WorldWideScience

Sample records for forest canopy closure

  1. Emergence time in forest bats: the influence of canopy closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Danilo; Cistrone, Luca; Jones, Gareth

    2007-01-01

    The role of the forest canopy in protecting bats roosting in forest from predators is poorly known. We analysed the effect of canopy closure on emergence time in Barbastella barbastellus in a mountainous area of central Italy. We used radio-tracking to locate roosts and filmed evening emergence. Comparisons were made between roosts in open areas and those in dense forest. Median emergence time and illuminance were correlated. Moreover, from pregnancy to late lactation bats emerged progressively earlier, probably because of the exceptionally high wing loading affecting pregnant bats and the high energy demand of lactation. A significant influence of canopy closure on median emergence time was revealed after adjusting for the effects of light and reproductive state. Bats in open habitat emerged later than those roosting beneath closed canopy. In cluttered habitats, predators relying on vision may find it more difficult to detect and catch bats at light levels which would offer more chances of success when attacking prey in open habitats. Bats in dense forest are less vulnerable to predators and may take advantage of an earlier emergence by prolonging foraging. Although more vulnerable, lactating females roosting at open sites may benefit from warmer roosting conditions. Roosts in dense forest may be preferred under intense predation pressure. Forest management should favour canopy heterogeneity to provide bats with a range of roosting conditions. Our work emphasises the role of a fine-grained spatial scale in the roosting ecology of forest bats.

  2. Leaf-on canopy closure in broadleaf deciduous forests predicted during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Ayala, Andrea J.; Shickel, Madeline R.

    2015-01-01

    Forest canopy influences light transmittance, which in turn affects tree regeneration and survival, thereby having an impact on forest composition and habitat conditions for wildlife. Because leaf area is the primary impediment to light penetration, quantitative estimates of canopy closure are normally made during summer. Studies of forest structure and wildlife habitat that occur during winter, when deciduous trees have shed their leaves, may inaccurately estimate canopy closure. We estimated percent canopy closure during both summer (leaf-on) and winter (leaf-off) in broadleaf deciduous forests in Mississippi and Louisiana using gap light analysis of hemispherical photographs that were obtained during repeat visits to the same locations within bottomland and mesic upland hardwood forests and hardwood plantation forests. We used mixed-model linear regression to predict leaf-on canopy closure from measurements of leaf-off canopy closure, basal area, stem density, and tree height. Competing predictive models all included leaf-off canopy closure (relative importance = 0.93), whereas basal area and stem density, more traditional predictors of canopy closure, had relative model importance of ≤ 0.51.

  3. Remote sensing of temperate coniferous forest lead area index - The influence of canopy closure, understory vegetation and background reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanner, Michael A.; Pierce, Lars L.; Running, Steven W.; Peterson, David L.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the effects of canopy closure, understory vegetation, and background reflectance on the relationship between Landsat TM data and the leaf area index (LAI) of temperate coniferous forests in the western U.S. A methodology for correcting TM data for atmospheric conditions and sun-surface-sensor geometry is discussed. Strong inverse curvilinear relationships were found between coniferous forest LAI and TM bands 3 and 5. It is suggested that these inverse relationships are due to increased reflectance of understory vegetation and background in open stands of lower LAI and decreased reflectance of the overstory in closed canopy stands with higher LAI.

  4. Remote sensing of temperate coniferous forest lead area index - The influence of canopy closure, understory vegetation and background reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanner, Michael A.; Pierce, Lars L.; Running, Steven W.; Peterson, David L.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the effects of canopy closure, understory vegetation, and background reflectance on the relationship between Landsat TM data and the leaf area index (LAI) of temperate coniferous forests in the western U.S. A methodology for correcting TM data for atmospheric conditions and sun-surface-sensor geometry is discussed. Strong inverse curvilinear relationships were found between coniferous forest LAI and TM bands 3 and 5. It is suggested that these inverse relationships are due to increased reflectance of understory vegetation and background in open stands of lower LAI and decreased reflectance of the overstory in closed canopy stands with higher LAI.

  5. Distribution of juveniles of tree species along a canopy closure gradient in a tropical cloud forest of the Venezuelan Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quevedo-Rojas A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloud forests represent a minor portion of the world forests, though outstanding in terms of biodiversity, endemisms, and environmental services provided. Understanding the factors that drive the regeneration and species composition of these forests, and in particular how light availability affects the patterns of juvenile tree distribution in the understory, is critical for conservation and restoration programs. In this study, we determined the range-size and overlap of the abundance distribution of juveniles for 20 tree species in an Andean tropical cloud forest in Venezuela along a gradient of percentage canopy openness (%CO used as a surrogate of light availability. The observed distribution of %CO was then compared with a bounded null model of community structure in order to test light partitioning as a driver of tree species’ coexistence. We measured %CO using hemispherical photography and the abundance and size of juvenile trees in 280 plots of 1-m radius spread over a 32 ha forest area. The distribution of sites was skewed towards the lower end of the %CO gradient (0.5 to 12.8%, while species abundance sharply diminished at both ends of the gradient. Nevertheless, 15 out of 20 species had a non-random distribution in relation to %CO, with many species concentrated near the lower side of the gradient. The observed pattern of species’ overlap was within the 95% confidence limits for the average overlap expected under the bounded null model. These patterns indicate that low canopy openness is the rule in this forest, in spite of the scattered tree-fall gaps, and suggest that light partitioning does not determine the tree community structure at the juvenile stage. High redundancy in light requirements among juveniles of tree species may have a positive effect on species coexistence in cloud forests, thus maintaining a high species diversity. However, other factors such as recruitment limitation and differential growth/carbon-gain among

  6. Canopy dynamics of a tropical rain forest in French Guiana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The canopy dynamics (i.e. the formation and closure of canopy gaps) of a tropical rain forest in French Guiana are described. The formation of canopy gaps is investigated. The difficulties with gap size measurements are studied, and causes and consequences of treefalls and branchfalls are examined.

  7. Canopy dynamics of a tropical rain forest in French Guiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The canopy dynamics (i.e. the formation and closure of canopy gaps) of a tropical rain forest in French Guiana are described. The formation of canopy gaps is investigated. The difficulties with gap size measurements are studied, and causes and consequences of treefalls and branchfalls are

  8. Lidar Altimeter Measurements of Canopy Structure: Methods and Validation for Closed Canopy, Broadleaf Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, D. J.; Lefsky, M. A.; Parker, G. G.; Blair, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    Lidar altimeter observations of vegetated landscapes provide a time-resolved measure of laser pulse backscatter energy from canopy surfaces and the underlying ground. Airborne lidar altimeter data was acquired using the Scanning Lidar Imager of Canopies by Echo Recovery (SLICER) for a successional sequence of four, closed-canopy, deciduous forest stands in eastern Maryland. The four stands were selected so as to include a range of canopy structures of importance to forest ecosystem function, including variation in the height and roughness of the outer-most canopy surface and the vertical organization of canopy stories and gaps. The character of the SLICER backscatter signal is described and a method is developed that accounts for occlusion of the laser energy by canopy surfaces, transforming the backscatter signal to a canopy height profile (CHP) that quantitatively represents the relative vertical distribution of canopy surface area. The transformation applies an increased weighting to the backscatter amplitude as a function of closure through the canopy and assumes a horizontally random distribution of the canopy components. SLICER CHPs, averaged over areas of overlap where lidar ground tracks intersect, are shown to be highly reproducible. CHP transects across the four stands reveal spatial variations in vegetation, at the scale of the individual 10 m diameter laser footprints, within and between stands. Averaged SLICER CHPs are compared to analogous height profile results derived from ground-based sightings to plant intercepts measured on plots within the four stands. Tbe plots were located on the segments of the lidar ground tracks from which averaged SLICER CHPs were derived, and the ground observations were acquired within two weeks of the SLICER data acquisition to minimize temporal change. The differences in canopy structure between the four stands is similarly described by the SLICER and ground-based CHP results, however a Chi-square test of similarity

  9. US Forest Service LANDFIRE Canopy Fuel

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — LANDFIRE canopy fuel data describe the composition and characteristics of wildland surface fuel and can be implemented within models to predict wildland fire...

  10. Subpixel measurement of mangrove canopy closure via spectral mixture analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minhe JI; Jing FENG

    2011-01-01

    Canopy closure can vary spatially within a remotely sensed image pixel,but Boolean logic inherent in traditional classification methods only works at the wholepixel level.This study attempted to decompose mangrove closure information from spectrally-mixed pixels through spectral mixture analysis (SMA) for coastal wetland management.Endmembers of different surface categories were established through signature selection and training,and memberships of a pixel with respect to the surface categories were determined via a spectral mixture model.A case study involving DigitalGlobe's Quickbird highresolution multispectral imagery of Beilun Estuary,China was used to demonstrate this approach.Mangrove canopy closure was first quantified as percent coverage through the model and then further grouped into eight ordinal categories.The model results were verified using Quickbird panchromatic data from the same acquisition.An overall accuracy of 84.4% (Kappa = 0.825) was achieved,indicating good application potential of the approach in coastal resource inventory and ecosystem management.

  11. Modeling of forest canopy BRDF using DIRSIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Rajagopalan; Schott, John R.

    2016-05-01

    The characterization and temporal analysis of multispectral and hyperspectral data to extract the biophysical information of the Earth's surface can be significantly improved by understanding its aniosotropic reflectance properties, which are best described by a Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF). The advancements in the field of remote sensing techniques and instrumentation have made hyperspectral BRDF measurements in the field possible using sophisticated goniometers. However, natural surfaces such as forest canopies impose limitations on both the data collection techniques, as well as, the range of illumination angles that can be collected from the field. These limitations can be mitigated by measuring BRDF in a virtual environment. This paper presents an approach to model the spectral BRDF of a forest canopy using the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model. A synthetic forest canopy scene is constructed by modeling the 3D geometries of different tree species using OnyxTree software. The field collected spectra from the Harvard forest is used to represent the optical properties of the tree elements. The canopy radiative transfer is estimated using the DIRSIG model for specific view and illumination angles to generate BRDF measurements. A full hemispherical BRDF is generated by fitting the measured BRDF to a semi-empirical BRDF model. The results from fitting the model to the measurement indicates a root mean square error of less than 5% (2 reflectance units) relative to the forest's reflectance in the VIS-NIR-SWIR region. The process can be easily extended to generate a spectral BRDF library for various biomes.

  12. Summertime canopy albedo is sensitive to forest thinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, J.; Berveiller, D.; Bréon, F.M.; Delpierre, N.; Geppert, G.; Granier, A.; Jans, W.W.P.; Knohl, A.; Moors, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an emerging body of literature linking canopy albedo to forest management, understanding of the process is still fragmented. We combined a stand-level forest gap model with a canopy radiation transfer model and satellite-derived model parameters to quantify the effects of forest thinning,

  13. Radiative transfer in forest canopies with intercepted and underlying snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essery, R.

    2012-12-01

    Representations of shortwave radiative transfer through forest canopies are required for modelling energy balance below the canopy for hydrological and ecological applications and energy balance above the canopy for meteorological applications. Although highly detailed ray-tracing models of canopy radiative transfer exist, large-scale models invariably treat canopies as plane-parallel absorbing or scattering media. Within these simplifications, however, there are a range of common choices for handling canopy architecture, multiple reflections, anisotropic incoming radiation and the influence of intercepted snow. A representative range of parametrizations will be compared with radiation measurements above and below canopies at sites with seasonal snow cover to identify sources of uncertainty and implications for modelling of forest snow dynamics.bserved and modelled albedo above and transmission through a mountain pine canopy

  14. Global patterns and determinants of forest canopy height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shengli; Guo, Qinghua; Li, Chao; Wang, Zhiheng; Fang, Jingyun

    2016-12-01

    Forest canopy height is an important indicator of forest biomass, species diversity, and other ecosystem functions; however, the climatic determinants that underlie its global patterns have not been fully explored. Using satellite LiDAR-derived forest canopy heights and field measurements of the world's giant trees, combined with climate indices, we evaluated the global patterns and determinants of forest canopy height. The mean canopy height was highest in tropical regions, but tall forests (>50 m) occur at various latitudes. Water availability, quantified by the difference between annual precipitation and annual potential evapotranspiration (P-PET), was the best predictor of global forest canopy height, which supports the hydraulic limitation hypothesis. However, in striking contrast with previous studies, the canopy height exhibited a hump-shaped curve along a gradient of P-PET: it initially increased, then peaked at approximately 680 mm of P-PET, and finally declined, which suggests that excessive water supply negatively affects the canopy height. This trend held true across continents and forest types, and it was also validated using forest inventory data from China and the United States. Our findings provide new insights into the climatic controls of the world's giant trees and have important implications for forest management and improvement of forest growth models.

  15. Estimating canopy fuel parameters for Atlantic Coastal Plain forest types.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.

    2007-01-15

    Abstract It is necessary to quantify forest canopy characteristics to assess crown fire hazard, prioritize treatment areas, and design treatments to reduce crown fire potential. A number of fire behavior models such as FARSITE, FIRETEC, and NEXUS require as input four particular canopy fuel parameters: 1) canopy cover, 2) stand height, 3) crown base height, and 4) canopy bulk density. These canopy characteristics must be mapped across the landscape at high spatial resolution to accurately simulate crown fire. Currently no models exist to forecast these four canopy parameters for forests of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, a region that supports millions of acres of loblolly, longleaf, and slash pine forests as well as pine-broadleaf forests and mixed species broadleaf forests. Many forest cover types are recognized, too many to efficiently model. For expediency, forests of the Savannah River Site are categorized as belonging to 1 of 7 broad forest type groups, based on composition: 1) loblolly pine, 2) longleaf pine, 3) slash pine, 4) pine-hardwood, 5) hardwood-pine, 6) hardwoods, and 7) cypress-tupelo. These 7 broad forest types typify forests of the Atlantic Coastal Plain region, from Maryland to Florida.

  16. Seasonal bird use of canopy gaps in a bottomland forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, Liessa, T,; Moorman, Christopher, E.; Kilgo, John, C.

    2007-04-01

    ABSTRACT.—Bird use of small canopy gaps within mature forests has not been well studied, particularly across multiple seasons. We investigated seasonal differences in bird use of gap and forest habitat within a bottomland hardwood forest in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Gaps were 0.13- to 0.5-ha, 7- to 8-year-old group-selection timber harvest openings. Our study occurred during four bird-use periods (spring migration, breeding, postbreeding, and fall migration) in 2001 and 2002. We used plot counts and mist netting to estimate bird abundance in canopy gaps and surrounding mature forest habitats. Using both survey methods, we observed more birds, including forest-interior species, forest-edge species, field-edge species, and several individual species in canopy gap and gap-edge habitats than in surrounding mature forest during all periods. Interactions between period and habitat type often were significant in models, suggesting a seasonal shift in habitat use. Bird activity generally shifted between the interior of canopy gaps and the immediate gap edge, but many species increased their use of forested habitat during the breeding period. This suggests that many species of birds selectively choose gap and gap-edge habitat over surrounding mature forest during the non-breeding period. Creation of small canopy gaps within a mature forest may increase local bird species richness. The reasons for increased bird activity in gaps remain unclear.

  17. Methods to assess tropical rain forest canopy structure: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, F.

    2001-01-01

    Forest canopy structure (sensu latu) is the combination of forest texture (the qualitative and quantitative composition of the vegetation as to different morphological elements), and forest structure (sensu strictu, the spatial arrangement of these elements). Scale is an aspect of major importance.

  18. Forest canopy BRDF simulation using Monte Carlo method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.; Wu, B.; Zeng, Y.; Tian, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo method is a random statistic method, which has been widely used to simulate the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of vegetation canopy in the field of visible remote sensing. The random process between photons and forest canopy was designed using Monte Carlo method.

  19. Forest canopy BRDF simulation using Monte Carlo method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.; Wu, B.; Zeng, Y.; Tian, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo method is a random statistic method, which has been widely used to simulate the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of vegetation canopy in the field of visible remote sensing. The random process between photons and forest canopy was designed using Monte Carlo method.

  20. Estimating forest canopy attributes via airborne, high-resolution, multispectral imagery in midwest forest types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatziolis, Demetrios

    An investigation of the utility of high spatial resolution (sub-meter), 16-bit, multispectral, airborne digital imagery for forest land cover mapping in the heterogeneous and structurally complex forested landscapes of northern Michigan is presented. Imagery frame registration and georeferencing issues are presented and a novel approach for bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) effects correction and between-frame brightness normalization is introduced. Maximum likelihood classification of five cover type classes is performed over various geographic aggregates of 34 plots established in the study area that were designed according to the Forest Inventory and Analysis protocol. Classification accuracy estimates show that although band registration and BRDF corrections and brightness normalization provide an approximately 5% improvement over the raw imagery data, overall classification accuracy remains relatively low, barely exceeding 50%. Computed kappa coefficients reveal no statistical differences among classification trials. Classification results appear to be independent of geographic aggregations of sampling plots. Estimation of forest stand canopy parameter parameters (stem density, canopy closure, and mean crown diameter) is based on quantifying the spatial autocorrelation among pixel digital numbers (DN) using variogram analysis and slope break analysis, an alternative non-parametric approach. Parameter estimation and cover type classification proceed from the identification of tree apexes. Parameter accuracy assessment is evaluated via value comparison with a spatially precise set of field observations. In general, slope-break-based parameter estimates are superior to those obtained using variograms. Estimated root mean square errors at the plot level for the former average 6.5% for stem density, 3.5% for canopy closure and 2.5% for mean crown diameter, which are less than or equal to error rates obtained via traditional forest stand

  1. Estimates of forest canopy height and aboveground biomass using ICESat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Lefsky; David J. Harding; Michael Keller; Warren B. Cohen; Claudia C. Carabajal; Fernando Del Bom; Maria O. Hunter; Raimundo Jr. de Oliveira

    2005-01-01

    Exchange of carbon between forests and the atmosphere is a vital component of the global carbon cycle. Satellite laser altimetry has a unique capability for estimating forest canopy height, which has a direct and increasingly well understood relationship to aboveground carbon storage. While the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) onboard the Ice, Cloud and land...

  2. Depletion of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a forest canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-D. Choi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid uptake of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs by a forest canopy was observed at Borden in Southern Ontario, Canada during bud break in early spring 2003. High volume air samples were taken on 12 individual days at three different heights (44.4, 29.1, and 16.7 m on a scaffolding tower and on the forest floor below the canopy (1.5 m. Concentrations of PAHs were positively correlated to ambient temperature, resulting from relatively warm and polluted air masses passing over the Eastern United States and Toronto prior to arriving at the sampling site. An analysis of vertical profiles and gas/particle partitioning of the PAHs showed that gaseous PAHs established a concentration gradient with height, whereas levels of particulate PAHs were relatively uniform, implying that only the uptake of gaseous PAHs by the forest canopy was sufficiently rapid to be observed. Specifically, the gaseous concentrations of intermediate PAHs, such as phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene, during budburst and leaf emergence were reduced within and above the canopy. When a gradient was observed, the percentage of PAHs on particles increased at the elevations experiencing a decrease in gas phase concentrations. The uptake of intermediate PAHs by the canopy also led to significant differences in gaseous PAH composition with height. These results are the most direct evidence yet of the filter effect of forest canopies for gaseous PAHs in early spring. PAH deposition fluxes and dry gaseous deposition velocities to the forest canopy were estimated from the concentration gradients.

  3. A Note on Two-Equation Closure Modelling of Canopy Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey

    2009-01-01

    The note presents a rational approach to modelling the source/sink due to vegetation or buoyancy effects that appear in the turbulent kinetic energy, E, equation and a supplementary equation for a length-scale determining variable, φ, when two-equation closure is applied to canopy and atmospheric...

  4. A Note on Two-Equation Closure Modelling of Canopy Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey

    2009-01-01

    The note presents a rational approach to modelling the source/sink due to vegetation or buoyancy effects that appear in the turbulent kinetic energy, E, equation and a supplementary equation for a length-scale determining variable, φ, when two-equation closure is applied to canopy and atmospheric...

  5. Characterization of Canopy Layering in Forested Ecosystems Using Full Waveform Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Dubayah

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Canopy structure, the vertical distribution of canopy material, is an important element of forest ecosystem dynamics and habitat preference. Although vertical stratification, or “canopy layering,” is a basic characterization of canopy structure for research and forest management, it is difficult to quantify at landscape scales. In this paper we describe canopy structure and develop methodologies to map forest vertical stratification in a mixed temperate forest using full-waveform lidar. Two definitions—one categorical and one continuous—are used to map canopy layering over Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire with lidar data collected in 2009 by NASA’s Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS. The two resulting canopy layering datasets describe variation of canopy layering throughout the forest and show that layering varies with terrain elevation and canopy height. This information should provide increased understanding of vertical structure variability and aid habitat characterization and other forest management activities.

  6. Characterization of Canopy Layering in Forested Ecosystems Using Full Waveform Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, Amanda S.; Swatantran, Anu; Blair, J. Bryan; Hofton, Michelle A.; Dubayah, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Canopy structure, the vertical distribution of canopy material, is an important element of forest ecosystem dynamics and habitat preference. Although vertical stratification, or "canopy layering," is a basic characterization of canopy structure for research and forest management, it is difficult to quantify at landscape scales. In this paper we describe canopy structure and develop methodologies to map forest vertical stratification in a mixed temperate forest using full-waveform lidar. Two definitions-one categorical and one continuous-are used to map canopy layering over Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire with lidar data collected in 2009 by NASA's Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). The two resulting canopy layering datasets describe variation of canopy layering throughout the forest and show that layering varies with terrain elevation and canopy height. This information should provide increased understanding of vertical structure variability and aid habitat characterization and other forest management activities.

  7. Evaporation from rain-wetted forest in relation to canopy wetness, canopy cover, and net radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    2001-01-01

    Evaporation from wet canopies is commonly calculated using E-PM, the Penman-Monteith equation with zero surface resistance. However, several observations show a lower evaporation from rain-wetted forest. Possible causes for the difference between E-PM and experiments are evaluated to provide rules f

  8. Evaporation from rain-wetted forest in relation to canopy wetness, canopy cover, and net radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    2001-01-01

    Evaporation from wet canopies is commonly calculated using E-PM, the Penman-Monteith equation with zero surface resistance. However, several observations show a lower evaporation from rain-wetted forest. Possible causes for the difference between E-PM and experiments are evaluated to provide rules

  9. Canopy processes, fluxes and microclimate in a pine forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Launiainen, S.

    2011-07-01

    Interaction between forests and the atmosphere occurs by radiative and turbulent transport. The fluxes of energy and mass between surface and the atmosphere directly influence the properties of the lower atmosphere and in longer time scales the global climate. Boreal forest ecosystems are central in the global climate system, and its responses to human activities, because they are significant sources and sinks of greenhouse gases and of aerosol particles. The aim of the present work was to improve our understanding on the existing interplay between biologically active canopy, microenvironment and turbulent flow and quantify. In specific, the aim was to quantify the contribution of different canopy layers to whole forest fluxes. For this purpose, long-term micrometeorological and ecological measurements made in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest at SMEAR II research station in Southern Finland were used. The properties of turbulent flow are strongly modified by the interaction between the canopy elements: momentum is efficiently absorbed in the upper layers of the canopy, mean wind speed and turbulence intensities decrease rapidly towards the forest floor and power spectra is modulated by spectral short-cut . In the relative open forest, diabatic stability above the canopy explained much of the changes in velocity statistics within the canopy except in strongly stable stratification. Large eddies, ranging from tens to hundred meters in size, were responsible for the major fraction of turbulent transport between a forest and the atmosphere. Because of this, the eddy-covariance (EC) method proved to be successful for measuring energy and mass exchange inside a forest canopy with exception of strongly stable conditions. Vertical variations of within canopy microclimate, light attenuation in particular, affect strongly the assimilation and transpiration rates. According to model simulations, assimilation rate decreases with height more rapidly than stomatal

  10. Convergent elevation trends in canopy chemical traits of tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, Gregory P; Martin, Roberta E

    2016-06-01

    The functional biogeography of tropical forests is expressed in foliar chemicals that are key physiologically based predictors of plant adaptation to changing environmental conditions including climate. However, understanding the degree to which environmental filters sort the canopy chemical characteristics of forest canopies remains a challenge. Here, we report on the elevation and soil-type dependence of forest canopy chemistry among 75 compositionally and environmentally distinct forests in nine regions, with a total of 7819 individual trees representing 3246 species collected, identified and assayed for foliar traits. We assessed whether there are consistent relationships between canopy chemical traits and both elevation and soil type, and evaluated the general role of phylogeny in mediating patterns of canopy traits within and across communities. Chemical trait variation and partitioning suggested a general model based on four interconnected findings. First, geographic variation at the soil-Order level, expressing broad changes in fertility, underpins major shifts in foliar phosphorus (P) and calcium (Ca). Second, elevation-dependent shifts in average community leaf dry mass per area (LMA), chlorophyll, and carbon allocation (including nonstructural carbohydrates) are most strongly correlated with changes in foliar Ca. Third, chemical diversity within communities is driven by differences between species rather than by plasticity within species. Finally, elevation- and soil-dependent changes in N, LMA and leaf carbon allocation are mediated by canopy compositional turnover, whereas foliar P and Ca are driven more by changes in site conditions than by phylogeny. Our findings have broad implications for understanding the global ecology of humid tropical forests, and their functional responses to changing climate.

  11. Energy budget closure and field scale estimation of canopy energy storage with increased and sustained turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. G.; Wang, D.

    2012-12-01

    Eddy Covariance (EC) is widely used for direct, non-invasive observations of land-atmosphere energy and mass fluxes. However, EC observations of available energy fluxes are usually less than fluxes inferred from radiometer and soil heat flux observations; thus introducing additional uncertainty in using and interpreting EC flux measurements. We compare EC observations from two towers established over sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) in Hawai'i, USA under similar cultivation, temperature, sunlight, and precipitation, but drastically different wind conditions due to orographic effects. At a daily scale, we find that energy closure for both towers occurs on days when the entire 24 hours has sufficient turbulence. At our windier site, this turbulence condition occurs over 60% of the time, which contributes to substantially better daily energy closure (~98%) than at the calmer site (~75%). At our windy site, we then invert the daily energy closure for continuously windy days to calculate canopy energy storage. At full canopy, peak daily canopy energy storage fluxes (200-400 Wm-2) are approximately an order of magnitude larger than soil heat flux (20-40 Wm-2). As a fraction of net radiation, canopy energy storage appears to vary seasonally and shows substantially greater variability than soil heat flux. The results illustrate the importance of sustained turbulence for accurate, direct measurement of land-atmosphere fluxes. As increasing number of EC towers are established in complex terrain, these results indicate the need for preliminary wind studies to optimize tower placement where orography enhances, rather than suppresses, turbulence.

  12. Assessing aboveground tropical forest biomass using Google Earth canopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploton, Pierre; Pélissier, Raphaël; Proisy, Christophe; Flavenot, Théo; Barbier, Nicolas; Rai, S N; Couteron, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) in efforts to combat climate change requires participating countries to periodically assess their forest resources on a national scale. Such a process is particularly challenging in the tropics because of technical difficulties related to large aboveground forest biomass stocks, restricted availability of affordable, appropriate remote-sensing images, and a lack of accurate forest inventory data. In this paper, we apply the Fourier-based FOTO method of canopy texture analysis to Google Earth's very-high-resolution images of the wet evergreen forests in the Western Ghats of India in order to (1) assess the predictive power of the method on aboveground biomass of tropical forests, (2) test the merits of free Google Earth images relative to their native commercial IKONOS counterparts and (3) highlight further research needs for affordable, accurate regional aboveground biomass estimations. We used the FOTO method to ordinate Fourier spectra of 1436 square canopy images (125 x 125 m) with respect to a canopy grain texture gradient (i.e., a combination of size distribution and spatial pattern of tree crowns), benchmarked against virtual canopy scenes simulated from a set of known forest structure parameters and a 3-D light interception model. We then used 15 1-ha ground plots to demonstrate that both texture gradients provided by Google Earth and IKONOS images strongly correlated with field-observed stand structure parameters such as the density of large trees, total basal area, and aboveground biomass estimated from a regional allometric model. Our results highlight the great potential of the FOTO method applied to Google Earth data for biomass retrieval because the texture-biomass relationship is only subject to 15% relative error, on average, and does not show obvious saturation trends at large biomass values. We also provide the first reliable map of tropical forest aboveground biomass predicted

  13. Effect of forest canopy on GPS-based movement data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas J. DeCesare; John R. Squires; Jay A. Kolbe

    2005-01-01

    The advancing role of Global Positioning System (GPS) technology in ecology has made studies of animal movement possible for larger and more vagile species. A simple field test revealed that lengths of GPS-based movement data were strongly biased (P<0.001) by effects of forest canopy. Global Positioning System error added an average of 27.5% additional...

  14. Estimating foliar biochemistry from hyperspectral data in mixed forest canopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber Gharib, Silvia; Kneubühler, Mathias; Psomas, Achilleas

    2008-01-01

    data to estimate the foliar concentration of nitrogen, carbon and water in three mixed forest canopies in Switzerland. With multiple linear regression models, continuum-removed and normalized HyMap spectra were related to foliar biochemistry on an individual tree level. The six spectral wavebands used...

  15. Spatial Upscaling of Soil Respiration under a Complex Canopy Structure in an Old‐Growth Deciduous Forest, Central Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilanee Suchewaboripont

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural complexity, especially canopy and gap structure, of old‐growth forests affects the spatial variation of soil respiration (Rs. Without considering this variation, the upscaling of Rs from field measurements to the forest site will be biased. The present study examined responses of Rs to soil temperature (Ts and water content (W in canopy and gap areas, developed the best fit modelof Rs and used the unique spatial patterns of Rs and crown closure to upscale chamber measurements to the site scale in an old‐growth beech‐oak forest. Rs increased with an increase in Ts in both gap and canopy areas, but the effect of W on Rs was different between the two areas. The generalized linear model (GLM analysis identified that an empirical model of Rs with thecoupling of Ts and W was better than an exponential model of Rs with only Ts. Moreover, because of different responses of Rs to W between canopy and gap areas, it was necessary to estimate Rs in these areas separately. Consequently, combining the spatial patterns of Rs and the crown closure could allow upscaling of Rs from chamber‐based measurements to the whole site in the present study.

  16. A comparative analysis of simulated and observed photosynthetic CO2 uptake in two coniferous forest canopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrom, A.; Jarvis, P.G.; Clement, R.

    2006-01-01

    Gross canopy photosynthesis (Pg) can be simulated with canopy models or retrieved from turbulent carbon dioxide (CO2) flux measurements above the forest canopy. We compare the two estimates and illustrate our findings with two case studies. We used the three-dimensional canopy model MAESTRA to si...

  17. Radon 222 tracing of soil and forest canopy trace gas exchange in an open canopy boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussler, William, III; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Kelley, Cheryl A.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    A set of continuous, high-resolution atmospheric radon (Rn-222) concentration time series and radon soil flux measurements were acquired during the summer of 1990 at a micrometeorological tower site 13 km northwest of Schefferville, Quebec, Canada. The tower was located in a dry upland, open-canopy lichen-spruce woodland. For the period July 23 to August 1, 1990, the mean radon soil flux was 41.1 +/- 4.8 Bq m(exp -2)/h. Radon surface flux from the two end-member forest floor cover types (lichen mat and bare soil) were 38.8 +/- 5.1 and 61.8 +/- 15.6 Bq m(exp -2)/h, respectively. Average total forest canopy resistances computed using a simple 'flux box' model for radon exchange between the forest canopy and the overlying atmosphere range from 0.47 +/- 0.24 s cm(exp -1) to 2.65 +/- 1.61 cm(exp -1) for daytime hours (0900-1700 LT) and from 3.44 +/- 0.91 s cm(exp -1) to 10.55 +/- 7.16 s cm(exp -1) for nighttime hours (2000-0600) for the period July 23 to August 6, 1990. Continuous radon profiling of canopy atmospheres is a suitable approach for determining rates of biosphere/atmosphere trace gas exchange for remote field sites where daily equipment maintenance is not possible. where daily equipment maintenance is not possible.

  18. SPATIAL CONTAGIOUSNESS OF CANOPY DISTURBANCE IN TROPICAL RAIN FOREST : AN INDIVIDUAL-TREE-BASED TEST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Van Der Meer, Peter J.; Bongers, Frans

    2008-01-01

    Spatial contagiousness of canopy dynamics-the tendency of canopy disturbances to occur nearby existing canopy openings due to an elevated risk of tree fall around gaps-has been demonstrated in many temperate-zone forests, but only inferentially for tropical forests. Hypothesized mechanisms increasin

  19. SPATIAL CONTAGIOUSNESS OF CANOPY DISTURBANCE IN TROPICAL RAIN FOREST : AN INDIVIDUAL-TREE-BASED TEST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Van Der Meer, Peter J.; Bongers, Frans

    2008-01-01

    Spatial contagiousness of canopy dynamics-the tendency of canopy disturbances to occur nearby existing canopy openings due to an elevated risk of tree fall around gaps-has been demonstrated in many temperate-zone forests, but only inferentially for tropical forests. Hypothesized mechanisms increasin

  20. A review of the roles of forest canopy gaps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adele Muscolo; Silvio Bagnato; Maria Sidari; Roberto Mercurio

    2014-01-01

    Treefall gap, canopy opening caused by the death of one or more trees, is the dominant form of disturbance in many forest systems worldwide. Gaps play an important role in forest ecology helping to pre-serve bio-and pedo-diversity, influencing nutrient cycles, and maintain-ing the complex structure of the late-successional forests. Over the last 30 years, numerous reviews have been written describing gap dynamics. Here we synthesize current understanding on gap dynamics relating to tree regeneration with particular emphasis on gap characteristics consid-ered critical to develop ecologically sustainable forest management sys-tems and to conserve native biodiversity. Specifically, we addressed the question:how do gaps influence forest structure? From the literature re-viewed, the size of gaps induces important changes in factors such as light intensity, soil humidity and soil biological properties that influence tree species regeneration and differ in gaps of different sizes. Shade-tolerant species can colonize small gaps; shade-intolerant species need large gaps for successful regeneration. Additionally, gap dynamics differ between temperate, boreal, and tropical forests, showing the importance of climate differences in driving forest regeneration. This review summa-rizes information of use to forest managers who design cutting regimes that mimic natural disturbances and who must consider forest structure, forest climate, and the role of natural disturbance in their designs.

  1. Estimating sources, sinks and fluxes of reactive atmospheric compounds within a forest canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, K.; Duman, T.; Walker, J. T.; Bash, J. O.; Huang, C. W.; Khlystov, A.; Katul, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    While few dispute the significance of within-canopy sources or sinks of reactive gaseous and particulate compounds, their estimation continues to be the subject of active research and debate. Reactive species undergo turbulent dispersion within an inhomogeneous flow field, and may be subjected to chemical, biological and/or physical deposition, emissions or transformations on leaves, woody elements, and the forest floor. This system involves chemical reactions and biological processes with multiple time scales and represents the terrestrial ecosystem's exposure to nutrient and acid deposition and atmospheric oxidants. The quantification of these processes is a first step in better understanding the ecological impact of air pollution and feedback to atmospheric composition. Hence, it follows that direct measurements of sources or sinks is difficult to conduct in the presence of all these processes. However, mean scalar concentration profiles measured within the canopy can be used to infer the profile distribution of effective sinks and sources if the flow field is known. This is commonly referred to as the 'inverse problem'. In-canopy and above-canopy multi-level concentration measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds (ammonia, nitric acid, nitrous acid), as well as other compounds that are highly reactive to ammonia and its secondary products (hydrochloric acid and sulfur dioxide), are presented within a deciduous second-growth 180 year old oak-hickory forest situated within the Southeastern U.S. Two different approaches are used to solve for the source-sink distribution from the measured mean scalar concentration profiles: (1) an Eulerian high-order closure model that solves the scalar flux budget equation and (2) a new Lagrangian stochastic model that estimates the dispersion matrix. As each of these methods is subject to different assumptions, the combination of the two can be used to constrain the solution to the inverse problem and permit inference on the

  2. Studies of microwave scattering and canopy architecture for boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, G. Lance; Gogineni, S. P.

    1995-01-01

    This is an annual report on the project titled 'Study of Microwave Scattering and Canopy Architecture for Boreal Forests.' The objectives of our work are to study the interaction of microwave signals with vegetation components and to determine the radar's ability to provide accurate estimates of biophysical parameters such as biomass. Our research is aimed at refining the current microwave models and using these improvements to facilitate more accurate interpretations of SAR (synthetic aperture radar) imagery.

  3. Canopy leaching of subtropical mixed forests under acid rain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renjun XIANG; Liyuan CHAI; Xilin ZHANG; Gong ZHANG; Guifang ZHAO

    2008-01-01

    Leaching of major ions from acid precipitation in a subtropical forest was examined based on an experi-ment in four sample sites in Shaoshan City, Hunan Province, China, from January 2001 to June 2002. Results clearly show that when rain passed through the canopy, pH increased and the evidence of ion uptake was presented for SO42- , NO3-, Mg2+ and NH4+ ions, espe-cially of NH4+ and NO3-. The percentages of dissolved SO42-, Ca2+ and Mg2+ show a decreasing trend with increasing rainfall. Percentages of leaching Ca2+, K+ and Cl- ions show an increasing trend as a function of increased pH values. The forest canopy in Shaoshan City has a strong effect on the uptake of SO42- and NO3- ions under acid rain conditions. The decreasing order of ions leaching in the forest canopy is as follows: K+> Ca2+ > Cl- > Mg2+ > SO42- > NO3- > NH4+ > Na+.

  4. Turbulence spectral structures and dissipation rates above and within the forest canopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘树华; 刘和平; 朱廷曜; 金昌杰; 洪钟祥; 李军; 刘辉志

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensional velocity components and temperature were measured using the new three-dimensional sonic anemometers/thermometers at two levels, above and within the forest canopy, in the Changbai Mountains of Northeast China. Turbulence spectral structure, local isotropy property and dissipation rates above and within the forest canopy were calculated using the eddy correlation method. Results show that the normalized turbulent spectral curves have-2/3 slopes in the inertial subrange. While the shapes of the spectra are in good agreement with the Kansas flat terrain results, the atmospheric turbulence is anisotropic above the forest canopy. Within the forest canopy, the turbulence is approximately isotropic. Compared with measurements from previous studies over flat terrain, the velocity and temperature spectra rates above and inside the forest canopy appear to shift toward higher frequencies. The turbulent kinetic energy and heat energy dissipation rates above and inside the forest canopy are much la

  5. Assessing the cumulative impact of disturbance on canopy structure and chemistry in Appalachian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deel, Lindsay N.

    Eastern forests experience a range of disturbance events over time, from stand-replacing disturbances, such as clear cuts, to ephemeral disturbances, such as insect outbreaks. By understanding the cumulative impact of disturbances on canopy structure and chemistry, we can gain insight into management strategies, assess a variety of ecosystem services, and even contribute to a larger body of knowledge on global climate change. I transformed a series of Landsat images spanning approximately 25 years into cumulative disturbance maps covering Green Ridge State Forest and Savage River State Forest in western Maryland. Intensive field surveys collected during the summer of 2009 provided measurements of canopy N and estimates of canopy cover, understory cover, and leaf cover. I used AVIRIS imagery flown concurrently with field data collection to map canopy nitrogen across both forests. Through this project, I tested the impact of cumulative disturbance on forest canopy cover and canopy nitrogen. I found that increased values of cumulative disturbance had a measurable negative impact on forest canopy structure and canopy nitrogen. Moreover, by testing varying methods of summing cumulative disturbance, I found that past disturbances diminish over time in importance, yet still influence the current canopy structure and canopy N of a forest. Thus, my study suggests that Landsat time series data can be synthesized into cumulative metrics incorporating multiple disturbance types, which help explain important disturbance-mediated changes in ecosystem functions.

  6. New generation of airborne lidar for forest canopy sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, J.; Chazette, P.; Allouis, T.; Sanak, J.; Genou, P.; Flamant, P. H.; Durrieu, S.; Toussaint, F.

    2009-04-01

    Cuesta J. (1,2), Chazette P. (1,3), Allouis T. (4), Sanak J. (1,3), Genau P. (2), Flamant P.H. (1), Durrieu S. (4) and Toussaint F. Biomass in forest cover is an essential actor in climate regulation. It is one of the principal sinks of atmospheric CO2 and a major water cycle regulator. In the coming years, climate change may generate an increase in the frequency of fires in the ecosystems, which are already affected in regions as southern Europe, near the Mediterranean basin. For a better understanding and prevention of the risks created by the propagation and intensity of fires, one requires a detailed characterization of the structural parameters of the forest canopy. Such description is as well essential for a proper management and sustainable use of forest resources and the characterization of the evolution of bio-diversity. These environmental and socio-economical issues motivate the development of new remote sensing instruments and methodology, particularly active remote sensing by lidar. These tools should be evaluated in order to achieve a global survey of the forest cover by satellite observation. In this framework, a French effort of the Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (LMD, LSCE and LATMOS) and the CEMAGREF has led to the deployment of a new airborne lidar prototype to study the vertical distribution of the forest canopy in the Landes region in France, around the Arcachon basin and Mimizan. The measuring system is the ultra-violet new generation lidar LAUVA (Lidar Aérosol UtraViolet (Aéroporté), Chazette et al., EST 2007), onboard an Ultra-Light Airplane (ULA). This system was developed by the Comissarait pour l'Energie Atomique and the Centre National de Recherches Scientifiques, originally for atmospheric applications, and it was successfully used in West Africa in the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses. After a proper adaptation, this compact and polyvalent lidar onboard an ULA is capable of measuring the forest canopy with

  7. Relationships between MODIS black-sky shortwave albedo and airborne lidar based forest canopy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Lauri; Rautiainen, Miina; Arumäe, Tauri; Lang, Mait; Flewelling, James; Tokola, Timo; Stenberg, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    Albedo is one of the essential climate variables affecting the Earth's radiation balance. It is however not well understood how changes in forest canopy structure influence the albedo. Canopy structure can be mapped consistently for fairly large areas using airborne lidar sensors. Our objective was to study the relationships between MODIS shortwave black sky albedo product and lidar-based estimates of canopy structure in different biomes ranging from arctic to tropical. Our study is based on six structurally different forest sites located in Finland, Estonia, USA and Laos. Lidar-based mean height of the canopy, canopy cover and their transformations were used as predictor variables to describe the canopy structure. Tree species composition was also included for the three sites where it was available. We noticed that the variables predicting albedo best were different in open and closed canopy forests. In closed canopy forests, the species information was more important than canopy structure variables (R2=0.31-0.32) and using only structural variables resulted in poor R2 (0.13-0.15). If the 500 m MODIS pixel contained a mixture of forests and other land cover types, the albedo was strongly related to the forest area percent. In open canopy forests, structural variables such as canopy cover or height explained albedo well, but species information still improved the models (R2=0.27-0.52). We obtained the highest R2=0.52 using only structural variables in Laos on a partially degraded tropical forest with large variation in canopy cover. The different canopy structure variables were often correlated and the one that provided the best model changed from site to site.

  8. Dynamic reorganization of Amazon forest structure and canopy illumination from tree and branch fall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D. C.; Leitold, V.; Longo, M.; dos-Santos, M. N.; Keller, M. M.; Cook, B.

    2016-12-01

    Amazon forests are dynamic ecosystems that store and cycle globally-significant amounts of atmospheric CO2. Forest inventory plots and atmospheric CO2 measurements integrate long-term and large-scale changes in Amazon forests, respectively, but neither approach captures the dynamic reorganization of Amazon forests at fine spatial and temporal scales necessary to refine estimates of the Amazon forest carbon sink. Here, we used multi-temporal airborne lidar data to characterize changes in canopy structure and illumination in the Brazilian Amazon. Annualized rates of canopy turnover varied four-fold across study sites (1.18 to 4.63% yr-1). Branch fall events (4 - 25 m2) were widespread and accounted for one-third of total canopy turnover. Branch and tree fall events created intermediate or low illumination conditions in 80% of canopy turnover areas, regardless of size, as taller neighbors partially shaded areas with canopy height losses. Importantly, canopy losses also redistributed light to adjacent canopy trees, doubling the canopy area influenced by turnover dynamics. Linking multi-temporal lidar measurements with field data on tree mortality and coarse woody debris, our analysis provides a critical link between existing forest inventory data and next generation ecosystem models with full three-dimensional representation of tropical forest structure and canopy dynamics. Current ecosystem models do not capture the influence of forest structure on canopy illumination, dynamism in canopy light availability over short (1-4 yr) time scales, or contributions from branch falls to canopy turnover. These mechanisms alter Amazon forest productivity over time scales relevant for carbon cycle science and climate mitigation efforts.

  9. Weak Environmental Controls of Tropical Forest Canopy Height in the Guiana Shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youven Goulamoussène

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Canopy height is a key variable in tropical forest functioning and for regional carbon inventories. We investigate the spatial structure of the canopy height of a tropical forest, its relationship with environmental physical covariates, and the implication for tropical forest height variation mapping. Making use of high-resolution maps of LiDAR-derived Digital Canopy Model (DCM and environmental covariates from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM acquired over 30,000 ha of tropical forest in French Guiana, we first show that forest canopy height is spatially correlated up to 2500 m. Forest canopy height is significantly associated with environmental variables, but the degree of correlation varies strongly with pixel resolution. On the whole, bottomland forests generally have lower canopy heights than hillslope or hilltop forests. However, this global picture is very noisy at local scale likely because of the endogenous gap-phase forest dynamic processes. Forest canopy height has been predictively mapped across a pixel resolution going from 6 m to 384 m mimicking a low resolution case of 3 points·km − 2 . Results of canopy height mapping indicated that the error for spatial model with environment effects decrease from 8.7 m to 0.91 m, depending of the pixel resolution. Results suggest that, outside the calibration plots, the contribution of environment in shaping the global canopy height distribution is quite limited. This prevents accurate canopy height mapping based only on environmental information, and suggests that precise canopy height maps, for local management purposes, can only be obtained with direct LiDAR monitoring.

  10. Estimating Canopy Structure in an Amazon Forest from Laser Range Finder and IKONOS Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory P. Asner; Michael Palace; Michael Keller; Rodrigo Pereira Jr.; Jose N. M. Silva; Johan C. Zweede

    2002-01-01

    Canopy structural data can be used for biomass estimation and studies of carbon cycling, disturbance, energy balance, and hydrological processes in tropical forest ecosystems. Scarce information on canopy dimensions reflects the difficulties associated with measuring crown height, width, depth, and area in tall, humid tropical forests. New field and spaceborne...

  11. Regional and historical factors supplement current climate in shaping global forest canopy height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jian; Nielsen, Scott; Mao, Lingfeng;

    2016-01-01

    Summary Canopy height is a key factor that affects carbon storage, vegetation productivity and biodiversity in forests, as well as an indicator of key processes such as biomass allocation. However, global variation in forest canopy height and its determinants are poorly known. We used global data...

  12. Thermal Imaging of Forest Canopy Temperatures: Relationships with Biological and Biophysical Drivers and Ecosystem Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, C. J.; Kim, Y.; Hanson, C. V.; Law, B. E.; Kwon, H.; Schulze, M.; Pau, S.; Detto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature is a primary environmental control on plant processes at a range of spatial and temporal scales, affecting enzymatic reactions, ecosystem biogeochemistry, and species distributions. Although most focus is on air temperature, the radiative or skin temperature of plants is more relevant. Canopy skin temperature dynamics reflect biophysical, physiological, and anatomical characteristics and interactions with environmental drivers, and can be used to examine forest responses to stresses like droughts and heat waves. Direct measurements of plant canopy temperatures using thermocouple sensors have been challenging and offer limited information. Such measurements are usually conducted over short periods of time and a limited spatial extent of the canopy. By contrast, thermal infrared (TIR) imaging allows for extensive temporal and spatial measurement of canopy temperature regimes. We present results of TIR imaging of forest canopies at a range of well-studied forest sites in the United States and Panama. These forest types include temperate rainforests, a semi­arid pine forest, and a semi­deciduous tropical forest. Canopy temperature regimes at these sites are highly variable spatially and temporally and display frequent departures from air temperature, particularly during clear sky conditions. Canopy tissue temperatures are often warmer (daytime) and colder (nighttime) than air temperature, and canopy structure seems to have a large influence on the thermal regime. Additionally, comparison of canopy temperatures to eddy covariance fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy reveals relationships not apparent using air temperature. Initial comparisons between our forest canopy temperatures and remotely sensed skin temperature using Landsat and MODIS data show reasonably good agreement. We conclude that temporal and spatial changes in canopy temperature and its relationship to biological and environmental factors can improve our understanding of how

  13. [Estimation of forest canopy chlorophyll content based on PROSPECT and SAIL models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi-guang; Fan, Wen-yi; Yu, Ying

    2010-11-01

    The forest canopy chlorophyll content directly reflects the health and stress of forest. The accurate estimation of the forest canopy chlorophyll content is a significant foundation for researching forest ecosystem cycle models. In the present paper, the inversion of the forest canopy chlorophyll content was based on PROSPECT and SAIL models from the physical mechanism angle. First, leaf spectrum and canopy spectrum were simulated by PROSPECT and SAIL models respectively. And leaf chlorophyll content look-up-table was established for leaf chlorophyll content retrieval. Then leaf chlorophyll content was converted into canopy chlorophyll content by Leaf Area Index (LAD). Finally, canopy chlorophyll content was estimated from Hyperion image. The results indicated that the main effect bands of chlorophyll content were 400-900 nm, the simulation of leaf and canopy spectrum by PROSPECT and SAIL models fit better with the measured spectrum with 7.06% and 16.49% relative error respectively, the RMSE of LAI inversion was 0. 542 6 and the forest canopy chlorophyll content was estimated better by PROSPECT and SAIL models with precision = 77.02%.

  14. Vertical stratification of beetles (Coleoptera) and flies (Diptera) in temperate forest canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Dorothy Y; Robert, Katleen; Brochu, Kristen; Larrivée, Maxim; Buddle, Christopher M; Wheeler, Terry A

    2014-02-01

    Forest canopies support high arthropod biodiversity, but in temperate canopies, little is known about the spatial distribution of these arthropods. This is an important first step toward understanding ecological roles of insects in temperate canopies. The objective of this study was to assess differences in the species composition of two dominant and diverse taxa (Diptera and Coleoptera) along a vertical gradient in temperate deciduous forest canopies. Five sugar maple trees from each of three deciduous forest sites in southern Quebec were sampled using a combination of window and trunk traps placed in three vertical strata (understory, mid-canopy, and upper-canopy) for three sampling periods throughout the summer. Coleoptera species richness and abundance did not differ between canopy heights, but more specimens and species of Diptera were collected in the upper-canopy. Community composition of Coleoptera and Diptera varied significantly by trap height. Window traps collected more specimens and species of Coleoptera than trunk traps, although both trap types should be used to maximize representation of the entire Coleoptera community. There were no differences in abundance, diversity, or composition of Diptera collected between trap types. Our data confirm the relevance of sampling all strata in a forest when studying canopy arthropod biodiversity.

  15. Evaluation of Forest Canopy and Understory Gap Fraction Derived from Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K. C.; Wang, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    The quantification of forest carbon sequestration is helpful to understand the carbon storage on the Earth. The estimation of forest carbon sequestration can be achieved by the use of leaf area index (LAI), which is derived from forest gap fraction. The hemispherical image-based technique is the most popular non-destructive means for obtaining such information. However, only the gap fraction of the top canopy is derived due to the limitation of imaging technique. The gap fraction information of understory is thus neglected. In this study, we evaluate the use of a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) to obtain the forest canopy and understory gap fraction. The forest TLS data were manually classified as the top canopy and understory layers to facilitate the estimation of top canopy and understory gap fraction, respectively.

  16. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James L.; Ulyshen, Michael D.; Kilgo, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Horn, Scott, James L. Hanula, Michael D. Ulyshen, and John C. Kilgo. 2005. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest. Am. Midl. Nat. 153:321-326. Abstract: We found more green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea) in canopy gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopy gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat. Flies were the most commonly collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogs were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.

  17. Using Canopy Temperature to Infer Hydrologic Processes in Floodplain Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, M. G.; Allen, S. T.; Keim, R.; Edwards, B. L.; King, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Decreased water availability due to hydrologic modifications, groundwater withdrawal, and climate change threaten the hydrological architecture of floodplain forests globally. The relative contributions of different sources of water (e.g., precipitation, surface flooding, and groundwater) to soil moisture on floodplains is poorly constrained, so identification of areas of water stress within a floodplain can provide valuable information about floodplain hydrology. Canopy temperature is a useful indicator of moisture stress and has long been used in agricultural and natural landscapes. Accordingly, thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data (spatial resolution of 1 km) from NASA's MODIS sensor was used to examine patterns of spatiotemporal variation in water stress in two floodplain forests over 12 growing seasons. On the upper Sabine River floodplain, Texas, increasing rainfall-derived soil moisture corresponded with increased heterogeneity of LST but there was weak association between river stage and heterogeneity. On the lower White River floodplain, Arkansas, distinct differences in LST between two reaches were observed during low flow years, while little relationship was observed between LST spatial variability and rainfall-derived soil moisture on either reach. The differences in hydrological control on these floodplain ecosystems have important ramifications for varying resilience to climate change and water resource management.

  18. Forest canopy height estimation using double-frequency repeat pass interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamvasis, Kleanthis; Karathanassi, Vassilia

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, many efforts have been made in order to assess forest stand parameters from remote sensing data, as a mean to estimate the above-ground carbon stock of forests in the context of the Kyoto protocol. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) techniques have gained traction in last decade as a viable technology for vegetation parameter estimation. Many works have shown that forest canopy height, which is a critical parameter for quantifying the terrestrial carbon cycle, can be estimated with InSAR. However, research is still needed to understand further the interaction of SAR signals with forest canopy and to develop an operational method for forestry applications. This work discusses the use of repeat pass interferometry with ALOS PALSAR (L band) HH polarized and COSMO Skymed (X band) HH polarized acquisitions over the Taxiarchis forest (Chalkidiki, Greece), in order to produce accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) and estimate canopy height with interferometric processing. The effect of wavelength-dependent penetration depth into the canopy is known to be strong, and could potentially lead to forest canopy height mapping using dual-wavelength SAR interferometry at X- and L-band. The method is based on scattering phase center separation at different wavelengths. It involves the generation of a terrain elevation model underneath the forest canopy from repeat-pass L-band InSAR data as well as the generation of a canopy surface elevation model from repeat pass X-band InSAR data. The terrain model is then used to remove the terrain component from the repeat pass interferometric X-band elevation model, so as to enable the forest canopy height estimation. The canopy height results were compared to a field survey with 6.9 m root mean square error (RMSE). The effects of vegetation characteristics, SAR incidence angle and view geometry, and terrain slope on the accuracy of the results have also been studied in this work.

  19. A canopy trimming experiment in Puerto Rico: the response of litter invertebrate communities to canopy loss and debris deposition in a tropical forest subject to hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara A. Richardson; Michael J. Richardson; Grizelle Gonzalez; Aaron B. Shiels; Diane S. Srivastava

    2010-01-01

    Hurricanes cause canopy removal and deposition of pulses of litter to the forest floor. A Canopy Trimming Experiment (CTE) was designed to decouple these two factors, and to investigate the separate abiotic and biotic consequences of hurricane-type damage and monitor recovery processes. As part of this experiment, effects on forest floor invertebrate communities were...

  20. Missing Peroxy Radical Sources Within a Rural Forest Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, G. M.; Cantrell, C.; Kim, S.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Karl, T.; Harley, P.; Turnipseed, A.; Zheng, W.; Flocke, F.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Henry, S. B.; DiGangi, J. P.; Boyle, E. S.; Kaser, L.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Hansel, A.; Graus, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.; Guenther, A.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2013-01-01

    Organic peroxy (RO2) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals are key intermediates in the photochemical processes that generate ozone, secondary organic aerosol and reactive nitrogen reservoirs throughout the troposphere. In regions with ample biogenic hydrocarbons, the richness and complexity of peroxy radical chemistry presents a significant challenge to current-generation models, especially given the scarcity of measurements in such environments. We present peroxy radical observations acquired within a Ponderosa pine forest during the summer 2010 Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Organic Carbon Study (BEACHON-ROCS). Total peroxy radical mixing ratios reach as high as 180 pptv and are among the highest yet recorded. Using the comprehensive measurement suite to constrain a near-explicit 0-D box model, we investigate the sources, sinks and distribution of peroxy radicals below the forest canopy. The base chemical mechanism underestimates total peroxy radicals by as much as a factor of 3. Since primary reaction partners for peroxy radicals are either measured (NO) or under-predicted (HO2 and RO2, i.e. self-reaction), missing sources are the most likely explanation for this result. A close comparison of model output with observations reveals at least two distinct source signatures. The first missing source, characterized by a sharp midday maximum and a strong dependence on solar radiation, is consistent with photolytic production of HO2. The diel profile of the second missing source peaks in the afternoon and suggests a process that generates RO2 independently of sun-driven photochemistry, such as ozonolysis of reactive hydrocarbons. The maximum magnitudes of these missing sources (approximately 120 and 50 pptv min-1, respectively) are consistent with previous observations alluding to unexpectedly intense oxidation within forests. We conclude that a similar mechanism may underlie many such observations.

  1. High-Resolution Forest Canopy Height Estimation in an African Blue Carbon Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomasino, David; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Lee, Seung-Kuk; Simard, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Mangrove forests are one of the most productive and carbon dense ecosystems that are only found at tidally inundated coastal areas. Forest canopy height is an important measure for modeling carbon and biomass dynamics, as well as land cover change. By taking advantage of the flat terrain and dense canopy cover, the present study derived digital surface models (DSMs) using stereophotogrammetric techniques on high-resolution spaceborne imagery (HRSI) for southern Mozambique. A mean-weighted ground surface elevation factor was subtracted from the HRSI DSM to accurately estimate the canopy height in mangrove forests in southern Mozambique. The mean and H100 tree height measured in both the field and with the digital canopy model provided the most accurate results with a vertical error of 1.18-1.84 m, respectively. Distinct patterns were identified in the HRSI canopy height map that could not be discerned from coarse shuttle radar topography mission canopy maps even though the mode and distribution of canopy heights were similar over the same area. Through further investigation, HRSI DSMs have the potential of providing a new type of three-dimensional dataset that could serve as calibration/validation data for other DSMs generated from spaceborne datasets with much larger global coverage. HSRI DSMs could be used in lieu of Lidar acquisitions for canopy height and forest biomass estimation, and be combined with passive optical data to improve land cover classifications.

  2. High-Resolution Forest Canopy Height Estimation in an African Blue Carbon Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomasino, David; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Lee, Seung-Kuk; Simard, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Mangrove forests are one of the most productive and carbon dense ecosystems that are only found at tidally inundated coastal areas. Forest canopy height is an important measure for modeling carbon and biomass dynamics, as well as land cover change. By taking advantage of the flat terrain and dense canopy cover, the present study derived digital surface models (DSMs) using stereophotogrammetric techniques on high-resolution spaceborne imagery (HRSI) for southern Mozambique. A mean-weighted ground surface elevation factor was subtracted from the HRSI DSM to accurately estimate the canopy height in mangrove forests in southern Mozambique. The mean and H100 tree height measured in both the field and with the digital canopy model provided the most accurate results with a vertical error of 1.18-1.84 m, respectively. Distinct patterns were identified in the HRSI canopy height map that could not be discerned from coarse shuttle radar topography mission canopy maps even though the mode and distribution of canopy heights were similar over the same area. Through further investigation, HRSI DSMs have the potential of providing a new type of three-dimensional dataset that could serve as calibration/validation data for other DSMs generated from spaceborne datasets with much larger global coverage. HSRI DSMs could be used in lieu of Lidar acquisitions for canopy height and forest biomass estimation, and be combined with passive optical data to improve land cover classifications.

  3. Response of clonal plasticity of Fargesia nitida to different canopy conditions of subalpine coniferous forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianping TAO; Lixia SONG; Yongjian WANG; Weiyin ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effects of canopy conditions on clump and culm numbers, and the morphological plasticity and biomass distribution patterns of the dwarf bamboo species Fargesia nitida. Specifically, we investigated the effects of canopy condi-tions on the growth and morphological characteristics of F. nitida, and the adaptive responses of F. nitida to dif-ferent canopy conditions and its ecological senses. The results indicate that forest canopy had a significant effect on the genet density and culm number per clump, while it did not affect the ramet density. Clumps tended to be few and large in gaps and forest edge plots, and small under forest understory plots. The ramets showed an even distribution under the closed canopy, and clus-ter distribution under gaps and forest edge plots. The forest canopy had a significant effect on both the ramets'biomass and biomass allocation. Favourable light conditions promoted ramet growth and biomass accumulation. Greater amounts of biomass in gaps and forest edge plots were shown by the higher number of culms per clump and the diameter of these culms. Under closed canopy, the bamboos increased their branching angle, leaf biomass allocation, specific leaf area and leaf area ratio to exploit more favourable light conditions in these locations. The spacer length, specific spacer length and spacer branching angles all showed significant differences between gaps and closed canopy conditions. The larger specific spacer length and spacer branching angle were beneficial for bamboo growth, scattering the ramets and exploiting more favourable light conditions. In summary, this study shows that to varying degrees, F nitida exhibits both a wide ecological amplitude and high degree of morphological plasticity in response to differing forest canopy conditions. More-over, the changes in plasticity enable the plants to optimize their light usage efficiency to promote growth and increase access to resources available in

  4. Changes in Amazon Forest Structure and Canopy Illumination from Multi-temporal Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitold, V.; Morton, D. C.; Keller, M. M.; Cook, B.

    2015-12-01

    Lidar remote sensing of tropical forests provides unprecedented detail on 3D vegetation structure to support in-depth studies of ecosystem processes and carbon dynamics across large landscapes. Here, we used high-resolution, multi-temporal airborne lidar data from nine terra firme forest sites (total area = 3500 ha) in the Brazilian Amazon to estimate spatial and temporal patterns of forest disturbance and associated changes in canopy illumination. Across sites, we observed large variability in mean canopy height (15.7 m to 28.1 m) and the vertical distributions of forest vegetation and light penetration. At the site scale, lidar-derived canopy height models from repeat surveys showed minimal change in canopy structure over time intervals of 1 to 4 years, with nearly identical initial and final canopy height distributions. Annualized rates of total canopy turnover, based on losses in canopy height between lidar collections, ranged from 0.66 to 2.57% yr-1, with a mean value of 1.59% yr-1 across sites. Field estimates of tree crown sizes were used to classify canopy turnover into branch fall, tree fall and multiple tree fall events. Partial crown losses occurred most frequently across the landscape (40% of all events), but accounted for only a small fraction of the total turnover area (10%). Size-frequency distributions of canopy turnover followed a power-law distribution with a decline in the number of events with increasing size across all sites (range of λ between 1.26 - 1.35). The distributions of illumination conditions before and after disturbance events were inverted, as fully-illuminated crowns were replaced by low-light conditions within patches of canopy loss. Estimates of the spatial and temporal patterns of Amazon forest disturbance and recovery from multi-temporal lidar data complement information from plot-scale (≤ 1ha) studies to provide a more complete understanding of regional variability in ecosystem structure and function under current climate.

  5. Forest canopy water fluxes can be estimated using canopy structure metrics derived from airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Johannes; Christiansen, Jesper Riis

    2015-01-01

    Forests contribute to improve water quality, affect drinking water resources, and therefore influence water supply on a regional level. The forest canopy structure affects the retention of precipitation (Pr) in the canopy and hence the amount of water transferred to the forest floor termed canopy......-species broadleaf/coniferous and mixed forests) in Denmark were used to develop empirical models to estimate TF on a monthly, seasonal, and annual basis. This new approach offers the opportunity to greatly improve predictions of TF on catchment wide scales. Overall, results show that TF can be estimated by Pr...

  6. Large eddy simulations of forest canopies for determination of biological dispersal by wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrer, Gil

    Forest canopies interact with the atmosphere by emitting heat and moisture fluxes, by dragging the flow and by forming obstacles to the flow. Forests are heterogeneous with structural features at a vast range of length scale. The atmospheric effects of micro-scale canopy structures, which describe differences between individual trees, have so far been poorly studied. Changes to turbulence, flow patterns, and fluxes in and above the canopy strongly affect the dispersal of seeds and its ecological consequences because they are strongly dependent on the far "tail" of the dispersal distribution. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) is further developed to operate as a large-eddy simulation (LES) at high resolution with 3D heterogeneous forest canopies. This RAMS-based Forest LES (RAFLES) represents the canopy through drag, volume restriction by stems, and heat and moisture fluxes in the canopy domain. The model incorporates explicit canopy descriptions, which can be obtained from observations, or from the virtual-canopy generator, which is developed here. RAFLES is used to simulate noontime conditions for two days at the hardwood stand in the Duke Forest, representing two sets of atmospheric and canopy conditions. The results are evaluated against eddy-flux observations from these days. RAFLES compares well to the observed data. Comparison between artificial homogeneous cases and natural heterogeneous cases reveals that small-scale canopy heterogeneity affects the profiles of momentum and scalar fluxes, and modifies the spatial structure of the flow. Low areas in the canopy promote ejection events, which leads to a correlation between the canopy height and flow variables that extends up to four times the canopy height. Seed dispersal kernels simulated with RAFLES closely match those measured in seed release experiments in a temperate forest. It is also used to examine potential biases resulting from simplifications in common dispersal models, such as planar

  7. Mapping canopy gaps in an indigenous subtropical coastal forest using high resolution WorldView-2 data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malahlela, O

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive species usually colonize canopy gaps in tropical and sub-tropical forests, which results in loss of native species. Therefore, an understanding of the location and distribution of canopy gaps will assist in predicting the occurrence...

  8. Plant science in forest canopies--the first 30 years of advances and challenges (1980-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Margaret D; Schowalter, Timothy D

    2012-04-01

    As an emerging subdiscipline of forest biology, canopy science has undergone a transition from observational, 'oh-wow' exploration to a more hypothesis-driven, experimental arena for rigorous field biology. Although efforts to explore forest canopies have occurred for a century, the new tools to access the treetops during the past 30 yr facilitated not only widespread exploration but also new discoveries about the complexity and global effects of this so-called 'eighth continent of the planet'. The forest canopy is the engine that fixes solar energy in carbohydrates to power interactions among forest components that, in turn, affect regional and global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem services. Climate change, biodiversity conservation, fresh water conservation, ecosystem productivity, and carbon sequestration represent important components of forest research that benefit from access to the canopy for rigorous study. Although some canopy variables can be observed or measured from the ground, vertical and horizontal variation in environmental conditions and processes within the canopy that determine canopy-atmosphere and canopy-forest floor interactions are best measured within the canopy. Canopy science has matured into a cutting-edge subset of forest research, and the treetops also serve as social and economic drivers for sustainable communities, fostering science education and ecotourism. This interdisciplinary context of forest canopy science has inspired innovative new approaches to environmental stewardship, involving diverse stakeholders.

  9. Progressive forest canopy water loss during the 2012-2015 California drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, Gregory P; Brodrick, Philip G; Anderson, Christopher B; Vaughn, Nicholas; Knapp, David E; Martin, Roberta E

    2016-01-12

    The 2012-2015 drought has left California with severely reduced snowpack, soil moisture, ground water, and reservoir stocks, but the impact of this estimated millennial-scale event on forest health is unknown. We used airborne laser-guided spectroscopy and satellite-based models to assess losses in canopy water content of California's forests between 2011 and 2015. Approximately 10.6 million ha of forest containing up to 888 million large trees experienced measurable loss in canopy water content during this drought period. Severe canopy water losses of greater than 30% occurred over 1 million ha, affecting up to 58 million large trees. Our measurements exclude forests affected by fire between 2011 and 2015. If drought conditions continue or reoccur, even with temporary reprieves such as El Niño, we predict substantial future forest change.

  10. Differences in BVOC oxidation and SOA formation above and below the forest canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Benjamin C.; Wallace, Henry W.; Flynn, James H.; Lefer, Barry L.; Erickson, Matt H.; Jobson, B. Tom; Dusanter, Sebastien; Griffith, Stephen M.; Hansen, Robert F.; Stevens, Philip S.; VanReken, Timothy; Griffin, Robert J.

    2017-02-01

    Gas-phase biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are oxidized in the troposphere to produce secondary pollutants such as ozone (O3), organic nitrates (RONO2), and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Two coupled zero-dimensional models have been used to investigate differences in oxidation and SOA production from isoprene and α-pinene, especially with respect to the nitrate radical (NO3), above and below a forest canopy in rural Michigan. In both modeled environments (above and below the canopy), NO3 mixing ratios are relatively small (urban forest environment increases the average contribution of NO3 to daytime below-canopy α-pinene oxidation to 32 %. Gas-phase RONO2 produced through NO3 oxidation undergoes net transport upward from the below-canopy environment during the day, and this transport contributes up to 30 % of total NO3-derived RONO2 production above the canopy in the morning (˜ 07:00). Modeled SOA mass loadings above and below the canopy ultimately differ by less than 0.5 µg m-3, and extremely low-volatility organic compounds dominate SOA composition. Lower temperatures below the canopy cause increased partitioning of semi-volatile gas-phase products to the particle phase and up to 35 % larger SOA mass loadings of these products relative to above the canopy in the model. Including transport between above- and below-canopy environments increases above-canopy NO3-derived α-pinene RONO2 SOA mass by as much as 45 %, suggesting that below-canopy chemical processes substantially influence above-canopy SOA mass loadings, especially with regard to monoterpene-derived RONO2.

  11. Canopy structure effects on the wind at a complex forested site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boudreault, Louis-Etienne; Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2014-01-01

    models. Previously difficult to estimate, this variable can now be easily recovered using aerial LiDAR scans. In this study, three approaches were tested which were all based on a novel method to extract the forest properties from the scans. A first approach used the fully spatial varying frontal area......We investigated the effect of the canopy description in a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method based on key flow results from a complex forested site. The canopy structure in RANS is represented trough the frontal area of canopy elements per unit volume, a variable required as input in canopy...... density. In a second approach, the vertical frontal area density variations were ignored, but the horizontally varying forest heights were kept represented. The third approach ignored any variations: the frontal area density was defined as a constant up to a fixed tree height over the whole domain...

  12. Environmental Filtering of Forest Canopy Functional Traits Determined from Imaging Spectroscopy 139618

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, G. P.

    2016-12-01

    Forests play a vital role in the functioning of the biosphere, yet little is known about functional properties of forest canopies that contribute to biospheric processes. Forest canopy functional traits - the chemical and physical properties of the foliage mediating carbon update, nutrient use, and water relations - are of particular interest because they link tree physiology to biogeochemical and hydrological cycles. Measuring forest canopy functional traits has been a slow, laborious, and usually spatially biased process. Forest functional traits are difficult to assess because spatial and temporal variation often exceeds our ability to adequately utilize field-based approaches, and traditional satellite observations do not easily reveal functionally-relevant differences or changes. Using high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy, it is possible to measure, map and monitor a growing suite of forest canopy functional traits, including water content, multiple nutrients, photosynthetic pigments, and defense compounds. In combination, these traits describe a large proportion of tree physiology, and the interaction with abiotic and biotic drivers. Using airborne imaging spectroscopy from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, combined with maps of geophysical, climatic and land-use factors, we have determined the relative importance of these environmental filters in determining forest canopy functional traits over large areas such as the Peruvian Amazon, California, and Borneo. Results indicate consistency in the critical role of certain environmental factors that geographically sort forest canopy functional traits, with multiple secondary factors shifting their contribution among forest types. Mapping and monitoring a suite of forest functional traits is now possible at sub-continental scales using airborne high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy. Taking this new scientific knowledge and capability global will require an Earth observing mission with 15-16 day revisit and a spatial

  13. Impact of Canopy Openness on Spider Communities: Implications for Conservation Management of Formerly Coppiced Oak Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Košulič

    Full Text Available Traditional woodland management created a mosaic of differently aged patches providing favorable conditions for a variety of arthropods. After abandonment of historical ownership patterns and traditional management and the deliberate transformation to high forest after World War II, large forest areas became darker and more homogeneous. This had significant negative consequences for biodiversity. An important question is whether even small-scale habitat structures maintained by different levels of canopy openness in abandoned coppiced forest may constitute conditions suitable for forest as well as open habitat specialists. We investigated the effect of canopy openness in former traditionally coppiced woodlands on the species richness, functional diversity, activity density, conservation value, and degree of rareness of epigeic spiders. In each of the eight studied locations, 60-m-long transect was established consisting of five pitfall traps placed at regular 15 m intervals along the gradient. Spiders were collected from May to July 2012. We recorded 90 spider species, including high proportions of xeric specialists (40% and red-listed threatened species (26%. The peaks of conservation indicators, as well as spider community abundance, were shifted toward more open canopies. On the other hand, functional diversity peaked at more closed canopies followed by a rapid decrease with increasing canopy openness. Species richness was highest in the middle of the canopy openness gradient, suggesting an ecotone effect. Ordinations revealed that species of conservation concern tended to be associated with sparse and partly opened canopy. The results show that the various components of biodiversity peaked at different levels of canopy openness. Therefore, the restoration and suitable forest management of such conditions will retain important diversification of habitats in formerly coppiced oak forest stands. We indicate that permanent presence of small

  14. Impact of Canopy Openness on Spider Communities: Implications for Conservation Management of Formerly Coppiced Oak Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košulič, Ondřej; Michalko, Radek; Hula, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Traditional woodland management created a mosaic of differently aged patches providing favorable conditions for a variety of arthropods. After abandonment of historical ownership patterns and traditional management and the deliberate transformation to high forest after World War II, large forest areas became darker and more homogeneous. This had significant negative consequences for biodiversity. An important question is whether even small-scale habitat structures maintained by different levels of canopy openness in abandoned coppiced forest may constitute conditions suitable for forest as well as open habitat specialists. We investigated the effect of canopy openness in former traditionally coppiced woodlands on the species richness, functional diversity, activity density, conservation value, and degree of rareness of epigeic spiders. In each of the eight studied locations, 60-m-long transect was established consisting of five pitfall traps placed at regular 15 m intervals along the gradient. Spiders were collected from May to July 2012. We recorded 90 spider species, including high proportions of xeric specialists (40%) and red-listed threatened species (26%). The peaks of conservation indicators, as well as spider community abundance, were shifted toward more open canopies. On the other hand, functional diversity peaked at more closed canopies followed by a rapid decrease with increasing canopy openness. Species richness was highest in the middle of the canopy openness gradient, suggesting an ecotone effect. Ordinations revealed that species of conservation concern tended to be associated with sparse and partly opened canopy. The results show that the various components of biodiversity peaked at different levels of canopy openness. Therefore, the restoration and suitable forest management of such conditions will retain important diversification of habitats in formerly coppiced oak forest stands. We indicate that permanent presence of small-scale improvements

  15. Patterns of vegetation composition across levels of canopy disturbance in temperate forests of west Himalaya, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airi Subodh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the impacts of canopy disturbance on vegetation compositional attributes of two characteristic temperate forests (i.e., mixed broad-leaf and banj-oak forests in west Himalayan part of India. Following the standard approaches, quantitative information on compositional attributes of forest vegetation was generated and analyzed. Considerable changes in these attributes were revealed across different levels of canopy disturbance in both forests. In particular, tree density and total basal area (TBA exhibited significant decline from undegraded to degraded stands. Among others, seedling and sapling density of mixed broad-leaf forest was affected adversely by increased level of canopy disturbance. However, herb density in this forest increased significantly with increasing levels of disturbance; the same was not true for banj-oak forest. A significant decline in relative frequency and density of native herbaceous species was apparent towards degraded stands, implying that the disturbed sites in both forests created an opportunity for the establishment and proliferation of non-natives. However, with significant increase in relative density of non-native herbs, the degraded stands of banj-oak forest emerged as critically vulnerable to non-native proliferation. The patterns of tree size class distribution in both forests also exhibited certain trends across canopy disturbance, which suggested possible future changes in composition. In particular, the patterns of common tree associates (i.e., Myrica esculenta and Rhododendron arboreum in banj-oak forest and Pinus roxburghii in mixed broad-leaf forest were indicative of likely compositional changes in near future. The study concludes that: (i compositional attributes of both mixed broad-leaf and banj-oak forests were sensitive to increasing levels of canopy disturbance, (ii mixed broad-leaf forest exhibited greater sensitivity to canopy disturbance at recruitment levels, (iii increased

  16. Prediction of Macronutrients at the Canopy Level Using Spaceborne Imaging Spectroscopy and LiDAR Data in a Mixedwood Boreal Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Gökkaya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Information on foliar macronutrients is required in order to understand plant physiological and ecosystem processes such as photosynthesis, nutrient cycling, respiration and cell wall formation. The ability to measure, model and map foliar macronutrients (nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P, potassium (K, calcium (Ca and magnesium (Mg at the forest canopy level provides information on the spatial patterns of ecosystem processes (e.g., carbon exchange and provides insight on forest condition and stress. Imaging spectroscopy (IS has been used particularly for modeling N, using airborne and satellite imagery mostly in temperate and tropical forests. However, there has been very little research conducted at these scales to model P, K, Ca, and Mg and few studies have focused on boreal forests. We report results of a study of macronutrient modeling using spaceborne IS and airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR data for a mixedwood boreal forest canopy in northern Ontario, Canada. Models incorporating Hyperion data explained approximately 90% of the variation in canopy concentrations of N, P, and Mg; whereas the inclusion of LiDAR data significantly improved the prediction of canopy concentration of Ca (R2 = 0.80. The combined used of IS and LiDAR data significantly improved the prediction accuracy of canopy Ca and K concentration but decreased the prediction accuracy of canopy P concentration. The results indicate that the variability of macronutrient concentration due to interspecific and functional type differences at the site provides the basis for the relationship observed between the remote sensing measurements (i.e., IS and LiDAR and macronutrient concentration. Crown closure and canopy height are the structural metrics that establish the connection between macronutrient concentration and IS and LiDAR data, respectively. The spatial distribution of macronutrient concentration at the canopy scale mimics functional type distribution at the site. The

  17. Long-term fragmentation effects on the distribution and dynamics of canopy gaps in a tropical montane forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas R. Vaughn; Gregory P. Asner; Christian P. Giardina

    2015-01-01

    Fragmentation alters forest canopy structure through various mechanisms, which in turn drive subsequent changes to biogeochemical processes and biological diversity. Using repeated airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) mappings, we investigated the size distribution and dynamics of forest canopy gaps across a topical montane forest landscape in Hawaii naturally...

  18. Detecting forest canopy layering: applying lidar remote sensing to further understand the role of vertical structure in species habitat preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, A. S.; Dubayah, R.; Swatantran, A.

    2011-12-01

    Full waveform lidar reflects off all forest canopy elements, showing not only height, but also the structure within the canopy from the top to the forest floor, making it an ideal remote sensing technology for research in forest ecosystem dynamics. Vertical stratification or canopy layering has long been noted as an essential element in the forest ecosystem and of importance for species habitat. This project explores the utility of lidar for characterizing forest canopy layering and applying canopy layering information to better understand species habitat preference. Canopy layering will be mapped across the landscape using full-waveform lidar remote sensing data from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). Two methods for quantifying layering have been developed from LVIS data collected during the summer of 2009 for Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire. The two layering datasets (one categorical, one continuous) describe how vertical stratification varies across the forest with canopy height and elevation. The relationships between of canopy layering and avian species habitat preference will also be assessed for bird species within Hubbard Brook Experimental forest. These results will provide ecologically meaningful information and a relevant method for quantifying canopy layering at the landscape scale, which will aid in a better understanding of forest ecosystem dynamics for forest management and species habitat research.

  19. Light-driven growth in Amazon evergreen forests explained by seasonal variations of vertical canopy structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao; Dubayah, Ralph

    2017-03-07

    Light-regime variability is an important limiting factor constraining tree growth in tropical forests. However, there is considerable debate about whether radiation-induced green-up during the dry season is real, or an apparent artifact of the remote-sensing techniques used to infer seasonal changes in canopy leaf area. Direct and widespread observations of vertical canopy structures that drive radiation regimes have been largely absent. Here we analyze seasonal dynamic patterns between the canopy and understory layers in Amazon evergreen forests using observations of vertical canopy structure from a spaceborne lidar. We discovered that net leaf flushing of the canopy layer mainly occurs in early dry season, and is followed by net abscission in late dry season that coincides with increasing leaf area of the understory layer. Our observations of understory development from lidar either weakly respond to or are not correlated to seasonal variations in precipitation or insolation, but are strongly related to the seasonal structural dynamics of the canopy layer. We hypothesize that understory growth is driven by increased light gaps caused by seasonal variations of the canopy. This light-regime variability that exists in both spatial and temporal domains can better reveal the drought-induced green-up phenomenon, which appears less obvious when treating the Amazon forests as a whole.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF MANGROVE FOREST DEGRADATION THROUGH CANOPY FRACTIONAL COVER IN KARIMUNJAWA ISLAND, CENTRAL JAVA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kamal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Karimunjawa Islands mangrove forest has been subjected to various direct and indirect human disturbances in the recent years. If not properly managed, this disturbance will lead to the degradation of mangrove habitat health. Assessing forest canopy fractional cover (fc using remote sensing data is one way of measuring mangrove forest degradation. This study aims to (1 estimate the forest canopy fc using a semi-empirical method, (2 assess the accuracy of the fc estimation and (3 create mangrove forest degradation from the canopy fc results. A sample set of in-situ fc was collected using the hemispherical camera for model development and accuracy assessment purposes. We developed semi-empirical relationship models between pixel values of ALOS AVNIR-2 image (10m pixel size and field fc, using Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI as a proxy of the image spectral response. The results show that the EVI provides reasonable estimation accuracy of mangrove canopy fc in Karimunjawa Island with the values ranged from 0.17 to 0.96 (n = 69. The low fc values correspond to vegetation opening and gaps caused by human activities or mangrove dieback. The high fc values correspond to the healthy and dense mangrove stands, especially the Rhizophora sp formation at the seafront. The results of this research justify the use of simple canopy fractional cover model for assessing the mangrove forest degradation status in the study area. Further research is needed to test the applicability of this approach at different sites.

  1. Waveform- and Terrestrial Lidar Assessment of the Usual (Structural) Suspects in a Forest Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aardt, J. A.; Romanczyk, P.; Kelbe, D.; van Leeuwen, M.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; Gough, C. M.; Kampe, T. U.

    2015-12-01

    Forest inventory has evolved from standard stem diameter-height relationships, to coarse canopy metrics, to more involved ecologically-meaningful variables, such as leaf area index (LAI) and even canopy radiative transfer as a function of canopy gaps, leaf clumping, and leaf angle distributions. Accurate and precise measurement of the latter set of variables presents a challenge to the ecological and modeling communities; however, relatively novel remote sensing modalities, e.g., waveform lidar (wlidar) and terrestrial lidar systems (TLS), have the potential to adress this challenge. Research teams at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) and the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) have been collaborating with the National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) to assess vegetation canopy structure and variation at the University of Michigan Biological Research Station and the NEON Northeast domain (Harvard Forest, MA). Airborne small-footprint wlidar data, in-situ TLS data, and first-principles, physics-based simulation tools are being used to study (i) the impact of vegetation canopy geometric elements on wlidar signals (twigs and petioles have been deemed negligible), (ii) the analysis of airborne wlidar data for top-down assessment of canopy metrics such as LAI, and (iii) our ability to extract "bottom-up" canopy structure from TLS using scans registered to each other using a novel marker-free registration approach (e.g., basal area: R2=0.82, RMSE=7.43 m2/ha). Such studies indicate that we can potentially assess radiative transfer through vegetation canopies remotely using a vertically-stratified approach with wlidar, and augment such an approach via rapid-scan TLS technology to gain a better understanding of fine-scale variation in canopy structure. This in turn is key to quantifying and modeling radiative transfer based on understanding of forest canopy structural change as a function of ecosystem development, climate, and anthropogenic drivers.

  2. Centennial impacts of fragmentation on the canopy structure of tropical montane forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas Vaughn; Greg Asner; Christian Giardina

    2014-01-01

    Fragmentation poses one of the greatest threats to tropical forests with short-term changes to the structure of forest canopies affecting microclimate, tree mortality, and growth. Yet the long-term effects of fragmentation are poorly understood because (1) most effects require many decades to materialize, but long-term studies are very rare, (2) the effects of edges on...

  3. Forest Canopy Height Estimation from Calipso Lidar Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang; Lucker, Patricia L.; Trepte, Charles

    2016-06-01

    The canopy height is an important parameter in aboveground biomass estimation. Lidar remote sensing from airborne or satellite platforms, has a unique capability for forestry applications. This study introduces an innovative concept to estimate canopy height using CALIOP two wavelengths lidar measurements. One main advantage is that the concept proposed here is dependent on the penetration depths at two wavelengths without making assumption about the last peak of waveform as the ground location, and it does not require the ancillary Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data in order to obtain the slope information of terrain. Canopy penetration depths at two wavelengths indicate moderately strong relationships for estimating the canopy height. Results show that the CALIOP-derived canopy heights were highly correlated with the ICESat/GLAS-derived values with a mean RMSE of 3.4 m and correlation coefficient (R) of 0.89. Our findings present a relationship between the penetration difference and canopy height, which can be used as another metrics for canopy height estimation, except the full waveforms.

  4. Temporal Scales of the Nocturnal Flow Within and Above a Forest Canopy in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Daniel M.; Acevedo, Otávio C.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Fuentes, José D.; Gerken, Tobias; Stoy, Paul C.

    2016-10-01

    Multiresolution decomposition is applied to 10 months of nocturnal turbulence observations taken at eight levels within and above a forest canopy in Central Amazonia. The aim is to identify the contributions of different temporal scales of the flow above and within the canopy. Results show that turbulence intensity in the lower canopy is mostly affected by the static stability in the upper canopy. Horizontal velocity fluctuations peak at time scales longer than 100 s within the canopy, which correspond to the scale of non-turbulent submeso motions above the canopy. In the vertical velocity spectrum near the surface, the peak occurs at time scales around 100 s, which are larger than the time scales of the turbulent flow above the canopy. Heat-flux cospectra within the canopy peak at the same temporal scales as the vertical velocity fluctuations at that level, suggesting the existence of buoyancy driven turbulence. Case studies are presented as evidence that low-frequency fluctuations propagate towards the canopy interior more easily than does turbulence.

  5. Impact of Canopy Cover on Butterfly Abundance and Diversity in Intermediate Zone Forest of Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M.B Weerakoon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify the influence of canopy cover on butterfly abundance in young secondary forest and regenerating forest at Maragamuwa area of Kumaragala forest reserve in Naula, Matale district of Sri Lanka. Line transect method was used to collect data. Hundred meter long five transects were established in each forest area. Butterfly abundance data were collected weekly for eight months from January to August 2014. Regenerating forest had low canopy cover (<50% than young secondary forest (20-90%. Total of 2,696 butterflies belonging to 87 species in six families were recorded. Some butterfly species were restricted to shady areas, but most butterflies were abundant in sunny areas. Butterflies in some families (Family Lycanidae, Nymphalidae, Pieridae were abundant in sunny conditions and some families (Family Hesperiidae, Papilionidae abundant in shade. ANOVA was conducted to identify the variation of number of species (F=54.05, p<0.001 and among abundance (F=10.49, p<0.05 with the canopy cover. Species richness was high in moderate canopy cover (20±5%. Negative Pearson correlation coefficient stated butterfly abundance decreased with the canopy cover (r=-0.91 and species richness decreased with canopy cover (r=-0.85.Some butterflies were common in sunny areas and some species were confined to shady areas. However, most of the species were generally found throughout the area. Regenerating forest encountered more shrubs than in young secondary forest, which butterflies preferred to food on. Main findings of the study were that butterfly abundance was high in sunny areas and butterfly species richness was high in moderate shady areas.

  6. Observing the Forest Canopy with a New Ultra-Violet Compact Airborne Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Guyon

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new airborne UV lidar for the forest canopy and deployed it in the Landes forest (France. It is the first one that: (i operates at 355 nm for emitting energetic pulses of 16 mJ at 20 Hz while fulfilling eye-safety regulations and (ii is flown onboard an ultra-light airplane for enhanced flight flexibility. Laser footprints at ground level were 2.4 m wide for a flying altitude of 300 m. Three test areas of ~500 × 500 m2 with Maritime pines of different ages were investigated. We used a threshold method adapted for this lidar to accurately extract from its waveforms detailed forest canopy vertical structure: canopy top, tree crown base and undergrowth heights. Good detection sensitivity enabled the observation of ground returns underneath the trees. Statistical and one-to-one comparisons with ground measurements by field foresters indicated a mean absolute accuracy of ~1 m. Sensitivity tests on detection threshold showed the importance of signal to noise ratio and footprint size for a proper detection of the canopy vertical structure. This UV-lidar is intended for future innovative applications of simultaneous observation of forest canopy, laser-induced vegetation fluorescence and atmospheric aerosols.

  7. Observing the forest canopy with a new ultra-violet compact airborne lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Juan; Chazette, Patrick; Allouis, Tristan; Flamant, Pierre H; Durrieu, Sylvie; Sanak, Joseph; Genau, Pascal; Guyon, Dominique; Loustau, Denis; Flamant, Cyrille

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new airborne UV lidar for the forest canopy and deployed it in the Landes forest (France). It is the first one that: (i) operates at 355 nm for emitting energetic pulses of 16 mJ at 20 Hz while fulfilling eye-safety regulations and (ii) is flown onboard an ultra-light airplane for enhanced flight flexibility. Laser footprints at ground level were 2.4 m wide for a flying altitude of 300 m. Three test areas of ≈ 500 × 500 m(2) with Maritime pines of different ages were investigated. We used a threshold method adapted for this lidar to accurately extract from its waveforms detailed forest canopy vertical structure: canopy top, tree crown base and undergrowth heights. Good detection sensitivity enabled the observation of ground returns underneath the trees. Statistical and one-to-one comparisons with ground measurements by field foresters indicated a mean absolute accuracy of ≈ 1 m. Sensitivity tests on detection threshold showed the importance of signal to noise ratio and footprint size for a proper detection of the canopy vertical structure. This UV-lidar is intended for future innovative applications of simultaneous observation of forest canopy, laser-induced vegetation fluorescence and atmospheric aerosols.

  8. Observing the Forest Canopy with a New Ultra-Violet Compact Airborne Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Juan; Chazette, Patrick; Allouis, Tristan; Flamant, Pierre H.; Durrieu, Sylvie; Sanak, Joseph; Genau, Pascal; Guyon, Dominique; Loustau, Denis; Flamant, Cyrille

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new airborne UV lidar for the forest canopy and deployed it in the Landes forest (France). It is the first one that: (i) operates at 355 nm for emitting energetic pulses of 16 mJ at 20 Hz while fulfilling eye-safety regulations and (ii) is flown onboard an ultra-light airplane for enhanced flight flexibility. Laser footprints at ground level were 2.4 m wide for a flying altitude of 300 m. Three test areas of ∼500 × 500 m2 with Maritime pines of different ages were investigated. We used a threshold method adapted for this lidar to accurately extract from its waveforms detailed forest canopy vertical structure: canopy top, tree crown base and undergrowth heights. Good detection sensitivity enabled the observation of ground returns underneath the trees. Statistical and one-to-one comparisons with ground measurements by field foresters indicated a mean absolute accuracy of ∼1 m. Sensitivity tests on detection threshold showed the importance of signal to noise ratio and footprint size for a proper detection of the canopy vertical structure. This UV-lidar is intended for future innovative applications of simultaneous observation of forest canopy, laser-induced vegetation fluorescence and atmospheric aerosols. PMID:22163608

  9. Simulating Spatial Distribution of Canopy Rainfall Interception of Forests in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The canopy rainfall interception modei linked to environmental conditions and biological features is established on the basis of stationary observation and measurements in China. Upscaling from site observation to regional Ievel estimation of canopy rainfall interception has been made. The potential interception value of forests during the rainfall season in China according to rainfall records of May, July and September in the year 1982, has been simulated and mapped under the GIS software package Idris...

  10. Abundance of Green Tree Frogs and Insects in Artificial Canopy Gaps in a Bottomland Hardwood Forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.; Ulyshen, Michael D.; Kilgo, John, C.

    2005-04-01

    ABSTRACT - We found more green tree frogs ( Hyla cinerea) n canopv gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopv gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat Flies were the most commonlv collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogs were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.

  11. CAN Canopy Addition of Nitrogen Better Illustrate the Effect of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition on Forest Ecosystem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Weijun; Zhu, Shidan; Wan, Shiqiang; Luo, Yiqi; Yan, Junhua; Wang, Keya; Liu, Lei; Dai, Huitang; Li, Peixue; Dai, Keyuan; Zhang, Weixin; Liu, Zhanfeng; Wang, Faming; Kuang, Yuanwen; Li, Zhian; Lin, Yongbiao; Rao, Xingquan; Li, Jiong; Zou, Bi; Cai, Xian; Mo, Jiangming; Zhao, Ping; Ye, Qing; Huang, Jianguo; Fu, Shenglei

    2015-06-01

    Increasing atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition could profoundly impact community structure and ecosystem functions in forests. However, conventional experiments with understory addition of N (UAN) largely neglect canopy-associated biota and processes and therefore may not realistically simulate atmospheric N deposition to generate reliable impacts on forest ecosystems. Here we, for the first time, designed a novel experiment with canopy addition of N (CAN) vs. UAN and reviewed the merits and pitfalls of the two approaches. The following hypotheses will be tested: i) UAN overestimates the N addition effects on understory and soil processes but underestimates those on canopy-associated biota and processes, ii) with low-level N addition, CAN favors canopy tree species and canopy-dwelling biota and promotes the detritus food web, and iii) with high-level N addition, CAN suppresses canopy tree species and other biota and favors rhizosphere food web. As a long-term comprehensive program, this experiment will provide opportunities for multidisciplinary collaborations, including biogeochemistry, microbiology, zoology, and plant science to examine forest ecosystem responses to atmospheric N deposition.

  12. Soil types and forest canopy structures in southern Missouri: A first look with AIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G. M.; Arvidson, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral reflectance properties of deciduous oak-hickory forests covering the eastern half of the Rolla Quadrangle were examined using Thematic Mapper (TM) data acquired in August and December, 1982 and Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data acquired in August, 1985. For the TM data distinctly high relative reflectance values (greater than 0.3) in the near infrared (Band 4, 0.73 to 0.94 micrometers) correspond to regions characterized by xeric (dry) forests that overlie soils with low water retention capacities. These soils are derived primarily from rhyolites. More mesic forests characterized by lower TM band 4 relative reflectances are associated with soils of higher retention capacities derived predominately from non-cherty carbonates. The major factors affecting canopy reflectance appear to be the leaf area index (LAI) and leaf optical properties. The Suits canopy reflectance model predicts the relative reflectance values for the xeric canopies. The mesic canopy reflectance is less well matched and incorporation of canopy shadowing caused by the irregular nature of the mesic canopy may be necessary. Preliminary examination of high spectral resolution AIS data acquired in August of 1985 reveals no more information than found in the broad band TM data.

  13. How does canopy wetness shape evapotranspiration in a mountain cloud forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, H.-S.; Chang, S.-C.; Lin, Y.-Z.; Hsia, Y.-J.

    2010-07-01

    Interception plays an important role in the hydrological characteristics of cloud forest ecosystems due to frequent wetness of the canopy. The dynamics of this canopy interception processes are ecologically important for partitioning between interception evaporation and transpiration. Long term meteorological observations at the Chi-Lan Mountain site (24°35’N, 121°25’E) indicated that fog weather accounts for one third of the time on a year around and mainly prevails in the late afternoon and evening. However, it is still not clear how long the interception water could last on canopy surface under such diurnal foggy patterns and how this wetness further shapes the partition between interception evaporation and transpiration. In order to explore the evapotranspiration patterns under wet canopy conditions, three-month intensive experiment was conducted at the CLM site from 2009/4/28 to 7/21. Eddy covariance method was applied to measure the net water vapor exchange between ecosystem and atmosphere. An open/closed-path eddy covariance system, including a sonic anemometer (Campbell CSAT3), an open path infrared gas analyzer (Licor LI7500) and a closed path infrared gas analyzer (Licor LI7000), was mounted at 1.8-fold of canopy height. The S-type sap flow sensors (Ecomatik SF-L) were mounted at 1.3 m height of trunk on five representative Chamaecyparis obtusa var. formosana trees as an index of transpiration rate. Three leaf wetness sensors (Campbell LW237) and two infrared surface thermometers (Apogee IRTS-P) were added to monitor the wetness and surface temperature of canopy. The result showed that canopy wetness played a crucial role in partitioning the interception evaporation and transpiration at this forest stand. Evapotranspiration either under wet or dry canopy conditions was mainly driven by the evapotranspiration demand, as indicated by the potential evapotranspiration. However, evapotranspiration was lower for dry canopy condition. While total

  14. Towards Automated Characterization of Canopy Layering in Mixed Temperate Forests Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reik Leiterer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Canopy layers form essential structural components, affecting stand productivity and wildlife habitats. Airborne laser scanning (ALS provides horizontal and vertical information on canopy structure simultaneously. Existing approaches to assess canopy layering often require prior information about stand characteristics or rely on pre-defined height thresholds. We developed a multi-scale method using ALS data with point densities >10 pts/m2 to determine the number and vertical extent of canopy layers (canopylayer, canopylength, seasonal variations in the topmost canopy layer (canopytype, as well as small-scale heterogeneities in the canopy (canopyheterogeneity. We first tested and developed the method on a small forest patch (800 ha and afterwards tested transferability and robustness of the method on a larger patch (180,000 ha. We validated the approach using an extensive set of ground data, achieving overall accuracies >77% for canopytype and canopyheterogeneity, and >62% for canopylayer and canopylength. We conclude that our method provides a robust characterization of canopy layering supporting automated canopy structure monitoring.

  15. Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition at a Conifer Forest: Canopy Nitrogen Uptake and Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, T.; Sievering, H.

    2006-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is known to impact forests in a variety of ways ranging from increased growth and photosynthesis to needle necrosis. More than half of the growing-season N deposition flux at the Niwot Ridge Long-Term Ecological Research site's subalpine forest (Niwot Forest) is of anthropogenic origin. N fertilization studies investigating forest responses to increased N deposition have primarily dealt with deposition loading to the soil. However, some studies indicate that forest canopies (especially conifer forest canopies) retain a substantial portion of atmospherically-deposited N before this N reaches the soil in throughfall solutions. In the present study, canopy N uptake (CNU) and the influence of CNU on photosynthesis are investigated. At the Niwot Forest, growing-season throughfall fluxes of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) are markedly lower (~70% lower) than fluxes in wet plus dry deposition flux, indicating the forest canopy is taking up atmospherically-deposited N. This uptake was found to be driven by diffusion of NH4+ and NO3- into canopy tissues. Although the canopy is taking up atmospherically-deposited N, spruce foliar N content is still relatively low at the Niwot Forest. This low foliar N content contributes to low rates of light-saturated photosynthesis and maximum carboxylation (initial rate of CO2 reduction by RUBISCO). Further, a strong linear dependence of maximum carboxylation on needle N content was found and N solutions that had been directly applied to foliage at Niwot Forest spruce branches induced a 12% greater photosynthetic efficiency (i.e., proportion of absorbed light utilized by photosynthesis). The low foliar N content and dependence of photosynthetic parameters on foliar N content show that the Niwot Forest has yet to reach a state of N saturation. Noting the Niwot Forest has one of the largest N deposition fluxes in the Rockies, our CNU and photosynthetic parameter results characterizing pre

  16. Selection of forest canopy gaps by male Cerulean Warblers in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kelly A.; Wood, Petra Bohall

    2014-01-01

    Forest openings, or canopy gaps, are an important resource for many forest songbirds, such as Cerulean Warblers (Setophaga cerulea). We examined canopy gap selection by this declining species to determine if male Cerulean Warblers selected particular sizes, vegetative heights, or types of gaps. We tested whether these parameters differed among territories, territory core areas, and randomly-placed sample plots. We used enhanced territory mapping techniques (burst sampling) to define habitat use within the territory. Canopy gap densities were higher within core areas of territories than within territories or random plots, indicating that Cerulean Warblers selected habitat within their territories with the highest gap densities. Selection of regenerating gaps with woody vegetation >12 m within the gap, and canopy heights >24 m surrounding the gap, occurred within territory core areas. These findings differed between two sites indicating that gap selection may vary based on forest structure. Differences were also found regarding the placement of territories with respect to gaps. Larger gaps, such as wildlife food plots, were located on the periphery of territories more often than other types and sizes of gaps, while smaller gaps, such as treefalls, were located within territory boundaries more often than expected. The creations of smaller canopy gaps, <100 m2, within dense stands are likely compatible with forest management for this species.

  17. Patterns of Canopy and Surface Layer Consumption in a Boreal Forest Fire from Repeat Airborne Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Michael; Morton, Douglas C.; Cook, Bruce D.; Andersen, Hans-Erik; Babcock, Chad; Pattison, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Fire in the boreal region is the dominant agent of forest disturbance with direct impacts on ecosystem structure, carbon cycling, and global climate. Global and biome-scale impacts are mediated by burn severity, measured as loss of forest canopy and consumption of the soil organic layer. To date, knowledge of the spatial variability in burn severity has been limited by sparse field sampling and moderate resolution satellite data. Here, we used pre- and post-fire airborne lidar data to directly estimate changes in canopy vertical structure and surface elevation for a 2005 boreal forest fire on Alaskas Kenai Peninsula. We found that both canopy and surface losses were strongly linked to pre-fire species composition and exhibited important fine-scale spatial variability at sub-30m resolution. The fractional reduction in canopy volume ranged from 0.61 in lowland black spruce stands to 0.27 in mixed white spruce and broad leaf forest. Residual structure largely reflects standing dead trees, highlighting the influence of pre-fire forest structure on delayed carbon losses from above ground biomass, post-fire albedo, and variability in understory light environments. Median loss of surface elevation was highest in lowland black spruce stands (0.18 m) but much lower in mixed stands (0.02 m), consistent with differences in pre-fire organic layer accumulation. Spatially continuous depth-of-burn estimates from repeat lidar measurements provide novel information to constrain carbon emissions from the surface organic layer and may inform related research on post-fire successional trajectories. Spectral measures of burn severity from Landsat were correlated with canopy (r = 0.76) and surface (r = -0.71) removal in black spruce stands but captured less of the spatial variability in fire effects for mixed stands (canopy r = 0.56, surface r = -0.26), underscoring the difficulty in capturing fire effects in heterogeneous boreal forest landscapes using proxy measures of burn severity

  18. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements of Forest Canopy Structure as Predictors of Net Primary Production Across Successional Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, C. M.; Gough, C. M.; Nave, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Forest canopy structure is a key predictor of gas exchange processes that control carbon (C) uptake, including the allocation of photosynthetically fixed C to new plant biomass growth, or net primary production (NPP). Prior work suggests forest canopy structural complexity (CSC), the arrangement of leaves within a volume of canopy, changes as forests develop and is a strong predictor of NPP. However, the expressions of CSC that best predict NPP over decadal to century timescales is unknown. Our objectives were to use multiple remote sensing observations to characterize forest canopy structure in increasing dimensional complexity over a forest age gradient, and to identify which expressions of physical structure best served as proxies of NPP. The study at the University of Michigan Biological Station in Pellston, MI, USA uses two parallel forest chronosequences with different harvesting and fire disturbance histories and includes three old-growth ecosystems varying in canopy composition. We have derived several expressions of 2-D and 3-D forest canopy structure from hemispherical images, a ground-based portable canopy lidar (PCL), and a 3-D terrestrial lidar scanner (TLS), and are relating these structural metrics with NPP and light and nitrogen allocation within the canopy. Preliminary analysis shows that old-growth stands converged on a common mean CSC, but with substantially higher within-stand variation in complexity as deciduous tree species increased in forest canopy dominance. Forest stands that were more intensely disturbed were slower to recover leaf area index (LAI) as they regrew, but 2-D measures of CSC increased similarly as forests aged, regardless of disturbance history. Ongoing work will relate long-term trends in forest CSC with NPP and resource allocation to determine which forest structure remote sensing products are most useful for modeling and scaling C cycling processes through different stages of forest development.

  19. Leaf and canopy conductance in aspen and aspen-birch forests under free-air enrichment of carbon dioxide and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddling, Johan; Teclaw, Ronald M; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Ellsworth, David S

    2009-11-01

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) have the potential to affect tree physiology and structure, and hence forest feedbacks on climate. Here, we investigated how elevated concentrations of CO2 (+45%) and O3 (+35%), alone and in combination, affected conductance for mass transfer at the leaf and canopy levels in pure aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and in mixed aspen and birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) forests in the free-air CO2-O3 enrichment experiment near Rhinelander, Wisconsin (Aspen FACE). The study was conducted during two growing seasons, when steady-state leaf area index (L) had been reached after > 6 years of exposure to CO2- and O3-enrichment treatments. Canopy conductance (g(c)) was estimated from stand sap flux, while leaf-level conductance of sun leaves in the upper canopy was derived by three different and independent methods: sap flux and L in combination with vertical canopy modelling, leaf 13C discrimination methodology in combination with photosynthesis modelling and leaf-level gas exchange. Regardless of the method used, the mean values of leaf-level conductance were higher in trees growing under elevated CO2 and/or O3 than in trees growing in control plots, causing a CO2 x O3 interaction that was statistically significant (P aspen and mixed aspen-birch communities. These results demonstrate that short-term primary stomatal closure responses to elevated CO2 and O3 were completely offset by long-term cumulative effects of these trace gases on tree and stand structure in determining canopy- and leaf-level conductance in pure aspen and mixed aspen-birch forests. Our results, together with the findings from other long-term FACE experiments with trees, suggest that model assumptions of large reductions in stomatal conductance under rising atmospheric CO2 are very uncertain for forests.

  20. Spatial Heterogeneity of the Forest Canopy Scales with the Heterogeneity of an Understory Shrub Based on Fractal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine K. Denny

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Spatial heterogeneity of vegetation is an important landscape characteristic, but is difficult to assess due to scale-dependence. Here we examine how spatial patterns in the forest canopy affect those of understory plants, using the shrub Canada buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis (L. Nutt. as a focal species. Evergreen and deciduous forest canopy and buffaloberry shrub presence were measured with line-intercept sampling along ten 2-km transects in the Rocky Mountain foothills of west-central Alberta, Canada. Relationships between overstory canopy and understory buffaloberry presence were assessed for scales ranging from 2 m to 502 m. Fractal dimensions of both canopy and buffaloberry were estimated and then related using box-counting methods to evaluate spatial heterogeneity based on patch distribution and abundance. Effects of canopy presence on buffaloberry were scale-dependent, with shrub presence negatively related to evergreen canopy cover and positively related to deciduous cover. The effect of evergreen canopy was significant at a local scale between 2 m and 42 m, while that of deciduous canopy was significant at a meso-scale between 150 m and 358 m. Fractal analysis indicated that buffaloberry heterogeneity positively scaled with evergreen canopy heterogeneity, but was unrelated to that of deciduous canopy. This study demonstrates that evergreen canopy cover is a determinant of buffaloberry heterogeneity, highlighting the importance of spatial scale and canopy composition in understanding canopy-understory relationships.

  1. Contribution of lianas to plant area index and canopy structure in a Panamanian forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ronderos, M Elizabeth; Bohrer, Gil; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Powers, Jennifer S; Schnitzer, Stefan A

    2016-12-01

    Lianas are an important component of tropical forests, where they reduce tree growth, fecundity, and survival. Competition for light from lianas may be intense; however, the amount of light that lianas intercept is poorly understood. We used a large-scale liana-removal experiment to quantify light interception by lianas in a Panamanian secondary forest. We measured the change in plant area index (PAI) and forest structure before and after cutting lianas (for 4 yr) in eight 80 m × 80 m plots and eight control plots (16 plots total). We used ground-based LiDAR to measure the 3-dimensional canopy structure before cutting lianas, and then annually for 2 yr afterwards. Six weeks after cutting lianas, mean plot PAI was 20% higher in control vs. liana removal plots. One yr after cutting lianas, mean plot PAI was ~17% higher in control plots. The differences between treatments diminished significantly 2 yr after liana cutting and, after 4 yr, trees had fully compensated for liana removal. Ground-based LiDAR revealed that lianas attenuated light in the upper- and middle-forest canopy layers, and not only in the upper canopy as was previously suspected. Thus, lianas compete with trees by intercepting light in the upper- and mid-canopy of this forest.

  2. Urbanization Impacts on Tree Canopies: The Unexplored Link Between Canopy Epiphytes and Pacific Northwest Forest Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, H.; Rosenstiel, T. N.

    2014-12-01

    Canopy-dwelling cryptogamic plants (i.e. lichens and mosses) serve important roles in biogeochemical cycles worldwide and are of particular importance to biogeochemical cycling in Pacific Northwest forests. Epiphytic lichens and mosses respond sensitively to both direct and indirect effects of global change, as evidenced by distinct changes in epiphyte community structure. Yet, few studies have explored how shifting epiphytic communities, resulting from changing climate and increasing air pollutant exposure, may greatly impact biogeochemical cycles of the forests they inhabit. We present the first study investigating how urbanization, as a proxy for global change, impacts epiphytic community structure and functional biodiversity and address the impending effects on Pacific Northwest forest biogeochemical cycles. We discuss the results of paired ground and arboreal epiphyte surveys across an urban to rural gradient in Portland, Oregon. Three research sites with varying distance (0km, 74km, and 109km) from urban center were surveyed and epiphytic biodiversity was described. Pronounced shifts in epiphyte community structure were observed downwind of the Portland metro region. These results suggest that the impacts of urbanization may have significant and surprisingly far-reaching impacts on forested ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest. The impacts of an altered ground and arboreal epiphytic community on Pacific Northwest forest biogeochemical processes will be discussed.

  3. Sunscreening fungal pigments influence the vertical gradient of pendulous lichens in boreal forest canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färber, Leonie; Sølhaug, Knut Asbjorn; Esseen, Per-Anders; Bilger, Wolfgang; Gauslaa, Yngvar

    2014-06-01

    Pendulous lichens dominate canopies of boreal forests, with dark Bryoria species in the upper canopy vs. light Alectoria and Usnea species in lower canopy. These genera offer important ecosystem services such as winter forage for reindeer and caribou. The mechanism behind this niche separation is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that species-specific sunscreening fungal pigments protect underlying symbiotic algae differently against high light, and thus shape the vertical canopy gradient of epiphytes. Three pale species with the reflecting pigment usnic acid (Alectoria sarmentosa, Usnea dasypoga, U. longissima) and three with dark, absorbing melanins (Bryoria capillaris, B. fremontii, B. fuscescens) were compared. We subjected the lichens to desiccation stress with and without light, and assessed their performance with chlorophyll fluorescence. Desiccation alone only affected U. longissima. By contrast, light in combination with desiccation caused photoinhibitory damage in all species. Usnic lichens were significantly more susceptible to light during desiccation than melanic ones. Thus, melanin is a more efficient light-screening pigment than usnic acid. Thereby, the vertical gradient of pendulous lichens in forest canopies is consistent with a shift in type and functioning of sunscreening pigments, from high-light-tolerant Bryoria in the upper to susceptible Alectoria and Usnea in the lower canopy.

  4. Epiphyte biodiversity in the coffee agricultural matrix: canopy stratification and distance from forest fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Leigh C; Philpott, Stacy M; Bichier, Peter

    2010-06-01

    Quality of the agricultural matrix profoundly affects biodiversity and dispersal in agricultural areas. Vegetatively complex coffee agroecosystems maintain species richness at larger distances from the forest. Epiphytes colonize canopy trees and provide resources for birds and insects and thus effects of agricultural production on epiphytes may affect other species. We compared diversity, composition, and vertical stratification of epiphytes in a forest fragment and in two coffee farms differing in management intensity in southern Mexico. We also examined spatial distribution of epiphytes with respect to the forest fragment to examine quality of the two agricultural matrix types for epiphyte conservation. We sampled vascular epiphytes in a forest fragment, a shade polyculture farm, and a shade monoculture farm at 100 m, 200 m, and 400 m from the forest. Epiphyte and orchid richness was greater in the forest than in the monoculture but richness was similar in the forest and polyculture farm. Epiphyte species composition differed with habitat type, but not with distance from the forest. In the forest, epiphytes were distributed throughout tree canopies, but in the farms, epiphytes were primarily found on trunks and larger branches. Epiphyte richness and species similarity to forest species declined with distance from the forest fragment in the monoculture, but richness and similarity to forest species did not decline with distance from forest in the polyculture. This suggests polyculture coffee has greater conservation value. In contrast, monoculture coffee is likely a sink habitat for epiphytes dispersing from forests into coffee. Coffee farms differ from forests in terms of the habitat they provide and species composition, thus protecting forest fragments is essential for epiphyte conservation. Nonetheless, in agricultural landscapes, vegetatively complex coffee farms may contribute to conservation of epiphytes more than other agricultural land uses.

  5. [Estimating forest canopy cover by combining spaceborne ICESat-GLAS waveforms and mul- tispectral Landsat-TM images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The spatial distribution of forest canopy cover is a critical indicator for evaluating the forest productivity and decomposition rates. With the Wangqing Forest Region in Jilin Province of China as the study area, this study first estimated the forest canopy cover using spaceborne LiDAR IC- ESat-GLAS waveforms and Landsat-TM multispectral images, respectively, and then GLAS data and TM images were combined to further estimate forest canopy cover by using multiple linear regression and BP neural network. The results showed that when the forest canopy cover was estimated with single data source, the determination coefficient of model was 0.762 for GLAS data and 0.598 for TM data. When the forest canopy cover was estimated by combining GLAS data and TM data, the determination coefficient of model was 0.841 for multiple linear regression, and the simulation precision was 0.851 for BP neural network. The study indicated that the combination of ICESat-GLAS data and Landsat-TM images could exploit the advantages of multi-source remote sensing data and improve the estimating accuracy of forest canopy cover, and it was expected to provide a promising way for spatially continuous mapping of forest canopy cover in future.

  6. Response of canopy stomatal conductance of Acacia mangium forest to environmental driving factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing LIU; Ping ZHAO; Xingquan RAO; Ling MA; Xian CAI; Xiaoping ZENG

    2008-01-01

    Granier's probes were applied to measure the sap flow of 14 sample trees in an Acacia mangium forest on the hilly lands in Heshan City, Guangdong, during the time period of October, 2003. The photosynthetically active radi-ation (PAR), air relative humidity (RH) and temperature of air (T) above the forest canopy were recorded. The sap flow measurement was used in combination with morphological characteristics of tree and forest structure to calculate the whole-tree transpiration (E), stand transpiration (Et), and mean canopy stomatal conductance (gc). Analyses on the rela-tionships between tree morphological characters and whole-tree water use, and on the responses of gc to PAR and vapor pressure deficit (D) were conducted. The results showed that whole-tree transpiration correlated significantly and positively with tree diameter at breast height (DBH) (p < 0.0001), with sapwood area (p < 0.0001), and with canopy size (p = 0.0007) logarithmically, but exponentially with tree height (p = 0.014). The analyses on the responses of canopy stomatal conductance showed that the maximum gc (gcmax) changed with PAR in a hyperbolic curve (p <0.0001) and with D in a logarithmic one (p < 0.0001). The results obtained with sap flow technique indicate its reliability and accuracy of the methods of estimation of whole-tree and stand transpirations and canopy stomatal conductance.

  7. Assimilating satellite-based canopy height within an ecosystem model to estimate aboveground forest biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joetzjer, E.; Pillet, M.; Ciais, P.; Barbier, N.; Chave, J.; Schlund, M.; Maignan, F.; Barichivich, J.; Luyssaert, S.; Hérault, B.; von Poncet, F.; Poulter, B.

    2017-07-01

    Despite advances in Earth observation and modeling, estimating tropical biomass remains a challenge. Recent work suggests that integrating satellite measurements of canopy height within ecosystem models is a promising approach to infer biomass. We tested the feasibility of this approach to retrieve aboveground biomass (AGB) at three tropical forest sites by assimilating remotely sensed canopy height derived from a texture analysis algorithm applied to the high-resolution Pleiades imager in the Organizing Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamic Ecosystems Canopy (ORCHIDEE-CAN) ecosystem model. While mean AGB could be estimated within 10% of AGB derived from census data in average across sites, canopy height derived from Pleiades product was spatially too smooth, thus unable to accurately resolve large height (and biomass) variations within the site considered. The error budget was evaluated in details, and systematic errors related to the ORCHIDEE-CAN structure contribute as a secondary source of error and could be overcome by using improved allometric equations.

  8. Response of a boreal forest to canopy opening: assessing vertical and lateral tree growth with multi-temporal lidar data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vepakomma, Udayalakshmi; St-Onge, Benoit; Kneeshaw, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Fine-scale height-growth response of boreal trees to canopy openings is difficult to measure from the ground, and there are important limitations in using stereophotogrammetry in defining gaps and determining individual crowns and height. However, precise knowledge on height growth response to different openings is critical for refining partial harvesting techniques. In this study, we question whether conifers and hardwoods respond equally in terms of sapling growth or lateral growth to openings. We also ask to what distance gaps affect tree growth into the forest. We use multi-temporal lidar to characterize tree/sapling height and lateral growth responses over five years to canopy openings and high resolution images to identify conifers and hardwoods. Species-class-wise height-growth patterns of trees/saplings in various neighborhood contexts were determined across a 6-km matrix of Canadian boreal mixed deciduous coniferous forests. We then use statistical techniques to probe how these growth responses vary by spatial location with respect to the gap edge. Results confirm that both mechanisms of gap closure contribute to the closing of canopies at a rate of 1.2% per annum. Evidence also shows that both hardwood and conifer gap edge trees have a similar lateral growth (average of 22 cm/yr) and similar rates of height growth irrespective of their location and initial height. Height growth of all saplings, however, was strongly dependent on their position within the gap and the size of the gap. Results suggest that hardwood and softwood saplings in gaps have greatest growth rates at distances of 0.5-2 m and 1.5-4 m from the gap edge and in openings smaller than 800 m2 and 250 m2, respectively. Gap effects on the height growth of trees in the intact forest were evident up to 30 m and 20 m from gap edges for hardwood and softwood overstory trees, respectively. Our results thus suggest that foresters should consider silvicultural techniques that create many small

  9. Nitrogen cycling in canopy soils of tropical montane forests responds rapidly to indirect N and P fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Amanda L; Corre, Marife D; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2014-12-01

    Although the canopy can play an important role in forest nutrient cycles, canopy-based processes are often overlooked in studies on nutrient deposition. In areas of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) deposition, canopy soils may retain a significant proportion of atmospheric inputs, and also receive indirect enrichment through root uptake followed by throughfall or recycling of plant litter in the canopy. We measured net and gross rates of N cycling in canopy soils of tropical montane forests along an elevation gradient and assessed indirect effects of elevated nutrient inputs to the forest floor. Net N cycling rates were measured using the buried bag method. Gross N cycling rates were measured using (15) N pool dilution techniques. Measurements took place in the field, in the wet and dry season, using intact cores of canopy soil from three elevations (1000, 2000 and 3000 m). The forest floor had been fertilized biannually with moderate amounts of N and P for 4 years; treatments included control, N, P, and N + P. In control plots, gross rates of NH4 (+) transformations decreased with increasing elevation; gross rates of NO3 (-) transformations did not exhibit a clear elevation trend, but were significantly affected by season. Nutrient-addition effects were different at each elevation, but combined N + P generally increased N cycling rates at all elevations. Results showed that canopy soils could be a significant N source for epiphytes as well as contributing up to 23% of total (canopy + forest floor) mineral N production in our forests. In contrast to theories that canopy soils are decoupled from nutrient cycling in forest floor soil, N cycling in our canopy soils was sensitive to slight changes in forest floor nutrient availability. Long-term atmospheric N and P deposition may lead to increased N cycling, but also increased mineral N losses from the canopy soil system.

  10. Characterization of canopy dew formation in tropical forests using active microwave remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlein-Safdi, C.; Frolking, S. E.; Caylor, K. K.

    2016-12-01

    Dew deposition in a closed canopy is thought to be greatest on top of the canopy, since a clear view of the sky increases condensation. In tropical forests, these same leaves are also subject to direct sunlight and high transpiration rates. Dew deposition can offset some of the water stress through foliar uptake of the dew droplets, or transpiration suppression from the energy dissipation associated with dew evaporation. However, the long-term trends of dew formation and their global patterns have received little attention, despite the wide acknowledgement that non-meteoric water can be a key source of water for many species, especially in tropical ecosystems. As such, accumulated and future effects of climate change on non-meteoric water occurrence remain an under-appreciated and unquantified factor in determining the risks that tropical ecosystems face. In this presentation, we simulate the effects of a wet canopy on satellite-based microwave backscatter by modifying the Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering Model to account for the presence of dew droplets. We apply this model to estimate the canopy water storage derived from the SeaWinds Scatterometer aboard the QuikSCAT satellite by comparing the 6AM and 6PM microwave retrievals. We examine dew frequency and amount in tropical forests in South America, Africa and South-East Asia. Using the 10 years of available data, we investigate trends in dew formation in these three areas and speculate on the potential impact of the observed changes on dew-dependent tropical ecosystems.Finally, we compare our results to locally measured and modeled leaf wetness data. With multiple recently-launched instruments providing new data, strong correlations between satellite-based canopy water storage and in-situ data indicate the possibility of novel applications of microwave backscatter datasets in closed canopies ecosystems, such as the estimation of canopy interception or leaf-water content.

  11. Canopy Spectral Invariants. Part 2; Application to Classification of Forest Types from Hyperspectral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schull, M. A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Xu, L.; Samanta, A.; Carmona, P. L.; Lepine, L.; Jenkins, J. P.; Ganguly, S.; Myneni, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted to demonstrate the ability of hyperspectral data to discriminate plant dominant species. Most of them have employed the use of empirically based techniques, which are site specific, requires some initial training based on characteristics of known leaf and/or canopy spectra and therefore may not be extendable to operational use or adapted to changing or unknown land cover. In this paper we propose a physically based approach for separation of dominant forest type using hyperspectral data. The radiative transfer theory of canopy spectral invariants underlies the approach, which facilitates parameterization of the canopy reflectance in terms of the leaf spectral scattering and two spectrally invariant and structurally varying variables - recollision and directional escape probabilities. The methodology is based on the idea of retrieving spectrally invariant parameters from hyperspectral data first, and then relating their values to structural characteristics of three-dimensional canopy structure. Theoretical and empirical analyses of ground and airborne data acquired by Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) over two sites in New England, USA, suggest that the canopy spectral invariants convey information about canopy structure at both the macro- and micro-scales. The total escape probability (one minus recollision probability) varies as a power function with the exponent related to the number of nested hierarchical levels present in the pixel. Its base is a geometrical mean of the local total escape probabilities and accounts for the cumulative effect of canopy structure over a wide range of scales. The ratio of the directional to the total escape probability becomes independent of the number of hierarchical levels and is a function of the canopy structure at the macro-scale such as tree spatial distribution, crown shape and size, within-crown foliage density and ground cover. These properties allow for the natural

  12. Seasonal variability of interception evaporation from the canopy of a mixed deciduous forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Rosier, Paul T.W.; McNeil, David D.;

    2008-01-01

    Gross rainfall, net rainfall and stemflow were measured in a mixed deciduous woodland in southern England over a period of 14 months. Continuous measurements of standard weather data and momentum and sensible heat fluxes between the forest canopy and the atmosphere accompanied the investigation....... The gross rainfall was corrected for catch losses due to high turbulence. Reliable net rainfall data were obtained from a combined application of simple storage gauges and troughs connected to automatic tipping bucket gauges. The evaporation rates from the wet canopy were calculated with the Penman......% in the leafless period. The analytical sparse canopy rainfall interception model of Gash et al. [Gash, J.H.C., Lloyd, C.R., Lachaud, G., 1995. Estimating sparse forest rainfall interception with an analytical model. J. Hydrol. 170, 79-86] was parameterised, for the first time, for a mixed deciduous woodland...

  13. Soil properties in forest gaps and under canopy in broad-leaved Pinus koraiensis forests in Changbai Mountainous Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chunyu; ZHAO Xiuhai

    2007-01-01

    The species composition and diversities,and soil properties under canopy gaps in broad-leaved Pinus koraiensis forests were studied in the Changbai Mountains.The results indicated that the species composition and diversifies in gap were different from those under canopy.The Shannon-Wiener index,evenness index,and abundance index in gap were higher than those under canopy in the seedling layer,while the community dominance in the seedling layer increased in closed canopy.The physicochemical properties of soil changed with the change of space and resource availability in gaps.The thickness,standing crop,and water holding capacity of the litter layer under canopy were significantly (p < 0.01) higher than those in gap.The content of total nitrogen and total potassium of litter in gap were 10.47% and 20.73% higher than those under canopy,however,the content of total phosphorus and organic carbon under canopy were 15.23% and 12.66% more than those under canopy.The water content of 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm of soil layer in gap were 17.65% and 16.17% more than those under canopy.The soil buck density of 0-10 cm were slightly higher under canopy than that in gaps,but there was no significant difference in the soil buck density of the 10-20 cm soil layer.The soil pH values were 5.80 and 5.85 in gap and under canopy,respectively,and were not significantly different.The content of soil organic matter,total nitrogen,and total potassium in gap were 12.85%,7.67%,and 2.38% higher than those under canopy.The content of NH4+-N,available phosphorus,available potassium,and total phosphorus in soil under canopy were 13.33%,20.04%,16.52%,and 4.30% higher than those in gap.

  14. Correlations between canopy gaps and species diversity in broad-leaved and Korean pine mixed forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiuhai; ZHANG Chunyu; ZHENG Jingming

    2006-01-01

    Regeneration of tree species associated with canopy gaps in broad-leaved Korean pine forests was investigated.Species diversity in gaps and under closed canopy was compared,the relationship between biodiversity and gap structure was analyzed.Results indicate that there were significant differences between tree species diversity in gaps and that under canopy (p<0.01).In terms of Shannon-Wiener index,evenness index,and abundance index,the biodiversity in gap community were higher than those under forest canopy in regeneration layer.In terms of Simpson's dominance index,the dominance of certain species in the regeneration layer increased from gaps to closed canopy (p<0.01).In contrast,trends of biodiversity changes of succession layer in gaps and under closed canopy were opposite.Tree species diversity of different layers reacted directly to the change of gap size class.For example,Shannon-Wiener index and abundance index is higher and Simpson's dominance index is the lowest in succession layer of medium-size gap (100-250 m2) in the broad-leaved Korean pine forest of Changbai Mountains.Shannon-Wiener index reached the highest in a size of≥250 m2 and<100 m2,reached the lowest in a size of 200-250 m2 in the regeneration layer.Simpson's dominance index reached its maximum when the gap size was between 200 and 250m2.Generally,species of different layers reacted differently to the changes of gap size classes.The gap size class with more seedlings did not correspond to size class containing more medium-size trees.Tree species diversity indices in the two layers behaved reciprocally during the development process of forest gaps.

  15. Interactive effects of burn severity and canopy cover on ecophysiology of tree seedlings in boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildfires are an important disturbance because they improve habitat conditions for establishing plants. Fires of differing severity can have dramatically different impacts on habitat, particularly when coupled with canopy-level disturbances. In a boreal forest, we outplanted seedlings of four specie...

  16. Remotely sensed estimation of forest canopy density: A comparison of the performance of four methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, C.; Leeuw, de J.; Skidmore, A.K.; Duren, van I.C.; Oosten, van H.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, a number of alternative methods have been proposed to predict forest canopy density from remotely sensed data. To date, however, it remains difficult to decide which method to use, since their relative performance has never been evaluated. In this study the performance of: (1) an ar

  17. Quantitative forest canopy structure assessment using an inverted geometric-optical model and up-scaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Y.; Schaepman, M.E.; Wu, B.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Bregt, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    The physical-based geometric-optical Li-Strahler model can be inverted to retrieve forest canopy structural variables. One of the main input variables of the inverted model is the fractional component of sunlit background (K g). K g is calculated by using pure reflectance spectra (endmembers) of the

  18. Vegetation Indices for Mapping Canopy Foliar Nitrogen in a Mixed Temperate Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral remote sensing serves as an effective tool for estimating foliar nitrogen using a variety of techniques. Vegetation indices (VIs are a simple means of retrieving foliar nitrogen. Despite their popularity, few studies have been conducted to examine the utility of VIs for mapping canopy foliar nitrogen in a mixed forest context. In this study, we assessed the performance of 32 vegetation indices derived from HySpex airborne hyperspectral images for estimating canopy mass-based foliar nitrogen concentration (%N in the Bavarian Forest National Park. The partial least squares regression (PLSR was performed for comparison. These vegetation indices were classified into three categories that are mostly correlated to nitrogen, chlorophyll, and structural properties such as leaf area index (LAI. %N was destructively measured in 26 broadleaf, needle leaf, and mixed stand plots to represent the different species and canopy structure. The canopy foliar %N is defined as the plot-level mean foliar %N of all species weighted by species canopy foliar mass fraction. Our results showed that the variance of canopy foliar %N is mainly explained by functional type and species composition. The normalized difference nitrogen index (NDNI produced the most accurate estimation of %N (R2CV = 0.79, RMSECV = 0.26. A comparable estimation of %N was obtained by the chlorophyll index Boochs2 (R2CV = 0.76, RMSECV = 0.27. In addition, the mean NIR reflectance (800–850 nm, representing canopy structural properties, also achieved a good accuracy in %N estimation (R2CV = 0.73, RMSECV = 0.30. The PLSR model provided a less accurate estimation of %N (R2CV = 0.69, RMSECV = 0.32. We argue that the good performance of all three categories of vegetation indices in %N estimation can be attributed to the synergy among plant traits (i.e., canopy structure, leaf chemical and optical properties while these traits may converge across plant species for evolutionary reasons. Our

  19. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  20. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  1. Near-continuous thermal monitoring of a diverse tropical forest canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, S.; Still, C. J.; Kim, Y.; Detto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical species may be highly sensitive to temperature increases associated with climate change because of their narrow thermal tolerances. Recent work has highlighted the importance of temperature in tropical forest function, however most studies use air temperature measurements from sparse meteorological stations even though surface temperatures are known to deviate from air temperatures. Tropical organisms exist in microclimates that are highly variable in space and time and not easily measured in natural environments. This is in part because of the complex structure of tropical forests and the potential for organisms themselves to modify their own environment. In the case of plants, leaf temperature is linked to the water and surface energy balance of their microenvironment. Here we present results from near-continuous thermal camera monitoring of the forest canopy in Barro Colorado Island, Panama (5-minute intervals for approximately 9 months). We compare daytime (maximum) vs. nighttime (minimum) differences between canopy temperature and air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and precipitation. On average, canopy temperatures are consistently ~2 degrees Celsius higher than air temperatures. These data can paired with flux tower data on-site and used to advance understanding of temperature controls on the structure and function of tropical forests, such as carbon assimilation, phenology, and habitat monitoring, and can be integrated into models to improve predictions of tropical forest response to future climate change.

  2. [Responses of canopy stomatal conductance of Acacia mangium forest to environmental driving factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping; Rao, Xingquan; Ma, Ling; Cai, Xi'an; Zeng, Xiaoping

    2006-07-01

    Employing Granierś probes, this paper measured the sap flow of 14 sample trees in an Acacia mangium forest on the Heshan hilly lands of Guangdong Province, and recorded the photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), air relative humidity (RH) , and air temperature (T) above the forest canopy. The whole-tree transpiration (E), stand transpiration (Et), and mean canopy stomatal conductance (gc) were calculated, and the relationships between tree morphological characters and whole-tree water use as well as the responses of gc to PAR and vapor pressure deficit (D) were analyzed. The results showed that the whole-tree transpiration had logarithmical positive correlations with tree diameter at breast height (DBH) (P < 0.0001) , sapwood area (P < 0.0001) and canopy size (P = 0.0007), and an exponential positive correlation with tree height (P = 0. 014). The maximum gc (gc max) changed with PAR hyperbolically (P < 0.0001), and with D logarithmically (P < 0.0001). The sap flow measurement system used in this study was reliable and accurate in estimating the transpiration of whole-tree and stand and the canopy stomatal conductance, being an effective tool in studying the relationships between forest water use and environmental factors.

  3. Testing the Application of Terrestrial Laser Scanning to Measure Forest Canopy Gap Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mark Danson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS have the potential to revolutionise measurement of the three-dimensional structure of vegetation canopies for applications in ecology, hydrology and climate change. This potential has been the subject of recent research that has attempted to measure forest biophysical variables from TLS data, and make comparisons with two-dimensional data from hemispherical photography. This research presents a systematic comparison between forest canopy gap fraction estimates derived from TLS measurements and hemispherical photography. The TLS datasets used in the research were obtained between April 2008 and March 2009 at Delamere Forest, Cheshire, UK. The analysis of canopy gap fraction estimates derived from TLS data highlighted the repeatability and consistency of the measurements in comparison with those from coincident hemispherical photographs. The comparison also showed that estimates computed considering only the number of hits and misses registered in the TLS datasets were consistently lower than those estimated from hemispherical photographs. To examine this difference, the potential information available in the intensity values recorded by TLS was investigated and a new method developed to estimate canopy gap fraction proposed. The new approach produced gap fractions closer to those estimated from hemispherical photography, but the research also highlighted the limitations of single return TLS data for this application.

  4. Using Airborne Lidar for Detection and Morphologic Analysis of Waterbodies Obscured by the Forest Canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Anamaria

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to map watercourses, watersheds, and small wetland features that are completely obscured by the forest canopy using airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging within the archaeological site from Porolissum. This technology was used to generate a bare-earth Digital Terrain Model (DTM with 0.5 m spatial resolution in order to map small depressions and concavities across 10 km2 of forested landscape. Although further research is needed to determine the ecological, geological, and archaeological significance of the mapped waterbodies, the general methodology represents important progress in the rapid and accurate detection of wetland habitats in forested landscapes.

  5. Dynamics of leaf area index and canopy openness of three forest types in a warm temperate zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiguo SANG; Sha CHEN; Guangqi LI

    2008-01-01

    Deciduous broad-leaved forests (DBF), Larix principis-rupprechtii (LF) and Pinus tabulaeformis planta-tions (PF) are three typical forest communities in the warm temperate zone of the Dongling Mountains. In this study, we used an indirect method, hemispheric pho-tography, to measure and analyze the dynamics of leaf area index (LAI) and canopy openness of the three forest communities. The results show that the LAI values of DBF and LF increased gradually with plant growth and development. The highest LAI value appeared in August, while canopy openness changed inversely with LAI. The lowest value appeared in November. DBF maintained a higher LAI in August and had a more open canopy in November compared with LF. For PF, we observed little changes in the LAI and canopy openness which was attributed to the leaf retention of this evergreen species. However, a similar relation between LAI and canopy openness was found for the three forest communities: canopy openness varied inversely with LAI. The relation is exponential and significant. Therefore, canopy open-ness is a good indicator of LAI in forests. This result can be used to test the validity of the LAI based on remote sensing and to provide a reference for the study of the canopy heterogeneity and its effect. This also benefits modeling for fluxes of carbon, water and energy from the level of the stand to landscape.

  6. Lidar Remote Sensing for Forest Canopy Studies 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remote sensing has facilitated extraordinary advances in modeling, mapping, and the understanding of ecosystems. Conventional sensors have significant limitations for ecological and forest applications. The sensitivity and accuracy of these devices have repeatedly been shown to fall with increasing ...

  7. Determination of zero-plane displacement and roughness length of a forest canopy using profiles of limited height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Aloysius Kou-Fang

    1995-09-01

    Flux parameters, zero-plane displancement height and roughness length of a forest canopy are determined taking into consideration a transition layer and atmospheric diabatic influences. The present study, unlike previous studies by DeBruin and Moore (1985) and Lo (1990) that accounted for the velocity profile alone, make use of information from both wind and temperature profiles in formulating the governing equations. However, only the top level measurement is assumed to be within the logarithmic regime. In addition to the mass conservation principle (e.g., Lo, 1990; DeBruin and Moore, 1985), an analytic relationship between the Monin-Obukhov length and the bulk Richardson number is employed as the closure equation for the governing system.The present method is applied to profile measurements taken at Camp Borden (den Hartog and Neumann, 1984) in and above a forest canopy with mean crown height of about 18.5 m. Profile data under neutral or near-neutral conditions yieldedd=12.69 m andz 0=0.97 m, which are realistic values. In general,z 0 increases slightly with increasing wind yet remains relatively constant with respect to small variation of stabilities. On the other hand, increases of wind speed reduced values of displacement height,d, by as much as 50%. The influence, if any, of stability ond, however, is not clear from the results of the present study. The validity of using profile data of limited height is also carefully examined. At least for neutral or near-neutral stabilities, the present method can yield realistic results even though the profile heights are substantially below the transition layer height" suggested by Garratt (1978).

  8. Patterns of canopy and surface layer consumption in a boreal forest fire from repeat airborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Michael; Morton, Douglas C.; Cook, Bruce D.; Andersen, Hans-Erik; Babcock, Chad; Pattison, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Fire in the boreal region is the dominant agent of forest disturbance with direct impacts on ecosystem structure, carbon cycling, and global climate. Global and biome-scale impacts are mediated by burn severity, measured as loss of forest canopy and consumption of the soil organic layer. To date, knowledge of the spatial variability in burn severity has been limited by sparse field sampling and moderate resolution satellite data. Here, we used pre- and post-fire airborne lidar data to directly estimate changes in canopy vertical structure and surface elevation for a 2005 boreal forest fire on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula. We found that both canopy and surface losses were strongly linked to pre-fire species composition and exhibited important fine-scale spatial variability at sub-30 m resolution. The fractional reduction in canopy volume ranged from 0.61 in lowland black spruce stands to 0.27 in mixed white spruce and broadleaf forest. Residual structure largely reflects standing dead trees, highlighting the influence of pre-fire forest structure on delayed carbon losses from aboveground biomass, post-fire albedo, and variability in understory light environments. Median loss of surface elevation was highest in lowland black spruce stands (0.18 m) but much lower in mixed stands (0.02 m), consistent with differences in pre-fire organic layer accumulation. Spatially continuous depth-of-burn estimates from repeat lidar measurements provide novel information to constrain carbon emissions from the surface organic layer and may inform related research on post-fire successional trajectories. Spectral measures of burn severity from Landsat were correlated with canopy (r = 0.76) and surface (r = -0.71) removal in black spruce stands but captured less of the spatial variability in fire effects for mixed stands (canopy r = 0.56, surface r = -0.26), underscoring the difficulty in capturing fire effects in heterogeneous boreal forest landscapes using proxy measures of burn

  9. Glacial Amazonia at the canopy-scale: Using a biophysical model to understand forest robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiromitsu; Cowling, Sharon Anne

    2017-09-01

    A canopy-scale model (CANOAK) was used to simulate lowland Amazonia during the Last Glacial Maximum. Modeled values of Net Ecosystem Exchange driven by glacial environmental conditions were roughly half the magnitude of modern fluxes. Factorial experiments reveal lowered [CO2] to be the primary cause of reduced carbon fluxes while lowered air temperatures enhance net carbon uptake. LGM temperatures are suggested to be closer to optimal for carbon uptake than modern temperatures, explained through the canopy energy balance. Further analysis of the canopy energy balance and resultant leaf temperature regime provide viable mechanisms to explain enhanced carbon-water relations at lowered temperatures and forest robustness over glaciations. An ecophysiological phenomena known as the 'cross-over' point, wherein leaf temperatures sink below air temperature, was reproduced and found to demarcate critical changes in energy balance partitioning.

  10. Mapping forest canopy fuels in Yellowstone National Park using lidar and hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, Kerry Quinn

    The severity and size of wildland fires in the forested western U.S have increased in recent years despite improvements in fire suppression efficiency. This, along with increased density of homes in the wildland-urban interface, has resulted in high costs for fire management and increased risks to human health, safety and property. Crown fires, in comparison to surface fires, pose an especially high risk due to their intensity and high rate of spread. Crown fire models require a range of quantitative fuel parameters which can be difficult and costly to obtain, but advances in lidar and hyperspectral sensor technologies hold promise for delivering these inputs. Further research is needed, however, to assess the strengths and limitations of these technologies and the most appropriate analysis methodologies for estimating crown fuel parameters from these data. This dissertation focuses on retrieving critical crown fuel parameters, including canopy height, canopy bulk density and proportion of dead canopy fuel, from airborne lidar and hyperspectral data. Remote sensing data were used in conjunction with detailed field data on forest parameters and surface reflectance measurements. A new method was developed for retrieving Digital Surface Model (DSM) and Digital Canopy Models (DCM) from first return lidar data. Validation data on individual tree heights demonstrated the high accuracy (r2 0.95) of the DCMs developed via this new algorithm. Lidar-derived DCMs were used to estimate critical crown fire parameters including available canopy fuel, canopy height and canopy bulk density with linear regression model r2 values ranging from 0.75 to 0.85. Hyperspectral data were used in conjunction with Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA) to assess fuel quality in the form of live versus dead canopy proportions. Severity and stage of insect-caused forest mortality were estimated using the fractional abundance of green vegetation, non-photosynthetic vegetation and shade obtained from

  11. Spread of an invasive grass in closed-canopy deciduous forests across local and regional environmental gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia D. Huebner

    2010-01-01

    Spread of Microstegium vimineum, an invasive exotic grass, in closed-canopy forests of West Virginia, U.S. was evaluated across a local (roadside to forest interior) and regional (across two geographic provinces) environmental gradient. Seed dispersal distances from roadside populations into forest interiors based on seed rain and soil seed bank data...

  12. Backscattering of Individual LIDAR Pulses from Forest Canopies Explained by Photogrammetrically Derived Vegetation Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, I.; Hovi, A.; Korhonen, L.

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, airborne LiDAR sensors have shown remarkable performance in the mapping of forest vegetation. This experimental study looks at LiDAR data at the scale of individual pulses to elucidate the sources behind interpulse variation in backscattering. Close-range photogrammetry was used for obtaining the canopy reference measurements at the ratio scale. The experiments illustrated different orientation techniques in the field, LiDAR acquisitions and photogrammetry in both leaf-on and leaf-off conditions, and two-waveform recording LiDAR sensors. The intrafootprint branch silhouettes in zenith-looking images, in which the camera, footprint, and LiDAR sensor were collinear, were extracted and contrasted with LiDAR backscattering. An enhanced planimetric match (refinement of strip matching) was achieved by shifting the pulses in a strip and searching for the maximal correlation between the silhouette and LiDAR intensity. The relative silhouette explained up to 80-90% of the interpulse variation. We tested whether accounting for the Gaussian spread of intrafootprint irradiance would improve the correlations, but the effect was blurred by small-scale geometric noise. Accounting for receiver gain variations in the Leica ALS60 sensor data strengthened the dependences. The size of the vegetation objects required for triggering a LiDAR observation was analyzed. We demonstrated the use of LiDAR pulses adjacent to canopy vegetation, which did not trigger a canopy echo, for canopy mapping. Pulses not triggering an echo constitute the complement to the actual canopy. We conclude that field photogrammetry is a useful tool for mapping forest canopies from below and that quantitative analysis is feasible even at the scale of single pulses for enhanced understanding of LiDAR observations from vegetation.

  13. A modified micrometeorological gradient method for estimating O3 dry deposition over a forest canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Y. Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small pollutant concentration gradients between levels above a plant canopy result in large uncertainties in estimated air–surface exchange fluxes when using existing micrometeorological gradient methods, including the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM and the modified Bowen-Ratio method (MBR. A modified micrometeorological gradient method (MGM is proposed in this study for estimating O3 dry deposition fluxes over a forest canopy using concentration gradients between a level above and a level below the canopy top, taking advantage of relatively large gradients between these levels due to significant pollutant uptake at top layers of the canopy. The new method is compared with the AGM and MBR methods and is also evaluated using eddy-covariance (EC flux measurements collected at the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurement Site, Massachusetts during 1993–2000. All the three gradient methods (AGM, MBR and MGM produced similar diurnal cycles of O3 dry deposition velocity (Vd(O3 to the EC measurements, with the MGM method being the closest in magnitude to the EC measurements. The multi-year average Vd(O3 differed significantly between these methods, with the AGM, MBR and MGM method being 2.28, 1.45 and 1.18 times of that of the EC. Sensitivity experiments identified several input parameters for the MGM method as first-order parameters that affect the estimated Vd(O3. A 10% uncertainty in the wind speed attenuation coefficient or canopy displacement height can cause about 10% uncertainty in the estimated Vd(O3. An unrealistic leaf area density vertical profile can cause an uncertainty of a factor of 2.0 in the estimated Vd(O3. Other input parameters or formulas for stability functions only caused an uncertainly of a few percent. The new method provides an alternative approach in monitoring/estimating long-term deposition fluxes of similar pollutants over tall canopies.

  14. Measurement of sub-canopy evaporation in a flooded forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evapotranspiration is the dominant water efflux in many forested wetlands, but few studies have quantified the contribution of subcanopy evaporation. The goal of this study is to investigate the subcanopy energy balance to more fully understand physical controls over evaporation. We used Bowen ratio...

  15. Canopy interaction with precipitation and sulphur deposition in two boreal forests of Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, C; Houle, D; Duchesne, L; Gagnon, C

    2012-03-01

    The interaction of atmospheric sulphur (S) was investigated within the canopies of two boreal forests in Québec, Canada. The net canopy exchange approach, i.e. the difference between S-SO(4) in throughfall and precipitation, suggests high proportion of dry deposition in winter (up to 53%) as compared to summer (1-9%). However, a 3.5‰ decrease in δ(18)O-SO(4) throughfall in summer compared to incident precipitation points towards a much larger proportion of dry deposition during the warm season. We suggest that a significant fraction of dry deposition (about 1.2 kg ha(-1) yr(-1), representing 30-40% of annual wet S deposition) which contributed to the decreased δ(18)O-SO(4) in throughfall was taken up by the canopy. Overall, these results showed that, contrary to what is commonly considered, S interchanges in the canopy could be important in boreal forests with low absolute atmospheric S depositions. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modifying Geometric-Optical Bidirectional Reflectance Model for Direct Inversion of Forest Canopy Leaf Area Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congrong Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Forest canopy leaf area index (LAI inversion based on remote sensing data is an important method to obtain LAI. Currently, the most widely-used model to achieve forest canopy structure parameters is the Li-Strahler geometric-optical bidirectional reflectance model, by considering the effect of crown shape and mutual shadowing, which is referred to as the GOMS model. However, it is difficult to retrieve LAI through the GOMS model directly because LAI is not a fundamental parameter of the model. In this study, a gap probability model was used to obtain the relationship between the canopy structure parameter nR2 and LAI. Thus, LAI was introduced into the GOMS model as an independent variable by replacing nR2 The modified GOMS (MGOMS model was validated by application to Dayekou in the Heihe River Basin of China. The LAI retrieved using the MGOMS model with optical multi-angle remote sensing data, high spatial resolution images and field-measured data was in good agreement with the field-measured LAI, with an R-square (R2 of 0.64, and an RMSE of 0.67. The results demonstrate that the MGOMS model obtained by replacing the canopy structure parameter nR2 of the GOMS model with LAI can be used to invert LAI directly and precisely.

  17. Regeneration in bottomland forest canopy gaps six years after variable retention harvests to enhance wildlife habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Somershoe, Scott G.; Guldin, James M.

    2013-01-01

    To promote desired forest conditions that enhance wildlife habitat in bottomland forests, managers prescribed and implemented variable-retention harvest, a.k.a. wildlife forestry, in four stands on Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge, LA. These treatments created canopy openings (gaps) within which managers sought to regenerate shade-intolerant trees. Six years after prescribed harvests, we assessed regeneration in 41 canopy gaps and 4 large (>0.5-ha) patch cut openings that resulted from treatments and in 21 natural canopy gaps on 2 unharvested control stands. Mean gap area of anthropogenic gaps (582 m²) was greater than that of natural gaps (262 m²). Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) and red oaks (Quercus nigra, Q. nuttallii, and Q. phellos) were common in anthropogenic gaps, whereas elms (Ulmus spp.) and sugarberry (Celtis laevigata) were numerous in natural gaps. We recommend harvest prescriptions include gaps with diameter >25 m, because the proportion of shade-intolerant regeneration increased with gap area up to 500 m². The proportion of shade-intolerant definitive gap fillers (individuals likely to occupy the canopy) increased with gap area: 35 percent in natural gaps, 54 percent in anthropogenic gaps, and 84 percent in patch cuts. Sweetgum, green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), and red oaks were common definitive gap fillers.

  18. Canopy influence on trace metal atmospheric inputs on forest ecosystems: Speciation in throughfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandois, L.; Tipping, E.; Dumat, C.; Probst, A.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric inputs of selected Trace Metals (TM: Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb, Zn, as well as Al, Fe and Mn) were studied on six forested sites in France. In order to evaluate canopy interaction with atmospheric inputs, TM were measured in both Open Field Bulk Deposition (BD) and Throughfall (TF). Anthropogenic contribution to BD composition is high for Zn, Cd and Sb, reflecting actual TM emissions trends. Canopy greatly influences precipitation composition, through different processes, including assimilation and leaching by canopy, complexation as well as accumulation/dissolution of dry deposition. TM and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) physical fractionation between colloidal and truly dissolved phases was performed with ultrafiltration. Al, Fe, Pb and Cu are found in the colloidal fraction whereas Cd, Ni, Zn and Sb are mostly in the truly dissolved fraction. Chemical speciation predicted with WHAM-VI shows that in throughfall, Al, Fe, Pb and Cu are almost entirely complexed by DOC, whereas Ni, Cd and Zn are present in average 30% in the free metal ion form. TM present in labile forms (Cd, Ni, Zn) interact with the canopy, are cycled in the ecosystem, and their concentration is either slightly increased or even decreased in throughfall. Sb, Pb and Cu concentration are increased through canopy, as a consequence of dry deposition accumulation.

  19. Ozone deposition in relation to canopy physiology in a mixed conifer forest in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ro-Poulsen, H.; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Hovmand, M.F.;

    1998-01-01

    In this study CO(2) and H(2)O flux measurements made above a spruce forest was compared with the ozone flux to the canopy during growing season 1995. The fluxes were determined by micro meteorological gradient methods using a 36-m tall meteorological mast. The trees were about 12 m high and air...... uptake seems to follow very well the evapotranspiration. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  20. [Microbial community and its activities in canopy- and understory humus of two montane forest types in Ailao Mountains, Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-jie; Liu, Wen-yao; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Han-bo; Wang, Gao-sheng

    2010-09-01

    Mid-montane moist evergreen broadleaved forest (MMF) and top-montane dwarf mossy forest (DMF) are the two major natural forest types in subtropical mountainous area of Ailao Mountains, Northwest China. In this paper, a comparative study was made on the microbial composition, quantity, biochemical activity, metabolic activity, and their seasonal dynamics in the canopy- and understory humus of the two forest types. The composition, quantity, and metabolic activity of the microbes in the canopy humus of dominant tree species in MMF and DMF were also analyzed. In the canopy humus of the two forest types, the amounts of fungi and actinomycetes, microbial biomass C and N, and intensities of nitrogen fixation and cellulose decomposition were significantly higher than those in understory humus. Meanwhile, the amount of cellulose-decomposing microbes (ACDM), cellulose decomposition intensity, microbial biomass C and N, and metabolic activity in the canopy humus of MMF were significantly higher than those of DMF. The amounts of bacteria, fungi, and aerobic nitrogen-fixing bacteria (ANFB) and the metabolic activity in the canopy humus of MMF and DMF were significantly higher in wet season than in dry season, while a contradictory trend was observed on the amount of actinomycetes. No significant difference was observed on the amount of ACDM between wet season and dry season. For the two forest types, the amounts of microbes and their biochemical activities in canopy humus had a larger seasonal variation range than those in understory humus. There was a significant difference in the amounts of the microbes in canopy humus among the dominant tree species in MMF and DMF, especially in wet season. The microbes in canopy humus played important roles in maintaining the biodiversity of epiphytes in the canopy, and in supplying the needed nutrients for the vigorous growth of the epiphytes.

  1. Interception of the Fukushima reactor accident-derived 137Cs, 134Cs and 131I by coniferous forest canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Onda, Yuichi; Gomi, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident resulted in extensive radioactive contamination of the surrounding forests. In this study, we analyzed fallout 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I in rainwater, throughfall, and stemflow in coniferous forest plantations immediately after the accident. We show selective fractionation of the deposited radionuclides by the forest canopy and contrasting transfer of radiocesium and 131I from the canopy to the forest floor in association with precipitation. More than 60% of the total deposited radiocesium remained in the canopy after 5 month of the initial fallout, while marked penetration of the initially deposited 131I through the canopy was observed. The half-lives of 137Cs absorbed in the cypress and cedar canopies were calculated as 620 days and 890 days, respectively for the period of 0-160 days. The transfer of the deposited radiocesium from the canopy to the forest floor was slow compared with that of the spruce forest affected by fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident.

  2. Algorithm for Extracting Digital Terrain Models under Forest Canopy from Airborne LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almasi S. Maguya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracting digital elevationmodels (DTMs from LiDAR data under forest canopy is a challenging task. This is because the forest canopy tends to block a portion of the LiDAR pulses from reaching the ground, hence introducing gaps in the data. This paper presents an algorithm for DTM extraction from LiDAR data under forest canopy. The algorithm copes with the challenge of low data density by generating a series of coarse DTMs by using the few ground points available and using trend surfaces to interpolate missing elevation values in the vicinity of the available points. This process generates a cloud of ground points from which the final DTM is generated. The algorithm has been compared to two other algorithms proposed in the literature in three different test sites with varying degrees of difficulty. Results show that the algorithm presented in this paper is more tolerant to low data density compared to the other two algorithms. The results further show that with decreasing point density, the differences between the three algorithms dramatically increased from about 0.5m to over 10m.

  3. A canopy trimming experiment in Puerto Rico: The response of litter decomposition and nutrient release to canopy opening and debris deposition in a subtropical wet forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Gonzalez; D.J. Lodge; B.A. Richardson; M.J. Richardson

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we used a replicated factorial design to separate the individual and interacting effects of two main components of a severe hurricane – canopy opening and green debris deposition on leaf litter decay in the tabonuco forest in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. We quantify changes in percent mass remaining (PMR), the concentration and absolute amounts...

  4. Disruption of Ant-Aphid Mutualism in Canopy Enhances the Abundance of Beetles on the Forest Floor

    OpenAIRE

    Shuang Zhang; Yuxin Zhang; Keming Ma

    2012-01-01

    Ant-aphid mutualism is known to play a key role in the structure of the arthropod community in the tree canopy, but its possible ecological effects for the forest floor are unknown. We hypothesized that aphids in the canopy can increase the abundance of ants on the forest floor, thus intensifying the impacts of ants on other arthropods on the forest floor. We tested this hypothesis in a deciduous temperate forest in Beijing, China. We excluded the aphid-tending ants Lasius fuliginosus from th...

  5. The Utilization of Landsat 8 Multitemporal Imagery and Forest Canopy Density (FCD) Model for Forest Reclamation Priority of Natural Disaster Areas at Kelud Mountain, East Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himayah, S.; Hartono; Danoedoro, P.

    2016-11-01

    Remote sensing has the advantage in terms of temporal resolution that can be used to examine changes of the forest canopy density as occurred in Kelud Mountain after the eruption of 2014. Canopy density changes then used as a consideration for forest reclamation priority. This study aims to assess the ability of Landsat 8 multitemporal imagery and Forest Canopy Density (FCD) modeling for canopy density changes at Kelud forest before and after the eruption, as well as take advantage of the canopy density changes from FCD and biophysical condition of forest to make a forest reclamation priority. This research using a Landsat 8 imagery (26 June 2013 and 4 September 2015). The method that used is FCD modeling to obtain canopy density. Forest reclamation priority is determined based on the canopy density change after the eruption and biophysical factors such as slope, soil fertility and native vegetation. Landsat 8 can used to determine the forest canopy density of Kelud before and after eruption with an accuracy of 83.73% and 81.14%. Kelud forest reclamation priorities are divided into nine classes based on priority level. The most prioritized class is 1a with an area of 865 ha and class 1b with an area of 2.085 ha. Then class 1c (0 ha), 1d (413 ha), and 1e that most dominate (5.454 ha). Beside that, there is class 2a (1.900 ha) and 2b (243 ha), and the last is class 3a (467 ha) and 3b (1.172 Ha).ntroduction

  6. Simultaneous measurements of HONO below and above a spruce forest canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörgel, M.; Trebs, I.; Moravek, A.; Hens, K.; Zetzsch, C.

    2009-04-01

    Nitrous Acid (HONO) plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry because it is easily photolyzed and contributes to OH, the most important oxidizing agent in the atmosphere. Understanding sources and sinks of HONO (especially during daytime) leads to a better estimation of OH-budget. We have performed simultaneous HONO measurements in and above a tall spruce forest canopy using two long path absorption photometers (LOPAPs) at a field site located in the Fichtelgebirge mountains in northeastern Bavaria, Germany (50°09'N, 11°52'E, 775m above sea level). The LOPAP is a wet chemical instrument actively correcting for interferences (Kleffmann et al., 2002). Measurements were made simultaneously with the devices from 13-25 Sep 2007 on a tower (z = 24.25m, above canopy) and in the trunk space (z = 0.48m close to the forest floor). To determine the instrument precisions, both instruments were operated side-by-side in the trunk space at z = 1m, enabling the validation of observed mixing ratio differences in and above the canopy. At HONO levels ranging from 30 ppt to 220 ppt, the two LOPAP instruments agreed within 10% under dry conditions. Both instruments were operating without temperature control under field conditions including rainy, foggy and dry clear sky periods with large temperature variations (5 - 20 °C). Several other micrometeorological and chemical quantities were measured aiming to investigate the coupling between soil, canopy and atmospheric boundary layer. The measured HONO mixing ratios showed typical diel cycles with higher values during nighttime, especially during dry periods. During wet conditions, mixing ratios were significantly lower. Average mixing ratios measured with the LOPAP instruments ranged from 40 ppt to 80 ppt during the day and from 80 ppt to 150 ppt during the night with a higher variability during nighttime, but were found to be independent of NO2 mixing ratios. The average HONO/NO2 ratios are 0.03 both in and above canopy, which

  7. A Photogrammetric Workflow for the Creation of a Forest Canopy Height Model from Small Unmanned Aerial System Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lejeune

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of operational small unmanned aerial systems (UASs opens the door for their extensive use in forest mapping, as both the spatial and temporal resolution of UAS imagery better suit local-scale investigation than traditional remote sensing tools. This article focuses on the use of combined photogrammetry and “Structure from Motion” approaches in order to model the forest canopy surface from low-altitude aerial images. An original workflow, using the open source and free photogrammetric toolbox, MICMAC (acronym for Multi Image Matches for Auto Correlation Methods, was set up to create a digital canopy surface model of deciduous stands. In combination with a co-registered light detection and ranging (LiDAR digital terrain model, the elevation of vegetation was determined, and the resulting hybrid photo/LiDAR canopy height model was compared to data from a LiDAR canopy height model and from forest inventory data. Linear regressions predicting dominant height and individual height from plot metrics and crown metrics showed that the photogrammetric canopy height model was of good quality for deciduous stands. Although photogrammetric reconstruction significantly smooths the canopy surface, the use of this workflow has the potential to take full advantage of the flexible revisit period of drones in order to refresh the LiDAR canopy height model and to collect dense multitemporal canopy height series.

  8. Unifying constructal theory of tree roots, canopies and forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejan, A; Lorente, S; Lee, J

    2008-10-07

    Here, we show that the most basic features of tree and forest architecture can be put on a unifying theoretical basis, which is provided by the constructal law. Key is the integrative approach to understanding the emergence of "designedness" in nature. Trees and forests are viewed as integral components (along with dendritic river basins, aerodynamic raindrops, and atmospheric and oceanic circulation) of the much greater global architecture that facilitates the cyclical flow of water in nature (Fig. 1) and the flow of stresses between wind and ground. Theoretical features derived in this paper are: the tapered shape of the root and longitudinally uniform diameter and density of internal flow tubes, the near-conical shape of tree trunks and branches, the proportionality between tree length and wood mass raised to 1/3, the proportionality between total water mass flow rate and tree length, the proportionality between the tree flow conductance and the tree length scale raised to a power between 1 and 2, the existence of forest floor plans that maximize ground-air flow access, the proportionality between the length scale of the tree and its rank raised to a power between -1 and -1/2, and the inverse proportionality between the tree size and number of trees of the same size. This paper further shows that there exists an optimal ratio of leaf volume divided by total tree volume, trees of the same size must have a larger wood volume fraction in windy climates, and larger trees must pack more wood per unit of tree volume than smaller trees. Comparisons with empirical correlations and formulas based on ad hoc models are provided. This theory predicts classical notions such as Leonardo's rule, Huber's rule, Zipf's distribution, and the Fibonacci sequence. The difference between modeling (description) and theory (prediction) is brought into evidence.

  9. Factorial analysis on forest canopy density restoration in the burned area of northern Great Xing'an Mountains, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEFu-ju; XIAODu-ning; LIXiu-zhen; WANGXu-gao; SHIBao-dong

    2005-01-01

    The restoration of forest landscape has drawn much attention since the catastrophic fire took place on the northern slope of Great Xing'an Mountains in 1987. Forest canopy density, which has close relation to forest productivity, was selected as a key factor to find how much the forest quality was changed 13 years after fire, and how fire severity, regeneration way and terrain factors influenced the restoration of forest canopy density, based on forest inventory data in China, and using Kendall Bivariate Correlation Analysis, and Distances Correlation Analysis. The results showed that fire severity which was inversely correlated with forest canopy density grade was an initial factor among all that selected. Regeneration way which did not remarkably affect forest canopy density restoration in short period, may shorten the cycle of forest succession and promote the forest productivity of conophorium in the future, Among the three terrain factors, the effect of slope was the strongest, the position on slope was the second and the aspect was the last.

  10. Identification of turbulence structures above a forest canopy using a wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, B. J.; Leclerc, M. Y.; Gauthier, M.; Moore, K. E.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The wavelet transform is used to identify scales of large coherent structures present in atmospheric turbulence above the subarctic forest at Schefferville. Individual coherent structures contributing to much of the exchange between the forest and the atmosphere are depicted in terms of both scale and location using contour diagrams of wavelet transform coefficients. Three typical case studies of turbulence and flux observations were selected to examine the physical characteristics of these flux-filled events and their evolution with distance away from the forest canopy. A wavelet transform spectral technique is applied to vertical velocity, temperature, and turbulent heat flux data observed over the sparse coniferous forest to extract the relative importance of each scale present in those data series. The scale of turbulence structures in relation with their characteristic spacing is discussed.

  11. Measuring sub-canopy evaporation in a forested wetland using an ensemble of methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, S. T.; Edwards, B.; Reba, M. L.; Keim, R.

    2013-12-01

    Evaporation from the sub-canopy water surface is an integral but understudied component of the water balance in forested wetlands. Previous studies have used eddy covariance, energy balance approaches, and water-table fluctuations to assess whole-system evapotranspiration. However, partitioning evaporation from transpiration is necessary for modeling the system because of different controls over each process. Sub-canopy evaporation is a physically controlled process driven by relatively small gradients in residual energy transmitted through the canopy. The low-energy sub-canopy environment is characterized by a spatiotemporally varying light environment due to sunflecks, small and often inverse temperature and vapor gradients, and a high capacity for heat storage in flood water, which each present challenges to common evapotranspiration measurement techniques. Previous studies have examined wetland surface evaporation rates with small lysimeter experiments, but this approach does not encapsulate micrometeorological processes occurring at the scale of natural wetlands. In this study, we examine a one year time series of in situ sub-canopy flux measurements from a seasonally flooded cypress-tupelo swamp in southeast Louisiana. Our objective is to apply these data towards modeling sub-canopy energy flux responses to intra-annual hydrologic, phenologic, and climatic cycles. To assess and mitigate potential errors due to the inherent measurement challenges of this environment, we utilized multiple measurement approaches including eddy covariance, Bowen ratio energy balance (with both air to air gradients and water surface to air gradients) and direct measurement using a floating evaporation pan. Preliminary results show that Bowen ratio energy balance measurements are useful for constraining evaporation measurements when low wind speed conditions create a non-ideal setting for eddy covariance. However, Bowen ratios were often highly erratic due to the weak temperature

  12. Mapping growing stock at 1-km spatial resolution for Spanish forest areas from ground forest inventory data and GLAS canopy height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ruiz, S.; Chiesi, M.; Maselli, F.; Gilabert, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    National forest inventories provide measurements of forest variables (e.g. growing stock) that can be used for the estimation of above ground biomass (AGB). Mapping growing stock brings knowledge about spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of ABG, which is necessary for carbon cycle analysis. Several studies have been conducted on the integration of ground and optical remote sensing data to map forest biomass over Europe. Nevertheless, more direct information on forest biomass could be obtained by LiDAR techniques, which directly assess vertical forest structure by measuring the distance between the sensor and the scattering elements located inside the canopy volume. Thus, global 1-km maps of forest canopy height have been recently obtained from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). The current study aims to produce a forest growing stock map in Spain. Five different forest type areas were identified in three provinces along a North - South gradient accounting for different ecosystems and climatic conditions. Growing stock ground data from the Third Spanish National Forest Inventory were assigned to each forest type and aggregated to 1-km spatial resolution. GLAS-derived canopy height was extracted for the locations of selected ground data. A relationship between inventory growing stock and satellite canopy height was found for each class. The obtained relationships were then extended all over Spain. The accuracy of the resulting growing stock map was assessed at province level against the Third Spanish National Forest Inventory growing stock estimations (R = 0.85, RMSE = 21 m3 ha-1).

  13. TLS monitoring of snowpack distribution in a mountain forested areas: Analysis of canopy disturbance on snow evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revuelto, Jesús; López-Moreno, Juan Ignacio; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Alonso, Esteban; San Miguel, Alba

    2016-04-01

    Forested mountain areas at high elevations show important interaction with snowpack distribution and its evolution in time, and thus in many cases are the limit of the cryosphere in mountain zones. Such interactions have significant consequences in the hydrologic response of mountain rivers. Thereby observing the evolution of snowpack in forested areas has a big importance form a basic science perspective and also for water management. This work presents a detailed comparison of small scale effect of forest characteristics on snowpack distribution in Central Pyrenees, before and after a strong modification of canopies features. The snowpack distribution has been obtained using a novel remote sensing technology (Terrestrial Laser Scanner, TLS), with high spatial resolution (0.25m) over a 1000m2 study area for 27 survey dates along three snow seasons. Between the second and the third snow season a strong canopy pruning was performed in the study site, and thereby the snowpack evolution with both canopy configurations was compared. A Principal Component Analysis has been applied to analyze the snowpack distributions observed during the study period. Results obtained have shown that despite large differences in Canopy radius (1.2 m) and Canopy height (2.5m), not a different snowpack evolution was observed. For both Canopy configurations the variable with higher importance on snowpack distribution is the snow depth amount. The change in forest structure has important implications in the decrease of Canopy areas and the increase of Open areas (proportionally to Canopy change), but not a different interaction with forest structure was observed. The canopy pruning realized in the study site is typically accomplished for fire risk reduction and this shows the consequences that such action has in snowpack distribution and that hereby these may have in water management possibly delaying peak runoff.

  14. Invistigation on Canopy Height and Density Differentiations in the Managed and Unmanaged Forest Stands Using LIDAR Data (case Study: Shastkalateh Forest, Gorgan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shataee, Sh.; Mohammadi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Forest management plans are interesting to keep the forest stand natural composite and structure after silvicultural and management treatments. In order to investigate on stand differences made by management treatments, comparing of these stands with unmanaged stands as natural forests is necessary. Aerial laser scanners are providing suitable 3D information to map the horizontal and vertical characteristics of forest structures. In this study, different of canopy height and canopy cover variances between managed and unmanaged forest stands as well as in two dominant forest types were investigated using Lidar data in Dr. Bahramnia forest, Northern Iran. The in-situ information was gathered from 308 circular plots by a random systematic sampling designs. The low lidar cloud point data were used to generate accurate DEM and DSM models and plot-based height statistics metrics and canopy cover characteristics. The significant analyses were done by independent T-test between two stands in same dominant forest types. Results showed that there are no significant differences between canopy cover mean in two stands as well as forest types. Result of statistically analysis on height characteristics showed that there are a decreasing the forest height and its variance in the managed forest compared to unmanaged stands. In addition, there is a significant difference between maximum, range, and mean heights of two stands in 99 percent confidence level. However, there is no significant difference between standard deviation and canopy height variance of managed and unmanged stands. These results showd that accomplished management treatments and cuttings could lead to reducing of height variances and converting multi-layers stands to two or single layers. Results are also showed that the canopy cover densities in the managed forest stands are changing from high dense cover to dense cover.

  15. Simulating ozone dry deposition at a boreal forest with a multi-layer canopy deposition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Putian; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Rannik, Üllar; Zhou, Luxi; Gierens, Rosa; Taipale, Ditte; Mammarella, Ivan; Boy, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A multi-layer ozone (O3) dry deposition model has been implemented into SOSAA (a model to Simulate the concentrations of Organic vapours, Sulphuric Acid and Aerosols) to improve the representation of O3 concentration and flux within and above the forest canopy in the planetary boundary layer. We aim to predict the O3 uptake by a boreal forest canopy under varying environmental conditions and analyse the influence of different factors on total O3 uptake by the canopy as well as the vertical distribution of deposition sinks inside the canopy. The newly implemented dry deposition model was validated by an extensive comparison of simulated and observed O3 turbulent fluxes and concentration profiles within and above the boreal forest canopy at SMEAR II (Station to Measure Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) in Hyytiälä, Finland, in August 2010. In this model, the fraction of wet surface on vegetation leaves was parametrised according to the ambient relative humidity (RH). Model results showed that when RH was larger than 70 % the O3 uptake onto wet skin contributed ˜ 51 % to the total deposition during nighttime and ˜ 19 % during daytime. The overall contribution of soil uptake was estimated about 36 %. The contribution of sub-canopy deposition below 4.2 m was modelled to be ˜ 38 % of the total O3 deposition during daytime, which was similar to the contribution reported in previous studies. The chemical contribution to O3 removal was evaluated directly in the model simulations. According to the simulated averaged diurnal cycle the net chemical production of O3 compensated up to ˜ 4 % of dry deposition loss from about 06:00 to 15:00 LT. During nighttime, the net chemical loss of O3 further enhanced removal by dry deposition by a maximum ˜ 9 %. Thus the results indicated an overall relatively small contribution of airborne chemical processes to O3 removal at this site.

  16. [Segmentation of Winter Wheat Canopy Image Based on Visual Spectral and Random Forest Algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-dong; Cui, Ri-xian

    2015-12-01

    Digital image analysis has been widely used in non-destructive monitoring of crop growth and nitrogen nutrition status due to its simplicity and efficiency. It is necessary to segment winter wheat plant from soil background for accessing canopy cover, intensity level of visible spectrum (R, G, and B) and other color indices derived from RGB. In present study, according to the variation in R, G, and B components of sRGB color space and L*, a*, and b* components of CIEL* a* b* color space between wheat plant and soil background, the segmentation of wheat plant from soil background were conducted by the Otsu's method based on a* component of CIEL* a* b* color space, and RGB based random forest method, and CIEL* a* b* based random forest method, respectively. Also the ability to segment wheat plant from soil background was evaluated with the value of segmentation accuracy. The results showed that all three methods had revealed good ability to segment wheat plant from soil background. The Otsu's method had lowest segmentation accuracy in comparison with the other two methods. There were only little difference in segmentation error between the two random forest methods. In conclusion, the random forest method had revealed its capacity to segment wheat plant from soil background with only the visual spectral information of canopy image without any color components combinations or any color space transformation.

  17. Seasonal diets of insectivorous birds using canopy gaps in a bottomland forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorman, Christopher, E.; Bowen, Liessa, T.; Kilgo, John, C.; Sorenson, Clyde E.; Hanula, James L.; Horn, Scott; Ulyshen, Mike D.

    2007-07-01

    ABSTRACT. Little is known about how insectivorous bird diets are influenced by arthropod availability and about how these relationships vary seasonally. We captured birds in forest-canopy gaps and adjacent mature forest during 2001 and 2002 at the Savannah River Site in Barnwell County, South Carolina, and flushed their crops to gather information about arthropods eaten during four periods: spring migration, breeding, postbreeding, and fall migration. Arthropod availability for foliage- and ground-gleaning birds was examined by leaf clipping and pitfall trapping. Coleopterans and Hemipterans were used by foliage- and ground-gleaners more than expected during all periods, whereas arthropods in the orders Araneae and Hymenoptera were used as, or less than, expected based on availability during all periods. Ground-gleaning birds used Homopterans and Lepidopterans in proportions higher than availability during all periods. Arthropod use by birds was consistent from spring through all migration, with no apparent seasonal shift in diet. Based on concurrent studies, heavily used orders of arthropods were equally abundant or slightly less abundant in canopy gaps than in the surrounding mature forest, but bird species were most frequently detected in gaps. Such results suggest that preferential feeding on arthropods by foliage-gleaning birds in p p habitats reduced arthropod densities or, alternatively, that bird use of gap and forest habitat was not determined y food resources. The abundance of arthropods across the stand may have allowed birds to remain in the densely vegetated gaps where thick cover provides protection from predators.

  18. In-canopy gradients, composition, and sources of optically active aerosols over the Amazon forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, P.; Graham, B.; Roberts, G. C.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.; Maenhaut, W.

    2003-04-01

    As part of the European contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA-EUSTACH), size-fractionated aerosol samples were collected at a primary rainforest site in the Brazilian Amazon during the wet and dry seasons. Daytime-nighttime segregated sampling was carried out at three different heights (above, within and below canopy level) on a 54 m meteorological tower. The samples were analyzed for up to 19 trace elements, equivalent black carbon (BCe) and mass concentrations. Additionally, measurements of scattering and absorption coefficients were performed. Absolute principal component analysis revealed that the wet and dry season aerosols contained the same three main aerosol components, namely a natural biogenic, a pyrogenic, and a soil dust component, but that these were present in different (absolute and relative) amounts. The elements related to biomass burning and soil dust generally exhibited highest concentrations above the canopy and during daytime, whilst forest-derived aerosol was more concentrated underneath the canopy and during nighttime. These variations can be largely attributed to daytime convective mixing and the formation of a shallow nocturnal boundary layer, along with the possibility of enhanced nighttime release of biogenic aerosol particles. All three components contributed significantly to light extinction, suggesting that, in addition to pyrogenic particles, biogenic and soil dust aerosols must be taken into account when modeling the physical and optical properties of aerosols in forested regions such the Amazon Basin.

  19. The canopy interception-landslide initiation conundrum: insight from a tropical secondary forest in northern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidle, Roy C.; Ziegler, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    The interception and smoothing effect of forest canopies on pulses of incident rainfall and its delivery to the soil has been suggested as a factor in moderating peak pore water pressure in soil mantles, thus reducing the risk of shallow landslides. Here we provide 3 years of rainfall and throughfall data in a tropical secondary dipterocarp forest characterized by few large trees in northern Thailand, along with selected soil moisture dynamics, to address this issue. Throughfall was an estimated 88 % of rainfall, varying from 86 to 90 % in individual years. Data from 167 events demonstrate that canopy interception was only weakly associated (via a nonlinear relationship) with total event rainfall, but not significantly correlated with duration, mean intensity, or antecedent 2-day precipitation (API2). Mean interception during small events (≤ 35 mm) was 17 % (n = 135 events) compared with only 7 % for large events (> 35 mm; n = 32). Examining small temporal intervals within the largest and highest intensity events that would potentially trigger landslides revealed complex patterns of interception. The tropical forest canopy had little smoothing effect on incident rainfall during the largest events. During events with high peak intensities, high wind speeds, and/or moderate-to-high pre-event wetting, measured throughfall was occasionally higher than rainfall during large event peaks, demonstrating limited buffering. However, in events with little wetting and low-to-moderate wind speed, early event rainfall peaks were buffered by the canopy. As rainfall continued during most large events, there was little difference between rainfall and throughfall depths. A comparison of both rainfall and throughfall depths to conservative mean intensity-duration thresholds for landslide initiation revealed that throughfall exceeded the threshold in 75 % of the events in which rainfall exceeded the threshold for both wet and dry conditions. Throughfall intensity for the 11 largest

  20. Forest and Shrub Canopy Structure from Multiangle and High Resolution Passive Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopping, M. J.; Wang, Z.; Bull, M. A.; Duchesne, R.; North, M.

    2015-12-01

    The 3-D structure of forest and shrub canopies can be mapped using diverse technologies, with the most advanced being lidar and interferometric radar. Other approaches include various modes of interpretation of multi-angle imagery, high-resolution stereo photogrammetry, plant identification, delineation, and measurement from high-resolution panchromatic imagery, and image texture metrics. While active remote sensing will revolutionize mapping of canopy structure, there are currently limitations. High precision lidar will remain limited geographically until the launch of NASA's innovative Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation to the International Space Station in 2019 but even this mission will not see high latitude boreal forest, taiga, or shrubs in tundra because of the orbit. Radar-based methods must be calibrated using high quality data. Imagery from passive imagers acquired at a range of scales therefore has much value if it can be used to provide structure data at broader geographic and temporal scales. Here we report on canopy mapping at scales from 0.5 m to 250 m using high-resolution panchromatic imagery from satellite imagers and NASA's Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), respectively. MISR-based 250 m aboveground biomass maps for the southwestern U.S. were assessed against the radar-derived North American Carbon Program National Biomass and Carbon Dataset 2000, showing good agreement (R2=0.80, RMSE=31 Mg ha-1 for the validation data set; and 0.76 and 18 Mg ha-1, respectively, for 1013 random points). For Oregon forests the best and worst cases were R2=0.90, RMSE=42 Mg ha-1 and R2=0.78, RMSE=62 Mg ha-1, respectively. For improved validation, the CANAPI algorithm was used to interpret high-resolution panchromatic imagery. In Sierra National forest, California, canopy cover estimates agreed well with those from field inventory (R2=0.92, RMSE=0.03). Height estimates gave R2=0.94 and relative RMSE=0.25 m for the range 3 m - 60 m, vs. lidar

  1. Subpixel canopy cover estimation of coniferous forests in Oregon using SWIR imaging spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobell, David B.; Asner, Gregory P.; Law, Beverly E.; Treuhaft, Robert N.

    2001-03-01

    The percent cover of vegetation canopies is an important variable for many land-surface biophysical and biogeochemical models and serves as a useful measure of land cover change. Remote sensing methods to estimate the subpixel fraction of vegetation canopies with spectral mixture analysis (SMA) require knowledge of the reflectance properties of major land cover units, called endmembers. However, variability in endmember reflectance across space and time has limited the interpretation and general applicability of SMA approaches. In this study, a subpixel vegetation cover of coniferous forests in Oregon, United States, was successfully estimated by employing shortwave infrared reflectance measurements (SWIR2 region, 2080-2280 nm) collected by the NASA Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). The approach presented here, referred to as AutoSWIR [Asner and Lobell, 2000], was originally developed for semiarid and arid environments and exploits the low SWIR2 variability of materials found in most ecosystems. SWIR2 field spectra from Oregon were compared with spectra from an arid systems database, revealing significant differences only for soil reflectance. However, SWIR2 variability remained low, as indicated by field spectra and principal component analysis, and AutoSWIR was then modified to use coniferous forest spectra collected in Oregon. Subsequent high spatial resolution estimates of forest canopy cover agreed well with estimates from low-altitude air photos (rms = 3%), demonstrating the successful extension of AutoSWIR to a coniferous forest ecosystem. The generality of AutoSWIR facilitates accurate estimates of vegetation cover that can be automatically retrieved from SWIR2 spectral measurements collected by forthcoming spaceborne imaging spectrometers such as NASA's New Millenium Program EO-1 Hyperion. These estimates can then be used to characterize landscape heterogeneity important for land-surface, atmospheric, and biogeochemical research.

  2. Amazon Forests Maintain Consistent Canopy Structure and Greenness During the Dry Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Rosette, Jacqueline; Palace, Michael; Cook, Bruce D.; Vermote, Eric F.; Harding, David J.; North, Peter R. J.

    2014-01-01

    The seasonality of sunlight and rainfall regulates net primary production in tropical forests. Previous studies have suggested that light is more limiting than water for tropical forest productivity, consistent with greening of Amazon forests during the dry season in satellite data.We evaluated four potential mechanisms for the seasonal green-up phenomenon, including increases in leaf area or leaf reflectance, using a sophisticated radiative transfer model and independent satellite observations from lidar and optical sensors. Here we show that the apparent green up of Amazon forests in optical remote sensing data resulted from seasonal changes in near-infrared reflectance, an artefact of variations in sun-sensor geometry. Correcting this bidirectional reflectance effect eliminated seasonal changes in surface reflectance, consistent with independent lidar observations and model simulations with unchanging canopy properties. The stability of Amazon forest structure and reflectance over seasonal timescales challenges the paradigm of light-limited net primary production in Amazon forests and enhanced forest growth during drought conditions. Correcting optical remote sensing data for artefacts of sun-sensor geometry is essential to isolate the response of global vegetation to seasonal and interannual climate variability.

  3. GNSS-Reflectometry: Forest canopies polarization scattering properties and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuerui; Jin, Shuanggen

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) can be a new promising remote sensing tool in the ocean, snow/ice and land surfaces, e.g., vegetation biomass monitoring. Although GNSS-R provides a potentially special L-band multi-angular and multi-polarization measurement, the theoretical vegetation scattering properties and mechanisms for GNSS-R are not understood clearly. In this paper, the GNSS-R vegetation polarization scattering properties are studied and modeled at different incidence angles (specular direction). The bistatic scattering model Bi-mimics is employed, which is the first-order radiative transfer equation. As a kind of forest stand, the Aspen’s crown layer is composed of entire leaves, and its parameters in Mimics handbook are used as model input. The specular circular polarizations (co-polarization RR and cross-polarization LR) are simulated. For cross-polarization, the received polarization is assumed as a linear (horizontal and vertical) polarizations and ±45° linear polarizations. Therefore, the HR VR, +45R and -45R polarizations are simulated here. Contributions from different scattering components at RR, LR and VR polarization are also presented. For co-polarization, it is large in the whole specular angles (10-80°). The scattering trends of the other cross polarization (HR, LR, +45R and -45R) are a little similar when compared to the RR and RV. Therefore, the RHCP and V polarizations are more favorable to collect the reflected signals. The trunk heights and crown depths do not affect the scattering trends of RR, RV and RL, while the trunk height has some effect on the scattering amplitude of different polarizations. The azimuth angle has more effects on RR, RL and RV scattering, especially in lower than 50°. The observation angles and polarization combinations are extremely important for GNSS-R remote sensing.

  4. Phylogenetic Structure of Tree Species across Different Life Stages from Seedlings to Canopy Trees in a Subtropical Evergreen Broad-Leaved Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi; Qian, Hong; Yu, Mingjian

    2015-01-01

    Investigating patterns of phylogenetic structure across different life stages of tree species in forests is crucial to understanding forest community assembly, and investigating forest gap influence on the phylogenetic structure of forest regeneration is necessary for understanding forest community assembly. Here, we examine the phylogenetic structure of tree species across life stages from seedlings to canopy trees, as well as forest gap influence on the phylogenetic structure of forest regeneration in a forest of the subtropical region in China. We investigate changes in phylogenetic relatedness (measured as NRI) of tree species from seedlings, saplings, treelets to canopy trees; we compare the phylogenetic turnover (measured as βNRI) between canopy trees and seedlings in forest understory with that between canopy trees and seedlings in forest gaps. We found that phylogenetic relatedness generally increases from seedlings through saplings and treelets up to canopy trees, and that phylogenetic relatedness does not differ between seedlings in forest understory and those in forest gaps, but phylogenetic turnover between canopy trees and seedlings in forest understory is lower than that between canopy trees and seedlings in forest gaps. We conclude that tree species tend to be more closely related from seedling to canopy layers, and that forest gaps alter the seedling phylogenetic turnover of the studied forest. It is likely that the increasing trend of phylogenetic clustering as tree stem size increases observed in this subtropical forest is primarily driven by abiotic filtering processes, which select a set of closely related evergreen broad-leaved tree species whose regeneration has adapted to the closed canopy environments of the subtropical forest developed under the regional monsoon climate.

  5. Movement patterns of three arboreal primates in a Neotropical moist forest explained by LiDAR-estimated canopy structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLean, Kevin A.; Trainor, Anne M.; Asner, Gregory P.; Crofoot, Margaret C.; Hopkins, Mariah E.; Campbell, Christina J.; Martin, Roberta E.; Knapp, David E.; Jansen, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Many arboreal mammals in Neotropical forests are important seed dispersers that influence the spatial patterns of tree regeneration via their movement patterns, which in turn are determined by the canopy structure of the forest itself. However, the relationship between arboreal mammal mo

  6. Effects of bark beetle attack on canopy fuel flammability and crown fire potential in lodgepole pine and Engelmann spruce forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley G. Page; Martin E. Alexander; Michael J. Jenkins

    2015-01-01

    Large wildland fires in conifer forests typically involve some degree of crowning, with their initiation and propagation dependent upon several characteristics of the canopy fuels. Recent outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia E ngelm.) forests and spruce beetle (Dendroctonus...

  7. Establishment of an invasive grass in closed-canopy deciduous forests across local and regional environmental gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia D. Huebner

    2010-01-01

    Establishment of Microstegium vimineum, an invasive exotic grass, in closed-canopy U.S. eastern forests was evaluated across a local (roadside to forest interior) and regional (across two geographic provinces) environmental gradient in West Virginia. The two geographic provinces were the Allegheny Plateau (more mesic) and the Ridge and Valley...

  8. Seasonal relationships between birds and arthropods in bottomland forest canopy gaps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, Liessa, Thomas

    2004-12-31

    Bowen, Liessa, Thomas. 2004. Seasonal relationships between birds and arthropods in bottomland forest canopy gaps. PhD Dissertation. North Carolina State University. Raleigh, North Carolina. 98pp. I investigated the influence of arthropod availability and vegetation structure on avian habitat use at the center, edge, and adjacent to forest canopy gaps in 2001 and 2002. I used mist-netting and plot counts to estimate abundance of birds using three sizes (0.13, 0.26, and 0.5 ha) of 7-8 year old group-selection timber harvest openings during four seasons (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration) in a bottomland hardwood forest in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. I used foliage clipping, Malaise trapping, and pitfall trapping to determine arthropod abundance within each habitat, and I used a warm water crop-flush on captured birds to gather information about arthropods eaten. I observed more birds, including forest interior species, forest-edge spedge species, and several individual species, in early-successional canopy gap and gap-edge habitats than in surrounding mature forest during all seasons. I found a significant interaction between season and habitat type for several groups and individual species, suggesting a seasonal shift in habitat use. Captures of all birds, insectivorous birds, foliage- gleaners, ground-gleaners, aerial salliers, Hooded Warbler (Wilsonia citrina), Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus), and Black-throated Blue Warbler (Dendroica caerulescens) were positively correlated with understory vegetation density during two or more seasons. I found relationships between insectivorous birds and leaf-dwelling Lepidoptera, insectivorous birds and ground-dwelling arthropods, foliage-gleaning birds and foliage-dwelling arthropods, and aerial salliers and flying arthropods, as well as between individual bird species and arthropods. Relationships were inconsistent, however, with many

  9. Forest canopy interception loss exceeds wet canopy evaporation in Japanese cypress (Hinoki) and Japanese cedar (Sugi) plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takami; Matsuda, Hiroki; Komatsu, Misako; Xiang, Yang; Takahashi, Atsuhiro; Shinohara, Yoshinori; Otsuki, Kyoichi

    2013-12-01

    Physical process of canopy interception loss remains to be explained.Rainfall partitioning to interception was similar between the stands.The rate of interception increased with rainfall intensity.Observed amount of interception was greater than estimated amount of evaporation.We suggest that splash droplets transport by canopy ventilation is the primary process of interception loss.

  10. A model-based comparison of organic matter dynamics between riparian-forested and open-canopy streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenroth Karolina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The food webs of forest streams are primarily based upon inputs of organic matter from adjacent terrestrial ecosystems. However, streams that run through open landscapes generally lack closed riparian canopies, and an increasing number of studies indicate that terrestrial organic matter may be an important resource in these systems as well. Combining key abiotically-controlled factors (stream discharge, water temperature, and litter input rate with relevant biotic processes (e.g. macroinvertebrate CPOM consumption, microbial processing, we constructed a model to predict and contrast organic matter dynamics (including temporal variation in CPOM standing crop, CPOM processing rate, FPOM production, and detritivore biomass in small riparian-forested and open-canopy streams. Our modeled results showed that the standing crop of CPOM was similar between riparian-forested and open-canopy streams, despite considerable differences in litter input rate. This unexpected result was partly due to linkages between CPOM supply and consumer abundance that produced higher detritivore biomass in the forest stream than the open-canopy stream. CPOM standing crop in the forest stream was mainly regulated by top-down consumer control, depressing it to a level similar to that of the open-canopy stream. In contrast, CPOM standing crop in the open-canopy stream was primarily controlled by physical factors (litter input rates and discharge, not consumption. This suggests that abiotic processes (e.g. discharge may play a greater role in limiting detrital resource availability and consumer biomass in open-canopy streams than in forest streams. These model results give insight on functional differences that exists among streams and they can be used to predict effects of anthropogenic influences such as forestry, agriculture, urbanization, and climate change on streams and how riparian management and conservation tools can be employed to mitigate undesirable effects.

  11. Estimation of canopy attributes in beech forests using true colour digital images from a small fixed-wing UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianucci, Francesco; Disperati, Leonardo; Guzzi, Donatella; Bianchini, Daniele; Nardino, Vanni; Lastri, Cinzia; Rindinella, Andrea; Corona, Piermaria

    2016-05-01

    Accurate estimates of forest canopy are essential for the characterization of forest ecosystems. Remotely-sensed techniques provide a unique way to obtain estimates over spatially extensive areas, but their application is limited by the spectral and temporal resolution available from these systems, which is often not suited to meet regional or local objectives. The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) as remote sensing platforms has recently gained increasing attention, but their applications in forestry are still at an experimental stage. In this study we described a methodology to obtain rapid and reliable estimates of forest canopy from a small UAV equipped with a commercial RGB camera. The red, green and blue digital numbers were converted to the green leaf algorithm (GLA) and to the CIE L*a*b* colour space to obtain estimates of canopy cover, foliage clumping and leaf area index (L) from aerial images. Canopy attributes were compared with in situ estimates obtained from two digital canopy photographic techniques (cover and fisheye photography). The method was tested in beech forests. UAV images accurately quantified canopy cover even in very dense stand conditions, despite a tendency to not detecting small within-crown gaps in aerial images, leading to a measurement of a quantity much closer to crown cover estimated from in situ cover photography. Estimates of L from UAV images significantly agreed with that obtained from fisheye images, but the accuracy of UAV estimates is influenced by the appropriate assumption of leaf angle distribution. We concluded that true colour UAV images can be effectively used to obtain rapid, cheap and meaningful estimates of forest canopy attributes at medium-large scales. UAV can combine the advantage of high resolution imagery with quick turnaround series, being therefore suitable for routine forest stand monitoring and real-time applications.

  12. Do soil fertilization and forest canopy foliage affect the growth and photosynthesis of Amazonian saplings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilvanda dos Santos Magalhães

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Most Amazonian soils are highly weathered and poor in nutrients. Therefore, photosynthesis and plant growth should positively respond to the addition of mineral nutrients. Surprisingly, no study has been carried out in situ in the central Amazon to address this issue for juvenile trees. The objective of this study was to determine how photosynthetic rates and growth of tree saplings respond to the addition of mineral nutrients, to the variation in leaf area index of the forest canopy, and to changes in soil water content associated with rainfall seasonality. We assessed the effect of adding a slow-release fertilizer. We determined plant growth from 2010 to 2012 and gas exchange in the wet and dry season of 2012. Rainfall seasonality led to variations in soil water content, but it did not affect sapling growth or leaf gas exchange parameters. Although soil amendment increased phosphorus content by 60 %, neither plant growth nor the photosynthetic parameters were influenced by the addition of mineral nutrients. However, photosynthetic rates and growth of saplings decreased as the forest canopy became denser. Even when Amazonian soils are poor in nutrients, photosynthesis and sapling growth are more responsive to slight variations in light availability in the forest understory than to the availability of nutrients. Therefore, the response of saplings to future increases in atmospheric [CO2] will not be limited by the availability of mineral nutrients in the soil.

  13. Nitrogen Availability and Forest Canopy Albedo from Leaf to Regional Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollinger, S. V.; Plourde, L. C.; Martin, M.; Wicklein, H. F.; Haddad, D. M.; Richardson, A. D.; Hollinger, D.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 uptake capacity in temperate and boreal forests has been shown to scale directly with whole-canopy nitrogen concentrations, mirroring a leaf-level trend that has been observed for woody plants worldwide. Recent work has also demonstrated that both CO2 uptake capacity and canopy %N are strongly and positively correlated with shortwave surface albedo. This suggests that variation in nitrogen availability may play an additional, and previously overlooked, role in the climate system via its influence on surface energy exchange as well as via its better-known influence on carbon assimilation. Thus far, the carbon-nitrogen-albedo relationship has been demonstrated at relatively coarse spatial scales that cover broad gradients in climate and forest type. It is unclear whether similar trends occur within local landscapes and within ecosystems other than forests. It is also unclear whether N deposition and N fertilization can cause a shift in albedo stemming from changes in foliar %N. Examining finer-scale patterns in the N-albedo relationship is necessary before we can establish the generality of the observed trends and understand their implications for carbon-nutrient-climate interactions. Here, we expand on the C-N-albedo relationship in several important ways: (1) using fine-scale remote sensing data from the U.S. and Canada, we examined albedo in relation to foliar N and canopy structure at local scales for several well characterized landscapes; (2) we examined changes in both foliar N and albedo along a regional-scale nitrogen deposition gradient; (3) we examined leaf-level changes in %N and albedo in response to experimental N additions, and (4) we conducted a global synthesis of data from FLUXNET to examine the C-N-albedo relationship over a broader range of ecosystems. Results are discussed in the context of improving our understanding of interactions between terrestrial biogeochemistry and climate.

  14. Usability of multiangular imaging spectroscopy data for analysis of vegetation canopy shadow fraction in boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiet, Vincent; Perheentupa, Viljami; Mõttus, Matti; Hernández-Clemente, Rocío

    2016-04-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is a remote sensing technology which records continuous spectral data at a very high (better than 10 nm) resolution. Such spectral images can be used to monitor, for example, the photosynthetic activity of vegetation. Photosynthetic activity is dependent on varying light conditions and varies within the canopy. To measure this variation we need very high spatial resolution data with resolution better than the dominating canopy element size (e.g., tree crown in a forest canopy). This is useful, e.g., for detecting photosynthetic downregulation and thus plant stress. Canopy illumination conditions are often quantified using the shadow fraction: the fraction of visible foliage which is not sunlit. Shadow fraction is known to depend on view angle (e.g., hot spot images have very low shadow fraction). Hence, multiple observation angles potentially increase the range of shadow fraction in the imagery in high spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy data. To investigate the potential of multi-angle imaging spectroscopy in investigating canopy processes which vary with shadow fraction, we obtained a unique multiangular airborne imaging spectroscopy data for the Hyytiälä forest research station located in Finland (61° 50'N, 24° 17'E) in July 2015. The main tree species are Norway spruce (Picea abies L. karst), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh., Betula pendula Roth). We used an airborne hyperspectral sensor AISA Eagle II (Specim - Spectral Imaging Ltd., Finland) mounted on a tilting platform. The tilting platform allowed us to measure at nadir and approximately 35 degrees off-nadir. The hyperspectral sensor has a 37.5 degrees field of view (FOV), 0.6m pixel size, 128 spectral bands with an average spectral bandwidth of 4.6nm and is sensitive in the 400-1000 nm spectral region. The airborne data was radiometrically, atmospherically and geometrically processed using the Parge and Atcor software (Re Se applications Schl

  15. Variation in forest canopy nitrogen and albedo in response to N fertilization and elevated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklein, H. F.; Ollinger, S. V.; Martin, M.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Collatz, G. J.

    2009-12-01

    It is important to understand how high levels of nitrogen (N) deposition, through changes in N status, could influence a forest’s albedo and photosynthetic rates, and therefore the forest’s overall feedback (positive or negative) to global warming. Foliar N and albedo have recently been shown to covary at the canopy level across temperate and boreal forests. The purpose of this study is to examine the nature of this relationship from leaf to canopy scales and how it might change in response N and CO2 fertilization. Research was conducted at two long-term forest experimental sites. The chronic N amendment site at Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA includes three treatments: high N (fertilized with 150 kg N ha-1 yr-1), low N (50 kg N ha-1 yr-1), and ambient deposition (around 8 kg N ha-1 yr-1). The Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park in Oak Ridge, TN includes a Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site where plots receive either ambient and elevated CO2 (540 ppm), and an N amendment site where plots are either fertilized with N (200 kg N ha-1 yr-1) or receive ambient deposition (10-15 kg N ha-1 yr-1). At Harvard Forest we measured seven black oak (Quercus velutina) and five red maple (Acer rubrum) trees in each treatment plot. At Oak Ridge we measured five sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) trees in each FACE treatment plot, and four sweetgum trees in each N amendment treatment plot. Leaves were collected from two to three canopy heights from trees in each treatment plot. For each tree height we measured reflectance and transmittance spectra for stacks of 1, 2, 4, and 8 leaves, both abaxial and adaxial sides. We also measured N concentration, water content, and leaf mass per unit area (LMA) of the leaves. Canopy-level reflectance was modeled using the Scattering by Arbitrarily Inclined Leaves (SAIL-2) radiative transfer model. Preliminary results show significant differences in average leaf-level reflectance in the N fertilized treatments, with higher NIR

  16. High Upward Fluxes of Formic Acid from a Boreal Forest Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobesberger, S.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Taipale, D.; Millet, D. B.; D'Ambro, E.; Mammarella, I.; Zhou, P.; Wolfe, G.; Lee, B. H.; Boy, M.; Thornton, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Formic acid, HCOOH, is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids found in the atmosphere, affecting cloud chemistry and acidity, and as a common product in the oxidative processing of volatile organic compounds (VOC), it provides constraints on the importance of various pathways and precursors. Yet, significant uncertainties in the sources and sinks of HCOOH concentrations remain. We present measurements of HCOOH mixing ratios and eddy fluxes over a boreal forest canopy in spring/summer. Boreal forests have been identified as a key region for much of the global production of HCOOH, as well as for our lack of understanding of the underlying processes. To our knowledge, these are the first direct measurements of HCOOH exchange above a boreal forest ecosystem. The measured HCOOH fluxes were bidirectional, but mostly upward during daytime, in contrast to studies made elsewhere that reported mostly downward fluxes. Episodes of downward flux were explained well by standard resistor models of dry deposition. The sum of net observed flux and modeled deposition yields an upward "gross flux" of HCOOH, which could not be quantitatively explained by literature estimates of direct vegetative/soil emissions nor by efficient chemical production from other VOC (e.g. monoterpenes). These observations suggest greatly underestimated HCOOH sources, by up to a factor of 10, of biogenic origin in the boreal forest. We implemented a vegetative HCOOH source into the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to match our derived gross flux, and evaluated the updated model against air- and space-borne HCOOH observations. Model biases in the boundary layer were substantially reduced based on this revised treatment, suggesting that a significant fraction of the missing HCOOH source in boreal regions is located within or just above the forest canopy. Biases in the free troposphere remain unexplained.

  17. Disruption of ant-aphid mutualism in canopy enhances the abundance of beetles on the forest floor.

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    Shuang Zhang

    Full Text Available Ant-aphid mutualism is known to play a key role in the structure of the arthropod community in the tree canopy, but its possible ecological effects for the forest floor are unknown. We hypothesized that aphids in the canopy can increase the abundance of ants on the forest floor, thus intensifying the impacts of ants on other arthropods on the forest floor. We tested this hypothesis in a deciduous temperate forest in Beijing, China. We excluded the aphid-tending ants Lasius fuliginosus from the canopy using plots of varying sizes, and monitored the change in the abundance of ants and other arthropods on the forest floor in the treated and control plots. We also surveyed the abundance of ants and other arthropods on the forest floor to explore the relationships between ants and other arthropods in the field. Through a three-year experimental study, we found that the exclusion of ants from the canopy significantly decreased the abundance of ants on the forest floor, but increased the abundance of beetles, although the effect was only significant in the large ant-exclusion plot (80*60 m. The field survey showed that the abundance of both beetles and spiders was negatively related to the abundance of ants. These results suggest that aphids located in the tree canopy have indirect negative effects on beetles by enhancing the ant abundance on the forest floor. Considering that most of the beetles in our study are important predators, the ant-aphid mutualism can have further trophic cascading effects on the forest floor food web.

  18. Disruption of ant-aphid mutualism in canopy enhances the abundance of beetles on the forest floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Yuxin; Ma, Keming

    2012-01-01

    Ant-aphid mutualism is known to play a key role in the structure of the arthropod community in the tree canopy, but its possible ecological effects for the forest floor are unknown. We hypothesized that aphids in the canopy can increase the abundance of ants on the forest floor, thus intensifying the impacts of ants on other arthropods on the forest floor. We tested this hypothesis in a deciduous temperate forest in Beijing, China. We excluded the aphid-tending ants Lasius fuliginosus from the canopy using plots of varying sizes, and monitored the change in the abundance of ants and other arthropods on the forest floor in the treated and control plots. We also surveyed the abundance of ants and other arthropods on the forest floor to explore the relationships between ants and other arthropods in the field. Through a three-year experimental study, we found that the exclusion of ants from the canopy significantly decreased the abundance of ants on the forest floor, but increased the abundance of beetles, although the effect was only significant in the large ant-exclusion plot (80*60 m). The field survey showed that the abundance of both beetles and spiders was negatively related to the abundance of ants. These results suggest that aphids located in the tree canopy have indirect negative effects on beetles by enhancing the ant abundance on the forest floor. Considering that most of the beetles in our study are important predators, the ant-aphid mutualism can have further trophic cascading effects on the forest floor food web.

  19. Linking canopy phenology to the seasonality of biosphere-atmosphere interactions in a temperate deciduous forest (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A. D.; Toomey, M. P.; Aubrecht, D.; Sonnentag, O.; Ryu, Y.; Hilker, T.

    2013-12-01

    Phenology - the annual rhythm of canopy development and senescence - is a key control on the seasonality of surface-atmosphere fluxes of CO2, water, and energy. Phenology is also a highly sensitive indicator of the biological impacts of climate change. In many biomes, there is strong evidence of trends towards earlier spring onset, and later autumn senescence, over the last four decades. These shifts in phenology may play an imprortant role in mitigating - or amplifying - feedbacks between terrestrial ecosystems and the climate system. To better understand relationships between canopy structure and function in a temperate deciduous forest, we installed a wide array of radiometric instruments and imaging sensors near the top of a 40-m high tower at Harvard Forest beginning in 2011. Our data set includes: - incoming and outgoing visible (including incoming direct and diffuse components), shortwave, and longwave radiation; - narrowband (five visible and three near-infrared channels) canopy reflectance; - leaf area index (LAI, from continuous below-canopy digital cover photography), fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR, from above- and below-canopy quantum sensors), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, from broad- and narrow-band radiometric sensors), and photochemical reflectance index (PRI, from narrow-band radiometric sensors); - visible and near-infrared PhenoCam (http://phenocam.sr.unh.edu) canopy imagery; - multi-angular narrowband hyperspectral canopy reflectance (AMSPEC, in 2012); and - beginning in 2013, hyperspectral and thermal canopy imagery. Together with eddy covariance measurements of CO2 and water fluxes from the Harvard Forest AmeriFlux site, located in similar forest about 1 km to the east, on-the-ground visual observations of phenology, and continuous stem diameter measurements with automated band dendrometers, these data provide an unusually detailed view of phenological processes at scales from leaves to trees to

  20. Polarimetric, Two-Color, Photon-Counting Laser Altimeter Measurements of Forest Canopy Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, David J.; Dabney, Philip W.; Valett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Laser altimeter measurements of forest stands with distinct structures and compositions have been acquired at 532 nm (green) and 1064 nm (near-infrared) wavelengths and parallel and perpendicular polarization states using the Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon Counting Lidar (SIMPL). The micropulse, single photon ranging measurement approach employed by SIMPL provides canopy structure measurements with high vertical and spatial resolution. Using a height distribution analysis method adapted from conventional, 1064 nm, full-waveform lidar remote sensing, the sensitivity of two parameters commonly used for above-ground biomass estimation are compared as a function of wavelength. The results for the height of median energy (HOME) and canopy cover are for the most part very similar, indicating biomass estimations using lidars operating at green and near-infrared wavelengths will yield comparable estimates. The expected detection of increasing depolarization with depth into the canopies due to volume multiple-scattering was not observed, possibly due to the small laser footprint and the small detector field of view used in the SIMPL instrument. The results of this work provide pathfinder information for NASA's ICESat-2 mission that will employ a 532 nm, micropulse, photon counting laser altimeter.

  1. Relative abundance of amphibians in forest canopy gaps of natural origin vs. timber harvest origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strojny, C. A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale canopy gaps created by logging may retain adequate habitat structure to maintain amphibian abundance. We used pitfalls with drift fences to measure relative abundance of amphibians in 44 harvested gaps, 19 natural treefall gaps, and 36 closed-canopy forest plots. Metamorphs had relatively lower capture rates in large harvest gaps for Ambystoma maculatum, Lithobates catesbeianus, L. clamitans, and L. sylvaticus but we did not detect statistically significant (p < 0.1 differences among gap types for Lithobates palustris metamorphs. L. clamitans juveniles and L. sylvaticus juveniles and adults had relatively lower capture rates in large harvest gaps. For juvenile-adult A. maculatum, we caught relatively fewer individuals in all gap types than in closed-canopy areas. Some groups with overall lower capture rates (immature Plethodon cinereus, juvenile L. palustris had mixed differences among gap types, and Notophthalmus viridescens (efts and adult P. cinereus showed no differences among gap types. One species, L. clamitans, was captured more often at gap edges than gap centers. These results suggest that harvest gaps, especially small gaps, provided habitat similar to natural gaps for some, but not all, amphibian species or life-stages.

  2. Spatial and temporal variation in the canopy cover in a tropical semi-deciduous forest

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    Edmilson Bianchini

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was developed in the Mata dos Godoy State Park (23° 27’S, 51° 15’W South Brazil which present great environmental heterogeneity when its north portion (ridge is compared with the southern portion (valley, where there are some flooded areas. The forest formation is classified as tropical semi-deciduous forest. Spatial and temporal variations in the degree of the canopy cover were compared at flooded and unflooded sites. The measures were taken seasonally in 100m² plots using a spherical densiometer from spring 1995 to winter 1996. The flooded area was more open and lighter and had a greater spatial and temporal variation in the canopy cover than the unflooded areas. The greater heterogeneity in the flooded area could be due to structural characteristics of the canopy (greater spacing between individual trees, lower canopy and less stratified canopy, more frequent natural disturbances and a greater degree of deciduousness. These causes seemed to be related to the presence of the river and flooding.Este estudo foi desenvolvido no Parque Estadual Mata dos Godoy (23° 27’ S, 51° 15’ W, região Sul do Brasil. O Parque apresenta grande heterogeneidade ambiental quando as partes norte (espigão e sul (fundo de vale são comparadas. A floresta é classificada como tropical semi-decidual. As variações espaciais e temporais no grau de cobertura do dossel foram comparadas em sítios esporadicamente alagáveis e não alagáveis do Parque. Leituras foram realizadas sazonalmente, em parcelas de 100 m², com um densiômetro esférico, da primavera de 1995 até o inverno de 1996. A área alagável apresentou maior variação espacial e temporal na cobertura do dossel do que as áreas não alagáveis, indicando ser mais aberta e mais iluminada. Esta maior heterogeneidade da área alagável pode ser devido às características estruturais do dossel (maior espaçamento entre indivíduos arbóreos, dossel mais baixo e menos estratificado

  3. Mapping Above-Ground Biomass in a Tropical Forest in Cambodia Using Canopy Textures Derived from Google Earth

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    Minerva Singh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a modelling framework for utilizing very high-resolution (VHR aerial imagery for monitoring stocks of above-ground biomass (AGB in a tropical forest in Southeast Asia. Three different texture-based methods (grey level co-occurrence metric (GLCM, Gabor wavelets and Fourier-based textural ordination (FOTO were used in conjunction with two different machine learning (ML-based regression techniques (support vector regression (SVR and random forest (RF regression. These methods were implemented on both 50-cm resolution Digital Globe data extracted from Google Earth™ (GE and 8-cm commercially obtained VHR imagery. This study further examines the role of forest biophysical parameters, such as ground-measured canopy cover and vertical canopy height, in explaining AGB distribution. Three models were developed using: (i horizontal canopy variables (i.e., canopy cover and texture variables plus vertical canopy height; (ii horizontal variables only; and (iii texture variables only. AGB was variable across the site, ranging from 51.02 Mg/ha to 356.34 Mg/ha. GE-based AGB estimates were comparable to those derived from commercial aerial imagery. The findings demonstrate that novel use of this array of texture-based techniques with GE imagery can help promote the wider use of freely available imagery for low-cost, fine-resolution monitoring of forests parameters at the landscape scale.

  4. Accuracy of Kinematic Positioning Using Global Satellite Navigation Systems under Forest Canopies

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    Harri Kaartinen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A harvester enables detailed roundwood data to be collected during harvesting operations by means of the measurement apparatus integrated into its felling head. These data can be used to improve the efficiency of wood procurement and also replace some of the field measurements, and thus provide both less costly and more detailed ground truth for remote sensing based forest inventories. However, the positional accuracy of harvester-collected tree data is not sufficient currently to match the accuracy per individual trees achieved with remote sensing data. The aim in the present study was to test the accuracy of various instruments utilizing global satellite navigation systems (GNSS in motion under forest canopies of varying densities to enable us to get an understanding of the current state-of-the-art in GNSS-based positioning under forest canopies. Tests were conducted using several different combinations of GNSS and inertial measurement unit (IMU mounted on an all-terrain vehicle (ATV “simulating” a moving harvester. The positions of 224 trees along the driving route were measured using a total-station and real-time kinematic GPS. These trees were used as reference items. The position of the ATV was obtained using GNSS and IMU with an accuracy of 0.7 m (root mean squared error (RMSE for 2D positions. For the single-frequency GNSS receivers, the RMSE of real-time 2D GNSS positions was 4.2–9.3 m. Based on these results, it seems that the accuracy of novel single-frequency GNSS devices is not so dependent on forest conditions, whereas the performance of the tested geodetic dual-frequency receiver is very sensitive to the visibility of the satellites. When post-processing can be applied, especially when combined with IMU data, the improvement in the accuracy of the dual-frequency receiver was significant.

  5. Measurements of soil and canopy exchange rates in the Amazon rain forest using Rn-222

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbore, S. E.; Keller, M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Da Costa, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements were taken of the emission of Rn-222 from Amazon forest rocks and soils and used as a tracer of ventilation of the forest canopy layer at night. It was determined that the greatest resistance to transfer of trace gases from the soil to the atmosphere lies in the soil air space. Profiles of Rn-222 and CO2 showed steepest concentration gradients in the layer between 0 and 3 m above soil surface. Aerodynamic resistances calculated for this layer from Rn-222 and CO2 varied from 1.6 to 18 s/cm, with greater resistance during the afternoon than at night. The resistance to exchange with air from the entire 41 m layer below the canopy averaged 4.8 s/cm during 13 nights of CO2 profiles. The calculated average time to flush the layer below 41 m is 5.5 hr, and it is concluded that this indicates that significant exchange occurs despite nocturnal stratification.

  6. Canopy transpiration of pure and mixed forest stands with variable abundance of European beech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Tobias; Horna, Viviana; Leuschner, Christoph

    2012-06-01

    SummaryThe importance of tree species identity and diversity for biogeochemical cycles in forests is not well understood. In the past, forestry has widely converted mixed forests to pure stands while contemporary forest policy often prefers mixed stands again. However, the hydrological consequences of these changes remain unclear. We tested the hypotheses (i) that significant differences in water use per ground area exist among the tree species of temperate mixed forests and that these differences are more relevant for the amount of stand-level canopy transpiration (Ec) than putative complementarity effects of tree water use, and (ii) that the seasonal patterns of Ec in mixed stands are significantly influenced by the identity of the present tree species. We measured xylem sap flux during 2005 (average precipitation) and 2006 (relatively dry) synchronously in three nearby old-growth forest stands on similar soil differing in the abundance of European beech (pure beech stand, 3-species stand with 70% beech, 5-species stand with species stand than in the two stands with moderate to high beech presence (158 vs. 97 and 101 mm yr-1); in the dry summer 2006, all stands converged toward similar Ec totals (128-139 mm yr-1). Species differences in Ec were large on a sapwood area basis, reflecting a considerable variation in hydraulic architecture and leaf conductance regulation among the co-existing species. Moreover, transpiration per crown projection area (ECA) also differed up to 5-fold among the different species in the mixed stands, probably reflecting contrasting sapwood/crown area ratios. We conclude that Ec is not principally higher in mixed forests than in pure beech stands. However, tree species-specific traits have an important influence on the height of Ec and affect its seasonal variation. Species with a relatively high ECA (notably Tilia) may exhaust soil water reserves early in summer, thereby increasing drought stress in dry years and possibly reducing

  7. Forest-atmosphere BVOC exchange in diverse and structurally complex canopies: 1-D modeling of a mid-successional forest in northern Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Alexander M.; Cheng, Susan J.; Ashworth, Kirsti; Guenther, Alex B.; Hardiman, Brady; Bohrer, Gil; Steiner, A. L.

    2015-11-01

    Foliar emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC)dimportant precursors of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosolsdvary widely by vegetation type. Modeling studies to date typi-cally represent the canopy as a single dominant tree type or a blend of tree types, yet many forests are diverse with trees of varying height. To assess the sensitivity of biogenic emissions to tree height vari-ation, we compare two 1-D canopy model simulations in which BVOC emission potentials are homo-geneous or heterogeneous with canopy depth. The heterogeneous canopy emulates the mid-successional forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). In this case, high-isoprene-emitting fo-liage (e.g., aspen and oak) is constrained to the upper canopy, where higher sunlight availability increases the light-dependent isoprene emission, leading to 34% more isoprene and its oxidation products as compared to the homogeneous simulation. Isoprene declines from aspen mortality are 10% larger when heterogeneity is considered. Overall, our results highlight the importance of adequately representing complexities of forest canopy structure when simulating light-dependent BVOC emissions and chemistry.

  8. Scale-dependent effects of post-fire canopy cover on snowpack depth in montane coniferous forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jens T

    2017-09-01

    Winter snowpack in dry montane regions provides a valuable ecosystem service by storing water into the growing season. Wildfire in coniferous montane forests has the potential to indirectly affect snowpack accumulation and ablation (mass loss) rates by reducing canopy cover, which reduces canopy interception of snow but also increases solar radiation and wind speed. These counteracting effects create uncertainty regarding the canopy conditions that maximize post-fire snowpack duration, which is of concern as montane regions across the western United States experience increasingly warm, dry winters with below-average snowpack. The net effect of wildfire on snowpack depth and duration across the landscape is uncertain, and likely scale dependent. In this study, I tested whether intermediate levels of wildfire severity maximize snowpack depth by increasing accumulation while slowing ablation, using gridded, repeated snow depth measurements from three fires in the Sierra Nevada of California. Increasing fire severity had a strong negative effect on snowpack depth, suggesting that increased ablation after fire, rather than increased accumulation, was the dominant control over snowpack duration. Contrary to expectations, the unburned forest condition had the highest overall snowpack depth, and mean snow depth among all site visits was reduced by 78% from unburned forest to high-severity fire. However, at the individual tree scale, snowpack depth was greater under canopy openings than underneath canopy, controlling for effects of fire severity and aspect. This apparent paradox in snowpack response to fire at the stand vs. individual tree scales is likely due to greater variation in canopy cover within unburned and very low severity areas, which creates smaller areas for snow accumulation while reducing ablation via shading. Management efforts to maximize snowpack duration in montane forests should focus on retaining fine-scale heterogeneity in forest structure. © 2017 by

  9. Interactions between Canopy Structure and Herbaceous Biomass along Environmental Gradients in Moist Forest and Dry Miombo Woodland of Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deo D Shirima

    Full Text Available We have limited understanding of how tropical canopy foliage varies along environmental gradients, and how this may in turn affect forest processes and functions. Here, we analyse the relationships between canopy leaf area index (LAI and above ground herbaceous biomass (AGBH along environmental gradients in a moist forest and miombo woodland in Tanzania. We recorded canopy structure and herbaceous biomass in 100 permanent vegetation plots (20 m × 40 m, stratified by elevation. We quantified tree species richness, evenness, Shannon diversity and predominant height as measures of structural variability, and disturbance (tree stumps, soil nutrients and elevation as indicators of environmental variability. Moist forest and miombo woodland differed substantially with respect to nearly all variables tested. Both structural and environmental variables were found to affect LAI and AGBH, the latter being additionally dependent on LAI in moist forest but not in miombo, where other factors are limiting. Combining structural and environmental predictors yielded the most powerful models. In moist forest, they explained 76% and 25% of deviance in LAI and AGBH, respectively. In miombo woodland, they explained 82% and 45% of deviance in LAI and AGBH. In moist forest, LAI increased non-linearly with predominant height and linearly with tree richness, and decreased with soil nitrogen except under high disturbance. Miombo woodland LAI increased linearly with stem density, soil phosphorous and nitrogen, and decreased linearly with tree species evenness. AGBH in moist forest decreased with LAI at lower elevations whilst increasing slightly at higher elevations. AGBH in miombo woodland increased linearly with soil nitrogen and soil pH. Overall, moist forest plots had denser canopies and lower AGBH compared with miombo plots. Further field studies are encouraged, to disentangle the direct influence of LAI on AGBH from complex interrelationships between stand

  10. Nitrous oxide fluxes from forest floor, tree stems and canopies of boreal tree species during spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haikarainen, Iikka; Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Machacova, Katerina; Pihlatie, Mari

    2017-04-01

    Boreal forests are considered as small sources of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) due to microbial N2O production in the soils. Recent evidence shows that trees may play an important role in N2O exchange of forest ecosystems by offering pathways for soil produced N2O to the atmosphere. To confirm magnitude, variability and the origin of the tree mediated N2O emissions more research is needed, especially in boreal forests which have been in a minority in such investigation. We measured forest floor, tree stem and shoot N2O exchange of three boreal tree species at the beginning of the growing season (13.4.-13.6.2015) at SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, located in Southern Finland (61˚ 51´N, 24˚ 17´E, 181 a.s.l.). The fluxes were measured in silver birch (Betula pendula), downy birch (B. pubescens) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) on two sites with differing soil type and characteristics (paludified and mineral soil), vegetation cover and forest structure. The aim was to study the vertical profile of N2O fluxes at stem level and to observe temporal changes in N2O fluxes over the beginning of the growing season. The N2O exchange was determined using the static chamber technique and gas chromatographic analyses. Scaffold towers were used for measurements at multiple stem heights and at the canopy level. Overall, the N2O fluxes from the forest floor and trees at both sites were very small and close to the detection limit. The measured trees mainly emitted N2O from their stems and shoots, while the forest floor acted as a sink of N2O at the paludified site and as a small source of N2O at the mineral soil site. Stem emissions from all the trees at both sites were on average below 0.5 μg N2O m-2 of stem area h-1, and the shoot emissions varied between 0.2 and 0.5 ng N2O m-2 g-1 dry biomass. When the N2O fluxes were scaled up to the whole forest ecosystem, based on the tree biomass and stand density, the N2O emissions from birch and spruce trees at the paludified site

  11. Frugivory in Canopy Plants in a Western Amazonian Forest: Dispersal Systems, Phylogenetic Ensembles and Keystone Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Pablo R; Link, Andrés; González-Caro, Sebastian; Torres-Jiménez, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Frugivory is a widespread mutualistic interaction in which frugivores obtain nutritional resources while favoring plant recruitment through their seed dispersal services. Nonetheless, how these complex interactions are organized in diverse communities, such as tropical forests, is not fully understood. In this study we evaluated the existence of plant-frugivore sub-assemblages and their phylogenetic organization in an undisturbed western Amazonian forest in Colombia. We also explored for potential keystone plants, based on network analyses and an estimate of the amount of fruit going from plants to frugivores. We carried out diurnal observations on 73 canopy plant species during a period of two years. During focal tree sampling, we recorded frugivore identity, the duration of each individual visit, and feeding rates. We did not find support for the existence of sub assemblages, such as specialized vs. generalized dispersal systems. Visitation rates on the vast majority of canopy species were associated with the relative abundance of frugivores, in which ateline monkeys (i.e. Lagothrix and Ateles) played the most important roles. All fruiting plants were visited by a variety of frugivores and the phylogenetic assemblage was random in more than 67% of the cases. In cases of aggregation, the plant species were consumed by only primates or only birds, and filters were associated with fruit protection and likely chemical content. Plants suggested as keystone species based on the amount of pulp going from plants to frugivores differ from those suggested based on network approaches. Our results suggest that in tropical forests most tree-frugivore interactions are generalized, and abundance should be taken into account when assessing the most important plants for frugivores.

  12. Tracking the Creation of Tropical Forest Canopy Gaps with UAV Computer Vision Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandois, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of canopy gaps is fundamental for shaping forest structure and is an important component of ecosystem function. Recent time-series of airborne LIDAR have shown great promise for improving understanding of the spatial distribution and size of forest gaps. However, such work typically looks at gap formation across multiple years and important intra-annual variation in gap dynamics remains unknown. Here we present findings on the intra-annual dynamics of canopy gap formation within the 50 ha forest dynamics plot of Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama based on unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) remote sensing. High-resolution imagery (7 cm GSD) over the 50 ha plot was obtained regularly (≈ every 10 days) beginning October 2014 using a UAV equipped with a point and shoot camera. Imagery was processed into three-dimensional (3D) digital surface models (DSMs) using automated computer vision structure from motion / photogrammetric methods. New gaps that formed between each UAV flight were identified by subtracting DSMs between each interval and identifying areas of large deviation. A total of 48 new gaps were detected from 2014-10-02 to 2015-07-23, with sizes ranging from less than 20 m2 to greater than 350 m2. The creation of new gaps was also evaluated across wet and dry seasons with 4.5 new gaps detected per month in the dry season (Jan. - May) and 5.2 per month outside the dry season (Oct. - Jan. & May - July). The incidence of gap formation was positively correlated with ground-surveyed liana stem density (R2 = 0.77, p UAV remote sensing.

  13. Frugivory in Canopy Plants in a Western Amazonian Forest: Dispersal Systems, Phylogenetic Ensembles and Keystone Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo R Stevenson

    Full Text Available Frugivory is a widespread mutualistic interaction in which frugivores obtain nutritional resources while favoring plant recruitment through their seed dispersal services. Nonetheless, how these complex interactions are organized in diverse communities, such as tropical forests, is not fully understood. In this study we evaluated the existence of plant-frugivore sub-assemblages and their phylogenetic organization in an undisturbed western Amazonian forest in Colombia. We also explored for potential keystone plants, based on network analyses and an estimate of the amount of fruit going from plants to frugivores. We carried out diurnal observations on 73 canopy plant species during a period of two years. During focal tree sampling, we recorded frugivore identity, the duration of each individual visit, and feeding rates. We did not find support for the existence of sub assemblages, such as specialized vs. generalized dispersal systems. Visitation rates on the vast majority of canopy species were associated with the relative abundance of frugivores, in which ateline monkeys (i.e. Lagothrix and Ateles played the most important roles. All fruiting plants were visited by a variety of frugivores and the phylogenetic assemblage was random in more than 67% of the cases. In cases of aggregation, the plant species were consumed by only primates or only birds, and filters were associated with fruit protection and likely chemical content. Plants suggested as keystone species based on the amount of pulp going from plants to frugivores differ from those suggested based on network approaches. Our results suggest that in tropical forests most tree-frugivore interactions are generalized, and abundance should be taken into account when assessing the most important plants for frugivores.

  14. Effects of canopy tree species on belowground biogeochemistry in a lowland wet tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Adrienne B.; Reed, Sasha C.; Townsend, Alan R.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical rain forests are known for their high biological diversity, but the effects of plant diversity on important ecosystem processes in this biome remain unclear. Interspecies differences in both the demand for nutrients and in foliar and litter nutrient concentrations could drive variations in both the pool sizes and fluxes of important belowground resources, yet our understanding of the effects and importance of aboveground heterogeneity on belowground biogeochemistry is poor, especially in the species-rich forests of the wet tropics. To investigate the effects of individual tree species on belowground biogeochemical processes, we used both field and laboratory studies to examine how carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) cycles vary under nine different canopy tree species – including three legume and six non-legume species – that vary in foliar nutrient concentrations in a wet tropical forest in southwestern Costa Rica. We found significant differences in belowground C, N and P cycling under different canopy tree species: total C, N and P pools in standing litter varied by species, as did total soil and microbial C and N pools. Rates of soil extracellular acid phosphatase activity also varied significantly among species and functional groups, with higher rates of phosphatase activity under legumes. In addition, across all tree species, phosphatase activity was significantly positively correlated with litter N/P ratios, suggesting a tight coupling between relative N and P inputs and resource allocation to P acquisition. Overall, our results suggest the importance of aboveground plant community composition in promoting belowground biogeochemical heterogeneity at relatively small spatial scales.

  15. The accuracy of large-area forest canopy cover estimation using Landsat in boreal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi; Korhonen, Lauri; Hovi, Aarne; Rönnholm, Petri; Rautiainen, Miina

    2016-12-01

    Large area prediction of continuous field of tree cover i.e., canopy cover (CC) using Earth observation data is of high interest in practical forestry, ecology, and climate change mitigation activities. We report the accuracy of using Landsat images for CC prediction in boreal forests validated with field reference plots (N = 250) covering large variation in latitude, forest structure, species composition, and site type. We tested two statistical models suitable for estimating CC: the beta regression (BetaReg) and random forest (RanFor). Landsat-based predictors utilized include individual bands, spectral vegetation indices (SVI), and Tasseled cap (Tass) features. Additionally, we tested an alternative model based on spectral mixture analysis (SMA). Finally, we carried out a first validation in boreal forests of the recently published Landsat Tree Cover Continuous (TCC) global product. Results showed simple BetaReg with red band reflectance provided the highest prediction accuracy (leave-site-out RMSECV 13.7%; R2CV 0.59; biasCV 0.5%). Spectral transformations into SVI and Tass did not improve accuracy. Including additional predictors did not significantly improve accuracy either. Nonlinear model RanFor did not outperform BetaReg. The alternative SMA model did not outperform the empirical models. However, empirical models cannot resolve the underestimation of high cover and overestimation of low cover. SMA prediction errors appeared less dependent on forest structure, while there seemed to be a potential for improvement by accounting for endmember variability of different tree species. Finally, using temporally concurrent observations, we showed the reasonably good accuracy of Landsat TCC product in boreal forests (RMSE 13.0%; R2 0.53; bias -2.1%), however with a tendency to underestimate high cover.

  16. Closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    At least an easier task than I have carried out the previous hour when we discussed the preliminary conclusions and recommendations has, as a compensation I guess, been given to me as well. To say a few words as a closure of this symposium. The beginning of such a series of closing statements is mos

  17. Combining sap flow meas- urement-based canopy stomatal conductance and 13C discrimination to estimate forest carbon assimilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ping; LU Ping; MA Ling; SUN Guchou; RAO Xingquan; CAI Xian; ZENG Xiaoping

    2005-01-01

    The available methods for studying C uptake of forest and their problems in practices are reviewed, and a new approach to combining sap flow and 13C techniques is proposed in this paper. This approach, obtained through strict mathematic derivation, combines sap flow measurement-based canopy stomatal conductance and 13C discrimination to estimate instantaneous carbon assimilation rate of a forest. Namely the mean canopy stomatal conductance (gc) acquired from accurate measurement of sap flux density is integrated with the relationship between 13C discrimination (() and Ci/Ca (intercellular/ambient CO2 concentrations) and with that between Anet (net photosynthetic rate) and gCO2 (stomatal conductance for CO2) so that a new relation between forest C uptake and ( as well as gc is established. It is a new method of such kind for studying the C exchange between forest and atmosphere based on experimental ecology.

  18. Atmospheric deposition and canopy exchange of anions and cations in two plantation forests under acid rain influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Weijun; Ren, Huili; Darrel Jenerette, G.; Hui, Dafeng; Ren, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition as a widely concerned environmental problem in China has been less studied in plantation forests compared to urban and secondary forests, albeit they constitute 1/3 of the total forested areas of the country. We measured the rainwater amount and chemistry outside and beneath the canopies of two widely distributed plantations (Acacia mangium and Dimocarpus longan) in the severe acid rain influenced Pearl River Delta region of southeastern China for two years. Our results showed that the frequency of acid rain was 96% on the basis of pH value 88%) and NH (10-38%). The two tree species showed distinct impacts on rainfall redistribution and rainwater chemistry due to their differences in canopy architecture and leaf/bark texture, suggesting that species-specific effects should not be overlooked while assessing the acid deposition in forested areas.

  19. Vertical stratification of forest canopy for segmentation of understory trees within small-footprint airborne LiDAR point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamraz, Hamid; Contreras, Marco A.; Zhang, Jun

    2017-08-01

    Airborne LiDAR point cloud representing a forest contains 3D data, from which vertical stand structure even of understory layers can be derived. This paper presents a tree segmentation approach for multi-story stands that stratifies the point cloud to canopy layers and segments individual tree crowns within each layer using a digital surface model based tree segmentation method. The novelty of the approach is the stratification procedure that separates the point cloud to an overstory and multiple understory tree canopy layers by analyzing vertical distributions of LiDAR points within overlapping locales. The procedure does not make a priori assumptions about the shape and size of the tree crowns and can, independent of the tree segmentation method, be utilized to vertically stratify tree crowns of forest canopies. We applied the proposed approach to the University of Kentucky Robinson Forest - a natural deciduous forest with complex and highly variable terrain and vegetation structure. The segmentation results showed that using the stratification procedure strongly improved detecting understory trees (from 46% to 68%) at the cost of introducing a fair number of over-segmented understory trees (increased from 1% to 16%), while barely affecting the overall segmentation quality of overstory trees. Results of vertical stratification of the canopy showed that the point density of understory canopy layers were suboptimal for performing a reasonable tree segmentation, suggesting that acquiring denser LiDAR point clouds would allow more improvements in segmenting understory trees. As shown by inspecting correlations of the results with forest structure, the segmentation approach is applicable to a variety of forest types.

  20. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, Andreas; Korhonen, J. F. J.;

    2013-01-01

    and Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally...... of the leaf habit, i.e. deciduous versus evergreen, the majority of the canopy foliage N was retained within the trees. This was accomplished through an effective N re-translocation (beech), higher foliage longevity (fir) or both (boreal pine forest). In combination with data from a literature review...... peak summer canopy N content and also returned the largest amount of N in foliage litter, suggesting that higher N fertility leads to increased turnover in the ecosystem N cycle with higher risks of losses such as leaching and gas emissions....

  1. Tracking forest canopy stress from an automated proximal hyperspectral monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, William; van Gorsel, Eva; Hughes, Dale; Cabello-Leblic, Arantxa

    2016-04-01

    Increasing climate variability and associated extreme weather events such as drought are likely to profoundly affect ecosystems, as many ecological processes are more sensitive to climate extremes than to changes in the mean states. However, the response of vegetation to these changes is one of the largest uncertainties in projecting future climate, carbon sequestration, and water resources. This remains a major limitation for long term climate prediction models integrating vegetation dynamics that are crucial for modelling the interplay of water, carbon and radiation fluxes. Satellite remote sensing data, such as that from the MODIS, Landsat and Sentinel missions, are the only viable means to study national and global vegetation trends. Highly accurate in-situ data is critical to better understand and validate our satellite products. Here, we developed a fully automated hyperspectral monitoring system installed on a flux monitoring tower at a mature Eucalypt forest site. The monitoring system is designed to provide a long-term (May 2014 - ongoing) and high temporal characterisation (3 acquisitions per day) of the proximal forest canopy to an unprecedented level of detail. The system comprises four main instruments: a thermal imaging camera and hyperspectral line camera (spectral ranges 7.5-14 μm and 0.4-1 μm, respectively), an upward pointing spectrometer (350-1000 nm), and hemispherical camera. The time series of hyperspectral and thermal imagery and flux tower data provides a unique dataset to study the impacts of logging, nutrient, and heat stress on trees and forest. Specifically, the monitoring system can be used to derive a range of physiological and structural indices that are also derived by satellites, such as PRI, TCARI/OSAVI, and NDVI. The monitoring system, to our knowledge, is the first fully automated data acquisition system that allows for spatially resolved spectral measurements at the sub-crown scale. Preliminary results indicate that canopy

  2. Comparison of vertical resolved leaf area index measurements in an open canopy savannah-type forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piayda, Arndt; Cuntz, Matthias; Dubbert, Maren; Werner, Christiane; Pereira, Joao S.

    2013-04-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is a very important vegetation parameter in soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange modeling. To represent the structure of ecosystems in vertically distributed modeling, vertical resolved LAI distributions as well as vertically and angular gap fraction (Pgap) distributions are needed, but rarely available. Additionally, former studies neglect woody plant components when using light interception or digital photography based methods for LAI or Pgap observations. This can lead to significantly biased results, particularly in semi-arid savannah-type ecosystems with low LAI values. The objective of this study is to compare three non-destructive LAI measurement techniques in a sparse savannah-type cork oak canopy in central Portugal in order to derive vertically resolved LAI as well as vertically and angular resolved Pgap. Since established canopy analyzers, such as the LAI-2000, rely on diffuse light conditions, which are rarely realized in semi-arid regions, we also employed fast, digital cover photography (DCP) working independently from diffuse light conditions. We used vertical and angular distributed DCP and applied object-based image analysis techniques to exclude woody plant components from Pgap estimation and LAI determination. We compared the results with vertically distributed LAI-2000 measurements, and additionally with vertical estimates based on easily measurable forest canopy parameters. We employed bootstrap resampling methods to determine the accuracy of all measurements depending on sample size. Leaf inclination measurements indicate planophile leaf orientation. Thus LAI was calculated with Pgap and the leaf inclination information. This led to a spatial averaged LAI of 0.52 +- 0.06 for DCP while LAI-2000 measurements resulted in 0.67 +- 0.07. Uncertainty bounds of LAI converge much faster with increasing sample size for the DCP than for the LAI-2000. This allows a more efficient sampling design, which is of great importance in

  3. Estimation of Moisture Content of Forest Canopy and Floor from SAR Data Part I: Volume Scattering Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, M.; Saatchi, S.

    1996-01-01

    To understand and predict the functioning of forest biomes, their interaction with the atmosphere, and their growth rates, the knowledge of moisture content of their canopy and the floor soil is essential. The synthetic aperture radar on airborne and spaceborne platforms has proven to be a flexible tool for measuring electromagnetic back- scattering properties of vegetation related to their moisture content.

  4. AREA-BASED SNOW DAMAGE CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST CANOPIES USING BI- TEMPORAL LIDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vastaranta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Multitemporal LiDAR data provide means for mapping structural changes in forest canopies. We demonstrate the use of area-based estimation method for snow damage assessment. Change features of bi-temporal LiDAR point height distributions were used as predictors in combination with in situ training data. In the winter 2009–2010, snow damages occurred in Hyytiälä (62°N, 24°E, southern Finland. Snow load resulted in broken, bent and fallen trees changing the canopy structure. The damages were documented at the tree level at permanent field plots and dense LiDAR data from 2007 and 2010 were used in the analyses. A 5 × 5-m grid was established in one pine%ndash;spruce stand and change metrics from the LiDAR point height distribution were extracted for the cells. Cells were classified as damaged (n = 43 or undamaged (n = 42 based on the field data. Stepwise logistic regression detected the damaged cells with an overall accuracy of 78.6% (Kappa = 0.57. The best predictors were differences in h-distribution percentage points 5, 35, 40, 50 and 70 of first-or-single return data. The tentative results from the single stand suggest that dense bi-temporal LiDAR data and an area-based approach could be feasible in mapping canopy changes. The accuracy of the point h-distribution is dependent on the pulse density per grid cell. Depending on the time span between LiDAR acquisitions, the natural changes of the h- distributions due to tree growth need to be accounted for as well as differences in the scanning geometry, which can substantially affect the LiDAR h-metrics.

  5. Assessing and Correcting Topographic Effects on Forest Canopy Height Retrieval Using Airborne LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhugeng Duan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Topography affects forest canopy height retrieval based on airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR data a lot. This paper proposes a method for correcting deviations caused by topography based on individual tree crown segmentation. The point cloud of an individual tree was extracted according to crown boundaries of isolated individual trees from digital orthophoto maps (DOMs. Normalized canopy height was calculated by subtracting the elevation of centres of gravity from the elevation of point cloud. First, individual tree crown boundaries are obtained by carrying out segmentation on the DOM. Second, point clouds of the individual trees are extracted based on the boundaries. Third, precise DEM is derived from the point cloud which is classified by a multi-scale curvature classification algorithm. Finally, a height weighted correction method is applied to correct the topological effects. The method is applied to LiDAR data acquired in South China, and its effectiveness is tested using 41 field survey plots. The results show that the terrain impacts the canopy height of individual trees in that the downslope side of the tree trunk is elevated and the upslope side is depressed. This further affects the extraction of the location and crown of individual trees. A strong correlation was detected between the slope gradient and the proportions of returns with height differences more than 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 m in the total returns, with coefficient of determination R2 of 0.83, 0.76, and 0.60 (n = 41, respectively.

  6. Assessing and correcting topographic effects on forest canopy height retrieval using airborne LiDAR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhugeng; Zhao, Dan; Zeng, Yuan; Zhao, Yujin; Wu, Bingfang; Zhu, Jianjun

    2015-05-26

    Topography affects forest canopy height retrieval based on airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data a lot. This paper proposes a method for correcting deviations caused by topography based on individual tree crown segmentation. The point cloud of an individual tree was extracted according to crown boundaries of isolated individual trees from digital orthophoto maps (DOMs). Normalized canopy height was calculated by subtracting the elevation of centres of gravity from the elevation of point cloud. First, individual tree crown boundaries are obtained by carrying out segmentation on the DOM. Second, point clouds of the individual trees are extracted based on the boundaries. Third, precise DEM is derived from the point cloud which is classified by a multi-scale curvature classification algorithm. Finally, a height weighted correction method is applied to correct the topological effects. The method is applied to LiDAR data acquired in South China, and its effectiveness is tested using 41 field survey plots. The results show that the terrain impacts the canopy height of individual trees in that the downslope side of the tree trunk is elevated and the upslope side is depressed. This further affects the extraction of the location and crown of individual trees. A strong correlation was detected between the slope gradient and the proportions of returns with height differences more than 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 m in the total returns, with coefficient of determination R2 of 0.83, 0.76, and 0.60 (n = 41), respectively.

  7. Organismic-Scale Remote Sensing of Canopy Foliar Traits in Lowland Tropical Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dana Chadwick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne high fidelity imaging spectroscopy (HiFIS holds great promise for bridging the gap between field studies of functional diversity, which are spatially limited, and satellite detection of ecosystem properties, which lacks resolution to understand within landscape dynamics. We use Carnegie Airborne Observatory HiFIS data combined with field collected foliar trait data to develop quantitative prediction models of foliar traits at the tree-crown level across over 1000 ha of humid tropical forest. We predicted foliar leaf mass per area (LMA as well as foliar concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium and potassium for canopy emergent trees (R2: 0.45–0.67, relative RMSE: 11%–14%. Correlations between remotely sensed model coefficients for these foliar traits are similar to those found in laboratory studies, suggesting that the detection of these mineral nutrients is possible through their biochemical stoichiometry. Maps derived from HiFIS provide quantitative foliar trait information across a tropical forest landscape at fine spatial resolution, and along environmental gradients. Multi-nutrient maps implemented at the fine organismic scale will subsequently provide new insight to the functional biogeography and biological diversity of tropical forest ecosystems.

  8. Taxonomic identity determines N2 fixation by canopy trees across lowland tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzburger, Nina; Hedin, Lars O

    2016-01-01

    Legumes capable of fixing atmospheric N2 are abundant and diverse in many tropical forests, but the factors determining ecological patterns in fixation are unresolved. A long-standing idea is that fixation depends on soil nutrients (N, P or Mo), but recent evidence shows that fixation may also differ among N2-fixing species. We sampled canopy-height trees across five species and one species group of N2-fixers along a landscape P gradient, and manipulated P and Mo to seedlings in a shadehouse. Our results identify taxonomy as the major determinant of fixation, with P (and possibly Mo) only influencing fixation following tree-fall disturbances. While 44% of trees did not fix N2, other trees fixed at high rates, with two species functioning as superfixers across the landscape. Our results raise the possibility that fixation is determined by biodiversity, evolutionary history and species-specific traits (tree growth rate, canopy stature and response to disturbance) in the tropical biome.

  9. Consistent effects of canopy vs. understory nitrogen addition on the soil exchangeable cations and microbial community in two contrasting forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Leilei; Zhang, Hongzhi; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Weixin; Shao, Yuanhu; Ha, Denglong; Li, Yuanqiu; Zhang, Chuangmao; Cai, Xi-an; Rao, Xingquan; Lin, Yongbiao; Zhou, Lixia; Zhao, Ping; Ye, Qing; Zou, Xiaoming; Fu, Shenglei

    2016-05-15

    Anthropogenic N deposition has been well documented to cause substantial impacts on the chemical and biological properties of forest soils. In most studies, however, atmospheric N deposition has been simulated by directly adding N to the forest floor. Such studies thus ignored the potentially significant effect of some key processes occurring in forest canopy (i.e., nitrogen retention) and may therefore have incorrectly assessed the effects of N deposition on soils. Here, we conducted an experiment that included both understory addition of N (UAN) and canopy addition of N (CAN) in two contrasting forests (temperate deciduous forest vs. subtropical evergreen forest). The goal was to determine whether the effects on soil exchangeable cations and microbial biomass differed between CAN and UAN. We found that N addition reduced pH, BS (base saturation) and exchangeable Ca and increased exchangeable Al significantly only at the temperate JGS site, and reduced the biomass of most soil microbial groups only at the subtropical SMT site. Except for soil exchangeable Mn, however, effects on soil chemical properties and soil microbial community did not significantly differ between CAN and UAN. Although biotic and abiotic soil characteristics differ significantly and the responses of both soil exchangeable cations and microbial biomass were different between the two study sites, we found no significant interactive effects between study site and N treatment approach on almost all soil properties involved in this study. In addition, N addition rate (25 vs. 50 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) did not show different effects on soil properties under both N addition approaches. These findings did not support previous prediction which expected that, by bypassing canopy effects (i.e., canopy retention and foliage fertilization), understory addition of N would overestimate the effects of N deposition on forest soil properties, at least for short time scale.

  10. Seasonal Variation of Nutrient Resorption in Nine Canopy Trees of a Wet Tropical Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, T. E.; Lawrence, D.

    2006-12-01

    Withdrawal of nutrients at the time of leaf abscission (nutrient resorption) is a nutrient conserving mechanism that could play an important role in stand-level nutrient economy. Currently data on nutrient resorption in wet tropical forests and on how this process varies temporally are sparse. We evaluated the N and P resorption efficiency of nine rain forest canopy tree species in both wet and dry season months. In addition, we measured short-term (bi-weekly) variation in nutrient resorption in the two dominant tree species, Pentaclethra macroloba and Laetia procera, over a 4-month period. We hypothesized that nutrient resorption would be more efficient during the dry season months and that resorption would be low during periods of high rainfall. Contrary to expectations, P resorption efficiency was higher in the wet season for four of the nine canopy tree species, while N resorption did not differ seasonally. The low dry season P resorption efficiency found in this study may be the result of drought stress during short periods of low rainfall, leading to incomplete nutrient resorption from senescing leaves. Nutrient resorption also varied significantly over the short-term. Both P and N resorption efficiency increased in P. macroloba and L. procera as the wet season progressed. The variability in resorption was not related to rainfall or temperature. Instead, the senesced leaf concentrations were a simple proportion of green leaf nutrient concentrations, with short punctuated periods of high resorption efficiency that may be reflective of species-specific phenological events, such as fruit and leaf production. The different timing of the seasonal increase in nutrient resorption between L. procera and P. macroloba supports this hypothesis, deserving of further study.

  11. Prediction of Forest Canopy and Surface Fuels from Lidar and Satellite Time Series Data in a Bark Beetle-Affected Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C. Bright

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Wildfire behavior depends on the type, quantity, and condition of fuels, and the effect that bark beetle outbreaks have on fuels is a topic of current research and debate. Remote sensing can provide estimates of fuels across landscapes, although few studies have estimated surface fuels from remote sensing data. Here we predicted and mapped field-measured canopy and surface fuels from light detection and ranging (lidar and Landsat time series explanatory variables via random forest (RF modeling across a coniferous montane forest in Colorado, USA, which was affected by mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins approximately six years prior. We examined relationships between mapped fuels and the severity of tree mortality with correlation tests. RF models explained 59%, 48%, 35%, and 70% of the variation in available canopy fuel, canopy bulk density, canopy base height, and canopy height, respectively (percent root-mean-square error (%RMSE = 12–54%. Surface fuels were predicted less accurately, with models explaining 24%, 28%, 32%, and 30% of the variation in litter and duff, 1 to 100-h, 1000-h, and total surface fuels, respectively (%RMSE = 37–98%. Fuel metrics were negatively correlated with the severity of tree mortality, except canopy base height, which increased with greater tree mortality. Our results showed how bark beetle-caused tree mortality significantly reduced canopy fuels in our study area. We demonstrated that lidar and Landsat time series data contain substantial information about canopy and surface fuels and can be used for large-scale efforts to monitor and map fuel loads for fire behavior modeling at a landscape scale.

  12. Prediction of forest canopy and surface fuels from Lidar and satellite time series data in a bark beetle-affected forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Benjamin C.; Hudak, Andrew T.; Meddens, Arjan J.H.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Briggs, Jenny S.; Kennedy, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Wildfire behavior depends on the type, quantity, and condition of fuels, and the effect that bark beetle outbreaks have on fuels is a topic of current research and debate. Remote sensing can provide estimates of fuels across landscapes, although few studies have estimated surface fuels from remote sensing data. Here we predicted and mapped field-measured canopy and surface fuels from light detection and ranging (lidar) and Landsat time series explanatory variables via random forest (RF) modeling across a coniferous montane forest in Colorado, USA, which was affected by mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) approximately six years prior. We examined relationships between mapped fuels and the severity of tree mortality with correlation tests. RF models explained 59%, 48%, 35%, and 70% of the variation in available canopy fuel, canopy bulk density, canopy base height, and canopy height, respectively (percent root-mean-square error (%RMSE) = 12–54%). Surface fuels were predicted less accurately, with models explaining 24%, 28%, 32%, and 30% of the variation in litter and duff, 1 to 100-h, 1000-h, and total surface fuels, respectively (%RMSE = 37–98%). Fuel metrics were negatively correlated with the severity of tree mortality, except canopy base height, which increased with greater tree mortality. Our results showed how bark beetle-caused tree mortality significantly reduced canopy fuels in our study area. We demonstrated that lidar and Landsat time series data contain substantial information about canopy and surface fuels and can be used for large-scale efforts to monitor and map fuel loads for fire behavior modeling at a landscape scale.

  13. A virtual experiment on the effect of canopy and forest floor interception on subsurface flow behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrits, A. M. J.; Hopp, L.; McDonnell, J. J.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Pfister, L.

    2009-04-01

    From several field experiments we know that the soil moisture distribution is highly heterogeneous on a hillslope, and also lateral subsurface flow appears to develop irregular flow paths along its way downslope. However, knowledge is still lacking on which processes are causing this spatial distribution. One of the possible explanations could be interception. First of all, interception prevents a part of the rainfall to infiltrate in the unsaturated zone, which is immediately fed back to the atmosphere. This fast feedback is highly dependent on the vegetation density, and causes a spread in the distribution of the net rainfall. On the other hand, it appears that vegetation can also funnel rain water, causing hot spots of high infiltration. Finally, interception delays precipitation. Only after the interception storage has been filled, water can find its way down through several storages. To investigate the influence of interception on subsurface flow processes, detailed experimental data is required. Because this data is often not available and new or additional field campaigns are very labour intensive, a virtual experiment can be a helpful tool. A virtual experiment is a numerical experiment driven by collective field intelligence. It provides a learning tool to investigate the effect of separated processes in a complex system. We apply the concept of virtual modelling to investigate the effects of interception on subsurface flow processes. It will enable us to separate the effect of ‘no interception', ‘canopy interception only', and ‘both canopy and forest floor interception'. Furthermore, we shall explore if there occurs a change in flow paths patterns when we use lumped or distributed input data. We use the topography characteristics of the Panola hillslope (Georgia, USA). On this hillslope intensive trench and soil moisture measurements have been carried out. Since there are no detailed interception measurements at Panola, we use interception data from

  14. The Effect of Illumination and Viewing Geometry and Forest Canopies on the Estimation of Snow Cover Using Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Woodcock, C. E.; Melloh, R. A.; Davis, R. E.

    2003-12-01

    With the exception of cloud cover, the largest obstacle to producing a global daily snow cover product using remotely sensed data is the presence of the forests, which cover much of the seasonally snow-covered portion of the world. The presence of the forest canopy influences the radiance received by the sensor in such a way that the proportion of viewable snow within a pixel changes as a function of forest properties, topography and viewing position. To explore the potential effects of sun angle and viewing geometry of satellite systems such as NOAA AVHRR and MODIS on snow cover estimation, a program has been written to estimate viewable gap fractions (VGF) across landscapes based on the Li-Strahler geometric-optical (GO) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model. It computes a VGF map for a specified illumination and viewing geometry using maps of forest cover and species and terrain images of slope and aspect. This study explores the effect of illumination and viewing geometry and forest properties on the VGF for the Fool's Creek Intensive Study Area (ISA) in Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado. Intensive field measurements of the required parameters for the GO model and maps of forest properties are used to generate maps of viewable gap fractions. Hemispherical photos are used to validate model results. The results improve our understanding of the way forest canopies influence the estimation of snow cover using remotely sensed data.

  15. Influence of vegetation structure on lidar-derived canopy height and fractional cover in forested riparian buffers during leaf-off and leaf-on conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, Leah; Day, Rick; Chasmer, Laura; Taylor, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of canopy height (H) and fractional canopy cover (FC) derived from lidar data collected during leaf-on and leaf-off conditions are compared with field measurements from 80 forested riparian buffer plots. The purpose is to determine if existing lidar data flown in leaf-off conditions for applications such as terrain mapping can effectively estimate forested riparian buffer H and FC within a range of riparian vegetation types. Results illustrate that: 1) leaf-off and leaf-on lidar percentile estimates are similar to measured heights in all plots except those dominated by deciduous compound-leaved trees where lidar underestimates H during leaf off periods; 2) canopy height models (CHMs) underestimate H by a larger margin compared to percentile methods and are influenced by vegetation type (conifer needle, deciduous simple leaf or deciduous compound leaf) and canopy height variability, 3) lidar estimates of FC are within 10% of plot measurements during leaf-on periods, but are underestimated during leaf-off periods except in mixed and conifer plots; and 4) depth of laser pulse penetration lower in the canopy is more variable compared to top of the canopy penetration which may influence within canopy vegetation structure estimates. This study demonstrates that leaf-off lidar data can be used to estimate forested riparian buffer canopy height within diverse vegetation conditions and fractional canopy cover within mixed and conifer forests when leaf-on lidar data are not available.

  16. Assessing the performance of aerial image point cloud and spectral metrics in predicting boreal forest canopy cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, M.; Korhonen, L.; Kukkonen, M.; Packalen, P.

    2017-07-01

    Canopy cover (CC) is a variable used to describe the status of forests and forested habitats, but also the variable used primarily to define what counts as a forest. The estimation of CC has relied heavily on remote sensing with past studies focusing on satellite imagery as well as Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) using light detection and ranging (lidar). Of these, ALS has been proven highly accurate, because the fraction of pulses penetrating the canopy represents a direct measurement of canopy gap percentage. However, the methods of photogrammetry can be applied to produce point clouds fairly similar to airborne lidar data from aerial images. Currently there is little information about how well such point clouds measure canopy density and gaps. The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of aerial image point clouds for CC estimation and compare the results with those obtained using spectral data from aerial images and Landsat 5. First, we modeled CC for n = 1149 lidar plots using field-measured CCs and lidar data. Next, this data was split into five subsets in north-south direction (y-coordinate). Finally, four CC models (AerialSpectral, AerialPointcloud, AerialCombi (spectral + pointcloud) and Landsat) were created and they were used to predict new CC values to the lidar plots, subset by subset, using five-fold cross validation. The Landsat and AerialSpectral models performed with RMSEs of 13.8% and 12.4%, respectively. AerialPointcloud model reached an RMSE of 10.3%, which was further improved by the inclusion of spectral data; RMSE of the AerialCombi model was 9.3%. We noticed that the aerial image point clouds managed to describe only the outermost layer of the canopy and missed the details in lower canopy, which was resulted in weak characterization of the total CC variation, especially in the tails of the data.

  17. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, Andreas; Korhonen, J. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    of the leaf habit, i.e. deciduous versus evergreen, the majority of the canopy foliage N was retained within the trees. This was accomplished through an effective N re-translocation (beech), higher foliage longevity (fir) or both (boreal pine forest). In combination with data from a literature review......Seasonal and spatial variations in foliar nitrogen (N) parameters were investigated in three European forests with different tree species, viz. beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in Denmark, the Netherlands...... and Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally...

  18. Electromagnetic wave scattering from a forest or vegetation canopy - Ongoing research at the University of Texas at Arlington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Mostafa A.; Amar, Faouzi; Fung, Adrian K.

    1993-01-01

    The Wave Scattering Research Center at the University of Texas at Arlington has developed a scattering model for forest or vegetation, based on the theory of electromagnetic-wave scattering in random media. The model generalizes the assumptions imposed by earlier models, and compares well with measurements from several forest canopies. This paper gives a description of the model. It also indicates how the model elements are integrated to obtain the scattering characteristics of different forest canopies. The scattering characteristics may be displayed in the form of polarimetric signatures, represented by like- and cross-polarized scattering coefficients, for an elliptically-polarized wave, or in the form of signal-distribution curves. Results illustrating both types of scattering characteristics are given.

  19. Variation in foliar respiration and wood CO2 efflux rates among species and canopy layers in a wet tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Shinichi; Bedoya-Arrieta, Ricardo; Ryan, Michael G

    2015-02-01

    As tropical forests respond to environmental change, autotrophic respiration may consume a greater proportion of carbon fixed in photosynthesis at the expense of growth, potentially turning the forests into a carbon source. Predicting such a response requires that we measure and place autotrophic respiration in a complete carbon budget, but extrapolating measurements of autotrophic respiration from chambers to ecosystem remains a challenge. High plant species diversity and complex canopy structure may cause respiration rates to vary and measurements that do not account for this complexity may introduce bias in extrapolation more detrimental than uncertainty. Using experimental plantations of four native tree species with two canopy layers, we examined whether species and canopy layers vary in foliar respiration and wood CO2 efflux and whether the variation relates to commonly used scalars of mass, nitrogen (N), photosynthetic capacity and wood size. Foliar respiration rate varied threefold between canopy layers, ∼0.74 μmol m(-2) s(-1) in the overstory and ∼0.25 μmol m(-2) s(-1) in the understory, but little among species. Leaf mass per area, N and photosynthetic capacity explained some of the variation, but height explained more. Chamber measurements of foliar respiration thus can be extrapolated to the canopy with rates and leaf area specific to each canopy layer or height class. If area-based rates are sampled across canopy layers, the area-based rate may be regressed against leaf mass per area to derive the slope (per mass rate) to extrapolate to the canopy using the total leaf mass. Wood CO2 efflux varied 1.0-1.6 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for overstory trees and 0.6-0.9 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for understory species. The variation in wood CO2 efflux rate was mostly related to wood size, and little to species, canopy layer or height. Mean wood CO2 efflux rate per surface area, derived by regressing CO2 efflux per mass against the ratio of surface

  20. Correcting attenuation effects caused by interactions in the forest canopy in full-waveform airborne laser scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, K.; Stelling, N.; Maas, H.-G.

    2014-08-01

    Full-waveform airborne laser scanning offers a great potential for various forestry applications. Especially applications requiring information on the vertical structure of the lower canopy parts benefit from the great amount of information contained in waveform data. To enable the derivation of vertical forest canopy structure, the development of suitable voxel based data analysis methods is straightforward. Beyond extracting additional 3D points, it is very promising to derive the voxel attributes from the digitized waveform directly. For this purpose, the differential backscatter cross sections have to be projected into a Cartesian voxel structure. Thereby the voxel entries represent amplitudes of the cross section and can be interpreted as a local measure for the amount of pulse reflecting matter. However, the "history" of each laser echo pulse is characterized by attenuation effects caused by reflections in higher regions of the crown. As a result, the received waveform signals within the canopy have a lower amplitude than it would be observed for an identical structure without the previous canopy structure interactions (Romanczyk et al., 2012). If the biophysical structure is determined from the raw waveform data, material in the lower parts of the canopy is thus under-represented. To achieve a radiometrically correct voxel space representation the loss of signal strength caused by partial reflections on the path of a laser pulse through the canopy has to be compensated. In this paper, we present an integral approach correcting the waveform at each recorded sample. The basic idea of the procedure is to enhance the waveform intensity values in lower parts of the canopy for portions of the pulse intensity, which have been reflected (and thus blocked) in higher parts of the canopy. The paper will discuss the developed correction method and show results from a validation both with synthetic and real world data.

  1. Effects of topography, soil type and forest age on the frequency and size distribution of canopy gap disturbances in a tropical forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lobo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Treefall gaps are the major source of disturbance in most tropical forests. The frequency and size of these gaps have important implications for forest ecosystem processes as they can influence the functional trait distribution of tree communities, stand-level above-ground biomass and productivity. However, we still know little about the relative importance of environmental drivers of gap disturbance regimes because existing studies vary greatly in criteria used for defining gaps, in the spatial extent of the study area, and the spatial resolution of canopy height measurements. Here we use LiDAR (light detecting and ranging to explore how forest age, topography and soil type affect canopy disturbance patterns across a 1500 ha tropical forest landscape in central Panama. We characterize disturbance based on the frequency distribution of gap sizes (the "gap size distribution", and the area of the forest affected by gaps (the "gap area fraction". We found that slope and forest age had significant effects on the gap size distribution, with a higher frequency of large gaps associated with old-growth forests and more gentle slopes. Slope and forest age had similar effects on the gap area fraction, however gap area fraction was also affected by soil type and by aspect. We conclude that variation in disturbance patterns across the landscape can be linked to factors that act at the fine scale (such as aspect or slope, and factors that show heterogeneity at coarser scales (such as forest age or soil type. Awareness of the role of different environmental factors influencing gap formation can help scale-up the impacts of canopy disturbance on forest communities measured at the plot scale to landscape and regional scales.

  2. Leaf Surface Wettability and Implications for Drop Shedding and Evaporation from Forest Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, W.; Ebner, M.; Traiser, C.; Roth-Nebelsick, A.

    2012-05-01

    Wettability and retention capacity of leaf surfaces are parameters that contribute to interception of rain, fog or dew by forest canopies. Contrary to common expectation, hydrophobicity or wettability of a leaf do not dictate the stickiness of drops to leaves. Crucial for the adhesion of drops is the contact angle hysteresis, the difference between leading edge contact angle and trailing edge contact angle for a running drop. Other parameters that are dependent on the static contact angle are the maximum volume of drops that can stick to the surface and the persistence of an adhering drop with respect to evaporation. Adaption of contact angle and contact angle hysteresis allow one to pursue different strategies of drop control, for example efficient water shedding or maximum retention of adhering water. Efficient water shedding is achieved if contact angle hysteresis is low. Retention of (isolated) large drops requires a high contact angle hysteresis and a static contact angle of 65.5°, while maximum retention by optimum spacing of drops necessitates a high contact angle hysteresis and a static contact angle of 111.6°. Maximum persistence with respect to evaporation is obtained if the static contact angle amounts to 77.5°, together with a high contact angle hysteresis. It is to be expected that knowledge of these parameters can contribute to the capacity of a forest to intercept water.

  3. Estimation of biophysical properties of forest canopies using C-band microwave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, David E.; Badhwar, Gautam D.; Reyna, E.

    A scatterometer ranging experiment is described in which C-band data and boresight photography were collected using a helicopter so as to provide a capability to study scattering processes in forest canopies in the Superior National Forest in Minnesota. An inversion scheme is used to determine C-band volume extinction and scattering coefficients for high density aspen sites. Analysis of data thru the season indicates that VV, HH, and VH volume extinction coefficients change during the year and are presumably affected by the emergence and senescence of leaves. A linear relationship was observed between σ° (VV) and leaf area index for low and medium density aspen sites, but a large decrease occurred in σ° for both high density sites. Calculations using the Fung disk model, which accounts only for the leaves, shows an underestimate of σ° by a factor of 2 or 3 indicating that scattering by branches and soil background may be important at C-band.

  4. Characteristics of Light Availability Under Forest Canopies and Its Influences on Photosynthesis of Understory Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Y. H. Chen

    2003-01-01

    Available light under forest canopies includes two components, diffuse light and direct light (sunflecks), and is characterized as low and highly dynamic. Understory habitats under different forest types experience different light conditions. Sunflecks as a critical resource for understory plants have great importance on carbon gain of understory plants. Under the light-limiting habitat, understory plants exhibit a high light utilization efficiency attributed by a post-illumination CO2 uptake. Although different species have different photosynthetic responses, shade plants appear to be acclimated to respond more quickly and efficiently to sunflecks. This acclimation includes a faster induction, relatively lower rate of induction loss, lower photosynthetic compensation point, and higher water use efficiency. The process that shade plants harvest light energy is not well known. Studies of photosynthetic responses to sunflecks in natural conditions are rare. Little is known about constraints on sunfleck utilization, which may change seasonally. Extensive field studies in conjunction with laboratory investigations will be needed to further understand potential and actual constraints on sunfleck utilization. Most studies on photosynthetic responses to fluctuating light condition were done in the level of leaves. Fluctuating light utilization on the basis of whole plants and populations presents future challenges to ecologists.

  5. Forest Management in Earth System Modelling: a Vertically Discretised Canopy Description for ORCHIDEE and Effects on European Climate Since 1750

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, M.; Luyssaert, S.; Naudts, K.; Chen, Y.; Ryder, J.; Otto, J.; Valade, A.

    2015-12-01

    Forest management has the potential to impact surface physical characteristics to the same degree that changes in land cover do. The impacts of land cover changes on the global climate are well-known. Despite an increasingly detailed understanding of the potential for forest management to affect climate, none of the current generation of Earth system models account for forest management through their land surface modules. We addressed this gap by developing and reparameterizing the ORCHIDEE land surface model to simulate the biogeochemical and biophysical effects of forest management. Through vertical discretization of the forest canopy and corresponding modifications to the energy budget, radiation transfer, and carbon allocation, forest management can now be simulated much more realistically on the global scale. This model was used to explore the effect of forest management on European climate since 1750. Reparameterization was carried out to replace generic forest plant functional types with real tree species, covering the most dominant species across the continent. Historical forest management and land cover maps were created to run the simulations from 1600 until the present day. The model was coupled to the atmospheric model LMDz to explore differences in climate between 1750 and 2010 and attribute those differences to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and concurrent warming, land cover, species composition, and wood extraction. Although Europe's forest are considered a carbon sink in this century, our simulations show the modern forests are still experiencing carbon debt compared to their historical values.

  6. Dry deposition and canopy uptake in Mediterranean holm-oak forests estimated with a canopy budget model: A focus on N estimations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguillaume, L.; Izquieta-Rojano, S.; García-Gómez, H.; Elustondo, D.; Santamaría, J. M.; Alonso, R.; Avila, A.

    2017-03-01

    Bulk/wet and throughfall fluxes of major compounds were measured from June 2011 to June 2013 at four Mediterranean holm-oak (Quercus ilex) forests in the Iberian Peninsula. Regression analysis between net throughfall fluxes and precipitation indicated that the best defined canopy process was leaching for K+ and uptake for NH4+ at all sites. A more variable response between sites was found for Na+, Ca2+, SO42- and Cl-, which suggests that the interplay of dry deposition, leaching and uptake at the canopy was different depending on site climate and air quality characteristics. A canopy budget model (CBM) was used to try to discriminate between the canopy processes and enable to estimate dry deposition and uptake fluxes at three of the sites that complied with the model specifications. To derive N uptake, an efficiency factor of NH4+vs. NO3- uptake (xNH4) corresponding to moles of NH4+ taken up for each NO3- mol, has to be determined. Up to now, a value of 6 has been proposed for temperate forests, but we lack information for Mediterranean forests. Experimental determination of N absorption on Quercus ilex seedlings in Spain suggests efficiency factors from 1 to 6. Based on these values, a sensitivity analysis for xNH4 was performed and the NH4sbnd N and NO3sbnd N modeled dry deposition was compared with dry deposition estimated with independent methods (inferential modeling and washing of branches). At two sites in NE Spain under a milder Mediterranean climate, the best match was obtained for xNH4 = 6, corroborating results from European temperate forests. Based on this value, total DIN deposition was 12-13 kg N ha-1 y-1 at these sites. However, for a site in central Spain under drier conditions, variation of the NH4+ efficiency factor had little effect on DD estimates (which ranged from 2 to 2.6 kg N ha-1 y-1 with varying xNH4); when added to wet deposition, this produced a total N deposition in the range 2.6-3.4 kg N ha-1 y-1. Dry deposition was the predominant

  7. The Bonobo Pan paniscus (Mammalia: Primates: Hominidae nesting patterns and forest canopy layers in the Lake Tumba forests and Salonga National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bila-Isia Inogwabini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The description and differentiation of habitat types is a major concern in ecology.  This study examined relationships between Bonobo Pan paniscus nesting patterns and forest structure in the Lake Tumba Swampy Forests. Data on presence of fresh Bonobo nests, canopy cover, canopy structure, tree densities and tree basal areas were collected systematically along 134 transects at 400m and 800m intervals, and the leaf-covered area (LCA was calculated for each of seven forest types. I observed a significant correlation between bonobo nests and mixed mature forest/closed understory forest type (r=-0.730, df = 21, p <0.05, but not mixed mature forest/open understory, old secondary forest and young secondary forest.  Basal areas of non-nesting trees along transects did not differ significantly from those in sites where bonobos nested.  Higher LCA (55% and 55% occurred in nesting sites when compared with non-nesting sites (39% and 42% at elevations 4–8 m and 8–16 m above the soil.  There was greater leaf cover in the understorey at sites where bonobos did not nest, while there was greater leaf cover in the mid-storey at sites where bonobos did nest.  

  8. Avian response to microclimate in canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champlin, Tracey B.; Kilgo, John C.; Gumpertz, Marcia L.; Moorman, Christopher E.

    2009-04-01

    Abstract - Microclimate may infl uence use of early successional habitat by birds. We assessed the relationships between avian habitat use and microclimate (temperature, light intensity, and relative humidity) in experimentally created canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest on the Savannah River Site, SC. Gaps were 2- to 3-year-old group-selection timber harvest openings of three sizes (0.13, 0.26, 0.50 ha). Our study was conducted from spring through fall, encompassing four bird-use periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration), in 2002 and 2003. We used mist netting and simultaneously recorded microclimate variables to determine the influence of microclimate on bird habitat use. Microclimate was strongly affected by net location within canopy gaps in both years. Temperature generally was higher on the west side of gaps, light intensity was greater in gap centers, and relative humidity was higher on the east side of gaps. However, we found few relationships between bird captures and the microclimate variables. Bird captures were inversely correlated with temperature during the breeding and postbreeding periods in 2002 and positively correlated with temperature during spring 2003. Captures were high where humidity was high during post-breeding 2002, and captures were low where humidity was high during spring 2003. We conclude that variations in the local microclimate had minor infl uence on avian habitat use within gaps. Instead, habitat selection in relatively mild regions like the southeastern US is based primarily on vegetation structure, while other factors, including microclimate, are less important.

  9. Analysis of the energy balance closure over a FLUXNET boreal forest in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sánchez

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The imbalance in the surface energy budget, when using eddy-covariance techniques to measure turbulent fluxes, is still an unresolved problem. Important progresses have been reported in recent years identifying potential reasons for this lack of energy balance closure. In this paper we focus on the data collected in a FLUXNET boreal forest site in Sodankylä, Finland. Using one month half-hourly data, an average Energy Balance Ratio (EBR of 0.72 is obtained. The inclusion of the heat storage terms in the energy budget yields an improvement of about 6% in the total closure. The sensitivity of the energy balance closure to the turbulence intensity is analysed in terms of the friction velocity, and atmospheric stability/instability conditions. Significant better closure is obtained for high values of the friction velocity and unstable conditions. The mismatch in variable footprints for different fluxes is checked by analysing the dependence of the closure on wind direction. The inhomogeneities of the emplacement surrounding the flux tower induce a critical decrease in the EBR of up to 30% for specific wind directions. After filtering all unfavourable conditions, EBR=0.94. This is a reasonable good result for the energy balance closure. However there is still a 6% of the available energy unaccounted. Part of this remaining imbalance could be justified as the impossibility of the 30 min averaging time to capture the low frequency flux contributions, since the closure is improved by a 5% when the averaging time is expanded to 2 h.

  10. Analysis of the energy balance closure over a FLUXNET boreal forest in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sánchez

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The imbalance in the surface energy budget, when using eddy-covariance techniques to measure turbulent fluxes, is still an unresolved problem. Important progresses have been reported in recent years identifying potential reasons for this lack of energy balance closure. In this paper we focus on the data collected in a FLUXNET boreal forest site in Sodankylä, Finland. Using one month half-hourly data, an average Energy Balance Ratio (EBR of 0.72 is obtained. The inclusion of the heat storage terms in the energy budget yields an improvement of about 6% in the total closure. The sensitivity of the energy balance closure to the turbulence intensity is analysed in terms of the friction velocity, and atmospheric stability/instability conditions. Significant better closure is obtained for high values of the friction velocity and unstable conditions. The mismatch in variable footprints for different fluxes is checked by analysing the dependence of the closure on wind direction. The inhomogeneities of the emplacement surrounding the flux tower induce a critical decrease in the EBR of up to 30% for specific wind directions. After filtering all unfavourable conditions, EBR=0.94. This is a reasonable good result for the energy balance closure. However there is still a 6% of the available energy unaccounted. Part of this remaining imbalance could be justified as the impossibility of the 30 min averaging time to capture the low frequency flux contributions, since the closure is improved by a 5% when the averaging time is expanded to 2 h.

  11. Photosynthetic characteristics of dominant tree species and canopy in the broadleaved Korean pine forest of Changbai Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>Based on the light-photosynthesis response measurement at leaf level, combined with over- and under-canopy eddy covariance measurements, research on photosynthetic characteristics of single trees and forest canopy was conducted. The relationship between light intensity and photo-synthetic rates for leaves and canopy can be well fitted by a non-rectangular hyperbola model. Mongolian oak presented a high light compensation point, Lcp (28μmol·m-2·s-1), a light saturation point Lsp (>1800μmol·m-2·s-1), and a maximal net photosynthetic rate Pmax (9.96μmol·m-2·s-1), which suggest that it is a typical heliophilous plant. Mono maple presented the highest apparent quantum efficiencyα(0.066) but the lowest, Lcp (16μmol·m-2·s-1), Lsp (=800μmol·m-2·s-1), and Pmax (4.51μmol·m-2·s-1), which suggest that it is heliophilous plant. Korean pine showed the lowestαvalue but a higher Pmax, which suggest that it is a semi-heliophilous plant. At the canopy level, the values of both or and Pmax approached the upper limit of reported values in temperate forests, while Lcp was within the lower limit. Canopy photosynthetic characteristics were well consistent with those of leaves. Both showed a high ability to photosynthesize. However, environmental stresses, especially high vapor pressure deficits, could significantly reduce the photosynthetic ability of leaves and canopy.

  12. A review and evaluation of forest canopy epiphyte roles in the partitioning and chemical alteration of precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Stan, John T., E-mail: jvanstan@georgiasouthern.edu [Dept. of Geology and Geography, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460 (United States); Pypker, Thomas G. [Dept. of Natural Resource Sciences, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC (Canada)

    2015-12-01

    Interactions between precipitation and forest canopy elements (bark, leaves, and epiphytes) control the quantity, spatiotemporal patterning, and the chemical concentration, character and constituency of precipitation to soils. Canopy epiphytes exert a range of hydrological and biogeochemical effects due to their diversity of morphological traits and nutrient acquisition mechanisms. We reviewed and evaluated the state of knowledge regarding epiphyte interactions with precipitation partitioning (into interception loss, throughfall, and stemflow) and the chemical alteration of net precipitation fluxes (throughfall and stemflow). As epiphyte species are quite diverse, this review categorized findings by common paraphyletic groups: lichens, bryophytes, and vascular epiphytes. Of these groups, vascular epiphytes have received the least attention and lichens the most. In general, epiphytes decrease throughfall and stemflow and increase interception loss. Epiphytes alter the spatiotemporal pattern of throughfall and increase overall latent heat fluxes from the canopy. Epiphytes alter biogeochemical processes by impacting the transfer of solutes through the canopy; however, the change in solute concentration varies with epiphyte type and chemical species. We discuss several important knowledge gaps across all epiphyte groups. We also explore innovative methods that currently exist to confront these knowledge gaps and past techniques applied to gain our current understanding. Future research addressing the listed deficiencies will improve our knowledge of epiphyte roles in water and biogeochemical processes coupled within forest canopies—processes crucial to supporting microbe, plant, vertebrate and invertebrate communities within individual epiphytes, epiphyte assemblages, host trees, and even the forest ecosystem as a whole. - Highlights: • Reviews > 100 studies on epiphyte effects on throughfall, stemflow, & interception • Identifies shared hydro

  13. Investigation of radioactive cesium transportation from forest canopy to floor by litterfall, stemflow and throughfall in northern Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, I.; Ohte, N.; Iseda, K.; Tanoi, K.; Hirose, A.; Kobayashi, N. I.; Murakami, M.; Tokuchi, N.; Ohashi, M.

    2015-12-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident due to Great East Japan Earthquake in March 11th 2011, large areas of forest have been highly contaminated by the radioactive nuclides. Most of the deposited radioactive material to the canopy is then washed out with rainfall or leaf fall due to the tree phenology. There have been studies showing that the amount of 137Cs transportation differs among litter components and water pathways, and was affected by seasonal variations. Thus, to evaluate the amount of 137Cs flux from canopy to forest floor, continuous monitoring of each component (litterfall, throughfall and stemflow) is required. We investigated the annual transfer of 137Cs from the forest canopy to the floor by litterfall, throughfall and stemflow at two different forest types in northern Fukushima after two years from the accident. Seasonal variations in 137Cs transportation and differences between forests types were also determined. Forest sites were set in the upstream part of Kami-Oguni River catchment at Date city, which locates approximately 50km northwest from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The study sites consisted of two deciduous (Mixed deciduous-1, Mixed deciduous-2) and one cedar (Cedar plantation) stands. The cumulative 137Cs transportation from the forest canopy to the floor was 6.6 kBq m-2 year-1 for the Mixed deciduous-1, 3.9 kBq m-2 year-1 for the Mixed deciduous-2 and 11.0 kBq m-2 year-1 for the Cedar plantation. 137Cs transportation with litterfall increased in the defoliation period which correlated with the increased amount of litterfall. 137Cs transportation with throughfall and stemflow increased in the rainy season. 137Cs flux by litterfall was higher in Cedar plantation compared with that of mixed deciduous forests, while the opposite result was obtained for stemflow. The ratio of annual 137Cs flux and the estimated 137Cs amount deposited in the forests will be discussed.

  14. Interspecific variation of photosynthesis and leaf characteristics in canopy trees of five species of Dipterocarpaceae in a tropical rain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzo, Tanaka; Ichie, Tomoaki; Yoneda, Reiji; Kitahashi, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoko; Ninomiya, Ikuo; Koike, Takayoshi

    2004-10-01

    Photosynthetic rate, nitrogen concentration and morphological properties of canopy leaves were studied in 18 trees, comprising five dipterocarp species, in a tropical rain forest in Sarawak, Malaysia. Photosynthetic rate at light saturation (Pmax) differed significantly across species, varying from 7 to 18 micro mol m(-2) s(-1). Leaf nitrogen concentration and morphological properties, such as leaf blade and palisade layer thickness, leaf mass per area (LMA) and surface area of mesophyll cells per unit leaf area (Ames/A), also varied significantly across species. Among the relationships with leaf characteristics, Pmax had the strongest correlation with leaf mesophyll parameters, such as palisade cell layer thickness (r2 = 0.76, P palisade layer, with up to five or more layers. We conclude that interspecific variation in photosynthetic capacity in tropical rain forest canopies is influenced more by leaf mesophyll structure than by leaf thickness, LMA or leaf nitrogen concentration.

  15. In-situ laser induced fluorescence detection and modeling of formaldehyde above a forest canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottle, John Robert

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is ubiquitous throughout the atmosphere. Its main source within the troposphere is the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The photolysis and oxidation of HCHO leads to elevated levels of ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which play critical roles in human health and climate change. The design, development and implementation of an in-situ laser induced fluorescence (LIF) based instrument for atmospheric detection of HCHO is described. To the best of the author's knowledge, the first published reports using LIF for the measurement of atmospheric HCHO are presented. The instrument was field tested during the PROPHET, 2008 field intensive, at the University of Michigan Biological Station, where it continuously measured HCHO for one week with a detection limit (3sigma) of 0.120 ppbv/min. HCHO levels ranged from ˜0.5-4.5 ppbv at a height of ˜10 m above the forest canopy from August 1-8, 2008, in good agreement with previously reported values at the site. Two photochemical box models were constructed to evaluate the understanding of the photochemistry controlling HCHO in a forested region dominated by isoprene emissions. An explicit photochemical box model, as defined by the Master Chemical Mechanism ver3.1, was compared to an implicit chemical model previously developed in the literature. These two models were evaluated to determine the accuracy of the assumptions within the implicit model, in addition to further examining our understanding of HCHO chemistry within an isoprene dominated forest. These two models were found to agree within ˜5% throughout the daytime (1000-1800 h, EST) and both calculations over-predict HCHO levels by a factor of ˜2.8. In an effort to estimate the influence of vertical advection, a vertical dilution term was added to both models and it was found to reduce the over-prediction of both from a factor of ˜2.8 to ˜1.6. These results imply that the photochemistry occurring within an isoprene

  16. Nonlinear response of canopy developmental rate to temperature in temperate and boreal forest in the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Ho, C. H.; Jeong, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the changes in vegetation annual cycle is crucial for improving our knowledge about various interactions between the terrestrial ecosystem and climate. However, our understanding about the vegetation seasonality is mostly confined to some phenological timings such as spring emergence and fall senescence. This study assessed large-scale variations in the vegetation green-up rate (VGrate), which indicates the rate of canopy development from winter dormancy to summer maturity, and its relationship over Northern Hemisphere temperate and boreal forests for 1982-2011. VGrate and local temperature changes show a positive correlation over the region of interest, and it indicates that a temperature increase during green-up period leads to faster canopy development. The responses of VGrate tend to be more sensitive to positive temperature anomalies than negative anomalies despite same magnitude of the temperature changes. These nonlinear responsiveness of VGrate to local temperature change is clearly observed in deciduous broadleaf forests over Eurasia compared to woodlands over North America. These results suggest that anomalous warming in green-up period would make canopy developments faster over wide temperate and boreal forest areas.

  17. Seasonal variations of leaf and canopy properties tracked by ground-based NDVI imagery in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hualei; Yang, Xi; Heskel, Mary; Sun, Shucun; Tang, Jianwu

    2017-04-28

    Changes in plant phenology affect the carbon flux of terrestrial forest ecosystems due to the link between the growing season length and vegetation productivity. Digital camera imagery, which can be acquired frequently, has been used to monitor seasonal and annual changes in forest canopy phenology and track critical phenological events. However, quantitative assessment of the structural and biochemical controls of the phenological patterns in camera images has rarely been done. In this study, we used an NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) camera to monitor daily variations of vegetation reflectance at visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands with high spatial and temporal resolutions, and found that the infrared camera based NDVI (camera-NDVI) agreed well with the leaf expansion process that was measured by independent manual observations at Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, USA. We also measured the seasonality of canopy structural (leaf area index, LAI) and biochemical properties (leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen content). We found significant linear relationships between camera-NDVI and leaf chlorophyll concentration, and between camera-NDVI and leaf nitrogen content, though weaker relationships between camera-NDVI and LAI. Therefore, we recommend ground-based camera-NDVI as a powerful tool for long-term, near surface observations to monitor canopy development and to estimate leaf chlorophyll, nitrogen status, and LAI.

  18. Evaluation of hydrologic equilibrium in a mountainous watershed: incorporating forest canopy spatial adjustment to soil biogeochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, D. Scott

    Hydrologic equilibrium theory has been used to describe both short-term regulation of gas exchange and long-term adjustment of forest canopy density. However, by focusing on water and atmospheric conditions alone a hydrologic equilibrium may impose an oversimplification of the growth of forests adjusted to hydrology. In this study nitrogen is incorporated as a third regulation of catchment level forest dynamics and gas exchange. This was examined with an integrated distributed hydrology and forest growth model in a central Sierra Nevada watershed covered primarily by old-growth coniferous forest. Water and atmospheric conditions reasonably reproduced daily latent heat flux, and predicted the expected catenary trend of leaf area index (LAI). However, it was not until the model was provided a spatially detailed description of initial soil carbon and nitrogen pools that spatial patterns of LAI were generated. This latter problem was attributed to a lack of soil history or memory in the initialization of the simulations. Finally, by reducing stomatal sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit (VPD) the canopy density increased when water and nitrogen limitations were not present. The results support a three-control hydrologic equilibrium in the Sierra Nevada watershed. This has implications for modeling catchment level soil-vegetation-atmospheric interactions over interannual, decade, and century time-scales.

  19. An experimental test of the causes of forest growth decline with stand age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael G. Ryan; Dan Binkley; James H. Fownes; Christian Giardina; Randy S. Senock

    2004-01-01

    The decline in aboveground wood production after canopy closure in even-aged forest stands is a common pattern in forests, but clear evidence for the mechanism causing the decline is lacking. The problem is fundamental to forest biology, commercial forestry (the decline sets the rotation age), and to carbon storage in forests. We tested three hypotheses...

  20. How deep does disturbance go? The long-term effects of canopy disturbance on tropical forest soil biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez del Arroyo, O.; Silver, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    We used the Canopy Trimming Experiment (CTE), an ongoing ecosystem manipulation study in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF), Puerto Rico to determine the decadal-scale effects of canopy disturbance and debris deposition on biogeochemistry throughout the soil profile of a wet tropical forest. These manipulations represent the most significant effects of hurricanes, which may increase in frequency or intensity with warming, strengthening their ecosystem-level effects on carbon (C) and nutrient cycling. Four replicated treatments were applied in 2005 using a complete randomized block design: canopy trimming + debris deposition, canopy trimming only, debris deposition only, and untreated control. In 2015, we sampled soils at 10 cm intervals to 1 m depth in each of 12 plots (3 per treatment). We measured gravimetric moisture content, pH, HCl and citrate-ascorbate (CA) extractable iron (Fe) species, organic (Po) and inorganic fractions of NaHCO3 and NaOH phosphorus (P), as well as total C and nitrogen (N). Soil moisture decreased markedly with depth up to ~60-70 cm, and then stabilized at ~33% down to 1 m. Across all treatments, pH increased significantly with depth, ranging from 4.6 in surface soils (0-10 cm) of trimmed plots to 5.2 in deep soils (80-90 cm) of control plots. Canopy trimming decreased pH significantly, possibly due to increased root activity in surface soils as vegetation recovered. Both HCl and CA extractable Fe showed strong depth dependance, decreasing linearly to 50 cm, and stabilizing at very low concentrations (soil profile (deposition significantly increased Po, revealing the role of hurricanes in subsidizing the available soil P pool in these highly productive, low-P wet tropical forests. Debris deposition also increased soil C and N concentrations in surface soils (soil profile in this wet tropical forest. However, effects were persistent and detectable after ten years of the CTE, suggesting that hurricanes result in long-term changes in

  1. A comparison of winter mercury accumulation at forested and no-canopy sites measured with different snow sampling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, S.J.; Johnson, K.B.; Weathers, K.C.; Loftin, C.S.; Fernandez, I.J.; Kahl, J.S.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric mercury (Hg) is delivered to ecosystems via rain, snow, cloud/fog, and dry deposition. The importance of snow, especially snow that has passed through the forest canopy (throughfall), in delivering Hg to terrestrial ecosystems has received little attention in the literature. The snowpack is a dynamic system that links atmospheric deposition and ecosystem cycling through deposition and emission of deposited Hg. To examine the magnitude of Hg delivery via snowfall, and to illuminate processes affecting Hg flux to catchments during winter (cold season), Hg in snow in no-canopy areas and under forest canopies measured with four collection methods were compared: (1) Hg in wet precipitation as measured by the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) for the site in Acadia National Park, Maine, USA, (2) event throughfall (collected after snowfall cessation for accumulations of >8 cm), (3) season-long throughfall collected using the same apparatus for event sampling but deployed for the entire cold season, and (4) snowpack sampling. Estimates (mean ?? SE) of Hg deposition using these methods during the 91-day cold season in 2004-2005 at conifer sites showed that season-long throughfall Hg flux (1.80 ??g/m2) Mercury deposition at the MDN site (0.91 ??g/m2) was similar to that measured at other no-canopy sites in the area using the other methods, but was 3.4 times less than was measured under conifer canopies using the event sampling regime. This indicates that snow accumulated under the forest canopy received Hg from the overstory or exhibited less re-emission of Hg deposited in snow relative to open areas. The soil surface of field-scale plots were sprayed with a natural rain water sample that contained an Hg tracer (202Hg) just prior to the first snowfall to explore whether some snowpack Hg might be explained from soil emissions. The appearance of the 202Hg tracer in the snowpack (0-64% of the total Hg mass in the snowpack) suggests that movement of Hg from the soil

  2. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, A.; Korhonen, J. F. J.; Arnoud Frumau, K. F.; Wu, J.; Pihlatie, M.; Schjoerring, J. K.

    2013-02-01

    Seasonal and spatial variations in foliar nitrogen (N) parameters were investigated in three European forests with different tree species, viz. beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in Denmark, the Netherlands and Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally showed much higher seasonal and vertical variability in beech than in the coniferous canopies. However, also the two coniferous tree species behaved very differently with respect to peak summer canopy N content and N re-translocation efficiency, showing that generalisations on tree internal vs. ecosystem internal N cycling cannot be made on the basis of the leaf duration alone. During phases of intensive N turnover in spring and autumn, the NH4+ concentration in beech leaves rose considerably, while fully developed green beech leaves had relatively low tissue NH4+, similar to the steadily low levels in Douglas fir and, particularly, in Scots pine. The ratio between bulk foliar concentrations of NH4+ and H+, which is an indicator of the NH3 emission potential, reflected differences in foliage N concentration, with beech having the highest values followed by Douglas fir and Scots pine. Irrespectively of the leaf habit, i.e. deciduous versus evergreen, the majority of the canopy foliage N was retained within the trees. This was accomplished through an effective N re-translocation (beech), higher foliage longevity (fir) or both (boreal pine forest). In combination with data from a literature review, a general relationship of decreasing N re-translocation efficiency with the time needed for canopy renewal was deduced, showing that leaves which live longer re

  3. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal and spatial variations in foliar nitrogen (N parameters were investigated in three European forests with different tree species, viz. beech (Fagus sylvatica L., Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. growing in Denmark, the Netherlands and Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally showed much higher seasonal and vertical variability in beech than in the coniferous canopies. However, also the two coniferous tree species behaved very differently with respect to peak summer canopy N content and N re-translocation efficiency, showing that generalisations on tree internal vs. ecosystem internal N cycling cannot be made on the basis of the leaf duration alone. During phases of intensive N turnover in spring and autumn, the NH4+ concentration in beech leaves rose considerably, while fully developed green beech leaves had relatively low tissue NH4+, similar to the steadily low levels in Douglas fir and, particularly, in Scots pine. The ratio between bulk foliar concentrations of NH4+ and H+, which is an indicator of the NH3 emission potential, reflected differences in foliage N concentration, with beech having the highest values followed by Douglas fir and Scots pine. Irrespectively of the leaf habit, i.e. deciduous versus evergreen, the majority of the canopy foliage N was retained within the trees. This was accomplished through an effective N re-translocation (beech, higher foliage longevity (fir or both (boreal pine forest. In combination with data from a literature review, a general relationship of decreasing N re

  4. [Energy flux and energy balance closure of intensively managed lei bamboo forest ecosystem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-fei; Jiang, Hong; Zhou, Guo-mo; Sun, Cheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-04-01

    By using open-path eddy covariance system and meteorological instruments, an observation was conducted on the sensitive heat flux, latent heat flux, net radiation, soil heat flux, air temperature, ground temperature, and precipitation in a intensively managed Lei bamboo forest ecosystem in 2011, with the diurnal and monthly variations of energy flux as well as the distribution pattern of each energy component analyzed, and the Bowen ratio and energy balance closure calculated. The yearly net radiation of the forest ecosystem was 2928. 92 MJ m-2, and the latent heat flux, sensitive heat flux, and soil heat flux were 1384.90, 927.54, and -28.27 MJ m-2, respectively. Both the daily and the monthly variations of the energy components showed a single peak curve. The sensible and latent heat fluxes were 31.7% and 47.3% of the net radiation, respectively, indicating that latent heat flux was the main form of energy loss. The Bowen ratio followed the "U"-shaped pattern, and fluctuated from 0. 285 to 2. 062, suggesting that soil was a heat source. The yearly energy balance closure of the forest ecosystem was 0. 782, and the monthly average was 0.808.

  5. A Lidar Point Cloud Based Procedure for Vertical Canopy Structure Analysis And 3D Single Tree Modelling in Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunsheng; Weinacker, Holger; Koch, Barbara

    2008-06-12

    A procedure for both vertical canopy structure analysis and 3D single tree modelling based on Lidar point cloud is presented in this paper. The whole area of research is segmented into small study cells by a raster net. For each cell, a normalized point cloud whose point heights represent the absolute heights of the ground objects is generated from the original Lidar raw point cloud. The main tree canopy layers and the height ranges of the layers are detected according to a statistical analysis of the height distribution probability of the normalized raw points. For the 3D modelling of individual trees, individual trees are detected and delineated not only from the top canopy layer but also from the sub canopy layer. The normalized points are resampled into a local voxel space. A series of horizontal 2D projection images at the different height levels are then generated respect to the voxel space. Tree crown regions are detected from the projection images. Individual trees are then extracted by means of a pre-order forest traversal process through all the tree crown regions at the different height levels. Finally, 3D tree crown models of the extracted individual trees are reconstructed. With further analyses on the 3D models of individual tree crowns, important parameters such as crown height range, crown volume and crown contours at the different height levels can be derived.

  6. ACCURACY ASSESSMENT OF LIDAR-DERIVED DIGITAL TERRAIN MODEL (DTM WITH DIFFERENT SLOPE AND CANOPY COVER IN TROPICAL FOREST REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. M. Salleh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR technology has been widely used recent years especially in generating high accuracy of Digital Terrain Model (DTM. High density and good quality of airborne LiDAR data promises a high quality of DTM. This study focussing on the analysing the error associated with the density of vegetation cover (canopy cover and terrain slope in a LiDAR derived-DTM value in a tropical forest environment in Bentong, State of Pahang, Malaysia. Airborne LiDAR data were collected can be consider as low density captured by Reigl system mounted on an aircraft. The ground filtering procedure use adaptive triangulation irregular network (ATIN algorithm technique in producing ground points. Next, the ground control points (GCPs used in generating the reference DTM and these DTM was used for slope classification and the point clouds belong to non-ground are then used in determining the relative percentage of canopy cover. The results show that terrain slope has high correlation for both study area (0.993 and 0.870 with the RMSE of the LiDAR-derived DTM. This is similar to canopy cover where high value of correlation (0.989 and 0.924 obtained. This indicates that the accuracy of airborne LiDAR-derived DTM is significantly affected by terrain slope and canopy caver of study area.

  7. Modeling of leachable 137Cs in throughfall and stemflow for Japanese forest canopies after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffredo, Nicolas; Onda, Yuichi; Kawamori, Ayumi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2014-09-15

    The Fukushima accident dispersed significant amounts of radioactive cesium (Cs) in the landscape. Our research investigated, from June 2011 to November 2013, the mobility of leachable Cs in forests canopies. In particular, (137)Cs and (134)Cs activity concentrations were measured in rainfall, throughfall, and stemflow in broad-leaf and cedar forests in an area located 40 km from the power plant. Leachable (137)Cs loss was modeled by a double exponential (DE) model. This model could not reproduce the variation in activity concentration observed. In order to refine the DE model, the main physical measurable parameters (rainfall intensity, wind velocity, and snowfall occurrence) were assessed, and rainfall was identified as the dominant factor controlling observed variation. A corrective factor was then developed to incorporate rainfall intensity in an improved DE model. With the original DE model, we estimated total (137)Cs loss by leaching from canopies to be 72 ± 4%, 67 ± 4%, and 48 ± 2% of the total plume deposition under mature cedar, young cedar, and broad-leaf forests, respectively. In contrast, with the improved DE model, the total (137)Cs loss by leaching was estimated to be 34 ± 2%, 34 ± 2%, and 16 ± 1% of the total plume deposition under mature cedar, young cedar, and broad-leaf forests, respectively. The improved DE model corresponds better to observed data in literature. Understanding (137)Cs and (134)Cs forest dynamics is important for forecasting future contamination of forest soils around the FDNPP. It also provides a basis for understanding forest transfers in future potential nuclear disasters.

  8. Techniques of Ozone Monitoring in a Mountain Forest Region: Passive and Continuous Sampling, Vertical and Canopy Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Gerosa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is the most harmful air pollutant for plant ecosystems in the Mediterranean and Alpine areas due to its biological and economic damage to crops and forests. In order to evaluate the relation between ozone exposure and vegetation injury under on-field conditions, suitable ozone monitoring techniques were investi-gated. In the framework of a 5-year research project aimed at ozone risk assessment on forests, both continuous analysers and passive samplers were employed during the summer seasons (1994�1998 in different sites of a wide mountain region (80 x 40 km2 on the southern slope of the European Alps. Continuous analysers allowed the recording of ozone hourly concentration means necessary both to calculate specific exposure indexes (such as AOT, SUM, W126 and to record daily time-courses. Passive samplers, even though supplied only weekly mean concentration values, made it possible to estimate the altitude concentration gradient useful to correct the altitude dependence of ozone concentrations to be inserted into exposure indexes. In-canopy ozone profiles were also determined by placing passive samplers at different heights inside the forest canopy. Vertical ozone soundings by means of tethered balloons (kytoons allowed the measurement of the vertical concentration gradient above the forest canopy. They also revealed ozone reservoirs aloft and were useful to explain the ozone advection dynamic in mountain slopes where ground measurement proved to be inadequate. An intercomparison between passive (PASSAM, CH and continuous measurements highlighted the necessity to accurately standardize all the exposure operations, particularly the pre- and postexposure conservation at cold temperature to avoid dye (DPE activity. Advantages and disadvantages from each mentioned technique are discussed.

  9. The phenology of leaf quality and its within-canopy variation is essential for accurate modeling of photosynthesis in tropical evergreen forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin; Serbin, Shawn P; Xu, Xiangtao; Albert, Loren P; Chen, Min; Meng, Ran; Saleska, Scott R; Rogers, Alistair

    2017-04-18

    Leaf quantity (i.e., canopy leaf area index, LAI), quality (i.e., per-area photosynthetic capacity), and longevity all influence the photosynthetic seasonality of tropical evergreen forests. However, these components of tropical leaf phenology are poorly represented in most terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs). Here, we explored alternative options for the representation of leaf phenology effects in TBMs that employ the Farquahar, von Caemmerer & Berry (FvCB) representation of CO2 assimilation. We developed a two-fraction leaf (sun and shade), two-layer canopy (upper and lower) photosynthesis model to evaluate different modeling approaches and assessed three components of phenological variations (i.e., leaf quantity, quality, and within-canopy variation in leaf longevity). Our model was driven by the prescribed seasonality of leaf quantity and quality derived from ground-based measurements within an Amazonian evergreen forest. Modeled photosynthetic seasonality was not sensitive to leaf quantity, but was highly sensitive to leaf quality and its vertical distribution within the canopy, with markedly more sensitivity to upper canopy leaf quality. This is because light absorption in tropical canopies is near maximal for the entire year, implying that seasonal changes in LAI have little impact on total canopy light absorption; and because leaf quality has a greater effect on photosynthesis of sunlit leaves than light limited, shade leaves and sunlit foliage are more abundant in the upper canopy. Our two-fraction leaf, two-layer canopy model, which accounted for all three phenological components, was able to simulate photosynthetic seasonality, explaining ~90% of the average seasonal variation in eddy covariance-derived CO2 assimilation. This work identifies a parsimonious approach for representing tropical evergreen forest photosynthetic seasonality in TBMs that utilize the FvCB model of CO2 assimilation and highlights the importance of incorporating more realistic

  10. Tree Species Establishment in Urban Forest in Relation to Vegetation Composition, Tree Canopy Gap Area and Soil Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilze Jankovska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of density and growth of pine, birch and oak seedlings and saplings in canopy gaps in the urban boreal forest in Riga, Latvia, indicates that natural regeneration can increase diversity in small gaps caused by tree mortality, and can ensure conversion from even-aged pine forest. Abundant regeneration in small gaps showed that light (gap area was only one of the factors affecting tree regeneration in the gaps. The depth of the O layer and pH were suggested to be important factors for the establishment and growth of pine and birch. For oak, the main factors for establishment and growth were favorable moisture, higher pH and N concentration. Knowledge of ecological factors affecting the establishment of seedlings and growth of saplings of the most common trees species in the urban boreal forest is needed to predict successional trajectories and to aid management.

  11. Deciduous birch canopy as unexpected contributor to stand level atmospheric reactivity in boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Jaana; Taipale, Ditte; Aalto, Juho

    2017-04-01

    In boreal forests, deciduous trees such as birches may in future climate become more abundant due to their large biomass production capacity, relatively good resource use ability and large acclimation potential to elevated CO2 levels and warmer climate. Increase in birch abundance may lead to unpredicted consequences in atmospheric composition. Currently it is acknowledged that conifers such as Scots pine and Norway spruce are important sources for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), especially monoterpenes, throughout the year, although the strong temperature relationships implies that emissions are highest in summertime. However, the dynamics of the deciduous birch foliage VOC emissions and their relationship with environmental drivers during the development, maturation and senescence of foliage has not been well analyzed. Long-term measurements of birch, which are unfortunately very sparse, can provide very useful information for the development of biosphere-atmosphere models that simulate boreal and subarctic forested areas where birch is often a sub-canopy species, occurs as a mixture among conifers or forms even pure stands in the higher latitudes. We measured the branch level VOC emissions from a mature Silver birch with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer during 2014 and 2015 at the SMEAR II station (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), southern Finland. Our results showed that the Silver birch foliage is a huge source for both short-chained volatiles such as methanol, acetaldehyde and acetone, as well as for monoterpenes. The mean emission rates from birch leaves were 5 to 10 times higher than the corresponding emissions from Scots pine shoots. We compared several semi-empirical model approaches for determining the birch foliage monoterpene standardized emission potentials, and utilized the continuous emission measurements from the two growing seasons for development of a novel algorithm which accounts for the leaf development and

  12. Forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone: sensitivity to very reactive biogenic VOC emissions and implications for in-canopy photochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wolfe

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the fate of ozone within and above forested environments is vital to assessing the anthropogenic impact on ecosystems and air quality at the urban-rural interface. Observed forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone is often much faster than explicable by stomatal uptake alone, suggesting the presence of additional ozone sinks within the canopy. Using the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE model in conjunction with summer noontime observations from the 2007 Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX-2007, we explore the viability and implications of the hypothesis that ozonolysis of very reactive but yet unidentified biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC can influence the forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone. Non-stomatal processes typically generate 67 % of the observed ozone flux, but reactions of ozone with measured BVOC, including monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, can account for only 2 % of this flux during the selected timeframe. By incorporating additional emissions and chemistry of a proxy for very reactive VOC (VRVOC that undergo rapid ozonolysis, we demonstrate that an in-canopy chemical ozone sink of ~2 × 108 molec cm−3 s−1 can close the ozone flux budget. Even in such a case, the 65 min chemical lifetime of ozone is much longer than the canopy residence time of ~2 min, highlighting that chemistry can influence reactive trace gas exchange even when it is "slow" relative to vertical mixing. This level of VRVOC ozonolysis could enhance OH and RO2 production by as much as 1 pptv s−1 and substantially alter their respective vertical profiles depending on the actual product yields. Reaction products would also contribute significantly to the oxidized VOC budget and, by extension, secondary organic aerosol mass. Given the potentially significant ramifications of a chemical ozone flux for both in-canopy chemistry and estimates of ozone

  13. Forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone: sensitivity to very reactive biogenic VOC emissions and implications for in-canopy photochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wolfe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the fate of ozone within and above forested environments is vital to assessing the anthropogenic impact on ecosystems and air quality at the urban-rural interface. Observed forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone is often much faster than explicable by stomatal uptake alone, suggesting the presence of additional ozone sinks within the canopy. Using the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE model in conjunction with summer noontime observations from the 2007 Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX-2007, we explore the viability and implications of the hypothesis that ozonolysis of very reactive but yet unidentified biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC can influence the forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone. Non-stomatal processes typically generate 67% of the observed ozone flux, but reactions of ozone with measured BVOC, including monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, can account for only 2% of this flux during the selected timeframe. By incorporating additional emissions and chemistry of a proxy for very reactive VOC (VRVOC that undergo rapid ozonolysis, we demonstrate that an in-canopy chemical ozone sink of ~2×108 molecules cm−3 s−1 can close the ozone flux budget. Even in such a case, the 65 min chemical lifetime of ozone is much longer than the canopy residence time of ~2 min, highlighting that chemistry can influence reactive trace gas exchange even when it is "slow" relative to vertical mixing. This level of VRVOC ozonolysis could enhance OH and RO2 production by as much as 1 pptv s−1 and substantially alter their respective vertical profiles depending on the actual product yields. Reaction products would also contribute significantly to the oxidized VOC budget and, by extension, secondary organic aerosol mass. Given the potentially significant ramifications of a chemical ozone flux for both in-canopy chemistry and estimates of ozone

  14. Response of canopy nitrogen uptake to a rapid decrease in bulk nitrate deposition in two eastern Canadian boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, D; Marty, C; Duchesne, L

    2015-01-01

    A few studies have reported a recent and rapid decline in NO3(-) deposition in eastern North America. Whether this trend can be observed at remote boreal sites with low rates of N deposition and how it could impact canopy uptake (CU) of N remain unknown. Here we report trends between 1997/1999 and 2012 for precipitation, throughfall N deposition as well as inorganic N CU for two boreal forest sites of Quebec, Canada, with contrasted N deposition rates and tree species composition. NO3(-) bulk deposition declined by approximately 50% at both sites over the studied period while no change was observed for NH4(+). As a result, the contribution of NH4(+) to inorganic N deposition changed from ~33% to more than 50% during the study period. On average, 52-59% of N deposition was intercepted by the canopy, the retention being higher for NH4(+) (60-67%) than for NO3(-) (45-54%). The decrease in NO3(-) bulk deposition and the increase in the NH4(+):NO3(-) ratio had important impacts on N-canopy interactions. The contribution of NH4(+) CU to that of total inorganic N CU increased at both sites but the trend was significant only at Tirasse (lowest N deposition). At this site, absolute NO3(-) CU significantly decreased (as did total N CU) during the study period, a consequence of the strong relationship (r(2) = 0.88) between NO3(-) bulk deposition and NO3(-) CU. Our data suggest that N interactions with forest canopies may change rapidly with changes in N deposition as well as with tree species composition.

  15. Life in the Treetops: Drought Tolerance and Water Balance of Canopy Epiphytes in a Tropical Montane Cloud Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsch, S. G.; Nadkarni, N.; Darby, A.; Dix, M.; Glunk, A.; Davidson, K.; Dawson, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) inhabit regions rich in biodiversity that play an important role in the local and regional water cycle. Canopy plants such as epiphytes and hemiepiphytes are an important component of the biodiversity in the TMCF and therefore play a significant role in the carbon, nutrient and water cycles. With only partial or no access to resources on the ground, canopy plants may be vulnerable to changes in climate that increase canopy temperatures and decrease atmospheric humidity or precipitation inputs. Despite their importance in the TMCF, there is little information regarding drought tolerance and water balance in this community. In this study we quantified variation in functional traits and water relations in 12 species of epiphytes and hemiepiphytes in a Costa Rican TMCF. We also generated pressure-volume curves and xylem vulnerability curves that we used as indicators of drought tolerance. Lastly, we determined the capacity for foliar water uptake in the laboratory and measured whole-plant transpiration in the field. We found that all species had a high turgor loss point (ψTLP), high vulnerability to cavitation (P50), and low bulk elastic modulus (ɛmax, i.e. high cell wall elasticity). These results indicate that capacitance may be high in canopy plants and that stored water may help to maintain high leaf water potentials during dry periods. We also found that all species had the capacity for foliar uptake and that this process contributed substantially to their water status and water balance. On average, foliar uptake contributed to the reabsorption of 70% of the water transpired over a 34-day period at the beginning of the dry season. Our results indicate that canopy plants can mitigate water loss substantially, but they may be vulnerable to changes in the overall precipitation patterns or increases in cloud base heights.

  16. Influence of thinning intensity and canopy type on Scots pine stand and growth dynamics in a mixed managed forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primicia, I.; Artázcoz, R.; Imbert, J.B.; Puertas, F.; Traver, M.C.; Castillo, F.J.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study: We analysed the effects of thinning intensity and canopy type on Scots pine growth and stand dynamics in a mixed Scots pine-beech forest. Area of the study: Western Pyrenees. Material and methods: Three thinning intensities were applied in 1999 (0, 20 and 30% basal area removed) and 2009 (0, 20 and 40%) on 9 plots. Within each plot, pure pine and mixed pine-beech patches are distinguished. All pine trees were inventoried in 1999, 2009 and 2014. The effects of treatments on the tree and stand structure variables (density, basal area, stand and tree volume), on the periodic annual increment in basal area and stand and tree volume, and on mortality rates, were analysed using linear mixed effects models. Main Results: The enhancement of tree growth was mainly noticeable after the second thinning. Growth rates following thinning were similar or higher in the moderate than in the severe thinning. Periodic stand volume annual increments were higher in the thinned than in the unthinned plots, but no differences were observed between the thinned treatments. We observed an increase in the differences of the Tree volume annual increment between canopy types (mixed < pure) over time in the unthinned plots, as beech crowns developed. Research highlights: Moderate thinning is suggested as an appropriate forest practice at early pine age in these mixed forests, since it produced higher tree growth rates than the severe thinning and it counteracted the negative effect of beech on pine growth observed in the unthinned plots. (Author)

  17. Measuring global canopy reduction: A forest degradation proxy for FRA2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth MacDicken; Erik Lidquist

    2013-01-01

    Global interest in forest degradation is widespread – but is fraught with widely differing views. Forest degradation by one definition may be sustainable forest management by another. The Global Forest Resources Assessment, conducted by FAO every five years, is working to find an approach to a global estimation of forest area that can address these differing...

  18. Integration of ALOS/PALSAR backscatter with a LiDAR-derived canopy height map to quantify forest fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, N.; Dubayah, R.; Simard, M.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    Habitat loss is the main predictor of species extinctions and must be characterized in high-biodiversity ecosystems where land cover change is pervasive. Forests' ability to support viable animal populations is typically modeled as a function of the presence of linkages or corridors, and quantified with fragmentation metrics. In this scenario, small forest patches and linear (e.g. riparian) zones can act as keystone structures. Fine-resolution, all-weather Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data from ALOS/PALSAR is well-suited to resolve forest fragments in tropical sites. This study summarizes a technique for integrating fragmentation metrics from ALOS/PALSAR with vertical structure data from ICESat/GLAS to produce fine-resolution (30 m) forest habitat metrics that capture both local quality (canopy height) as well as spatial context and multi-scale connectivity. We illustrate our approach with backscatter images acquired over the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, a biodiversity hotspot. ALOS/PALSAR 1.1 images acquired over the dry season were calibrated to calculate gamma naught and map forest cover via tresholding. We employ network algorithms to locate dispersal bottlenecks between conservation units. The location of keystone structures is compared against a model that uses coarse (500m) percent tree cover as an input.

  19. Temporal trends and sources of variation in carbon flux from coarse woody debris in experimental forest canopy openings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, J A; Mladenoff, D J; D'Amato, A W; Fraver, S; Lindner, D L; Brazee, N J; Clayton, M K; Gower, S T

    2015-11-01

    Pulses of respiration from coarse woody debris (CWD) have been observed immediately following canopy disturbances, but it is unclear how long these pulses are sustained. Several factors are known to influence carbon flux rates from CWD, but few studies have evaluated more than temperature and moisture. We experimentally manipulated forest structure in a second-growth northern hardwood forest and measured CO2 flux periodically for seven growing seasons following gap creation. We present an analysis of which factors, including the composition of the wood-decay fungal community influence CO2 flux. CO2 flux from CWD was strongly and positively related to wood temperature and varied significantly between substrate types (logs vs. stumps). For five growing seasons after treatment, the CO2 flux of stumps reached rates up to seven times higher than that of logs. CO2 flux of logs did not differ significantly between canopy-gap and closed-canopy conditions in the fourth through seventh post-treatment growing seasons. By the seventh season, the seasonal carbon flux of both logs and stumps had decreased significantly from prior years. Linear mixed models indicated the variation in the wood inhabiting fungal community composition explained a significant portion of variability in the CO2 flux along with measures of substrate conditions. CO2 flux rates were inversely related to fungal diversity, with logs hosting more species but emitting less CO2 than stumps. Overall, our results suggest that the current treatment of CWD in dynamic forest carbon models may be oversimplified, thereby hampering our ability to predict realistic carbon fluxes associated with wood decomposition.

  20. Relative lack of regeneration of shade-intolerant canopy species in some South African forests

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Midgley, JJ

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Some species such as Celtis Africana, are experiencing relative recruitment bottlenecks, because there are usually fewer recruits [i.e. individuals <20 cm diameter at breast height, (dbh)] than canopy individuals. The species with low recruitment...

  1. A proposal for a new forest canopy interception mechanism: Splash droplet evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shigeki

    2006-03-01

    Canopy interception was observed at a young stand of Chamaecyparis obtusa in a small Japanese experimental watershed for 2 years. Hourly canopy interception is linearly related to hourly rainfall on a rain event basis; this implies a dependence of the canopy interception on the rainfall intensity ( DOCIORI). The DOCIORI became stronger from spring to summer and declined from fall to winter. Though canopy interception has been treated as evaporation from wet canopy surfaces, this concept cannot be accountable for (1) the DOCIORI and (2) the efficient canopy interception mechanism, as about 10-40% of the rainfall evaporates during rain events under high humidity conditions. A new concept is proposed to explain these contradictions: numerous small droplets are produced by splashes when a raindrop hits a canopy and they evaporate. It is well known that the specific number and the average size of raindrops increases with rainfall intensity, and, as a result, so do the number of small droplets produced by splashes and evaporation. This splash mechanism can explain both the DOCIORI and the efficient canopy interception mechanism based on simulations. A droplet of 25 μm in radius falling at its terminal velocity under a relative humidity of 95% evaporates and disappears after 1.7-2.8 m of fall distance, depending on the ambient temperature (15-25 °C), while one of 50 μm loses 20-32% of its original mass after 8 m of fall distance. However, a droplet of 100 μm in radius loses only 2-4% of its original mass with an 8 m fall distance. Seasonal changes in the DOCIORI are also partly explainable by the splash mechanism.

  2. Mapping Canopy Damage from Understory Fires in Amazon Forests Using Annual Time Series of Landsat and MODIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Douglas C.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Souza, Carlos M., Jr.; Kasischke, Eric S.; Hurtt, George C.; Dubayah, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Understory fires in Amazon forests alter forest structure, species composition, and the likelihood of future disturbance. The annual extent of fire-damaged forest in Amazonia remains uncertain due to difficulties in separating burning from other types of forest damage in satellite data. We developed a new approach, the Burn Damage and Recovery (BDR) algorithm, to identify fire-related canopy damages using spatial and spectral information from multi-year time series of satellite data. The BDR approach identifies understory fires in intact and logged Amazon forests based on the reduction and recovery of live canopy cover in the years following fire damages and the size and shape of individual understory burn scars. The BDR algorithm was applied to time series of Landsat (1997-2004) and MODIS (2000-2005) data covering one Landsat scene (path/row 226/068) in southern Amazonia and the results were compared to field observations, image-derived burn scars, and independent data on selective logging and deforestation. Landsat resolution was essential for detection of burn scars less than 50 ha, yet these small burns contributed only 12% of all burned forest detected during 1997-2002. MODIS data were suitable for mapping medium (50-500 ha) and large (greater than 500 ha) burn scars that accounted for the majority of all fire-damaged forest in this study. Therefore, moderate resolution satellite data may be suitable to provide estimates of the extent of fire-damaged Amazon forest at a regional scale. In the study region, Landsat-based understory fire damages in 1999 (1508 square kilometers) were an order of magnitude higher than during the 1997-1998 El Nino event (124 square kilometers and 39 square kilometers, respectively), suggesting a different link between climate and understory fires than previously reported for other Amazon regions. The results in this study illustrate the potential to address critical questions concerning climate and fire risk in Amazon forests by

  3. Quantifying canopy complexity and effects on productivity and resilience in late-successional hemlock-hardwood forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Robert T; Fotis, Alexander T; Woods, Kerry D

    2015-04-01

    The regrowing forests of eastern North America have been an important global C sink over the past 100+ years, but many are now transitioning into late succession. The consequences of this transition are unclear due to uncertainty around the C dynamics of old- growth forests. Canopy structural complexity (CSC) has been shown to be an important source of variability in C dynamics in younger forests (e.g., in productivity and resilience to disturbance), but its role in late-successional forests has not been widely addressed. We investigated patterns of CSC in two old-growth forest landscapes in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA, to assess factors associated with CSC and its influence on productivity and disturbance resilience (to moderate-severity windstorm). CSC was quantified using a portable below-canopy LiDAR (PCL) system in 65 plots that also had long-term (50-70+ years). inventory data, which were used to quantify aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), disturbance history, and stand characteristics. We found high and variable CSC relative to younger forests across a suite of PCL-derived metrics. Variation in CSC was driven by species composition and size structure, rather than disturbance history or site characteristics. Recent moderate severity wind disturbance decreased plot-scale CSC, but increased stand-scale variation in CSC. The strong positive correlation between CSC and productivity illustrated in younger forests was not present in undisturbed portions of these late-successional ecosystems. Moderate severity disturbance appeared to reestablish the positive link between CSC and productivity, but this relationship was scale and severity dependent. A positive CSC-productivity relationship was evident at the plot scale with low-severity, dispersed disturbance, but only at a patch scale in more severely disturbed areas. CSC does not appear to strongly correlate With variation in productivity in undisturbed old-growth forests, but may play a very

  4. Isotopic characteristics of canopies in simulated leaf assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Heather V.; Patzkowsky, Mark E.; Wing, Scott L.; Parker, Geoffrey G.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2014-11-01

    The geologic history of closed-canopy forests is of great interest to paleoecologists and paleoclimatologists alike. Closed canopies have pronounced effects on local, continental and global rainfall and temperature patterns. Although evidence for canopy closure is difficult to reconstruct from the fossil record, the characteristic isotope gradients of the "canopy effect" could be preserved in leaves and proxy biomarkers. To assess this, we employed new carbon isotopic data for leaves collected in diverse light environments within a deciduous, temperate forest (Maryland, USA) and for leaves from a perennially closed canopy, moist tropical forest (Bosque Protector San Lorenzo, Panamá). In the tropical forest, leaf carbon isotope values range 10‰, with higher δ13Cleaf values occurring both in upper reaches of the canopy, and with higher light exposure and lower humidity. Leaf fractionation (Δleaf) varied negatively with height and light and positively with humidity. Vertical 13C enrichment in leaves largely reflects changes in Δleaf, and does not trend with δ13C of CO2 within the canopy. At the site in Maryland, leaves express a more modest δ13C range (∼6‰), with a clear trend that follows both light and leaf height. Using a model we simulate leaf assemblage isotope patterns from canopy data binned by elevation. The re-sampling (bootstrap) model determined both the mean and range of carbon isotope values for simulated leaf assemblages ranging in size from 10 to over 1000 leaves. For the tropical forest data, the canopy's isotope range is captured with 50 or more randomly sampled leaves. Thus, with a sufficient number of fossil leaves it is possible to distinguish isotopic gradients in an ancient closed canopy forest from those in an open forest. For very large leaf assemblages, mean isotopic values approximate the δ13C of carbon contributed by leaves to soil and are similar to observed δ13Clitter values at forested sites within Panamá, including the

  5. Methods in Forest Canopy Research, Edited by Margaret D. Lowman, Timothy D. Schowalter, Jerry F. Franklin, University of California Press, 2012; 221 Pages. Price: £41.95, ISBN 978-0520-27371-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Poised between soil and sky, forest canopies represent a critical point of exchange between the atmosphere and the earth, yet until recently, they remained a largely unexplored frontier. For a long time, problems with access and the lack of tools and methods suitable for monitoring these complex bioscopes made canopy analysis extremely difficult. Fortunately, canopy research has advanced dramatically in recent decades. Methods in Forest Canopy Research is a comprehensive overview of these developments for explorers of this astonishing environment. The authors describe methods for reaching the canopy and the best ways to measure how the canopy, atmosphere, and forest floor interact. They address how to replicate experiments in challenging environments and lay the groundwork for creating standardized measurements in the canopy — essential tools for understanding our changing world.

  6. Sapling growth and crown expansion in canopy gaps of Nothofagus pumilio (lenga) forests in Chubut, Patagonia, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Bernal, P. M.; Defosse, G. E.; Quinteros, C. P.; Bava, J. O.

    2012-07-01

    In the province of Chubut in Patagonia, Argentina, Nothofagus pumilio forests (locally known as lenga), are managed through selective cuts, which imply the opening of canopy gaps. This management scheme is carried out without taking into consideration the changes of sapling requirements through either a cutting cycle or the precipitation gradient in which these forests thrive. To analyze these changes, we inferred the facilitation-competition balance between the canopy and regeneration, studying the effects of precipitation levels, gap size and gap age on saplings growth in height on 45 canopy gaps artificially created between 1960 and 1993. Results showed that during the first 20 years since gap opening, growth of regeneration is determined by light availability in mesic sites and by water availability in xeric sites. However, differences due to precipitation levels gradually decrease over time. Moreover, in the period between 20 and 35 years after gap opening, in both mesic and xeric sites, growth is limited by light availability. This indicates that in xeric sites, sapling growth requirements shift from a water-dependent situation to a light-dependent situation. The average closing rate of gaps due to lateral growth of bordering trees is high enough so that within the proposed gap size range, gap healing can occur before regeneration reaches the upper stratum. Consequently, in mesic sites gap opening can be done by a single operation that generates gaps with diameters of approximately twice the average height of the canopy (D/H). While in xeric environments, lenga seedling establishment and initial growth require the cover of small gaps, but advanced regeneration requires bigger gaps to reach the canopy. For this reason, gaps should be opened in two stages: the first gaps should be opened with a D/H between 0.8 and 1, and after a cutting cycle of 35 years, these openings should be enlarged to a D/H between 1.5 and 2. The close relationship maintained between the

  7. Amblyomma tapirellum  (Acari: Ixodidae collected from tropical forest canopy [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2uy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose R Loaiza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Free-ranging ticks are widely known to be restricted to the ground level of vegetation. Here, we document the capture of the tick species Amblyomma tapirellum in light traps placed in the forest canopy of Barro Colorado Island, central Panama. A total of forty eight adults and three nymphs were removed from carbon dioxide–octenol baited CDC light traps suspended 20 meters above the ground during surveys for forest canopy mosquitoes. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of questing ticks from the canopy of tropical forests. Our finding suggests a novel ecological relationship between A. tapirellum and arboreal mammals, perhaps monkeys that come to the ground to drink or to feed on fallen fruits.

  8. Forest floor methane flux modelled by soil water content and ground vegetation - comparison to above canopy flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Peltola, Olli; Haikarainen, Iikka; Ryhti, Kira; Rannik, Üllar; Pihlatie, Mari

    2017-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is an important and strong greenhouse gas of which atmospheric concentration is rising. While boreal forests are considered as an important sink of CH4 due to soil CH4 oxidation, the soils have also a capacity to emit CH4. Moreover, vegetation is shown to contribute to the ecosystem-atmosphere CH4 flux, and it has been estimated to be the least well known natural sources of CH4. In addition to well-known CH4 emissions from wetland plants, even boreal trees have been discovered to emit CH4. At the SMEAR (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) II station in Hyytiälä, southern Finland (61° 51' N, 24°17' E; 181 m asl), we have detected small CH4 emissions from above the canopy of a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) dominated forest. To assess the origin of the observed emissions, we conducted forest floor CH4 flux measurements with 54 soil chambers at the footprint area of the above canopy flux measurements during two growing seasons. In addition, we measured the soil volumetric water content (VWC) every time next to the forest floor chamber measurements, and estimated vegetation coverages inside the chambers. In order to model the forest floor CH4 flux at the whole footprint area, we combined lidar (light detection and ranging) data with the field measurements. To predict the soil water content and thus the potential CH4 flux, we used local elevation, slope, and ground return intensity (GRI), calculated from the lidar data (National Land Survey of Finland). We categorized the soil chambers into four classes based on the VWC so that the class with the highest VWC values includes all the soil chambers with a potential to emit CH4. Based on a statistically significant correlation between the VWC and the forest floor CH4 flux (r = 0.30, p < 0.001), we modelled the potential forest floor CH4 flux of the whole area. The results of the soil chamber measurements show a few areas of the forest floor with significant CH4 emissions. The modelled map

  9. Characterizing spatial and seasonal variability of carbon dioxide and water vapour fluxes above a tropical mixed mangrove forest canopy, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhra Chanda; Anirban Akhand; Sudip Manna; Sachinandan Dutta; Sugata Hazra; Indrani Das; V K Dadhwal

    2013-04-01

    The above canopy carbon dioxide and water vapour fluxes were measured by micrometeorological gradient technique at three distant stations, within the world’s largest mangrove ecosystem of Sundarban (Indian part), between April 2011 and March 2012. Quadrat analysis revealed that all the three study sites are characterized by a strong heterogeneity in the mangrove vegetation cover. At day time the forest was a sink for CO2, but its magnitude varied significantly from −0.39 to −1.33 mg m−2 s−1. The station named Jharkhali showed maximum annual fluxes followed by Henry Island and Bonnie Camp. Day time fluxes were higher during March and October, while in August and January the magnitudes were comparatively lower. The seasonal variation followed the same trend in all the sites. The spatial variation of CO2 flux above the canopy was mainly explained by the canopy density and photosynthetic efficiency of the mangrove species. The CO2 sink strength of the mangrove cover in different stations varied in the same way with the CO2 uptake potential of the species diversity in the respective sites. The relationship between the magnitude of day time CO2 uptake by the canopy and photosynthetic photon flux was defined by a non-linear exponential curve (2 ranging from 0.51 to 0.60). Water vapour fluxes varied between 1.4 and 69.5 mg m−2 s−1. There were significant differences in magnitude between day and night time water vapour fluxes, but no spatial variation was observed.

  10. Forest Canopy Cover and Height from MISR in Topographically Complex Southwestern US Landscape Assessed with High Quality Reference Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopping, Mark; North, Malcolm; Chen, Jiquan; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Blair, J. Bryan; Martonchik, John V.; Bull, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the retrieval of spatially contiguous canopy cover and height estimates in southwestern USforests via inversion of a geometric-optical (GO) model against surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) estimates from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). Model inversion can provide such maps if good estimates of the background bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) are available. The study area is in the Sierra National Forest in the Sierra Nevada of California. Tree number density, mean crown radius, and fractional cover reference estimates were obtained via analysis of QuickBird 0.6 m spatial resolution panchromatic imagery usingthe CANopy Analysis with Panchromatic Imagery (CANAPI) algorithm, while RH50, RH75 and RH100 (50, 75, and 100 energy return) height data were obtained from the NASA Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS), a full waveform light detection and ranging (lidar) instrument. These canopy parameters were used to drive a modified version of the simple GO model (SGM), accurately reproducing patterns ofMISR 672 nm band surface reflectance (mean RMSE 0.011, mean R2 0.82, N 1048). Cover and height maps were obtained through model inversion against MISR 672 nm reflectance estimates on a 250 m grid.The free parameters were tree number density and mean crown radius. RMSE values with respect to reference data for the cover and height retrievals were 0.05 and 6.65 m, respectively, with of 0.54 and 0.49. MISR can thus provide maps of forest cover and height in areas of topographic variation although refinements are required to improve retrieval precision.

  11. RECONSTRUCTION, QUANTIFICATION, AND VISUALIZATION OF FOREST CANOPY BASED ON 3D TRIANGULATIONS OF AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING POINT DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vauhkonen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D forest canopy is described and quantified using airborne laser scanning (ALS data with densities of 0.6–0.8 points m-2 and field measurements aggregated at resolutions of 400–900 m2. The reconstruction was based on computational geometry, topological connectivity, and numerical optimization. More precisely, triangulations and their filtrations, i.e. ordered sets of simplices belonging to the triangulations, based on the point data were analyzed. Triangulating the ALS point data corresponds to subdividing the underlying space of the points into weighted simplicial complexes with weights quantifying the (empty space delimited by the points. Reconstructing the canopy volume populated by biomass will thus likely require filtering to exclude that volume from canopy voids. The approaches applied for this purpose were (i to optimize the degree of filtration with respect to the field measurements, and (ii to predict this degree by means of analyzing the persistent homology of the obtained triangulations, which is applied for the first time for vegetation point clouds. When derived from optimized filtrations, the total tetrahedral volume had a high degree of determination (R2 with the stem volume considered, both alone (R2=0.65 and together with other predictors (R2=0.78. When derived by analyzing the topological persistence of the point data and without any field input, the R2 were lower, but the predictions still showed a correlation with the field-measured stem volumes. Finally, producing realistic visualizations of a forested landscape using the persistent homology approach is demonstrated.

  12. A multi-sensor lidar, multi-spectral and multi-angular approach for mapping canopy height in boreal forest regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkowitz, David J.; Green, Gordon; Peterson, Birgit E.; Wylie, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Spatially explicit representations of vegetation canopy height over large regions are necessary for a wide variety of inventory, monitoring, and modeling activities. Although airborne lidar data has been successfully used to develop vegetation canopy height maps in many regions, for vast, sparsely populated regions such as the boreal forest biome, airborne lidar is not widely available. An alternative approach to canopy height mapping in areas where airborne lidar data is limited is to use spaceborne lidar measurements in combination with multi-angular and multi-spectral remote sensing data to produce comprehensive canopy height maps for the entire region. This study uses spaceborne lidar data from the Geosciences Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) as training data for regression tree models that incorporate multi-angular and multi-spectral data from the Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) to map vegetation canopy height across a 1,300,000 km2 swath of boreal forest in Interior Alaska. Results are compared to in situ height measurements as well as airborne lidar data. Although many of the GLAS-derived canopy height estimates are inaccurate, applying a series of filters incorporating both data associated with the GLAS shots as well as ancillary data such as land cover can identify the majority of height estimates with significant errors, resulting in a filtered dataset with much higher accuracy. Results from the regression tree models indicate that late winter MISR imagery acquired under snow-covered conditions is effective for mapping canopy heights ranging from 5 to 15 m, which includes the vast majority of forests in the region. It appears that neither MISR nor MODIS imagery acquired during the growing season is effective for canopy height mapping, although including summer multi-spectral MODIS data along with winter MISR imagery does appear to provide a slight increase in the accuracy of

  13. Seasonal variability of interception evaporation from the canopy of a mixed deciduous forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Rosier, Paul T.W.; McNeil, David D.

    2008-01-01

    . The gross rainfall was corrected for catch losses due to high turbulence. Reliable net rainfall data were obtained from a combined application of simple storage gauges and troughs connected to automatic tipping bucket gauges. The evaporation rates from the wet canopy were calculated with the Penman......-Monteith equation using the measured aerodynamic conductance to the momentum flux and, additionally, with the eddy covariance energy balance approach. Both methods agreed in the observation that the average wet canopy evaporation rate was slightly higher in the leafless period, due to higher wind speeds...

  14. Kinetic energy of Throughfall in subtropical forests of SE China - effects of tree canopy structure, functional traits, and biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Geißler

    Full Text Available Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE plays an important role in soil erosion in forests. We studied TKE as a function of biodiversity, functional diversity as well as structural stand variables in a secondary subtropical broad-leaved forest in the Gutianshan National Nature Reserve (GNNR in south-east China, a biodiversity hotspot in the northern hemisphere with more than 250 woody species present. Using a mixed model approach we could identify significant effects of all these variables on TKE: TKE increased with rarefied tree species richness and decreased with increasing proportion of needle-leaved species and increasing leaf area index (LAI. Furthermore, for average rainfall amounts TKE was decreasing with tree canopy height whereas for high rainfall amounts this was not the case. The spatial pattern of throughfall was stable across several rain events. The temporal variation of TKE decreased with rainfall intensity and increased with tree diversity. Our results show that more diverse forest stands over the season have to cope with higher cumulative raindrop energy than less diverse stands. However, the kinetic energy (KE of one single raindrop is less predictable in diverse stands since the variability in KE is higher. This paper is the first to contribute to the understanding of the ecosystem function of soil erosion prevention in diverse subtropical forests.

  15. Canopy Height Estimation in French Guiana with LiDAR ICESat/GLAS Data Using Principal Component Analysis and Random Forest Regressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Fayad

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Estimating forest canopy height from large-footprint satellite LiDAR waveforms is challenging given the complex interaction between LiDAR waveforms, terrain, and vegetation, especially in dense tropical and equatorial forests. In this study, canopy height in French Guiana was estimated using multiple linear regression models and the Random Forest technique (RF. This analysis was either based on LiDAR waveform metrics extracted from the GLAS (Geoscience Laser Altimeter System spaceborne LiDAR data and terrain information derived from the SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEM (Digital Elevation Model or on Principal Component Analysis (PCA of GLAS waveforms. Results show that the best statistical model for estimating forest height based on waveform metrics and digital elevation data is a linear regression of waveform extent, trailing edge extent, and terrain index (RMSE of 3.7 m. For the PCA based models, better canopy height estimation results were observed using a regression model that incorporated both the first 13 principal components (PCs and the waveform extent (RMSE = 3.8 m. Random Forest regressions revealed that the best configuration for canopy height estimation used all the following metrics: waveform extent, leading edge, trailing edge, and terrain index (RMSE = 3.4 m. Waveform extent was the variable that best explained canopy height, with an importance factor almost three times higher than those for the other three metrics (leading edge, trailing edge, and terrain index. Furthermore, the Random Forest regression incorporating the first 13 PCs and the waveform extent had a slightly-improved canopy height estimation in comparison to the linear model, with an RMSE of 3.6 m. In conclusion, multiple linear regressions and RF regressions provided canopy height estimations with similar precision using either LiDAR metrics or PCs. However, a regression model (linear regression or RF based on the PCA of waveform samples with waveform

  16. Axial and radial water transport and internal water storage in tropical forest canopy trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Shelley A; Meinzer, Frederick C; Goldstein, Guillermo; Woodruff, David; Jones, Timothy; Restom, Teresa; Mejia, Monica; Clearwater, Michael; Campanello, Paula

    2003-01-01

    Heat and stable isotope tracers were used to study axial and radial water transport in relation to sapwood anatomical characteristics and internal water storage in four canopy tree species of a seasonally dry tropical forest in Panama. Anatomical characteristics of the wood and radial profiles of sap flow were measured at the base, upper trunk, and crown of a single individual of Anacardium excelsum, Ficus insipida, Schefflera morototoni, and Cordia alliodora during two consecutive dry seasons. Vessel lumen diameter and vessel density did not exhibit a consistent trend axially from the base of the stem to the base of the crown. However, lumen diameter decreased sharply from the base of the crown to the terminal branches. The ratio of vessel lumen area to sapwood cross-sectional area was consistently higher at the base of the crown than at the base of the trunk in A. excelsum, F. insipida and C. alliodora, but no axial trend was apparent in S. morototoni. Radial profiles of the preceding wood anatomical characteristics varied according to species and the height at which the wood samples were obtained. Radial profiles of sap flux density measured with thermal dissipation sensors of variable length near the base of the crown were highly correlated with radial profiles of specific hydraulic conductivity (k(s)) calculated from xylem anatomical characteristics. The relationship between sap flux density and k(s) was species-independent. Deuterium oxide (D(2)O) injected into the base of the trunk of the four study trees was detected in the water transpired from the upper crown after only 1 day in the 26-m-tall C. alliodora tree, 2 days in the 28-m-tall F. insipida tree, 3 days in the 38-m-tall A. excelsum tree, and 5 days in the 22-m-tall S. morototoni tree. Radial transport of injected D(2)O was detected in A. excelsum, F. insipida and S. morototoni, but not C. alliodora. The rate of axial D(2)O transport, a surrogate for maximum sap velocity, was positively correlated

  17. Ramet population structure of Fargesia nitida in different canopy conditions of the subalpine dark coniferous forest in the Wolong Nature Reserve ,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Jianping; SONG Lixia; LI Yuan; WANG Yongjian; YU Xiaohong

    2007-01-01

    The bamboo Fargesia nitida,one of the giant panda's main food sources and the dominant shrub species of the forest understory,is mainly distributed in the dark coniferous belt in western Sichuan and southern Gansu in China.To study the impact of different forest canopy conditions on subalpine dwarf bamboo populations,ramet population structures of clonal Fargesia nitida were surveyed in:forest understory (FU),moderate gap (MG),large gap (LG) and marginal open space (MOS).In order to determine how the ramet structures could be affected and its effects on these four canopy conditions,a field survey of the age structure of Fargesia nitida population,its morphological traits and biomass was conducted in the Abies faxoniana forest situated in the Wolong Nature Reserve,western Sichuan,China.The main results were as follows.First,at the ramet level,the structures of the ramet populations in four canopy conditions were significantly different,and as the canopy density decreased,the mean height,basal diameter and biomass of the populations increased following the order:LG < MG < FU.Second,the biomass proportions of ramets modularly varied with different canopy conditions and leaf biomass proportion was positively related to the canopy density except for the MOS where the biomass proportions of rhizome and roots were both higher than those in the three other canopy conditions.Third,ramet specific leaf weight increased in parallel with the decrease in canopy density.In the MG,the values of the individual leaf biomass and leaf area were the largest,followed by those in the MOS.Both the individual leaf biomass and leaf area were significantly different from those in the FU and LG.Leaf number per ramet was significantly different among the four different canopy conditions and the biggest in the LG.Fourth,the ramet population mortality was the lowest in the FU (Chi-square test,p <0.01),while there was no significant difference in the average population age (Mann

  18. Foliar Stable Isotope Dynamics in a Closed-Canopy Tropical Forest: Towards a Better Understanding of Terrestrial Productivity in the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, H. V.; Freeman, K. H.; Wing, S.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical forests with closed canopies today represent a large proportion (~40%) of global terrestrial biomass carbon, at least one-third of global soil carbon and 30-50% of terrestrial productivity. However, productivity of terrestrial habitats in the past is difficult to discern from the fossil record and the geologic history of three-dimensional forest structure remains unknown. This study seeks to identify isotopic and biochemical leaf characteristics that both signify a closed canopy forest and are preserved in the geologic record. The most charismatic feature of dense canopy forests is the extreme light gradient from canopy top to base, with as little as 1% of available light reaching the forest floor. Along this gradient, leaves exhibit strong light-dependent physiological responses and these adaptations are recorded in biochemical and anatomical leaf features. Using the canopy crane access system at Bosque San Lorenzo in Panamá we are able to sample leaves in the full diversity of light environments in a lowland, terre firme rainforest. As expected, bulk leaf material and individual plant waxes reveal a well-known pattern of vertical enrichment of carbon isotopes. This is generally attributed either to 13C-depleted carbon dioxide from respiration in the understory or to the increased photosynthetic rate typical of high light leaves. By comparing bulk leaf 13C to air samples captured in the same sampling locations we are able to contrast the effects of light with air 13C composition. Vertical gradients in the deuterium composition of leaf-water are associated with the evapotranspirative pattern of enrichment in high light leaves. We measured the D/H ratios of extracted n-alkanes to see if this relationship extends from leaf water to the geologically recalcitrant leaf wax lipids. The relationship between light environment and δDleaf as influenced by evapotranspiration can be constrained by measurement of the oxygen isotope ratio of α-cellulose, which

  19. Leaf function in tropical rain forest canopy trees: the effect of light on leaf morphology and physiology in different-sized trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkers, T.

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis the effect of constant and fluctuating light availability on several leaf traits was studied for naturally growing trees of different sizes, i.e . from sapling to adult canopy tree, of five species in a tropical rain forest in French Guiana. Leaf acclimation responses were examined th

  20. Regeneration after 8 years in artificial canopy gaps in mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell.) forest in south-eastern Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der P.J.; Dignan, P.

    2007-01-01

    We report on a study of regeneration of Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans) forest in S.E. Australia in artificially created canopy gaps (0.01¿2 ha) and clearfelled coupes (4¿27 ha) with different seedbed treatments. Treatments were applied in 1988, 1989, and 1990. Our results are based on measurement

  1. Effects of single-tree selection harvesting on hymenopteran and saproxylic insect assemblages in the canopy and understory of northern temperate forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandy M.Smith; Nurul Islam; M.Isabel Bellocq

    2012-01-01

    Insects respond to changes in microhabitat caused by canopy disturbance,and thus can be used to examine the ecological impacts of harvesting.Single-tree selection harvesting is the most common silvicultural system used to emulate local small-scale natural disturbance and maintain uneven-aged forest structure in temperate forests.Here,we test for differences in richness,abundance,and composition of hymenopteran and saproxylic insect assemblages at four different taxon levels (selected insect orders; and all hymenopteran families,and braconid subfamilies and morphospecies) between the canopy and understory of unharvested and single-tree selection harvested sites in a northern temperate forest from central Canada.Harvesting had no effect on insect assemblage richness,composition or abundance at the three highest taxon levels (order,family and subfamily).Similarly,richness and abundance at the lowest-taxon level (braconid morphospecies) were similar,although composition differed slightly between unharvested and harvested stands.Insect assemblages were vertically stratified,with generally higher abundance (for Diptera,Hymenoptera,some hymenopteran families and braconid subfamilies) and richness (for braconid morphospecies) in the understory than the canopy.In particular,composition of the braconid morphospecies assemblage showed relatively low similarity between the understory and canopy.Single-tree selection harvesting appears to influence wood-associated insect taxa only subtly through small changes in community composition at the lowest taxon level,and thus is recommended as a conservative approach for managing these northern temperate forests.

  2. Derivation of canopy resistance for water vapour fluxes over a spruce forest, using a new technique for the viscous sublayer resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, N.O.; Hummelshøj, P.

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports on some evaporation measurements made above a spruce forest (Picea abies) during late August and the beginning of September 1991. The period was dry, and the response of the trees to this condition is clearly seen in the form of the diurnal course of the evapotranspiration...... sublayer resistance to atmosphere canopy exchange....

  3. Effects of forest canopy gap on biomass of Abies faxoniana seedlings and its allocation in subalpine coniferous forests of western Sichuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junren XIAN; Tingxing HU; Yuanbin ZHANG; Kaiyun WANG

    2008-01-01

    Using a strip transect sampling method, the density, height (≤ 100 cm), basal diameter and compo-nents of biomass of Abiesfaxoniana seedlings, living in a forest gap (FG) and under the forest canopy (FC) of sub-alpine natural coniferous forests in western Sichuan, were investigated and the relationships among different com-ponents of biomass analyzed. The results indicated that the density and average height (H) of A. faxoniana seed-lings were significantly different in the FG and under the FC, with the values being 12903 and 2017 per hm2, and 26.6 and 24.3 cm. No significant differences were found in the average basal diameter (D) and biomass. The biomass allocation in seedling components was significantly affec-ted by forest gap. In the FG, the biomass ratio of branch to stem reached a maximum of 1.54 at age 12 and then declined and fluctuated around 0.69. Under the FC, the biomass ratio of branch to stem increased with seedling growth and exceeded 1.0 at about age 15. The total bio-mass and the biomass of leaves, stems, shoots and roots grown in the FG and under the FC were significantly correlated with D2H. There were significant and positive correlations among the biomass of different components.

  4. Estimating Canopy Gap Fraction Using ICESat GLAS within Australian Forest Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Mahoney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spaceborne laser altimetry waveform estimates of canopy Gap Fraction (GF vary with respect to discrete return airborne equivalents due to their greater sensitivity to reflectance differences between canopy and ground surfaces resulting from differences in footprint size, energy thresholding, noise characteristics and sampling geometry. Applying scaling factors to either the ground or canopy portions of waveforms has successfully circumvented this issue, but not at large scales. This study develops a method to scale spaceborne altimeter waveforms by identifying which remotely-sensed vegetation, terrain and environmental attributes are best suited to predicting scaling factors based on an independent measure of importance. The most important attributes were identified as: soil phosphorus and nitrogen contents, vegetation height, MODIS vegetation continuous fields product and terrain slope. Unscaled and scaled estimates of GF are compared to corresponding ALS data for all available data and an optimized subset, where the latter produced most encouraging results (R2 = 0.89, RMSE = 0.10. This methodology shows potential for successfully refining estimates of GF at large scales and identifies the most suitable attributes for deriving appropriate scaling factors. Large-scale active sensor estimates of GF can establish a baseline from which future monitoring investigations can be initiated via upcoming Earth Observation missions.

  5. Influence of Tree Height on the Carbon Isotopic Discrimination of Canopy Photosynthesis in Southeastern Pine Forest Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, B.; Chanton, J.; Conte, M.; Martin, T.

    2007-12-01

    Intensive investigations of carbon and water exchange in highly productive pine forests in the Southeastern US are restricted to a limited numbers of locations that are equipped with eddy covariance towers. These towers are mostly located within homogenous stands. However, the southeastern pine forests are composed of plantations of different ages/heights that are interlaced with hardwood forests. We have measured variability in photosynthetic parameters, and the 13C of ecosystem, foliage and soil respired CO2 over a 3-yr period at the Ameriflux tower site in Gainesville, FL, a slash pine ecosystem. Additionally we examined trends in canopy foliage bulk organic matter 13C, leaf wax 13C and the 13C of foliage respired CO2 as a function of tree height. Sampled tree heights ranged from 5 to 25 meters along the transect, characteristic of pine plantations within this region. A highly significant positive correlation was observed between tree height and the 13C of foliage bulk organic matter. Leaf wax 13C mirrored the trend observed in foliage respired CO2 and bulk organic matter, with approximately a -3 ‰ offset from foliage respired CO2. Point measurements of upper-crown light-saturated net photosynthesis rate were not correlated with height, but were likely confounded by water stress effects. Research in other forest ecosystems has demonstrated tree height effects on hydraulics and leaf gas exchange, but these effects have not been explored in southern pines. These data suggest that southern pine hydraulics and leaf gas exchange may be influenced by tree height, and that scaling of isotopic data in these forests will require careful consideration of age and height variation.

  6. Observations of elevated formaldehyde over a forest canopy suggest missing sources from rapid oxidation of arboreal hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Choi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the processing of biogenic VOCs (BVOCs in the pine forests of the US Sierra Nevada, we measured HCHO at Blodgett Research Station using Quantum Cascade Laser Spectroscopy (QCLS during the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX of late summer 2007. Four days of the experiment exhibited particularly copious HCHO, with midday peaks between 15–20 ppbv, while the other days developed delayed maxima between 8–14 ppbv in the early evening. From the expansive photochemical data set, we attempt to explain the observed HCHO concentrations by quantifying the various known photochemical production and loss terms in its chemical budget. Overall, known chemistry predicts a factor of 3–5 times less HCHO than observed. By examining diurnal patterns of the various budget terms we conclude that, during the high HCHO period, local, highly reactive oxidation chemistry produces an abundance of formaldehyde at the site. The results support the hypothesis of previous work at Blodgett Forest suggesting that large quantities of oxidation products, observed directly above the ponderosa pine canopy, are evidence of profuse emissions of very reactive volatile organic compounds (VR-VOCs from the forest. However, on the majority of days, under generally cooler and more moist conditions, lower levels of HCHO develop primarily influenced by the influx of precursors transported into the region along with the Sacramento plume.

  7. Observations of elevated formaldehyde over a forest canopy suggest missing sources from rapid oxidation of arboreal hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Choi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the processing of biogenic VOCs (BVOCs in the pine forests of the U.S. Sierra Nevada, we measured HCHO at Blodgett Research Station using Quantum Cascade Laser Spectroscopy (QCLS during the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX of late summer 2007. Four days of the experiment exhibited particularly copious HCHO, with midday peaks between 15–20 ppbv, while the other days developed delayed maxima between 8–14 ppbv in the early evening. From the expansive photochemical data set, we attempt to explain the observed HCHO concentrations by quantifying the various known photochemical production and loss terms in its chemical budget. Overall, known chemistry predicts a factor of 3–5 times less HCHO than observed. By examining diurnal patterns of the various budget terms we conclude that, during the high HCHO period, local, highly reactive oxidation chemistry produces an abundance of formaldehyde at the site. The results support the hypothesis of previous work at Blodgett Forest suggesting that large quantities of BVOC oxidation products, observed directly above the ponderosa pine canopy, are evidence of profuse emissions of very reactive volatile organic compounds (VR-VOCs from the forest. However, on the majority of days, under generally cooler and more moist conditions, lower levels of HCHO develop primarily influenced by the influx of precursors transported into the region along with the Sacramento plume.

  8. Annual variation in canopy openness, air temperature and humidity inthe understory of three forested sites in southern Bahia State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marayana Prado Pinheiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at contributing to the knowledge of physical factors affecting community structure in Atlantic Forest remnants of southern Bahia state, Brazil, we analyzed the annual variation in the understory microclimate of a hillside forest fragment in the ‘Reserva Particular do Patrimônio Natural Serra do Teimoso’ (RST and a rustic cacao agroforestry system (Cabruca, located nearby the RST. Canopy openness (CO, air temperature (Ta, air relative humidity (RH and vapor pressure deficit (VPD data were collected between April, 2005 and April, 2006 at the base (RSTB, 340 m and the top (RSTT, 640 m of the RST and at the Cabruca (CB, 250 m. Data of rainfall, Ta, RH and VPD were also collected in an open area (OA, 270 m. The highest rainfalls (> 100 mm occurred in November, 2005 and April, 2006, whereas October, 2005 was the driest month (< 20 mm. CO ranged between 2.5 % in the CB (April, 2006 and 7.7 % in the RST (October, 2005. Low rainfall in October, 2005 affected VPDmax in all sites. Those effects were more pronounced in OA, followed by CB, RSTB and RSTT. During the period of measurements, the values of Ta, RH and VPD in CB were closer to the values measured in OA than to the values measured inside the forest.

  9. UU* filtering of nighttime net ecosystem CO2 exchange flux over forest canopy under strong wind in wintertime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Junhui

    2005-01-01

    effects and density fluxes, Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 2000, 97:487-511.[12]Massman, W. J., Sommerfeld, R. A., Mosier, A. R. et al., A model investigation of turbulence-driven pressure-pumping effects on the rate of diffusion of CO2, N2O and CH4 through Layered snowpacks, Journal of Geophysical Research (D), 1997, 102:18851-18863.[13]Bink, N. J., The structure of the atmospheric surface layer subject to local advection, Ph. D. Thesis, Agricultural University, Wageningen, The Netherlands, 1996.[14]Raupach, M. R., Weng, W. S., Carruthers, D. J. et al., Temperature and humidity fields and fluxes over hills, Quart. J. Roy Meteoroi. Soc., 1992, 118: 191-225.[15]Aubinet, M., Heinesch, B., Yernaux, M., Horizontal and vertical CO2 advection in a sloping forest, Boundary-Layer Meteorology,2003, 108: 397-417.[16]Raupach, M. R., Finnigan, J. J., Brunet, Y., Coherent eddies and turbulence in vegetation canopies: the mixing-Layer analogy,Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 1996, 78:351-382.[17]Zhuang, Y., Amiro, B. D., Pressure fluctuations during coherent motions and their effects on the budgets of turbulent kinetic energy and momentum flux within a forest canopy, Journal Of Applied Meteorology, 1994, 33: 704-711.[18]Shaw, R. H., Zhang, X. J., Evidence of pressure-forced turbulent flow in a forest, Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 1992, 58: 273-288.[19]Maitani, T., Seo, T., Estimates of Velocity-pressure and velocity-pressure gradient interactions in the surface layer over plant canopies, Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 1985, 33: 51-60.[20]Schols, J. L. J., Wartena, L., A dynamical description of turbulent structures in the near neutral atmospheric surface layer: the Role of static pressure fluctuations, Boundary-Layer Meteorology,1986, 34: 1-15.[21]McBean, G. A., Elliott, J. A., The vertical transports of kinetic energy by turbulence and pressure in Boundary Layer, Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 1975, 32: 753-765.[22]Wilczak, J. M., Edson, J. B

  10. Spatial patterns and interspecific associations of three canopy species at different life stages in a subtropical forest, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Wei, Shi-Guang; Huang, Zhong-Liang; Ye, Wan-Hui; Cao, Hong-Lin

    2008-09-01

    Spatial patterns of species at different life stages are an important aspect for understanding causal mechanisms that facilitate species co-existence. Using Ripley's univariate L(t) and bivariate L(12)(t) functions, we analyzed the spatial patterns and interspecific associations of three canopy species at different life history stages in a 20-ha subtropical forest plot in Dinghushan Nature Reserve. Based on diameter at breast height (DBH), four life stages were distinguished. Castanopsis chinensis and Schima superba showed a unimodal DBH distribution. Engelhardtia roxburghiana showed a bimodal curve. L(t) function analysis showed significantly aggregated distributions of all three species at later life stages and random distribution at early life stages at some scales. From the analysis of L(12)(t) function, the results showed the positive association was a dominant pattern for most species pairs at most scales but the intensity of association decreases with the increase of life stages. Juveniles of the three species had no negative intra- and interspecific associations with the older life stages. Only premature trees were suppressed by overmature trees at some scales. Considering these results, we found three canopy-dominant species that lacked regeneration. There was no direct competition occurring between understorey individuals. Young trees can grow well under conspecific species with two other species. Longevity and lack of regeneration led to a large number of trees stored in mature and overmature stages, therefore, intra- and inter-competition can be strong at later life stages.

  11. Could the canopy structure of bryophytes serve as an indicator of microbial biodiversity? A test for testate amoebae and microcrustaceans from a subtropical cloud forest in Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Mercado, D; Cancel-Morales, N; Chinea, J D; Santos-Flores, C J; De Jesús, I Sastre

    2012-07-01

    The mechanisms that ultimately regulate the diversity of microbial eukaryotic communities in bryophyte ecosystems remain a contentious topic in microbial ecology. Although there is robust consensus that abiotic factors, such as water chemistry of the bryophyte and pH, explain a significant proportion of protist and microcrustacean diversity, there is no systematic assessment of the role of bryophyte habitat complexity on such prominent microbial groups. Water-holding capacity is correlated with bryophyte morphology and canopy structure. Similarly, canopy structure explains biodiversity dynamics of the macrobiota suggesting that canopy structure may also be a potential parameter for understanding microbial diversity. Canopy roughness of the dominant bryophyte species within the Bahoruco Cloud Forest, Cachote, Dominican Republic, concomitant with their associated diversity of testate amoebae and microcrustaceans was estimated to determine whether canopy structure could be added to the list of factors explaining microbial biodiversity in bryophytes. We hypothesized that smooth (with high moisture content) canopies will have higher species richness, density, and biomass of testate amoebae and higher richness and density of microcrustaceans than rough (desiccation-prone) canopies. For testate amoebae, we found 83 morphospecies with relative low abundances. Species richness and density differed among bryophytes with different bryophyte canopy structures and based on non-metric multidimensional scaling, canopy roughness explained 25% of the variation in species composition although not as predicted. Acroporium pungens (low roughness, LR) had the lowest species richness (2 ± 0.61 SD per gram dry weight bryophyte), and density (2.1 ± 0.61 SD individual per gram of dry weight bryophyte); whereas Thuidium urceolatum (high roughness) had the highest richness (24 ± 10.82 SD) and density (94 ± 64.30 SD). The fact that the bryophyte with the highest roughness had the highest

  12. Characterization of seasonal variation of forest canopy in a temperate deciduous broadleaf forest, using daily MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingyuan Zhang; Xiangming Xiao; Bobby Braswell; Ernst Linder; Scott Ollinger; Marie-Louise Smith; Julian P. Jenkins; Fred Baret; Andrew D. Richardson; Berrien III Moore; Rakesh. Minocha

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present an improved procedure for collecting no or little atmosphere- and snow-contaminated observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. The resultant time series of daily MODIS data of a temperate deciduous broadleaf forest (the Bartlett Experimental Forest) in 2004 show strong seasonal dynamics of surface...

  13. Distribution of detritivores in tropical forest streams of peninsular Malaysia: role of temperature, canopy cover and altitude variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Salmah, Md Rawi; Al-Shami, Salman Abdo; Abu Hassan, Ahmad; Madrus, Madziatul Rosemahanie; Nurul Huda, Abdul

    2014-07-01

    The diversity and abundance of macroinvertebrate shredders were investigated in 52 forested streams (local scale) from nine catchments (regional scale) covering a large area of peninsular Malaysia. A total of 10,642 individuals of aquatic macroinvertebrates were collected, of which 18.22 % were shredders. Biodiversity of shredders was described by alpha (αaverage ), beta (β) and gamma diversity (γ) measures. We found high diversity and abundance of shredders in all catchments, represented by 1,939 individuals (range 6-115 and average per site of 37.29 ± 3.48 SE) from 31 taxa with 2-13 taxa per site (αaverage = 6.98 ± 0.33 SE) and 10-15 taxa per catchment (γ = 13.33 ± 0.55 SE). At the local scale, water temperature, stream width, depth and altitude were correlated significantly with diversity (Adj- R 2 = 0.205). Meanwhile, dissolved oxygen, stream velocity, water temperature, stream width and altitude were correlated to shredder abundance (Adj- R 2 = 0.242). At regional scale, however, water temperature was correlated negatively with β and γ diversity ( r 2 = 0.161 and 0.237, respectively) as well as abundance of shredders ( r 2 = 0.235). Canopy cover was correlated positively with β diversity ( r 2 = 0.378) and abundance ( r 2 = 0.266), meanwhile altitude was correlated positively with β (quadratic: r 2 = 0.175), γ diversity (quadratic: r 2 = 0.848) as well as abundance (quadratic: r 2 = 0.299). The present study is considered as the first report describing the biodiversity and abundance of shredders in forested headwater streams across a large spatial scale in peninsular Malaysia. We concluded that water temperature has a negative effect while altitude showed a positive relationship with diversity and abundance of shredders. However, it was difficult to detect an influence of canopy cover on shredder diversity.

  14. Relative Linkages of Canopy-Level CO2 Fluxes with the Climatic and Environmental Variables for US Deciduous Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishtiaq, Khandker S.; Abdul-Aziz, Omar I.

    2015-04-01

    We used a simple, systematic data-analytics approach to determine the relative linkages of different climate and environmental variables with the canopy-level, half-hourly CO2 fluxes of US deciduous forests. Multivariate pattern recognition techniques of principal component and factor analyses were utilized to classify and group climatic, environmental, and ecological variables based on their similarity as drivers, examining their interrelation patterns at different sites. Explanatory partial least squares regression models were developed to estimate the relative linkages of CO2 fluxes with the climatic and environmental variables. Three biophysical process components adequately described the system-data variances. The `radiation-energy' component had the strongest linkage with CO2 fluxes, whereas the `aerodynamic' and `temperature-hydrology' components were low to moderately linked with the carbon fluxes. On average, the `radiation-energy' component showed 5 and 8 times stronger carbon flux linkages than that of the `temperature-hydrology' and `aerodynamic' components, respectively. The similarity of observed patterns among different study sites (representing gradients in climate, canopy heights and soil-formations) indicates that the findings are potentially transferable to other deciduous forests. The similarities also highlight the scope of developing parsimonious data-driven models to predict the potential sequestration of ecosystem carbon under a changing climate and environment. The presented data-analytics provides an objective, empirical foundation to obtain crucial mechanistic insights; complementing process-based model building with a warranted complexity. Model efficiency and accuracy ( R 2 = 0.55-0.81; ratio of root-mean-square error to the observed standard deviations, RSR = 0.44-0.67) reiterate the usefulness of multivariate analytics models for gap-filling of instantaneous flux data.

  15. Forest canopy reduction and breeding bird responses: treatment-and temporal-dependent patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandie K. Stringer; Yong Wang; Callie J. Schweitzer

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of oak regeneration forest management treatments on territorial density of breeding forest birds. The study area was located on the southern end of the mid-Cumberland Plateau in northern Jackson County, AL. Fifteen 4-ha stands were treated in 2001 with one of five target overstory retention (percentage) treatments: 0 (clearcut); 25; 50; 75; and...

  16. Lidar-derived canopy architecture predicts Brown Creeper occupancy of two western coniferous forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jody C. Vogeler; Andrew T. Hudak; Lee A. Vierling; Kerri T. Vierling

    2013-01-01

    In western conifer-dominated forests where the abundance of old-growth stands is decreasing, species such as the Brown Creeper (Certhia americana) may be useful as indicator species for monitoring the health of old-growth systems because they are strongly associated with habitat characteristics associated with old growth and are especially sensitive to forest...

  17. Estimation of aboveground biomass in alpine forests: a semi-empirical approach considering canopy transparency derived from airborne LiDAR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochem, Andreas; Hollaus, Markus; Rutzinger, Martin; Höfle, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a semi-empirical model that was originally developed for stem volume estimation is used for aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation of a spruce dominated alpine forest. The reference AGB of the available sample plots is calculated from forest inventory data by means of biomass expansion factors. Furthermore, the semi-empirical model is extended by three different canopy transparency parameters derived from airborne LiDAR data. These parameters have not been considered for stem volume estimation until now and are introduced in order to investigate the behavior of the model concerning AGB estimation. The developed additional input parameters are based on the assumption that transparency of vegetation can be measured by determining the penetration of the laser beams through the canopy. These parameters are calculated for every single point within the 3D point cloud in order to consider the varying properties of the vegetation in an appropriate way. Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) is performed to evaluate the influence of the additional LiDAR derived canopy transparency parameters for AGB estimation. The study is carried out in a 560 km(2) alpine area in Austria, where reference forest inventory data and LiDAR data are available. The investigations show that the introduction of the canopy transparency parameters does not change the results significantly according to R(2) (R(2) = 0.70 to R(2) = 0.71) in comparison to the results derived from, the semi-empirical model, which was originally developed for stem volume estimation.

  18. Canopy structure and atmospheric flows in relation to the δ13C of respired CO2 in a subalpine coniferous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Sean M.; Anderson, Dean E.; Burns, Sean P.; Monson, Russell K.; Sun, Jielun; Bowling, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Stable isotopes provide insight into ecosystem carbon cycling, plant physiological processes, atmospheric boundary-layer dynamics, and are useful for the integration of processes over multiple scales. Of particular interest is the carbon isotope content (δ13C) of nocturnal ecosystem-respired CO2 (δR). Recent advances in technology have made it possible to continuously examine the variation in δR within a forest canopy over relatively long time-scales (months–years). We used tunable diode laser spectroscopy to examine δR at within- and below-canopy spatial locations in a Colorado subalpine forest (the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site). We found a systematic pattern of increased δR within the forest canopy (δR-c) compared to that near the ground (δR-g). Values of δR-c were weakly correlated with the previous day's mean maximum daytime vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Conversely, there was a negative but still weak correlation between δR-g and time-lagged (0–5 days) daily mean soil moisture. The topography and presence of sustained nightly drainage flows at the Niwot Ridge forest site suggests that, on nights with stable atmospheric conditions, there is little mixing of air near the ground with that in the canopy. Atmospheric stability was assessed using thresholds of friction velocity, stability above the canopy, and bulk Richardson number within the canopy. When we selectively calculated δR-g and δR-c by removing time periods when ground and canopy air were well mixed, we found stronger correlations between δR-c and VPD, and δR-g and soil moisture. This suggests that there may be fundamental differences in the environmental controls on δR at sub-canopy spatial scales. These results may help explain the wide variance observed in the correlation of δR with different environmental parameters in other studies.

  19. Influence of stocking, site quality, stand age, low-severity canopy disturbance, and forest composition on sub-boreal aspen mixedwood carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinikainen, Michael; D’Amato, Anthony W.; Bradford, John B.; Fraver, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Low-severity canopy disturbance presumably influences forest carbon dynamics during the course of stand development, yet the topic has received relatively little attention. This is surprising because of the frequent occurrence of such events and the potential for both the severity and frequency of disturbances to increase as a result of climate change. We investigated the impacts of low-severity canopy disturbance and average insect defoliation on forest carbon stocks and rates of carbon sequestration in mature aspen mixedwood forests of varying stand age (ranging from 61 to 85 years), overstory composition, stocking level, and site quality. Stocking level and site quality positively affected the average annual aboveground tree carbon increment (CAAI), while stocking level, site quality, and stand age positively affected tree carbon stocks (CTREE) and total ecosystem carbon stocks (CTOTAL). Cumulative canopy disturbance (DIST) was reconstructed using dendroecological methods over a 29-year period. DIST was negatively and significantly related to soil carbon (CSOIL), and it was negatively, albeit marginally, related to CTOTAL. Minima in the annual aboveground carbon increment of trees (CAI) occurred at sites during defoliation of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) by forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria Hubner), and minima were more extreme at sites dominated by trembling aspen than sites mixed with conifers. At sites defoliated by forest tent caterpillar in the early 2000s, increased sequestration by the softwood component (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill. and Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) compensated for overall decreases in CAI by 17% on average. These results underscore the importance of accounting for low-severity canopy disturbance events when developing regional forest carbon models and argue for the restoration and maintenance of historically important conifer species within aspen mixedwoods to enhance stand-level resilience to disturbance agents and maintain

  20. Forest disturbance and recovery: A general review in the context of spaceborne remote sensing of impacts on aboveground biomass and canopy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolking, S.; Palace, M. W.; Clark, D. B.; Chambers, J. Q.; Shugart, H. H.; Hurtt, G. C.

    2009-07-01

    Abrupt forest disturbances generating gaps >0.001 km2 impact roughly 0.4-0.7 million km2 a-1. Fire, windstorms, logging, and shifting cultivation are dominant disturbances; minor contributors are land conversion, flooding, landslides, and avalanches. All can have substantial impacts on canopy biomass and structure. Quantifying disturbance location, extent, severity, and the fate of disturbed biomass will improve carbon budget estimates and lead to better initialization, parameterization, and/or testing of forest carbon cycle models. Spaceborne remote sensing maps large-scale forest disturbance occurrence, location, and extent, particularly with moderate- and fine-scale resolution passive optical/near-infrared (NIR) instruments. High-resolution remote sensing (e.g., ˜1 m passive optical/NIR, or small footprint lidar) can map crown geometry and gaps, but has rarely been systematically applied to study small-scale disturbance and natural mortality gap dynamics over large regions. Reducing uncertainty in disturbance and recovery impacts on global forest carbon balance requires quantification of (1) predisturbance forest biomass; (2) disturbance impact on standing biomass and its fate; and (3) rate of biomass accumulation during recovery. Active remote sensing data (e.g., lidar, radar) are more directly indicative of canopy biomass and many structural properties than passive instrument data; a new generation of instruments designed to generate global coverage/sampling of canopy biomass and structure can improve our ability to quantify the carbon balance of Earth's forests. Generating a high-quality quantitative assessment of disturbance impacts on canopy biomass and structure with spaceborne remote sensing requires comprehensive, well designed, and well coordinated field programs collecting high-quality ground-based data and linkages to dynamical models that can use this information.

  1. Measuring spatiotemporal variation in snow optical grain size under a subalpine forest canopy using contact spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Molotch, Noah P; Barnard, David M; Burns, Sean P; Painter, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    .... In this study, we address one of many measurement gaps by using contact spectroscopy to measure snow optical grain size at high spatial resolution in trenches dug between tree boles in a subalpine forest...

  2. Soil Properties and Plant Community Changes along a Goat Grazing Intensity Gradient in an Open Canopy Oak Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimilia LEMPESI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how the management practices of silvopastoral systems affect the long-term sustainability of oak ecosystems and what their influence is on nutrient cycling and plant community, is of great interest. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of relative grazing intensity on soil properties and on vegetation characteristics in an open canopy oak forest dominated by Quercus frainetto. The research was conducted in the area of Pentalofos, which is located in Evros region, north-eastern Greece and is grazed by goats. The distance from a goat corral was used to represent relative grazing intensity. In June 2011, soil and vegetation samples were collected along transects placed at 50, 150, 300, 600 and 1200 m from the goat corral, running perpendicular to three replicates. Soil measurements included pH, phosphorous (P and nitrogen (N concentrations while vegetation measurements included plant cover, species composition and diversity. Plant cover was not significantly different among grazing intensities. Species diversity, especially of the woody vegetation layer, was significantly higher in the light grazing intensity in comparison to both the heavy and the very light grazing. Heavy grazing reduced soil organic matter while it increased total nitrogen. Grazing intensity did not affect available P and soil pH. Light to moderate goat grazing could ameliorate floristic diversity and increase sustainability of oak forests in the Mediterranean region.

  3. Classification of Tree Species in Overstorey Canopy of Subtropical Forest Using QuickBird Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinsu Lin

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a supervised classification scheme to identify 40 tree species (2 coniferous, 38 broadleaf belonging to 22 families and 36 genera in high spatial resolution QuickBird multispectral images (HMS. Overall kappa coefficient (OKC and species conditional kappa coefficients (SCKC were used to evaluate classification performance in training samples and estimate accuracy and uncertainty in test samples. Baseline classification performance using HMS images and vegetation index (VI images were evaluated with an OKC value of 0.58 and 0.48 respectively, but performance improved significantly (up to 0.99 when used in combination with an HMS spectral-spatial texture image (SpecTex. One of the 40 species had very high conditional kappa coefficient performance (SCKC ≥ 0.95 using 4-band HMS and 5-band VIs images, but, only five species had lower performance (0.68 ≤ SCKC ≤ 0.94 using the SpecTex images. When SpecTex images were combined with a Visible Atmospherically Resistant Index (VARI, there was a significant improvement in performance in the training samples. The same level of improvement could not be replicated in the test samples indicating that a high degree of uncertainty exists in species classification accuracy which may be due to individual tree crown density, leaf greenness (inter-canopy gaps, and noise in the background environment (intra-canopy gaps. These factors increase uncertainty in the spectral texture features and therefore represent potential problems when using pixel-based classification techniques for multi-species classification.

  4. The effects of forest canopy shading and turbulence on boundary layer ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makar, P. A.; Staebler, R. M.; Akingunola, A.; Zhang, J.; McLinden, C.; Kharol, S. K.; Pabla, B.; Cheung, P.; Zheng, Q.

    2017-05-01

    The chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere close to the surface is known to be strongly influenced by vegetation. However, two critical aspects of the forest environment have been neglected in the description of the large-scale influence of forests on air pollution: the reduction of photolysis reaction rates and the modification of vertical transport due to the presence of foliage. Here we show that foliage shading and foliage-modified vertical diffusion have a profound influence on atmospheric chemistry, both at the Earth's surface and extending throughout the atmospheric boundary layer. The absence of these processes in three-dimensional models may account for 59-72% of the positive bias in North American surface ozone forecasts, and up to 97% of the bias in forested regions within the continent. These processes are shown to have similar or greater influence on surface ozone levels as climate change and current emissions policy scenario simulations.

  5. Variability in Canopy Transpiration with Atmospheric Drivers and Permafrost Thaw Depth in an Arctic Siberian Larch Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loranty, M. M.; Berner, L. T.; Alexander, H. D.; Davydov, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic ecosystems are experiencing rapid change associated with amplified rates of climate warming. A general increase in vegetation productivity has been among the expected responses for terrestrial ecosystems in the Arctic. However, recent evidence from satellite derived productivity metrics has revealed a high degree of spatial heterogeneity in the magnitude, and even the direction, of productivity trends in recent decades. Declines in productivity may seem counterintuitive in what are traditionally thought to be temperature limited ecosystems. However a warmer and drier atmosphere in conjunction with changing permafrost conditions may impose hydrologic stresses on vegetation as well. Many Siberian ecosystems receive annual precipitation inputs characteristics of arid and semiarid regions. Boreal forests persist because permafrost acts as an aquatard trapping water near the surface and because historically cool growing season temperatures have kept atmospheric evaporative demand relatively low. As climate change simultaneously warms the atmosphere and deepens the active layer it is likely that vegetation will experience a higher degree of hydrologic limitation, perhaps necessitating the reallocation of resources. Here we use sap flux observations of canopy transpiration to understand the influence of atmospheric and permafrost conditions on the function of an arctic boreal forest in northeastern Siberia. We find that individual trees exhibit stronger responses to atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (D) as the growing season progresses. Further, the magnitude of this response appears to be positively correlated with changes in the depth of permafrost thaw. These results imply that arctic boreal forests will need to adapt to increasing hydrologic stress in order to benefit from what are typically thought of as increasingly favorable growing conditions with continued climate change.

  6. Accuracy Assessment of Timber Volume Maps Using Forest Inventory Data and LiDAR Canopy Height Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Maps of standing timber volume provide valuable decision support for forest managers and have therefore been the subject of recent studies. For map production, field observations are commonly combined with area-wide remote sensing data in order to formulate prediction models, which are then applied over the entire inventory area. The accuracy of such maps has frequently been described by parameters such as the root mean square error of the prediction model. The aim of this study was to additionally address the accuracy of timber volume classes, which are used to better represent the map predictions. However, the use of constant class intervals neglects the possibility that the precision of the underlying prediction model may not be constant across the entire volume range, resulting in pronounced gradients between class accuracies. This study proposes an optimization technique that automatically identifies a classification scheme which accounts for the properties of the underlying model and the implied properties of the remote sensing support information. We demonstrate the approach in a mountainous study site in Eastern Switzerland covering a forest area of 2000 hectares using a multiple linear regression model approach. A LiDAR-based canopy height model (CHM provided the auxiliary information; timber volume observations from the latest forest inventory were used for model calibration and map validation. The coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.64 and the cross-validated root mean square error (RMSECV = 123.79 m3 ha−1 were only slightly smaller than those of studies in less steep and heterogeneous landscapes. For a large set of pre-defined number of classes, the optimization model successfully identified those classification schemes that achieved the highest possible accuracies for each class.

  7. Spatial Patterns and Interspecific Associations of Three Canopy Species at Different Life Stages in a Subtropical Forest,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Li; Shi-Guang Wei; Zhong-Liang Huang; Wan-Hui Ye; Hong-Lin Cao

    2008-01-01

    Spatial patterns of species at different life stages are an important aspect for understanding causal mechanisms that facilitate species co-existence.Using Ripley's univariate L(t) and bivariate L12(t) functions,we analyzed the spatial patterns and interspecific associations of three canopy species at different life history stages in a 20-ha subtropical forest plot in Dinghushan Nature Reserve.Based on diameter at breast height (DBH),four life stages were distinguished.Castanopsis chinensis and Schima superba showed a unimodal DBH distribution.Engelhardtia roxburghiana showed a bimodal curve.L(t) function analysis showed significantly aggregated distributions of all three species at later life stages and random distribution at early life stages at some scales.From the analysis of L12(t) function,the results showed the positive association was a dominant pattern for most species pairs at most scales but the intensity of association decreases with the increase of life stages.Juveniles of the three species had no negative intra- and interspecific associations with the older life stages.Only premature trees were suppressed by overmature trees at some scales.Considering these results,we found three canopy-dominant species that lacked regeneration.There was no direct competition occurring between understorey individuals.Young trees can grow well under conspecific species with two other species.Longevity and lack of regeneration led to a large number of trees stored in mature and overmature stages,therefore,intra-and inter-competition can be strong at later life stages.

  8. Species richness and ecological characterization of myxomycetes and myxomycete-like organisms in the canopy of a temperate deciduous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittler, Martin; Unterseher, Martin; Tesmer, Jens

    2006-01-01

    The ecological community of myxomycetes and myxomycete-like organisms (MMLO) in the canopy of living deciduous trees was studied in a riparian deciduous forest at Leipzig, Germany. A systematic survey carried out with a total of 146 moist chamber cultures resulted in 386 records of 37 taxa, with 32 myxomycetes, two myxobacteria, two protostelids and the fruit body forming ciliate Sorogena stoianovitchae, the latter recorded for the first time for Europe. With 94% of all cultures positive for MMLO, these organisms are present consistently in the investigated sections of white-rotten twigs attached to living trees at 10-30 m above the ground. Our sampling recovered a majority of the likely species, with 37 out of the 42-45 predicted according to a species-accumulation curve and two other estimators of species richness. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling revealed pH, water-holding capacity and stage of decay to explain most of the variation in species distribution. Arcyria cinerea and Perichaena depressa as the most common species occurred in 32% and 29% of all samples, respectively. Viewing the sampled twigs as habitat islands and a single spore as sufficient to establish a population, a simulation program assuming a random spore rain estimated an average of 0.4 and 0.35 spore hits per twig as necessary to explain the observed frequencies. This is matched by the potential productivity of the substrate. All fruit bodies from the cultured twigs would be able to create a spore rain of 86 (A. cinerea) or 40 (P. depressa) spore hits per twig when dispersed evenly over the plot. The terminal fall velocity of spores was measured, revealing that it took about 5 h for a spore to land (30 m) in still air and indicating high dispersal ability for canopy-inhabiting MMLO.

  9. Modeling of leachable {sup 137}Cs in throughfall and stemflow for Japanese forest canopies after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loffredo, Nicolas, E-mail: wataiso@free.fr [Center for Research in Isotopes and Environmental Dynamics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Onda, Yuichi [Center for Research in Isotopes and Environmental Dynamics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Kawamori, Ayumi [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Kato, Hiroaki [Center for Research in Isotopes and Environmental Dynamics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    The Fukushima accident dispersed significant amounts of radioactive cesium (Cs) in the landscape. Our research investigated, from June 2011 to November 2013, the mobility of leachable Cs in forests canopies. In particular, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs activity concentrations were measured in rainfall, throughfall, and stemflow in broad-leaf and cedar forests in an area located 40 km from the power plant. Leachable {sup 137}Cs loss was modeled by a double exponential (DE) model. This model could not reproduce the variation in activity concentration observed. In order to refine the DE model, the main physical measurable parameters (rainfall intensity, wind velocity, and snowfall occurrence) were assessed, and rainfall was identified as the dominant factor controlling observed variation. A corrective factor was then developed to incorporate rainfall intensity in an improved DE model. With the original DE model, we estimated total {sup 137}Cs loss by leaching from canopies to be 72 ± 4%, 67 ± 4%, and 48 ± 2% of the total plume deposition under mature cedar, young cedar, and broad-leaf forests, respectively. In contrast, with the improved DE model, the total {sup 137}Cs loss by leaching was estimated to be 34 ± 2%, 34 ± 2%, and 16 ± 1% of the total plume deposition under mature cedar, young cedar, and broad-leaf forests, respectively. The improved DE model corresponds better to observed data in literature. Understanding {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs forest dynamics is important for forecasting future contamination of forest soils around the FDNPP. It also provides a basis for understanding forest transfers in future potential nuclear disasters. - Highlights: • A double exponential model was used to model leachable cesium loss from canopies. • The model could not reproduce variation observed. • Rainfall was identified as the dominant factor controlling the variation. • A rainfall parameter was used to develop an improved double exponential model. • The

  10. High NDVI and Potential Canopy Photosynthesis of South American Subtropical Forests despite Seasonal Changes in Leaf Area Index and Air Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piedad M. Cristiano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The canopy photosynthesis and carbon balance of the subtropical forests are not well studied compared to temperate and tropical forest ecosystems. The main objective of this study was to assess the seasonal dynamics of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and potential canopy photosynthesis in relation to seasonal changes in leaf area index (LAI, chlorophyll concentration, and air temperatures of NE Argentina subtropical forests throughout the year. We included in the analysis several tree plantations (Pinus, Eucalyptus and Araucaria species that are known to have high productivity. Field studies in native forests and tree plantations were conducted; stem growth rates, LAI and leaf chlorophyll concentration were measured. MODIS satellite-derived LAI (1 km SIN Grid and NDVI (250m SIN Grid from February 2000 to 2012 were used as a proxy of seasonal dynamics of potential photosynthetic activity at the stand level. The remote sensing LAI of the subtropical forests decreased every year from 6 to 5 during the cold season, similar to field LAI measurements, when temperatures were 10 °C lower than during the summer. The yearly maximum NDVI values were observed during a few months in autumn and spring (March through May and November, respectively because high and low air temperatures may have a small detrimental effect on photosynthetic activity during both the warm and the cold seasons. Leaf chlorophyll concentration was higher during the cold season than the warm season which may have a compensatory effect on the seasonal variation of the NDVI values. The NDVI of the subtropical forest stands remained high and fairly constant throughout the year (the intra-annual coefficient of variation was 1.9%, and were comparable to the values of high-yield tree plantations. These results suggest that the humid subtropical forests in NE Argentina potentially could maintain high canopy photosynthetic activity throughout the year and thus this ecosystem may

  11. Tree dynamics in canopy gaps in old-growth forests of Nothofagus pumilio in Southern Chile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fajardo, Alex; Graaf, de N.R.

    2004-01-01

    The gap dynamics of two Nothofagus pumilio (lenga) stands have been investigated. We evaluated and compared tree diameter distributions, spatial patterns, tree fall and gap characteristics and regeneration responses in gaps in two old-growth forests of Nothofagus pumilio in Southern Chile (Shangri-L

  12. Stable water isotopes suggest sub-canopy water recycling in a northern forested catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark B. Green; Bethany K. Laursen; John L. Campbell; Kevin J. McGuire; Eric P. Kelsey

    2015-01-01

    Stable water isotopes provide a means of tracing many hydrologic processes, including poorly understood dynamics like soil water interactions with the atmosphere. We present a four-year dataset of biweekly water isotope samples from eight fluxes and stores in a headwater catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA. We use Dansgaard's...

  13. Sustaining northern red oak forests: managing oak from regeneration to canopy dominance in mature stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel C. Dey; Gary W. Miller; John M. Kabrick

    2008-01-01

    Across the range of northern red oak, managers have problems sustaining current stocking of northern red oak in forests. Oak species are adapted to frequent stand disturbances that reduce the abundance of shade tolerant competitors and control fast-growing pioneer species. A widely recommended approach to regenerating northern red oak is to develop relatively large...

  14. Effects of canopy herbivory on nutrient cycling in a northern hardwood forest in Western North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara C. Reynolds; Mark D. Hunter; D.A. Crossely

    2000-01-01

    In May 1998 an outbreak of sawflies, Periclista sp. (Hymenoptera: Symphyta), occurred in a high-elevation hardwood forest in western North Carolina. Estimated defoliation of northern red oak (Quercus rubra) and white oak (Q. alba) removed 40% of leaf area Weights of frass (insect feces) collected at the site...

  15. Quantitative remote sensing for monitoring forest canopy structural variables in the Three Gorges region of China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Bridging various scales ranging from local to regional and global, remote sensing has facilitated extraordinary advances in modeling and mapping ecosystems and their functioning. Since forests are one of the most important natural resources on the terrestrial Earth surface, accurate and up-to-date i

  16. Inversion of Moisture Content of Forest Canopy and Floor from SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, M.; Saatchi, S.

    1996-01-01

    Several scattering mechanisms contribute to the total radar backscatter cross section measured by the synthetic aperture radar. These are volume scattering, trunk-ground double-bounce scattering, branch-ground double-bounce scattering, and surface scattering. All of these mechanisms are directly related to the dielectric constant of forest components responsible for that mechanism and their moisture.

  17. Regeneration in canopy gaps of tierra-firme forest in the Peruvian Amazon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsten, Rune Juelsborg; Jovanovic, Milos; Meilby, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Reduced impact logging (RIL) has been promoted as a cornerstone in sustainable forest management in the tropics, although the ecological implications of RIL guidelines are poorly understood. This study aims to identify the impact of RIL on the regeneration of commercial timber species by comparin...

  18. 森林冠层节肢动物多样性研究进展%THE BIODIVERSITY OF ARTHROPODS FROM FOREST CANOPIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑国; 李枢强

    2013-01-01

    森林冠层蕴涵着大约40%的现存物种,在维持生态系统功能、演化和生物多样性等方面起着重要的作用.森林冠层对全球气候变化和人为干扰高度敏感,使冠层生物面临威胁.本文简要介绍了森林冠层节肢动物的研究技术,概述了森林冠层节肢动物的研究进展.%Forest canopies, supporting about 40 % of the world's terrestrial species, play a crucial role in maintaining ecosystem function, evolution, and biodiversity. Forest canopies are highly susceptible to global climate change and anthropogenic disturbance;therefore, canopy arthropods are facing the threat seriously. In this study, we reviewed the brief history of methodology and summarized the research progress in studies of canopy arthropods.

  19. Partitioning of soil water among canopy trees during a soil desiccation period in a temperate mixed forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Meißner

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Complementary resource use is considered an important mechanism in the study of biodiversity effects. Here we explore how species identity, species mixture and tree size influence the vertical partitioning of soil water among canopy trees during a soil desiccation period. In the Hainich Forest, Germany, the species Fagus sylvatica, Tilia sp. and Fraxinus excelsior were studied in single- and three-species mixed clusters, each consisting of three co-dominant trees situated within a larger mixed forest stand. Vertical soil water uptake depth was assessed by analyzing the hydrogen stable isotope composition (deuterium, δD of water from depth intervals throughout the soil profile and in tree xylem water. For single species clusters, a mixing model suggested that Fagus distinctively drew water from soil depths of 0.3–0.5 m, Tilia from 0.3–0.5 m and 0.5–0.7 m and Fraxinus mainly used water from 0.5–0.7 m. In mixed clusters, the uptake patterns of Fagus and Tilia were similar to those of the single-species clusters (mainly uptake form 0.3–0.5 m, but Fraxinus showed a different uptake pattern. Fraxinus in mixture had a somewhat homogenously distributed uptake over the soil depths 0.2–0.7 m. For single species clusters, there was no correlation between main soil water uptake depth and tree diameter, irrespective of variations in tree size. In contrast, for mixed clusters there was a significant decrease in the main uptake depth with increasing tree size (P<0.001, R2adj = 0.73, irrespective of species mix. In consequence, soil water partitioning was strongest where species were mixed and tree size varied. We further analyzed whether single and mixed-species clusters differed in the level of water uptake, e.g. due to complementarity, but our soil water budgeting did not indicate any such differences. A possible explanation might be

  20. Exchange of reactive nitrogen compounds: concentrations and fluxes of total ammonium and total nitrate above a spruce forest canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wolff

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Total ammonium (tot-NH4+ and total nitrate (tot-NO3 provide a chemically conservative quantity in the measurement of exchange processes of reactive nitrogen compounds ammonia (NH3, particulate ammonium (NH4+, nitric acid (HNO3, and particulate nitrate (NO3, using the aerodynamic gradient method. Total fluxes were derived from concentration differences of total ammonium (NH3 and NH4+ and total nitrate (HNO3 and NO3 measured at two levels. Gaseous species and related particulate compounds were measured selectively, simultaneously and continuously above a spruce forest canopy in south-eastern Germany in summer 2007. Measurements were performed using a wet-chemical two-point gradient instrument, the GRAEGOR. Median concentrations of NH3, HNO3, NH4, and NO3 were 0.57, 0.12, 0.76, and 0.48 μg m−3, respectively. Total ammonium and total nitrate fluxes showed large variations depending on meteorological conditions, with concentrations close to zero under humid and cool conditions and higher concentrations under dry conditions. Mean fluxes of total ammonium and total nitrate in September 2007 were directed towards the forest canopy and were −65.77 ng m−2 s−1 and −41.02 ng m−2 s−1 (in terms of nitrogen, respectively. Their deposition was controlled by aerodynamic resistances only, with very little influence of surface resistances. Including measurements of wet deposition and findings of former studies at the study site on occult deposition (fog water interception, the total N deposition in September 2007 was estimated to 5.86 kg ha−1.

  1. Partitioning of soil water among canopy trees during a soil desiccation period in a temperate mixed forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Meißner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Complementary resource use is considered an important mechanism in the study of biodiversity effects. Here we explore how species identity, species mixture and tree size influence the vertical partitioning of soil water among canopy trees during a soil desiccation period. In the Hainich forest, Germany, the species Fagus sylvatica, Tilia sp. and Fraxinus excelsior were studied in single- and three-species mixed clusters, each consisting of three co-dominant trees situated within a larger mixed forest stand. Vertical soil water uptake depth was assessed by analyzing the hydrogen stable isotope composition (deuterium, δ D of water from depth intervals throughout the soil profile and in tree xylem water. For single species clusters, a mixing model suggested that Fagus distinctively drew water from soil depths of 0.3–0.5 m, Tilia from 0.3–0.5 m and 0.5–0.7 m and Fraxinus mainly used water from 0.5–0.7 m. In mixed clusters, the uptake patterns of Fagus and Tilia were similar to those of the single-species clusters (mainly uptake form 0.3–0.5 m, but Fraxinus showed a different uptake pattern. Fraxinus in mixture had a somewhat homogenously distributed uptake over the soil depths 0.2–0.7 m. For single species clusters, there was no correlation between main soil water uptake depth and tree diameter, irrespective of variations in tree size. In contrast, for mixed clusters there was a significant decrease in the main uptake depth with increasing tree size (P<0.001, R2adj = 0.73, irrespective of species mix. In consequence, soil water partitioning was strongest where species were mixed and tree size varied. We further analyzed whether single and mixed-species clusters differed in the level of water uptake, e.g. due to complementarity, but our soil water budgeting did not indicate any such differences. A possible explanation might be that the

  2. Heat storage in forest biomass significantly improves energy balance closure particularly during stable conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lindroth

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Temperature measurements in trunks and branches in a mature ca. 100 years-old mixed pine and spruce forest in central Sweden were used to estimate the heat storage in the tree biomass. The estimated heat flux in the sample trees and data on biomass distributions were used to scale up to stand level biomass heat fluxes. The rate of change of sensible and latent heat storage in the air layer below the level of the flux measurements was estimated from air temperature and humidity profile measurements and soil heat flux was estimated from heat flux plates and soil temperature measurements. The fluxes of sensible and latent heat from the forest were measured with an eddy covariance system in a tower. The analysis was made for a two-month period in summer of 1995. The tree biomass heat flux was the largest of the estimated storage components and varied between 40 and −35 W m−2 on summer days with nice weather. Averaged over two months the diurnal maximum of total heat storage was 45 W m−2 and the minimum was −35 W m−2. The soil heat flux and the sensible heat storage in air were out of phase with the biomass flux and they reached maximum values that were about 75% of the maximum of the tree biomass heat storage. The energy balance closure improved significantly when the total heat storage was added to the turbulent fluxes. The slope of a regression line with sum of fluxes and storage as independent and net radiation as dependent variable, increased from 0.86 to 0.95 for half-hourly data and the scatter was also reduced. The most significant finding was, however, that during nights with strongly stable conditions when the sensible heat flux dropped to nearly zero, the total storage matched the net radiation nearly perfectly. Another interesting result was that the mean energy imbalance started to increase when the Richardson number became more negative than ca. −0.1. In fact, the largest energy deficit

  3. Hydrocarbon fluxes above a Scots pine forest canopy: measurements and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rinne

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We measured the fluxes of several hydrocarbon species above a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris stand using disjunct eddy covariance technique with proton transfer reaction – mass spectrometry. The measurements were conducted during four days in July at SMEAR II research station in Hyytiälä, Finland. Compounds which showed significant emission fluxes were methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and monoterpenes. A stochastic Lagrangian transport model with simple chemical degradation was applied to assess the sensitivity of the above canopy fluxes to chemistry. According to the model, the chemical degradation had a minor effect on the fluxes measured in this study but may have a major effect on the vertical flux profiles of more reactive compounds, such as sesquiterpenes. The monoterpene fluxes derived using M81 and M137 had a systematic difference with the latter one being higher. These fluxes followed the traditional exponential temperature dependent emission algorithm but were considerably higher than the fluxes measured before at the same site. The normalized monoterpene emission potentials at 30°C, obtained using the temperature dependence coefficient of 0.09°C−1, were 2.0 μg gdw−1 h−1 and 2.5 μg gdw−1 h−1, for fluxes derived using M81 and M137.

  4. The Roll of Canopy on Interception and Redistribution of Anthropogenic Radionuclides Derived from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident in Coniferous Forest Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, H.; Onda, Y.; Kawaguchi, S.; Gomi, T.

    2011-12-01

    Soil, vegetation and other ecological compartments are expected to be highly contaminated by the deposited radionuclides after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident triggered by a magnitude 9.1 earthquake and the resulting tsunami on Marchi 11, 2011. A large proportion of radionuclides which deposited on forest area are trapped by canopies, throughfall and stemflow are the most important pathways for the input of radionuclides into the soil of forest floor. In this study, to investigate the roll of forest canopy on interception and redistribution of the deposited radionuclides, a series of field monitoring experiment of throughfall and stemflow were conducted in coniferous forest plantations in Tochigi prefecture, 170 km southwest from the NPP. A set of 20 throughfall collectors with latticelike distribution and 5 stemflow collectors were located in the 10m × 10m interception plot, and the activities of caesium (137Cs, 134Cs) and radioiodine (131I) in throughfall and stemflow were quantified by using a high purity n-type germanium coaxial gamma ray detectors. Rainfall, throughfall, and stemflow samples were collected from 10 rainfall events, which includes first rainfall event after the NPP accident. The cumulative fallout of radionuclides in the study site was 3400 Bq m-2 for 137Cs, 3300 Bq m-2 for 134Cs, and 26000 Bq m-2 for 131I, respectively. The 137Cs in rainfall decreased exponentially with time since the NPP accident. For the rainfall event of 28 March, which is first rainfall event after the NPP accident, both the amount and concentration of caesium clearly increased with throughfall, whereas the concentration of radioiodine decreased with throughfall. For the subsequent rainfall events, the concentration of caesium decreased with throughfall, whereas radioiodine was not detected as a result of decay due to short half-life. At the end of May, approximately 30% and 60% of total caesium deposited after the NPP accident remained on the

  5. Ancient associations of aquatic beetles and tank bromeliads in the Neotropical forest canopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balke, Michael; Gómez-Zurita, Jesús; Ribera, Ignacio; Viloria, Angel; Zillikens, Anne; Steiner, Josephina; García, Mauricio; Hendrich, Lars; Vogler, Alfried P

    2008-04-29

    Water reservoirs formed by the leaf axils of bromeliads are a highly derived system for nutrient and water capture that also house a diverse fauna of invertebrate specialists. Here we investigate the origin and specificity of bromeliad-associated insects using Copelatinae diving beetles (Dytiscidae). This group is widely distributed in small water bodies throughout tropical forests, but a subset of species encountered in bromeliad tanks is strictly specialized to this habitat. An extensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of Neotropical Copelatinae places these bromeliadicolous species in at least three clades nested within other Copelatus. One lineage is morphologically distinct, and its origin was estimated to reach back to 12-23 million years ago, comparable to the age of the tank habitat itself. Species of this clade in the Atlantic rainforest of southern Brazil and mountain ranges of northern Venezuela and Trinidad show marked phylogeographical structure with up to 8% mtDNA divergence, possibly indicating allopatric speciation. The other two invasions of bromeliad water tanks are more recent, and haplotype distributions within species are best explained by recent expansion into newly formed habitat. Hence, bromeliad tanks create a second stratum of aquatic freshwater habitat independent of that on the ground but affected by parallel processes of species and population diversification at various temporal scales, possibly reflecting the paleoclimatic history of neotropical forests.

  6. Tree architecture and forest canopy structure obtained from terrestrial LiDAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Reiner; Bittner, Sebastian; Ritter, Daniel; Priesack, Eckart

    2013-04-01

    ranging from single tree architectures to tree stand architecture of almost 100 deciduous trees of 25 meter height. The handling of the effects of self-shadowing and data gaps and the limits of the algorithm is discussed as well as the requirements for the laser scanner hardware and data acquisition. We show the use of the obtained tree and canopy architectures to simulate water uptake, water storage, and transpiration in combination with light absorption and leaf photosynthesis using a ray tracer model.

  7. Estimation of Aboveground Biomass in Alpine Forests: A Semi-Empirical Approach Considering Canopy Transparency Derived from Airborne LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rutzinger

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a semi-empirical model that was originally developed for stem volume estimation is used for aboveground biomass (AGB estimation of a spruce dominated alpine forest. The reference AGB of the available sample plots is calculated from forest inventory data by means of biomass expansion factors. Furthermore, the semi-empirical model is extended by three different canopy transparency parameters derived from airborne LiDAR data. These parameters have not been considered for stem volume estimation until now and are introduced in order to investigate the behavior of the model concerning AGB estimation. The developed additional input parameters are based on the assumption that transparency of vegetation can be measured by determining the penetration of the laser beams through the canopy. These parameters are calculated for every single point within the 3D point cloud in order to consider the varying properties of the vegetation in an appropriate way. Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA is performed to evaluate the influence of the additional LiDAR derived canopy transparency parameters for AGB estimation. The study is carried out in a 560 km2 alpine area in Austria, where reference forest inventory data and LiDAR data are available. The investigations show that the introduction of the canopy transparency parameters does not change the results significantly according to R2 (R2 = 0.70 to R2 = 0.71 in comparison to the results derived from, the semi-empirical model, which was originally developed for stem volume estimation.

  8. Impact of aerosol composition and foliage characteristics on forest canopy deposition rates: A laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, K. E.; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Forests are a major sink for atmospheric aerosols. Hence it has been suggested that (i) increased tree planting in urban areas might lead to a reduction in aerosol particle concentrations and thus a reduction in respiratory conditions and heart complications, and (ii) forests may be responsible for removing a disproportionately large fraction of potentially climate-relevant fine and ultra-fine aerosol particles from the atmosphere. However, larger uncertainties remain with respect to controls on uptake rates for forests. E.g. the deposition flux partitioning between foliage and non-foliage elements, the influence of particle size and composition, the role of leaf surface morphology and stomatal aperture in surface uptake. Improved understanding of the relative importance of these factors and the variability across different tree species should help determine how much of a sink naturally occurring and planted forests can provide downstream of fine particle production. In this study, a sample of trees native to southern Indiana were exposed to ultra-fine aerosol particle populations in a 1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.5 m Teflon chamber. Stable particle size distributions (PSD) with geometric mean diameters (GMD) ranging from 40 to 80 nm were generated from sodium chloride, ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and sodium sulfite solutions using a TSI model 3940 Aerosol Generation System (AGS). The aerosol stream was diluted using scrubbed and dried zero air to allow a variation of total number concentration across two orders of magnitude. PSD in the chamber are continuously measured using a TSI Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) comprising an Electrostatic Classifier (EC model 3080) attached to a Long DMA (LDMA model 3081) and a TSI model 3025A Butanol Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) operated with both the internal diffusion loss and multiple charge corrections turned on. The composition of the chamber air was also monitored for carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor

  9. Modelling day-time concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds in a boreal forest canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Lappalainen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Three different models for day-time atmospheric methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene and monoterpene concentrations were developed using measurements above a boreal forest stand in Southern Finland in 2006–2007 and tested against an independent dataset from the same forest measured in summer 2008. The models were based on the exponential relationship between air temperature and the concentration of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC. Our first model for BVOC concentrations was a simple exponential function of air temperature (T-model. The T-model could explain 27–66% of the variation of all the compounds, but it failed to catch the extremely high concentration peaks observed in summer. To improve the temperature model we developed two other models. The second model, a Temperature-State of Development- model (T-S model, included two explaining variables: air temperature and the seasonal photosynthetic efficiency. This model performed slightly better compared to the T-model for both datasets and increased the fraction of variation explained to 29–69%, but it still could not explain the high concentration peaks. To explain those we modified the T-S model to include environmental triggers that could increase the concentrations momentarily. The triggers that improved the model most were high photosynthetically active photon flux density (PPDF compared to the seasonally available radiation and high ozone concentration. The Trigger model described the peak concentrations somewhat better than T or T-S model, thus the level of explanation was improved and was 30–71%. This study shows the importance to include seasonal variations in photosynthetic efficiency when modeling BVOC concentrations and presents the idea of a trigger model for explaining high peak concentrations of BVOCs. Our study suggests that when developing a trigger type modelfurther the model and the triggers should be more compounds-specific.

  10. [Simulation of the effects of climate change on canopy transpiration over a broad-leaved Korean pine forest in Changbai Mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ni-Na; Yuan, Feng-Hui; Wang, An-Zhi; Wu, Jia-Bing; Jin, Chang-Jie; Guan, De-Xin; Shi, Ting-Ting

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the effects of climate change on canopy transpiration, a process-based carbon and water coupling multi-layer model was verified, and used to simulate the canopy transpiration over a broad-leaved Korean pine forest in Changbai Mountains. This multi-layer model could well estimate canopy transpiration. The simulated values fitted well with the measured data based on eddy covariance method. The simulation of the responses of canopy transpiration to climate change indicated that the latent heat flux (LE) increased with increasing air temperature, and decreased with the decline of soil water content or the increase of air CO2 concentration. Under the climate scenarios in this study, the LE was most sensitive to the associated variation of 10% reduction of soil water content in 0-20 cm layer and 190 micromol x mol(-1) increase of CO2 concentration, but not sensitive to the synchronous variation of 10% reduce of soil water content and 3.6 degrees C increase of air temperature.

  11. Growth and mortality patterns in a thinning canopy of post-hurricane regenerating rain forest in eastern Nicaragua (1990-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ruiz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the strongest hypothesis about the maintenance of tree species diversity in tropical areas is disturbance. In order to assess this, the effect of intensive natural disturbances on forest growth and mortality in a thinning canopy was studied after the landfall of hurricane Joan in 1988. We evaluated the growth and mortality rates of the 26 most common tree species of that forest in eastern Nicaragua. Permanent plots were established at two study sites within the damaged area. Growth and mortality rates of all individual trees ≥3.18cm diameter at breast height were assessed annually from 1990 to 2005. During this period the forest underwent two phases: the building phase (marked by increased number of individuals of tree species present after the hurricane and the canopy thinning phase (marked by increased competition and mortality. Our results from the thinning phase show that tree survival was independent of species identity and was positively related to the increase in growth rates. The analysis of mortality presented here aims to test the null hypothesis that individual trees die independently of their species identity. These findings were influenced by the mortality observed during the late thinning phase (2003-2005 and provide evidence in favor of a non-niche hypothesis at the thinning phase of forest regeneration. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (4: 1283-1297. Epub 2010 December 01.

  12. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, Andreas; Korhonen, J. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    showed much higher seasonal and vertical variability in beech than in the coniferous canopies. However, also the two coniferous tree species behaved very differently with respect to peak summer canopy N content and N re-translocation efficiency, showing that generalisations on tree internal vs. ecosystem...

  13. Speciated Fine Particle Deposition to a Forest Canopy Measured by Eddy-Correlation Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. O.; Gonzales, D. A.; Delia, A. E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Smith, K. A.; Canagaratna, M.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2002-12-01

    Dry deposition serves as an important mechanism for the removal particles from the atmosphere and for the addition of material to ecosystems. Here we report on measurements of aerosol particle deposition using eddy-correlation mass spectrometry data collected during the PROPHET 2001 study which was conducted at the University of Michigan Biological Station in a north Michigan forest. Aerosol composition was measured with fast time response using the recently-developed Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) (Jayne et~al.,~2000). In the AMS, particles were focused using an aerodynamic lens. The aerosol was then expanded into a vacuum where aerodynamic particle size is determined by particle time-of-flight. The particles were then directed to an oven where semi-volatile components were flash vaporized. Vaporized components were ionized by electron impaction and detected using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Thus the response of characteristic ions from fine aerosol particles (particle diameter, Dp, = 0.04-1.5 μm) were measured with a frequency of 10 Hz. A sonic anemometer was also deployed to measure wind velocity with a frequency of 10 Hz. Fluxes of aerosol species were then calculated using the well-known eddy-correlation method as the covariance of the vertical wind speed and the species concentration. These results demonstrate the new eddy-correlation mass spectrometry technique for measuring directly speciated fine particle deposition rates.

  14. Retrieval of Vegetation Structural Parameters and 3-D Reconstruction of Forest Canopies Using Ground-Based Echidna® Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahler, A. H.; Yao, T.; Zhao, F.; Yang, X.; Schaaf, C.; Woodcock, C. E.; Jupp, D. L.; Culvenor, D.; Newnham, G.; Lovell, J.

    2010-12-01

    A ground-based, scanning, near-infrared lidar, the Echidna® validation instrument (EVI), built by CSIRO Australia, retrieves structural parameters of forest stands rapidly and accurately, and by merging multiple scans into a single point cloud, the lidar also provides 3-D stand reconstructions. Echidna lidar technology scans with pulses of light at 1064 nm wavelength and digitizes the full return waveform sufficiently finely to recover and distinguish the differing shapes of return pulses as they are scattered by leaves, trunks, and branches. Deployments in New England in 2007 and the southern Sierra Nevada of California in 2008 tested the ability of the instrument to retrieve mean tree diameter, stem count density (stems/ha), basal area, and above-ground woody biomass from single scans at points beneath the forest canopy. Parameters retrieved from five scans located within six 1-ha stand sites matched manually-measured parameters with values of R2 = 0.94-0.99 in New England and 0.92-0.95 in the Sierra Nevada. Retrieved leaf area index (LAI) values were similar to those of LAI-2000 and hemispherical photography. In New England, an analysis of variance showed that EVI-retrieved values were not significantly different from other methods (power = 0.84 or higher). In the Sierra, R2 = 0.96 and 0.81 for hemispherical photos and LAI-2000, respectively. Foliage profiles, which measure leaf area with canopy height, showed distinctly different shapes for the stands, depending on species composition and age structure. New England stand heights, obtained from foliage profiles, were not significantly different (power = 0.91) from RH100 values observed by LVIS in 2003. Three-dimensional stand reconstruction identifies one or more “hits” along the pulse path coupled with the peak return of each hit expressed as apparent reflectance. Returns are classified as trunk, leaf, or ground returns based on the shape of the return pulse and its location. These data provide a point

  15. Segmentation and classification of high resolution imagery for mapping individual species in a closed canopy, deciduous forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timothy; A.; Warner; James; B.; McGraw; Rick; Landenberger

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the use of a shadow-based delineation program for identifying segments in imagery of a closed canopy, deciduous forest, in West Virginia, USA, as a way to reduce the noise associated with per-pixel classification in forested environments. Shadows typically cluster along the boundaries of trees and therefore can be used to provide a network of nodes for the delineation of segments. A minimum cost path algorithm, where cost is defined as the cumulative sum of brightness values traversed along the connecting route, was used to connect shadow clumps. To test this approach, a series of classifications was undertaken using a multispectral digital aerial image of a six hectare test site and a minimum cost path segmentation. Three species were mapped: oaks, red maple and yellow poplar. The accuracy of an aspatial maximum likelihood classification (termed PERPIXEL classification) was 68.5%, compared to 74.0% for classification using the mean vector of the segments identified with the minimum cost path algorithm (MEAN_SEG), and 78% when the most common class present in the segment is assigned to the entire segment (POSTCLASS_SEG). By comparison, multispectral classification of the multispectral data using the field-mapped polygons of individual trees as segments, produced an accuracy of 82.3% when the mean vector of the polygon was used for classification (MEAN_TREE), and 85.7% when the most common class was assigned to the entire polygon (POSTCLASS_TREE). A moving window-based post-classification majority filter (POSTCLASS_MAJ5BY5) produced an intermediate accuracy value, 73.8%. The minimum cost path segmentation algorithm was found to correctly delineate approximately 28% of the trees. The remaining trees were either segmented, aggregated, or a combination of both segmented and aggregated. Varying the threshold that was used to discriminate shadows appeared to have little effect on the number of correctly delineated trees, or on the overall

  16. Estimating fire radiative power obscuration by tree canopies through laboratory experiments: Estimating fire radiative energy in a longleaf pine forest from airborne thermal imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, William

    Remote sensing has been proven as a useful tool in characterizing the effects of fire on a landscape scale. The radiant energy released during biomass burning can be measured remotely, and is directly related to the rate biomass consumed from the fire. This is an important measurement as it can characterize fire effects on the ground along with provide important information about the amount of gases produced by the fire. One source of error associated with estimating the fire radiative energy (FRE) remotely is the obscuration of the signal by the forest canopy. We quantify the relationship between canopy cover and the amount of energy observed by a sensor rom laboratory experiments. A prescribed fire was conducted in northwestern Florida and a suite of pre-, active, and post-fire measurements were taken by an interdisciplinary team. From those data we measured the amount of biomass consumed by the fire FRE estimates.

  17. Forest management in Earth system modelling: a vertically discretised canopy description for ORCHIDEE and the modifications to the energy, water and carbon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudts, Kim; Ryder, James; McGrath, Matthew J.; Otto, Juliane; Chen, Yiying; Valade, Aude; Bellasen, Valentin; Ghattas, Josefine; Haverd, Vanessa; MacBean, Natasha; Maignan, Fabienne; Peylin, Philippe; Pinty, Bernard; Solyga, Didier; Vuichard, Nicolas; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2015-04-01

    Since 70% of global forests are managed and forests impact the global carbon cycle and the energy exchange with the overlying atmosphere, forest management has the potential to mitigate climate change. Yet, none of the land surface models used in Earth system models, and therefore none of today's predictions of future climate, account for the interactions between climate and forest management. We addressed this gap in modelling capability by developing and parametrizing a version of the land surface model ORCHIDEE to simulate the biogeochemical and biophysical effects of forest management. The most significant changes between the new model called ORCHIDEE-CAN and the standard version of ORCHIDEE are the allometric-based allocation of carbon to leaf, root, wood, fruit and reserve pools; the transmittance, absorbance and reflectance of radiation within the canopy; and the vertical discretisation of the energy budget calculations. In addition, conceptual changes towards a better process representation occurred for the interaction of radiation with snow, the hydraulic architecture of plants, the representation of forest management and a numerical solution for the photosynthesis formalism of Farquhar, von Caemmerer and Berry. For consistency reasons, these changes were extensively linked throughout the code. Parametrization was revisited after introducing twelve new parameter sets that represent specific tree species or genera rather than a group of unrelated species, as is the case in widely used plant functional types. Performance of the new model was compared against the trunk and validated against independent spatially explicit data for basal area, tree height, canopy structure, GPP, albedo and evapotranspiration over Europe. For all tested variables ORCHIDEE-CAN outperformed the trunk regarding its ability to reproduce large-scale spatial patterns as well as their inter-annual variability over Europe. Depending on the data stream, ORCHIDEE-CAN had a 67 to 92

  18. Inverting Aboveground Biomass–Canopy Texture Relationships in a Landscape of Forest Mosaic in the Western Ghats of India Using Very High Resolution Cartosat Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Pargal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Large scale assessment of aboveground biomass (AGB in tropical forests is often limited by the saturation of remote sensing signals at high AGB values. Fourier Transform Textural Ordination (FOTO performs well in quantifying canopy texture from very high-resolution (VHR imagery, from which stand structure parameters can be retrieved with no saturation effect for AGB values up to 650 Mg·ha−1. The method is robust when tested on wet evergreen forests but is more demanding when applied across different forest types characterized by varying structures and allometries. The present study focuses on a gradient of forest types ranging from dry deciduous to wet evergreen forests in the Western Ghats (WG of India, where we applied FOTO to Cartosat-1a images with 2.5 m resolution. Based on 21 1-ha ground control forest plots, we calibrated independent texture–AGB models for the dry and wet zone forests in the area, as delineated from the distribution of NDVI values computed from LISS-4 multispectral images. This stratification largely improved the relationship between texture-derived and field-derived AGB estimates, which exhibited a R2 of 0.82 for a mean rRMSE of ca. 17%. By inverting the texture–AGB models, we finally mapped AGB predictions at 1.6-ha resolution over a heterogeneous landscape of ca. 1500 km2 in the WG, with a mean relative per-pixel propagated error <20% for wet zone forests, i.e., below the recommended IPCC criteria for Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV methods. The method proved to perform well in predicting high-resolution AGB values over heterogeneous tropical landscape encompassing diversified forest types, and thus presents a promising option for affordable regional monitoring systems of greenhouse gas (GhG emissions related to forest degradation.

  19. Nematode community shifts in response to experimental warming and canopy conditions are associated with plant community changes in the temperate-boreal forest ecotone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Madhav Prakash; Reich, Peter B; Fisichelli, Nicholas A; Stefanski, Artur; Cesarz, Simone; Dobies, Tomasz; Rich, Roy L; Hobbie, Sarah E; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2014-06-01

    Global climate warming is one of the key forces driving plant community shifts, such as range shifts of temperate species into boreal forests. As plant community shifts are slow to observe, ecotones, boundaries between two ecosystems, are target areas for providing early evidence of ecological responses to warming. The role of soil fauna is poorly explored in ecotones, although their positive and negative effects on plant species can influence plant community structure. We studied nematode communities in response to experimental warming (ambient, +1.7, +3.4 °C) in soils of closed and open canopy forest in the temperate-boreal ecotone of Minnesota, USA and calculated various established nematode indices. We estimated species-specific coverage of understory herbaceous and shrub plant species from the same experimental plots and tested if changes in the nematode community are associated with plant cover and composition. Individual nematode trophic groups did not differ among warming treatments, but the ratio between microbial-feeding and plant-feeding nematodes increased significantly and consistently with warming in both closed and open canopy areas and at both experimental field sites. The increase in this ratio was positively correlated with total cover of understory plant species, perhaps due to increased predation pressure on soil microorganisms causing higher nutrient availability for plants. Multivariate analyses revealed that temperature treatment, canopy conditions and nematode density consistently shaped understory plant communities across experimental sites. Our findings suggest that warming-induced changes in nematode community structure are associated with shifts in plant community composition and productivity in the temperate-boreal forest ecotones.

  20. Effects of Closing Mountain for Forest Restoration in the Watershed of Miyun Reservoir, Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xinxiao; Niu Jianzhi; Xu Junliang

    2004-01-01

    The paper provides a systematical analysis of ecological restoration effects of natural secondary forest of closure area in Chao Guanxi Gou, Miyun County, Beijing. The results indicate that through more than twenty years of hillclosing afforestation since 1983, canopy closure has improved almost by 0.2; forest cover rate has raised from 7.2% to 93.8%; biodiversity, tree biomass and vegetation community have increased to a great extent. Compared with the average canopy closure before hillclosing afforestation in this area, it has improved to over 0.4 in average and increased by 0.1-0.2. The forest coverage degree has reached more than 90%. Consequently, the forest plays more important roles in intercepting precipitation, improving water storage capacity of soil, decreasing the surface runoff, and preventing soil and water loss.

  1. Soil phosphorus fractionation as a tool for monitoring dust phosphorus signature underneath a Blue Pine (Pinus wallichiana canopy in a Temperate Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa-Nawaz Shafqat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims of the study: This study aims (i to monitor the amount of dust deposition during dry season in the moist temperate forest; (ii to study nature of P fractions in the dust samples falling on the trees in the region; (iii to study soil P fractions as influenced by the processes of throughfall and stemflow of a Blue Pine (Pinus wallichiana canopy and to finger print the contribution of dust towards P input in the temperate forest ecosystem. Area of study: The site used for the collection of soil samples was situated at an elevation of 6900 feet above sea levels (temperate forest in Himalaya region in the Thandani area national forest located in the north west of Pakistan. Material and methods:  For soil sampling and processing, three forest sites with three old tree plants per site were selected at approximately leveled plain for surface soil sampling. Two dust samples were collected and analyzed for different physicochemical properties along with different P fractions. First dust sample was collected from a site situated at an elevation of 4000 feet and second one was collected from an elevation of 6500 feet above sea levels. Modified Hedley procedure for the fractionation of P in the dust and soil samples were used. Main results: The input of dust was 43 and 20 kg ha-1 during drier months of the year (September-June at lower and higher elevation sites respectively, and the dust from lower elevation site had relative more all P fractions than the other dust sample. However, HCl-Pi fraction was dominant in both samples. Both labile (water plus NaHCO3 and non-labile (NaOH plus HCl inorganic P (Pi fractions were significantly increased in the surface soil by both stemflow and throughfall compared to the open field soil. The buildup of NaOH and HCl-Pi pools in soils underneath the canopy might prove useful in fingerprinting the contribution of atmospheric dust towards P cycling in this temperate forest. Research highlights: The role of dust in

  2. [Ecological benefit evaluation of urban forests in Shenyang City based on QuickBird image and CITYgreen model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Fu; He, Xing-Yuan; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Gui-Ling; Li, Ling; Xu, Wen-Duo

    2008-09-01

    Based on the urban forest coverage data interpreted from QuickBird image (2006) and the CITYgreen model, the benefits of Shenyang urban forest types with different canopy closure in carbon fixation and pollutant removal were investigated by means of sampling strategy. The results showed that the total amount of carbon storage, annual carbon sequestration, annual air pollutant removal, and their corresponding values were 0.51 Tg, 6858.20 Mg x a-1), 556.04 Mg x a(-1) 1.26 x 10(8) Yuan, 1.72 x 10(6) Yuan, and 0.22 x 10(8) Yuan, respectively. Among the urban forest types in Shenyang City, ecological and public welfare forest (E) contributed most to the carbon fixation and air pollutant removal. The carbon density decreased in the order of S (subordinated forest) > L (landscape and relaxation forest) > P (production and management forest) > E > R (road forest), annual carbon sequestration was in the order of P > L > E > S > R, and annual air pollutant removal was in the order of P > L > S > E > R. The carbon density of different urban forest types was closely related to their structural complexity. For the forests with high canopy closure, both the annual carbon sequestration and the annual pollutant removal were high; while for those with lower canopy closure, these two characteristics were dependent on the structural complexity of the forests.

  3. Effects of experimental nitrogen additions on plant diversity in tropical forests of contrasting disturbance regimes in southern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Xiankai [Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510160 (China); Mo Jiangming, E-mail: mojm@scib.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510160 (China); Gilliam, Frank S. [Department of Biological Sciences, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755-2510 (United States); Yu Guirui [Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Zhang Wei; Fang Yunting; Huang Juan [Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510160 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Responses of understory plant diversity to nitrogen (N) additions were investigated in reforested forests of contrasting disturbance regimes in southern China from 2003 to 2008: disturbed forest (with harvesting of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated forest (without harvesting). Experimental additions of N were administered as the following treatments: Control, 50 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, and 100 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. Nitrogen additions did not significantly affect understory plant richness, density, and cover in the disturbed forest. Similarly, no significant response was found for canopy closure in this forest. In the rehabilitated forest, species richness and density showed no significant response to N additions; however, understory cover decreased significantly in the N-treated plots, largely a function of a significant increase in canopy closure. Our results suggest that responses of plant diversity to N deposition may vary with different land-use history, and rehabilitated forests may be more sensitive to N deposition. - Highlights: > Nitrogen addition had no significant effect on understory plant diversity in the disturbed forest. > Nitrogen addition significantly decreased understory plant cover. > Nitrogen addition had no effect on richness and density in the rehabilitated forest. > The decrease is largely a function of a significant increase in canopy closure. > Land-use practices may dominate the responses of plant diversity to N addition. - Research in disturbed forests of southeastern China demonstrates that land-use history can substantially alter effects of excess nitrogen deposition on plant diversity of tropical forest ecosystems.

  4. Deciphering the Precision of Stereo IKONOS Canopy Height Models for U.S. Forests with G-LiHT Airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudasill-Neigh, Christopher S.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Bourget, Paul; Cook, Bruce; Huang, Chengquan; Rishmawi, Khaldoun; Zhao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the precision of IKONOS stereo data for measuring forest canopy height. The high cost of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data collection for large area studies and the present lack of a spaceborne instrument lead to the need to explore other low cost options. The US Government currently has access to a large archive of commercial high-resolution imagery, which could be quite valuable to forest structure studies. At 1 m resolution, we here compared canopy height models (CHMs) and height data derived from Goddard's airborne LiDAR Hyper-spectral and Thermal Imager (G-LiHT) with three types of IKONOS stereo derived digital surface models (DSMs) that estimate CHMs by subtracting National Elevation Data (NED) digital terrain models (DTMs). We found the following in three different forested regions of the US after excluding heterogeneous and disturbed forest samples: (1) G-LiHT DTMs were highly correlated with NED DTMs with R (sup 2) greater than 0.98 and root mean square errors (RMSEs) less than 2.96 m; (2) when using one visually identifiable ground control point (GCP) from NED, G-LiHT DSMs and IKONOS DSMs had R (sup 2) greater than 0.84 and RMSEs of 2.7 to 4.1 m; and (3) one GCP CHMs for two study sites had R (sup 2) greater than 0.7 and RMSEs of 2.6 to 3 m where data were collected less than four years apart. Our results suggest that IKONOS stereo data are a useful LiDAR alternative where high-quality DTMs are available.

  5. Deciphering the Precision of Stereo IKONOS Canopy Height Models for US Forests with G-LiHT Airborne LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. R. Neigh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have evaluated the precision of IKONOS stereo data for measuring forest canopy height. The high cost of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR data collection for large area studies and the present lack of a spaceborne instrument lead to the need to explore other low cost options. The US Government currently has access to a large archive of commercial high-resolution imagery, which could be quite valuable to forest structure studies. At 1 m resolution, we here compared canopy height models (CHMs and height data derived from Goddard’s airborne LiDAR Hyper-spectral and Thermal Imager (G-LiHT with three types of IKONOS stereo derived digital surface models (DSMs that estimate CHMs by subtracting National Elevation Data (NED digital terrain models (DTMs. We found the following in three different forested regions of the US after excluding heterogeneous and disturbed forest samples: (1 G-LiHT DTMs were highly correlated with NED DTMs with R2 > 0.98 and root mean square errors (RMSEs < 2.96 m; (2 when using one visually identifiable ground control point (GCP from NED, G-LiHT DSMs and IKONOS DSMs had R2 > 0.84 and RMSEs of 2.7 to 4.1 m; and (3 one GCP CHMs for two study sites had R2 > 0.7 and RMSEs of 2.6 to 3 m where data were collected less than four years apart. Our results suggest that IKONOS stereo data are a useful LiDAR alternative where high-quality DTMs are available.

  6. Canopy-scale flux measurements and bottom-up emission estimates of volatile organic compounds from a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. F. Acton

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the fluxes and mixing ratios of biogenically emitted volatile organic compounds (BVOCs 4 m above a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in northern Italy. Fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone + methacrolein, methyl ethyl ketone and monoterpenes were obtained using both a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS and a proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS together with the methods of virtual disjunct eddy covariance (PTR-MS and eddy covariance (PTR-ToF-MS. Isoprene was the dominant emitted compound with a mean day-time flux of 1.9 mg m-2 h-1. Mixing ratios, recorded 4 m above the canopy, were dominated by methanol with a mean value of 6.2 ppbv over the 28 day measurement period. Comparison of isoprene fluxes calculated using the PTR-MS and PTR-ToF-MS showed very good agreement while comparison of the monoterpene fluxes suggested a slight over estimation of the flux by the PTR-MS. A basal isoprene emission rate for the forest of 1.7 mg m-2 h-1 was calculated using the MEGAN isoprene emissions algorithms (Guenther et al., 2006. A detailed tree species distribution map for the site enabled the leaf-level emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes recorded using GC-MS to be scaled up to produce a "bottom-up" canopy-scale flux. This was compared with the "top-down" canopy-scale flux obtained by measurements. For monoterpenes, the two estimates were closely correlated and this correlation improved when the plant species composition in the individual flux footprint was taken into account. However, the bottom-up approach significantly underestimated the isoprene flux, compared with the top-down measurements, suggesting that the leaf-level measurements were not representative of actual emission rates.

  7. Forest Canopy LAI and Vertical FAVD Profile Inversion from Airborne Full-Waveform LiDAR Data Based on a Radiative Transfer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Forest canopy leaf area index (LAI is a critical variable for the modeling of climates and ecosystems over both regional and global scales. This paper proposes a physically based method to retrieve LAI and foliage area volume density (FAVD profile directly from full-waveform Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR data using a radiative transfer (RT model. First, a physical interaction model between LiDAR and a forest scene was built on the basis of radiative transfer theories. Next, FAVD profile of each laser shot of full-waveform LiDAR was inverted using the physical model. In addition, the missing LiDAR data, caused by high-density forest and LiDAR system limitations, were filled in based on the inverted FAVD and the ancillary CHM data. Finally, LAI of the study area was retrieved from the inverted FAVD at a 10-m resolution. CHM derived LAI based on the Beer-Lambert law was compared with the LAI derived from full-waveform data. Also, we compared the results with the field measured LAI. The values of correlation coefficient r and RMSE of the estimated LAI were 0.73 and 0.67, respectively. The results indicate that full-waveform LiDAR data is a reliable data source and represent a useful tool for retrieving forest LAI.

  8. Performance of trees in forest canopies: explorations with a bottom-up functional-structural plant growth model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterck, F.J.; Schieving, F.; Lemmens, A.; Pons, T.L.

    2005-01-01

    Here we present a functional-structural plant model that integrates the growth of metamers into a growing, three-dimensional tree structure, and study the effects of different constraints and strategies on tree performance in different canopies. The tree is a three-dimensional system of connected me

  9. A tool to determine crown and plot canopy transparency for forest inventory and analysis phase 3 plots using digital photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew F. Winn; Philip A. Araman

    2012-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program collects crown foliage transparency estimates for individual trees on Phase 3 (P3) inventory plots. The FIA crown foliage estimate is obtained from a pair of perpendicular side views of the tree. Researchers with the USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station have developed a computer program that...

  10. Modelling basin-wide variations in Amazon forest productivity – Part 1: Model calibration, evaluation and upscaling functions for canopy photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Mercado

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of Amazon rainforest in the global carbon and hydrological cycles, there is a need to parameterize and validate ecosystem gas exchange and vegetation models for this region in order to adequately simulate present and future carbon and water balances. In this study, a sun and shade canopy gas exchange model is calibrated and evaluated at five rainforest sites using eddy correlation measurements of carbon and energy fluxes.

    Results from the model-data evaluation suggest that with adequate parameterisation, photosynthesis models taking into account the separation of diffuse and direct irradiance and the dynamics of sunlit and shaded leaves can accurately represent photosynthesis in these forests. Also, stomatal conductance formulations that only take into account atmospheric demand fail to correctly simulate moisture and CO2 fluxes in forests with a pronounced dry season, particularly during afternoon conditions. Nevertheless, it is also the case that large uncertainties are associated not only with the eddy correlation data, but also with the estimates of ecosystem respiration required for model validation. To accurately simulate Gross Primary Productivity (GPP and energy partitioning the most critical parameters and model processes are the quantum yield of photosynthetic uptake, the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco, and simulation of stomatal conductance.

    Using this model-data synergy, we developed scaling functions to provide estimates of canopy photosynthetic parameters for a~range of diverse forests across the Amazon region, utilising the best fitted parameter for maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco, and foliar nutrients (N and P for all sites.

  11. Modelling basin-wide variations in Amazon forest productivity – Part 1: Model calibration, evaluation and upscaling functions for canopy photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Mercado

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of Amazon rainforest in the global carbon and hydrological cycles, there is a need to parameterize and validate ecosystem gas exchange and vegetation models for this region in order to adequately simulate present and future carbon and water balances. In this study, a sun and shade canopy gas exchange model is calibrated and evaluated at five rainforest sites using eddy correlation measurements of carbon and energy fluxes.

    Results from the model-data evaluation suggest that with adequate parameterisation, photosynthesis models taking into account the separation of diffuse and direct irradiance and the dynamics of sunlit and shaded leaves can accurately represent photosynthesis in these forests. Also, stomatal conductance formulations that only take into account atmospheric demand fail to correctly simulate moisture and CO2 fluxes in forests with a pronounced dry season, particularly during afternoon conditions. Nevertheless, it is also the case that large uncertainties are associated not only with the eddy correlation data, but also with the estimates of ecosystem respiration required for model validation. To accurately simulate Gross Primary Productivity (GPP and energy partitioning the most critical parameters and model processes are the quantum yield of photosynthetic uptake, the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco, and simulation of stomatal conductance.

    Using this model-data synergy, we developed scaling functions to provide estimates of canopy photosynthetic parameters for a range of diverse forests across the Amazon region, utilising the best fitted parameter for maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco, and foliar nutrients (N and P for all sites.

  12. A Forest Tent Caterpillar Outbreak Increased Resource Levels and Seedling Growth in a Northern Hardwood Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozendaal, Danaë M A; Kobe, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    In closed-canopy forests, gap formation and closure are thought to be major drivers of forest dynamics. Crown defoliation by insects, however, may also influence understory resource levels and thus forest dynamics. We evaluate the effect of a forest tent caterpillar outbreak on understory light availability, soil nutrient levels and tree seedling height growth in six sites with contrasting levels of canopy defoliation in a hardwood forest in northern lower Michigan. We compared resource levels and seedling growth of six hardwood species before, during and in the three years after the outbreak (2008-2012). Canopy openness increased strongly during the forest tent caterpillar outbreak in the four moderately and severely defoliated sites, but not in lightly defoliated sites. Total inorganic soil nitrogen concentrations increased in response to the outbreak in moderately and severely defoliated sites. The increase in total inorganic soil nitrogen was driven by a strong increase in soil nitrate, and tended to become stronger with increasing site defoliation. Seedling height growth increased for all species in the moderately and severely defoliated sites, but not in lightly defoliated sites, either during the outbreak year or in the year after the outbreak. Growth increases did not become stronger with increasing site defoliation, but were strongest in a moderately defoliated site with high soil nutrient levels. Growth increases tended to be strongest for the shade intolerant species Fraxinus americana and Prunus serotina, and the shade tolerant species Ostrya virginiana. The strong growth response of F. americana and P. serotina suggests that recurring forest tent caterpillar outbreaks may facilitate the persistence of shade intolerant species in the understory in the absence of canopy gaps. Overall, our results suggest that recurrent canopy defoliation resulting from cyclical forest insect outbreaks may be an additional driver of dynamics in temperate closed-canopy

  13. Fossil Leaves and Fossil Leaf n-Alkanes: Reconstructing the First Closed Canopied Rainforests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, H. V.; Freeman, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Although the age and location is disputed, the rise of the first closed-canopy forest is likely linked with the expansion of angiosperms in the late Cretacous or early Cenozoic. The carbon isotope 'canopy effect' reflects the extent of canopy closure, and is well documented in δ13C values of the leaves and leaf lipids in modern forests. To test the extent of canopy closure among the oldest documented angiosperm tropical forests, we analyzed isotopic characteristics of leaf fossils and leaf waxes from the Guaduas and Cerrejón Formations. The Guaduas Fm. (Maastrichtian) contains some of the earliest angiosperm fossils in the Neotropics, and both leaf morphology and pollen records at this site suggest an open-canopy structure. The Cerrejón Fm. (Paleocene) contains what are believed to be the first recorded fossil leaves from a closed-canopy forest. We analyzed the bulk carbon isotope content (δ13Cleaf) of 199 fossil leaves, as well as the n-alkane concentration and chain-length distribution, and δ13C of alkanes (δ13Clipid) of 73 fossil leaves and adjacent sediment samples. Fossil leaves are dominated by eudicots and include ten modern plant families (Apocynaceae, Bombaceae, Euphorbaceae, Fabaceae, Lauraceae, Malvaceae, Meliaceae, Menispermaceae, Moraceae, Sapotaceae). We interpreted extent of canopy coverage based on the range of δ13Cleaf values. The narrow range of δ13C values in leaves from the Guaduas Fm (2.7‰) is consistent with an open canopy. A significantly wider range in values (6.3‰) suggests a closed-canopy signature for site 0315 of the Cerrejón Fm,. In contrast, at Site 0318, a lacustrine deposit, leaves had a narrow range (3.3‰) in δ13C values, and this is not consistent with a closed-canopy, but is consistent with leaf assemblages from a forest edge. Leaves that accumulate in lake sediments tend to be biased toward plants living at the lake edge, which do not experience closed-canopy conditions, and do not express the isotopic

  14. Thermal acclimation of leaf respiration of tropical trees and lianas: response to experimental canopy warming, and consequences for tropical forest carbon balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot, Martijn; Rey-Sánchez, Camilo; Gerber, Stefan; Lichstein, Jeremy W; Winter, Klaus; Kitajima, Kaoru

    2014-09-01

    Climate warming is expected to increase respiration rates of tropical forest trees and lianas, which may negatively affect the carbon balance of tropical forests. Thermal acclimation could mitigate the expected respiration increase, but the thermal acclimation potential of tropical forests remains largely unknown. In a tropical forest in Panama, we experimentally increased nighttime temperatures of upper canopy leaves of three tree and two liana species by on average 3 °C for 1 week, and quantified temperature responses of leaf dark respiration. Respiration at 25 °C (R25 ) decreased with increasing leaf temperature, but acclimation did not result in perfect homeostasis of respiration across temperatures. In contrast, Q10 of treatment and control leaves exhibited similarly high values (range 2.5-3.0) without evidence of acclimation. The decrease in R25 was not caused by respiratory substrate depletion, as warming did not reduce leaf carbohydrate concentration. To evaluate the wider implications of our experimental results, we simulated the carbon cycle of tropical latitudes (24°S-24°N) from 2000 to 2100 using a dynamic global vegetation model (LM3VN) modified to account for acclimation. Acclimation reduced the degree to which respiration increases with climate warming in the model relative to a no-acclimation scenario, leading to 21% greater increase in net primary productivity and 18% greater increase in biomass carbon storage over the 21st century. We conclude that leaf respiration of tropical forest plants can acclimate to nighttime warming, thereby reducing the magnitude of the positive feedback between climate change and the carbon cycle. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Extracting Canopy Surface Texture from Airborne Laser Scanning Data for the Supervised and Unsupervised Prediction of Area-Based Forest Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko T. Niemi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Area-based analyses of airborne laser scanning (ALS data are an established approach to obtain wall-to-wall predictions of forest characteristics for vast areas. The analyses of sparse data in particular are based on the height value distributions, which do not produce optimal information on the horizontal forest structure. We evaluated the complementary potential of features quantifying the textural variation of ALS-based canopy height models (CHMs for both supervised (linear regression and unsupervised (k-Means clustering analyses. Based on a comprehensive literature review, we identified a total of four texture analysis methods that produced rotation-invariant features of different order and scale. The CHMs and the textural features were derived from practical sparse-density, leaf-off ALS data originally acquired for ground elevation modeling. The features were extracted from a circular window of 254 m2 and related with boreal forest characteristics observed from altogether 155 field sample plots. Features based on gray-level histograms, distribution of forest patches, and gray-level co-occurrence matrices were related with plot volume, basal area, and mean diameter with coefficients of determination (R2 of up to 0.63–0.70, whereas features that measured the uniformity of local binary patterns of the CHMs performed poorer. Overall, the textural features compared favorably with benchmark features based on the point data, indicating that the textural features contain additional information useful for the prediction of forest characteristics. Due to the developed processing routines for raster data, the CHM features may potentially be extracted with a lower computational burden, which promotes their use for applications such as pre-stratification or guiding the field plot sampling based solely on ALS data.

  16. Simulation of daily discharges for the upper Durance catchment (French Alps) using subgrid parameterization for topography and a forest canopy climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Ulrich; Etchevers, Pierre

    2005-08-01

    This study describes the application of the coupled SAFRAN (meteorological variables), ISBA (soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer) and CROCUS (snow cover evolution) models to simulate daily discharges for the upper Durance catchment (French Alps) from 1981 to 1994. The results are validated by comparison with measurements at three gauging stations located in the watershed. Previous investigations have shown a remarkable overestimation of the spring flood peak generated by the modelled snowmelt. It could be significantly improved by increasing the model resolution from 8 km to 1 km, thus more precisely considering the elevation-dependent snowmelt process. However, it is also possible to use subgrid parameterizations at the coarse grid resolution to improve simulations. This paper investigates the influence of a subgrid parameterization for topography, a subgrid parameterization for the snow cover in a forest canopy and a combination of the two on the simulated spring flood peak. Results show a significant improvement in the simulations by both subgrid parameterizations, in particular by their combination: the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of the daily discharges is improved from 0.73 (original experiment) to 0.77 (subgrid topography), to 0.75 (forest) and to 0.78 (combination of subgrid topography and forest).

  17. Impact of air-borne or canopy-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on forest soil solution DOC in Flanders, Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Arne; De Vos, Bruno; Neirynck, Johan; Roskams, Peter; Hens, Maarten

    2014-02-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the soil solution of forests originates from a number of biologically and/or biochemically mediated processes, including litter decomposition and leaching, soil organic matter mineralization, root exudation, mucilage and microbial activity. A variable amount of DOC reaches the forest floor through deposition, but limited information is available about its impact on soil solution DOC. In this study, trends and patterns of soil solution DOC were evaluated in relation to deposition of DOC over an 11-year period (2002-2012) at five ICP Forests intensive monitoring plots in Flanders, northern Belgium. Trend analysis over this period showed an increase of soil solution DOC concentrations for all observed depth intervals. Fluxes of DOC increased in the organic layer, but were nearly stable in the mineral soil. Annual leaching losses of DOC were higher in coniferous (55-61 kg C ha-1) compared to deciduous plots (19-30 kg C ha-1) but embody less than 0.05% of total 1-m soil organic C stocks. Temporal deposition patterns could not explain the increasing trends of soil solution DOC concentrations. Deposition fluxes of DOC were strongly correlated with soil solution fluxes of DOC, but their seasonal peaks were not simultaneous, which confirmed that air-borne or canopy-derived DOC has a limited impact on soil solution DOC.

  18. Numerical sensitivity study of the nocturnal low-level jet over a forest canopy and implications for nocturnal surface exchange of carbon dioxide and other trace gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, M.Y.; Duarte, H.F.

    2010-01-01

    in the nocturnal boundary layer, several studies demonstrated the role of nocturnal jets in transporting moisture, ozone, and other trace gases between the biosphere and the lower atmosphere (Mathieu et al., 2005; Karipot et al., 2006; 2007; 2008; 2009). This study suggests that SCADIS, because of its simplicity...... and low computational demand, has potential as a research tool regarding surface–atmosphere gaseous exchange in the nocturnal boundary layer, especially if carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone and other gases are released or deposited inside the forest canopy.......The development of a wind speed maximum in the nocturnal boundary layer, commonly referred to as a low-level jet (LLJ) (Blackadar, 1957), is a common feature of the vertical structure of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and impacts the meteorology and the local climate of a region. A variety...

  19. Numerical sensitivity study of the nocturnal low-level jet over a forest canopy and implications for nocturnal surface exchange of carbon dioxide and other trace gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, M.Y.; Duarte, H.F.

    2010-01-01

    in the nocturnal boundary layer, several studies demonstrated the role of nocturnal jets in transporting moisture, ozone, and other trace gases between the biosphere and the lower atmosphere (Mathieu et al., 2005; Karipot et al., 2006; 2007; 2008; 2009). This study suggests that SCADIS, because of its simplicity...... and low computational demand, has potential as a research tool regarding surface–atmosphere gaseous exchange in the nocturnal boundary layer, especially if carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone and other gases are released or deposited inside the forest canopy.......The development of a wind speed maximum in the nocturnal boundary layer, commonly referred to as a low-level jet (LLJ) (Blackadar, 1957), is a common feature of the vertical structure of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and impacts the meteorology and the local climate of a region. A variety...

  20. Potential applications of prefield land use and canopy cover data: Examples from nonforest and nonsampled forest inventory plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara A. Goeking

    2012-01-01

    The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) prefield workflow involves interpreting aerial imagery to determine whether each plot in a given inventory year may meet FIA’s definition of forest land. The primary purpose of this determination is to minimize inventory costs by avoiding unnecessary ground surveys of plots that are obviously in nonforest areas. Since the...

  1. Seeing through the Canopy: Relationship between Coarse Woody Debris and Forest Structure measured by Airborne Lidar in the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaranello, M. A., Sr.; Keller, M. M.; dos-Santos, M. N.; Longo, M.; Pinagé, E. R.; Leitold, V.

    2016-12-01

    Coarse woody debris is an important but infrequently quantified carbon pool in tropical forests. Based on studies at 12 sites spread across the Brazilian Amazon, we quantified coarse woody debris stocks in intact forests and forests affected by different intensities of degradation by logging and/or fire. Measurement were made in-situ and for the first time field measurements of coarse woody debris were related to structural metrics derived from airborne lidar. Using the line-intercept method we established 84 transects for sampling fallen coarse woody debris and associated inventory plots for sampling standing dead wood in intact, conventional logging, reduced impact logging, burned and burned after logging forests. Overall mean and standard deviation of total coarse woody debris were 50.0 Mg ha-1 and 26.4 Mg ha-1 respectively. Forest degradation increased coarse woody debris stocks compared to intact forests by a factor of 1.7 in reduced impact logging forests and up to 3-fold in burned forests, in a side-by-side comparison of nearby areas. The ratio between coarse woody debris and biomass increased linearly with number of degradation events (R²: 0.67, plevels in the Brazilian Amazon. The strong relation of coarse woody debris with lidar derived structural variables suggests an approach for quantifying infrequently measured coarse woody debris over large areas.

  2. The influences of canopy species and topographic variables on understory species diversity and composition in coniferous forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Hong; Feng, Qi; Su, Yong-hong

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the factors that influence the distribution of understory vegetation is important for biological conservation and forest management. We compared understory species composition by multi-response permutation procedure and indicator species analysis between plots dominated by Qinghai spruce (Picea crassifolia Kom.) and Qilian juniper (Sabina przewalskii Kom.) in coniferous forests of the Qilian Mountains, northwestern China. Understory species composition differed markedly between the forest types. Many heliophilous species were significantly associated with juniper forest, while only one species was indicative of spruce forest. Using constrained ordination and the variation partitioning model, we quantitatively assessed the relative effects of two sets of explanatory variables on understory species composition. The results showed that topographic variables had higher explanatory power than did site conditions for understory plant distributions. However, a large amount of the variation in understory species composition remained unexplained. Forward selection revealed that understory species distributions were primarily affected by elevation and aspect. Juniper forest had higher species richness and α-diversity and lower β-diversity in the herb layer of the understory plant community than spruce forest, suggesting that the former may be more important in maintaining understory biodiversity and community stability in alpine coniferous forest ecosystems.

  3. Influence of Dynamics and Chemistry on the Diurnal Variation of VOCs in the Planetary Boundary Layer above a Mixed Forest Canopy in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, A. B.; Su, L.; Patton, E. G.; Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Mak, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) is a region of inherent interest because reactive VOCs emitted from the forest canopy are mixed with the residual and free tropospheric air masses, oxidized, and/or otherwise removed in this region. The characterization of diurnal variation of VOCs in the PBL is limited due to the lack of appropriate sampling platforms that are able to probe all the regions of interest: from the surface to the entrainment zone. Here we present the application of the Whole Air Sample Profiler (WASP) system during the 2013 Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) campaign. A total of 41 research flights (RFs) were carried out during the 2013 SAS campaign between June 1 and June 14 over the Alabama Aquatic Biodiversity Center (AABC) site and the SEARCH site. During each RF, ambient air sampling started from 50-100 m above the canopy top and stopped at ~1200 m above the mean sea level (a.m.s.l). The air samples were subsequently analyzed by using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS). Here we analyze the vertical profiles and averaged diurnal variation of the mixing ratios of several reactive VOC species, including isoprene, the sum of monoterpenes, and first generation oxidation products of isoprene: methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein (MVK+MACR). A MiXed Layer Chemistry (MXLCH) model, guided by the meteorological and chemical observations during the SAS campaign, is used to study the influence of boundary layer dynamics and new isoprene oxidation mechanism on the diurnal variation of major biogenic VOCs emitted from the forest canopy. The new scheme includes OH recycling through two pathways under low-NOx regime: (1) hydroxyl peroxy radicals (HOC5H8OO•; ISOPO2) unimolecular isomerization, and (2) ISOPO2+HO2. The model is able to reproduce the evolution of the boundary layer dynamics (including potential temperature, and boundary layer height) during the selected simulation dates. Based on the model results, budget

  4. Canopy-scale flux measurements and bottom-up emission estimates of volatile organic compounds from a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, W. Joe F.; Schallhart, Simon; Langford, Ben; Valach, Amy; Rantala, Pekka; Fares, Silvano; Carriero, Giulia; Tillmann, Ralf; Tomlinson, Sam J.; Dragosits, Ulrike; Gianelle, Damiano; Hewitt, C. Nicholas; Nemitz, Eiko

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports the fluxes and mixing ratios of biogenically emitted volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) 4 m above a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in northern Italy. Fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone + methacrolein, methyl ethyl ketone and monoterpenes were obtained using both a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) together with the methods of virtual disjunct eddy covariance (using PTR-MS) and eddy covariance (using PTR-ToF-MS). Isoprene was the dominant emitted compound with a mean daytime flux of 1.9 mg m-2 h-1. Mixing ratios, recorded 4 m above the canopy, were dominated by methanol with a mean value of 6.2 ppbv over the 28-day measurement period. Comparison of isoprene fluxes calculated using the PTR-MS and PTR-ToF-MS showed very good agreement while comparison of the monoterpene fluxes suggested a slight over estimation of the flux by the PTR-MS. A basal isoprene emission rate for the forest of 1.7 mg m-2 h-1 was calculated using the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) isoprene emission algorithms (Guenther et al., 2006). A detailed tree-species distribution map for the site enabled the leaf-level emission of isoprene and monoterpenes recorded using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to be scaled up to produce a bottom-up canopy-scale flux. This was compared with the top-down canopy-scale flux obtained by measurements. For monoterpenes, the two estimates were closely correlated and this correlation improved when the plant-species composition in the individual flux footprint was taken into account. However, the bottom-up approach significantly underestimated the isoprene flux, compared with the top-down measurements, suggesting that the leaf-level measurements were not representative of actual emission rates.

  5. Dynamic and Spatio-temporal variability of leachable 137Cs by throughfall and stemflow in Japanese forest canopies after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffredo, Nicolas; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Kawamori, Ayumi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    In the context of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident (FDNPPA), this study focuses on the mobility of leachable Caesium by throughfall and stemflow mechanisms in forests canopies, for the period going from June 2011 (four months after the accident), and until April 2013. In this period, 137Cs and 134Cs activity has been periodically measured, in an area located at 40 km from the power plant, in rainfall, throughfall and stemflow for broad-leaf and cedar forests. Specifically, our study deals with the seasonal effect, the dynamic and the spatio-temporal variability on leachable Cs in these forests. Except for rainfall intensity, no weather impact (wind velocity and snow fall episodes) was observed for the Cs loss. Concerning the seasonal effect, two periods for which Cs significantly increased could be identify: autumn and spring. During the period of investigation, compared to stemflow, the main flux of Cs was induced by throughfall mechanisms, whereas for rainfall, no Cs was detected. By using a double exponential model, the Cs loss by throughfall and stemflow was estimated from the initial deposition to 2 years after the accident. Since the accident, the total Cs loss by leaching was estimated to 35-70%, 31-62% and 49-99% of the total deposition for respectively mature cedar, young cedar and broad-leaf forests. In term of qualitative spatial variability no variation was observed in throughfall collectors with time. However, a high quantitative variability can be observed, due to the difference of leaf density above each throughfall collectors.

  6. Species Turnover across Different Life Stages from Seedlings to Canopy Trees in Swamp Forests of Central Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Fontes, Clarissa G.; Bruno M. T. Walter; José Roberto R. Pinto; Gabriel Damasco

    2015-01-01

    Processes driving the assembly of swamp forest communities have been poorly explored. We analyzed natural regeneration and adult tree communities data of a swamp gallery forest in Central Brazil to discuss the role of ecological filters in shaping plant species turnover in a successional gradient. Species data of 120 plots were used to assess species turnover between natural regeneration and adult tree communities. Our analyses were based on 4995 individuals belonging to 72 species. Community...

  7. Species Turnover across Different Life Stages from Seedlings to Canopy Trees in Swamp Forests of Central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa G. Fontes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Processes driving the assembly of swamp forest communities have been poorly explored. We analyzed natural regeneration and adult tree communities data of a swamp gallery forest in Central Brazil to discuss the role of ecological filters in shaping plant species turnover in a successional gradient. Species data of 120 plots were used to assess species turnover between natural regeneration and adult tree communities. Our analyses were based on 4995 individuals belonging to 72 species. Community patterns were discerned using ordination analyses. A clear floristic turnover among plant life stages was distinguished. Regeneration community of swamp forests was richer in species composition than the adult community. Tree species commonly found in nonflooded gallery forests were present in the regeneration plots but not in the adult community. Differences in the floristic composition of these two strata suggest that not all species in the seedling stage can stand permanent flooding conditions and only a few tolerant species survive to become adult trees. We propose that natural disturbances play an important role by altering limiting resources, allowing seeds of nonflooded forest species to germinate. This paper elucidates the turnover between plant life stages in swamp forests and suggests mechanisms that may shape these communities.

  8. Observations of HNO3, ΣAN, ΣPN and NO2 fluxes: evidence for rapid HOx chemistry within a pine forest canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Farmer

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of exchange of reactive nitrogen oxides between the atmosphere and a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains are reported. During winter, we observe upward fluxes of NO2, and downward fluxes of total peroxy and peroxy acyl nitrates (ΣPNs, total gas and particle phase alkyl and multifunctional alkyl nitrates (ΣANs(g+p, and the sum of gaseous HNO3 and semi-volatile NO3− particles (HNO3(g+p. We use calculations of the vertical profile and flux of NO, partially constrained by observations, to show that net midday ΣNOyi fluxes in winter are –4.9 ppt m s−1. The signs and magnitudes of these wintertime individual and ΣNOyi fluxes are in the range of prior measurements. In contrast, during summer, we observe downward fluxes only of ΣANs(g+p, and upward fluxes of HNO3(g+p, ΣPNs and NO2 with signs and magnitudes that are unlike most, if not all, previous observations and analyses of fluxes of individual nitrogen oxides. The results imply that the mechanisms contributing to NOy fluxes, at least at this site, are much more complex than previously recognized. We show that the observations of upward fluxes of HNO3(g+p and σPNs during summer are consistent with oxidation of NO2 and acetaldehyde by an OH x residence time of 1.1×1010 molec OH cm−3 s, corresponding to 3 to 16×107 molecules cm−3 OH within the forest canopy for a 420 to 70 s canopy residence time. We show that ΣAN(g+p fluxes are consistent with this range in OH if the reaction of OH with ΣANs produces either HNO3 or NO2 with a 6–30% yield. Calculations of NO fluxes constrained by the NO2 observations and the inferred OH indicate that NOx fluxes are downward into the canopy because of the substantial conversion of NOx to HNO3 and σPNs in the canopy. Even so, we derive that NOx emission fluxes of ~15 ng(N m−2 s−1 at midday during summer are required to balance the NOx and NOy flux budgets. These fluxes are partly explained by estimates of soil

  9. Influences of canopy photosynthesis and summer rain pulses on root dynamics and soil respiration in a young ponderosa pine forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misson, Laurent; Gershenson, Alexander; Tang, Jianwu; McKay, Megan; Cheng, Weixin; Goldstein, Allen

    2006-07-01

    Our first objective was to link the seasonality of fine root dynamics with soil respiration in a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa P. & C. Lawson) plantation located in the Sierra Nevada of California. The second objective was to examine how canopy photosynthesis influences fine root initiation, growth and mortality in this ecosystem. We compared CO2 flux measurements with aboveground and belowground root dynamics. Initiation of fine root growth coincided with tree stem thickening and shoot elongation, preceding new needle growth. In the spring, root, shoot and stem growth occurred simultaneously with the increase in canopy photosynthesis. Compared with the other tree components, initial growth rate of fine roots was the highest and their growing period was the shortest. Both above and belowground components completed 90% of their growth by the end of July and the growing season lasted approximately 80 days. The period for optimal growth is short at the study site because of low soil temperatures during winter and low soil water content during summer. High photosynthetic rates were observed following unusual late-summer rains, but tree growth did not resume. The autotrophic contribution to soil respiration was 49% over the whole season, with daily contributions ranging between 18 and 87%. Increases in soil and ecosystem respiration were observed during spring growth; however, the largest variation in soil respiration occurred during summer rain events when no growth was observed. Both the magnitude and persistence of the soil respiration pulses were positively correlated with the amount of rain. These pulses accounted for 16.5% of soil respiration between Days 130 and 329.

  10. Fractal analysis of canopy architectures of Acacia angustissima, Gliricidia sepium, and Leucaena collinsii for estimation of aboveground biomass in a short rotation forest in eastern Zambia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin.L.Kaonga

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted at Msekera Regional Agricultural Research Station in eastern Zambia to (1) describe canopy branching properties of Acacia angustissima,Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena collinsii in short rotation forests,(2) test the existence of self similarity from repeated iteration of a structural unit in tree canopies,(3) examined intra-speciflc relationships between functional branching characteristics,and (4) determine whether allometric equations for relating aboveground tree biomass to fractal properties could accurately predict aboveground biomass.Measurements of basal diameter (D10) at 10cm aboveground and total height (H),and aboveground biomass of 27 trees were taken,but only nine trees representative of variability of the stand and the three species were processed for functional branching analyses (FBA) of the shoot systems.For each species,fractal properties of three trees,including fractal dimension (Dfract),bifurcation ratios (p) and proportionality ratios (q) of branching points were assessed.The slope of the linear regression ofp on proximal diameter was not significantly different (P <0.01) from zero and hence the assumption that p is independent of scale,a pre-requisite for use of fractal branching rules to describe a fractal tree canopy,was fulfilled at branching orders with link diameters >1.5 cm.The proportionality ration q for branching patterns of all tree species was constant at all scales.The proportion ofq values >0.9 (fq) was 0.8 for all species.Mean fractal dimension (Dfract) values (1.5-1.7) for all species showed that branching patterns had an increasing magnitude of intricacy.Since Dfract values were >1.5,branching patterns within species were self similar.Basal diameter (D10),proximal diameter and Dfract described most of variations in aboveground biomass,suggesting that allometric equations for relating aboveground tree biomass to fractal properties could accurately predict aboveground biomass.Thus,assessed Acacia

  11. [Retrieval of crown closure of moso bamboo forest using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) remotely sensed imagery based on geometric-optical model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Du, Hua-qiang; Zhou, Guo-mo; Xu, Xiao-jun; Sun, Shao-bo; Gao, Guo-long

    2015-05-01

    This research focused on the application of remotely sensed imagery from unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with high spatial resolution for the estimation of crown closure of moso bamboo forest based on the geometric-optical model, and analyzed the influence of unconstrained and fully constrained linear spectral mixture analysis (SMA) on the accuracy of the estimated results. The results demonstrated that the combination of UAV remotely sensed imagery and geometric-optical model could, to some degrees, achieve the estimation of crown closure. However, the different SMA methods led to significant differentiation in the estimation accuracy. Compared with unconstrained SMA, the fully constrained linear SMA method resulted in higher accuracy of the estimated values, with the coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.63 at 0.01 level, against the measured values acquired during the field survey. Root mean square error (RMSE) of approximate 0.04 was low, indicating that the usage of fully constrained linear SMA could bring about better results in crown closure estimation, which was closer to the actual condition in moso bamboo forest.

  12. Estimation of Alpine Forest Structural Variables from Imaging Spectrometer Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Fatehi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial information of forest structural variables is crucial for sustainable forest management planning, forest monitoring, and the assessment of forest ecosystem productivity. We investigate a complex alpine forest ecosystem located in the Swiss National Park (SNP and apply empirical models to retrieve the structural variables canopy closure, basal area, and timber volume at plot scale. We used imaging spectrometer (IS data from the Airborne Prism EXperiment (APEX in combination with in-situ measurements of forest structural variables to develop empirical models. These models are based on simple and stepwise multiple regressions, while all potential two narrow-band combinations of the Simple Ratio (SR, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, the perpendicular vegetation index (PVI, the second soil-adjusted vegetation index (SAVI2, and band depth indices were tested. The accuracy of the estimated structural attributes was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross-validation technique. Using stepwise multiple regression models, we obtained a moderate to good accuracy when estimating canopy closure (R2 = 0.81, rRMSE = 10%, basal area (R2 = 0.68, rRMSE = 20%, and timber volume (R2 = 0.73, rRMSE = 22%. We discuss the reliability of empirical approaches for estimates of canopy structural parameters considering the causality of light interaction and surface information.

  13. Performance of the Enhanced Vegetation Index to Detect Inner-annual Dry Season and Drought Impacts on Amazon Forest Canopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brede, B.; Verbesselt, J.; Dutrieux, L.; Herold, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Amazon rainforests represent the largest connected forested area in the tropics and play an integral role in the global carbon cycle. In the last years the discussion about their phenology and response to drought has intensified. A recent study argued that seasonality in greenness expressed as E

  14. Performance of the Enhanced Vegetation Index to Detect Inner-annual Dry Season and Drought Impacts on Amazon Forest Canopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brede, B.; Verbesselt, J.; Dutrieux, L.; Herold, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Amazon rainforests represent the largest connected forested area in the tropics and play an integral role in the global carbon cycle. In the last years the discussion about their phenology and response to drought has intensified. A recent study argued that seasonality in greenness expressed as

  15. Performance of the Enhanced Vegetation Index to Detect Inner-annual Dry Season and Drought Impacts on Amazon Forest Canopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brede, B.; Verbesselt, J.; Dutrieux, L.; Herold, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Amazon rainforests represent the largest connected forested area in the tropics and play an integral role in the global carbon cycle. In the last years the discussion about their phenology and response to drought has intensified. A recent study argued that seasonality in greenness expressed as E

  16. From forest floor to the canopy: life history of secondary hemiepiphytes (Heteropsis species) in the Colombian Amazon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balcazar Vargas, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    The ecology of hemiepiphytes is very poorly understood. More appalling is the lack of information on hemiepiphyte vital rates and demography. Such information is essential to understand the ecology, management and conservation of this group that is an important component of tropical forest. In this

  17. Performance of the Enhanced Vegetation Index to Detect Inner-annual Dry Season and Drought Impacts on Amazon Forest Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, B.; Verbesselt, J.; Dutrieux, L.; Herold, M.

    2015-04-01

    The Amazon rainforests represent the largest connected forested area in the tropics and play an integral role in the global carbon cycle. In the last years the discussion about their phenology and response to drought has intensified. A recent study argued that seasonality in greenness expressed as Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) is an artifact of variations in sun-sensor geometry throughout the year. We aimed to reproduce these results with the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MCD43 product suite, which allows modeling the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) and keeping sun-sensor geometry constant. The derived BRDF-adjusted EVI was spatially aggregated over large areas of central Amazon forests. The resulting time series of EVI spanning the 2000-2013 period contained distinct seasonal patterns with peak values at the onset of the dry season, but also followed the same pattern of sun geometry expressed as Solar Zenith Angle (SZA). Additionally, we assessed EVI's sensitivity to precipitation anomalies. For that we compared BRDF-adjusted EVI dry season anomalies to two drought indices (Maximum Cumulative Water Deficit, Standardized Precipitation Index). This analysis covered the whole of Amazonia and data from the years 2000 to 2013. The results showed no meaningful connection between EVI anomalies and drought. This is in contrast to other studies that investigate the drought impact on EVI and forest photosynthetic capacity. The results from both sub-analyses question the predictive power of EVI for large scale assessments of forest ecosystem functioning in Amazonia. Based on the presented results, we recommend a careful evaluation of the EVI for applications in tropical forests, including rigorous validation supported by ground plots.

  18. [Distribution patterns of canopy and understory tree species at local scale in a Tierra Firme forest, the Colombian Amazonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Silva, Juan Sebastian; López, Dairon Cárdenas; Montoya, Alvaro Javier Duque

    2014-03-01

    The effect of environmental variation on the structure of tree communities in tropical forests is still under debate. There is evidence that in landscapes like Tierra Firme forest, where the environmental gradient decreases at a local level, the effect of soil on the distribution patterns of plant species is minimal, happens to be random or is due to biological processes. In contrast, in studies with different kinds of plants from tropical forests, a greater effect on floristic composition of varying soil and topography has been reported. To assess this, the current study was carried out in a permanent plot of ten hectares in the Amacayacu National Park, Colombian Amazonia. To run the analysis, floristic and environmental variations were obtained according to tree species abundance categories and growth forms. In order to quantify the role played by both environmental filtering and dispersal limitation, the variation of the spatial configuration was included. We used Detrended Correspondence Analysis and Canonical Correspondence Analysis, followed by a variation partitioning, to analyze the species distribution patterns. The spatial template was evaluated using the Principal Coordinates of Neighbor Matrix method. We recorded 14 074 individuals from 1 053 species and 80 families. The most abundant families were Myristicaceae, Moraceae, Meliaceae, Arecaceae and Lecythidaceae, coinciding with other studies from Northwest Amazonia. Beta diversity was relatively low within the plot. Soils were very poor, had high aluminum concentration and were predominantly clayey. The floristic differences explained along the ten hectares plot were mainly associated to biological processes, such as dispersal limitation. The largest proportion of community variation in our dataset was unexplained by either environmental or spatial data. In conclusion, these results support random processes as the major drivers of the spatial variation of tree species at a local scale on Tierra Firme

  19. A conceptual framework for dryland aeolian sediment transport along the grassland-forest continuum: Effects of woody plant canopy cover and disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, David D.; Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Zou, Chris B.; Field, Jason P.; Allen, Craig D.

    2009-04-01

    Aeolian processes are of particular importance in dryland ecosystems where ground cover is inherently sparse because of limited precipitation. Dryland ecosystems include grassland, shrubland, savanna, woodland, and forest, and can be viewed collectively as a continuum of woody plant cover spanning from grasslands with no woody plant cover up to forests with nearly complete woody plant cover. Along this continuum, the spacing and shape of woody plants determine the spatial density of roughness elements, which directly affects aeolian sediment transport. Despite the extensiveness of dryland ecosystems, studies of aeolian sediment transport have generally focused on agricultural fields, deserts, or highly disturbed sites where rates of transport are likely to be greatest. Until recently, few measurements have been made of aeolian sediment transport over multiple wind events and across a variety of types of dryland ecosystems. To evaluate potential trends in aeolian sediment transport as a function of woody plant cover, estimates of aeolian sediment transport from recently published studies, in concert with rates from four additional locations (two grassland and two woodland sites), are reported here. The synthesis of these reports leads to the development of a new conceptual framework for aeolian sediment transport in dryland ecosystems along the grassland-forest continuum. The findings suggest that: (1) for relatively undisturbed ecosystems, shrublands have inherently greater aeolian sediment transport because of wake interference flow associated with intermediate levels of density and spacing of woody plants; and (2) for disturbed ecosystems, the upper bound for aeolian sediment transport decreases as a function of increasing amounts of woody plant cover because of the effects of the height and density of the canopy on airflow patterns and ground cover associated with woody plant cover. Consequently, aeolian sediment transport following disturbance spans the largest

  20. Growth and mortality patterns in a thinning canopy of post-hurricane regenerating rain forest in eastern Nicaragua (1990-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ruiz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the strongest hypothesis about the maintenance of tree species diversity in tropical areas is disturbance. In order to assess this, the effect of intensive natural disturbances on forest growth and mortality in a thinning canopy was studied after the landfall of hurricane Joan in 1988. We evaluated the growth and mortality rates of the 26 most common tree species of that forest in eastern Nicaragua. Permanent plots were established at two study sites within the damaged area. Growth and mortality rates of all individual trees ≥3.18cm diameter at breast height were assessed annually from 1990 to 2005. During this period the forest underwent two phases: the building phase (marked by increased number of individuals of tree species present after the hurricane and the canopy thinning phase (marked by increased competition and mortality. Our results from the thinning phase show that tree survival was independent of species identity and was positively related to the increase in growth rates. The analysis of mortality presented here aims to test the null hypothesis that individual trees die independently of their species identity. These findings were influenced by the mortality observed during the late thinning phase (2003-2005 and provide evidence in favor of a non-niche hypothesis at the thinning phase of forest regeneration. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (4: 1283-1297. Epub 2010 December 01.Estudiamos el efecto de los fenómenos naturales sobre la dinámica de bosques húmedos tropicales del este de Nicaragua después del paso del huracán Juana en 1988. Evaluamos las tasas de crecimiento y mortalidad de las 26 especies más comunes en ese bosque posterior al huracán. El estudio se llevó a cabo en dos localidades del área afectada por el huracán. Establecimos parcelas permanentes en dos sitios afectados por el huracán, en las cuales medimos variables demográficas poblacionales a todos los individuos con un diámetro a la altura del pecho ≥3

  1. Hurricane disturbance and recovery of energy balance, CO2 fluxes and canopy structure in a mangrove forest of the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jordan G.; Engel, Vic; Smith, Thomas J.; Fuentes, Jose D.

    2012-01-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) estimates of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes and energy balance are examined to investigate the functional responses of a mature mangrove forest to a disturbance generated by Hurricane Wilma on October 24, 2005 in the Florida Everglades. At the EC site, high winds from the hurricane caused nearly 100% defoliation in the upper canopy and widespread tree mortality. Soil temperatures down to -50 cm increased, and air temperature lapse rates within the forest canopy switched from statically stable to statically unstable conditions following the disturbance. Unstable conditions allowed more efficient transport of water vapor and CO2 from the surface up to the upper canopy layer. Significant increases in latent heat fluxes (LE) and nighttime net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were also observed and sensible heat fluxes (H) as a proportion of net radiation decreased significantly in response to the disturbance. Many of these impacts persisted through much of the study period through 2009. However, local albedo and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer) data (the Enhanced Vegetation Index) indicated a substantial proportion of active leaf area recovered before the EC measurements began 1 year after the storm. Observed changes in the vertical distribution and the degree of clumping in newly emerged leaves may have affected the energy balance. Direct comparisons of daytime NEE values from before the storm and after our measurements resumed did not show substantial or consistent differences that could be attributed to the disturbance. Regression analyses on seasonal time scales were required to differentiate the storm's impact on monthly average daytime NEE from the changes caused by interannual variability in other environmental drivers. The effects of the storm were apparent on annual time scales, and CO2 uptake remained approximately 250 g C m-2 yr-1 lower in 2009 compared to the average annual values measured in 2004–2005. Dry season CO2

  2. A new 500-m resolution map of canopy height for Amazon forest using spaceborne LiDAR and cloud-free MODIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Yoshito; Suwa, Rempei; Jindo, Keiji; Endo, Takahiro; Oki, Kazuo; Sawada, Haruo; Arai, Egidio; Shimabukuro, Yosio Edemir; Celes, Carlos Henrique Souza; Campos, Moacir Alberto Assis; Higuchi, Francisco Gasparetto; Lima, Adriano José Nogueira; Higuchi, Niro; Kajimoto, Takuya; Ishizuka, Moriyoshi

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we aimed to map canopy heights in the Brazilian Amazon mainly on the basis of spaceborne LiDAR and cloud-free MODIS imagery with a new method (the Self-Organizing Relationships method) for spatial modeling of the LiDAR footprint. To evaluate the general versatility, we compared the created canopy height map with two different canopy height estimates on the basis of our original field study plots (799 plots located in eight study sites) and a previously developed canopy height map. The compared canopy height estimates were obtained by: (1) a stem diameter at breast height (D) - tree height (H) relationship specific to each site on the basis of our original field study, (2) a previously developed D-H model involving environmental and structural factors as explanatory variables (Feldpausch et al., 2011), and (3) a previously developed canopy height map derived from the spaceborne LiDAR data with different spatial modeling method and explanatory variables (Simard et al., 2011). As a result, our canopy height map successfully detected a spatial distribution pattern in canopy height estimates based on our original field study data (r = 0.845, p = 8.31 × 10-3) though our canopy height map showed a poor correlation (r = 0.563, p = 0.146) with the canopy height estimate based on a previously developed model by Feldpausch et al. (2011). We also confirmed that the created canopy height map showed a similar pattern with the previously developed canopy height map by Simard et al. (2011). It was concluded that the use of the spaceborne LiDAR data provides a sufficient accuracy in estimating the canopy height at regional scale.

  3. Remote detection of canopy water stress in coniferous forests using the NS001 Thematic Mapper Simulator and the thermal infrared multispectral scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Lars L.; Running, Steven W.; Riggs, George A.

    1990-01-01

    Water stress was induced in two coniferous forest stands in West Germany by severing tree sapwood. Leaf water potential, Psi(L), measurements indicated that maximum, naturally occurring levels of water stress developed in the stressed plots while control plots exhibited natural diurnal trends. Images of each site were obtained with the Thematic Mapper Simulator (NS001) and the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) 12 to 15 days after stress induction. NS001 bands 2 to 6, NS001 indices combining bands 4 and 6, and NS001 and TIMS thermal bands showed significant radiance differences between stressed and control plots when large differences in Psi(L) and relative water content (RWC) existed during the morning overflights at Munich. However, the NS001 and TIMS sensors could not detect the slightly smaller differences in Psi(L) and RWC during the Munich afternoon and Frankfurt overflights. The results suggest that routine detection of canopy water stress under operational conditions is difficult utilizing current sensor technology.

  4. Principle Analysis on Characteristics of the Spatial Variation of Average Air Temperature in Tropical Secondary Forest Canopy Gap%热带次生林林窗平均气温空间分布特征的初步分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张一平; 王进欣; 刘玉洪; 马友鑫

    2001-01-01

    Temperature measurements at the secondary forest canopy gap wereconducted in Xishuangbanna, Yunnan in fog-cool season and dry-hot season. On the basis of this measurements, the air temperature characteristics and their spatial variations in different seasons in the secondary forest canopy gap were discussed. The findings showed that there was a significant thermal effect at the gap.The effect of sunshine on the air temperature in the gap was quite different, the extreme value was on the eastern edge of gap, which may be a reason to form the gap microclimate. The results supplied a basis on further study canopy gap microclimate and the relevant ecological phenomena.

  5. Prognostic land surface albedo from a dynamic global vegetation model clumped canopy radiative transfer scheme and satellite-derived geographic forest heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, N. Y.; Yang, W.; Ni-Meister, W.; Aleinov, I. D.; Jonas, J.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation cover was introduced into general circulations models (GCMs) in the 1980's to account for the effect of land surface albedo and water vapor conductance on the Earth's climate. Schemes assigning canopy albedoes by broad biome type have been superceded in 1990's by canopy radiative transfer schemes for homogeneous canopies obeying Beer's Law extinction as a function of leaf area index (LAI). Leaf albedo and often canopy height are prescribed by plant functional type (PFT). It is recognized that this approach does not effectively describe geographic variation in the radiative transfer of vegetated cover, particularly for mixed and sparse canopies. GCM-coupled dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) have retained these simple canopy representations, with little further evaluation of their albedos. With the emergence lidar-derived canopy vertical structure data, DGVM modelers are now revisiting albedo simulation. We present preliminary prognostic global land surface albedo produced by the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (TBM), a DGVM coupled to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. The Ent TBM is a next generation DGVM designed to incorporate variation in canopy heights, and mixed and sparse canopies. For such dynamically varying canopy structure, it uses the Analytical Clumped Two-Stream (ACTS) canopy radiative transfer model, which is derived from gap probability theory for canopies of tree cohorts with ellipsoidal crowns, and accounts for soil, snow, and bare stems. We have developed a first-order global vegetation structure data set (GVSD), which gives a year of satellite-derived geographic variation in canopy height, maximum canopy leaf area, and seasonal LAI. Combined with Ent allometric relations, this data set provides population density and foliage clumping within crowns. We compare the Ent prognostic albedoes to those of the previous GISS GCM scheme, and to satellite estimates. The impact of albedo differences on surface

  6. Seeing the Fields and Forests: Application of Surface-Layer Theory and Flux-Tower Data to Calculating Vegetation Canopy Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennypacker, Sam; Baldocchi, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    Canopy height is an important and dynamic site variable that affects the mass and energy exchanges between vegetation and the atmosphere. We develop a method to estimate canopy height routinely, using surface-layer theory and turbulence measurements made from a collection of flux towers. This tool is based on connecting the logarithmic wind profile generally expected in a neutral surface layer with direct measurements of friction velocity and assumptions about canopy height's relationships with zero-plane displacement and aerodynamic roughness length. Tests over a broad range of canopy types and heights find that calculated values are in good agreement with direct measurements of canopy height, including in a heterogeneous landscape. Based on the various uncertainties associated with our starting assumptions about canopy micrometeorology, we present a blueprint for future work that is necessary for expanding and improving these initial calculations.

  7. UU* filtering of nighttime net ecosystem CO2 exchange flux over forest canopy under strong wind in wintertime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Junhui; HAN Shijie; SUN Xiaomin; TANG Fengde

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of the negative nighttime net CO2 flux in wintertime and reasonable treatment with it is of great importance in evaluating the carbon metabolism of boreal forest.Results, based on the data obtained with open-path eddy covariance system and CO2 profile measurement system from Nov. 2002 to Apr. 2003 and that obtained with five sonic anemometers in Nov. 1999, show that (1) the negative net ecosystem CO2 exchange flux (NEE) always appeared under conditions of strong wind; (2) the pressure fluctuation and horizontal advection flow are dominantly responsible for the negative NEE. Operable upper bound u* filtering method (UU* filtering) was introduced since the difficulties in real-time measuring of pressure fluctuation and horizontal advection fluxes under conditions of strong wind. Nighttime upper u* threshold for the broad-leaved Korean pine mixed forest of the Changbai Mountains is 0.4 ms-1 and can be applied to the daytime filtering; and (3) the UU* filtering corrected the nighttime ‘problem’ of negative NEE under strong wind and made the estimates more ecologically reasonable.

  8. Structural, physiognomic and above-ground biomass variation in savanna-forest transition zones on three continents - how different are co-occurring savanna and forest formations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenendaal, E. M.; Torello-Raventos, M.; Feldpausch, T. R.; Domingues, T. F.; Gerard, F.; Schrodt, F.; Saiz, G.; Quesada, C. A.; Djagbletey, G.; Ford, A.; Kemp, J.; Marimon, B. S.; Marimon-Junior, B. H.; Lenza, E.; Ratter, J. A.; Maracahipes, L.; Sasaki, D.; Sonke, B.; Zapfack, L.; Villarroel, D.; Schwarz, M.; Yoko Ishida, F.; Gilpin, M.; Nardoto, G. B.; Affum-Baffoe, K.; Arroyo, L.; Bloomfield, K.; Ceca, G.; Compaore, H.; Davies, K.; Diallo, A.; Fyllas, N. M.; Gignoux, J.; Hien, F.; Johnson, M.; Mougin, E.; Hiernaux, P.; Killeen, T.; Metcalfe, D.; Miranda, H. S.; Steininger, M.; Sykora, K.; Bird, M. I.; Grace, J.; Lewis, S.; Phillips, O. L.; Lloyd, J.

    2015-05-01

    Through interpretations of remote-sensing data and/or theoretical propositions, the idea that forest and savanna represent "alternative stable states" is gaining increasing acceptance. Filling an observational gap, we present detailed stratified floristic and structural analyses for forest and savanna stands located mostly within zones of transition (where both vegetation types occur in close proximity) in Africa, South America and Australia. Woody plant leaf area index variation was related to tree canopy cover in a similar way for both savanna and forest with substantial overlap between the two vegetation types. As total woody plant canopy cover increased, so did the relative contribution of middle and lower strata of woody vegetation. Herbaceous layer cover declined as woody cover increased. This pattern of understorey grasses and herbs progressively replaced by shrubs as the canopy closes over was found for both savanna and forests and on all continents. Thus, once subordinate woody canopy layers are taken into account, a less marked transition in woody plant cover across the savanna-forest-species discontinuum is observed compared to that inferred when trees of a basal diameter > 0.1 m are considered in isolation. This is especially the case for shrub-dominated savannas and in taller savannas approaching canopy closure. An increased contribution of forest species to the total subordinate cover is also observed as savanna stand canopy closure occurs. Despite similarities in canopy-cover characteristics, woody vegetation in Africa and Australia attained greater heights and stored a greater amount of above-ground biomass than in South America. Up to three times as much above-ground biomass is stored in forests compared to savannas under equivalent climatic conditions. Savanna-forest transition zones were also found to typically occur at higher precipitation regimes for South America than for Africa. Nevertheless, consistent across all three continents coexistence

  9. Structural, physiognomic and above-ground biomass variation in savanna–forest transition zones on three continents – how different are co-occurring savanna and forest formations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Veenendaal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Through interpretations of remote-sensing data and/or theoretical propositions, the idea that forest and savanna represent "alternative stable states" is gaining increasing acceptance. Filling an observational gap, we present detailed stratified floristic and structural analyses for forest and savanna stands located mostly within zones of transition (where both vegetation types occur in close proximity in Africa, South America and Australia. Woody plant leaf area index variation was related to tree canopy cover in a similar way for both savanna and forest with substantial overlap between the two vegetation types. As total woody plant canopy cover increased, so did the relative contribution of middle and lower strata of woody vegetation. Herbaceous layer cover declined as woody cover increased. This pattern of understorey grasses and herbs progressively replaced by shrubs as the canopy closes over was found for both savanna and forests and on all continents. Thus, once subordinate woody canopy layers are taken into account, a less marked transition in woody plant cover across the savanna–forest-species discontinuum is observed compared to that inferred when trees of a basal diameter > 0.1 m are considered in isolation. This is especially the case for shrub-dominated savannas and in taller savannas approaching canopy closure. An increased contribution of forest species to the total subordinate cover is also observed as savanna stand canopy closure occurs. Despite similarities in canopy-cover characteristics, woody vegetation in Africa and Australia attained greater heights and stored a greater amount of above-ground biomass than in South America. Up to three times as much above-ground biomass is stored in forests compared to savannas under equivalent climatic conditions. Savanna–forest transition zones were also found to typically occur at higher precipitation regimes for South America than for Africa. Nevertheless, consistent across all three

  10. Structural, physiognomic and aboveground biomass variation in savanna-forest transition zones on three continents. How different are co-occurring savanna and forest formations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Veenendaal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Through interpretations of remote sensing data and/or theoretical propositions, the idea that forest and savanna represent "alternative stable states" is gaining increasing acceptance. Filling an observational gap, we present detailed stratified floristic and structural analyses for forest and savanna stands mostly located within zones of transition (where both vegetation types occur in close proximity in Africa, South America and Australia. Woody plant leaf area index variation was related in a similar way to tree canopy cover for both savanna and forest with substantial overlap between the two vegetation types. As total woody plant canopy cover increased, so did the contribution of middle and lower strata of woody vegetation to this total. Herbaceous layer cover also declined as woody cover increased. This pattern of understorey grasses and herbs being progressively replaced by shrubs as canopy closure occurs was found for both savanna and forests and on all continents. Thus, once subordinate woody canopy layers are taken into account, a less marked transition in woody plant cover across the savanna-forest species discontinuum is observed compared to that implied when trees of a basal diameter > 0.1m are considered in isolation. This is especially the case for shrub-dominated savannas and in taller savannas approaching canopy closure. An increased contribution of forest species to the total subordinate cover is also observed as savanna stand canopy closure occurs. Despite similarities in canopy cover characteristics, woody vegetation in Africa and Australia attained greater heights and stored a greater concentration of above ground biomass than in South America. Up to three times as much aboveground biomass is stored in forests compared to savannas under equivalent climatic conditions. Savanna/forest transition zones were also found to typically occur at higher precipitation regimes for South America than for Africa. Nevertheless, coexistence

  11. Observations of HNO3, ΣAN, ΣPN and NO2 fluxes: evidence for rapid HOx chemistry within a pine forest canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Farmer

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of exchange of reactive nitrogen oxides between the atmosphere and a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains are reported. During winter, we observe upward fluxes of NO2, and downward fluxes of total peroxy and peroxy acyl nitrates (ΣPNs, total gas and particle phase alkyl and multifunctional alkyl nitrates (ΣANs(g+p, and the sum of gaseous HNO3 and semi-volatile NO3− particles (HNO3(g+p. We use calculations of the vertical profile and flux of NO, partially constrained by observations, to show that net midday ΣNOyi fluxes in winter are –4.9 ppt m s−1. The signs and magnitudes of these wintertime individual and ΣNOyi fluxes are in the range of prior measurements. In contrast, during summer, we observe downward fluxes only of ΣANs(g+p, and upward fluxes of HNO3(g+p, ΣPNs and NO2 with signs and magnitudes that are unlike most, if not all, previous observations and analyses of fluxes of individual nitrogen oxides. The results imply that the mechanisms contributing to NOy fluxes, at least at this site, are much more complex than previously recognized. We show that the observations of upward fluxes of HNO3(g+p and ΣPNs during summer are consistent with oxidation of NO2 and acetaldehyde by OH with the product of concentration and residence time equal to 1.1×1010 molec OH cm−3 s, e.g. 3×107 molecules cm−3 OH for a 400 s canopy residence time. We show that ΣAN(g+p fluxes are consistent with this same OH if the reaction of OH with ΣANs produces either HNO3 or NO2 in 6–30% yield. Calculations of NO fluxes constrained by the NO2 observations and the inferred OH indicate that NOx fluxes are downward into the canopy because of the substantial conversion of NOx to HNO3 and ΣPNs in the canopy. Even so, we derive that NOx emission fluxes of ~15 ng(N m−2 s−1 at midday during summer are required to balance the NOx and NOy flux budgets. These fluxes are partly explained by estimates of soil emissions (estimated

  12. Bias in lidar-based canopy gap fraction estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaccari, S.; Leeuwen, van M.; Calders, K.; Coops, N.C.; Herold, M.

    2013-01-01

    Leaf area index and canopy gap fraction (GF) provide important information to forest managers regarding the ecological functioning and productivity of forest resources. Traditional measurements such as those obtained from hemispherical photography (HP) measure solar irradiation, penetrating the fore

  13. Tree canopy cover and natural regeneration into strictly-protected forest areas: the MaB reserve of Montedimezzo (Isernia,Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Giannini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The ecological analysis and the analysis of mechanisms underlying the natural regeneration process into strictly protected forest areas, is basic to the understanding of ecosystem functioning and to estimate the recovery ability as a function of time and environmental changes. Aim of the paper is to analyze the spatial-temporal dynamics of tree species regeneration into mixed Turkey oak-common beech stands growing undisturbed since more than one half- century. The ability of first establishment and following growth of natural regeneration related to the ecological parameters, the structural features of standing crop and its development stages, are analyzed in detail. The study was carried out into two permanent monitoring plots (A and (B where two different tree species play the main functional role. In (A common beech is dominant (Fagus sylvatica L.-elevation 1040 m a.s.l.; in (B Turkey oak is prevailing (Quercus cerris L.-elevation 940 m a.s.l.. In each plot, the analysis of vertical stand structure, of natural regeneration pattern and ecological surveys (LAI, trasmittance, soil moisture content, canopy interception of rainfall were undertaken by monthly surveys from May to October into 57 sub-plots each 1m2 wide over the period 2005-2007. Results highlighted that (B, Turkey oak prevailing, shows a more complex structure, a higher tree canopy thickness and the lack of gaps. The area shows therefore a lower trasmittance and a higher LAI value; throughfall and soil moisture content are also reduced as compared to (A. As for the natural regeneration pattern, further to a first stage when seedlings mortality is high, their survival rate is being kept high and steady over time in (A. A further mortality peak has been detected vice versa over the following summer season in (B. The different main tree species composition and radiation regime seem to be the basic reasons of the dynamics observed

  14. A source-orientated approach for estimating daytime concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds in an upper layer of a boreal forest canopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappalainen, H.K. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland); Sevanto, S.; Dal Maso, M.; Taipale, R.; Kajos, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Kolari, P.; Back, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology Sciences

    2013-06-01

    Biologically justified statistical models for daytime atmospheric concentrations of methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene and monoterpene were tested using measurements at a boreal forest stand in southern Finland in 2006-2007 and in summer 2008. The canopy-scale concentrations of all compounds except monotepene were closely correlated with shoot-scale concentrations indicating a strong link to biological emission source. All the models were based on the exponential relationship between air temperature and atmospheric concentration of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). The first model - an exponential function of air temperature (T model) - could explain 27%-64% of the variation in BVOC daytime concentrations in the test data. The second model - a Temperature-State of Development model (T-S model) having two explaining variables (air temperature and seasonal photosynthetic efficiency) - was derived from an empirical adjustment of seasonality. This model slightly increased the fraction of explained variation but it still could not explain the high concentration peaks, which accounted for most of the unexplained variation. To better analyse these peaks we tested the Trigger model including two potential environmental triggers, a PAR index (high photosynthetically active photon flux density (PAR) and high ozone concentration, that could increase the concentrations momentarily. However, the Trigger model described the peak concentrations only somewhat better than the T or T-S model. It seems that it is very difficult to explain more than 32%-67% of variation in BVOC concentrations by a straightforward source-oriented modelling without deep understanding of biological and physical processes. In order to improve the models profound studies on specific stress factors and events inducing BVOC emissions are needed. (orig.)

  15. 森林冠层结构与光环境及其对林下植被生长和格局的影响%Forest canopy structure,light environment and their effects on the vegetation pattern and growth of understory in forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建宇; 刘晓娟; 杨晓杰

    2015-01-01

    回顾了前人对冠层结构和冠层光环境的描述,完善了冠层结构的定义并阐述了其生态学意义,剖析冠层结构对林下自然光照强度和分布的影响,综合了森林冠层结构和光环境对林内小气候特征及其与空气、土壤等其它环境因子之间相互关系的研究成果,概述了森林生态系统林下植被对光环境的响应。在已有的研究结果中总结光环境对森林生态系统中种子萌发、幼苗生长和林下植被分布格局的影响,以供国内同行参考。%Reviewing the description of the canopy structure and canopy light environment of predecessors,optimize the definition of canopy structure and expounds its ecological significance.Analyze the effect of canopy structure on the light intensity and distribution in the understory layer.Combining the research results of the forest canopy structure and light environment on the forest microclimate characteristics and with the air , soil and other environmental factors of the mutual relationship,summarized the understory vegetation of forest ecosystem for the response of light environment.Tries to summarize the effects of light environment on understory vegetation distribution,the germination of seeds and the growth of seedlings in forest ecosystem,with the aim of providing information for same research.

  16. Comparative Analysis of EO-1 ALI and Hyperion, and Landsat ETM+ Data for Mapping Forest Crown Closure and Leaf Area Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Ruiliang; Gong, Peng; Yu, Qian

    2008-06-06

    In this study, a comparative analysis of capabilities of three sensors for mapping forest crown closure (CC) and leaf area index (LAI) was conducted. The three sensors are Hyperspectral Imager (Hyperion) and Advanced Land Imager (ALI) onboard EO-1 satellite and Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). A total of 38 mixed coniferous forest CC and 38 LAI measurements were collected at Blodgett Forest Research Station, University of California at Berkeley, USA. The analysis method consists of (1) extracting spectral vegetation indices (VIs), spectral texture information and maximum noise fractions (MNFs), (2) establishing multivariate prediction models, (3) predicting and mapping pixel-based CC and LAI values, and (4) validating the mapped CC and LAI results with field validated photo-interpreted CC and LAI values. The experimental results indicate that the Hyperion data are the most effective for mapping forest CC and LAI (CC mapped accuracy (MA) = 76.0%, LAI MA = 74.7%), followed by ALI data (CC MA = 74.5%, LAI MA = 70.7%), with ETM+ data results being least effective (CC MA = 71.1%, LAI MA = 63.4%). This analysis demonstrates that the Hyperion sensor outperforms the other two sensors: ALI and ETM+. This is because of its high spectral resolution with rich subtle spectral information, of its short-wave infrared data for constructing optimal VIs that are slightly affected by the atmosphere, and of its more available MNFs than the other two sensors to be selected for establishing prediction models. Compared to ETM+ data, ALI data are better for mapping forest CC and LAI due to ALI data with more bands and higher signal-to-noise ratios than those of ETM+ data.

  17. ESTIMATION OF LEAF AREA INDEX IN OPEN-CANOPY PONDEROSA PINE FORESTS AT DIFFERENT SUCCESSIONAL STAGES AND MANAGEMENT REGIMES IN OREGON. (R828309)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractLeaf area and its spatial distribution are key parameters in describing canopy characteristics. They determine radiation regimes and influence mass and energy exchange with the atmosphere. The evaluation of leaf area in conifer stands is particularly challengi...

  18. Characteristic analysis on different thermal active surfaces in canopy gap of tropical secondary forest.%热带次生林林窗不同热力作用面特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张一平; 王进欣; 马友鑫; 刘玉洪

    2001-01-01

    Microclimatic measurements were conducted in the canopy gap of tropical secondary forest in Xishuangbanna in fog cool and dry-hot season. The daytime thermal effect of different thermal active surface in the canopy gap was dis cussed, and the variations of trunk surface temperature near gap edge and of surface temperature on the gap were ana lyzed. The result shows that the woody-wall surface is new thermal active surface on the vicinage of canopy gap, with the exception of the forest canopy surface, soil surface in the forest gap, and soil surface of the interior. Because of the influence of season, situs and time, the thermal effect of different thermal active surface of gap was sigrnificant different. Being subject to fog, the soil surface on the center of canopy gap is an important thermal active surface in the morning; wbhile in the midday and afternoon, because of the influence of incident radiation, the woody wall and soil surface of edge on the east and the woody wall surface of edge on the north are the key thermal active surface of the canopy gap. In the midday, the thermal active was salient on the surface of gap, and in the afternoon, it was salient on the woody wall. The thermal variations of canopy gap of forest are controlled by the thermal characteristics of different thermal active surfaces and by their interaction, affecting the growth of plants.%利用热带次生林林窗边缘树表温和林窗区域地表温的观测资料,探讨了昼间林窗各热力作用面的热 力效应及其变化规律.通过分析林窗边缘树表温和林窗地表温的变化,指出在林窗区域林窗边缘墙面是林冠 面、林窗地面、林内地面之外的新的第4热力作用面;各个热力作用面的热力效应随季节、位置和时刻的不同有 着明显差异.在受浓雾影响的上午,林窗地面热力作用较强;在中午和下午林窗东侧林缘壁面、林窗东侧-东北侧 地面的热力作用显著,中午以林

  19. APLIKASI MODEL FOREST CANOPY DENSITY CITRA LANDSAT 7 ETM UNTUK MENENTUKAN INDEKS LUAS TAJUK (CROWN AREA INDEX DAN KERAPATAN TEGAKAN (STAND DENSITY HUTAN RAWA GAMBUT DI DAS SEBANGAU PROVINSI KALIMANTAN TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Sukarna R.M. Sukarna

    2016-10-01

    Bayangan Index (SSI integrasi nilai SI dan TI. Hasil integrasi VD dan SSI menghasilkan model Forest Canopy Density (FCD, yang digunakan untuk menentukan nilai dari header indeks lebar (Indeks atau Cai di Area Crown dan variasi kepadatan berdiri (Stand Density atau SD. Hasil penelitian ini menyimpulkan bahwa antara FCD dan Cai memiliki model hubungan non-linear (peringkat polinomial 2 dengan R = 0,87. Pada hubungan antara Cai dan model SD memiliki hubungan dengan linier R = 0,97. Dengan model dasar diketahui hubungan matematis antara yang paling optimal dan FCD adalah pada nilai utama Cai = 5 m2 / ha.

  20. Canopy soil bacterial communities altered by severing host tree limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody R. Dangerfield

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Trees of temperate rainforests host a large biomass of epiphytic plants, which are associated with soils formed in the forest canopy. Falling of epiphytic material results in the transfer of carbon and nutrients from the canopy to the forest floor. This study provides the first characterization of bacterial communities in canopy soils enabled by high-depth environmental sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Canopy soil included many of the same major taxonomic groups of Bacteria that are also found in ground soil, but canopy bacterial communities were lower in diversity and contained different operational taxonomic units. A field experiment was conducted with epiphytic material from six Acer macrophyllum trees in Olympic National Park, Washington, USA to document changes in the bacterial communities of soils associated with epiphytic material that falls to the forest floor. Bacterial diversity and composition of canopy soil was highly similar, but not identical, to adjacent ground soil two years after transfer to the forest floor, indicating that canopy bacteria are almost, but not completely, replaced by ground soil bacteria. Furthermore, soil associated with epiphytic material on branches that were severed from the host tree and suspended in the canopy contained altered bacterial communities that were distinct from those in canopy material moved to the forest floor. Therefore, the unique nature of canopy soil bacteria is determined in part by the host tree and not only by the physical environmental conditions associated with the canopy. Connection to the living tree appears to be a key feature of the canopy habitat. These results represent an initial survey of bacterial diversity of the canopy and provide a foundation upon which future studies can more fully investigate the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of these communities.

  1. 三种人工林分的冠层结构参数与林下光照条件%Canopy structural parameters and understory light regimes of 3 artificial forest stands in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾小容; 苏志尧; 区余端; 解丹丹

    2011-01-01

    Canopy parameters and understory light regimes of three artificial forest stands in South China,I. E. ,Eucalyptus, slash pine and mixed forest stands .were estimated using hemispherical photography based on quadrat method together with plant census,and the relationship between canopy structure and understory light regimes was analyzed. Leaf area indexes(LAI)of the 3 artificial forest stands were 1. 9,2. 7,and 2. 6,respectively,and their CV(coefficient of variation)was 11. 3%,14. 4% ,and 19. 3% ,respectively. Canopy Openness( CO) was 18. 1% ,10. 4% and 11.0%,and their CV was 13. 9%, 17. 7%and 26. 2%, respectively (Transmitted direct gap light(TransDir)was 6. 5,4. 0 and 3. 9 mol·m-2· d-1 ,respectively,and their CV was 22. 1%,22. 9%and 30. 8%,respectively. Transmitted diffuse gap light(TransDif)was 5. 5,3. 2 and 3. 3 mol · m-2 · d-1 .respectively,and their CV was 15. 2% ,14. 8% and 19. 2% ,respectively. High spatial heterogeneity in understory light regimes was found in the mixed forest stand. Correlation a-nalysis indicated that in all the 3 forest stands TransDif was significantly correlated with LAI or CO, while TransDir was significantly correlated with LAI or CO in the mixed forest stand. Canopy structure of the mixed forest stand exhibited higher spatial heterogeneity and had a direct impact on understory light regimes.%以样方法为基础,用半球面影像技术测定了桉树林、湿地松林和混交林(木荷+青冈+银木荷)3种人工林分的冠层结构(叶面积指数LAI和林冠孔隙度CO)和林下光照条件(林下直射光TransDir和林下散射光TransDif),并分析了冠层结构与林下光照条件之间的关系.测定结果表明,桉树林、湿地松林和混交林的LAI平均值分别是1.9、2.7和2.6,变异系数为11.3%,14.4%和19.3% ;CO的平均值分别为18.1%,10.4%和11.0%,变异系数为13.9%,17.7%和26.2%;TransDir的平均值分别为6.5,4.0和3.9 mol· m-2·d-1,变异系数为22.1%,22.9%和30.8

  2. Canopy Spectral Invariants. Part 1: A New Concept in Remote Sensing of Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazikhin, Yuri; Schull, Mitchell A.; Xu, Liang; Myneni, Ranga B.; Samanta, Arindam

    2011-01-01

    The concept of canopy spectral invariants expresses the observation that simple algebraic combinations of leaf and canopy spectral reflectance become wavelength independent and determine two canopy structure specific variables the recollision and escape probabilities. These variables specify an accurate relationship between the spectral response of a vegetation canopy to incident solar radiation at the leaf and the canopy scale. They are sensitive to important structural features of the canopy such as forest cover, tree density, leaf area index, crown geometry, forest type and stand age. This paper presents the mathematical basis of the concept which is linked to eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the three-dimensional radiative transfer equation.

  3. Monitoring phenology of photosynthesis in temperate evergreen and mixed deciduous forests using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) at leaf and canopy scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C. Y.; Arain, M. A.; Ensminger, I.

    2016-12-01

    Evergreen conifers in boreal and temperate regions undergo strong seasonal changes in photoperiod and temperatures, which determines their phenology of high photosynthetic activity in the growing season and downregulation during the winter. Monitoring the timing of the transition between summer activity and winter downregulation in evergreens is difficult since this is a largely invisible process, unlike in deciduous trees that have a visible budding and a sequence of leaf unfolding in the spring and leaf abscission in the fall. The light-use efficiency (LUE) model estimates gross primary productivity (GPP) and may be parameterized using remotely sensed vegetation indices. Using spectral reflectance data, we derived the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), a measure of leaf "greenness", and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI), a proxy for chlorophyll:carotenoid ratios which is related to photosynthetic activity. To better understand the relationship between these vegetation indices and photosynthetic activity and to contrast this relationship between plant functional types, the phenology of NDVI, PRI and photosynthesis was monitored in an evergreen forest and a mixed deciduous forest at the leaf and canopy scale. Our data indicates that the LUE model can be parameterized by NDVI and PRI to track forest phenology. Differences in the sensitivity of PRI and NDVI will be discussed. These findings have implications to address the phenology of evergreen conifers by using PRI to complement NDVI in the LUE model, potentially improving model productivity estimates in northern hemisphere forests, that are dominated by conifers.

  4. Artificial canopy gaps and the establishment of planted dipterocarp seedlings in Macaranga spp. dominated secondary tropical rain forests of Sabah, Borneo

    OpenAIRE

    Romell, Eva

    2007-01-01

    The continued losses of primary tropical rain forests have increased the pressure on secondary tropical rain forests and led to additional logging and changes to other land uses. A requirement for a secondary tropical forest to recover the main traits of old-growth forests is the regeneration of non-pioneer (climax) species. To accelerate the recovery of non-pioneer species where natural regeneration is insufficient, enrichment planting can be used in artificially created gaps or lines. The s...

  5. Aerosol dry deposition on vegetative canopies. Part II: A new modelling approach and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroff, Alexandre; Mailliat, Alain; Amielh, Muriel; Anselmet, Fabien

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the modelling of aerosol dry deposition on vegetation. It follows a companion article, in which a review of the current knowledge highlights the need for a better description of the aerosol behaviour within the canopy [Petroff, A., Mailliat, A., Amielh, M., Anselmet, F., 2008. Aerosol dry deposition on vegetative canopies. Part I: Review of present knowledge. Atmospheric Environment, in press, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.09.043]. Concepts from multi-phase flow studies are used for describing the canopy medium and deriving a time and space-averaged aerosol balance equation and the associated deposition terms. The closure of the deposition terms follows an up-scaling procedure based on the statistical distribution of the collecting elements. This aerosol transport model is then applied in a stationary and mono-dimensional configuration and takes into account the properties of the vegetation, the aerosol and the turbulent flow. Deposition mechanisms are Brownian diffusion, interception, inertial and turbulent impactions, and gravitational settling. For each of them, a parameterisation of the particle collection is derived and the quality of their predictions is assessed by comparison with wind-tunnel deposition measurements on coniferous twigs [Belot, Y., Gauthier, D., 1975. Transport of micronic particles from atmosphere to foliar surfaces. In: De Vries, D.A., Afgan, N.H. (Eds.), Heat and Mass Transfer in the Biosphere. Scripta Book, Washington, DC, pp. 583-591; Belot, Y., 1977. Etude de la captation des polluants atmosphériques par les végétaux. CEA, R-4786, Fontenay-aux-Roses; Belot, Y., Camus, H., Gauthier, D., Caput, C., 1994. Uptake of small particles by canopies. The Science of the Total Environment 157, 1-6]. Under a real canopy configuration, the predictions of the aerosol transport model compare reasonably well with detailed on-site deposition measurements of Aitken mode particles [Buzorius, G., Rannik, Ü., M

  6. Effects of CO(2) enrichment on the photosynthetic light response of sun and shade leaves of canopy sweetgum trees (Liquidambar styraciflua) in a forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrick, J.D.; Thomas, R.B. [West Virginia Univ., Dept of Biology, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1999-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether sun and shade leaves of canopy sweetgum trees in the Duke University Free Air CO(2) enrichment experiment (FACE) respond differently to CO(2) enrichment. The hypothesis was tested that CO(2) enrichment will stimulate photosynthesis in sun and shade leaves in a manner that increases their daily carbon balance. It was predicted that sun leaves would have the the greatest absolute enhancement in response to CO(2) enrichment, because they have a greater photosynthetic capacity. Shade leaves would have their greatest relative enhancement of net photosynthesis by elevated CO(2), because of very low net assimilation in the understory and a stimulation of quantum yield. Photosynthetic light responses and leaf characteristics were measured twice during the first full growing season of the Duke FACE experiment and shade leaves of canopy sweetgum trees exposed to either elevated or ambient CO(2). Elevated CO(2) significantly increased light-saturated photosynthetic rates, quantum yield and modeled daytime leaf carbon gain of sun and shade leaves of canopy sweetgum trees during the first full year of the experiment. Elevated CO(2) enhanced Asat (light saturated net photosynthesis) and daytime carbon gain in sun leaves more than in shade leaves. Quantum yield was stimulated by CO(2) enrichment, but did not show a CO(2) x leaf position interaction. Sun leaves had greater mass per unit area, chlorophyll per unit leaf area, and light-saturated photosynthetic rates than shade leaves. The greater CO(2) enhancement of light-saturated photosynthesis in sun leaves than in shade leaves was probably associated with a greater amount of leaf N per unit area in sun leaves compared with shade leaves. Despite showing a smaller stimulation by elevated CO(2), shade leaves make up a large part of the sweetgum canopy, and consequently are an important to whole canopy photosynthesis. 48 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Estimating Understory Temperatures Using MODIS LST in Mixed Cordilleran Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N. Laskin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Satellite remote sensing provides a rapid and broad-scale means for monitoring vegetation phenology and its relationship with fluctuations in air temperature. Investigating the response of plant communities to climate change is needed to gain insight into the potentially detrimental effects on ecosystem processes. While many studies have used satellite-derived land surface temperature (LST as a proxy for air temperature, few studies have attempted to create and validate models of forest understory temperature (Tust, as it is obscured from these space-borne observations. This study worked to predict instantaneous values of Tust using daily Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS LST data over a 99,000 km2 study area located in the Rocky Mountains of western Alberta, Canada. Specifically, we aimed to identify the forest characteristics that improve estimates of Tust over using LST alone. Our top model predicted Tust to within a mean absolute error (MAE of 1.4 °C with an overall model fit of R2 = 0.89 over two growing seasons. Canopy closure and the LiDAR-derived standard deviation of canopy height metric were found to significantly improve estimations of Tust over MODIS LST alone. These findings demonstrate that canopy structure and forest stand-type function to differentiate understory air temperatures from ambient canopy temperature as seen by the sensor overhead.

  8. Relationship of Tree Stand Heterogeneity and Forest Naturalness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARTHA, Dénes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to investigate if compositional (tree species richness andstructural (vertical structure, age-structure, patterns of canopy closure heterogeneity of the canopylayer is related to individual naturalness criteria and to overall forest naturalness at the stand scale. Thenaturalness values of the assessed criteria (tree species composition, tree stand structure, speciescomposition and structure of shrub layer and forest floor vegetation, dead wood, effects of game, sitecharacteristics showed similar behaviour when groups of stands with different heterogeneity werecompared, regardless of the studied aspect of canopy heterogeneity. The greatest difference was foundfor criteria describing the canopy layer. Composition and structure of canopy layer, dead wood andtotal naturalness of the stand differed significantly among the stand groups showing consistentlyhigher values from homogeneous to the most heterogeneous group. Naturalness of the compositionand structure of the shrub layer is slightly but significantly higher in stands with heterogeneous canopylayer. Regarding other criteria, significant differences were found only between the homogeneous andthe most heterogeneous groups, while groups with intermediate level of heterogeneity did not differsignificantly from one extreme. However, the criterion describing effects of game got lowernaturalness values in more heterogeneous stands. Naturalness of site characteristics did not differsignificantly among the groups except for when stands were grouped based on pattern of canopyclosure. From the practical viewpoint it is shown that purposeful forestry operations affecting thecanopy layer cause changes in compositional and structural characteristics of other layers as well as inoverall stand scale forest naturalness.

  9. Modeling forest development after fire disturbance: Climate, soil organic layer, and nitrogen jointly affect forest canopy species and long-term ecosystem carbon accumulation in the North American boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trugman, A. T.; Fenton, N.; Bergeron, Y.; Xu, X.; Welp, L.; Medvigy, D.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic layer dynamics strongly affect boreal forest development after fire. Field studies show that soil organic layer thickness exerts a species-specific control on propagule establishment in the North American boreal forest. On organic soils thicker than a few centimeters, all propagules are less able to recruit, but broadleaf trees recruit less effectively than needleleaf trees. In turn, forest growth controls organic layer accumulation through modulating litter input and litter quality. These dynamics have not been fully incorporated into models, but may be essential for accurate projections of ecosystem carbon storage. Here, we develop a data-constrained model for understanding boreal forest development after fire. We update the ED2 model to include new aspen and black spruce species-types, species-specific propagule survivorship dependent on soil organic layer depth, species-specific litter decay rates, dynamically accumulating moss and soil organic layers, and nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria associated with moss. The model is validated against diverse observations ranging from monthly to centennial timescales and spanning a climate gradient in Alaska, central Canada, and Quebec. We then quantify differences in forest development that result from changes in organic layer accumulation, temperature, and nitrogen. We find that (1) the model accurately reproduces a range of observations throughout the North American boreal forest; (2) the presence of a thick organic layer results in decreased decomposition and decreased aboveground productivity, effects that can increase or decrease ecosystem carbon uptake depending on location-specific attributes; (3) with a mean warming of 4°C, some forests switch from undergoing succession to needleleaf forests to recruiting multiple cohorts of broadleaf trees, decreasing ecosystem accumulation by ~30% after 300 years; (4) the availability of nitrogen regulates successional dynamics such than broadleaf species are

  10. Canopy-level stomatal narrowing in adult Fagus sylvatica under O3 stress - means of preventing enhanced O3 uptake under high O3 exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyssek, R; Baumgarten, M; Hummel, U; Häberle, K-H; Kitao, M; Wieser, G

    2015-01-01

    Spatio-temporally consistent O(3) doses are demonstrated in adult Fagus sylvatica from the Kranzberg Forest free-air fumigation experiment, covering cross-canopy and whole-seasonal scopes through sap flow measurement. Given O(3)-driven closure of stomata, we hypothesized enhanced whole-tree level O(3) influx to be prevented under enhanced O(3) exposure. Although foliage transpiration rate was lowered under twice-ambient O(3) around noon by 30% along with canopy conductance, the hypothesis was falsified, as O(3) influx was raised by 25%. Nevertheless, the twice-ambient/ambient ratio of O(3) uptake was smaller by about 20% than that of O(3) exposure, suggesting stomatal limitation of uptake. The O(3) response was traceable from leaves across branches to the canopy, where peak transpiration rates resembled those of shade rather than sun branches. Rainy/overcast-day and nightly O(3) uptake is quantified and discussed. Whole-seasonal canopy-level validation of modelled with sap flow-derived O(3) flux becomes available in assessing O(3) risk for forest trees.

  11. Assessment of Forest Structure Using Two UAV Techniques: A Comparison of Airborne Laser Scanning and Structure from Motion (SfM Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Wallace

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the potential of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs to measure and monitor structural properties of forests. Two remote sensing techniques, airborne laser scanning (ALS and structure from motion (SfM were tested to capture three-dimensional structural information from a small multi-rotor UAV platform. A case study is presented through the analysis of data collected from a 30 × 50 m plot in a dry sclerophyll eucalypt forest with a spatially varying canopy cover. The study provides an insight into the capabilities of both technologies for assessing absolute terrain height, the horizontal and vertical distribution of forest canopy elements, and information related to individual trees. Results indicate that both techniques are capable of providing information that can be used to describe the terrain surface and canopy properties in areas of relatively low canopy closure. However, the SfM photogrammetric technique underperformed ALS in capturing the terrain surface under increasingly denser canopy cover, resulting in point density of less than 1 ground point per m2 and mean difference from ALS terrain surface of 0.12 m. This shortcoming caused errors that were propagated into the estimation of canopy properties, including the individual tree height (root mean square error of 0.92 m for ALS and 1.30 m for SfM. Differences were also seen in the estimates of canopy cover derived from the SfM (50% and ALS (63% pointclouds. Although ALS is capable of providing more accurate estimates of the vertical structure of forests across the larger range of canopy densities found in this study, SfM was still found to be an adequate low-cost alternative for surveying of forest stands.

  12. Forest damage survey for 1997. Study on forest ecosystems in Hessen. Canopy density and forest growth in changing environmental conditions; Waldschadensbericht `97. Waldoekosystemstudie Hessen. Kronenverlichtungen und Waldwachstum unter sich veraendernden Umweltbedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paar, U.; Koerver, F.; Gawehn, P.; Kirchhoff, A.; Schoenfelder, E.; Eichhorn, J. [comps.

    1997-12-31

    The results of this year`s forest damage survey, the fourteenth of its kind, show that the condition of our forests has improved slightly during the past two years. The mean loss of needle and leaf foliage across all tree species and age classes is now at 25%, which is a slight decrease from the 26% peak in 1995. In keeping with the schedule this year`s survey also contains the regional results of the twelve Hessian forest areas, which were last compiled in 1994. Our relief about the slight improvement is somewhat attenuated by the condition of the oak, whose deterioration is not least due to insect attack. Moreover, all tree species are still in a markedly poorer condition than at the first forest damge survey in 1984. We must accept the fact that we cannot reverse the course of time. Our forests have been subject to acid input for decades. Adding to this are the effects of the ongoing change of our global environment which manifests itself in climate and weather influences and intermittent ozone and persistently high nitrogen loads. These factors in turn influence the insect fauna and our forests` susceptibility to frost and dryness. In determining the direction of our future efforts for the protection and preservation of our forests we should take our bearings by the success of our technical measures for reducing sulphur deposition over the past decade. [Deutsch] Die Ergebnisse des diesjaehrigen 14. Waldschadensberichtes zeigen, dass sich der Gesundheitszustand unserer Waelder in den letzten zwei Jahren leicht verbessert hat. Fuer alle Baumarten und Altersstufen hat sich der mittlere Nadel-/Blattverlust vom Hoechstand 26% (1995) auf 25% in diesem Jahr verringert. Erstmals seit 1994 liegen turnusgemaess auch wieder regionale Ergebnisse fuer die 12 hessischen Wuchsgebiete vor. In die Freude ueber die leichte Erholung mischt sich allerdings Sorge um die Eiche, deren Zustand sich, auch bedingt durch den Frass von Insekten in den letzten Jahren wieder verschlechtert

  13. Aerially released spray penetration of a tall coniferous canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    An aerial spray deposition project was designed to evaluate aerial application to an Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) canopy to combat Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae). This adelgid offers a difficult target residing in the forest canopy at the nodes of branchlets. The study collected 1680 ...

  14. Microwave Propagation Through Cultural Vegetation Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Ahad

    The need to understand the interaction of microwaves with vegetation canopies has markedly increased in recent years. This is due to advances made in remote sensing science, microwave technology, and signal processing circuits. One class of the earth's vegetation cover is man-made canopies, such as agricultural fields, orchards, and artificial forests. Contrary to natural vegetation terrain, location, spacing, and density of plants in a man-made vegetation canopy are deterministic quantities. As a result, the semi-deterministic nature of cultural vegetation canopies violate the random assumption of the radiative transfer theory and leads to experimented results that are in variance with model calculations. Hence, an alternative approach is needed to model the interaction of microwaves with such canopies. This thesis examines the propagation behavior through a canopy of corn plants. The corn canopy was selected as a representative of cultural vegetation canopies that are planted in parallel rows with an approximately fixed spacing between adjacent plants. Several experimental measurements were conducted to determine the transmission properties of a corn canopy in the 1-10 GHz range. The measurements which included horizontal propagation through the canopy as well as propagation at oblique incidence, were performed for defoliated canopies and for canopies with leaves. Through experimental observations and model development, the propagation behavior was found to be strongly dependent on the wavelength and the path length. At a wavelength in the neighborhood of 20 cm, for example, it was found that scattering by the stalks was coherent in nature for waves propagating horizontally through the canopy, which necessitated the development of a coherent-field model that uses Bragg scattering to account for the observed interference pattern in the transmitted beam. As the wavelength is made shorter, the semi-random spacing between plants becomes significant relative to the

  15. Emerald ash borer and the urban forest: Changes in landslide potential due to canopy loss scenarios in the City of Pittsburgh, PA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil-McCullough, Erin; Bain, Daniel J; Bergman, Jeffery; Crumrine, Danielle

    2015-12-01

    Emerald ash borer is expected to kill thousands of ash trees in the eastern U.S. This research develops tools to predict the effect of ash tree loss from the urban canopy on landslide susceptibility in Pittsburgh, PA. A spatial model was built using the SINMAP (Stability INdex MAPping) model coupled with spatially explicit scenarios of tree loss (0%, 25%, 50%, and 75% loss of ash trees from the canopy). Ash spatial distributions were estimated via Monte Carlo methods and available vegetation plot data. Ash trees are most prevalent on steeper slopes, likely due to urban development patterns. Therefore, ash loss disproportionately increases hillslope instability. A 75% loss of ash resulted in roughly 800 new potential landslide initiation locations. Sensitivity testing reveals that variations in rainfall rates, and friction angles produce minor changes to model results relative to the magnitude of parameter variation, but reveal high model sensitivity to soil density and root cohesion values. The model predictions demonstrate the importance of large canopy species to urban hillslope stability, particularly on steep slopes and in areas where soils tend to retain water. To improve instability predictions, better characterization of urban soils, particularly spatial patterns of compaction and species specific root cohesion is necessary. The modeling framework developed in this research will enhance assessment of changes in landslide risk due to tree mortality, improving our ability to design economically and ecologically sustainable urban systems.

  16. Non-timber forest products: alternative multiple-uses for sustainable forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    James L. Chamberlain; Mary Predny

    2003-01-01

    Forests of the southern United States are the source of a great diversity of flora, much of which is gathered for non-timber forest products (NTFPs). These products are made from resources that grow under the forest canopy as trees, herbs, shrubs, vines, moss and even lichen. They occur naturally in forests or may be cultivated under the forest canopy or in...

  17. Comparison of Interpolation Methods of Forest Canopy Height Model Using Discrete Point Cloud Data%基于离散点云数据的森林冠层高度模型插值方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段祝庚; 肖化顺; 袁伟湘

    2016-01-01

    【目的】基于森林区域离散点云特点,利用不同插值方法构建冠层高度模型,并对不同插值方法进行比较、分析和评价,为森林冠层高度模型插值方法选择提供参考。【方法】以30 m ×30 m 样方离散点云数据为试验数据,采用开源软件 SAGS-GIS利用 B样条插值( B-Spline)、普通克里金插值法( OK)、线性插值三角网法( TLI)、反距离加权插值法(IDW)4种插值方法分别构建森林冠层高度模型,对森林冠层高度模型的平面视图、三维视图、剖面图及其像元统计量进行比较和分析;同时对反距离加权插值法的插值参数搜索半径进行讨论、比较和分析。【结果】对于森林区域空间分布均匀且存在高度突变的点云数据,B-Spline插值对空值区域都进行了填充,林冠空隙也被过分填充,且 CHM 像元最大值明显偏离原始插值数据; TLI插值的 CHM 显得比较破碎; OK 插值法对影像过度平滑,生成的 CHM 影像模糊;而 IDW插值法对冠层顶部进行了适当填充和平滑,但冠层边缘不被过度平滑,保留高度突变,同时林冠空隙仍然保留也不被过分填充。IDW 插值应选择合适的搜索半径,搜索半径为原始点云间隔的1.5~2.5倍较为合适。【结论】IDW插值法优于 B-Spline,OK,TLI插值法,生成的 CHM 能较准确反映森林冠层的真实自然形态,有利于森林参数的提取。%Objective]According to the characteristics of the discrete point cloud in forest area,canopy height model ( CHM ) was built through different interpolation methods. The results of the different interpolation methods were compared,analyzed and evaluated in order to provide the reference for choice of interpolation methods. [Method]In this study,the discrete point cloud data in plots(30 m × 30 m) were used as the experimental data. CHMs were generated by B-Spline,triangulation with linear interpolation ( TLI

  18. Inclusion of an ultraviolet radiation transfer component in an urban forest effects model for predicting tree influences on potential below-canopy exposure to UVB radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon M. Heisler; Richard H. Grant; David J. Nowak; Wei Gao; Daniel E. Crane; Jeffery T. Walton

    2003-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVB) on urban populations would be enhanced by improved predictions of the UVB radiation at the level of human activity. This paper reports the status of plans for incorporating a UVB prediction module into an existing Urban Forest Effects (UFORE) model. UFORE currently has modules to quantify urban forest structure,...

  19. Using ground penetrating radar to assess the variability of snow water equivalent and melt in a mixed canopy forest, Northern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Ryan W.

    2017-09-01

    Snow is an important environmental variable in headwater systems that controls hydrological processes such as streamflow, groundwater recharge, and evapotranspiration. These processes will be affected by both the amount of snow available for melt and the rate at which it melts. Snow water equivalent (SWE) and snowmelt are known to vary within complex subalpine terrain due to terrain and canopy influences. This study assesses this variability during the melt season using ground penetrating radar to survey multiple plots in northwestern Colorado near a snow telemetry (SNOTEL) station. The plots include south aspect and flat aspect slopes with open, coniferous (subalpine fir, Abies lasiocarpa and engelman spruce, Picea engelmanii), and deciduous (aspen, populous tremuooides) canopy cover. Results show the high variability for both SWE and loss of SWE during spring snowmelt in 2014. The coefficient of variation for SWE tended to increase with time during snowmelt whereas loss of SWE remained similar. Correlation lengths for SWE were between two and five meters with melt having correlation lengths between two and four meters. The SNOTEL station regularly measured higher SWE values relative to the survey plots but was able to reasonably capture the overall mean loss of SWE during melt. Ground Penetrating Radar methods can improve future investigations with the advantage of non-destructive sampling and the ability to estimate depth, density, and SWE.

  20. Gap formation in Danish beech (Fagus sylvatica) forests of low management intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Eva; Vesterdal, Lars

    2006-01-01

    WATBAL for one of the sites. Two forests were non-intervention forests (semi-natural and unmanaged), the third was subject to nature-based management. The study was intended to assess the range of effects of gap formation in forests of low management intensity. In the unmanaged and the nature......, measurements were carried out up to 29 months after gap formation. Average NO3-N concentrations in the gap were 19.3 mg NO3-N l(-1). Gap formation alone did not account for this high level, as concentrations were high also under closed canopy (average 12.4 mg NO3-N l(-1)). However, the gap had significantly....... In the semi-natural forest, advanced regeneration and lateral closure of the gap affected soil moisture levels in the gap in the last year of the study. Author Keywords: gaps; drainage fluxes; Fagus sylvatica L.; nitrate; soil moisture; soil solution; unmanaged forest ecosystems; WATBAL...

  1. Spatial variability of throughfall and raindrops under a single canopy with different canopy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanko, Kazuki; Onda, Yuichi; Ito, Akane; Moriwaki, Hiromu

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the spatial variability of throughfall amount, raindrops, and erosivity under a single canopy during calm meteorological conditions, indoor experiments were conducted using a 9.8-m-tall transplanted Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) and a large-scale rainfall simulator. Drop size distribution, drop velocity, and kinetic energy of throughfall varied spatially under a single canopy as did throughfall amount and rain rate. Compared with throughfall rain rate, the variability was similar in drop size distribution, lower in drop velocity, and higher in kinetic energy. The results suggest that the spatial distribution of throughfall amount was dominated by the canopy shape and position of branches inside the canopy, and thus the spatial distribution was correlated with the radial distance from the trunk. Throughfall amount and rate were lower at the midway point between the trunk and the canopy edge. Throughfall drop size indices (drop size distribution, drop velocity, and unit kinetic energy) varied spatially while did not differ significantly. On the other hand, time-specific throughfall kinetic energy was correlated with the radial distance from the trunk. The dependence the throughfall kinetic energy on the radial distance from the trunk was dominated by the spatial distribution of throughfall amount. The trend in the spatial distribution of throughfall revealed in this study will aid in modelling canopy water processes and in predicting soil erosion on the bare forest floor. The part of this study is published in Nanko et al. (2011, Agric. Forest. Meteorol. 151, 1173-1182).

  2. Eddy covariance fluxes of the NO-O3-NO2 triad above the forest canopy at the ATTO Site in the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokankunku, Anywhere; Wolff, Stefan; Sörgel, Matthias; Berger, Martina; Zelger, Michael; Dlugi, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen monoxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) (denoted together as NOx) determine the abundance of the tropospheric oxidants OH, O3 and NO3 that regulate atmospheric self-cleaning. The three reactive trace gases NO, NO2 and O3 undergo a series of interconnected photochemical reactions and are often referred to as the NO-O3-NO2 triad. Ozone deposition is mainly controlled by stomatal uptake, thus contributes to oxidative stress for the plants. Similarly, nitrogen dioxide from above or below the canopy is deposited to leaves through stomatal uptake. NO emissions from soils contribute to above canopy O3 formation and accelerate OH recycling. Therefore, quantification of the exchange fluxes of these species between the atmosphere and the biosphere are important for atmospheric chemistry and ecosystem research as well. The eddy covariance method is state of the art for direct measurements of ecosystem fluxes of trace gases. Eddy covariance measurements of NOx in pristine environments are rare because of lack of availability of instruments with the required precision to resolve concentrations characteristic of these environments. The Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) is located in a pristine rainforest environment in the Amazon basin about 150 km northeast of the city of Manaus. It is the ideal site for studying the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of the NO-O3-NO2 triad, being largely undisturbed by anthropogenic sources. During an intensive measurement campaign in November 2015 at the ATTO site, measurements of NO, NO2 and O3 were carried out at 42 m above ground level on the 80 m walk-up tower with a fast (5 Hz) and sensitive (< 30 ppt) instrument (CLD790SR2, Eco Physics) for NO and NO2 and with 10 Hz for O3 (Enviscope). Additionally, measurements of turbulent and micrometeorological parameters were conducted with a profile of 3-dimensional sonic anemometers and meteorological sensors for temperature, humidity and radiation. Vertical concentration profile

  3. Assessing the potential of Sun-Induced Fluorescence and the Canopy Scattering Coefficient to track large-scale vegetation dynamics in Amazon forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, P.; Guanter, L.; Kobayashi, H.; Walther, S.

    2016-12-01

    Two new remote sensing vegetation parameters derived from spaceborne spectrometers and simulated with a three dimensional radiative transfer model have been evaluated in terms of their prospects and drawbacks for the monitoring of dense vegetation canopies: (i) sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF), a unique signal emitted by photosynthetically active vegetation and (ii) the canopy scattering coefficient (CSC), a vegetation parameter derived along with the directional area scattering factor (DASF) and expected to be particularly sensitive to leaf optical properties. Here, we present the first global data set of DASF/CSC and examine the potential of CSC and SIF for providing complementary information on the controversially discussed vegetation seasonality in the Amazon rainforest. A comparison between near-infrared SIF derived from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) instrument and the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) (overpass time in the morning and noon, respectively) reveals the response of SIF to instantaneous photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the response of SIF to changing pigment concentrations ('green-up'). The observed seasonality of SIF largely depends on the satellite overpass time which is due to changing temporal trajectories of (instantaneous) PAR with daytime. Therefore, GOME-2 SIF reaches its seasonal maximum in October and around February, while OCO-2 SIF peaks in February and November. We further examine anisotropic reflectance characteristics with the finding that the hot spot effect significantly impacts observed GOME-2 SIF values. On the contrary, our sensitivity analysis suggests that CSC is highly independent of sun-sensor geometry as well as atmospheric effects. The slight annual variability of CSC shows a seasonal cycle attributable to variations in leaf area and/or the amount of precipitation, rather supporting the 'green-up' hypothesis for periods of less intense precipitation.

  4. Moose (Alces alces) reacts to high summer temperatures by utilizing thermal shelters in boreal forests - an analysis based on airborne laser scanning of the canopy structure at moose locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Markus; Matala, Juho; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Tiilikainen, Raisa; Tikkanen, Olli-Pekka; Maltamo, Matti; Pusenius, Jyrki; Packalen, Petteri

    2014-04-01

    The adaptation of different species to warming temperatures has been increasingly studied. Moose (Alces alces) is the largest of the ungulate species occupying the northern latitudes across the globe, and in Finland it is the most important game species. It is very well adapted to severe cold temperatures, but has a relatively low tolerance to warm temperatures. Previous studies have documented changes in habitat use by moose due to high temperatures. In many of these studies, the used areas have been classified according to how much thermal cover they were assumed to offer based on satellite/aerial imagery data. Here, we identified the vegetation structure in the areas used by moose under different thermal conditions. For this purpose, we used airborne laser scanning (ALS) data extracted from the locations of GPS-collared moose. This provided us with detailed information about the relationships between moose and the structure of forests it uses in different thermal conditions and we were therefore able to determine and differentiate between the canopy structures at locations occupied by moose during different thermal conditions. We also discovered a threshold beyond which moose behaviour began to change significantly: as day temperatures began to reach 20 °C and higher, the search for areas with higher and denser canopies during daytime became evident. The difference was clear when compared to habitat use at lower temperatures, and was so strong that it provides supporting evidence to previous studies, suggesting that moose are able to modify their behaviour to cope with high temperatures, but also that the species is likely to be affected by warming climate.

  5. California spotted owls: Chapter 5 in Managing Sierra Nevada forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Suzanne C.; Brooks, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) are habitat specialists that are strongly associated with late-successional forests. For nesting and roosting, they require large trees and snags embedded in a stand with a complex forest structure (Blakesley et al. 2005, Gutiérrez et al. 1992, Verner et al. 1992b). In mixedconifer forests of the Sierra Nevada, California spotted owls typically nest and roost in stands with high canopy closure (≥75 percent) [Note: when citing studies, we use terminology consistent with Jennings et al. (1999), however, not all studies properly distinguish between canopy cover and closure and often use the terms interchangeably (see chapter 14 for clarification)] and an abundance of large trees (>24 in (60 cm) diameter at breast height [d.b.h.]) (Bias and Gutiérrez 1992, Gutiérrez et al. 1992, LaHaye et al. 1997, Moen and Gutiérrez 1997, Verner et al. 1992a). The California spotted owl guidelines (Verner et al. 1992b) effectively summarized much of the information about nesting and roosting habitat. Since that report, research on the California spotted owl has continued with much of the new information concentrated in five areas: population trends, barred owl (Strix varia) invasion, climate effects, foraging habitat, and owl response to fire.

  6. Improved snowmelt simulations with a canopy model forced with photo-derived direct beam canopy transmissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, Keith N.; Molotch, Noah P.; Margulis, Steven A.; Lehning, Michael; Gustafsson, David

    2012-10-01

    The predictive capacity of a physically based snow model to simulate point-scale, subcanopy snowmelt dynamics is evaluated in a mixed conifer forest, southern Sierra Nevada, California. Three model scenarios each providing varying levels of canopy structure detail were tested. Simulations of three water years initialized at locations of 24 ultrasonic snow depth sensors were evaluated against observations of snow water equivalent (SWE), snow disappearance date, and volumetric soil water content. When canopy model parameters canopy openness and effective leaf area index were obtained from satellite and literature-based sources, respectively, the model was unable to resolve the variable subcanopy snowmelt dynamics. When canopy parameters were obtained from hemispherical photos, the improvements were not statistically significant. However, when the model was modified to accept photo-derived time-varying direct beam canopy transmissivity, the error in the snow disappearance date was reduced by as much as one week and positive and negative biases in melt-season SWE and snow cover duration were significantly reduced. Errors in the timing of soil meltwater fluxes were reduced by 11 days on average. The optimum aggregated temporal model resolution of direct beam canopy transmissivity was determined to be 30 min; hourly averages performed no better than the bulk canopy scenarios and finer time steps did not increase overall model accuracy. The improvements illustrate the important contribution of direct shortwave radiation to subcanopy snowmelt and confirm the known nonlinear melt behavior of snow cover.

  7. Spatio-temporal variations of CO2 concentration within the canopy in a temperate deciduous forest,Northeast China%温带落叶阔叶林冠层CO2浓度的时空变异

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦振; 王传宽; 王兴昌

    2011-01-01

    E) in 2007. [CO2] at each level was measured with a LI-COR LI-840 infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) by drawing it from each level with a sample pump through tubes of equal length. The IRGA was controlled and data were collected with a datalogger. Automatic calibration was done for the IRGA once a day. A Vaisala GMP343 was installed at 36.0 m to monitor ambient [CO2] for quality control of the [CO2] profile data. We simultaneously measured micrometeorological variables, including wind speed, air temperature, relative humidity, photosynthetically active radiation, vapor pressure, soil temperature and water content.Important findings At a daily scale, maximum [CO2] occurred at night or sun rise, while the minimum occurred in the afternoon at all levels. This pattern was predominant in the summer. The diurnal course of the [CO2] was "V"-shaped in winter but "U"-shaped in other seasons. [CO2] decreased with increasing height, particularly on summer nights. During the daytime of summer, daily mean [CO2] within the canopy was substantially lower than the ambient [CO2], suggesting that the vegetation acted as a CO2 sink due to its photosynthesis. Daily mean [CO2] above the canopy peaked in spring and autumn and reached a minimum in summer, while that near the forest floor showed a unimodal seasonal pattern with its maximum in summer. The diurnal dynamics of [CO2] and their vertical gradients during the growing season were jointly controlled by the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and forest carbon metabolism, while those during the dormant season were controlled mainly by ABL. The seasonal dynamics of the [CO2] near the forest floor were determined mainly by soil respiration, while those above the canopy were jointly controlled by canopy photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration.

  8. Estimation of Moisture Content of Forest Canopy and Floor from SAR Data Part II: Trunk-Ground Double-Bounce Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, M.; Saatchi, S.

    1996-01-01

    Several scattering mechanisms contribute to the total radar backscatter cross section measured by the synthetic aperture radar. These are volume scattering, trunk-ground double-bounce scattering, branch-ground double-bounce scattering, and surface scattering. All of these mechanisms are directly related to the dielectric constant of forest components responsible for that mechanism and their moisture.

  9. Non-timber forest products enterprises in the south: perceived distribution and implications for sustainable forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.L. Chamberlain; M. Predny

    2003-01-01

    Forests of the southern United States are the source of a great diversity of flora, much of which is gathered to produce non-timber forest products (NTFPs). These products are made from resources that grow under the forest canopy as trees, herbs, shrubs, vines, moss and even lichen. They occur naturally in forests or may be cultivated under the forest canopy or in...

  10. Use of Airborne LiDAR To Estimate Forest Stand Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Li, Chang

    2014-03-01

    Small-Footprint Airborne LiDAR(light detection and ranging) remote sensing is a breakthrough technology for deriving forest canopy structural characteristics. Because the technique is relatively new as applied to canopy measurement in China, there is a tremendous need for experiments that integrate field work, LiDAR remote sensing and subsequent analyses for retrieving the full complement of structural measures critical for forestry applications. Data storage capacity and high processing speed available today have made it possible to digitally sample and store the entire reflected waveform, instead of only extracting the discrete coordinates which form the so-called point clouds. Return waveforms can give more detailed insights into the vertical structure of surface objects, surface slope, roughness and reflectivity than the conventional echoes. In this paper, an improved Expectation Maximum (EM) algorithm is adopted to decompose raw waveform data. Derived forest biophysical parameters, such as vegetation height, subcanopy topography, crown volume, ground reflectivity, vegetation reflectivity and canopy closure, are able to describe the horizontal and vertical forest canopy structure.

  11. Extended leaf phenology and the autumn niche in deciduous forest invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridley, Jason D

    2012-05-17

    The phenology of growth in temperate deciduous forests, including the timing of leaf emergence and senescence, has strong control over ecosystem properties such as productivity and nutrient cycling, and has an important role in the carbon economy of understory plants. Extended leaf phenology, whereby understory species assimilate carbon in early spring before canopy closure or in late autumn after canopy fall, has been identified as a key feature of many forest species invasions, but it remains unclear whether there are systematic differences in the growth phenology of native and invasive forest species or whether invaders are more responsive to warming trends that have lengthened the duration of spring or autumn growth. Here, in a 3-year monitoring study of 43 native and 30 non-native shrub and liana species common to deciduous forests in the eastern United States, I show that extended autumn leaf phenology is a common attribute of eastern US forest invasions, where non-native species are extending the autumn growing season by an average of 4 weeks compared with natives. In contrast, there was no consistent evidence that non-natives as a group show earlier spring growth phenology, and non-natives were not better able to track interannual variation in spring temperatures. Seasonal leaf production and photosynthetic data suggest that most non-native species capture a significant proportion of their annual carbon assimilate after canopy leaf fall, a behaviour that was virtually absent in natives and consistent across five phylogenetic groups. Pronounced differences in how native and non-native understory species use pre- and post-canopy environments suggest eastern US invaders are driving a seasonal redistribution of forest productivity that may rival climate change in its impact on forest processes.

  12. Vulnerability and Resilience of Temperate Forest Landscapes to Broad-Scale Deforestation in Response to Changing Fire Regimes and Altered Post-Fire Vegetation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepley, A. J.; Veblen, T. T.; Perry, G.; Anderson-Teixeira, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    In the face of on-going climatic warming and land-use change, there is growing concern that temperate forest landscapes could be near a tipping point where relatively small changes to the fire regime or altered post-fire vegetation dynamics could lead to extensive conversion to shrublands or savannas. To evaluate vulnerability and resilience to such conversion, we develop a simple model based on three factors we hypothesize to be key in predicting temperate forest responses to changing fire regimes: (1) the hazard rate (i.e., the probability of burning in the next year given the time since the last fire) in closed-canopy forests, (2) the hazard rate for recently-burned, open-canopy vegetation, and (3) the time to redevelop canopy closure following fire. We generate a response surface representing the proportions of the landscape potentially supporting closed-canopy forest and non-forest vegetation under nearly all combinations of these three factors. We then place real landscapes on this response surface to assess the type and magnitude of changes to the fire regime that would drive extensive forest loss. We show that the deforestation of much of New Zealand that followed initial human colonization and the introduction of a new ignition source ca. 750 years ago was essentially inevitable due to the slow rate of forest recovery after fire and the high flammability of post-fire vegetation. In North America's Pacific Northwest, by contrast, a predominantly forested landscape persisted despite two periods of widespread burning in the recent past due in large part to faster post-fire forest recovery and less pronounced differences in flammability between forests and the post-fire vegetation. We also assess the factors that could drive extensive deforestation in other regions to identify where management could reduce this potential and to guide field and modeling work to better understand the responses and ecological feedbacks to changing fire regimes.

  13. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Canopy Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Charest, Martin; Sy, Mikailou

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves. This data set contains canopy biochemistry data collected in 1994 in the NSA at the YJP, OJR, OBS, UBS, and OA sites, including biochemistry lignin, nitrogen, cellulose, starch, and fiber concentrations. These data were collected to study the spatial and temporal changes in the canopy biochemistry of boreal forest cover types and how a high-resolution radiative transfer model in the mid-infrared could be applied in an effort to obtain better estimates of canopy biochemical properties using remote sensing. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  14. Tree canopy cover and natural regeneration into strictly-protected forest areas: the MaB reserve of Montedimezzo (Isernia,Italy).

    OpenAIRE

    Tessa Giannini; Andrea Cutini; Orazio Gugliotta; Maria Chiara Manetti

    2010-01-01

    The ecological analysis and the analysis of mechanisms underlying the natural regeneration process into strictly protected forest areas, is basic to the understanding of ecosystem functioning and to estimate the recovery ability as a function of time and environmental changes. Aim of the paper is to analyze the spatial-temporal dynamics of tree species regeneration into mixed Turkey oak-common beech stands growing undisturbed since more than one half- century. The ability of first establishme...

  15. Biomassa da rebrota de copas de pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke em plantios sob sombra parcial em floresta primária Canopy sprouting biomass of rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke in an Amazonian terra firme forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo de Tarso Barbosa Sampaio

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo propõe uma nova metodologia de exploração do pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke em substituição ao método tradicional, predatório, de corte raso. Avaliando-se a biomassa da rebrota