. But, in overall view, the EPR signal, especially at no irradiation level, is almost same for every measurement trial which is mainly composed of big noise and very small signal from real free radicals. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation.

  9. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1986-01-01

    During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both...... and sterilization dosimetry, optichromic dosimeters in the shape of small tubes for food processing, and ESR spectroscopy of alanine for reference dosimetry. In this paper the special features of radiation processing dosimetry are discussed, several commonly used dosimeters are reviewed, and factors leading...

  10. USE OF-EPR-DL FIELD TEST EQUIPMENT FOR DETECTION OF SIGMA PHASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraão Danilo Gomes Barreto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work has objective to correlate the intergranular corrosion susceptibility test named EPR-DL (Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation of Double Loop with the sigma phase formation and other phases. It has been used samples from a UNS S32760 steel pipe for conducting various aging heat treatments. Held isothermal heat treatment at 850°C for 1 min, 10 min, 30 min, 1 h, 1h30min and 10 h. Each heat treated sample and as received were tested using the electrochemical polarization reactivation of double loop technique (EPR-DL. It was possible the detection of deleterious phases with DL-EPR portable cell. The EPR-DL test of some samples showed a second peak of reactivation in which the results showed that this peak might be associated with ferrite or be related to the presence of chi phase

  11. Neutron dosimetry - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, J W

    1955-03-29

    This review summarizes information on the following subjects: (1) physical processes of importance in neutron dosimetry; (2) biological effects of neutrons; (3) neutron sources; and (4) instruments and methods used in neutron dosimetry. Also, possible improvements in dosimetry instrumentation are outlined and discussed. (author)

  12. Chemical dosimetry principles in high dose dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhatre, Sachin G.V.

    2016-01-01

    In radiation processing, activities of principal concern are process validation and process control. The objective of such formalized procedures is to establish documentary evidence that the irradiation process has achieved the desired results. The key element of such activities is inevitably a well characterized reliable dosimetry system that is traceable to recognized national and international dosimetry standards. Only such dosimetry systems can help establish the required documentary evidence. In addition, industrial radiation processing such as irradiation of foodstuffs and sterilization of health careproducts are both highly regulated, in particular with regard to dose. Besides, dosimetry is necessary for scaling up processes from the research level to the industrial level. Thus, accurate dosimetry is indispensable

  13. Evaluation of external and internal irradiation on uranium mining enterprise staff by tooth enamel EPR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhumadilov, Kassym; Ivannikov, Alexander; Khailov, Artem; Orlenko, Sergei; Skvortsov, Valeriy; Stepanenko, Valeriy; Kuterbekov, Kairat; Toyoda, Shin; Kazymbet, Polat; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2017-11-01

    In order to estimate radiation effects on uranium enterprise staff and population teeth samples were collected for EPR tooth enamel dosimetry from population of Stepnogorsk city and staff of uranium mining enterprise in Shantobe settlment (Akmola region, North of Kazakhstan). By measurements of tooth enamel EPR spectra, the total absorbed dose in the enamel samples and added doses after subtraction of the contribution of natural background radiation are determined. For the population of Stepnogorsk city average added dose value of 4 +/- 11 mGy with variation of 51 mGy was obtained. For the staff of uranium mining enterprise in Shantobe settlment average value of added dose 95 +/- 20 mGy, with 85 mGy variation was obtained. Higher doses and the average value and a large variation for the staff, probably is due to the contribution of occupational exposure.

  14. Dosimetry system 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolson, William A.; Egbert, Stephen D.; Gritzner, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    In May 1983, the authors proposed a dosimetry system for use by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) that would incorporate the new findings and calculations of the joint United States - Japan working groups on the reassessment of A-bomb dosimetry. The proposed dosimetry system evolved from extensive discussions with RERF personnel, numerous meetings of the scientists from Japan and the United States involved in the dosimetry reassessment research, and requirements expressed by epidemiologists and radiobiologists on the various review panels. The dosimetry system proposed was based on considerations of the dosimetry requirements for the normal work of RERF and for future research in radiobiology, the computerized input data on A-bomb survivors available in the RERF data base, the level of detail, precision, and accuracy of various components of the dosimetric estimates, and the computer resources available at RERF in Hiroshima. These discussions and our own experience indicated that, in light of the expansion of computer and radiation technologies and the desire for more detail in the dosimetry, an entirely new approach to the dosimetry system was appropriate. This resulted in a complete replacement of the T65D system as distinguished from a simpler approach involving a renormalization of T65D parameters to reflect the new dosimetry. The proposed dosimetry system for RERF and the plan for implementation was accepted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Working Group on A-bomb Dosimetry chaired by Dr. R.F. Christy. The dosimetry system plan was also presented to the binational A-bomb dosimetry review groups for critical comment and was discussed at joint US-Japan workshop. A prototype dosimetry system incorporating preliminary dosimetry estimates and applicable to only a limited set of A-bomb survivors was installed on the RERF computer system in the fall of 1984. This system was successfully operated at RERF and provided an initial look at the impact of

  15. Applications of gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S

    2004-01-01

    Gel dosimetry has been examined as a clinical dosimeter since the 1950s. During the last two decades, however, a rapid increase in the number of investigators has been seen, and the body of knowledge regarding gel dosimetry has expanded considerably. Gel dosimetry is still considered a research project, and the introduction of this tool into clinical use is proceeding slowly. This paper will review the characteristics of gel dosimetry that make it desirable for clinical use, the postulated and demonstrated applications of gel dosimetry, and some complications, set-backs, and failures that have contributed to the slow introduction into routine clinical use

  16. EPR assessment of the free radicals in irradiated foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tencheva, S.; Katsareva, Ts.; Malinovski, A.; Kabasanov, K.

    1985-01-01

    In the hygienic assessment of radiation treated foodstuffs the study of free radicals formed during radiation exposure, their concentration and disintegration kinetics are of particular interest. In the work presented the concentration of the free radicals in irradiated prunes, nuts and corn is determined using EPR spectroscopy. The following doses are applied: 2, 10 and 20 kGy for prunes, 1, 10 and 20 kGy for nuts, and 0.75, 10 and 20 kGy for corn. EPR measurements are done immediately after the irradiation: 24 hours, and 3, 6, 9 and 15 days after the exposure. In the small radiation doses the formation of single radicals is observed. In doses of 10 kGy the spectra get complicated with the occurence of radicals R 1 , R 2 , R 3 and R 4 . The assessment of radicals proves to be a prospective method for the identification and determination of the preservation terms of foodstuffs

  17. EPR project construction cost control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duflo, D.; Pouget-Abadie, X.; Dufour, A.; Kauffmann, G.

    2001-01-01

    The EPR project is now managed by EDF in cooperation with the German Utilities. The main engineering activities for this period are related to the preparation of construction project management, deepening of some safety issues, definition of the project technical reference. The EPR project concerns the so-called reference unit, that is an isolated first-off unit, with unit electrical power of about 1500 MW. The construction costs evaluated are those of the nuclear island, the conventional island, site facilities, installation work and the administrative buildings. The EPR project construction cost evaluation method applies to all the equipment installed and commissioned. It requires the availability of a preliminary project detailed enough to identify the bill of quantities. To these quantities are then assigned updated unit prices that are based either on cost bases for similar and recent facilities or taken from request for quotation for similar equipment or result from gains due to contractual conditions benefiting from simplifications in the functional and technical specifications. The input and output data are managed in a model that respects the breakdown on which the evaluation method is based. The structural organization of this method reflects a functional breakdown on the one hand (nuclear island, conventional island, common site elements) and on the other hand a breakdown according to equipment or activity (civil engineering, mechanics, electricity, instrumentation and control). This paper discusses the principle and the method of construction cost evaluation carried out, the cost data base and input and output parameters as well as results and oncoming cost analysis tasks. (author)

  18. Advances in electron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, D.

    1980-04-01

    Starting from the two most important interactions of electrons with matter, energy loss and scattering, a review is given of a number of effects which are important in electron dosimetry. For determining the absorbed dose in a phantom by means of ionization chambers, imformation is required on the electron spectrum at the location of the measurement, on the stopping powers of different materials and on disturbances such as the displacement of the effective point of measurements from the centre of the chamber. By means of figures and photographs of electron traces in bubble chambers, the origin of the formation of the absorbed dose maximum in a phantom is explained. It is shown, how by multiple scattering, the similarity of dose distributions in different media can be explained and how by Monte-Carlo calculations absorbed dose distributions in the surroundings of inhomogeneities (e.g. cavities) in a phantom can be determined. (orig.) [de

  19. Characterization of the factors having an influence on the evolution of the EPR signal of irradiated alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feaugas-Le-Berre, Valerie

    1999-01-01

    EPR/alanine dosimetry has been used by the LNHB (Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel) since many years for applied metrology. This technic is based on the measurement of the EPR signal of the free radicals induced in alanine by irradiation. The aim of this work is to characterize the factors having an influence on the evolution of the amplitude of the EPR signal of irradiated alanine to limit the uncertainties on the determination of the absorbed dose. The first step of this work has been the choice of the dosimeter. A bibliographic study completed by experiments on the response of alanine isomers to the dose and on its stability with time has lead us to choose L-α-alanine powder as dosimeter. The influence of the recording parameter of the spectrometer on the characteristics of the EPR spectrum has then been studied. This has enabled us to optimize the recording conditions of EPR spectra. As the angular anisotropy of the EPR signal limits the measurements reproducibility, an experimental protocol has been defined to solve this problem. The repeatability of the measurements has been enhanced by modifying the spectrometer and using an internal standard constituted of single crystals of CuSO 4 .5H 2 O. As the amplitude of the EPR signal is sensitive to the measurement temperature, a method of normalization of the results to 20 C has been determined. We have studied the influence of an irradiation parameter and of environmental parameters. We have shown that the EPR signal amplitude increases with irradiation temperature. The EPR signal amplitude and its evolution vary strongly with storage conditions (temperature and moisture) of the dosimeter before and after irradiation. The presence of moisture in alanine powder leads to a loss of signal amplitude. The dosimeters exposition to light also entails a loss of amplitude. Oxygen does not influence the EPR spectrum of alanine. We have noticed that the EPR signal amplitude of samples stored in absence of moisture

  20. EPR of exchange coupled systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bencini, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    From chemistry to solid state physics to biology, the applications of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) are relevant to many areas. This unified treatment is based on the spin Hamiltonian approach and makes extensive use of irreducible tensor techniques to analyze systems in which two or more spins are magnetically coupled. This edition contains a new Introduction by coauthor Dante Gatteschi, a pioneer and scholar of molecular magnetism.The first two chapters review the foundations of exchange interactions, followed by examinations of the spectra of pairs and clusters, relaxation in oligon

  1. EPR investigations on technetium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abram, U.; Munze, R.; Kirmse, R.; Stach, J.

    1986-01-01

    Stimulated by the widespread use of the isotope /sup 99m/Tc in the field of nuclear medicine, there has been a substantial growth of interest in the chemistry of this man-made element. A particular need emerges for analytical methods allowing solution investigations of coordination compounds of technetium with low substance use. Considering these facts, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EPR) appears to be a very suitable method because only very small amounts of the compounds are needed (lower than 1 mg). The resulting spectra give information regarding the valence state, symmetry and bonding properties of the compounds under study

  2. EPR spectroscopic investigation of psoriatic finger nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Minakawa, Satoko; Sawamura, Daisuke

    2013-11-01

    Nail lesions are common features of psoriasis and found in almost half of the patients. However, there is no feasible spectroscopic method evaluating changes and severity of nail psoriasis. EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) might be feasible for evaluating nail conditions in the patients of psoriasis. Finger nails of five cases with nail psoriasis, (three females and two males) were examined. Nail samples were subjected to the EPR assay. The small piece of the finger nail (1.5 × 5 mm(2)) was incubated in ~50 μM 5-DSA (5-doxylstearic acid) aqueous solutions for about 60 min at 37°C. After rinsing and wiping off the excess 5-DSA solution, the nail samples were measured by EPR. EPR spectra were analyzed using the intensity ratio (Fast/Slow) of the two motions at the peaks of the lower magnetic field. We observed two distinguishable sites on the basis of the EPR results. In addition, the modern EPR calculation was performed to analyze the spectra obtained. The nail psoriasis-related region is 2~3 times higher than that of the control. The present EPR results show that there are two distinguishable sites in the nail. In the case of nail psoriasis, the fragile components are 2~3 times more than those of the control. Thus, the EPR method is thought to be a novel and reliable method of evaluating the nail psoriasis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. EPR STUDIES OF THERMALLY STERILIZED VASELINUM ALBUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Paweł; Pilawa, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used for examination of free radicals in thermally treated vaselinum album (VA). Thermal treatment in hot air as sterilization process was tested. Conditions of thermal sterilization were chosen according to the pharmaceutical norms. Vaselinum album was heated at the following conditions (T--temperature, t--time): T = 160°C and t = 120 min, T = 170°C and t = 60 min and T = 180°C and t = 30 min. The aim of this work was to determine concentration and free radical properties of thermally sterilized VA. EPR analysis for VA was done 15 min after sterilization. EPR measurements were done at room temperature. EPR spectra were recorded in the range of microwave power of 2.2-70 mW. g-Factor, amplitudes (A) and line width (ΔBpp) of the spectra were determined. The shape of the EPR spectra was analyzed. Free radical concentration (N) in the heated samples was determined. EPR spectra were not obtained for the non heated VA. EPR spectra were detected for all thermally sterilized samples. The spectra revealed complex character, their asymmetry depends on microwave power. The lowest free radicals concentration was found for the VA sterilized at 180°C during 30 min. EPR spectroscopy is proposed as the method useful for optimization of sterilization process of drugs.

  4. Overview of LBB implementation for the EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauquelin, C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the use of leak-before-break (LBB) analysis for EPR reactors. EPR is an evolutionary Nuclear Island of the 4 loop x 1500 Mwe class currently in the design phase. Application of LBB to the main coolant lines and resulting design impacts are summarized. Background information on LBB analysis in France and Germany is also presented

  5. Overview of LBB implementation for the EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cauquelin, C.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the use of leak-before-break (LBB) analysis for EPR reactors. EPR is an evolutionary Nuclear Island of the 4 loop x 1500 Mwe class currently in the design phase. Application of LBB to the main coolant lines and resulting design impacts are summarized. Background information on LBB analysis in France and Germany is also presented.

  6. EPR meeting international safety standards with margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurkiewicz, S.M.; Brauns, J.; Blombach, J.

    2005-01-01

    The EPR provides technology that offers a solution to the market's need for safe, economic power. The EPR was originally developed through a joint effort between Framatome ANP and Siemens by incorporating the best technological features from the French and German nuclear reactor fleets into a cost-competitive product capable of international licensing. As such, the EPR is a global product with commercial units currently being built in Finland at the Olkiluoto site, and planned for France, at the Flamanville site. Framatome ANP has recently proposed four EPR units to China in response to a request for vendor bids. In addition, Framatome ANP has announced their intent to pursue design certification with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This paper discusses how EPR's innovative safety philosophy ensures compliance with international safety standards for advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs). (author)

  7. EPR meeting international safety standards with margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurkiewicz, S.M.; Brauns, J.; Blombach, J.

    2005-01-01

    The EPR provides technology that offers a solution to the market's need for safe, economic power. The EPR was originally developed through a joint effort between Framatome ANP and Siemens by incorporating the best technological features from the French and German nuclear reactor fleets into a cost-competitive product capable of international licensing. As such, the EPR is a global product with commercial units currently being built in Finland at the Olkiluoto site, and planned for France, at the Flamanville site. Framatome ANP has recently proposed four EPR units to China in response to a request for vendor bids. In addition, Framatome ANP has announced their intent to pursue design certification in with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This paper discusses how EPR's innovative safety philosophy ensures compliance with international safety standards for advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs). (author)

  8. Probing Microenvironment in Ionic Liquids by Time-Resolved EPR of Photoexcited Triplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, M Yu; Veber, S L; Prikhod'ko, S A; Adonin, N Yu; Bagryanskaya, E G; Fedin, M V

    2015-10-22

    Unusual physicochemical properties of ionic liquids (ILs) open vistas for a variety of new applications. Herewith, we investigate the influence of microviscosity and nanostructuring of ILs on spin dynamics of the dissolved photoexcited molecules. We use two most common ILs [Bmim]PF6 and [Bmim]BF4 (with its close analogue [C10mim]BF4) as solvents and photoexcited Zn tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP) as a probe. Time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TR EPR) is employed to investigate spectra and kinetics of spin-polarized triplet ZnTPP in the temperature range 100-270 K. TR EPR data clearly indicate the presence of two microenvironments of ZnTPP in frozen ILs at 100-200 K, being manifested in different spectral shapes and different spin relaxation rates. For one of these microenvironments TR EPR data is quite similar to those obtained in common frozen organic solvents (toluene, glycerol, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone). However, the second one favors the remarkably slow relaxation of spin polarization, being much longer than in the case of common solvents. Additional experiments using continuous wave EPR and stable nitroxide as a probe confirmed the formation of heterogeneities upon freezing of ILs and complemented TR EPR results. Thus, TR EPR of photoexcited triplets can be effectively used for probing heterogeneities and nanostructuring in frozen ILs. In addition, the increase of polarization lifetime in frozen ILs is an interesting finding that might allow investigation of short-lived intermediates inaccessible otherwise.

  9. Thermoluminescence albedo-neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, T.; Storruste, A.

    1986-10-01

    The report discusses neutron detection with respect to dosimetry and compares different thermoluminescent dosimetry materials for neutron dosimetry. Construction and calibration of a thermoluminescence albedo neutron dosemeter, developed by the authors, is described

  10. Advances towards using finger/toenail dosimetry to triage a large population after potential exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaoming; Gui Jiang; Matthews, Thomas P.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Swarts, Steven G.; Grinberg, Oleg; Sidabras, Jason; Wilcox, Dean E.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and accurate retrospective dosimetry is of critical importance and strategic value for the emergency medical response to a large-scale radiological/nuclear event. One technique that has the potential for rapid and accurate dosimetry measurements is electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of relatively stable radiation-induced signals (RIS) in fingernails and toenails. Two approaches are being developed for EPR nail dosimetry. In the approach using ex vivo measurements on nail clippings, accurate estimation of the dose-dependent amplitude of the RIS is complicated by the presence of mechanically-induced signals (MIS) that are generated during the nail clipping. Recent developments in ex vivo nail dosimetry, including a thorough characterization of the MIS and an appreciation of the role of hydration and the development of effective analytic techniques, have led to improvements in the accuracy and precision of this approach. An in vivo nail dosimetry approach is also very promising, as it eliminates the problems of MIS from the clipping and it has the potential to be an effective and efficient approach for field deployment. Two types of EPR resonators are being developed for in vivo measurements of fingernails and toenails.

  11. Thermoluminescence in medical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, T.

    2011-10-01

    The dosimetry by thermoluminescence (Tl) is applied in the entire world for the dosimetry of ionizing radiations specially to personal and medical dosimetry. This dosimetry method has been very interesting for measures in vivo because the Tl dosimeters have the advantage of being very sensitive in a very small volume and they are also equivalent to tissue and they do not need additional accessories (for example, cable, electrometer, etc.) The main characteristics of the diverse Tl materials to be used in the radiation measures and practical applications are: the Tl curve, the share homogeneity, the signal stability after the irradiation, precision and exactitude, the response in function with the dose and the energy influence. In this work a brief summary of the advances of the radiations dosimetry is presented by means of the thermally stimulated luminescence and its application to the dosimetry in radiotherapy. (Author)

  12. Thin film tritium dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Paul R.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for tritium dosimetry. A dosimeter comprising a thin film of a material having relatively sensitive RITAC-RITAP dosimetry properties is exposed to radiation from tritium, and after the dosimeter has been removed from the source of the radiation, the low energy electron dose deposited in the thin film is determined by radiation-induced, thermally-activated polarization dosimetry techniques.

  13. Nitrosyl hemoglobins: EPR above 80 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wajnberg, E.; Bemski, G.; El-Jaick, L.J.; Alves, O.C.

    1995-03-01

    The EPR spectra of nitrosyl hemoglobin and myoglobin in different conditions (native, denatured and lyophilized), as well as of hematin-NO were obtained in the temperature range of 80 K-280 K. There is a substantial and reversible.decrease of the areas of the EPR spectra of all the hemoglobin samples above 150 K. The interpretation of the results implies the existence of two conformational states in thermal equilibrium only one of which is EPR detectable. Thermodynamical parameters are determined for the hexa and penta-coordinated cases. (author). 25 refs, 3 figs.

  14. Nitrosyl hemoglobins: EPR above 80 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wajnberg, E.; Bemski, G.; El-Jaick, L.J.; Alves, O.C.

    1995-03-01

    The EPR spectra of nitrosyl hemoglobin and myoglobin in different conditions (native, denatured and lyophilized), as well as of hematin-NO were obtained in the temperature range of 80 K-280 K. There is a substantial and reversible.decrease of the areas of the EPR spectra of all the hemoglobin samples above 150 K. The interpretation of the results implies the existence of two conformational states in thermal equilibrium only one of which is EPR detectable. Thermodynamical parameters are determined for the hexa and penta-coordinated cases. (author). 25 refs, 3 figs

  15. EPR ohmic heating energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, F.M.; Stillwagon, R.E.; King, E.I.

    1977-01-01

    The Ohmic Heating (OH) Systems for all the Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) designs to date have all used temporary energy storage to assist in providing the OH current charge required to build up the plasma current. The energies involved (0.8 x 10 9 J to 1.9 x 10 9 J) are so large as to make capacitor storage impractical. Two alternative approaches are homopolar dc generators and ac generators. Either of these can be designed for pulse duty and can be made to function in a manner similar to a capacitor in the OH circuit and are therefore potential temporary energy storage devices for OH systems for large tokamaks. This study compared total OH system costs using homopolar and ac generators to determine their relative merits. The total system costs were not significantly different for either type of machine. The added flexibility and the lower maintenance of the ac machine system make it the more attractive approach

  16. Experiences with alanine dosimetry in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, H.-J.; Gohs, U.

    1996-01-01

    At the present, the most commonly used dosimetry for radiotherapy applications are ionisation chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). However, there are some undesirable characteristics of these dosimetry systems, such as large detection volume (ionisation chamber) as well as fading of the radiation induced signal with time and destructive readout (TLG). The present study is an investigation into the use of the alanine/ESR dosimetry in fractionated afterloading brachytherapy during the whole radiotherapy course. There are some qualities which make alanine dosimetry attractive. These are the linear energy response, low fading under standard conditions, and the nondestructive readout. Thus the alanine dosimetry makes possible cumulative dose measurements during the radiotherapy course and an archival storage. By ionizing radiation (gamma, e, n, p, charged particles) free radicals (unpaired electrons) are produced in the amino acid alanine. The continuous wave electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to determine the number of free radicals, which is proportional to the absorbed dose and the alanine content of the dosimeter. The ESR measurements were made at room temperature using a Bruker EPR analyzer EMS-104. The dosimeters used in the test are alanine pellets (23.72 mg weight, 4.9 mm diameter, 1 mm height) as well as flexible alanine film dosimeters (thickness about 500 μm). The dosimeters consist of a blend of L-alpha-alanine and a binder. The alanine content of the pellets and the film dosimeters is about 88 % and 50 % by weight, respectively. The dosimeters for the calculation of the dose-effect-relationship were irradiated at the Physical-Technical Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig by a standard 60Co source. The maximum deviation from the calculated linear function is about 0.12 Gy in the dose range up to 80 Gy. The goal of medical applications was the superficial dose measurement in afterloading brachytherapy during the radiotherapy course in

  17. Internal sources dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savio, Eduardo

    1994-01-01

    The absorbed dose, need of estimation in risk evaluation in the application of radiopharmaceuticals in Nuclear Medicine practice,internal dosimetry,internal and external sources. Calculation methodology,Marinelli model,MIRD system for absorbed dose calculation based on biological parameters of radiopharmaceutical in human body or individual,energy of emitted radiations by administered radionuclide, fraction of emitted energy that is absorbed by target body.Limitation of the MIRD calculation model. A explanation of Marinelli method of dosimetry calculation,β dosimetry. Y dosimetry, effective dose, calculation in organs and tissues, examples. Bibliography .

  18. Dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musilek, L.; Seda, J.; Trousil, J.

    1992-01-01

    The publication deals with a major field of ionizing radiation dosimetry, viz., integrating dosimetric methods, which are the basic means of operative dose determination. It is divided into the following sections: physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation; integrating dosimetric methods for low radiation doses (film dosimetry, nuclear emulsions, thermoluminescence, radiophotoluminescence, solid-state track detectors, integrating ionization dosemeters); dosimetry of high ionizing radiation doses (chemical dosimetric methods, dosemeters based on the coloring effect, activation detectors); additional methods applicable to integrating dosimetry (exoelectron emission, electron spin resonance, lyoluminescence, etc.); and calibration techniques for dosimetric instrumentation. (Z.S.). 422 refs

  19. Homogeneity and EPR metrics for assessment of regular grids used in CW EPR powder simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciun, Cora

    2014-08-01

    CW EPR powder spectra may be approximated numerically using a spherical grid and a Voronoi tessellation-based cubature. For a given spin system, the quality of simulated EPR spectra depends on the grid type, size, and orientation in the molecular frame. In previous work, the grids used in CW EPR powder simulations have been compared mainly from geometric perspective. However, some grids with similar homogeneity degree generate different quality simulated spectra. This paper evaluates the grids from EPR perspective, by defining two metrics depending on the spin system characteristics and the grid Voronoi tessellation. The first metric determines if the grid points are EPR-centred in their Voronoi cells, based on the resonance magnetic field variations inside these cells. The second metric verifies if the adjacent Voronoi cells of the tessellation are EPR-overlapping, by computing the common range of their resonance magnetic field intervals. Beside a series of well known regular grids, the paper investigates a modified ZCW grid and a Fibonacci spherical code, which are new in the context of EPR simulations. For the investigated grids, the EPR metrics bring more information than the homogeneity quantities and are better related to the grids' EPR behaviour, for different spin system symmetries. The metrics' efficiency and limits are finally verified for grids generated from the initial ones, by using the original or magnetic field-constraint variants of the Spherical Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Homogeneity and EPR metrics for assessment of regular grids used in CW EPR powder simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciun, Cora

    2014-08-01

    CW EPR powder spectra may be approximated numerically using a spherical grid and a Voronoi tessellation-based cubature. For a given spin system, the quality of simulated EPR spectra depends on the grid type, size, and orientation in the molecular frame. In previous work, the grids used in CW EPR powder simulations have been compared mainly from geometric perspective. However, some grids with similar homogeneity degree generate different quality simulated spectra. This paper evaluates the grids from EPR perspective, by defining two metrics depending on the spin system characteristics and the grid Voronoi tessellation. The first metric determines if the grid points are EPR-centred in their Voronoi cells, based on the resonance magnetic field variations inside these cells. The second metric verifies if the adjacent Voronoi cells of the tessellation are EPR-overlapping, by computing the common range of their resonance magnetic field intervals. Beside a series of well known regular grids, the paper investigates a modified ZCW grid and a Fibonacci spherical code, which are new in the context of EPR simulations. For the investigated grids, the EPR metrics bring more information than the homogeneity quantities and are better related to the grids’ EPR behaviour, for different spin system symmetries. The metrics’ efficiency and limits are finally verified for grids generated from the initial ones, by using the original or magnetic field-constraint variants of the Spherical Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation method.

  1. Pulsed EPR for studying silver clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.; Wasowicz, T.; Sadlo, J.; Reijerse, E.J.; Kevan, L.

    1996-01-01

    The cationic silver clusters of different nuclearity have been produced by radiolysis of zeolite A and SAPO molecular sieves containing Ag + as exchangeable cations. The pulsed EPR spectroscopy has been applied for studying the local environment of silver cluster in order to understand the mechanism of cluster formation and stabilization. the electron spin echo modulation (ESEM) results on Ag 6 n+ cluster in dehydration zeolite A indicate that the hexameric silver is stabilized only in sodalite cages which are surrounded by α-cages containing no water molecules. Trimeric silver clusters formed in hydrated A zeolites strongly interact with water, thus the paramagnetic center can be considered as a cluster-water adduct. In SAPO-molecular sieves, silver clusters are formed only in the presence of adsorbed alcohol molecules. From ESEM it is determined that Ag 4 n+ in SAPO-42 is stabilized in α cages, where it is directly coordinated by two methanol molecules. Dimeric silver, Ag 2 + in SAPO-5 and SAPO-11 is located in 6-ring channels and interacts with three CH 3 OH molecules, each in different 10 ring or 12 ring channels. The differences of Ag 2 + stability in SAPO-5 and SAPO-11 are also discussed. (Author)

  2. Using rapid scan EPR to improve the detection limit of quantitative EPR by more than one order of magnitude

    OpenAIRE

    Möser, J.; Lips, K.; Tseytlin, M.; Eaton, G.; Eaton, S.; Schnegg, A

    2017-01-01

    X band rapid scan EPR was implemented on a commercially available Bruker ELEXSYS E580 spectrometer. Room temperature rapid scan and continuous wave EPR spectra were recorded for amorphous silicon powder samples. By comparing the resulting signal intensities the feasibility of performing quantitative rapid scan EPR is demonstrated. For different hydrogenated amorphous silicon samples, rapid scan EPR results in signal to noise improvements by factors between 10 and 50. Rapid scan EPR is thus ca...

  3. New loophole for the EPR paradox

    OpenAIRE

    Feldmann, Michel

    1999-01-01

    We exhibit a classical model free from any paradox which exactly simulates the spin EPR test. We conclude that Bell's inequality violation is a strictly classical phenomenon, contrary to a general belief.

  4. Spin entanglement, decoherence and Bohm's EPR paradox

    OpenAIRE

    Cavalcanti, E. G.; Drummond, P. D.; Bachor, H. A.; Reid, M. D.

    2007-01-01

    We obtain criteria for entanglement and the EPR paradox for spin-entangled particles and analyse the effects of decoherence caused by absorption and state purity errors. For a two qubit photonic state, entanglement can occur for all transmission efficiencies. In this case, the state preparation purity must be above a threshold value. However, Bohm's spin EPR paradox can be achieved only above a critical level of loss. We calculate a required efficiency of 58%, which appears achievable with cu...

  5. Perspectives of shaped pulses for EPR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Philipp E.; Schöps, Philipp; Kallies, Wolfgang; Glaser, Steffen J.; Prisner, Thomas F.

    2017-07-01

    This article describes current uses of shaped pulses, generated by an arbitrary waveform generator, in the field of EPR spectroscopy. We show applications of sech/tanh and WURST pulses to dipolar spectroscopy, including new pulse schemes and procedures, and discuss the more general concept of optimum-control-based pulses for applications in EPR spectroscopy. The article also describes a procedure to correct for experimental imperfections, mostly introduced by the microwave resonator, and discusses further potential applications and limitations of such pulses.

  6. EPR of alanine irradiated by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivovarov, S.P.; Seredavina, T.A.; Zhdanov, S.V.; Mul'gin, S.I.; Zhakparov, R.K.

    2001-01-01

    In the work the first results of EPR studies of alanine, irradiated with diverse doses at neutron cyclotron generator different conditions and on the critical reactor stand are presented. A dose linearity dependence of EPR signal is observing, the methods of γ-background contribution separation are discussed. Obtain results is giving the basis to recommendation of alanine as an effective detector irradiation. However it is demanded the farther study on clarification of radiation sensitivity value dependence on the neutron energy spectrum form

  7. Dosimetry using environmental and biological materials. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskell, E.; Kenner, G.; Hayes, R.

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes a five year effort to improve the sensitivity and reliability of retrospective dosimetry methods, to collaborate with laboratories engaged in related research and to share the technology with startup laboratories seeking similar capabilities. This research program has focused on validation of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) as a dosimetry tool and on optimization of the technique by reducing the lower limits of detection, simplifying the process of sample preparation and analysis and speeding analysis to allow greater throughput in routine measurement situations. The authors have investigated the dosimetric signal of hard tissues in enamel, deorganified dentin, synthetic carbonated apatites and synthetic hydroxyapatite. This research has resulted in a total of 27 manuscripts which have been published, are in press, or have been submitted for publication. Of these manuscripts, 14 are included in this report and were indexed separately for inclusion in the data base

  8. Radiochromic film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhiyong

    2002-01-01

    Radiochromic film dosimetry was developed to measure ionization irradiation dose for industry and medicine. At this time, there are no comprehensive guideline on the medical application, calibration method and densitometer system for medicine. The review gives update on Radiochromic film dosimetry used for medicine, including principles, film model and material, characteristics, calibration method, scanning densitometer system and medical application

  9. Nuclear accident dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The film presents statistical data on criticality accidents. It outlines past IAEA activities on criticality accident dosimetry and the technical documents that resulted from this work. The film furthermore illustrates an international comparison study on nuclear accident dosimetry conducted at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, United Kingdom

  10. Personal dosimetry in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvoshnyanskaya, I.R.; Vdovichenko, V.G.; Lozbin, A.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    KATEP-AE Radiation Laboratory is the first organization in Kazakhstan officially licensed by the Kazakhstan Atomic Energy Committee to provide individual dosimetry services. The Laboratory was established according to the international standards. Nowadays it is the largest company providing personal dosimetry services in the Republic of Kazakhstan. (author)

  11. Nuclear accident dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-12-31

    The film presents statistical data on criticality accidents. It outlines past IAEA activities on criticality accident dosimetry and the technical documents that resulted from this work. The film furthermore illustrates an international comparison study on nuclear accident dosimetry conducted at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, United Kingdom

  12. 100 years of solid state dosimetry and radiation protection dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, David T.

    2008-01-01

    The use of solid state detectors in radiation dosimetry has passed its 100th anniversary. The major applications of these detectors in radiation dosimetry have been in personal dosimetry, retrospective dosimetry, dating, medical dosimetry, the characterization of radiation fields, and also in microdosimetry and radiobiology research. In this introductory paper for the 15th International Conference, I shall speak of the history of solid state dosimetry and of the radiation measurement quantities that developed at the same time, mention some landmark developments in detectors and applications, speak a bit more about dosimetry and measurement quantities, and briefly look at the past and future

  13. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Boyd, A.W.; Chadwick, K.H.; McDonald, J.C.; Miller, A.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation processing is a relatively young industry with broad applications and considerable commercial success. Dosimetry provides an independent and effective way of developing and controlling many industrial processes. In the sterilization of medical devices and in food irradiation, where the radiation treatment impacts directly on public health, the measurements of dose provide the official means of regulating and approving its use. In this respect, dosimetry provides the operator with a means of characterizing the facility, of proving that products are treated within acceptable dose limits and of controlling the routine operation. This book presents an up-to-date review of the theory, data and measurement techniques for radiation processing dosimetry in a practical and useful way. It is hoped that this book will lead to improved measurement procedures, more accurate and precise dosimetry and a greater appreciation of the necessity of dosimetry for radiation processing. (author)

  14. Camel molar tooth enamel response to gamma rays using EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Faramawy, N A; El-Somany, I; Mansour, A; Maghraby, A M; Eissa, H; Wieser, A

    2018-03-01

    Tooth enamel samples from molar teeth of camel were prepared using a combined procedure of mechanical and chemical tooth treatment. Based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the dose response of tooth enamel samples was examined and compared to that of human enamel. The EPR dose response of the tooth enamel samples was obtained through irradiation to gamma doses from 1 Gy up to 100 kGy. It was found that the radiation-induced EPR signal increased linearly with gamma dose for all studied tooth enamel samples, up to about 15 kGy. At higher doses, the dose response curve leveled off. The results revealed that the location of the native signal of camel tooth enamel was similar to that of enamel from human molars at 2.00644, but different from that of enamel from cows and goats. In addition, the peak-to-peak width (ΔH pp ) for human and camel molar teeth was similar. It was also found that the response of camel enamel to gamma radiation was 36% lower than that of human enamel. In conclusion, the results indicate the suitability of camel teeth for retrospective gamma dosimetry.

  15. Dental radiography: tooth enamel EPR dose assessment from Rando phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragno, D.; Fattibene, P.; Onori, S.

    2000-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry of tooth enamel is now established as a suitable method for individual dose reconstruction following radiation accidents. The accuracy of the method is limited by some confounding factors, among which is the dose received due to medical x-ray irradiation. In the present paper the EPR response of tooth enamel to endoral examination was experimentally evaluated using an anthropomorphic phantom. The dose to enamel for a single exposure of a typical dental examination performed with a new x-ray generation unit working at 65 kVp gave rise to a CO 2 -signal of intensity similar to that induced by a dose of about 2 mGy of 60 Co. EPR measurements were performed on the entire tooth with no attempt to separate buccal and lingual components. Also the dose to enamel for an orthopantomography exam was estimated. It was derived from TLD measurements as equivalent to 0.2 mGy of 60 Co. In view of application to risk assessment analysis, in the present work the value for the ratio of the reference dose at the phantom surface measured with TLD to the dose at the tooth measured with EPR was determined. (author)

  16. EPR dosimetric properties of 2-methylalanine pellet for radiation processing application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, Y.S.; Ali, Laila I.; Moustafa, H.; Tadros, Soad M.

    2014-01-01

    The dosimetric characteristics of γ-radiation induced free radicals in 2-methylalanine (2MA) pellet dosimeter are investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the high-dose range of 1–100 kGy. The EPR spectrum of γ-irradiated 2MA exhibits an isotropic EPR signal with seven lines. The dosimeter response is humidity independent in the range of 33–76% relative humidity. The manufactured dosimeter is typically adipose tissue equivalent in the energy level of 0.1–15 MeV. The overall uncertainty (2σ) of the dosimeter is less than 6.9%. - Highlights: • Preparation of 2-methyl alanine pellets for high-dose dosimetry (1–100 kGy). • The dosimeter response is humidity independent in 33–76% relative humidity range during irradiation. • The temperature coefficient equals 0.96%/°C in the range of 21–60 °C. • Overall uncertainty of the dosimeter not exceeds 6.9% at 2σ

  17. Camel molar tooth enamel response to gamma rays using EPR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Faramawy, N.A.; El-Somany, I. [Ain Shams University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo (Egypt); Mansour, A. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Maghraby, A.M.; Eissa, H. [National Institute of Standards (NIS), Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory, Giza (Egypt); Wieser, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Department of Radiation Sciences, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    Tooth enamel samples from molar teeth of camel were prepared using a combined procedure of mechanical and chemical tooth treatment. Based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the dose response of tooth enamel samples was examined and compared to that of human enamel. The EPR dose response of the tooth enamel samples was obtained through irradiation to gamma doses from 1 Gy up to 100 kGy. It was found that the radiation-induced EPR signal increased linearly with gamma dose for all studied tooth enamel samples, up to about 15 kGy. At higher doses, the dose response curve leveled off. The results revealed that the location of the native signal of camel tooth enamel was similar to that of enamel from human molars at 2.00644, but different from that of enamel from cows and goats. In addition, the peak-to-peak width (ΔH{sub pp}) for human and camel molar teeth was similar. It was also found that the response of camel enamel to gamma radiation was 36% lower than that of human enamel. In conclusion, the results indicate the suitability of camel teeth for retrospective gamma dosimetry. (orig.)

  18. Use of hydroxyapatite prepared by sol-gel method for gamma ray and electron beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajiloo, N.; Ziaie, F.; Hesami, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this research, radiation dosimetry was made through measuring free radicals induced in synthetic hydroxyapatite using EPR spectroscopy. At the first step, the hydroxyapatite nano-powders were synthesized via sol-gel method. The produced powders were passed through a thermal treatment, weighted and packed. Then, the samples were irradiated at different dose rates using 60 Co γ-ray and 10 MeV electron beam radiation at a high dose range. The hydroxyapatite signal intensity of hydroxyapatite samples were measured at room temperature in the air. Subsequently, the variations of the EPR signal intensities were constructed as peak-to-peak signal amplitude and were compared with alanine and bone powder samples. The results showed that the EPR signal intensity of the hydroxyapatite samples are several times higher than alanine and bone powder and are saturated at the higher dose rates in comparison with other species.

  19. SU-C-BRD-05: Non-Invasive in Vivo Biodosimetry in Radiotherapy Patients Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahar, N; Roberts, K; Stabile, F; Mongillo, N; Decker, RD; Wilson, LD; Husain, Z; Contessa, J; Carlson, DJ [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Williams, BB; Flood, AB; Swartz, HM [Geisel Medical School at Dartmouth University, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical intervention following a major, unplanned radiation event can elevate the human whole body exposure LD50 from 3 to 7 Gy. On a large scale, intervention cannot be achieved effectively without accurate and efficient triage. Current methods of retrospective biodosimetry are restricted in capability and applicability; published human data is limited. We aim to further develop, validate, and optimize an automated field-deployable in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) instrument that can fill this need. Methods: Ionizing radiation creates highly-stable, carbonate-based free radicals within tooth enamel. Using a process similar to nuclear magnetic resonance, EPR directly measures the presence of radiation-induced free radicals. We performed baseline EPR measurements on one of the upper central incisors of total body irradiation (TBI) and head and neck (H&N) radiotherapy patients before their first treatment. Additional measurements were performed between subsequent fractions to examine the EPR response with increasing radiation dose. Independent dosimetry measurements were performed with optically-stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) and diodes to more accurately establish the relationship between EPR signal and delivered radiation dose. Results: 36 EPR measurements were performed over the course of four months on two TBI and four H & N radiotherapy patients. We observe a linear increase in EPR signal with increasing dose across the entirety of the tested range. A linear least squares-weighted fit of delivered dose versus measured signal amplitude yields an adjusted R-square of 0.966. The standard error of inverse prediction (SEIP) is 1.77 Gy. For doses up to 7 Gy, the range most relevant to triage, we calculate an SEIP of 1.29 Gy. Conclusion: EPR spectroscopy provides a promising method of retrospective, non-invasive, in vivo biodosimetry. Our preliminary data show an excellent correlation between predicted signal amplitude and delivered

  20. Kinetic study of UV-irradiated amorphous sulfur by EPR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mkami, H.; Smith, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is used to investigate UV-irradiation damage in amorphous sulfur by examining post-irradiation kinetics as a function of UV-exposure time. The kinetic study is described by first-order concurrent reactions where the sulfur, as reactant, undergoes two parallel processes leading to the formation of two distinct defects called S 1 * and S 2 *. The temperature dependence of the EPR intensities of the signals, related to these defects, is used in the kinetic study

  1. Some recent multi-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance results on systems relevant for dosimetry and dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, F; Vanhaelewyn, G; Matthys, P

    2002-04-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) applications like e.g. EPR dosimetry and dating, are usually performed at X-band frequencies because of practical reasons (cost, sample size, etc.). However, it is increasingly recognized that the radiation-induced EPR signals are strongly composite, what might affect dose/age estimates. A few recent examples from both the dosimetry and dating field, illustrating the problems, will be presented. The involved spectra are mainly due to carbonate-derived radicals (CO2-, CO3(3-), etc.). Measurements at higher microwave frequencies are often recommended to improve the insight into the spectra and/or the practical signal quantification. Recent results at Q- and W-band frequencies will show that a multi-frequency approach indeed opens many interesting perspectives in this field but also that each frequency may have specific (dis)advantages depending on the EPR probe and application involved. The discussion will concern carbonate-containing apatite single crystals, shells, modern and fossil tooth enamel.

  2. EPR persistence measurements of UV-induced melanin free radicals in whole skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, B.; Poehler, T.O.; Bryden, W.A.

    1995-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance is used to detect the formation of free radicals caused by exposure to ultraviolet radiation in chemically untreated rabbit skin. A fast jump in EPR signal level, occurring over a few seconds, is observed immediately after a skin sample is exposed to UV. This is followed by a slower increase toward an elevated steady-state signal over a period of hours as the skin is continuously exposed to a UV light source. Upon cessation of UV light exposure, EPR signal levels undergo an abrupt drop followed by a slower decay toward natural levels. Elevated free radical concentrations following UV exposure are found to persist for several hours in whole skin. These results are consistent with time resolved EPR measurements of photoinduced radicals in various natural melanins. (Author)

  3. Use of spin traps to detect superoxide production in living cells by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Kahina; Babić, Nikola; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2016-10-15

    Detection of superoxide produced by living cells has been an on-going challenge in biology for over forty years. Various methods have been proposed to address this issue, among which spin trapping with cyclic nitrones coupled to EPR spectroscopy, the gold standard for detection of radicals. This technique is based on the nucleophilic addition of superoxide to a diamagnetic cyclic nitrone, referred to as the spin trap, and the formation of a spin adduct, i.e. a persistent radical with a characteristic EPR spectrum. The first application of spin trapping to living cells dates back 1979. Since then, considerable improvements of the method have been achieved both in the structures of the spin traps, the EPR methodology, and the design of the experiments including appropriate controls. Here, we will concentrate on technical aspects of the spin trapping/EPR technique, delineating recent breakthroughs, inherent limitations, and potential artifacts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Medical radiation dosimetry with radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, NSW; Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.; Metcalfe, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Photon, electron and proton radiation are used extensively for medical purposes in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Dosimetry of these radiation sources can be performed with radiochromic films, devices that have the ability to produce a permanent visible colour change upon irradiation. Within the last ten years, the use of radiochromic films has expanded rapidly in the medical world due to commercial products becoming more readily available, higher sensitivity films and technology advances in imaging which have allowed scientists to use two-dimensional dosimetry more accurately and inexpensively. Radiochromic film dosimeters are now available in formats, which have accurate dose measurement ranges from less than 1 Gy up to many kGy. A relatively energy independent dose response combined with automatic development of radiochromic film products has made these detectors most useful in medical radiation dosimetry. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  5. Polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldock, C [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney (Australia); De Deene, Y [Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Doran, S [CRUK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom); Ibbott, G [Radiation Physics, UT M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Jirasek, A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Lepage, M [Centre d' imagerie moleculaire de Sherbrooke, Departement de medecine nucleaire et de radiobiologie, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada); McAuley, K B [Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada); Oldham, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Schreiner, L J [Cancer Centre of South Eastern Ontario, Kingston, ON (Canada)], E-mail: c.baldock@physics.usyd.edu.au, E-mail: yves.dedeene@ugent.be

    2010-03-07

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented. (topical review)

  6. Chemical dosimetry system for criticality accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljanić, Saveta; Ilijas, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI) criticality dosimetry system consists of a chemical dosimetry system for measuring the total (neutron + gamma) dose, and a thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry system for a separate determination of the gamma ray component. The use of the chemical dosemeter solution chlorobenzene-ethanol-trimethylpentane (CET) is based on the radiolytic formation of hydrochloric acid, which protonates a pH indicator, thymolsulphonphthalein. The high molar absorptivity of its red form at 552 nm is responsible for a high sensitivity of the system: doses in the range 0.2-15 Gy can be measured. The dosemeter has been designed as a glass ampoule filled with the CET solution and inserted into a pen-shaped plastic holder. For dose determinations, a newly constructed optoelectronic reader has been used. The RBI team took part in the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002, with the CET dosimetry system. For gamma ray dose determination TLD-700 TL detectors were used. The results obtained with CET dosemeter show very good agreement with the reference values.

  7. Theoretical basis for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry is fundamental to all fields of science dealing with radiation effects and is concerned with problems which are often intricate as hinted above. A firm scientific basis is needed to face increasing demands on accurate dosimetry. This chapter is an attempt to review and to elucidate the elements for such a basis. Quantities suitable for radiation dosimetry have been defined in the unique work to coordinate radiation terminology and usage by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, ICRU. Basic definitions and terminology used in this chapter conform with the recent ''Radiation Quantities and Units, Report 33'' of the ICRU

  8. Dosimetry for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Arne

    1986-01-01

    During the past few years significant advances have taken place in the different areas of dosimetry for radiation processing, mainly stimulated by the increased interest in radiation for food preservation, plastic processing and sterilization of medical products. Reference services both by international organizations (IAEA) and national laboratories have helped to improve the reliability of dose measurements. In this paper the special features of radiation processing dosimetry are discussed, several commonly used dosimeters are reviewed, and factors leading to traceable and reliable dosimetry are discussed. (author)

  9. Radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldock, C.

    2002-01-01

    be either through direct absorption of ionising radiation or via intermediate water free radicals. Fe 2+ ions are converted to Fe 3+ ions with a corresponding change in paramagnetic properties that may be quantified using NMR relaxation measurements or optical techniques. Due to predominantly diffusion-related limitations (and references therein), alternative polymer gel dosimeters were subsequently suggested. In polymer gels, monomers such as acrylamide and N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide are usually dispersed in a gelatin or agarose matrix. Monomers undergo a polymerisation reaction as a function of absorbed dose resulting in a 3D polymer gel matrix. The radiation-induced formation of polymer influences NMR relaxation properties and results in other physical changes that may be used to quantify absorbed radiation dose. As well as MRI, other quantitative techniques for measuring dose distributions include X-ray computer tomography, vibrational spectroscopy and ultrasound. Clinical applications of these radiologically tissue equivalent gel dosimeters have been reported in the literature. For further information of gel dosimetry and specifically clinical applications the proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Radiotherapy Gel Dosimetry and references therein should be consulted

  10. Magnetic, catalytic, EPR and electrochemical studies on binuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetic, catalytic, EPR and electrochemical studies on binuclear copper(II) complexes ... to the oxidation of 3,5-di--butylcatechol to the corresponding quinone. ... EPR spectral studies in methanol solvent show welldefined four hyperfine ...

  11. Investigation of radical locations in various sesame seeds by CW EPR and 9-GHz EPR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, K; Hara, H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the location of radical in various sesame seeds using continuous-wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and 9-GHz EPR imaging. CW EPR detected persistent radicals (single line) for various sesame seeds. The EPR linewidth of black sesame seeds was narrower than that of the irradiated white sesame seeds. A very small signal was detected for the white sesame seeds. Two-dimensional (2D) imaging using a 9-GHz EPR imager showed that radical locations vary for various sesame seeds. The paramagnetic species in black sesame seeds were located on the seed coat (skin) and in the hilum region. The signal with the highest intensity was obtained from the hilum part. A very low-intensity image was observed for the white sesame seeds. In addition, the 2D imaging of the irradiated white sesame seeds showed that free radicals were located throughout the entire seed. For the first time, CW EPR and 9-GHz EPR imaging showed the exact location of radical species in various sesame seeds.

  12. Selfcalibrated alanine/EPR dosimeters. A new generation of solid state/EPR dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yordanov, N.D.; Gancheva, V.

    1999-01-01

    Alanine/EPR dosimeters are well established as secondary, reference dosimeters for high-energy radiation. However, there are various sources of uncertainty in the evaluation of absorbed dose. This arises primarily from the necessity to calibrate each EPR spectrometer and each batch of dosimeters before their use. In order to overcome this disadvantage, a new generation alanine/EPR dosimeter has been developed, and its possibilities as a radiation detector are reported. Principally, it is a mixture of alanine, some quantity of EPR active substance, and a binding material. The EPR active substance, acting as an internal EPR standard, is chosen to have EPR parameters which are independent of the irradiation dose. The simultaneous recording of the spectra of both the sample and the standard under the same experimental conditions and the estimation of the ratio I alanine /I Mn as a function of the absorbed dose strongly reduces the uncertainties. The response of these dosimeters for 60 Co γ-radiation exhibits excellent linearity and reproducibility in the range of absorbed dose, 10 2 - 5 x 10 4 Gy. (author)

  13. Computational and instrumental methods in EPR

    CERN Document Server

    Bender, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    Computational and Instrumental Methods in EPR Prof. Bender, Fordham University Prof. Lawrence J. Berliner, University of Denver Electron magnetic resonance has been greatly facilitated by the introduction of advances in instrumentation and better computational tools, such as the increasingly widespread use of the density matrix formalism. This volume is devoted to both instrumentation and computation aspects of EPR, while addressing applications such as spin relaxation time measurements, the measurement of hyperfine interaction parameters, and the recovery of Mn(II) spin Hamiltonian parameters via spectral simulation. Key features: Microwave Amplitude Modulation Technique to Measure Spin-Lattice (T1) and Spin-Spin (T2) Relaxation Times Improvement in the Measurement of Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Quantitative Measurement of Magnetic Hyperfine Parameters and the Physical Organic Chemistry of Supramolecular Systems New Methods of Simulation of Mn(II) EPR Spectra: Single Cryst...

  14. Relativistic Nonlocality and the EPR Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The exact violation of Bell's Inequalities is obtained with a local realistic model for spin. The model treats one particle that comprises a quantum ensemble and simulates the EPR data one coincidence at a time as a product state. Such a spin is represented by operators σx , iσy ,σz in its body frame rather than the usual set of σX ,σY ,σZ in the laboratory frame. This model, assumed valid in the absence of a measuring probe, contains both quantum polarizations and coherences. Each carries half the EPR correlation, but only half can be measured using coincidence techniques. The model further predicts the filter angles that maximize the spin correlation in EPR experiments.

  15. Pressurized water reactors: the EPR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Py, J.P.; Yvon, M.

    2007-01-01

    EPR (originally 'European pressurized water reactor', and now 'evolutionary power reactor') is a model of reactor initially jointly developed by French and German engineers which fulfills the particular safety specifications of both countries but also the European utility requirements jointly elaborated by the main European power companies under the initiative of Electricite de France (EdF). Today, two EPR-based reactors are under development: one is under construction in Finland and the other, Flamanville 3 (France), received its creation permit decree on April 10, 2007. This article presents, first, the main objectives of the EPR, and then, describes the Flamanville 3 reactor: reactor type and general conditions, core and conditions of operation, primary and secondary circuits with their components, main auxiliary and recovery systems, man-machine interface and instrumentation and control system, confinement and serious accidents, arrangement of buildings. (J.S.)

  16. Spin entanglement, decoherence and Bohm's EPR paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, E G; Drummond, P D; Bachor, H A; Reid, M D

    2009-10-12

    We obtain criteria for entanglement and the EPR paradox for spin-entangled particles and analyse the effects of decoherence caused by absorption and state purity errors. For a two qubit photonic state, entanglement can occur for all transmission efficiencies. In this case, the state preparation purity must be above a threshold value. However, Bohm's spin EPR paradox can be achieved only above a critical level of loss. We calculate a required efficiency of 58%, which appears achievable with current quantum optical technologies. For a macroscopic number of particles prepared in a correlated state, spin entanglement and the EPR paradox can be demonstrated using our criteria for efficiencies eta > 1/3 and eta > 2/3 respectively. This indicates a surprising insensitivity to loss decoherence, in a macroscopic system of ultra-cold atoms or photons.

  17. EPR and development of quantum electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manenkov, A A

    2011-01-01

    A role of electron paramagnetic resonance in development of quantum electronics is discussed. Basic principles and history of masers are briefly described. Spin-levels of paramagnetic ions in crystals as a very suitable object for active media of solid-state masers (called as EPR-masers) and physical processes in EPR-masers (population inversion of energy states) are analyzed. This analysis demonstrates a significant role of relaxation processes in multi-level spin-systems for efficient maser action. In this context peculiarities of spin-lattice and spin-spin cross relaxation processes in multi-level systems are analyzed. Development of EPR-masers and their application in radioastronomy and far-space communication systems are briefly described.

  18. EPR of impurity ions in disordered solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliava, J.

    1986-01-01

    The state of the art in the EPR spectroscopy of disordered solids is reviewed and theoretical aspects of the EPR shape in disordered systems are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the concept of the joint probability density of the spin Hamiltonian parameters. A survey of experimental data is provided on distributions of spin Hamiltonian parametes obtained using computer simulation techniques. A quantitative information is given on the short-range ordering in disordered materials available from EPR studies. A procedure of extracting such type of data which consists in a transformation from the distribution of the spin Hamiltonian parameters to that of atomic coordinates in the surrounding of a paramagnetic center is outlined. Numerical estimates of the degree of continuous disorder are reviewed

  19. EPR study of free radicals in bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Mladenova, Ralitsa

    2004-05-01

    The features of the recorded EPR spectra of paramagnetic species formed in bread and rusk are reported. The appearance of free radicals in them is only connected with their thermal treatment since the starting materials (flour and grains) exhibit very weak EPR signal. The obtained EPR spectra are complex and indicate that: (i) the relative number of paramagnetic species depends on the temperature and treating time of the raw product; (ii) the g-values are strongly temperature dependent with a tendency to coincide at t≥220 °C. Because of the relatively low (150-220 °C) temperature of thermal treatment, the studied free radicals can be assumed to appear in the course of the browning (Maillard) reaction and not to the carbonization of the material.

  20. Dosimetry of internal emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The Dosimetry of Internal Emitter Program endeavors to refine the correlation between radiation dose and observed biological effects. The program is presently engaged in the development of studies that will demonstrate the applicability of microdosimetry models developed under the Microdosimetry of Internal Sources Program. The program also provides guidance and assistance to Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Biology Department in the dosimetric analysis of internally deposited radionuclides. This report deals with alpha particle dosimetry plutonium 239 inhalation, and in vitro studies of chromosomal observations

  1. Individual neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauricio, C.L.P.

    1987-01-01

    The most important concepts and development in individual neutron dosimetry are presented, especially the dosimetric properties of the albedo technique. The main problem in albedo dosimetry is to calibrate the dosemeter in the environs of each neutron source. Some of the most used calibration techniques are discussed. The IRD albedo dosemeter used in the routine neutron individual monitoring is described in detail. Its dosimetric properties and calibration methods are discussed. (Author) [pt

  2. Can EPR non-locality be geometrical?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ne'eman, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The presence in Quantum Mechanics of non-local correlations is one of the two fundamentally non-intuitive features of that theory. The non-local correlations themselves fall into two classes: EPR and Geometrical. The non-local characteristics of the geometrical type are well-understood and are not suspected of possibly generating acausal features, such as faster-than-light propagation of information. This has especially become true since the emergence of a geometrical treatment for the relevant gauge theories, i.e. Fiber Bundle geometry, in which the quantum non-localities are seen to correspond to pure homotopy considerations. This aspect is reviewed in section 2. Contrary-wise, from its very conception, the EPR situation was felt to be paradoxical. It has been suggested that the non-local features of EPR might also derive from geometrical considerations, like all other non-local characteristics of QM. In[7], one of the authors was able to point out several plausibility arguments for this thesis, emphasizing in particular similarities between the non-local correlations provided by any gauge field theory and those required by the preservation of the quantum numbers of the original EPR state-vector, throughout its spatially-extended mode. The derivation was, however, somewhat incomplete, especially because of the apparent difference between, on the one hand, the closed spatial loops arising in the analysis of the geometrical non-localities, from Aharonov-Bohm and Berry phases to magnetic monopoles and instantons, and on the other hand, in the EPR case, the open line drawn by the positions of the two moving decay products of the disintegrating particle. In what follows, the authors endeavor to remove this obstacle and show that as in all other QM non-localities, EPR is somehow related to closed loops, almost involving homotopy considerations. They develop this view in section 3

  3. Dosimetry and Calibration Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Dosimetry and Calibration Section fulfils two tasks within CERN's Radiation Protection Group: the Individual Dosimetry Service monitors more than 5000 persons potentially exposed to ionizing radiation on the CERN sites, and the Calibration Laboratory verifies throughout the year, at regular intervals, over 1000 instruments, monitors, and electronic dosimeters used by RP Group. The establishment of a Quality Assurance System for the Individual Dosimetry Service, a requirement of the new Swiss Ordinance for personal dosimetry, put a considerable workload on the section. Together with an external consultant it was decided to identify and then describe the different 'processes' of the routine work performed in the dosimetry service. The resulting Quality Manual was submitted to the Federal Office for Public Health in Bern in autumn. The CERN Individual Dosimetry Service will eventually be officially endorsed after a successful technical test in March 1999. On the technical side, the introduction of an automatic development machine for gamma films was very successful. It processes the dosimetric films without an operator being present, and its built-in regeneration mechanism keeps the concentration of the processing chemicals at a constant level

  4. Using rapid-scan EPR to improve the detection limit of quantitative EPR by more than one order of magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möser, J; Lips, K; Tseytlin, M; Eaton, G R; Eaton, S S; Schnegg, A

    2017-08-01

    X-band rapid-scan EPR was implemented on a commercially available Bruker ELEXSYS E580 spectrometer. Room temperature rapid-scan and continuous-wave EPR spectra were recorded for amorphous silicon powder samples. By comparing the resulting signal intensities the feasibility of performing quantitative rapid-scan EPR is demonstrated. For different hydrogenated amorphous silicon samples, rapid-scan EPR results in signal-to-noise improvements by factors between 10 and 50. Rapid-scan EPR is thus capable of improving the detection limit of quantitative EPR by at least one order of magnitude. In addition, we provide a recipe for setting up and calibrating a conventional pulsed and continuous-wave EPR spectrometer for rapid-scan EPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. WE-AB-BRB-01: Development of a Probe-Format Graphite Calorimeter for Practical Clinical Dosimetry: Numerical Design Optimization, Prototyping, and Experimental Proof-Of-Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, J; Seuntjens, J; Sarfehnia, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, the feasibility of performing absolute dose to water measurements using a constant temperature graphite probe calorimeter (GPC) in a clinical environment is established. Methods: A numerical design optimization study was conducted by simulating the heat transfer in the GPC resulting from irradiation using a finite element method software package. The choice of device shape, dimensions, and materials was made to minimize the heat loss in the sensitive volume of the GPC. The resulting design, which incorporates a novel aerogel-based thermal insulator, and 15 temperature sensitive resistors capable of both Joule heating and measuring temperature, was constructed in house. A software based process controller was developed to stabilize the temperatures of the GPC’s constituent graphite components to within a few 10’s of µK. This control system enables the GPC to operate in either the quasi-adiabatic or isothermal mode, two well-known, and independent calorimetry techniques. Absorbed dose to water measurements were made using these two methods under standard conditions in a 6 MV 1000 MU/min photon beam and subsequently compared against TG-51 derived values. Results: Compared to an expected dose to water of 76.9 cGy/100 MU, the average GPC-measured doses were 76.5 ± 0.5 and 76.9 ± 0.5 cGy/100 MU for the adiabatic and isothermal modes, respectively. The Monte Carlo calculated graphite to water dose conversion was 1.013, and the adiabatic heat loss correction was 1.003. With an overall uncertainty of about 1%, the most significant contributions were the specific heat capacity (type B, 0.8%) and the repeatability (type A, 0.6%). Conclusion: While the quasi-adiabatic mode of operation had been validated in previous work, this is the first time that the GPC has been successfully used isothermally. This proof-of-concept will serve as the basis for further study into the GPC’s application to small fields and MRI-linac dosimetry. This work has been

  6. Identification of irradiated crab using EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghraby, A. [Radiation Dosimetry Department, National Institute for Standards (NIS), Ministry of Scientific Research, Haram, 12211- Giza, P.O. Box: 136 (Egypt)]. E-mail: maghrabism@yahoo.com

    2007-02-15

    EPR spectroscopy is a fast and powerful technique for the identification of irradiated food. Crab exoskeleton was divided into six parts: dactyl, cheliped, carapace, apron, swimming legs, and walking legs. Samples of the exoskeleton were prepared and irradiated to Cs-137 gamma radiation in the range (1.156-5.365 kGy). EPR spectra of unirradiated as well as irradiated samples were recorded and analyzed. Response to gamma radiation was plotted for each part of the exoskeleton, dactyl was found to be the most sensitive part, followed by the apron (38%), cheliped (37%), walking legs (30%), swimming legs (24%), and carapace (21%) relative to the dactyl response.

  7. Krótka (prehistoria argumentu EPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Pabjan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The 1935 thought experiment of Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen is one of the most important episodes in the history of the dispute about the correct interpretation of quantum mechanics. The present paper deals with the origin of the EPR paper and discusses some other thought experiments that preceded the formulation of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen argument. Special attention is paid to the evolution of a simply photon-box experiment, which was devised by Einstein in 1930 and then modified by him several times before 1935. It is argued that the scheme of the original EPR argument is in fact contained in these few seminal experiments.

  8. Biophysical EPR Studies Applied to Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Indra D; Lorigan, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are very important in controlling bioenergetics, functional activity, and initializing signal pathways in a wide variety of complicated biological systems. They also represent approximately 50% of the potential drug targets. EPR spectroscopy is a very popular and powerful biophysical tool that is used to study the structural and dynamic properties of membrane proteins. In this article, a basic overview of the most commonly used EPR techniques and examples of recent applications to answer pertinent structural and dynamic related questions on membrane protein systems will be presented. PMID:26855825

  9. Identification of irradiated crab using EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghraby, A.

    2007-01-01

    EPR spectroscopy is a fast and powerful technique for the identification of irradiated food. Crab exoskeleton was divided into six parts: dactyl, cheliped, carapace, apron, swimming legs, and walking legs. Samples of the exoskeleton were prepared and irradiated to Cs-137 gamma radiation in the range (1.156-5.365 kGy). EPR spectra of unirradiated as well as irradiated samples were recorded and analyzed. Response to gamma radiation was plotted for each part of the exoskeleton, dactyl was found to be the most sensitive part, followed by the apron (38%), cheliped (37%), walking legs (30%), swimming legs (24%), and carapace (21%) relative to the dactyl response

  10. Holographic EPR Pairs, Wormholes and Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Chernicoff, Mariano; Güijosa, Alberto; Pedraza, Juan F.

    2013-01-01

    As evidence for the ER=EPR conjecture, it has recently been observed that the string that is holographically dual to an entangled quark-antiquark pair separating with (asymptotically) uniform acceleration has a wormhole on its worldsheet. We point out that a two-sided horizon and a wormhole actually appear for much more generic quark-antiquark trajectories, which is consistent with the fact that the members of an EPR pair need not be permanently out of causal contact. The feature that determi...

  11. Mast-sipping in EPR trademark plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenberger, Jan; Schienbein, Marcel; Geier, Roland

    2010-01-01

    For more than 20 years, AREVA applies and develops different sipping techniques to identify fuel assemblies with leaking fuel rods. For the EPR trademark reactors a Mast Sipping System with newest developments will be implemented considering radiation protection and latest standards requirements. The innovative EPR trademark Sipping System differs from previous systems in many ways. One of the main innovations is that all the necessary processes of the Sipping system have been fully digitized. Second, several ALARA design modifications have been implemented to meet the current radiation protection requirements. An additional implementable multilingual assistance program facilitates the handling of the system and helps to prevent incorrect operation. (orig.)

  12. Reference dosimetry for helical tomotherapy: Practical implementation and a multicenter validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ost, B.; Schaeken, B.; Vynckier, S.; Sterpin, E.; Van den Weyngaert, D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to implement a protocol for reference dosimetry in tomotherapy and to validate the beam output measurements with an independent dosimetry system. Methods: Beam output was measured at the reference depth of 10 cm in water for the following three cases: (1) a 5 x 10 cm 2 static machine specific reference field (MSR), (2) a rotational 5 x 10 cm 2 field without modulation and no tabletop in the beam, (3) a plan class specific reference (PCSR) field defined as a rotational homogeneous dose delivery to a cylindrical shaped target volume: plan with modulation and table-top movement. The formalism for reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [Med.Phys.35: 5179-5186, 2008] and QA recommendations [Med.Phys.37: 4817-4853, 2010] were adopted in the dose measurement protocol. All ionization chamber measurements were verified independently using alanine/EPR dosimetry. As a pilot study, the beam output was measured on tomotherapy Hi-art systems at three other centers and directly compared to the centers specifications and to alanine dosimetry. Results: For the four centers, the mean static output at a depth of 10 cm in water and SAD = 85 cm, measured with an A1SL chamber following the TG-148 report was 6.238 Gy/min ± 0.058 (1 SD); the rotational output was 6.255 Gy/min ± 0.069 (1 SD). The dose stated by the center was found in good agreement with the measurements of the visiting team: D center /D visit = 1.000 ± 0.003 (1 SD). The A1SL chamber measurements were all in good agreement with Alanine/EPR dosimetry. Going from the static reference field to the rotational/non modulated field the dose rate remains constant within 0.2% except for one center where a deviation of 1.3% was detected. Conclusions: Following the TG-148 report, beam output measurements in water at the reference depth using a local protocol, as developed at different centers, was verified. The measurements were found in good agreement with alanine/EPR dosimetry. The

  13. Properties of light induced EPR signals in enamel and their possible interference with gamma-induced signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sholom, S.V.; Chumak, V.V.; Haskell, E.H.; Hayes, R.B.; Kenner, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of tooth enamel to natural and artificial UV light results in stable EPR signals with g-factors of 1.9985, 2.0018, 2.0045, 2.0052 and 2.0110. The first three signals correspond to the parallel and perpendicular components of the radiation induced or dosimetric signal and the native signal reported in dosimetry and dating studies. The latter two signals were found to be sensitive to both gamma-ray and sunlight exposure, however, their responses to light differed from that to radiation, giving rise to the possibility of using them as indicators of the dose-equivalent resulting from light exposure

  14. Design of the EPR containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appell, B.; Zaiss, W.

    1996-01-01

    In order to respect the safety objectives set for the EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor), the confinement function must be designed to guard against in the design uncontrolled releases in the environment in all conditions taken into account and to preserve its structural integrity. The concept chosen is a double-wall confinement with technology identical derived from the current French N4 containments and the associated systems ensuring the isolation and the control of leaks. The basic principles aiming to minimize leaks are as follows: no direct leak; state-of-the-art leak tight design of the systems and components passing through the containment building; recovery of potential leaks through the inner wall and the penetration sleeves in the inter-wall space; recovery in the peripheral buildings; and specific measures if necessary. The inner wall is a prestressed concrete shell (55 tendons cables arranged in two horizontal layers and a vertical layer for the barrel) without liner, of free volume 90000 m 3 , an internal diameter of 48 m and 1.3 m thickness. The free volume is chosen so as to rule out the risk of global detonation and the use of catalytic recombiners limits the risk of hydrogen explosion. The design pressure (6.5 bar abs) and temperature of the inner wall are defined for a given volume by the set of three conditions: Pee-4 conditions such as LOCA or SLB, global deflagration of hydrogen and core melt scenario. The rate of leakage in accident conditions from the inner wall must not be higher than 1% per day. The chosen concept must enable satisfactory leak tightness to be preserved for beyond design conditions in order to have margins and to guard against phenomenological uncertainties. The possibility of adding an internal composite liner is being studied. A large scale mockup is being built to validate the hypothesis and methods of leak rates of the inner wall and for the performance testing of the composite liner. The outer wall, made of

  15. Effects of water treatment and sample granularity on radiation sensitivity and stability of EPR signals in X-ray irradiated bone samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciesielski, Bartlomiej; Krefft, Karolina; Penkowski, Michal; Kaminska, Joanna; Drogoszewska, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The article describes effects of sample conditions during its irradiation and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements on the background (BG) and dosimetric EPR signals in bone. Intensity of the BG signal increased up to two to three times after crushing of bone to sub-millimetre grains. Immersion of samples in water caused about 50 % drop in intensity of the BG component followed by its regrowth in 1-2 months. Irradiation of bone samples produced an axial dosimetric EPR signal (radiation-induced signal) attributed to hydroxyapatite component of bone. This signal was stable and was not affected by water. In samples irradiated in dry conditions, EPR signal similar to the native BG was also generated by radiation. In samples irradiated in wet conditions, this BG-like component was initially much smaller than in bone irradiated as dry, but increased in time, reaching similar levels as in dry-irradiated samples. It is concluded that accuracy of EPR dosimetry in bones can be improved, if calibration of the samples is done by their irradiations in wet conditions. (authors)

  16. Scope and limitations of the TEMPO/EPR method for singlet oxygen detection: the misleading role of electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Giacomo; Manet, Ilse; Monti, Sandra; Miranda, Miguel A; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie

    2014-12-01

    For many biological and biomedical studies, it is essential to detect the production of (1)O2 and quantify its production yield. Among the available methods, detection of the characteristic 1270-nm phosphorescence of singlet oxygen by time-resolved near-infrared (TRNIR) emission constitutes the most direct and unambiguous approach. An alternative indirect method is electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in combination with a singlet oxygen probe. This is based on the detection of the TEMPO free radical formed after oxidation of TEMP (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine) by singlet oxygen. Although the TEMPO/EPR method has been widely employed, it can produce misleading data. This is demonstrated by the present study, in which the quantum yields of singlet oxygen formation obtained by TRNIR emission and by the TEMPO/EPR method are compared for a set of well-known photosensitizers. The results reveal that the TEMPO/EPR method leads to significant overestimation of singlet oxygen yield when the singlet or triplet excited state of the photosensitizer is efficiently quenched by TEMP, acting as electron donor. In such case, generation of the TEMP(+) radical cation, followed by deprotonation and reaction with molecular oxygen, gives rise to an EPR-detectable TEMPO signal that is not associated with singlet oxygen production. This knowledge is essential for an appropriate and error-free application of the TEMPO/EPR method in chemical, biological, and medical studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Image in nuclear dosimetry using thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinsburg, G.; Matsuoka, M.; Watanabe, S.

    1987-01-01

    A low cost methodology to produce images of internal sick organs by radioisotopic intake, is presented. Dosimetries of thermoluminescent material and Teflon (ratio:50%) in bidimensional matrix shape are used with a Pb collimator. This collimator-bidimensional matrix system was tested ''in vivo'' and in thyroid phantoms using 99m Tc. A comparative evaluation between this method and the scintigraphy one is presented. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. Biodosimetry versus physical dosimetry for emergency dose assessment following large-scale radiological exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeever, S.W.S.; Sholom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Existing data on intercomparisons involving biodosimetry or physical dosimetry methods are analyzed and the results interpreted regarding their efficacy in triage in emergency dosimetry following mass casualty radiological events. The biodosimetry technique examined is dicentric chromosome aberrations (DCA). The physical dosimetry techniques include electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of biological material (teeth) and physical material (smartphone screen glass), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of electronic components (surface mount resistors) from mobile phones. Issues relating to calibration and interpretation of the data are discussed. An important conclusion of the analysis is that more research is critically needed to interpret the efficacy of the various methods. Included in this needed research are intercomparisons of the various methods in controlled experiments and the need to harmonize protocols. - Highlights: • Utility of bio- and physical dosimetry methods for emergency dosimetry triage. • Analysis of intercomparison data for different bio- and physical dosimetry methods. • The percentage of false positives and false negatives for a simulated IND event. • More research, especially intercomparisons, is required to reduce uncertainties.

  19. MDEP Common Position No EPR-01 - Common positions on the EPR instrumentation and controls design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the EPR Working Group (EPRWG) of the Multinational Design Evaluation Program (MDEP) is to identify common positions among the regulators reviewing the EPR Instrumentation and Controls (I and C) Systems in order to: 1. Promote understanding of each country 's regulatory decisions and basis for the decisions, 2. Enhance communication among the members and with external stakeholders, 3. Identify areas where harmonization and convergence of regulations, standards, and guidance can be achieved or improved, and 4. Supports standardization of new reactor designs. Since January 2008, the EPR I and C Technical Expert Subgroup (TESG) members met five times to exchange information regarding their country 's review of the EPR I and C design. The EPR I and C TESG consists of regulators from China, Canada, Finland, France, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The information exchange includes presentation of each country 's review status and technical issues, sharing of guidance documents, and sharing of regulatory decision documents. The TESG focused on the following four core areas of the EPR I and C design: 1. I and C System Independence (particularly for data communications), 2. Level of Defense and Diversity (back-up systems), 3. Qualification/quality of digital platforms, 4. Categorization/classification of systems and functions. As meetings were conducted, some areas were emphasized more depending on the significance of the issues for each country. During the TESG interactions, it became apparent that there were aspects of the EPR design where the countries had common agreement. On November 2, 2009, three of the subgroup countries, France, Finland and the United Kingdom, issued a joint regulatory position on the EPR I and C design as result of the 'Groupe Permanent' meeting in France. This statement of common positions expands upon that joint regulatory position

  20. Teaching the EPR Paradox at High School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Gesche

    1999-01-01

    Argues the importance of students at university and in the final years of high school gaining an appreciation of the principles of quantum mechanics. Presents the EPR gedanken experiment (thought experiment) as a method of teaching the principles of quantum mechanics. (Author/CCM)

  1. EPR: outlines of research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The articles give an overview of the research and development presently under way for the future pressurized water reactors to be constructed in Europe, and particularly the French and German EPR (European Pressurized Reactor). Such an analysis deals essentially with respect to the pressurized water reactors now in operation. (author)

  2. Investigation of EPR signals on tooth enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlenko, A; Mironova-Ulmane, N; Polakov, M; Riekstina, D [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia)

    2007-12-15

    Calcified tissues are involved in continues metabolic process in human organism exchanging a number of chemical elements with environment. The rate of biochemical reactions is tissue dependent and the slowest one at the tooth enamel, the most mineralized tissue of human organism. The long time stability and unique chemical composition make tooth enamel suitable for number of application. The assessment of individual radiation dose by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and evaluations of elemental composition by Instrumentation Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) are the well known procedures where properties of tooth enamel intensively used. The current work is focused on investigation of EPR signals and determination of chemical composition on several teeth samples having different origin. The EPR spectra and INAA element content of milk tooth, caries tooth, and paradantose tooth have been compared to each other. The results showed that the intensity of EPR signal is much higher for the caries tooth than the for paradantose tooth that is in agreement with depleted Ca content.

  3. EPR application in medicine and biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stopka, Pavel; Křížová, Jana; Káfuňková, Eva

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 14 (2005), s. 190-192 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NB7377; GA MZd(CZ) NL7567 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : EPR application Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.445, year: 2005

  4. Zavoisky and the Discovery of EPR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    moved to Kazan. In 1926, after finishing the nine-year secondary ... year student, he got a patent for an invention. Zavoisky was ... Early Attempts at NMR and Interruption by World War II ... band modulation) and, in some cases, he did not even apply the constant ... was awarded the Lenin Prize for the discovery of EPR. In the.

  5. The EPR detection of radiation treated foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachowicz, W.; Burlinska, G.; Michalik, J.; Ostrowski, K.; Dziedzic-Goclawska, A.

    1993-01-01

    The short paper by a Polish study group describes the results of the use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy in the detection of irradiation to food. Pultry, fresh-water fish and sea fish as well as various fruits and yellow boletus are dealt with in some detail. (VHE) [de

  6. New Generation of self-calibrated SS/EPR dosimeters: Alanine/EPR dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yordanov, N.D.; Gancheva, V.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of solid state/EPR dosimeters is described. Principally, it contains radiation sensitive diamagnetic material, some quantity of EPR active, but radiation insensitive, substance (for example Mn 2+ /MgO) and a binding material. In the present case alanine is used as a radiation sensitive substance. With this dosimeter, the EPR spectra of alanine and Mn 2+ are simultaneously recorded and the calibration graph represents the ratio of alanine versus Mn 2+ EPR signal intensity as a function of absorbed dose. In this way the reproducibility of the results is expected to be improved significantly including their intercomparison among different laboratories. Homogeneity of the prepared dosimeters and their behaviour (fading of EPR signals with time, influence of different meteorological conditions) show satisfactory reproducibility and stability with time. Because two different EPR active samples are recorded simultaneously, the influence of some instrument setting parameters (microwave power, modulation amplitude and modulation frequency) on the ratio I alanine /I Mn is also investigated. (author)

  7. EFFECT OF CADMIUM(II) ON FREE RADICALS IN DOPA-MELANIN TESTED BY EPR SPECTROSCOPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Chodurek, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy may be applied to examine interactions of melanin with metal ions and drugs. In this work EPR method was used to examination of changes in free radical system of DOPA-melanin--the model eumelanin after complexing with diamagnetic cadmium(II) ions. Cadmium(II) may affect free radicals in melanin and drugs binding by this polymer, so the knowledge of modification of properties and free radical concentration in melanin is important to pharmacy. The effect of cadmium(II) in different concentrations on free radicals in DOPA-melanin was determined. EPR spectra of DOPA-melanin, and DOPA-melanin complexes with cadmium(II) were measured by an X-band (9.3 GHz) EPR spectrometer produced by Radiopan (Poznań, Poland) and the Rapid Scan Unit from Jagmar (Krak6w, Poland). The DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) to metal ions molar ratios in the reaction mixtures were 2:1, 1:1, and 1: 2. High concentrations of o-semiquinone (g ~2.0040) free radicals (~10(21)-10(22) spin/g) characterize DOPA-melanin and its complexes with cadmium(II). Formation of melanin complexes with cadmium(II) increase free radical concentration in DOPA-melanin. The highest free radical concentration was obtained for DOPA-melanin-cadmium(II) (1:1) complexes. Broad EPR lines with linewidths: 0.37-0.73 mT, were measured. Linewidths increase after binding of cadmium(II) to melanin. Changes of integral intensities and linewidths with increasing microwave power indicate the homogeneous broadening of EPR lines, independently on the metal ion concentration. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes existed in all the tested samples, their EPR lines saturated at low microwave powers. Cadmium(II) causes fastening of spin-lattice relaxation processes in DOPA-melanin. The EPR results bring to light the effect of cadmium(II) on free radicals in melanin, and probably as the consequence on drug binding to eumelanin.

  8. Secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Saion bin Salikin.

    1983-01-01

    A secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory has been established in the Tun Ismail Research Centre, Malaysia as a national laboratory for reference and standardization purposes in the field of radiation dosimetry. This article gives brief accounts on the general information, development of the facility, programmes to be carried out as well as other information on the relevant aspects of the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory. (author)

  9. Neutron dosimetry in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigurbjoernsson, B.; Smith, H.H.; Gustafsson, A.

    1965-01-01

    To study adequately the biological effects of different energy neutrons it is necessary to have high-intensity sources which are not contaminated by other radiations, the most serious of which are gamma rays. An effective dosimetry must provide an accurate measure of the absorbed dose, in biological materials, of each type of radiation at any reactor facility involved in radiobiological research. A standardized biological dosimetry, in addition to physical and chemical methods, may be desirable. The ideal data needed to achieve a fully documented dosimetry has been compiled by H. Glubrecht: (1) Energy spectrum and intensity of neutrons; (2) Angular distribution of neutrons on the whole surface of the irradiated object; (3) Additional undesired radiation accompanying the neutrons; (4) Physical state and chemical composition of the irradiated object. It is not sufficient to note only an integral dose value (e.g. in 'rad') as the biological effect depends on the above data

  10. Retrospective and emergency dosimetry in response to radiological incidents and nuclear mass-casualty events : a review.

    OpenAIRE

    Bailiff, I.K.; Sholom, S.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews recent research on the application of the physical dosimetry techniques of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and luminescence (optically stimulated luminescence, OSL, and thermoluminescence, TL) to determine radiation dose following catastrophic, large-scale radiological events. Such data are used in dose reconstruction to obtain estimates of dose due to the exposure to external sources of radiation, primarily gamma radiation, by individual members of the public and by ...

  11. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact their dispatchers to explain their activities for the future, after LEP dismantling in order to be maintained on the regular distribution list at Individual DosimetryWe inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period MAY/JUNE will be available from their usual dispatchers on Tuesday 2 May.Please have your films changed before the 12 May.The colour of the dosimeter valid in is MAY/JUNE is YELLOW.Individual Dosimetry Service will be closed on Friday 28 April.

  12. Nuclear medicine radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Complexities of the requirements for accurate radiation dosimetry evaluation in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine (including PET) have grown over the past decade. This is due primarily to four factors: growing consideration of accurate patient-specific treatment planning for radionuclide therapy as a means of improving the therapeutic benefit, development of more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in estimating radiation transport and dosimetry in patients, design and use of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms in calculating the above-mentioned radiation transport and

  13. EPR in characterization of seeds paramagnetic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luiz, A.P.C.; Mauro, M.F.F.L.; Portugal, K.O.; Barbana, V.M.; Guedes, C.L.B.; Mauro, E. di; Carneiro, C.E.A.; Zaia, D.A.M.; Prete, C.E.C.

    2011-01-01

    Full text. In Brazil, since 1970s, renewable fuel programs has been developed in order to replace petroleum. Today a program that has been discussed is the bio diesel, which intend to replace diesel fuel, fossil oil, to bio diesel, renewal fuel. As seeds are the basis for production of oil and consequently processed into bio diesel, the goal of this work is to characterize and compare paramagnetic species present in the seeds by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). Samples used in this study were seeds of sorghum, barley, corn, peanuts, soy beans, cotton, wheat, oats, mustard, rice, sunflower and turnip. Some paramagnetic species present in soil was also investigated as goethite (FeOOH), hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ), magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ), and ferrihydrite (Fe 5 HO 8 · 4H 2 O), since, these species present in appreciable quantities in the soil can be present in the seeds and analyzed for comparison. The characterization of these species is essential to understand the EPR seeds spectra. Each sample is placed in a thin quartz tube 4 mm in diameter, and it is inserted into the cavity of the spectrometer at room temperature, at low temperature (77 K) and variable temperature using liquid nitrogen flow and hot flow through a compressor air. It was used as standard Mg O:Mn 2+ , which is also inserted into the cavity. Shortly after the potency is regulated, frequency, amplitude and sweep the field. The spectroscopic analysis by EPR X-band (∼ 9:5GHz), were performed at the Fluorescence and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Laboratory, Exact Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Parana state, Brazil, through an EPR spectrometer JEOL brand (JES-PE-3X). In the EPR spectra, spectroscopic factor or g factor and line width were determined in paramagnetic species. Studies from several seeds with EPR technique detected in all of them presence of same complex of Fe 3+ present in the goethite at g ∼ 2, and in the seeds exist free radicals at g = 2:004, at room temperature

  14. EPR in characterization of seeds paramagnetic species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luiz, A.P.C.; Mauro, M.F.F.L.; Portugal, K.O.; Barbana, V.M.; Guedes, C.L.B.; Mauro, E. di; Carneiro, C.E.A.; Zaia, D.A.M.; Prete, C.E.C. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text. In Brazil, since 1970s, renewable fuel programs has been developed in order to replace petroleum. Today a program that has been discussed is the bio diesel, which intend to replace diesel fuel, fossil oil, to bio diesel, renewal fuel. As seeds are the basis for production of oil and consequently processed into bio diesel, the goal of this work is to characterize and compare paramagnetic species present in the seeds by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). Samples used in this study were seeds of sorghum, barley, corn, peanuts, soy beans, cotton, wheat, oats, mustard, rice, sunflower and turnip. Some paramagnetic species present in soil was also investigated as goethite (FeOOH), hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), and ferrihydrite (Fe{sub 5}HO{sub 8} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O), since, these species present in appreciable quantities in the soil can be present in the seeds and analyzed for comparison. The characterization of these species is essential to understand the EPR seeds spectra. Each sample is placed in a thin quartz tube 4 mm in diameter, and it is inserted into the cavity of the spectrometer at room temperature, at low temperature (77 K) and variable temperature using liquid nitrogen flow and hot flow through a compressor air. It was used as standard Mg O:Mn{sup 2+}, which is also inserted into the cavity. Shortly after the potency is regulated, frequency, amplitude and sweep the field. The spectroscopic analysis by EPR X-band ({approx} 9:5GHz), were performed at the Fluorescence and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Laboratory, Exact Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Parana state, Brazil, through an EPR spectrometer JEOL brand (JES-PE-3X). In the EPR spectra, spectroscopic factor or g factor and line width were determined in paramagnetic species. Studies from several seeds with EPR technique detected in all of them presence of same complex of Fe{sup 3+} present in the goethite at g {approx} 2, and in the seeds

  15. [Automatic Extraction and Analysis of Dosimetry Data in Radiotherapy Plans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Zhao, Di; Lu, Hong; Zhang, Biyun; Ma, Jun; Yu, Dahai

    To improve the efficiency and accuracy of extraction and analysis of dosimetry data in radiotherapy plans for a batch of patients. With the interface function provided in Matlab platform, a program was written to extract the dosimetry data exported from treatment planning system in DICOM RT format and exported the dose-volume data to an Excel file with the SPSS compatible format. This method was compared with manual operation for 14 gastric carcinoma patients to validate the efficiency and accuracy. The output Excel data were compatible with SPSS in format, the dosimetry data error for PTV dose interval of 90%-98%, PTV dose interval of 99%-106% and all OARs were -3.48E-5 ± 3.01E-5, -1.11E-3 ± 7.68E-4, -7.85E-5 ± 9.91E-5 respectively. Compared with manual operation, the time required was reduced from 5.3 h to 0.19 h and input error was reduced from 0.002 to 0. The automatic extraction of dosimetry data in DICOM RT format for batch patients, the SPSS compatible data exportation, quick analysis were achieved in this paper. The efficiency of clinical researches based on dosimetry data analysis of large number of patients will be improved with this methods.

  16. Post-processing of EPR spectrum from dosimetric substances through filtering of Discrete Fourier Transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Fabio P.B.; Bevilacqua, Joyce S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometers - EPR - in radiation dosimetry is known for more than four decades. It is an important tool in the retrospective determination of doses absorbed. To estimate the dose absorbed by the sample, it is necessary to know the amplitude of the peak to peak signature of the substance in its EPR spectrum. This information can be compromised by the presence of spurious information: noise - of random and low intensity nature; and the behavior of the baseline - coming from the coupling between the resonator tube and the sample analyzed. Due to the intrinsic characteristics of the three main components of the signal, i.e. signature, noise, and baseline - the analysis in the frequency domain allows, through post-processing techniques to filter spurious information. In this work, an algorithm that retrieves the signature of a substance has been implemented. The Discrete Fourier Transform is applied to the signal and without user intervention, the noise is filtered. From the filtered signal, recovers the signature by Inverse Discrete Fourier Transform. The peak to peak amplitude, and the absorbed dose is calculated with an error of less than 1% for signals wherein the base line is linearized. Some more general cases are under investigation and with little user intervention, you can get the same error

  17. A comparative in vivo and in vitro L-band EPR study of irradiated rat incisors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdravkova, M.; Gallez, B.; Debuyst, R.

    2005-01-01

    L-band (∼1GHz) EPR has the potential to measure the absorbed radiation dose in human teeth inside the mouth (in vivo analyses). One crucial point in the development of the method is to know if dosimetry evaluation carried out in vivo after accidental exposures can be reliably based on calibration curves built in vitro. The aim of the present work is to specifically address this point. First, we compared L-band in vitro and in vivo analyses in irradiated rat teeth and estimated the possible loss in in vivo experiments due to rat movements and mouth proximity. Second, the lower pair of rat incisors were analysed by L-band EPR before and after irradiation (50Gy), first on the living rat, then on the same dead rat, finally after extraction of the teeth. X-band powder spectra were also taken after crushing of the two teeth. Irradiations of dead rats and extracted teeth were also carried out. Comparing L-band spectra obtained with living rats and removed heads does not show any significant difference due to possible small rat movements or breathing. Relative standard deviations of the amplitudes of the dosimetric signal are quite high (27-54%). Nevertheless, it seems to be a tendency to have higher signals in irradiated extracted teeth than in irradiated animals

  18. Personnel photographic film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keirim-Markus, I.B.

    1981-01-01

    Technology of personnel photographic film dosimetry (PPD) based on the photographic effect of ionizing radiation is described briefly. Kinds of roentgen films used in PPD method are enumerated, compositions of a developer and fixing agents for these films are given [ru

  19. Dosimetry and Calibration Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, T.

    1998-01-01

    The two tasks of the Dosimetry and Calibration Section at CERN are the Individual Dosimetry Service which assures the personal monitoring of about 5000 persons potentially exposed to ionizing radiation at CERN, and the Calibration Laboratory which verifies all the instruments and monitors. This equipment is used by the sections of the RP Group for assuring radiation protection around CERN's accelerators, and by the Environmental Section of TISTE. In addition, nearly 250 electronic and 300 quartz fibre dosimeters, employed in operational dosimetry, are calibrated at least once a year. The Individual Dosimetry Service uses an extended database (INDOS) which contains information about all the individual doses ever received at CERN. For most of 1997 it was operated without the support of a database administrator as the technician who had assured this work retired. The Software Support Section of TIS-TE took over the technical responsibility of the database, but in view of the many other tasks of this Section and the lack of personnel, only a few interventions for solving immediate problems were possible

  20. Dosimetry of pion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicello, J.F.

    1975-01-01

    Negative pion beams are probably the most esoteric and most complicated type of radiation which has been suggested for use in clinical radiotherapy. Because of the limited availability of pion beams in the past, even to nuclear physicists, there exist relatively fewer basic data for this modality. Pion dosimetry is discussed

  1. High frequency electromagnetic dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Hernández, David A

    2009-01-01

    Along with the growth of RF and microwave technology applications, there is a mounting concern about the possible adverse effects over human health from electromagnetic radiation. Addressing this issue and putting it into perspective, this groundbreaking resource provides critical details on the latest advances in high frequency electromagnetic dosimetry.

  2. Group: radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, L.V.E.

    1990-01-01

    The main activities of the radiation dosimetry group is described, including the calibration of instruments, sources and radioactive solutions and the determination of neutron flux; development, production and market dosimetric materials; development radiation sensor make the control of radiation dose received by IPEN workers; development new techniques for monitoring, etc. (C.G.C.)

  3. Instrumentation in thermoluminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julius, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    In the performance of a thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) system the equipment plays an important role. Crucial parameters of instrumentation in TLD are discussed in some detail. A review is given of equipment available on the market today - with some emphasis on automation - which is partly based on information from industry and others involved in research and development. (author)

  4. Solid state radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    Important recent developments provide accurate, sensitive, and reliable radiation measurements by using solid state radiation dosimetry methods. A review of the basic phenomena, devices, practical limitations, and categories of solid state methods is presented. The primary focus is upon the general physics underlying radiation measurements with solid state devices

  5. Dosimetry and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farinelli, U.

    1977-01-01

    Today, reactor dosimetry and shielding have wide areas of overlap as concerns both problems and methods. Increased interchange of results and know-how would benefit both. The areas of common interest include calculational methods, sensitivity studies, theoretical and experimental benchmarks, cross sections and other nuclear data, multigroup libraries and procedures for their adjustment, experimental techniques and damage functions. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art and the latest development in each of these areas as far as shielding is concerned, and suggests a number of interactions that could be profitable for reactor dosimetry. Among them, re-evaluation of the potentialities of calculational methods (in view of the recent developments) in predicting radiation environments of interest; the application of sensitivity analysis to dosimetry problems; a common effort in the field of theoretical benchmarks; the use of the shielding one-material propagation experiments as reference spectra for detector cross sections; common standardization of the detector nuclear data used in both fields; the setting up of a common (or compatible) multigroup structure and library applicable to shielding, dosimetry and core physics; the exchange of information and experience in the fields of cross section errors, correlations and adjustment; and the intercomparison of experimental techniques

  6. Full cycle rapid scan EPR deconvolution algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseytlin, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Rapid scan electron paramagnetic resonance (RS EPR) is a continuous-wave (CW) method that combines narrowband excitation and broadband detection. Sinusoidal magnetic field scans that span the entire EPR spectrum cause electron spin excitations twice during the scan period. Periodic transient RS signals are digitized and time-averaged. Deconvolution of absorption spectrum from the measured full-cycle signal is an ill-posed problem that does not have a stable solution because the magnetic field passes the same EPR line twice per sinusoidal scan during up- and down-field passages. As a result, RS signals consist of two contributions that need to be separated and postprocessed individually. Deconvolution of either of the contributions is a well-posed problem that has a stable solution. The current version of the RS EPR algorithm solves the separation problem by cutting the full-scan signal into two half-period pieces. This imposes a constraint on the experiment; the EPR signal must completely decay by the end of each half-scan in order to not be truncated. The constraint limits the maximum scan frequency and, therefore, the RS signal-to-noise gain. Faster scans permit the use of higher excitation powers without saturating the spin system, translating into a higher EPR sensitivity. A stable, full-scan algorithm is described in this paper that does not require truncation of the periodic response. This algorithm utilizes the additive property of linear systems: the response to a sum of two inputs is equal the sum of responses to each of the inputs separately. Based on this property, the mathematical model for CW RS EPR can be replaced by that of a sum of two independent full-cycle pulsed field-modulated experiments. In each of these experiments, the excitation power equals to zero during either up- or down-field scan. The full-cycle algorithm permits approaching the upper theoretical scan frequency limit; the transient spin system response must decay within the scan

  7. Steering, Entanglement, Nonlocality, and the EPR Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Howard; Jones, Steve; Andrew, Doherty

    2007-06-01

    The concept of steering was introduced by Schroedinger in 1935 as a generalization of the EPR paradox for arbitrary pure bipartite entangled states and arbitrary measurements by one party. Until now, it has never been rigorously defined, so it has not been known (for example) what mixed states are steerable (that is, can be used to exhibit steering). We provide an operational definition, from which we prove (by considering Werner states and Isotropic states) that steerable states are a strict subset of the entangled states, and a strict superset of the states that can exhibit Bell-nonlocality. For arbitrary bipartite Gaussian states we derive a linear matrix inequality that decides the question of steerability via Gaussian measurements, and we relate this to the original EPR paradox.

  8. The long way to the EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berke, C.

    1997-01-01

    At the joint conference organized by the German Kerntechnische Gesellschaft (KTG) e.V. and the French Societe Francaise d'Energie Nucleaire (SFEN) in Cologne, the announcement was made on October 20, 1997 that Jean Claude Leny will be appointed Honorary Member of KTG. For reasons of ill health the new honorary member was prevented from attending the conference. In his place, Claus Berke sketched the history of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) and presented an overview of nuclear development in France and in Germany. Developing one standard reactor model in the primary objective of German-French cooperation in reactor development. The EPR is to replace the present nuclear generating units in France and Germany after the end of their planned service life, and is to be marketed as a standard export line. (orig.) [de

  9. EPR becomes reality at Finland's Olkiluoto 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueldner, R.; Giese, U.

    2005-01-01

    The EPR is a third-generation pressurized water reactor (PWR). Its development was started in 1992 by Framatome and Siemens within a Franco-German partnership. Since 2001 this work has been continued by Framatome ANP, which was formed when the two companies merged their nuclear businesses. The French company AREVA, world market leader in nuclear technology, holds a 66% share in Framatome ANP, with Siemens owning 34%. From the very start, development of the EPR was focused on improving plant safety and economics even further. The new reactor development was jointly financed together with the leading power utilities of both countries. The first steps towards realization of an EPR nuclear power plant were taken at Olkiluoto, Finland in 2004, consisting of initial preparation of the construction site. By mid-February 2005 the local municipality - Eurajoki - had issued a construction permit, and the Finnish Government a construction license pursuant to the Finnish Nuclear Energy Act. This had been preceded by a preliminary safety assessment prepared by the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) for the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry in which STUK verified that it did not see any safety-related issues opposing issuance of the nuclear construction license. STUK emphasized that the evolutionary design of the EPR had been further improved by AREVA compared to the previous product lines. Concreting work began this spring and the unit will start commercial operation in 2009. Construction of an EPR has also been given the political go-ahead in France. According to the utility Electricite de France (EDF) the new reactor will be built as a forerunner of a later series at the site of Flamanville in Normandy. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2007. An EPR nuclear power plant has a rated electric capacity of around 1600 MW, depending on specific site conditions. Being the product of intense bilateral cooperation the EPR combines the technological

  10. A theoretical interpretation of EPR and ENDOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, M.O.M. de.

    1975-08-01

    To interpret the EPR and ENDOR results of the U 2 center in SrF 2 , two wavefunctions are proposed to describe the unpaired electron of the defect. Use is made of two different models in order to obtain the wavefunctions: the Heitler-London and that of molecular orbitals models. The Pauli repulsion (overlap of wavefunctions) is discussed as well as covalency mechanisms and their influence in the calculation of the hyperfine constants due to magnetic interaction of the unpaired electron and the magnetic nucleus of the cristal. A small amount of covalency between the ground state of the interstitial Hydrogen atom and the 2p shell of the F - ions of the first cristaline shell is introduced fenomenologically in the molecular orbitals model. Both methods are discussed by comparing the theoretical calculations of the hyperfine constants with the measured experimental values obtained with the EPR and ENDOR techniques. (Author) [pt

  11. Holographic EPR pairs, wormholes and radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernicoff, Mariano; Güijosa, Alberto; Pedraza, Juan F.

    2013-10-01

    As evidence for the ER = EPR conjecture, it has recently been observed that the string that is holographically dual to an entangled quark-antiquark pair separating with (asymptotically) uniform acceleration has a wormhole on its worldsheet. We point out that a two-sided horizon and a wormhole actually appear for much more generic quark-antiquark trajectories, which is consistent with the fact that the members of an EPR pair need not be permanently out of causal contact. The feature that determines whether the causal structure of the string worldsheet is trivial or not turns out to be the emission of gluonic radiation by the dual quark and antiquark. In the strongly-coupled gauge theory, it is only when radiation is emitted that one obtains an unambiguous separation of the pair into entangled subsystems, and this is what is reflected on the gravity side by the existence of the worldsheet horizon.

  12. Multisite EPR oximetry from multiple quadrature harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, R; Som, S; Johnson, D H; Zweier, J L; Kuppusamy, P; Potter, L C

    2012-01-01

    Multisite continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry using multiple quadrature field modulation harmonics is presented. First, a recently developed digital receiver is used to extract multiple harmonics of field modulated projection data. Second, a forward model is presented that relates the projection data to unknown parameters, including linewidth at each site. Third, a maximum likelihood estimator of unknown parameters is reported using an iterative algorithm capable of jointly processing multiple quadrature harmonics. The data modeling and processing are applicable for parametric lineshapes under nonsaturating conditions. Joint processing of multiple harmonics leads to 2-3-fold acceleration of EPR data acquisition. For demonstration in two spatial dimensions, both simulations and phantom studies on an L-band system are reported. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. EPR study of interactions in the MoOCl3 - diethyl dithiophosphate - diethylamine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larin, G.M.; Minin, V.V.

    2004-01-01

    By the method of EPR in MoOCl 3 -DDFH-DEta system when reagents ration is 1:1:>3 formation of a new molybdenum(V) imidocomplex in situ solution is detected. Composition and structure of a new molybdenum(V) imidocomplex - composition is MoNRCl(DDF) 3 (DDFH), coordination number is 7, structure is pentagonal bipyramid - are determined using analysis of additional superfine structure from atoms of ligands forming coordination sphere of molybdenum(V) imidocomplex [ru

  14. Teichmuller Space Resolution of the EPR Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2013-04-01

    The mystery of Newton's action-at-a-distance law of gravity was resolved by Einstein with Riemann's non-Euclidean geometry, which permitted the explanation of the departure from Newton's law for the motion of Mercury. It is here proposed that the similarly mysterious non-local EPR-type quantum correlations may be explained by a Teichmuller space geometry below the Planck length, for which an experiment for its verification is proposed.

  15. Steering, Entanglement, Nonlocality, and the EPR Paradox

    OpenAIRE

    Wiseman, H. M.; Jones, S. J.; Doherty, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of steering was introduced by Schrodinger in 1935 as a generalization of the EPR paradox for arbitrary pure bipartite entangled states and arbitrary measurements by one party. Until now, it has never been rigorously defined, so it has not been known (for example) what mixed states are steerable (that is, can be used to exhibit steering). We provide an operational definition, from which we prove (by considering Werner states and Isotropic states) that steerable states are a strict ...

  16. Seventy Years of the EPR Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczynski, Marian

    2006-11-01

    In spite of the fact that statistical predictions of quantum theory (QT) can only be tested if large amount of data is available a claim has been made that QT provides the most complete description of an individual physical system. Einstein's opposition to this claim and the paradox he presented in the article written together with Podolsky and Rosen in 1935 inspired generations of physicists in their quest for better understanding of QT. Seventy years after EPR article it is clear that without deep understanding of the character and limitations of QT one may not hope to find a meaningful unified theory of all physical interactions, manipulate qubits or construct a quantum computer.. In this paper we present shortly the EPR paper, the discussion, which followed it and Bell inequalities (BI). To avoid various paradoxes we advocate purely statistical contextual interpretation (PSC) of QT. According to PSC a state vector is not an attribute of a single electron, photon, trapped ion or quantum dot. A value of an observable assigned to a physical system has only a meaning in a context of a particular physical experiment PSC does not provide any mental space-time picture of sub phenomena. The EPR paradox is avoided because the reduction of the state vector in the measurement process is a passage from a description of the whole ensemble of the experimental results to a particular sub-ensemble of these results. We show that the violation of BI is neither a proof of the completeness of QT nor of its non-locality. Therefore we rephrase the EPR question and ask whether QT is "predictably "complete or in other words does it provide the complete description of experimental data. To test the "predictable completeness" it is not necessary to perform additional experiments it is sufficient to analyze more in detail the existing experimental data by using various non-parametric purity tests and other specific statistical tools invented to study the fine structure the time-series.

  17. Seventy Years of the EPR Paradox

    OpenAIRE

    Kupczynski, Marian

    2007-01-01

    In spite of the fact that statistical predictions of quantum theory (QT) can only be tested if large amount of data is available a claim has been made that QT provides the most complete description of an individual physical system. Einstein's opposition to this claim and the paradox he presented in the article written together with Podolsky and Rosen in 1935 inspired generations of physicists in their quest for better understanding of QT. Seventy years after EPR article it is clear that witho...

  18. Is the EPR paradox really a paradox?

    OpenAIRE

    Tartaglia, A.

    1998-01-01

    The EPR paradox and the meaning of the Bell inequality are discussed. It is shown that considering the quantum objects as carrying with them ''instruction kits'' telling them what to do when meeting a measurement apparatus any paradox disappears. In this view the quantum state is characterized by the prescribed behaviour rather than by the specific value a parameter assumes as a result of an interaction.

  19. Should the EPR be financed by industrialists?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jemain, A.

    2005-01-01

    As a reciprocal arrangement, the industrialists should be invited to contribute to the financing of the new generation reactor EPR (European pressurized reactor) which will be built in Flamanville (Manche, France). In exchange to their financial participation, the industrialists will receive the contractual warranty of stable electricity prices during 10 to 15 years periods. This short paper presents the opposite opinion of two representative of French industries concerning this proposal. Short paper. (J.S.)

  20. EPR Test with Photons and Kaons Analogies

    CERN Document Server

    Gisin, Nicolas

    2001-01-01

    We present a unified formalism describing EPR test using spin 1/2 particles, photons and kaons. This facilitates the comparison between existing experiments using photons and kaons. It underlines the similarities between birefringence and polarization dependent losses that affects experiments using optical fibers and mixing and decay that are intrinsic to the kaons. We also discuss the limitation these two characteristics impose on the testing of Bell's inequality.

  1. On Popper's new EPR-Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, D.; Selleri, F.

    1985-01-01

    It is scientifically reasonable to search for particular statistical ensembles to which the standard quantum rules (like Heisenberg relations) do not apply: these rules would instead be applicable to more general statistical ensembles (which might be called ''standard quantum ensembles''). Along these lines, Popper has recently proposed what he calls ''a new version of the EPR experiment'' in which the Copenhagen and statistical interpretations of quantum mechanics apparently lead to distinguishably different predictions

  2. Self-testing through EPR-steering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Šupić, Ivan; Hoban, Matty J

    2016-01-01

    The verification of quantum devices is an important aspect of quantum information, especially with the emergence of more advanced experimental implementations of quantum computation and secure communication. Within this, the theory of device-independent robust self-testing via Bell tests has reached a level of maturity now that many quantum states and measurements can be verified without direct access to the quantum systems: interaction with the devices is solely classical. However, the requirements for this robust level of verification are daunting and require high levels of experimental accuracy. In this paper we discuss the possibility of self-testing where we only have direct access to one part of the quantum device. This motivates the study of self-testing via EPR-steering, an intermediate form of entanglement verification between full state tomography and Bell tests. Quantum non-locality implies EPR-steering so results in the former can apply in the latter, but we ask what advantages may be gleaned from the latter over the former given that one can do partial state tomography? We show that in the case of self-testing a maximally entangled two-qubit state, or ebit, EPR-steering allows for simpler analysis and better error tolerance than in the case of full device-independence. On the other hand, this improvement is only a constant improvement and (up to constants) is the best one can hope for. Finally, we indicate that the main advantage in self-testing based on EPR-steering could be in the case of self-testing multi-partite quantum states and measurements. For example, it may be easier to establish a tensor product structure for a particular party’s Hilbert space even if we do not have access to their part of the global quantum system. (paper)

  3. The Finnish EPR dependent on a bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupin, L.

    2010-01-01

    A new conflict has emerged between the main contractor Areva and its client TVO, the Finnish energy group. The qualification of a handling bridge has delayed the OL3 project of third EPR reactor at Olkiluoto, Finland. The disagreement concerns the testing procedure and may induce a two year delay in the completion of the project which is now planned for 2012 instead of 2010 initially. (J.S.)

  4. The EPR operators are trained on simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maincent, G.

    2009-01-01

    Three years before the EPR reactor of Flamanville (Normandie, France) is generating its very first kilowatt hours, Electricite de France has started to train its teams on a simulator which reproduces the man-machine interface of the future nuclear power plant. The simulator used is an evolutive tool specific to the Flamanville reactor and capable to test about 20 different accidental situations. (J.S.)

  5. EPR in non-doped irradiated polyacetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hola, O.; Stasko, A.; Foeldesova, M.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of γ-irradiation on the paramagnetic properties of non-doped polyacetylene at low and high radiation doses has been studied and summarized. The dependence of the EPR spectra on the radiation dose in irradiated polyacetylene has been measured. No essential changes of the spin mobility as a consequence of irradiation were observed. The measurements of spin concentration confirm the high resistivity of non-doped polyacetylene to radiation. (author) 9 refs

  6. Active or passive systems? The EPR approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonhomme, N.; Py, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    In attempting to review how EPR is contemplated to meet requirements applicable to future nuclear power plants, the authors indicate where they see the markets and the corresponding unit sizes for the EPR which is a generic key factor for competitiveness. There are no reason in industrialized countries, other than USA (where the investment and amortizing practices under control by Public Utility Commission are quite particular), not to build future plants in the 1000 to 1500 MWe range. Standardization, which has been actively applied all along the French program and for the Konvoi plants, does not prevent evolution and allows to concentrate large engineering effort in smooth realization of plants and achieve actual construction and commissioning without significant delays. In order to contribute to public trust renewal, a next generation of power reactors should be fundamentally less likely to incur serious accidents. To reach this goal the best of passive and active systems must be considered without forgetting that the most important source of knowledge is construction and operating experience. Criteria to assess passive systems investigated for possible implementation in the EPR, such as simplicity of design, impact on plant operation, safety and cost, are discussed. Examples of the principal passive systems investigated are described and reasons why they have been dropped after screening through the criteria are given. (author). 11 figs

  7. Active or passive systems? The EPR approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonhomme, N [Nuclear Power International, Cedex (France); Py, J P [FRAMATOME, Cedex (France)

    1996-12-01

    In attempting to review how EPR is contemplated to meet requirements applicable to future nuclear power plants, the authors indicate where they see the markets and the corresponding unit sizes for the EPR which is a generic key factor for competitiveness. There are no reason in industrialized countries, other than USA (where the investment and amortizing practices under control by Public Utility Commission are quite particular), not to build future plants in the 1000 to 1500 MWe range. Standardization, which has been actively applied all along the French program and for the Konvoi plants, does not prevent evolution and allows to concentrate large engineering effort in smooth realization of plants and achieve actual construction and commissioning without significant delays. In order to contribute to public trust renewal, a next generation of power reactors should be fundamentally less likely to incur serious accidents. To reach this goal the best of passive and active systems must be considered without forgetting that the most important source of knowledge is construction and operating experience. Criteria to assess passive systems investigated for possible implementation in the EPR, such as simplicity of design, impact on plant operation, safety and cost, are discussed. Examples of the principal passive systems investigated are described and reasons why they have been dropped after screening through the criteria are given. (author). 11 figs.

  8. Use of electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel for retrospective dose assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry is a physical method for the assessment of absorbed dose from ionising radiation. It is based on the measurement of stable radiation induced radicals in human calcified tissues (primarily in tooth enamel). EPR dosimetry with teeth is now firmly established in retrospective dosimetry. It is a powerful method for providing information on exposure to ionising radiation many years after the event, since the 'signal' is 'stored' in the tooth or the bone. This technique is of particular relevance to relatively low dose exposures or when the results of conventional dosimetry are not available (e.g. in accidental circumstances). The use of EPR dosimetry, as an essential tool for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure is an important part of radioepidemiological studies and also provides data to select appropriate countermeasures based on retrospective evaluation of individual doses. Despite well established regulations and protocols for maintaining radiation protection dose limits, the assurance that these limits will not be exceeded cannot be guaranteed, thus providing new challenges for development of accurate methods of individual dose assessment. To meet some of these challenges, in 1998 the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research project (CRP) with the objective to review the available methods, current research and development in EPR biodosimetry technology, which may be of practical use. The major goal of this CRP was to investigate the use of EPR biodosimetry for reconstruction of absorbed dose in tooth enamel with the aim of providing Member States with up-to-date, and generally agreed upon advice regarding the most suitable procedures and the best focus for their research. The co-ordinated research project was conducted over four years and this publication presents the results and findings by a group of investigators from different countries. The available cytogenetic methods for radiation dose assessment were

  9. Use of electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel for retrospective dose assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry is a physical method for the assessment of absorbed dose from ionising radiation. It is based on the measurement of stable radiation induced radicals in human calcified tissues (primarily in tooth enamel). EPR dosimetry with teeth is now firmly established in retrospective dosimetry. It is a powerful method for providing information on exposure to ionising radiation many years after the event, since the 'signal' is 'stored' in the tooth or the bone. This technique is of particular relevance to relatively low dose exposures or when the results of conventional dosimetry are not available (e.g. in accidental circumstances). The use of EPR dosimetry, as an essential tool for retrospective assessment of radiation exposure is an important part of radioepidemiological studies and also provides data to select appropriate countermeasures based on retrospective evaluation of individual doses. Despite well established regulations and protocols for maintaining radiation protection dose limits, the assurance that these limits will not be exceeded cannot be guaranteed, thus providing new challenges for development of accurate methods of individual dose assessment. To meet some of these challenges, in 1998 the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research project (CRP) with the objective to review the available methods, current research and development in EPR biodosimetry technology, which may be of practical use. The major goal of this CRP was to investigate the use of EPR biodosimetry for reconstruction of absorbed dose in tooth enamel with the aim of providing Member States with up-to-date, and generally agreed upon advice regarding the most suitable procedures and the best focus for their research. The co-ordinated research project was conducted over four years and this publication presents the results and findings by a group of investigators from different countries. The available cytogenetic methods for radiation dose assessment were

  10. Use of the Frank sequence in pulsed EPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tseitlin, Mark; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    The Frank polyphase sequence has been applied to pulsed EPR of triarylmethyl radicals at 256MHz (9.1mT magnetic field), using 256 phase pulses. In EPR, as in NMR, use of a Frank sequence of phase steps permits pulsed FID signal acquisition with very low power microwave/RF pulses (ca. 1.5m......W in the application reported here) relative to standard pulsed EPR. A 0.2mM aqueous solution of a triarylmethyl radical was studied using a 16mm diameter cross-loop resonator to isolate the EPR signal detection system from the incident pulses. Keyword: Correlation spectroscopy,Multi-pulse EPR,Low power pulses,NMR,EPR...

  11. Application of EPR spectroscopy to the examination of pro-oxidant activity of coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowian, Daniel; Skiba, Dominik; Kudelski, Adam; Pilawa, Barbara; Ramos, Paweł; Adamczyk, Jakub; Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna

    2014-05-15

    Free radicals present in coffee may be responsible for exerting toxic effects on an organism. The objectives of this work were to compare free radicals properties and concentrations in different commercially available coffees, in solid and liquid states, and to determine the effect of roasting on the formation of free radicals in coffee beans of various origins. The free radicals content of 15 commercially available coffees (solid and liquid) was compared and the impact of processing examined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at X-band (9.3 GHz). First derivative EPR spectra were measured at microwave power in the range of 0.7-70 mW. The following parameters were calculated for EPR spectra: amplitude (A), integral intensity (I), and line-width (ΔBpp); g-Factor was obtained from resonance condition. Our study showed that free radicals exist in green coffee beans (10(16) spin/g), roasted coffee beans (10(18) spin/g), and in commercially available coffee (10(17)-10(18) spin/g). Free radical concentrations were higher in solid ground coffee than in instant or lyophilised coffee. Continuous microwave saturation indicated homogeneous broadening of EPR lines from solid and liquid commercial coffee samples as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes were found to be present in all coffee samples tested, solid and liquid commercial coffees as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Higher free radicals concentrations were obtained for both the green and roasted at 240 °C coffee beans from Peru compared with those originating from Ethiopia, Brazil, India, or Colombia. Moreover, more free radicals occurred in Arabica coffee beans roasted at 240 °C than Robusta. EPR spectroscopy is a useful method of examining free radicals in different types of coffee. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Textbook of dosimetry. 4. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.I.

    1999-01-01

    This textbook of dosimetry is devoted to the students in physics and technical physics of high education institutions, confronted with different application of atomic energy as well as with protection of population and environment against ionizing radiations. Atomic energy is highly beneficial for man but unfortunately incorporates potential dangers which manifest in accidents, the source of which is either insufficient training of the personnel, a criminal negligence or insufficient reliability of the nuclear facilities. The majority of the incident and accident events have had as origin the personnel errors. This was the case with both the 'Three Miles Island' (1979) and Chernobyl (1986) NPP accidents. The dosimetry science acquires a vital significance in accident situations since the data obtained by its procedures are essential in choosing the correct immediate actions, behaviour tactics, orientation of liquidation of accident consequences as well as in ensuring the health of population. An important accent is placed in this manual on clarification of the nature of physical processes taken place in dosimetric detectors, in establishing the relation between radiation field characteristics and the detector response as well as in defining different dosimetric quantities. The terminology and the units of physical quantities is based on the international system of units. The book contains the following 15 chapters: 1. Ionizing radiation field; 2. Radiation doses; 3. Physical bases of gamma radiation dosimetry; 4. Ionization dosimetric detectors; 5. Semiconductor dosimetric detectors; 6. Scintillation detection in the gamma radiation dosimetry; 7. Luminescent methods in dosimetry; 8. The photographic and chemical methods of gamma radiation dosimetry; 9. Neutron dosimetry; 10. Dosimetry of high intensity radiation; 11. Dosimetry of high energy Bremsstrahlung; 12. Measurement of the linear energy transfer; 13. Microdosimetry; 14. Dosimetry of incorporated

  13. Confirmation of a second EPR to be built at Penly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    The French government has made public its decision to launch the construction of a second EPR in France. This EPR is planned to be built on the Penly site (northern region of France). EDF will manage this project but other investors like GDF-Suez are invited to participate. The construction works are planned to begin in 2012 for a commissioning in 2017. This reactor will be the fifth EPR being built in the world. (A.C.)

  14. Investigation of anisotropy in EPR spectra of radiation defects in irradiated beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.I.; Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Zashkvara, O. V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Petukhov, Yu. V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In this work results of analysis of anisotropy and hyperfine structure in EPR spectra of paramagnetic defects in irradiated samples of beryllium ceramics are presented. To explain peculiarities in a shape and parameters of the EPR spectrum hyperfine structure in beryllium ceramics, we have analyzed several versions of model representations for the radiation-induced paramagnetic defects uniformly distributed in a sample as well as for cluster defects which hyperfine structure is determined by interactions between electrons and nuclei of impurity atoms (S=1/2) and which are characterized by anisotropy in the g factors. Calculations of a shape of the uniformly widened EPR spectra are carried out by the model of random interactions between electron spins. The EPR spectra, widened at the expense of anisotropy in the g factors, are calculated by the following equation: g(Δ)=[2(ω-ω 0 )+α] -1/2 , where ω 0 =γH 0 , α is the quantify proportional to the anisotropy shift. To describe wings of spectral lines, where the equation doesn't work, we use the Gaussian function. To determine the frequency of precession of electron spins packages with local concentration N loc , the following expression is used: ω=ω 0 +1/2α(3cos 2 θ-1), where θ is an angle between the symmetry axis and the direction of the external magnetic field. It is shown that the best agreement between the calculated and experimental EPR spectra is observed with the following computational model: paramagnetic radiation defects are distributed uniformly over a ceramics sample, and the g factors of its EPR spectra have the anisotropy typical for dipole-dipole interaction in powder samples. By results of the data we obtained, it's clear that in future we'll need in more detailed information than that published in scientific journals about formation of the paramagnetic defect EPR spectra structure in beryllium oxides and ceramics at the expense of resonance line hyperfine splitting on atoms of

  15. Investigation of anisotropy in EPR spectra of radiation defects in irradiated beryllium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, A I; Ryabikin, Yu A; Zashkvara, O V; Bitenbaev, M I; Petukhov, Yu V [Inst. of Physics and Technology, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2004-07-01

    Full text: In this work results of analysis of anisotropy and hyperfine structure in EPR spectra of paramagnetic defects in irradiated samples of beryllium ceramics are presented. To explain peculiarities in a shape and parameters of the EPR spectrum hyperfine structure in beryllium ceramics, we have analyzed several versions of model representations for the radiation-induced paramagnetic defects uniformly distributed in a sample as well as for cluster defects which hyperfine structure is determined by interactions between electrons and nuclei of impurity atoms (S=1/2) and which are characterized by anisotropy in the g factors. Calculations of a shape of the uniformly widened EPR spectra are carried out by the model of random interactions between electron spins. The EPR spectra, widened at the expense of anisotropy in the g factors, are calculated by the following equation: g({delta})=[2({omega}-{omega}{sub 0})+{alpha}]{sup -1/2}, where {omega}{sub 0}={gamma}H{sub 0}, {alpha} is the quantify proportional to the anisotropy shift. To describe wings of spectral lines, where the equation doesn't work, we use the Gaussian function. To determine the frequency of precession of electron spins packages with local concentration N{sub loc}, the following expression is used: {omega}={omega}{sub 0}+1/2{alpha}(3cos{sup 2}{theta}-1), where {theta} is an angle between the symmetry axis and the direction of the external magnetic field. It is shown that the best agreement between the calculated and experimental EPR spectra is observed with the following computational model: paramagnetic radiation defects are distributed uniformly over a ceramics sample, and the g factors of its EPR spectra have the anisotropy typical for dipole-dipole interaction in powder samples. By results of the data we obtained, it's clear that in future we'll need in more detailed information than that published in scientific journals about formation of the paramagnetic defect EPR spectra structure in

  16. Application of the Electron paramagnetic resonance to the ionizing radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urena N, F.

    2000-01-01

    The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is defined as the resonant absorption of electromagnetic energy in paramagnetic substances by the spin transition of a non-pairing electron between different energy levels in presence of a magnetic field. (Slighter, 1989). One of the more important characteristic of EPR is that the electron spin levels are subdivided by the electron interaction with the magnetic dipoles of the nearby nucleus giving occasion for a spectral structure called hyperfine structure. In this kind of interactions two limit cases are distinguished: 1. when the non-pairing electron is located in a central ion surrounded of atoms belonging to coordinate molecules. 2. When a non-pairing electron interactioning in the same form with a number of equivalent nucleus, which is common in organic radicals, these will give as result spectra. Some EPR spectrometer can be used to dosimetric purposes by free radicals via. In this work, it is presented the application of EPR to dosimetry of ionizing radiations by free radicals via which allows to determinations of high doses. (Author)

  17. EPR study on gamma-irradiated fruits dehydrated via osmosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yordanov, N.D. [Laboratory EPR, Institute of Catalysis, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: ndyepr@bas.bg; Aleksieva, K. [Laboratory EPR, Institute of Catalysis, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2007-06-15

    The shape and time stability of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of non- and {gamma}-irradiated papaya, melon, cherry and fig samples dehydrated via osmosis are reported. It is shown that non-irradiated samples are generally EPR silent whereas {gamma}-irradiated exhibit 'sugar-like' EPR spectra. The recorded EPR spectra are monitored for a period of 7 months after irradiation (stored at low humidity and in the dark). The results suggest longer period of unambiguous identification of the radiation processing of osmose dehydrated fruits. Therefore, the Protocol EN 13708,2001 issued by CEN is fully applicable for the studied fruit samples.

  18. Two-dimensional 220 MHz Fourier transform EPR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placidi, Giuseppe; Brivati, John A.; Alecci, Marcello; Testa, Luca; Sotgiu, Antonello

    1998-01-01

    In the last decade radiofrequency continuous-wave EPR spectrometers have been developed to detect and localize free radicals in vivo. Only recently, pulsed radiofrequency EPR spectrometers have been described for imaging applications with small samples. In the present work, we show the first two-dimensional image obtained at 220 MHz on a large phantom (40 ml) that simulates typical conditions of in vivo EPR imaging. This pulsed EPR apparatus has the potential to make the time required for three-dimensional imaging compatible with the biological half-life of normally used paramagnetic probes. (author)

  19. EPR study on gamma-irradiated fruits dehydrated via osmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yordanov, N.D.; Aleksieva, K.

    2007-01-01

    The shape and time stability of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of non- and γ-irradiated papaya, melon, cherry and fig samples dehydrated via osmosis are reported. It is shown that non-irradiated samples are generally EPR silent whereas γ-irradiated exhibit 'sugar-like' EPR spectra. The recorded EPR spectra are monitored for a period of 7 months after irradiation (stored at low humidity and in the dark). The results suggest longer period of unambiguous identification of the radiation processing of osmose dehydrated fruits. Therefore, the Protocol EN 13708,2001 issued by CEN is fully applicable for the studied fruit samples

  20. EPR study on gamma-irradiated fruits dehydrated via osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Aleksieva, K.

    2007-06-01

    The shape and time stability of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of non- and γ-irradiated papaya, melon, cherry and fig samples dehydrated via osmosis are reported. It is shown that non-irradiated samples are generally EPR silent whereas γ-irradiated exhibit "sugar-like" EPR spectra. The recorded EPR spectra are monitored for a period of 7 months after irradiation (stored at low humidity and in the dark). The results suggest longer period of unambiguous identification of the radiation processing of osmose dehydrated fruits. Therefore, the Protocol EN 13708,2001 issued by CEN is fully applicable for the studied fruit samples.

  1. A web-based database for EPR centers in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, T.; Hagiwara, S.; Katagiri, M.; Mizuochi, N.; Isoya, J.

    2006-01-01

    We develop a web-based database system for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) centers in semiconductors. This database is available to anyone at http://www.kc.tsukuba.ac.jp/div-media/epr/. It currently has more than 300 records of the spin-Hamiltonian parameters for major known EPR centers. One can upload own new records to the database or can use simulation tools powered by EPR-NMR(C). Here, we describe the features and objectives of this database, and mention some future plans

  2. Identification of gamma-irradiated fruit juices by EPR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksieva, K.I.; Dimov, K.G.; Yordanov, N.D.

    2014-01-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on commercially available juices from various fruits and different fruit contents: 25%, 40%, 50%, and 100%, homemade juices, nectars and concentrated fruit syrups, before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. In order to remove water from non- and irradiated samples all juices and nectars were filtered; the solid residue was washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. Only concentrated fruit syrups were dried for 60 min at 40 °C in a standard laboratory oven. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0025 before irradiation with exception of concentrated fruit syrups, which are EPR silent. Irradiation of juice samples gives rise to complex EPR spectra which gradually transferred to “cellulose-like” EPR spectrum from 25% to 100% fruit content. Concentrated fruit syrups show typical “sugar-like“ spectra due to added saccharides. All EPR spectra are characteristic and can prove radiation treatment. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signals were studied for a period of 60 days after irradiation. - Highlights: • The EPR analysis of juices, nectars and syrups proves that the sample has been irradiated. • Two sample preparation procedures were used. • The stability of the radiation induced EPR signals was studied over 2 months. • Application of European standards can be extended for irradiated juices and syrups

  3. EPR investigation of some gamma-irradiated medicines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksieva, Katerina; Yordanov, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The results of EPR studies on three medical tablets – Galanthamine, Cytisine and Tribulus terrestris before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. Before irradiation Galanthamine and Cytisine tablets are EPR silent, whereas Tribulus terrestris show a broad singlet line with g factor 2.2084±0.002. The same spectrum is recorded after irradiation. After gamma-sterilization, however, Galanthamine and Cytisine tablets exhibit a typical EPR spectrum due to gamma induced free radicals in lactose used as an excipient. These stable free radicals can be used for identification of radiation processing for a long time after it. Key words: medical tablets, gamma-irradiation, EPR

  4. Eleventh DOE workshop on personnel neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Since its formation, the Office of Health (EH-40) has stressed the importance of the exchange of information related to and improvements in neutron dosimetry. This Workshop was the eleventh in the series sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). It provided a forum for operational personnel at DOE facilities to discuss current issues related to neutron dosimetry and for leading investigators in the field to discuss promising approaches for future research. A total of 26 papers were presented including the keynote address by Dr. Warren K. Sinclair, who spoke on, ''The 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP and their Biological Background.'' The first several papers discussed difficulties in measuring neutrons of different energies and ways of compensating or deriving correction factors at individual facilities. Presentations were also given by the US Navy and Air Force. Current research in neutron dosimeter development was the subject of the largest number of papers. These included a number on the development of neutron spectrometers

  5. Design performances and chemistry program supporting the FA3/UK-EPR (TM) Activity Management: Experience and Modelling Balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tigeras, A.; Bachet, M.; Bremmes, O.; Berger, M.; Clinard, M.H.; Jolivet, P.; Chahma, F.

    2012-01-01

    Several methodologies have been applied to evaluate the source term in the primary circuit and to define the appropriate chemistry conditioning for the EPR reactor. These methodologies are based on nuclear power plant (NPP) feedback experience, laboratory data and modelling considerations. It is concluded that the activity risks are understood and can be managed with EPR design options. A strategy for the chemical conditioning of the primary coolant has been defined through the specifications for 3 parameters: pH, Zn and H 2 whose target and limit values are based on NPP feedback, international experimental data from laboratory tests, theoretical studies and numerical simulations. The material inventory selected for the primary components will allow low dose rates and low crud formation despite the high power level of the EPR reactor

  6. Retrospective radiation dosimetry using electron paramagnetic resonance in canine dental enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Rao F.H.; Pekar, J.; Rink, W.J.; Boreham, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) biodosimetry of human tooth enamel has been widely used for measuring radiation doses in various scenarios. We have now developed EPR dosimetry in tooth enamel extracted from canines. Molars and incisors from canines were cleaned by processing in supersaturated aqueous potassium hydroxide solution. The dosimetric signal in canine tooth enamel was found to increase linearly as a function of laboratory added dose from 0.44±0.02 to 4.42±0.22 Gy. The gamma radiation sensitivity of the canine molar enamel was found to be comparable to that of human tooth enamel. The dosimetric signal in canine enamel has been found to be stable up to at least 6 weeks after in vitro irradiation. A dosimetric signal variation of 10-25% was observed for canines ranging from in age 3 years to 16 year old

  7. Modern methods of personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.; Herrmann, D.; Kiesewetter, W.

    The physical properties of radiation detectors for personnel dosimetry are described and compared. The suitability of different types of dosimeters for operational and central monitoring of normal occupational exposure, for accident and catastrophe dosimetry and for background and space-flight dosimetry is discussed. The difficulties in interpreting the dosimeter reading with respect to the dose in individual body organs are discussed briefly. 430 literature citations (up to Spring 1966) are given

  8. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of the treatise The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume III builds upon the foundations of Volumes I and II and the tradition of the preceeding treatise Radiation Dosimetry. Volume III contains three comprehensive chapters on the applications of radiation dosimetry in particular research and medical settings, a chapter on unique and useful detectors, and two chapters on Monte Carlo techniques and their applications.

  9. Locations of radical species in black pepper seeds investigated by CW EPR and 9GHz EPR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Epel, Boris

    2014-10-15

    In this study, noninvasive 9GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-imaging and continuous wave (CW) EPR were used to investigate the locations of paramagnetic species in black pepper seeds without further irradiation. First, lithium phthalocyanine (LiPC) phantom was used to examine 9GHz EPR imaging capabilities. The 9GHz EPR-imager easily resolved the LiPC samples at a distance of ∼2mm. Then, commercially available black pepper seeds were measured. We observed signatures from three different radical species, which were assigned to stable organic radicals, Fe(3+), and Mn(2+) complexes. In addition, no EPR spectral change in the seed was observed after it was submerged in distilled H2O for 1h. The EPR and spectral-spatial EPR imaging results suggested that the three paramagnetic species were mostly located at the seed surface. Fewer radicals were found inside the seed. We demonstrated that the CW EPR and 9GHz EPR imaging were useful for the determination of the spatial distribution of paramagnetic species in various seeds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Interlaboratory niobium dosimetry comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, P.

    1980-01-01

    For an interlaboratory comparison of neutron dosimetry using niobium the 93 sup(m)Nb activities of irradiated niobium monitors were measured. This work was performed to compare the applied techniques of dosimetry with Nb in different laboratories. The niobium monitors were irradiated in the fast breeder EBRII, USA and the BR2, Belgium. The monitors were dissolved and several samples were prepared. Their niobium contents were determined by the 94 Nb-count rates. since the original specific count rate was known. The KX radiations of the 93 sup(m)Nb of the samples and of a calibrated Nb-foil were compared. This foil was measured by PTB, Braunschweig and CBNM, Geel, which we additionally compared with the KX radiation of 88 Sr produced by a thin 88 Y source from a 88 Y-standard solution (PTB). (orig.) [de

  11. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaro, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR

  12. Hanford External Dosimetry Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, J.J.

    1990-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford External Dosimetry Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include administrating the Hanford personnel dosimeter processing program and ensuring that the related dosimeter data accurately reflect occupational dose received by Hanford personnel or visitors. Specific chapters of this report deal with the following subjects: personnel dosimetry organizations at Hanford and the associated DOE and contractor exposure guidelines; types, characteristics, and procurement of personnel dosimeters used at Hanford; personnel dosimeter identification, acceptance testing, accountability, and exchange; dosimeter processing and data recording practices; standard sources, calibration factors, and calibration processes (including algorithms) used for calibrating Hanford personnel dosimeters; system operating parameters required for assurance of dosimeter processing quality control; special dose evaluation methods applied for individuals under abnormal circumstances (i.e., lost results, etc.); and methods for evaluating personnel doses from nuclear accidents. 1 ref., 14 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Thermo-luminescent dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reither, M; Schorn, B; Schneider, E

    1981-01-01

    The development of paediatric radiology which began in the late 195O's has been characterised by the need to limit the dose of ionising radiation to which the child is subjected. The aim has been to keep radiation exposure as low as possible by the introduction of suitable techniques and by the development of new methods. It is therefore surprising that studies in dosimetry in the paediaytric age range have only been carried out in recent years. One reason for this may have been the fact that a suitable technique of measurement was not available at the time. The introduction of solid state dosimetry based on thermo-luminescence, first into radiotherapy (1968) and subsequently into radiodiagnosis, has made it possible to abandon the previously widely used ionisation chamber. The purpose of the present paper is to indicate the suitability of this form of dose measurement for paediatric radiological purposes and to stimulate its application in this field.

  14. Legal aspects of dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomarola, H.

    1976-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiations is regulated in France in all fields of application. The main principles governing inspection activities in the food industry are outlined. Conventional preservation methods are mentioned, after which a discussion is devoted to the preservation of food products by irradiation treatment and the increasing importance given to this technique. Consumer protection automatically implies the obligatory use of dosimetry by inspection organisms if the irradiated merchandise is likely to serve for human or animal consumption. Irradiation treatment permits are granted in a context of specific statutory texts mentioned here. Supervision is constant, but always both realistic and flexible. Each aspect of this treatment is discussed in maximum detail if not quite exhaustively, with special emphasis on dosimetry as an indispensable safety factor [fr

  15. WIPP radiation dosimetry program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.F.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry is the process by which various measurement results and procedures are applied to quantify the radiation exposure of an individual. Accurate and precise determination of radiation dose is a key factor to the success of a radiation protection program. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a Department of Energy (DOE) facility designed for permanent repository of transuranic wastes in a 2000-foot-thick salt bed 2150 feet underground, has established a dosimetry program developed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.11, ''Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers''; ANSI/ASME NQA-1, ''Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities''; DOE Order 5484.1, ''Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements''; and other applicable regulations

  16. Quantitative imaging for clinical dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardies, Manuel [INSERM U601, 9 Quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes (France)]. E-mail: manu@nantes.inserm.fr; Flux, Glenn [Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Lassmann, Michael [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Julis-Maximilians University, Wuerzburg (Germany); Monsieurs, Myriam [Department of Health Physics, University of Ghent, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Savolainen, Sauli [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki and HUS, Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Strand, Sven-Erik [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University (Sweden)

    2006-12-20

    Patient-specific dosimetry in nuclear medicine is now a legal requirement in many countries throughout the EU for targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) applications. In order to achieve that goal, an increased level of accuracy in dosimetry procedures is needed. Current research in nuclear medicine dosimetry should not only aim at developing new methods to assess the delivered radiation absorbed dose at the patient level, but also to ensure that the proposed methods can be put into practice in a sufficient number of institutions. A unified dosimetry methodology is required for making clinical outcome comparisons possible.

  17. Sixth symposium on neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This booklet contains all abstracts of papers presented in 13 sessions. Main topics: Cross sections and Kerma factors; analytical radiobiology; detectors for personnel monitoring; secondary charged particles and microdosimetric basis of q-value for neutrons; personnel dosimetry; concepts for radiation protection; ambient monitoring; TEPC and ion chambers in radiation protection; beam dosimetry; track detectors (CR-39); dosimetry at biomedical irradiation facilities; health physics at therapy facilities; calibration for radiation protection; devices for beam dosimetry (TLD and miscellaneous); therapy and biomedical irradiation facilities; treatment planning. (HP)

  18. Dosimetry for Crystals Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lecomte, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Before shipment to CMS, all PbWO4 crystals produced in China are irradiated there with 60 Co , in order to insure that the induced absorption coefficient is within specifications. Acceptance tests at CERNand at ENEA also include irradiation with gamma rays from 60 Co sources. There were initially discrepancies in quoted doses and doserates as well as in induced absorption coefficients. The present work resolves the discrepancies in irradiation measurements and defines common dosimetry methods for consistency checks between irradiation facilities.

  19. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact the Individual Dosimetry ServiceWe inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JANUARY/FEBRUARY will be available from their usual dispatchers on Monday the third of January 2000.Please have your films changed:before the 12 January.The colour of the dosimeter valid in JANUARY/FEBRUARY is WHITE.

  20. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact the Individual Dosimetry Service.We inform all staff and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period MARCH/APRIL will be available from their usual dispatchers on the third of March 2000.Please have your films changed before the 13th of March.The colour of the dosimeter valid in MARCH/APRIL is BLUE.

  1. Personal radon daughter dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocker, H.

    1979-12-01

    The conventional means of radon daughter exposure estimatikn for uranium miners in Canada is by grab sampling and time weighting. Personal dosimetry is a possible alternative method with its own advantages and limitations. The author poses basic questions with regard to two methods of radon daughter detection, thermoluminescent chips and track-etch film. An historical review of previous and current research and development programs in Canada and in other countries is presented, as are brief results and conclusions of each dosimeter evaluation

  2. Personnel radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The book contains the 21 technical papers presented at the Technical Committee Meeting to Elaborate Procedures and Data for the Intercomparison of Personnel Dosimeters organizaed by the IAEA on 22-26 April 1985. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. A list of areas in which additional research and development work is needed and recommendations for an IAEA-sponsored intercomparison program on personnel dosimetry is also included

  3. Radiochromic film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Christopher G.

    2006-01-01

    The object of this paper is to give a new user some practical information on the use of radiochromic films for medical applications. While various aspects of radiochromic film dosimetry for medical applications have been covered in some detail in several other excellent review articles which have appeared in the last few years [Niroomand-Rad, A., Blackwell, C.R., Coursey, B.M., Gall, K.P., McLaughlin, W.L., Meigooni, A.S., Nath, R., Rodgers, J.E., Soares, C.G., 1998. Radiochromic dosimetry: recommendations of the AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 55. Med. Phys. 25, 2093-2115; Dempsey, J.F., Low, D.A., Mutic, S., Markman, J., Kirov, A.S., Nussbaum, G.H., Williamson, J.F., 2000. Validation of a precision radiochromic film dosimetry system for quantitative two-dimensional imaging of acute exposure dose distributions. Med. Phys. 27, 2462-2475; Butson, M.J., Yu, P.K.N., Cheung, T., Metcalfe, P., 2003. Radiochromic film for medical radiation dosimetry. Mater. Sci. Eng. R41, 61-120], it is the intent of the present author to present material from a more user-oriented and practical standpoint. That is, how the films work will be stressed much less than how to make the films work well. The strength of radiochromic films is most evident in applications where there is a very high dose gradient and relatively high absorbed dose rates. These conditions are associated with brachytherapy applications, measurement of small fields, and at the edges (penumbra regions) of larger fields

  4. Dosimetry: an ARDENT topic

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The first annual ARDENT workshop took place in Vienna from 20 to 23 November. The workshop gathered together the Early-Stage Researchers (ESR) and their supervisors, plus other people involved from all the participating institutions.   “The meeting, which was organised with the local support of the Austrian Institute of Technology, was a nice opportunity for the ESRs to get together, meet each other, and present their research plans and some preliminary results of their work,” says Marco Silari, a member of CERN Radiation Protection Group and the scientist in charge of the programme. Two full days were devoted to a training course on radiation dosimetry, delivered by renowned experts. The workshop closed with a half-day visit to the MedAustron facility in Wiener Neustadt. ARDENT (Advanced Radiation Dosimetry European Network Training) is a Marie Curie ITN project funded under EU FP7 with €4 million. The project focuses on radiation dosimetry exploiting se...

  5. Dosimetry in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, M L; Chatterjee, Ingita; Patil, Preeti; Naveen, S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review various dosimeters used in dentistry and the cumulative results of various studies done with various dosimeters. Several relevant PubMed indexed articles from 1999 to 2013 were electronically searched by typing "dosimeters", "dosimeters in dentistry", "properties of dosimeters", "thermoluminescent and optically stimulated dosimeters", "recent advancements in dosimetry in dentistry." The searches were limited to articles in English to prepare a concise review on dental dosimetry. Titles and abstracts were screened, and articles that fulfilled the criteria of use of dosimeters in dental applications were selected for a full-text reading. Article was divided into four groups: (1) Biological effects of radiation, (2) properties of dosimeters, (3) types of dosimeters and (4) results of various studies using different dosimeters. The present review on dosimetry based on various studies done with dosimeters revealed that, with the advent of radiographic technique the effective dose delivered is low. Therefore, selection of radiological technique plays an important role in dental dose delivery.

  6. Dosimetry in life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The uses of radiation in medicine and biology have grown in scope and diversity to make the Radiological Sciences a significant factor in both research and medical practice. Of critical importance in the applications and development of biomedical and radiological techniques is the precision with which the dose may be determined at all points of interest in the absorbing medium. This has developed as a result of efficacy of investigations in clinical radiation therapy, concern for patient safety and diagnostic accuracy in diagnostic radiology and the advent of clinical trials and research into the use of heavily ionizing radiations in biology and medicine. Since the last IAEA Symposium on Dosimetry Techniques applied to Agriculture, Industry, Biology and Medicine, held in Vienna in 1972, it has become increasingly clear that advances in the techniques and hardware of biomedical dosimetry have been rapid. It is for these reasons that this symposium was organized in a concerted effort to focus on the problems, developments and areas of further research in dosimetry in the Life Sciences. (author)

  7. Dosimetry in life sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-06-15

    The uses of radiation in medicine and biology have grown in scope and diversity to make the Radiological Sciences a significant factor in both research and medical practice. Of critical importance in the applications and development of biomedical and radiological techniques is the precision with which the dose may be determined at all points of interest in the absorbing medium. This has developed as a result of efficacy of investigations in clinical radiation therapy, concern for patient safety and diagnostic accuracy in diagnostic radiology and the advent of clinical trials and research into the use of heavily ionizing radiations in biology and medicine. Since the last IAEA Symposium on Dosimetry Techniques applied to Agriculture, Industry, Biology and Medicine, held in Vienna in 1972, it has become increasingly clear that advances in the techniques and hardware of biomedical dosimetry have been rapid. It is for these reasons that this symposium was organized in a concerted effort to focus on the problems, developments and areas of further research in dosimetry in the Life Sciences. (author)

  8. Individual dosimetry and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, T.

    1997-01-01

    In 1996, the Dosimetry and Calibration Section was, as in previous years, mainly engaged in routine tasks: the distribution of over 6000 dosimeters (with a total of more than 10,000 films) every two months and the calibration of about 900 fixed and mobile instruments used in the radiation survey sections of RP group. These tasks were, thanks to an experienced team, well mastered. Special efforts had to be made in a number of areas to modernize the service or to keep it in line with new prescriptions. The Individual Dosimetry Service had to assure that CERN's contracting firms comply with the prescriptions in the Radiation Safety Manual (1996) that had been inspired by the Swiss Ordinance of 1994: Companies must file for authorizations with the Swiss Federal Office for Public Health requiring that in every company an 'Expert in Radiation Protection' be nominated and subsequently trained. CERN's Individual Dosimetry Service is accredited by the Swiss Federal Authorities and works closely together with other, similar services on a rigorous quality assurance programme. Within this framework, CERN was mandated to organize this year the annual Swiss 'Intercomparison of Dosimeters'. All ten accredited dosimetry services - among others those of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Villigen and of the four Swiss nuclear power stations - sent dosimeters to CERN, where they were irradiated in CERN's calibration facility with precise photon doses. After return to their origin they were processed and evaluated. The results were communicated to CERN and were compared with the originally given doses. A report on the results was subsequently prepared and submitted to the Swiss 'Group of Experts on Personal Dosimetry'. Reference monitors for photon and neutron radiation were brought to standard laboratories to assure the traceability of CERN's calibration service to the fundamental quantities. For photon radiation, a set of ionization chambers was calibrated in the reference field

  9. Advances in biomedical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Full text: Radiation dosimetry, the accurate determination of the absorbed dose within an irradiated body or a piece of material, is a prerequisite for all applications of ionizing radiation. This has been known since the very first radiation applications in medicine and biology, and increasing efforts are being made by radiation researchers to develop more reliable, effective and safe instruments, and to further improve dosimetric accuracy for all types of radiation used. Development of new techniques and instrumentation was particularly fast in the field of both medical diagnostic and therapeutic radiology. Thus, in Paris in October the IAEA held the latest symposium in its continuing series on dosimetry in medicine and biology. The last one was held in Vienna in 1975. High-quality dosimetry is obviously of great importance for human health, whether the objectives lie in the prevention and control of risks associated with the nuclear industry, in medical uses of radioactive substances or X-ray beams for diagnostic purposes, or in the application of photon, electron or neutron beams in radiotherapy. The symposium dealt with the following subjects: General aspects of dosimetry; Special physical and biomedical aspects; Determination of absorbed dose; Standardization and calibration of dosimetric systems; and Development of dosimetric systems. The forty or so papers presented and the discussions that followed them brought out a certain number of dominant themes, among which three deserve particular mention. - The recent generalization of the International System of Units having prompted a fundamental reassessment of the dosimetric quantities to be considered in calibrating measuring instruments, various proposals were advanced by the representatives of national metrology laboratories to replace the quantity 'exposure' (SI unit = coulomb/kg) by 'Kerma' or 'absorbed dose' (unit joule/kg, the special name of which is 'gray'), this latter being closer to the practical

  10. E-PR technologies in political party activities

    OpenAIRE

    Tereshchuk Vitaliy Ivanovych

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the role of the Internet as an important communicative tool in the field of political PR. The article reviews the characteristics of PR-activities on the Internet and the features of e-PR in the political sphere. Particular attention is paid to the system of political party’s e-PR tools.

  11. PropeR: a multi disciplinary EPR system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Helma; Boers, Gerrit; Tange, Huibert; Talmon, Jan; Hasman, Arie

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the architecture of an EPR system developed for the PropeR project. This EPR system not only aims at supporting home care of stroke patients, but is also designed in such a way that it can be ported to other medical services without much effort. We will briefly describe the

  12. EPR study on tomatoes before and after gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksieva, K.; Georgieva, L.; Tzvetkova, E.; Yordanov, N.D.

    2009-01-01

    The results from the EPR studies on fresh, air-dried and lyophilized tomato samples before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. Before irradiation fresh and air-dried tomatoes exhibit one singlet EPR line characterized with common g-factor of 2.0048±0.0005, whereas freeze-dried tomato does not show any EPR spectrum. After irradiation, a typical 'cellulose-like' triplet EPR spectrum appears in all samples, attributed to cellulose free radicals, generated by gamma-irradiation. It consists of intense central line with g=2.0048±0.0005 and two weak satellite lines separated ca. 3 mT left and right of it. In air-dried and lyophilized tomatoes the 'cellulose-like' EPR spectrum is superimposed by an additional partly resolved carbohydrate spectrum. Fading measurements of the radiation-induced EPR signals indicate that the intensity of the EPR spectra of air-dried and freeze-dried tomato are reduced to about 50% after 50 days, whereas those of fresh irradiated tomatoes kept at 4 o C fade completely in 15 days. The reported results unambiguously show that the presence of two satellite lines in the EPR 'cellulose-like' spectra of tomato samples can be used for identification of radiation processing.

  13. EPR and NMR spectroscopy on spin-labeled proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finiguerra, Michelina Giuseppina

    2011-01-01

    Spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) have been employed to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The surface polarity of four single cysteine mutants of the Zn-azurin in frozen solution were studied using 275 GHz EPR (J-band), with the advantage compared to 9 GHz (X-band) and

  14. Case Studies in e-RPL and e-PR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Roslyn; Miller, Allison

    2014-01-01

    The use of ePortfolios for recognition of prior learning (e-RPL) and for professional recognition (e-PR) is slowly gaining in popularity in the VET sector however their use is sporadic across educational sectors, disciplines, educational institutions and professions. Added to this is an array of purposes and types of e-RPL and e-PR models and…

  15. SU-F-J-100: Standardized Biodistribution Template for Nuclear Medicine Dosimetry Collection and Reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesner, A [University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Poli, G [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Beykan, S; Lassman, M [University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzberg, Wuerzberg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: As the field of Nuclear Medicine moves forward with efforts to integrate radiation dosimetry into clinical practice we can identify the challenge posed by the lack of standardized dose calculation methods and protocols. All personalized internal dosimetry is derived by projecting biodistribution measurements into dosimetry calculations. In an effort to standardize organization of data and its reporting, we have developed, as a sequel to the EANM recommendation of “Good Dosimetry Reporting”, a freely available biodistribution template, which can be used to create a common point of reference for dosimetry data. It can be disseminated, interpreted, and used for method development widely across the field. Methods: A generalized biodistribution template was built in a comma delineated format (.csv) to be completed by users performing biodistribution measurements. The template is available for free download. The download site includes instructions and other usage details on the template. Results: This is a new resource developed for the community. It is our hope that users will consider integrating it into their dosimetry operations. Having biodistribution data available and easily accessible for all patients processed is a strategy for organizing large amounts of information. It may enable users to create their own databases that can be analyzed for multiple aspects of dosimetry operations. Furthermore, it enables population data to easily be reprocessed using different dosimetry methodologies. With respect to dosimetry-related research and publications, the biodistribution template can be included as supplementary material, and will allow others in the community to better compare calculations and results achieved. Conclusion: As dosimetry in nuclear medicine become more routinely applied in clinical applications, we, as a field, need to develop the infrastructure for handling large amounts of data. Our organ level biodistribution template can be used as a

  16. Properties of the ammonium tartrate/EPR dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yordanov, N.D.; Gancheva, V.

    2004-01-01

    The EPR response of γ-irradiated ammonium tartrate on the absorbed dose of γ-rays up to 22 kGy as well as the changes in the shape of the EPR spectrum upon applied modulation amplitude and microwave power are reported. Also the possibility to use ammonium tartrate together with Mn 2+ magnetically diluted in MgO as an internal reference material is evaluated. The influence of the microwave power and the modulation amplitude on their dose response is investigated. The results show that the radiation-induced EPR spectrum of ammonium tartrate, obtained at a low microwave power is complex consisting several patterns and is more easily saturated than the Mn 2+ EPR spectrum. In this case the following settings of the EPR parameters are recommended: H mod ≤0.05 mT and 10≤P MW ≤13 mW. Using these parameters the dosimeters can be considered for use in intercomparisons

  17. On the annealing of the EPR dislocation signal in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotukhin, M.N.; Kveder, V.V.; Osip'yan, Yu.A.

    1981-01-01

    The annealing kinetics of the (EPR) dislocation signal (D-centers) in silicon is studied. The disappearance of the dislocation EPR signal as a result of annealing is ascribed to rearrangement of the nuclei of the partial dislocations accompanied by pairwise ''closing'' of the broken bonds in the S=0 state. The height of the energy barrier for the rearrangement process is approximately 2 eV. A residual ''nonannealing'' EPR signal is observed in strongly deformed silicon crystals. It resembles an isotropic line with a width approximately 7.5 Oe and a g-factor approximately 2.006. It is suggested that the respective EPR centers (O-centers) are similar to the EPR centers in amorphic silicon [ru

  18. Costing the EPR Project Using the Real Options Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epaulard, Anne; Gallon, Stephane

    2001-01-01

    Real options theory makes it possible to cost investments which offer flexibility but whose returns are uncertain, such as the construction in 2000 of an EPR prototype; this prototype will enable the European pressurised-water reactor (EPR) to be used to renew EDF's nuclear power stations in 2020 (flexibility) but its economic worth will then depend on the cost of the competing gas-fired power plants (uncertain return). Options theory shows that investing in EPR technology in 2000 provides sufficient flexibility in 2020 to be considered cost-effective, even though use of EPRs is unlikely by that date. The investment made in 2000 to develop EPR technology therefore actually plays the part of an option or, in other words, insurance (against the risk of high gas prices)

  19. Special workshop on lung dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    A Special Workshop on Lung Dosimetry was convened in Salt Lake City, Utah, on April 21-22, 1982, to stimulate the use of improved radiation dosimetry and to formulate a stronger basis for dose-response relationships for inhaled radionuclides. The two-day workshop was held in conjunction with the 30th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society. Publication is planned

  20. Deploying the advanced U.S. EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, C.

    2007-01-01

    As electricity demand, clean air concerns and energy prices increase in the U.S., interest in new nuclear reactors is also on the rise. These factors - along with decades of outstanding performance of the nation's existing nuclear fleet - have contributed to a favorable market for new nuclear power in the U.S. Although no U.S. company has declared it actually will buy and build new reactors, many have actively expressed their interest through investment and regulatory interaction. The timing is also right for new reactors in terms of public perception, government policy and acceptance of the investment community. Amid this environment, the U.S. commercial power industry recently has begun pursuing new nuclear generation in earnest. AREVA, whose ongoing global market analyses indicated the need for additional baseload nuclear generation in the U.S., chose to license its EPR design to meet that need. This article will discuss the American market landscape for new nuclear and how AREVA is approaching it, present an overview of the company's U.S. EPR technology, and provide an update on the regulatory status of the design and deployment schedule. (orig.)

  1. Preparation-induced errors in EPR dosimetry of enamel: pre- and post-crushing sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskell, E.H.; Hayes, R.B.; Kenner, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    Errors in dose estimation as a function of grain size for tooth enamel has been previously shown for beta irradiation after crushing. We tested the effect of gamma radiation applied to specimens before and after crushing. We extend the previous work in that we found that post-crushing irradiation altered the slope of the dose-response curve of the hydroxyapatite signal and produced a grain-size dependent offset. No changes in the slope of the dose-response curve were seen in enamel caps irradiated before crushing

  2. Membrane remodeling by amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic proteins studied by EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkey, Jobin; Langen, Ralf

    2017-07-01

    The advancement in site-directed spin labeling of proteins has enabled EPR studies to expand into newer research areas within the umbrella of protein-membrane interactions. Recently, membrane remodeling by amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic proteins has gained a substantial interest in relation to driving and controlling vital cellular processes such as endocytosis, exocytosis, shaping of organelles like endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and mitochondria, intracellular vesicular trafficking, formation of filopedia and multivesicular bodies, mitochondrial fusion and fission, and synaptic vesicle fusion and recycling in neurotransmission. Misregulation in any of these processes due to an aberrant protein (mutation or misfolding) or alteration of lipid metabolism can be detrimental to the cell and cause disease. Dissection of the structural basis of membrane remodeling by proteins is thus quite necessary for an understanding of the underlying mechanisms, but it remains a formidable task due to the difficulties of various common biophysical tools in monitoring the dynamic process of membrane binding and bending by proteins. This is largely since membranes generally complicate protein structure analysis and this problem is amplified for structural analysis in the presence of different types of membrane curvatures. Recent EPR studies on membrane remodeling by proteins show that a significant structural information can be generated to delineate the role of different protein modules, domains and individual amino acids in the generation of membrane curvature. These studies also show how EPR can complement the data obtained by high resolution techniques such as X-ray and NMR. This perspective covers the application of EPR in recent studies for understanding membrane remodeling by amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic proteins that is useful for researchers interested in using or complimenting EPR to gain better understanding of membrane remodeling. We also discuss how a single

  3. Membrane remodeling by amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic proteins studied by EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkey, Jobin; Langen, Ralf

    2017-07-01

    The advancement in site-directed spin labeling of proteins has enabled EPR studies to expand into newer research areas within the umbrella of protein-membrane interactions. Recently, membrane remodeling by amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic proteins has gained a substantial interest in relation to driving and controlling vital cellular processes such as endocytosis, exocytosis, shaping of organelles like endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and mitochondria, intracellular vesicular trafficking, formation of filopedia and multivesicular bodies, mitochondrial fusion and fission, and synaptic vesicle fusion and recycling in neurotransmission. Misregulation in any of these processes due to an aberrant protein (mutation or misfolding) or alteration of lipid metabolism can be detrimental to the cell and cause disease. Dissection of the structural basis of membrane remodeling by proteins is thus quite necessary for an understanding of the underlying mechanisms, but it remains a formidable task due to the difficulties of various common biophysical tools in monitoring the dynamic process of membrane binding and bending by proteins. This is largely since membranes generally complicate protein structure analysis and this problem is amplified for structural analysis in the presence of different types of membrane curvatures. Recent EPR studies on membrane remodeling by proteins show that a significant structural information can be generated to delineate the role of different protein modules, domains and individual amino acids in the generation of membrane curvature. These studies also show how EPR can complement the data obtained by high resolution techniques such as X-ray and NMR. This perspective covers the application of EPR in recent studies for understanding membrane remodeling by amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic proteins that is useful for researchers interested in using or complimenting EPR to gain better understanding of membrane remodeling. We also discuss how a single

  4. How can bio dosimetry measurements be used to improve radiation epidemiologic studies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, Andre; Kleinerman, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Bio dosimetry measurements can be used potentially to improve radiation epidemiologic studies by providing a means to corroborate analytical or model-based dose estimates, to assess bias in models and their dose estimates, and reduce uncertainty in individual or group-average doses. Radiation epidemiologic studies typically rely on accurate estimation of doses to the whole body or to specific organs for numerous individuals in order to derive reliable estimates of risk of cancer or other medical conditions. However, dose estimates whether based on analytical dose reconstruction (i.e., models) or personnel monitoring measurements, e.g., film-badges, are associated with considerable and varying degrees of uncertainty. Uncertainty is a product of many factors; persons were exposed many years or decades earlier and usually only inadequate data or measurements are available. While bio dosimetry has begun to play a more significant role in long-term health risk studies, its use is still limited in that context, primarily due sometimes to inadequate limits of detection, inter-individual variability of the signal measured, and high per-sample cost. Presently, the most suitable bio dosimetry methods for epidemiologic studies are chromosome aberration frequencies from fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of peripheral blood lymphocytes and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements made on tooth enamel, with detection limits of approximately 0.3 to 0.5 Gy, and as low as 0.03 Gy for FISH and EPR, respectively. Presently, both methods are invasive and require obtaining either blood or teeth. Though both FISH and EPR have been used in a variety of large long-term health risk studies including those of a-bomb survivors and various occupational and environmental exposures, only recently has considerable thought been given to how these data can be used in epidemiologic studies in any but rudimentary ways. Key issues to consider are the representativeness of

  5. Aqueous chemical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Aqueous chemical dosimetry based on ceric and ferrous sulfate solutions and on a number of fluorescence-induced systems is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the factors affecting the response of these dosimeters to radiation and the corrections necessary for more accurate dosimetry under various irradiation conditions. The effect of cerous and ceric ion, oxygen, and sulfuric acid concentration on the ceric dosimeter is discussed together with the effects of temperature, energy of radiation, degraded energy spectra, and peroxysulfuric acids. Practical aspects of ceric/cerous dosimetry are given. Although ferrous sulfate solution is the most important and widely studied reference dosimeter, general agreement has not been reached on the ''best'' value for the molar extinction coefficient of ferric ions nor on the correction necessary to the G(Fe 3 - ) value for irradiations at temperatures significantly different from 25 0 C. New data are presented which indicate that the larger temperature coefficients given in the literature are more accurate. The ferrous sulfate system has been of great importance in establishing the primary radiolytic yields for 0.4 M sulfuric acid solution; it is shown how the failure to take into account the effect of oxygen and ferrous sulfate concentrations has led to erroneously high estimates of the zero solute concentration values in acid solutions. Some of the methods for extending the dose ranges measurable with ferrous sulfate-based solutions are reviewed. Substances which on irradiation give highly fluorescent products are among the most sensitive aqueous chemical dosimeters. These include benzoate and terephthalate solutions and the more recent coumarin and trimesate solutions. Advantages and disadvantages system are discussed. (author)

  6. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained

  7. Individual dosimetry and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Nielsen, M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1995 both the Individual Dosimetry and Calibration Sections worked under the condition of a status quo and concentrated fully on the routine part of their work. Nevertheless, the machine for printing the bar code which will be glued onto the film holder and hence identify the people when entering into high radiation areas was put into operation and most of the holders were equipped with the new identification. As far as the Calibration Section is concerned the project of the new source control system that is realized by the Technical Support Section was somewhat accelerated

  8. NRPB patient dosimetry service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimpton, P.; Hillier, M.; Bungay, D.; Wall, B.

    1994-01-01

    For nearly 20 years, thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) have been used by NRPB to investigate the doses received by patients undergoing diagnostic examinations with x-rays, and these measurements have formed the basis for national recommendations on patient protection. Monitoring typical levels of patient dose should represent an essential element of routine quality assurance in x-ray departments. In order to promote more widespread measurements in hospitals, NRPB has drawn on a wealth of experience to establish a high-quality service providing TLDs for medical dosimetry by post. (author)

  9. Internal dosimetry and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, B.L.

    1990-05-01

    This internal dosimetry and control report provides guidance for EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., field programs in detecting, evaluating, and controlling personnel exposure resulting from uptake of radionuclides by the body. Procedures specific to each program or facility are required to define the details of guidance from this report. Fundamental principles related to philosophy, policies, monitoring guidelines, and dose evaluation are discussed. Specific numerical guides and action levels are developed to guide the programs in evaluating the significance of specific analytical results. The requirement to thoroughly document the results and provide a formal technical base for each policy and/or practice is outlined and explained. 8 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  10. Dosimetry in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andisco, D.; Blanco, S.; Buzzi, A.E

    2014-01-01

    The steady growth in the use of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging requires to maintain a proper management of patient’s dose. Dosimetry in Radiology is a difficult topic to address, but vital for proper estimation of the dose the patient is receiving. The awareness that every day is perceived in our country on these issues is the appropriate response to this problem. This article describes the main dosimetric units used and easily exemplifies doses in radiology through internationally known reference values. (authors) [es

  11. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Personnel in the distribution groups Aleph, Delphi, L3, Opal who also work for other experiments than at LEP, should contact their dispatchers to explain their activities for the future, after LEP dismantling in order to be maintained on the regular distribution list at Individual Dosimetry ServiceWe inform all staffs and users under regular dosimetric control that the dosimeters for the monitoring period JULY/AUGUST are available from their usual dispatchers.Please have your films changed before the 10th of July.The colour of the dosimeter valid in JULY/AUGUST is PINK.

  12. Fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period

  13. Tritium dosimetry and standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balonov, M.I.

    1983-01-01

    Actual problem of radiation hygiene such as an evaluation of human irradiation hazard due to a contact with tritium compounds both in industrial and public spheres is under discussion. Sources of tritium release to environment are characterized. Methods of tritium radiation monitoring are discussed. Methods of dosimetry of internal human exposure resulted from tritium compounds are developed on the base of modern representations on metbolism and tritium radiobiological effect. A system of standardization of permissible intake of tritium compounds for personnel and persons of population is grounded. Some protection measures are proposed as applied to tritium overdosage

  14. EPR and transient capacitance studies on electron-irradiated silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. H.; Cheng, L. J.; Mooney, P. M.; Corbett, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    One and two ohm-cm solar cells irradiated with 1 MeV electrons at 30 C were studied using both EPR and transient capacitance techniques. In 2 ohm-cm cells, Si-G6 and Si-G15 EPR spectra and majority carrier trapping levels at (E sub V + 0.23) eV and (E sub V + 0.38) eV were observed, each of which corresponded to the divacancy and the carbon-oxygen-vacancy complex, respectively. In addition, a boron-associated defect with a minority carrier trapping level at (E sub C -0.27) eV was observed. In 1 ohm-cm cells, the G15 spectrum and majority carrier trap at (E sub V + 0.38) eV were absent and an isotropic EPR line appeared at g = 1.9988 (+ or - 0.0003); additionally, a majority carrier trapping center at (E sub V + 0.32) eV, was found which could be associated with impurity lithium. The formation mechanisms of these defects are discussed according to isochronal annealing data in electron-irradiated p-type silicon.

  15. Chernobyl Experience in the Field of Retrospective Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumak, V.; Bakhanova, E.

    2011-01-01

    Chernobyl accident, which occurred on April 26, 1986 at NPP located less than 150 km north of Kiev, is the largest nuclear accident ever. Unprecedented scale of the accident was determined not only by the amount of released activity, but also by a number of population and workers involved and, therefore, exposed to enhanced doses of ionizing radiation. Population of the 30-km exclusion zone numbering about 116,000 persons of all ages and both genders was evacuated within days and weeks after the accident, emergency workers called ''liquidators of the accident'' (males age 20-50) were involved into clean-up and recovery for 5 years and their number is estimated as 600,000, about 300,000 are Ukrainian citizens. Due to unexpected and excessively large scale accident, none of residents had personal dosimeters, personal dosimetry of liquidators was not total, dosimetry techniques and practices were far from the optimum. As a result, an acute need for retrospective dose assessment was dictated by radiation protection and research considerations. This need was responded by implementation of wide scale dose reconstruction efforts, which covered main exposed cohorts and encompassed broad variety of newly developed methods: analytical (time-and-motion), modeling, biological and physical (EPR spectroscopy of teeth, TL of quartz). The presentation summarizes vast experience accumulated by RCRM in the field of retrospective dosimetry of large cohorts of exposed population and professionals. These dose reconstruction projects were implemented, in particular, in the framework of epidemiological studies, designed to follow-up medical consequences of Chernobyl accident and study health effects of ionizing radiation, in particular, Ukrainian-American studies of cataracts and leukemia among liquidators. Over 25 years passed after Chernobyl accident a broad variety of retrospective dosimetry problems was addressed by the team of Research Center for Radiation Medicine AMS Ukraine. In

  16. EPR design features to mitigate severe accident challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurkiewicz, S.M.; Fischer, M.; Bittermann, D.

    2005-01-01

    The EPR, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor (PWR), is a 4300-4500 MWth that incorporates proven technology within an optimized configuration to enhance safety. EPR was originally developed through a joint effort between Framatome ANP and Siemens by incorporating the best technological features from the French and German nuclear reactor fleets into a cost-competitive product. Commercial EPR units are currently being built in Finland at the Olkiluoto site, and planned for France at the Flamanville site. In recent months, Framatome ANP announced their intention to market the EPR units to China in response to a request for vendor bids as well as their intent to pursue design certification in the United States under 10CFR52. The EPR safety philosophy is based on a deterministic consideration of defense-in-depth complemented by probabilistic analyses. Not only is the EPR designed to prevent and mitigate design basis accidents (DBAs), it employs an extra level of safety associated with severe accident response. Therefore, as a design objective, features are included to ensure that radiological consequences are limited such that the need for stringent counter measures, such as evacuation and relocation of the nearby population, can be reasonably excluded. This paper discusses some of the innovative features of the EPR to address severe accident challenges. (author)

  17. The EPR - technology for the 3rd Millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstrauch, O.

    2000-01-01

    The Basic Design of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) was completed 1997 , the Basic Design Optimization Phase 1998 and the Detailed Design Phase will start in the near future. With these milestones, a new generation of PWRs is moving forward. Most of all, this is another story of a successful Franco-German cooperation. It is a rundown of the history of the EPR, before a decision is made to launch the lead-unit construction. The EPR project was launched in 1992 by Nuclear Power International (NPI), a joint company of FRAMATOME and Siemens KWU, supported by EDF and nine German electric utilities. Each step of the development of the EPR was harmonized with the Nuclear Safety Authorities both in France and Germany to reach an early approval. The EPR integrates the latest technological advances, especially in safety and operational aspects and comprises more than 30 years operating experience. Thus, the EPR combines the qualities of its predecessors, the French N4 and the German Konvoi. Presently, Siemens KWU and FRAMATOME are preparing the detailed design phase and the following construction and commissioning phase. The decision to build an EPR is not yet made either by the German electric utilities or by EdF, but it will be expected within the next months as a strong statement to follow the nuclear way and to ensure the know-how transfer. (author)

  18. Identification of gamma-irradiated fruit juices by EPR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksieva, K. I.; Dimov, K. G.; Yordanov, N. D.

    2014-10-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on commercially available juices from various fruits and different fruit contents: 25%, 40%, 50%, and 100%, homemade juices, nectars and concentrated fruit syrups, before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. In order to remove water from non- and irradiated samples all juices and nectars were filtered; the solid residue was washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. Only concentrated fruit syrups were dried for 60 min at 40 °C in a standard laboratory oven. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0025 before irradiation with exception of concentrated fruit syrups, which are EPR silent. Irradiation of juice samples gives rise to complex EPR spectra which gradually transferred to "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum from 25% to 100% fruit content. Concentrated fruit syrups show typical "sugar-like" spectra due to added saccharides. All EPR spectra are characteristic and can prove radiation treatment. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signals were studied for a period of 60 days after irradiation.

  19. Development of tailor-made silica fibres for TL dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.A.; Abdul Sani, Siti F.; Alalawi, Amani I.; Jafari, S.M.; Noor, Noramaliza M.; Hairul Azhar, A.R.; Mahdiraji, Ghafour Amouzad; Tamchek, Nizam; Ghosh, S.; Paul, M.C.; Alzimami, Khalid S.; Nisbet, A.; Maah, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    The Ge dopant in commercially available silica optical fibres gives rise to appreciable thermoluminscence (TL), weight-for-weight offering sensitivity to MV X-rays several times that of the LiF dosimeter TLD100. The response of these fibres to UV radiation, X-rays, electrons, protons, neutrons and alpha particles, with doses from a fraction of 1 Gy up to 10 kGy, have stimulated further investigation of the magnitude of the TL signal for intrinsic and doped SiO 2 fibres. We represent a consortium effort between Malaysian partners and the University of Surrey, aimed at production of silica fibres with specific TL dosimetry applications, utilizing modified chemical vapour deposition (MCVD) doped silica–glass production and fibre-pulling facilities. The work is informed by defect and dopant concentration and various production dependences including pulling parameters such as temperature, speed and tension; the fibres also provide for spatial resolutions down to <10 µm, confronting many limitations faced in use of conventional (TL) dosimetry. Early results are shown for high spatial resolution (∼0.1 mm) single-core Ge-doped TL sensors, suited to radiotherapy applications. Preliminary results are also shown for undoped flat optical fibres of mm dimensions and Ge-B doped flat optical fibres of sub-mm dimensions, with potential for measurement of doses in medical diagnostic applications. - Highlights: • Optical fibres tailor-made for TL dosimetry. • Sensitive to diagnostic as well as therapy doses in medicine. • Preform and fibre pulling facilities. • Relative TL and EPR measurements

  20. Internal Dosimetry. Chapter 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindorf, C. [Department of Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)

    2014-12-15

    The Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) is a committee within the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The MIRD Committee was formed in 1965 with the mission to standardize internal dosimetry calculations, improve the published emission data for radionuclides and enhance the data on pharmacokinetics for radiopharmaceuticals [18.1]. A unified approach to internal dosimetry was published by the MIRD Committee in 1968, MIRD Pamphlet No. 1 [18.2], which was updated several times thereafter. Currently, the most well known version is the MIRD Primer from 1991 [18.3]. The latest publication on the formalism was published in 2009 in MIRD Pamphlet No. 21 [18.4], which provides a notation meant to bridge the differences in the formalism used by the MIRD Committee and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [18.5]. The formalism presented in MIRD Pamphlet No. 21 [18.4] will be used here, although some references to the quantities and parameters used in the MIRD primer [18.3] will be made. All symbols, quantities and units are presented.

  1. Dosimetry of industrial sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Rodriguez J, R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez V, R.; Ramirez G, J.; Rivera M, T.

    2007-01-01

    The gamma rays are produced during the disintegration of the atomic nuclei, its high energy allows them to cross thick materials. The capacity to attenuate a photons beam allows to determine the density, in line, of industrial interest materials as the mining. By means of two active dosemeters and a TLDs group (passive dosimetry) the dose rates of two sources of Cs-137 used for determining in line the density of mining materials were determined. With the dosemeters the dose levels in diverse points inside the grave that it harbors the sources and by means of calculations the isodoses curves were determined. In the phase of calculations was supposed that both sources were punctual and the isodose curves were calculated for two situations: naked sources and in their Pb packings. The dosimetry was carried out around two sources of 137 Cs. The measured values allowed to develop a calculation procedure to obtain the isodoses curves in the grave where the sources are installed. (Author)

  2. Clinical dosimetry using mosfets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramani, Ramaseshan; Russell, Stephen; O'Brien, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The use of metal oxide-silicon field effect transistors (MOSFETs) as clinical dosimeters is demonstrated for a number of patients with targets at different clinical sites. Methods and Materials: Commercially available MOSFETs were characterized for energy response, angular dependency of response, and effect of accumulated dose on sensitivity and some inherent properties of MOSFETs. The doses determined both by thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) and MOSFETs in clinical situation were evaluated and compared to expected doses determined by calculation. Results: It was observed that a standard calibration of 0.01 Gy/mV gave MOSFET determined doses which agreed with expected doses to within 5% at the 95% confidence limit for photon beams from 6 to 25 MV and electron beams from 5 to 14 MeV. An energy-dependent variation in response of up to 28% was observed between two orientations of a MOSFET. The MOSFET doses compared very well with the doses estimated by TLDs, and the patients tolerated MOSFETs very well. A standard deviation of 3.9% between expected dose and MOSFET determined dose was observed, while for TLDs the standard deviation was 5.1%. The advantages and disadvantages of using MOSFETs for clinical dosimetry are discussed in detail. Conclusion: It was concluded that MOSFETs can be used as clinical dosimeters and can be a good alternative to TLDs. However, they have limitations under certain clinical situations

  3. Saturation recovery EPR spin-labeling method for quantification of lipids in biological membrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Camenisch, Theodore G; Hyde, James S; Subczynski, Witold K

    2017-12-01

    The presence of integral membrane proteins induces the formation of distinct domains in the lipid bilayer portion of biological membranes. Qualitative application of both continuous wave (CW) and saturation recovery (SR) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling methods allowed discrimination of the bulk, boundary, and trapped lipid domains. A recently developed method, which is based on the CW EPR spectra of phospholipid (PL) and cholesterol (Chol) analog spin labels, allows evaluation of the relative amount of PLs (% of total PLs) in the boundary plus trapped lipid domain and the relative amount of Chol (% of total Chol) in the trapped lipid domain [ M. Raguz, L. Mainali, W. J. O'Brien, and W. K. Subczynski (2015), Exp. Eye Res., 140:179-186 ]. Here, a new method is presented that, based on SR EPR spin-labeling, allows quantitative evaluation of the relative amounts of PLs and Chol in the trapped lipid domain of intact membranes. This new method complements the existing one, allowing acquisition of more detailed information about the distribution of lipids between domains in intact membranes. The methodological transition of the SR EPR spin-labeling approach from qualitative to quantitative is demonstrated. The abilities of this method are illustrated for intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes from porcine eye lenses. Statistical analysis (Student's t -test) of the data allowed determination of the separations of mean values above which differences can be treated as statistically significant ( P ≤ 0.05) and can be attributed to sources other than preparation/technique.

  4. EPR spectroscopy for the detection of foods treated with ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachowicz, W.; Burlinska, G.; Michalik, J.; Dziedzic-Goclawska, A.; Ostrowski, K.

    1996-01-01

    The advantage of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR or ESR) as a tool for the control of irradiated food lies in its sensitivity and accuracy. Ionising radiation produces, in irradiated materials, paramagnetic species of different kinds, i.e. radicals, radical-ions and paramagnetic centres, which can be measured by EPR but most of them are not stable enough to be used for the detection of irradiation. It is because radiation-induced paramagnetic species are thermodynamically less stable than surrounding molecules and take part in fast radiolytic reactions leading to the formation of final diamagnetic products that they are not detectable by the EPR method. Most of organic radicals produced by radiation in the liquid phase ae unstable but if the unpaired electron is incorporated into the complex polymeric system as in peptides and polysaccharides and is structurally isolated from the water, its stability is markedly increased. Since 1954 it is known that ionising radiation produces paramagnetic entities in biological materials, cells and tissues and some are stable enough to be observed by EPR spectroscopy at room temperature. The present paper describes and discusses that part of results obtained by this group during the period of ADMIT activity (1989-94) which are original and may be useful to those who will be working in the near future on the development of uniform control systems for the detection of irradiated food. The intention was to focus attention on these facts and data which influence the certainty of the detection in both positive and negative manner. (author)

  5. Next generation platforms for high-throughput bio-dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repin, Mikhail; Turner, Helen C.; Garty, Guy; Brenner, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Here the general concept of the combined use of plates and tubes in racks compatible with the American National Standards Institute/the Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening microplate formats as the next generation platforms for increasing the throughput of bio-dosimetry assays was described. These platforms can be used at different stages of bio-dosimetry assays starting from blood collection into micro-tubes organised in standardised racks and ending with the cytogenetic analysis of samples in standardised multi-well and multichannel plates. Robotically friendly platforms can be used for different bio-dosimetry assays in minimally equipped laboratories and on cost-effective automated universal biotech systems. (authors)

  6. Einstein and the Quantum: The Secret Life of EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Arthur

    2006-05-01

    Locality, separation and entanglement -- 1930s style. Starting with Solvay 1927, we'll explore the background to the 1935 paper by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen: how it was composed, the actual argument and principles used, and how the paper was received by Schroedinger, and others. We'll also look at Bohr's response: the extent to which Bohr connects with what Einstein was after in EPR and the extent to which EPR marks a shift in Bohr's thinking about the quantum theory. Time permitting, we will contrast EPR with Bell's theorem.

  7. EPR trademark project delivery. The value of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverenz, Ruediger

    2013-01-01

    We are building the EPR trademark reactor fleet. Together. With four EPR trademark projects under construction in the world, AREVA has unrivalled experience in the delivery of large-scale nuclear projects, including more than a thousand lessons learned captured from Olkiluoto 3 and Flamanville 3 projects. This book of knowledge as well as the return of experience of AREVA's and EDF's teams are now being fully leveraged on ongoing projects, especially on Flamanville 3 and Taishan, and will be incorporated in all future EPR TM projects.

  8. Radiation protection issues for EPR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniere, D.; Le Guen, B.; Beneteau, Y.; Le Guen, B.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the EPR (European Pressurized Reactor) project being deployed at Flamanville, EDF has pro actively made the decision to focus on radiation protection Radiation Protection aspects right from the start of the design phase, as it has done with nuclear safety. The approach adopted for managing Radiation Protection-significant activities has been to include all involved stakeholders - designers, licensee and contractor companies - in the three successive phases, starting with a survey among workers and designers, followed by a proposal review, and finally ending with the decision-making phase entrusted to an ALARA committee. The Radiation Protection target set by EDF for this new reactor is to engage in an effort of continuous improvement and optimisation, through benchmarking with the best performing plants of the fleet. The collective dose target is currently set at 0.35 Man Sv/year per unit. In addition to other aspects, efforts will focus on shortening the duration of the highest-dose jobs, with a new challenge being set for work performed in the reactor building during normal operations, the aim being to improve plant availability. The plan is for work to be performed 7 days prior to shutting down the reactor and 3 days afterwards, in order to make logistical arrangements for forthcoming jobs. Without this reduction, the estimated drop is currently 4.5% of annual dose. For this purpose, two areas have been set up in the E.P.R.'s reactor building: one no-go area for containing leaks from the primary circuit, and one accessible area for normal operations, separated from the no-go area by purpose-built ventilation equipment and facilities. To offer protection against radioactive flux (neutrons and high energy), Radiation Protection studies have resulted in the installation of a concrete floor and of nuclear shielding at the outlets of primary circuit pipes. Steam generator bunkers and pumps have also been reinforced. All these measures will ensure that the

  9. EPR by AREVA. An evolutionary reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstmann, Marion

    2010-01-01

    The EPR development goals are as follows: 1. Evolutionary design to fully capitalize on the design, construction and operating experience based on the 86 AREVA's PWR operating worldwide; 2. Enhanced Safety compared to operating PWRs: reduce core damage frequency (CDF), accommodate severe accidents with no long-term population effect, Withstand large airplane crash (APC); 3. High availability; 4. Simplified operation and maintenance; and 5. Generation cost at least 10 % lower than 1500 MWe series in operation.The design builds on the achievements of the N4 and Konvoi reactors. The main plant data are tabulated. The PWR structure is shown as an example of the stepwise improvement. Focus of the presentation is on the construction techniques, supply chain, and project delivery. (P.A.)

  10. EPR's energy conversion system. Alstom's solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledermann, P.

    2009-01-01

    ARABELLE steam turbines have been developed by Alstom to be used as the energy conversion system of light water reactors with high output power like the N4 PWR and the EPR. ARABELLE turbines cumulate 200.000 hours of service with a reliability ratio of 99.97 per cent. This series of slides presents the main features of the turbine including: the use of the simple flux, the very large shape of low pressure blades, the technology of welded rotors. The other main equipment like the alternator, the condenser, the moisture separator-reheaters, the circulating pumps that Alstom integrates in the energy conversion system have benefited with technological improvements that are also presented. (A.C.)

  11. EPR design tools. Integrated data processing tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, R.

    1997-01-01

    In all technical areas, planning and design have been supported by electronic data processing for many years. New data processing tools had to be developed for the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR). The work to be performed was split between KWU and Framatome and laid down in the Basic Design contract. The entire plant was reduced to a logical data structure; the circuit diagrams and flowsheets of the systems were drafted, the central data pool was established, the outlines of building structures were defined, the layout of plant components was planned, and the electrical systems were documented. Also building construction engineering was supported by data processing. The tasks laid down in the Basic Design were completed as so-called milestones. Additional data processing tools also based on the central data pool are required for the phases following after the Basic Design phase, i.e Basic Design Optimization; Detailed Design; Management; Construction, and Commissioning. (orig.) [de

  12. EPR of CU+2:Mb single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, O.R.; Ribeiro, S.C.; Bemski, G.

    1976-01-01

    Copper introduced into met-myoglobin crystals occupies various sites as indicated by EPR parameters. CU 2+ (A) is probably liganded to histidine A10, lysine A14 and asparagine GH4 (Banaszak, 1965) and shows super-hyperfine interaction with a single (imidazole) nitrogen. Cu 2+ (B) and Cu 2+ (C) correspond to other anisotropic sites described with lesser details. Cu 2+ (A) exhibits a transition to an isotropic form with a transition temperature of 40.5 0 C. This transition is indicative of a conformational change in myoglobin and could correspond to a motion of A helix away from the GH section. The transition temperature is 7 0 C higher than the previously reported (Atanasov, 1971) one for myoglobin in solution

  13. EPR paradox, quantum nonlocality and physical reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupczynski, M

    2016-01-01

    Eighty years ago Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen demonstrated that instantaneous reduction of wave function, believed to describe completely a pair of entangled physical systems, led to EPR paradox. The paradox disappears in statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM) according to which a wave function describes only an ensemble of identically prepared physical systems. QM predicts strong correlations between outcomes of measurements performed on different members of EPR pairs in far-away locations. Searching for an intuitive explanation of these correlations John Bell analysed so called local realistic hidden variable models and proved that correlations consistent with these models satisfy Bell inequalities which are violated by some predictions of QM and by experimental data. Several different local models were constructed and inequalities proven. Some eminent physicists concluded that Nature is definitely nonlocal and that it is acting according to a law of nonlocal randomness. According to these law perfectly random, but strongly correlated events, can be produced at the same time in far away locations and a local and causal explanation of their occurrence cannot be given. We strongly disagree with this conclusion and we prove the contrary by analysing in detail some influential finite sample proofs of Bell and CHSH inequalities and so called Quantum Randi Challenges. We also show how one can win so called Bell's game without violating locality of Nature. Nonlocal randomness is inconsistent with local quantum field theory, with standard model in elementary particle physics and with causal laws and adaptive dynamics prevailing in the surrounding us world. The experimental violation of Bell-type inequalities does not prove the nonlocality of Nature but it only confirms a contextual character of quantum observables and gives a strong argument against counterfactual definiteness and against a point of view according to which experimental outcomes are

  14. EPR paradox, quantum nonlocality and physical reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczynski, M.

    2016-03-01

    Eighty years ago Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen demonstrated that instantaneous reduction of wave function, believed to describe completely a pair of entangled physical systems, led to EPR paradox. The paradox disappears in statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM) according to which a wave function describes only an ensemble of identically prepared physical systems. QM predicts strong correlations between outcomes of measurements performed on different members of EPR pairs in far-away locations. Searching for an intuitive explanation of these correlations John Bell analysed so called local realistic hidden variable models and proved that correlations consistent with these models satisfy Bell inequalities which are violated by some predictions of QM and by experimental data. Several different local models were constructed and inequalities proven. Some eminent physicists concluded that Nature is definitely nonlocal and that it is acting according to a law of nonlocal randomness. According to these law perfectly random, but strongly correlated events, can be produced at the same time in far away locations and a local and causal explanation of their occurrence cannot be given. We strongly disagree with this conclusion and we prove the contrary by analysing in detail some influential finite sample proofs of Bell and CHSH inequalities and so called Quantum Randi Challenges. We also show how one can win so called Bell's game without violating locality of Nature. Nonlocal randomness is inconsistent with local quantum field theory, with standard model in elementary particle physics and with causal laws and adaptive dynamics prevailing in the surrounding us world. The experimental violation of Bell-type inequalities does not prove the nonlocality of Nature but it only confirms a contextual character of quantum observables and gives a strong argument against counterfactual definiteness and against a point of view according to which experimental outcomes are produced

  15. Information from the Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please note the following opening hours of the Service: From 31st July onwards: Every morning from 8:30 to 12:00 The Service is closed in the afternoons. We should like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCTs) must always be returned to the Service after use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel 72155 Bldg. 24 E 011 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  16. Study of radiation-induced paramagnetic centers in quartz and its possible use in radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, A.M.E.

    2008-01-01

    A new EPR dosimetry system has been developed based on the radiation-formed stable paramagnetic centers in quartz. The first part of the thesis includes the preparation of quartz rods (diameter = 3 mm, length = 10 mm) where quartz powder was mixed with molten mixture of paraffin wax and ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA). The binding-mixture EVA / paraffin do not present interference or noise in the EPR signal before or after irradiation to high doses. The quartz rods were prepared by different concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30 and 50 %). The rods (30 %) show good mechanical properties for safe and multi-use handling. The second part is concerned with studying the dosimetric characteristics of gamma irradiation sensitive rods where the radiation-formed stable free radicals (E-center, peroxy radical and non-bridging oxygen hole center) which analyzed by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. Unirradiated rods have no EPR signals. The useful dose range of these rods was found to range from 0.1 to 80 kGy depending on concentration of quartz powder, indicating their suitability for low and high dose gamma radiation applications. Also it was found that quartz rod exhibits a linear dose response in the dose regions 0.1-2.34 and 2.34-26 kGy at optimum EPR parameters. The dosimeter response was assessed using the peak-to-peak amplitude of the first-derivatives EPR spectrum. Its EPR signal was found unchanged in shape with different doses and different concentrations. A signal line spectrum attributed to the E-center was observed after irradiation, and this radical is insensitive to temperature, light independence as well as it have a very low decay (4.768 % per year). The overall uncertainty for quartz rod dosimeters at 2σ (σ is standard deviation) was found to be 3.8436 %. The dosimetric parameters, e. g. dose response, effect of temperature during irradiation on response as well as pre- and post-irradiation stability at different storage conditions

  17. Techniques for radiation measurements: Micro-dosimetry and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waker, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental Micro-dosimetry is concerned with the determination of radiation quality and how this can be specified in terms of the distribution of energy deposition arising from the interaction of a radiation field with a particular target site. This paper discusses various techniques that have been developed to measure radiation energy deposition over the three orders of magnitude of site-size; nano-meter, micrometer and millimetre, which radiation biology suggests is required to fully account for radiation quality. Inevitably, much of the discussion will concern the use of tissue-equivalent proportional counters and variants of this device, but other technologies that have been studied, or are under development, for their potential in experimental Micro-dosimetry are also covered. Through an examination of some of the quantities used in radiation metrology and dosimetry the natural link with Micro-dosimetric techniques will be shown and the particular benefits of using Micro-dosimetric methods for dosimetry illustrated. (authors)

  18. Skin dosimetry - radiological protection aspects of skin dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Following a Workshop in Skin Dosimetry, a summary of the radiological protection aspects is given. Aspects discussed include routine skin monitoring and dose limits, the need for careful skin dosimetry in high accidental exposures, techniques for assessing skin dose at all relevant depths and the specification of dose quantities to be measured by personal dosemeters and the appropriate methods to be used in their calibration. (UK)

  19. Arbitrary waveform modulated pulse EPR at 200 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminker, Ilia; Barnes, Ryan; Han, Songi

    2017-06-01

    We report here on the implementation of arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) capabilities at ∼200 GHz into an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) instrument platform operating at 7 T. This is achieved with the integration of a 1 GHz, 2 channel, digital to analog converter (DAC) board that enables the generation of coherent arbitrary waveforms at Ku-band frequencies with 1 ns resolution into an existing architecture of a solid state amplifier multiplier chain (AMC). This allows for the generation of arbitrary phase- and amplitude-modulated waveforms at 200 GHz with >150 mW power. We find that the non-linearity of the AMC poses significant difficulties in generating amplitude-modulated pulses at 200 GHz. We demonstrate that in the power-limited regime of ω1 10 MHz) spin manipulation in incoherent (inversion), as well as coherent (echo formation) experiments. Highlights include the improvement by one order of magnitude in inversion bandwidth compared to that of conventional rectangular pulses, as well as a factor of two in improvement in the refocused echo intensity at 200 GHz.

  20. Application of EPR spectroscopy to examine free radicals evolution during storage of the thermally sterilized Ungentum ophthalmicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Paweł; Pilawa, Barbara

    2016-06-24

    Free radicals formed during thermal sterilization of the Ungentum ophthalmicum were examined by an X-band EPR spectroscopy. The influence of storage time (15 min; 1, 2 and 3 days after heating) on free radical properties and concentrations in this sample was determined. Thermal sterilization was done according to the pharmaceutical norms. The first-derivative EPR spectra with g-values about 2 were measured with magnetic modulation of 100 kHz in the range of microwave power 2.2-70 mW. The changes of amplitudes (A) and linewidths (ΔB pp ) with microwave powers were evaluated. Free radicals in concentration ∼10 17 spin/g were formed during heating of the tested Ungentum. Free radical concentration decreased with increase in storage time, and reached values ∼10 17 spin/g after 3 days from sterilization. The tested U. ophthalmicum should not be sterilized at a temperature of 160 °C because of the free radicals formation, or it should be used 3 days after heating, when free radicals were considerably quenched. Free radical properties remain unchanged during storage of the Ungentum. The EPR lines of the U. ophthalmicum were homogeneously broadened and their linewidths (ΔB pp ) increased with increase in microwave power. EPR spectroscopy is useful to examine free radicals to optimize sterilization process and storage conditions of ophthalmologic samples.