WorldWideScience

Sample records for force microscopic observation

  1. Low temperature behavior of magnetic domains observed using a magnetic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, S. H.; Shinde, S. R.; Ogale, S. B.; Venkatesan, T.; Greene, R. L.; Dreyer, M.; Gomez, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    A commercial atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope (MFM) was modified to cool magnetic samples down to around 100 K under a high vacuum while maintaining its routine imaging functionality. MFM images of a 120 nm thick La 0.7 Ca 0.3 MnO 3 film on a LaAlO 3 substrate at low temperature show the paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic phase transition. Evolution of magnetic domains and magnetic ripples with decreasing temperature are also observed near the edge of a 20 nm thick patterned Co film on a Si substrate. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  2. Observation of ferromagnetic resonance in a microscopic sample using magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Hammel, P.C.; Wigen, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    We report the observation of a ferromagnetic resonance signal arising from a microscopic (∼20μmx40μm) particle of thin (3μm) yttrium iron garnet film using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). The large signal intensity in the resonance spectra suggests that MRFM could become a powerful microscopic ferromagnetic resonance technique with a micron or sub-micron resolution. We also observe a very strong nonresonance signal which occurs in the field regime where the sample magnetization readily reorients in response to the modulation of the magnetic field. This signal will be the main noise source in applications where a magnet is mounted on the cantilever. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  3. Atomic force microscope observation of branching in single transcript molecules derived from human cardiac muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Jason; Hsueh, Carlin; Gimzewski, James K; Mishra, Bud

    2008-01-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to examine a clinically derived sample of single-molecule gene transcripts, in the form of double-stranded cDNA, (c: complementary) obtained from human cardiac muscle without the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We observed a log-normal distribution of transcript sizes, with most molecules being in the range of 0.4-7.0 kilobase pairs (kb) or 130-2300 nm in contour length, in accordance with the expected distribution of mRNA (m: messenger) sizes in mammalian cells. We observed novel branching structures not previously known to exist in cDNA, and which could have profound negative effects on traditional analysis of cDNA samples through cloning, PCR and DNA sequencing

  4. Observations of fission-tracks in zircons by atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohishi, Shinnosuke; Hasebe, Noriko

    2012-01-01

    The fission-track (FT) method is a dating technique based on the observation of damage (tracks) by spontaneous fission of 238 U left in a mineral. The date is calculated from the track density and the uranium concentration in the mineral. This is possible because the number of tracks is a function of uranium concentration and time since the start of track accumulation. Usually, the number of tracks is counted under an optical microscope after etching (chemical expansion of a track). However, as FT density per unit area rises, it becomes difficult to count the number of tracks. This is due to the fact that FTs overlap one another and are unable to be readily distinguished. This research examines the potential of atomic force microscope (AFM) for FT dating using zircons, which are likely to show higher FT density than other minerals due to their high U concentrations. To obtain an AFM image for a sample prepared for FT dating, removing the static electricity of the sample is essential to avoid an unexpected movement of the cantilever. A grain should be wider than about 30 μm to bring the cantilever on the mineral surface. Polishing with a fine grained compound is very important. There is not much difference in sharpness between images by AC mode (scanning with vibrating cantilever at a constant cycle) and Contact mode (scanning with the cantilever always in close contact with the surface). To confirm how tracks can be identified with the AFM, an AFM image was compared with an image obtained with the optical microscope. When change in the number of tracks and their shapes were observed through stepwise etching, the track expanded as the etching time increased. In addition, the etching rate was slower for large tracks than those for small tracks. This implied that the AFM can be used to observe etching of zircons with different degrees of nuclear fission damage. A track that could not be seen with the optical microscope due to insufficient etching could be observed by

  5. Serum induced degradation of 3D DNA box origami observed by high speed atomic force microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Zaixing; Zhang, Shuai; Yang, Chuanxu

    2015-01-01

    3D DNA origami holds tremendous potential to encapsulate and selectively release therapeutic drugs. Observations of real-time performance of 3D DNA origami structures in physiological environment will contribute much to its further applications. Here, we investigate the degradation kinetics of 3D...... DNA box origami in serum using high-speed atomic force microscope optimized for imaging 3D DNA origami in real time. The time resolution allows characterizing the stages of serum effects on individual 3D DNA box origami with nanometer resolution. Our results indicate that the whole digest process...... is a combination of a rapid collapse phase and a slow degradation phase. The damages of box origami mainly happen in the collapse phase. Thus, the structure stability of 3D DNA box origami should be further improved, especially in the collapse phase, before clinical applications...

  6. In-Situ atomic force microscopic observation of ion beam bombarded plant cell envelopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Yu, L.D.; Brown, I.G.; Seprom, C.; Vilaithong, T.

    2007-01-01

    A program in ion beam bioengineering has been established at Chiang Mai University (CMU), Thailand, and ion beam induced transfer of plasmid DNA molecules into bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) has been demonstrated. However, a good understanding of the fundamental physical processes involved is lacking. In parallel work, onion skin cells have been bombarded with Ar + ions at energy 25 keV and fluence1-2 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 , revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures on the cell wall that could serve as channels for the transfer of large macromolecules into the cell interior. An in-situ atomic force microscope (AFM) system has been designed and installed in the CMU bio-implantation facility as a tool for the observation of these microcraters during ion beam bombardment. Here we describe some of the features of the in-situ AFM and outline some of the related work

  7. Direct observation of phase transition of GeSbTe thin films by Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Fei [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials Sciences and Technology, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu Ling, E-mail: xuling@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials Sciences and Technology, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang Rui; Geng Lei; Tong Liang; Xu Jun [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials Sciences and Technology, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Su Weining; Yu Yao [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ma Zhongyuan; Chen Kunji [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials Sciences and Technology, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Graphical abstract: Nano-sized marks on GST thin film were fabricated using Conductive-AFM (Atomic Force Microscope). The AFM morphology images show that the marks are ablated at the center and a raised ring surrounding it. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure of GeSbTe thin films was characterized by XRD and AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Annealing and applying electrical field can induce crystallization on thin film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conductive-AFM was used to modify the surface of GeSbTe thin film. - Abstract: GeSbTe (GST) thin films were deposited on quartz substrates using electron beam evaporation system and then annealed in nitrogen atmosphere at different temperatures, ranging from 20 Degree-Sign C to 300 Degree-Sign C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force microscope (AFM) measurements were used to characterize the as-deposited and post-annealed thin films. Annealing treatment was found to induce changes on microstructure, surface roughness and grain size, indicating that with the increase of annealing temperature, the amorphous GST films first changed to face-centered-cubic (fcc) phase and then the stable hexagonal (hex) phase. Meanwhile, conductive-AFM (C-AFM) was used to produce crystallized GST dots on thin films. I-V spectroscopy results show that GST films can switch from amorphous state to crystalline state at threshold voltage. After switching, I-V curve exhibits ohmic characteristic, which is usually observed in crystallized GST films. By applying repeated I-V spectroscopies on the thin films, crystallized nuclei were observed. As the times of I-V spectroscopies increases, the area of written dots increases, and the center of the mark begin to ablate. The AFM images show that the shape of marks is an ablated center with a raised ring surrounding it.

  8. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  9. Differential magnetic force microscope imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Zuobin; Liu, Jinyun; Hou, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging based on a two-pass scanning procedure to extract differential magnetic forces and eliminate or significantly reduce background forces with reversed tip magnetization. In the work, the difference of two scanned images with reversed tip magnetization was used to express the local magnetic forces. The magnetic sample was first scanned with a low lift distance between the MFM tip and the sample surface, and the magnetization direction of the probe was then changed after the first scan to perform the second scan. The differential magnetic force image was obtained through the subtraction of the two images from the two scans. The theoretical and experimental results have shown that the proposed method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging is able to reduce the effect of background or environment interference forces, and offers an improved image contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Photon scanning tunneling microscope in combination with a force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Tack, R.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1994-01-01

    The simultaneous operation of a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an atomic force microscope is presented. The use of standard atomic force silicon nitride cantilevers as near-field optical probes offers the possibility to combine the two methods. Vertical forces and torsion are detected

  11. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  12. Observation of linear I-V curves on vertical GaAs nanowires with atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geydt, P.; Alekseev, P. A.; Dunaevskiy, M.; Lähderanta, E.; Haggrén, T.; Kakko, J.-P.; Lipsanen, H.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate the possibility of studying the current-voltage characteristics for single vertically standing semiconductor nanowires on standard AFM equipped by current measuring module in PeakForce Tapping mode. On the basis of research of eight different samples of p-doped GaAs nanowires grown on different GaAs substrates, peculiar electrical effects were revealed. It was found how covering of substrate surface by SiOx layer increases the current, as well as phosphorous passivation of the grown nanowires. Elimination of the Schottky barrier between golden cap and the top parts of nanowires was observed. It was additionally studied that charge accumulation on the shell of single nanowires affects its resistivity and causes the hysteresis loops on I-V curves.

  13. Atomic force microscope with integrated optical microscope for biological applications

    OpenAIRE

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Putman, C.A.J.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    Since atomic force microscopy (AFM) is capable of imaging nonconducting surfaces, the technique holds great promises for high‐resolution imaging of biological specimens. A disadvantage of most AFMs is the fact that the relatively large sample surface has to be scanned multiple times to pinpoint a specific biological object of interest. Here an AFM is presented which has an incorporated inverted optical microscope. The optical image from the optical microscope is not obscured by the cantilever...

  14. Atomic force microscope featuring an integrated optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to image the surface of both conductors and nonconductors. Biological specimens constitute a large group of nonconductors. A disadvantage of most AFM's is the fact that relatively large areas of the sample surface have to be scanned to pinpoint a biological

  15. Measuring Forces between Oxide Surfaces Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Høj, Jakob Weiland

    1996-01-01

    The interactions between colloidal particles play a major role in processing of ceramics, especially in casting processes. With the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) it is possible to measure the inter-action force between a small oxide particle (a few micron) and a surface as function of surface...

  16. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  17. System modelling of a lateral force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michal, Guillaume; Lu, Cheng; Kiet Tieu, A

    2008-01-01

    To quantitatively analyse lateral force microscope measurements one needs to develop a model able to relate the photodiode signal to the force acting on the tip apex. In this paper we focus on the modelling of the interaction between the cantilever and the optical chain. The laser beam is discretized by a set of rays which propagates in the system. The analytical equation of a single ray's position on the optical sensor is presented as a function of the reflection's state on top of the cantilever. We use a finite element analysis on the cantilever to connect the optical model with the force acting on the tip apex. A first-order approximation of the constitutive equations are derived along with a definition of the system's crosstalk. Finally, the model is used to analytically simulate the 'wedge method' in the presence of crosstalk in 2D. The analysis shows how the torsion loop and torsion offset signals are affected by the crosstalk.

  18. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  19. Chromosome structure investigated with the atomic force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grooth, B.G.; Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.; van der Werf, Kees; van Hulst, N.F.; van Oort, G.; van Oort, Geeske; Greve, Jan; Manne, Srinivas

    1992-01-01

    We have developed an atomic force microscope (AFM) with an integrated optical microscope. The optical microscope consists of an inverted epi-illumination system that yields images in reflection or fluorescence of the sample. With this system it is possible to quickly locate an object of interest. A

  20. Atomic force microscope with integrated optical microscope for biological applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Putman, C.A.J.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    Since atomic force microscopy (AFM) is capable of imaging nonconducting surfaces, the technique holds great promises for high‐resolution imaging of biological specimens. A disadvantage of most AFMs is the fact that the relatively large sample surface has to be scanned multiple times to pinpoint a

  1. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2014-01-01

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10−100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed

  2. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E., E-mail: Tilman.Schaeffer@uni-tuebingen [Institute of Applied Physics and LISA, University of Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10−100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed.

  3. PC-based digital feedback control for scanning force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Ashhar Khalid

    2002-01-01

    In the past, most digital feedback implementation for scanned-probe microscope were based on a digital signal processor (DSP). At present DSP plug-in card with the input-output interface module is still expensive compared to a fast pentium PC motherboard. For a magnetic force microscope (MFM) digital feedback has an advantage where the magnetic signal can be easily separated from the topographic signal. In this paper, a simple low-cost PC-based digital feedback and imaging system for Scanning Force Microscope (SFM) is presented. (Author)

  4. Observation of Switchable Photoresponse of a Monolayer WSe2-MoS2 Lateral Heterostructure via Photocurrent Spectral Atomic Force Microscopic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Youngwoo; Li, Ming-Yang; Cheng, Chia-Chin; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Liu, Pingwei; Wang, Qing Hua; Li, Lain-Jong; Strano, Michael S

    2016-06-08

    In the pursuit of two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene, enormous advances have been made in exploring the exciting and useful properties of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as a permanent band gap in the visible range and the transition from indirect to direct band gap due to 2D quantum confinement, and their potential for a wide range of device applications. In particular, recent success in the synthesis of seamless monolayer lateral heterostructures of different TMDCs via chemical vapor deposition methods has provided an effective solution to producing an in-plane p-n junction, which is a critical component in electronic and optoelectronic device applications. However, spatial variation of the electronic and optoelectonic properties of the synthesized heterojunction crystals throughout the homogeneous as well as the lateral junction region and the charge carrier transport behavior at their nanoscale junctions with metals remain unaddressed. In this work, we use photocurrent spectral atomic force microscopy to image the current and photocurrent generated between a biased PtIr tip and a monolayer WSe2-MoS2 lateral heterostructure. Current measurements in the dark in both forward and reverse bias reveal an opposite characteristic diode behavior for WSe2 and MoS2, owing to the formation of a Schottky barrier of dissimilar properties. Notably, by changing the polarity and magnitude of the tip voltage applied, pixels that show the photoresponse of the heterostructure are observed to be selectively switched on and off, allowing for the realization of a hyper-resolution array of the switchable photodiode pixels. This experimental approach has significant implications toward the development of novel optoelectronic technologies for regioselective photodetection and imaging at nanoscale resolutions. Comparative 2D Fourier analysis of physical height and current images shows high spatial frequency variations in substrate/MoS2 (or WSe2) contact that

  5. Observation of Switchable Photoresponse of a Monolayer WSe 2 –MoS 2 Lateral Heterostructure via Photocurrent Spectral Atomic Force Microscopic Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Son, Youngwoo

    2016-04-27

    In the pursuit of two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene, enormous advances have been made in exploring the exciting and useful properties of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as a permanent band gap in the visible range and the transition from indirect to direct band gap due to 2D quantum confinement, and their potential for a wide range of device applications. In particular, recent success in the synthesis of seamless monolayer lateral heterostructures of different TMDCs via chemical vapor deposition methods has provided an effective solution to producing an in-plane p-n junction, which is a critical component in electronic and optoelectronic device applications. However, spatial variation of the electronic and optoelectonic properties of the synthesized heterojunction crystals throughout the homogeneous as well as the lateral junction region and the charge carrier transport behavior at their nanoscale junctions with metals remain unaddressed. In this work, we use photocurrent spectral atomic force microscopy to image the current and photocurrent generated between a biased PtIr tip and a monolayer WSe2-MoS2 lateral heterostructure. Current measurements in the dark in both forward and reverse bias reveal an opposite characteristic diode behavior for WSe2 and MoS2, owing to the formation of a Schottky barrier of dissimilar properties. Notably, by changing the polarity and magnitude of the tip voltage applied, pixels that show the photoresponse of the heterostructure are observed to be selectively switched on and off, allowing for the realization of a hyper-resolution array of the switchable photodiode pixels. This experimental approach has significant implications toward the development of novel optoelectronic technologies for regioselective photodetection and imaging at nanoscale resolutions. Comparative 2D Fourier analysis of physical height and current images shows high spatial frequency variations in substrate/MoS2 (or WSe2) contact that

  6. Observation of Switchable Photoresponse of a Monolayer WSe 2 –MoS 2 Lateral Heterostructure via Photocurrent Spectral Atomic Force Microscopic Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Son, Youngwoo; Li, Ming-yang; Cheng, Chia-Chin; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Liu, Pingwei; Wang, Qing Hua; Li, Lain-Jong; Strano, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    spectral atomic force microscopy to image the current and photocurrent generated between a biased PtIr tip and a monolayer WSe2-MoS2 lateral heterostructure. Current measurements in the dark in both forward and reverse bias reveal an opposite characteristic

  7. Large Scale Scanning Probe Microscope "Making Shear Force Scanning visible."

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, E.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; van der Veen, Jan T.; van der Veen, J.T.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Wessel, I.M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a demonstration of a scanning probe microscope with shear-force tuning fork feedback. The tuning fork is several centimeters long, and the rigid fiber is replaced by a toothpick. By scaling this demonstration to visible dimensions the accessibility of shear-force scanning and tuning fork

  8. Mechanochemistry Induced Using Force Exerted by a Functionalized Microscope Tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Yongfeng; Lü, Jing-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Atomic-scale mechanochemistry is realized from force exerted by a C60 -functionalized scanning tunneling microscope tip. Two conformers of tin phthalocyanine can be prepared on coinage-metal surfaces. A transition between these conformers is induced on Cu(111) and Ag(100). Density...

  9. Atomic force microscope characterization of a resonating nanocantilever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abadal, G.; Davis, Zachary James; Borrise, X.

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) is used as a nanometer-scale resolution tool for the characterization of the electromechanical behaviour of a resonant cantilever-based mass sensor. The cantilever is actuated electrostatically by applying DC and AC voltages from a driver electrode placed closely...

  10. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan Wagner; Robert Moon; Jon Pratt; Gordon Shaw; Arvind Raman

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale...

  11. Stitching Grid-wise Atomic Force Microscope Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mathias Zacho; Bengtson, Stefan Hein; Pedersen, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are able to capture images with a resolution in the nano metre scale. Due to this high resolution, the covered area per image is relatively small, which can be problematic when surveying a sample. A system able to stitch AFM images has been developed to solve this p...

  12. Scratch direction and threshold force in nanoscale scratching using atomic force microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Ampere A., E-mail: ampere.tseng@asu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Chung-Feng Jeffrey; Jou, Shyankay [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Nishimura, Shinya; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2011-09-01

    The nanoscaled tip in an AFM (atomic force microscope) has become an effective scratching tool for material removing in nanofabrication. In this article, the characteristics of using a diamond-coated pyramidal tip to scratch Ni-Fe thin film surfaces was experimentally investigated with the focus on the evaluation of the influence of the scratch or scan direction on the final shape of the scratched geometry as well as the applied scratch force. Results indicated that both the scratched profile and the scratch force were greatly affected by the scratch direction. It has been found that, to minimize the formation of protuberances along the groove sides and to have a better control of the scratched geometry, the tip face should be perpendicular to the scratching direction, which is also known as orthogonal cutting condition. To demonstrate the present findings, three groove patterns have been scratched with the tip face perpendicular to the scratching direction and very little amount of protuberances was observed. The threshold scratch force was also predicted based on the Hertz contact theory. Without considering the surface friction and adhesive forces between the tip and substrate, the threshold force predicted was twice smaller than the measurement value. Finally, recommendations for technical improvement and research focuses are provided.

  13. Scratch direction and threshold force in nanoscale scratching using atomic force microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Ampere A.; Kuo, Chung-Feng Jeffrey; Jou, Shyankay; Nishimura, Shinya; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi

    2011-01-01

    The nanoscaled tip in an AFM (atomic force microscope) has become an effective scratching tool for material removing in nanofabrication. In this article, the characteristics of using a diamond-coated pyramidal tip to scratch Ni-Fe thin film surfaces was experimentally investigated with the focus on the evaluation of the influence of the scratch or scan direction on the final shape of the scratched geometry as well as the applied scratch force. Results indicated that both the scratched profile and the scratch force were greatly affected by the scratch direction. It has been found that, to minimize the formation of protuberances along the groove sides and to have a better control of the scratched geometry, the tip face should be perpendicular to the scratching direction, which is also known as orthogonal cutting condition. To demonstrate the present findings, three groove patterns have been scratched with the tip face perpendicular to the scratching direction and very little amount of protuberances was observed. The threshold scratch force was also predicted based on the Hertz contact theory. Without considering the surface friction and adhesive forces between the tip and substrate, the threshold force predicted was twice smaller than the measurement value. Finally, recommendations for technical improvement and research focuses are provided.

  14. Lorentz force actuation of a heated atomic force microscope cantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Prater, Craig B; King, William P

    2012-02-10

    We report Lorentz force-induced actuation of a silicon microcantilever having an integrated resistive heater. Oscillating current through the cantilever interacts with the magnetic field around a NdFeB permanent magnet and induces a Lorentz force that deflects the cantilever. The same current induces cantilever heating. With AC currents as low as 0.2 mA, the cantilever can be oscillated as much as 80 nm at resonance with a DC temperature rise of less than 5 °C. By comparison, the AC temperature variation leads to a thermomechanical oscillation that is about 1000 times smaller than the Lorentz deflection at the cantilever resonance. The cantilever position in the nonuniform magnetic field affects the Lorentz force-induced deflection, with the magnetic field parallel to the cantilever having the largest effect on cantilever actuation. We demonstrate how the cantilever actuation can be used for imaging, and for measuring the local material softening temperature by sensing the contact resonance shift.

  15. Force Measurement with a Piezoelectric Cantilever in a Scanning Force Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Tansock, J.; Williams, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Detection of surface forces between a tip and sample has been demonstrated with a piezoelectric cantilever in a scanning force microscope (SFM). The use of piezoelectric force sensing is particularly advantageous in semiconductor applications where stray light from conventional optical force-sensing methods can significantly modify the local carrier density. Additionally, the piezoelectric sensors are simple, provide good sensitivity to force, and can be batch fabricated. Our piezoelectric fo...

  16. Manipulation and soldering of carbon nanotubes using atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwase, Yuta; Ikeda, Takayuki; Oya, Takahide; Ogino, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    Manipulation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by an atomic force microscope (AFM) and soldering of CNTs using Fe oxide nanoparticles are described. We succeeded to separate a CNT bundle into two CNTs or CNT bundles, to move the separated CNT to a desirable position, and to bind it to another bundle. For the accurate manipulation, load of the AFM cantilever and frequency of the scan were carefully selected. We soldered two CNTs using an Fe oxide nanoparticle prepared from a ferritin molecule. The adhesion forces between the soldered CNTs were examined by an AFM and it was found that the CNTs were bound, though the binding force was not strong

  17. Resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Cantrell, Sean A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope and methodology called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features.

  18. US Air Force Base Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly observations taken by U.S. Air Force personnel at bases in the United States and around the world. Foreign observations concentrated in the Middle East and...

  19. A quadruple-scanning-probe force microscope for electrical property measurements of microscopic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Seiji; Kubo, Osamu; Kuramochi, Hiromi; Aono, Masakazu; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2011-01-01

    Four-terminal electrical measurement is realized on a microscopic structure in air, without a lithographic process, using a home-built quadruple-scanning-probe force microscope (QSPFM). The QSPFM has four probes whose positions are individually controlled by obtaining images of a sample in the manner of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and uses the probes as contacting electrodes for electrical measurements. A specially arranged tuning fork probe (TFP) is used as a self-detection force sensor to operate each probe in a frequency modulation AFM mode, resulting in simultaneous imaging of the same microscopic feature on an insulator using the four TFPs. Four-terminal electrical measurement is then demonstrated in air by placing each probe electrode in contact with a graphene flake exfoliated on a silicon dioxide film, and the sheet resistance of the flake is measured by the van der Pauw method. The present work shows that the QSPFM has the potential to measure the intrinsic electrical properties of a wide range of microscopic materials in situ without electrode fabrication.

  20. Harmonic and power balance tools for tapping-mode atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, A.; Salapaka, M. V.; Chen, D. J.; Cleveland, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool for investigating surfaces at atomic scales. Harmonic balance and power balance techniques are introduced to analyze the tapping-mode dynamics of the atomic force microscope. The harmonic balance perspective explains observations hitherto unexplained in the AFM literature. A nonconservative model for the cantilever - sample interaction is developed. The energy dissipation in the sample is studied and the resulting power balance equations combined with the harmonic balance equations are used to estimate the model parameters. Experimental results confirm that the harmonic and power balance tools can be used effectively to predict the behavior of the tapping cantilever. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  1. Quantitative comparison of two independent lateral force calibration techniques for the atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkley, Sarice S.; Cannara, Rachel J.; Deng Zhao; Gates, Richard S.; Reitsma, Mark G.

    2012-01-01

    Two independent lateral-force calibration methods for the atomic force microscope (AFM)--the hammerhead (HH) technique and the diamagnetic lateral force calibrator (D-LFC)--are systematically compared and found to agree to within 5% or less, but with precision limited to about 15%, using four different tee-shaped HH reference probes. The limitations of each method, both of which offer independent yet feasible paths toward traceable accuracy, are discussed and investigated. We find that stiff cantilevers may produce inconsistent D-LFC values through the application of excessively high normal loads. In addition, D-LFC results vary when the method is implemented using different modes of AFM feedback control, constant height and constant force modes, where the latter is more consistent with the HH method and closer to typical experimental conditions. Specifically, for the D-LFC apparatus used here, calibration in constant height mode introduced errors up to 14 %. In constant force mode using a relatively stiff cantilever, we observed an ≅ 4 % systematic error per μN of applied load for loads ≤ 1 μN. The issue of excessive load typically emerges for cantilevers whose flexural spring constant is large compared with the normal spring constant of the D-LFC setup (such that relatively small cantilever flexural displacements produce relatively large loads). Overall, the HH method carries a larger uncertainty, which is dominated by uncertainty in measurement of the flexural spring constant of the HH cantilever as well as in the effective length dimension of the cantilever probe. The D-LFC method relies on fewer parameters and thus has fewer uncertainties associated with it. We thus show that it is the preferred method of the two, as long as care is taken to perform the calibration in constant force mode with low applied loads.

  2. MIDAS: Lessons learned from the first spaceborne atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Mark Stephen; Arends, Herman; Butler, Bart; Gavira, Jose; Jeszenszky, Harald; Mannel, Thurid; Romstedt, Jens; Schmied, Roland; Torkar, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System (MIDAS) atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta orbiter was the first such instrument launched into space in 2004. Designed only a few years after the technique was invented, MIDAS is currently orbiting comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko and producing the highest resolution 3D images of cometary dust ever made in situ. After more than a year of continuous operation much experience has been gained with this novel instrument. Coupled with operations of the Flight Spare and advances in terrestrial AFM a set of "lessons learned" has been produced, cumulating in recommendations for future spaceborne atomic force microscopes. The majority of the design could be reused as-is, or with incremental upgrades to include more modern components (e.g. the processor). Key additional recommendations are to incorporate an optical microscope to aid the search for particles and image registration, to include a variety of cantilevers (with different spring constants) and a variety of tip geometries.

  3. An atomic force microscope nanoscalpel for nanolithography and biological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beard, J D; Burbridge, D J; Moskalenko, A V; Dudko, O; Gordeev, S N [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Yarova, P L; Smirnov, S V, E-mail: jdb28@bath.ac.u [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-04

    We present the fabrication of specialized nanotools, termed nanoscalpels, and their application for nanolithography and nanomechanical manipulation of biological objects. Fabricated nanoscalpels have the shape of a thin blade with the controlled thickness of 20-30 nm and width of 100-200 nm. They were fabricated using electron beam induced deposition at the apex of atomic force microscope probes and are hard enough for a single cut to penetrate a {approx}45 nm thick gold layer; and thus can be used for making narrow electrode gaps required for fabrication of nanoelectronic devices. As an atomic force microscope-based technique the nanoscalpel provides simultaneous control of the applied cutting force and the depth of the cut. Using mammalian cells as an example, we demonstrated their ability to make narrow incisions and measurements of local elastic and inelastic characteristics of a cell, making nanoscalpels also useful as a nanosurgical tool in cell biology. Therefore, we believe that the nanoscalpel could serve as an important tool for nanofabrication and nanosurgery on biological objects.

  4. Measuring microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mc

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info McLaren_2009.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2976 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name McLaren_2009.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Measuring microscopic forces... and torques using optical tweezers M.G. McLaren1,2, A. Forbes2,3,4 and E. Sideras-Haddad2 1 CSIR National Laser Centre 2 School of Physics, University of Witwatersrand 3 School of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal 4 School of Physics, University...

  5. Atomic force microscopic imaging of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Balamuthia mandrillaris trophozoites and cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Ateeq, Muhammad; Raza Shah, Muhammad; Kulsoom, Huma; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy have been successfully used in the study of microbes, as well as free-living protists. Unlike light microscopy, which enables us to observe living organisms or the electron microscope which provides a two-dimensional image, atomic force microscopy provides a three-dimensional surface profile. Here, we observed two free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellanii and Balamuthia mandrillaris under the phase contrast inverted microscope, transmission electron microscope and atomic force microscope. Although light microscopy was of lower magnification, it revealed functional biology of live amoebae such as motility and osmoregulation using contractile vacuoles of the trophozoite stage, but it is of limited value in defining the cyst stage. In contrast, transmission electron microscopy showed significantly greater magnification and resolution to reveal the ultra-structural features of trophozoites and cysts including intracellular organelles and cyst wall characteristics but it only produced a snapshot in time of a dead amoeba cell. Atomic force microscopy produced three-dimensional images providing detailed topographic description of shape and surface, phase imaging measuring boundary stiffness, and amplitude measurements including width, height and length of A. castellanii and B. mandrillaris trophozoites and cysts. These results demonstrate the importance of the application of various microscopic methods in the biological and structural characterization of the whole cell, ultra-structural features, as well as surface components and cytoskeleton of protist pathogens. © 2014 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2014 International Society of Protistologists.

  6. Radical Chemistry and Charge Manipulation with an Atomic Force Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Leo

    The fuctionalization of tips by atomic manipulation dramatically increased the resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The combination of high-resolution AFM with atomic manipulation now offers the unprecedented possibility to custom-design individual molecules by making and breaking bonds with the tip of the microscope and directly characterizing the products on the atomic scale. We recently applied this technique to generate and study reaction intermediates and to investigate chemical reactions trigged by atomic manipulation. We formed diradicals by dissociating halogen atoms and then reversibly triggered ring-opening and -closing reactions via atomic manipulation, allowing us to switch and control the molecule's reactivity, magnetic and optical properties. Additional information about charge states and charge distributions can be obtained by Kelvin probe force spectroscopy. On multilayer insulating films we investigated single-electron attachment, detachment and transfer between individual molecules. EU ERC AMSEL (682144), EU project PAMS (610446).

  7. Athermalization in atomic force microscope based force spectroscopy using matched microstructure coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torun, H; Finkler, O; Degertekin, F L

    2009-07-01

    The authors describe a method for athermalization in atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy applications using microstructures that thermomechanically match the AFM probes. The method uses a setup where the AFM probe is coupled with the matched structure and the displacements of both structures are read out simultaneously. The matched structure displaces with the AFM probe as temperature changes, thus the force applied to the sample can be kept constant without the need for a separate feedback loop for thermal drift compensation, and the differential signal can be used to cancel the shift in zero-force level of the AFM.

  8. Method for lateral force calibration in atomic force microscope using MEMS microforce sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekoński, Cezary; Dera, Wojciech; Jarząbek, Dariusz M

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we present a simple and direct method for the lateral force calibration constant determination. Our procedure does not require any knowledge about material or geometrical parameters of an investigated cantilever. We apply a commercially available microforce sensor with advanced electronics for direct measurement of the friction force applied by the cantilever's tip to a flat surface of the microforce sensor measuring beam. Due to the third law of dynamics, the friction force of the equal value tilts the AFM cantilever. Therefore, torsional (lateral force) signal is compared with the signal from the microforce sensor and the lateral force calibration constant is determined. The method is easy to perform and could be widely used for the lateral force calibration constant determination in many types of atomic force microscopes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A new ion sensing deep atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, Barney; Randall, Connor; Bridges, Daniel; Hansma, Paul K. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new deep atomic force microscope (AFM) capable of ion sensing. A novel probe assembly incorporates a micropipette that can be used both for sensing ion currents and as the tip for AFM imaging. The key advance of this instrument over previous ion sensing AFMs is that it uses conventional micropipettes in a novel suspension system. This paper focuses on sensing the ion current passively while using force feedback for the operation of the AFM in contact mode. Two images are obtained simultaneously: (1) an AFM topography image and (2) an ion current image. As an example, two images of a MEMS device with a microchannel show peaks in the ion current as the pipette tip goes over the edges of the channel. This ion sensing AFM can also be used in other modes including tapping mode with force feedback as well as in non-contact mode by utilizing the ion current for feedback, as in scanning ion conductance microscopy. The instrument is gentle enough to be used on some biological samples such as plant leaves.

  10. Operation of a scanning near field optical microscope in reflection in combination with a scanning force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Faulkner, T.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1992-01-01

    Images obtained with a scanning near field optical microscope (SNOM) operating in reflection are presented. We have obtained the first results with a SiN tip as optical probe. The instrument is simultaneously operated as a scanning force microscope (SFM). Moreover, the instrument incorporates an

  11. Digital phase-shifting atomic force microscope Moire method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chiaming; Chen Lienwen

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the digital atomic force microscope (AFM) Moire method with phase-shifting technology is established to measure the in-plane displacement and strain fields. The Moire pattern is generated by the interference between the specimen grating and the virtual reference grating formed by digital image processes. The overlapped image is filtered by two-dimensional wavelet transformation to obtain the clear interference Moire patterns. The four-step phase-shifting method is realized by translating the phase of the virtual reference grating from 0 to 2π. The principle of the digital AFM Moire method and the phase-shifting technology are described in detail. Experimental results show that this method is convenient to use and efficient in realizing the microscale measurement

  12. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbiest, G. J., E-mail: Verbiest@physik.rwth-aachen.de [JARA-FIT and II. Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Zalm, D. J. van der; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Rost, M. J., E-mail: Rost@physics.leidenuniv.nl [Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  13. A Novel Atomic Force Microscope with Multi-Mode Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Chun; Zhang, Haijun; Xu, Rui; Han, Xu; Wang, Shuying

    2016-01-01

    A new type of atomic force microscope (AFM) with multi-mode scanner is proposed. The AFM system provides more than four scanning modes using a specially designed scanner with three tube piezoelectric ceramics and three stack piezoelectric ceramics. Sample scanning of small range with high resolution can be realized by using tube piezos, meanwhile, large range scanning can be achieved by stack piezos. Furthermore, the combination with tube piezos and stack piezos not only realizes high-resolution scanning of small samples with large- scale fluctuation structure, but also achieves small range area-selecting scanning. Corresponding experiments are carried out in terms of four different scanning modes showing that the AFM is of reliable stability, high resolution and can be widely applied in the fields of micro/nano-technology. (paper)

  14. Nanodot deposition and its application with atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zenglei, E-mail: liuzenglei@sia.cn; Jiao Niandong, E-mail: ndjiao@sia.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation (China); Xu Ke [Shenyang Jianzhu University (China); Wang, Zhidong [Chiba Institute of Technology (Japan); Dong Zaili; Liu Lianqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation (China)

    2013-06-15

    Nanodot deposition using atomic force microscope (AFM) is investigated. To realize repeatable and precise deposition of nanodots, the detailed control method is discussed. The electric field between AFM tip and substrate is analyzed, and a convenient method to control tip-substrate separation is proposed. In experiments, two nanodot matrixes are fabricated and the heights of the nanodots are analyzed. Experimental results testify that the control method can lead to repeatable and precise fabrication of deposited nanodots. As an application of deposited nanodots, a carbon nanotube (CNT) is soldered on gold electrodes with deposited Au nanodots. After soldering, the contact resistances between the CNT and the electrodes decrease greatly. AFM-based nanodot deposition can be used to fabricate special nanopatterns; also it can be used to solder nanomaterials on substrates to improve the electrical connection, which has a promising future for nanodevice fabrication.

  15. The atomic force microscope as a mechano–electrochemical pen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Obermair

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a method that allows the controlled writing of metallic patterns on the nanometer scale using the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM as a “mechano–electrochemical pen”. In contrast to previous experiments, no voltage is applied between the AFM tip and the sample surface. Instead, a passivated sample surface is activated locally due to lateral forces between the AFM tip and the sample surface. In this way, the area of tip–sample interaction is narrowly limited by the mechanical contact between tip and sample, and well-defined metallic patterns can be written reproducibly. Nanoscale structures and lines of copper were deposited, and the line widths ranged between 5 nm and 80 nm, depending on the deposition parameters. A procedure for the sequential writing of metallic nanostructures is introduced, based on the understanding of the passivation process. The mechanism of this mechano–electrochemical writing technique is investigated, and the processes of site-selective surface depassivation, deposition, dissolution and repassivation of electrochemically deposited nanoscale metallic islands are studied in detail.

  16. A new theoretical probe for the magnetic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windmill, J.F.C. E-mail: jwindmill@plymouth.ac.uk; Clegg, W.W.; Jenkins, D.F.L.; Davey, P.J

    2001-05-01

    The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is established as a valuable tool for the analysis of magnetic structures. The standard design of MFM incorporates a silicon tip coated with a magnetic material. However, these tips are subject to several inherent problems, e.g. changing characteristics over time due to damage or magnetic hysteresis. A new theoretical electromagnetic MFM probe is introduced here. Although electromagnetic MFM has been discussed before by Zhou et al. (J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 17 (1999) 2233), the design presented here is a different approach. Two different probe iterations and their magnetic field intensity distribution are modelled. The probe imaging capability is compared using the reciprocity principle (Wright and Hill, Appl. Phys. Lett. 68 (1996) 1726) to image the simulated force interaction between a sample and the probe fields. Thus, images of a sample's magnetic distribution are produced by the convolution of the different probe gradient field distributions and the sample magnetisation. Both perpendicular and longitudinal magnetisation patterns were simulated with the different probe iterations. This clearly showed the improvement of the second probe iteration, particularly for longitudinal patterns. The practical use of the new probe is also discussed, and future work outlined.

  17. Modification of calcite crystal growth by abalone shell proteins: an atomic force microscope study.

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, D A; Smith, B L; Belcher, A M; Paloczi, G T; Stucky, G D; Morse, D E; Hansma, P K

    1997-01-01

    A family of soluble proteins from the shell of Haliotis rufescens was introduced over a growing calcite crystal being scanned in situ by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Atomic step edges on the crystal surface were altered in shape and speed of growth by the proteins. Proteins attached nonuniformly to the surface, indicating different interactions with crystallographically different step edges. The observed changes were consistent with the habit modification induced by this family of protei...

  18. Electron microscopic observation at low temperature on superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Hatsujiro; Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have observed superconducting materials with a high resolution electron microscope at liquid helium temperature. First, observation was carried out on Nb system intermetallic compounds such as Nb 3 Al and Nb 3 Sn of Al 5 type and Nb 3 Ge of 11 type at extremely low temperature. Next, the observation of high temperature superconductive ceramics in the state of superconductivity was attempted. In this paper, first the development of the liquid helium sample holder for a 400 kV electron microscope to realize the observation is reported. Besides, the sample holder of Gatan Co. and an extremely low temperature, high resolution electron microscope with a superconducting lens are described. The purpose of carrying out the electron microscope observation of superconductors at low temperature is the direct observation of the crystalline lattice image in the state of superconductivity. Also the structural transformation from tetragonal crystals to rhombic crystals in Al 5 type superconductors can be observed. The results of observation are reported. (K.I.)

  19. z calibration of the atomic force microscope by means of a pyramidal tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Flemming

    1993-01-01

    A new method for imaging the probe tip of an atomic force microscope cantilever by the atomic force microscope itself (self-imaging) is presented. The self-imaging is accomplished by scanning the probe tip across a sharper tip on the surface. By using a pyramidal probe tip with a very well......-defined aspect ratio, this technique provides an excellent z-calibration standard for the atomic force microscope....

  20. Atomic imaging of an InSe single-crystal surface with atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Uosaki, Kohei; Koinuma, Michio

    1993-01-01

    The atomic force microscope was employed to observed in air the surface atomic structure of InSe, one of III-VI compound semiconductors with layered structures. Atomic arrangements were observed in both n-type and p-type materials. The observed structures are in good agreement with those expected from bulk crystal structures. The atomic images became less clear by repeating the imaging process. Wide area imaging after the imaging of small area clearly showed that a mound was created at the sp...

  1. A more comprehensive modeling of atomic force microscope cantilever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, M.H.; Farshidianfar, A.; Tahani, M.; Mahdavi, S.; Dalir, H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a complete model of an atomic force microscope (AFM) micro-cantilever beam, based on considering the effects of four major factors in modeling the cantilever. They are: rotary inertia and shear deformation of the beam and mass and rotary inertia of the tip. A method based on distributed-parameter modeling approach is proposed to solve the governing equations. The comparisons generally show a very good agreement between the present results and the results of other investigators. As expected, rotary inertia and shear deformation of the beam decrease resonance frequency especially at high ratio of cantilever thickness to its length, and it is relatively more pronounced for higher-order frequencies, than lower ones. Mass and rotary inertia of the tip have similar effects when the mass-ratio of the tip to the cantilever is high. Moreover, the influence of each of these four factors, thickness of the cantilever, density of the tip and inclination of the cantilever on the resonance frequencies has been investigated, separately. It is felt that this work might help the engineers in reducing AFM micro-cantilever design time, by providing insight into the effects of various parameters with the micro-cantilever.

  2. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7–20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force–distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials.

  3. High-speed atomic force microscope imaging: Adaptive multiloop mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Juan; Zou, Qingze; Li, Bo; Lin, Zhiqun

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, an imaging mode (called the adaptive multiloop mode) of atomic force microscope (AFM) is proposed to substantially increase the speed of tapping mode (TM) imaging while preserving the advantages of TM imaging over contact mode (CM) imaging. Due to its superior image quality and less sample disturbances over CM imaging, particularly for soft materials such as polymers, TM imaging is currently the most widely used imaging technique. The speed of TM imaging, however, is substantially (over an order of magnitude) lower than that of CM imaging, becoming the major bottleneck of this technique. Increasing the speed of TM imaging is challenging as a stable probe tapping on the sample surface must be maintained to preserve the image quality, whereas the probe tapping is rather sensitive to the sample topography variation. As a result, the increase of imaging speed can quickly lead to loss of the probe-sample contact and/or annihilation of the probe tapping, resulting in image distortion and/or sample deformation. The proposed adaptive multiloop mode (AMLM) imaging overcomes these limitations of TM imaging through the following three efforts integrated together: First, it is proposed to account for the variation of the TM deflection when quantifying the sample topography; second, an inner-outer feedback control loop to regulate the TM deflection is added on top of the tapping-feedback control loop to improve the sample topography tracking; and, third, an online iterative feedforward controller is augmented to the whole control system to further enhance the topography tracking, where the next-line sample topography is predicted and utilized to reduce the tracking error. The added feedback regulation of the TM deflection ensures the probe-sample interaction force remains near the minimum for maintaining a stable probe-sample interaction. The proposed AMLM imaging is tested and demonstrated by imaging a poly(tert-butyl acrylate) sample in experiments. The

  4. The usefulness of microscopic observation for drug susceptibility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The usefulness of microscopic observation for drug susceptibility of. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in routine clinical microbiology laboratory. S.E. MSHANA1,2*, C. IMIRZALIOGLU2, E. DOMANN2 and T. CHAKRABORTY2. 1 We l Bugando Un vers ty College of Health Sc ences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzan a.

  5. Microscopic observations of palladium used for cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the microscopic structures of palladium metals used for cold fusion experiments. Tiny spot defects suggesting cold fusion have been observed in grain boundaries as the Nattoh model predicts. The relationship between these defects and a series of neutron busts and an indirect loop of hydrogen chain reactions are discussed

  6. Design and performance of a high-resolution frictional force microscope with quantitative three-dimensional force sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienwiebel, M.; Kuyper, E. de; Crama, L.; Frenken, J.W.M.; Heimberg, J.A.; Spaanderman, D.-J.; Glatra van Loon, D.; Zijlstra, T.; Drift, E. van der

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the construction and initial tests of a frictional force microscope are described. The instrument makes use of a microfabricated cantilever that allows one to independently measure the lateral forces in X and Y directions as well as the normal force. We use four fiber-optic interferometers to detect the motion of the sensor in three dimensions. The properties of our cantilevers allow easy and accurate normal and lateral force calibration, making it possible to measure the lateral force on a fully quantitative basis. First experiments on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite demonstrate that the microscope is capable of measuring lateral forces with a resolution down to 15 pN

  7. In situ electrochemical atomic force microscope study on graphite electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasawa, K.A.; Sato, Tomohiro; Asahina, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoji; Mori, Shoichiro [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Inashiki, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Research Center

    1997-04-01

    Interest in the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film on graphite electrodes has increased recently in the quest to improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries. Topographic and frictional changes on the surface of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode in 1 M LiCiO{sub 4} ethylene carbonate/ethylmethyl carbonate (1:1) electrolyte were examined during charge and discharge by in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy and friction force microscopy simultaneously in real-time. Solid electrolyte interphase film formation commenced at approximately 2 V vs. Li/Li{sup +} and stable film formation with an island-like morphology was observed below approximately 0.9 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Further experiments on a KS-44 graphite/polyvinylidene difluoride binder composite electrode showed similar phenomena.

  8. Cantilever contribution to the total electrostatic force measured with the atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guriyanova, Svetlana; Golovko, Dmytro S; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2010-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool for surface imaging at the nanometer scale and surface force measurements in the piconewton range. Among long-range surface forces, the electrostatic forces play a predominant role. They originate if the electric potentials of the substrate and of the tip of the AFM cantilever are different. A quantitative interpretation of the AFM signal is often difficult because it depends in a complicated fashion on the cantilever–tip–surface geometry. Since the electrostatic interaction is a long-range interaction, the cantilever, which is many microns from the surface, contributes to the total electrostatic force along with the tip. Here we present results of the electrostatic interaction between a conducting flat surface and horizontal or tilted cantilevers, with and without tips, at various distances from the surface. As addressed in a previous work, we show that the contribution of the cantilever to the overall force cannot be neglected. Based on a predictive model and on 3D confocal measurements, we discuss the influence of the tilting angle of the cantilever

  9. Nanoscans of piezoelectric activity using an atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Z.; Guy, I.L.; Butcher, K.S.A.; Tansley, T.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Any crystal which lacks a centre of symmetry is piezoelectric. This includes all of the ferroelectric crystals used in photonics and virtually all compound semiconductors. Such crystals, when grown in thin film form invariably exist in a strained state and thus possess internal piezoelectric fields which can affect their electronic properties. A knowledge of the piezoelectric properties of such crystals is thus important in understanding how they behave in practical devices. It also provides a tool for analysing the crystal structure of such materials. Using an atomic force microscope (AFM) as a probe of piezoelectric activity allows the study of variations in crystal structure on a nanoscale. The AFM piezoelectric technique has been used by several groups to study structures of ceramic materials with large piezoelectric coefficients, intended for applications in piezoelectric actuators. In the AFM method, a driving signal of a few volts at a frequency well below the AFM tip resonance, is applied to a sample of the material mounted in the AFM. This voltage causes the sample dimensions to change in ways determined by the piezoelectric properties of the sample. The AFM signal thus contains the normal surface profile information and an additional component generated by the piezoelectric vibrations of the sample. A lockin amplifier is used to separate the piezoelectric signal from the normal AFM surface profile signal. The result is the simultaneous acquisition of the surface profile and a piezoelectric map of the surface of the material under study. We will present results showing the results of such measurements in materials such as lithium niobate and gallium nitride. These materials have piezoelectric coefficients which are much lower than those of materials to which the technique has normally been applied

  10. Capillary force on a tilted cylinder: Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sébastien; Laurent, Justine; Steinberger, Audrey

    2017-11-01

    The capillary force in situations where the liquid meniscus is asymmetric, such as the one around a tilted object, has been hitherto barely investigated even though these situations are very common in practice. In particular, the capillary force exerted on a tilted object may depend on the dipping angle i. We investigate experimentally the capillary force that applies on a tilted cylinder as a function of its dipping angle i, using a home-built tilting Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) with custom made probes. A micrometric-size rod is glued at the end of an AFM cantilever of known stiffness, whose deflection is measured when the cylindrical probe is dipped in and retracted from reference liquids. We show that a torque correction is necessary to understand the measured deflection. We give the explicit expression of this correction as a function of the probes' geometrical parameters, so that its magnitude can be readily evaluated. The results are compatible with a vertical capillary force varying as 1/cosi, in agreement with a recent theoretical prediction. Finally, we discuss the accuracy of the method for measuring the surface tension times the cosine of the contact angle of the liquid on the probe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An open source/real-time atomic force microscope architecture to perform customizable force spectroscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materassi, Donatello; Baschieri, Paolo; Tiribilli, Bruno; Zuccheri, Giampaolo; Samorì, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    We describe the realization of an atomic force microscope architecture designed to perform customizable experiments in a flexible and automatic way. Novel technological contributions are given by the software implementation platform (RTAI-LINUX), which is free and open source, and from a functional point of view, by the implementation of hard real-time control algorithms. Some other technical solutions such as a new way to estimate the optical lever constant are described as well. The adoption of this architecture provides many degrees of freedom in the device behavior and, furthermore, allows one to obtain a flexible experimental instrument at a relatively low cost. In particular, we show how such a system has been employed to obtain measures in sophisticated single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments [Fernandez and Li, Science 303, 1674 (2004)]. Experimental results on proteins already studied using the same methodologies are provided in order to show the reliability of the measure system.

  12. US Air Force Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Worksheets containing pilot balloon data computed from releases at Air Force stations in the western United States. Elevation and azimuth angles are used to compute...

  13. [Morphological observation on hypopus of Lepidoglyphus destructor by optical microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, H; Ning, T; Qiang, C; Chao-Pin, L I

    2017-07-03

    Objective To observe the external morphology of Lepidoglyphus destructor hypopus under an optical microscope. Methods The samples were collected in a store of Chinese medicinal herbs in Huainan City in September, 2016, the L. destructor and the hypopus were isolated, and then made of slide specimens. The slide samples were prepared and observed under an optical microscope. Results The L. destructor hypopus and protonymph were found. The inactive hypopus was oval in shape, the feet were not welldeveloped, there was a distinct transverse seam on its back, and there were 2 pairs of genital sensory organs. Conclusion The optical microscopy shows the morphological characteristics of L. destructor hypopus, which can provide the basis for the biological classification and the prevention.

  14. Optimization of Easy Atomic Force Microscope (ezAFM) Controls for Semiconductor Nanostructure Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ARL-MR-0965 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Optimization of Easy Atomic Force Microscope (ezAFM) Controls for... Optimization of Easy Atomic Force Microscope (ezAFM) Controls for Semiconductor Nanostructure Profiling by Satwik Bisoi Science and...REPORT TYPE Memorandum Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 2017 July 05–2017 August 18 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optimization of Easy Atomic Force

  15. Novel parallel plate condenser for single particle electrostatic force measurements in atomic force microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Kwek, Jin Wang

    2011-07-01

    A combination of small parallel plate condenser with Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) glass slides as electrodes and an atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to characterize the electrostatic behavior of single glass bead microparticles (105-150 μm) glued to the AFM cantilever. This novel setup allows measurements of the electrostatic forces acting on a particle in an applied electrical field to be performed in ambient air conditions. By varying the position of the microparticle between the electrodes and the strength of the applied electric field, the relative contributions of the particle net charge, induced and image charges were investigated. When the microparticle is positioned in the middle of the electrodes, the force acting on the microparticle was linear with the applied electric field and proportional to the microparticle net charge. At distances close to the bottom electrode, the force follows a parabolic relationship with the applied electric field reflecting the contributions of induced and image charges. The method can be used for the rapid evaluation of the charging and polarizability properties of the microparticle as well as an alternative to the conventional Faraday\\'s pail technique. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Functionalization of gold and nanocrystalline diamond atomic force microscope tips for single molecule force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Michael E.

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has fueled interest in nanotechnology because of its ability to image surfaces at the nanometer level and act as a molecular force sensor. Functionalization of the surface of an AFM tip surface in a stable, controlled manner expands the capabilities of the AFM and enables additional applications in the fields of single molecule force spectroscopy and nanolithography. Two AFM tip functionalizations are described: the assembly of tripodal molecular tips onto gold AFM tips and the photochemical attachment of terminal alkenes to nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) AFM tips. Two separate tripodal molecules with different linker lengths and a monopodal molecule terminated with biotin were synthesized to attach to a gold AFM tip for single molecule force spectroscopy. The immobilization of these molecules was examined by contact angle measurements, spectroscopic ellipsometry, infrared, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. All three molecules displayed rupture forces that agreed with previously reported values for the biotin--avidin rupture. The tripodal molecular tip displayed narrower distribution in their force histograms than the monopodal molecular tip. The performance of the tripodal molecular tip was compared to the monopodal molecular tip in single molecule force spectroscopy studies. Over repeated measurements, the distribution of forces for the monopodal molecular tip shifted to lower forces, whereas the distribution for the tripodal molecular tip remained constant throughout. Loading rate dependence and control experiments further indicated that the rupture forces of the tripod molecular tips were specific to the biotin--NeutrAvidin interaction. The second functionalization method used the photochemical attachment of undecylenic acid to NCD AFM tips. The photochemical attachment of undecylenic acid to hydrogen-terminated NCD wafer surfaces was investigated by contact angle measurements, x

  17. Atomic force microscopic study of the effects of ethanol on yeast cell surface morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Adya, Ashok K; Walker, Graeme M

    2006-02-01

    The detrimental effects of ethanol toxicity on the cell surface morphology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain NCYC 1681) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (strain DVPB 1354) were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). In combination with culture viability and mean cell volume measurements AFM studies allowed us to relate the cell surface morphological changes, observed on nanometer lateral resolution, with the cellular stress physiology. Exposing yeasts to increasing stressful concentrations of ethanol led to decreased cell viabilities and mean cell volumes. Together with the roughness and bearing volume analyses of the AFM images, the results provided novel insight into the relative ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae and Sc. pombe.

  18. A variable-temperature nanostencil compatible with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope/atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steurer, Wolfram; Gross, Leo; Schlittler, Reto R.; Meyer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    We describe a nanostencil lithography tool capable of operating at variable temperatures down to 30 K. The setup is compatible with a combined low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope/atomic force microscope located within the same ultra-high-vacuum apparatus. The lateral movement capability of the mask allows the patterning of complex structures. To demonstrate operational functionality of the tool and estimate temperature drift and blurring, we fabricated LiF and NaCl nanostructures on Cu(111) at 77 K

  19. A variable-temperature nanostencil compatible with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope/atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steurer, Wolfram, E-mail: wst@zurich.ibm.com; Gross, Leo; Schlittler, Reto R.; Meyer, Gerhard [IBM Research-Zurich, 8803 Rüschlikon (Switzerland)

    2014-02-15

    We describe a nanostencil lithography tool capable of operating at variable temperatures down to 30 K. The setup is compatible with a combined low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope/atomic force microscope located within the same ultra-high-vacuum apparatus. The lateral movement capability of the mask allows the patterning of complex structures. To demonstrate operational functionality of the tool and estimate temperature drift and blurring, we fabricated LiF and NaCl nanostructures on Cu(111) at 77 K.

  20. A variable-temperature nanostencil compatible with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope/atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurer, Wolfram; Gross, Leo; Schlittler, Reto R; Meyer, Gerhard

    2014-02-01

    We describe a nanostencil lithography tool capable of operating at variable temperatures down to 30 K. The setup is compatible with a combined low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope/atomic force microscope located within the same ultra-high-vacuum apparatus. The lateral movement capability of the mask allows the patterning of complex structures. To demonstrate operational functionality of the tool and estimate temperature drift and blurring, we fabricated LiF and NaCl nanostructures on Cu(111) at 77 K.

  1. Theoretical study of the effect of probe shape on adhesion force between probe and substrate in atomic force microscope experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Li; Hu, Junhui; Kong, Lingjiang

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative description of adhesion force dependence on the probe shapes are of importance in many scientific and industrial fields. In order to elucidate how the adhesion force varied with the probe shape in atomic force microscope manipulation experiment, we performed a theoretical study of the influences of the probe shape (the sphere and parabolic probe) on the adhesion force at different humidity. We found that the combined action of the triple point and the Kelvin radius guiding th...

  2. Visualization of cytoskeletal elements by the atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdyyeva, T.; Woodworth, C.D.; Sokolov, I.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a novel application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to directly visualize cytoskeletal fibers in human foreskin epithelial cells. The nonionic detergent Triton X-100 in a low concentration was used to remove the membrane, soluble proteins, and organelles from the cell. The remaining cytoskeleton can then be directly visualized in either liquid or air-dried ambient conditions. These two types of scanning provide complimentary information. Scanning in liquid visualizes the surface filaments of the cytoskeleton, whereas scanning in air shows both the surface filaments and the total 'volume' of the cytoskeletal fibers. The smallest fibers observed were ca. 50 nm in diameter. The lateral resolution of this technique was ca.20 nm, which can be increased to a single nanometer level by choosing sharper AFM tips. Because the AFM is a true 3D technique, we are able to quantify the observed cytoskeleton by its density and volume. The types of fibers can be identified by their size, similar to electron microscopy

  3. Optical forces, torques, and force densities calculated at a microscopic level using a self-consistent hydrodynamics method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kun; Chan, C. T.

    2018-04-01

    The calculation of optical force density distribution inside a material is challenging at the nanoscale, where quantum and nonlocal effects emerge and macroscopic parameters such as permittivity become ill-defined. We demonstrate that the microscopic optical force density of nanoplasmonic systems can be defined and calculated using the microscopic fields generated using a self-consistent hydrodynamics model that includes quantum, nonlocal, and retardation effects. We demonstrate this technique by calculating the microscopic optical force density distributions and the optical binding force induced by external light on nanoplasmonic dimers. This approach works even in the limit when the nanoparticles are close enough to each other so that electron tunneling occurs, a regime in which classical electromagnetic approach fails completely. We discover that an uneven distribution of optical force density can lead to a light-induced spinning torque acting on individual particles. The hydrodynamics method offers us an accurate and efficient approach to study optomechanical behavior for plasmonic systems at the nanoscale.

  4. Atomic force microscope image contrast mechanisms on supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J; Dufrêne, Y F; Barger, W R; Lee, G U

    2000-08-01

    This work presents a methodology to measure and quantitatively interpret force curves on supported lipid bilayers in water. We then use this method to correlate topographic imaging contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of phase-separated Langmuir-Blodgett bilayers with imaging load. Force curves collected on pure monolayers of both distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE) and monogalactosylethanolamine (MGDG) and dioleoylethanolamine (DOPE) deposited at similar surface pressures onto a monolayer of DSPE show an abrupt breakthrough event at a repeatable, material-dependent force. The breakthrough force for DSPE and MGDG is sizable, whereas the breakthrough force for DOPE is too small to measure accurately. Contact-mode AFM images on 1:1 mixed monolayers of DSPE/DOPE and MGDG/DOPE have a high topographic contrast at loads between the breakthrough force of each phase, and a low topographic contrast at loads above the breakthrough force of both phases. Frictional contrast is inverted and magnified at loads above the breakthrough force of both phases. These results emphasize the important role that surface forces and mechanics can play in imaging multicomponent biomembranes with AFM.

  5. Atomic Force Microscope Image Contrast Mechanisms on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, James; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Barger Jr., William R.; Lee, Gil U.

    2000-01-01

    This work presents a methodology to measure and quantitatively interpret force curves on supported lipid bilayers in water. We then use this method to correlate topographic imaging contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of phase-separated Langmuir-Blodgett bilayers with imaging load. Force curves collected on pure monolayers of both distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE) and monogalactosylethanolamine (MGDG) and dioleoylethanolamine (DOPE) deposited at similar surface pressures o...

  6. High frequency write head measurement with the phase detection magnetic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, M.; Tanaka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrated the measurement of the high frequency (HF) magnetic field of a write head with the phase detection magnetic force microscope. An amplitude-modulated current was applied to the head coil to detect the force gradient induced by the HF magnetic field. Spatial resolution of this method was higher than that of the deflection detection method previously proposed. By the phase detection method, dynamic HF magnetic fields at the poles of the write heads were clearly imaged. HF magnetic field leakage was observed along the P2 pole shape on the air-bearing surface. The frequency dependence of the write head dynamics up to 350 MHz was also investigated. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  7. Development of nanomanipulator using a high-speed atomic force microscope coupled with a haptic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, F.; Ohashi, Y.; Ishisaki, I.; Picco, L.M.; Ushiki, T.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has been widely used for surface fabrication and manipulation. However, nanomanipulation using a conventional AFM is inefficient because of the sequential nature of the scan-manipulation scan cycle, which makes it difficult for the operator to observe the region of interest and perform the manipulation simultaneously. In this paper, a nanomanipulation technique using a high-speed atomic force microscope (HS-AFM) is described. During manipulation using the AFM probe, the operation is periodically interrupted for a fraction of a second for high-speed imaging that allows the topographical image of the manipulated surface to be periodically updated. With the use of high-speed imaging, the interrupting time for imaging can be greatly reduced, and as a result, the operator almost does not notice the blink time of the interruption for imaging during the manipulation. This creates a more intuitive interface with greater feedback and finesse to the operator. Nanofabrication under real-time monitoring was performed to demonstrate the utility of this arrangement for real-time nanomanipulation of sample surfaces under ambient conditions. Furthermore, the HS-AFM is coupled with a haptic device for the human interface, enabling the operator to move the HS-AFM probe to any position on the surface while feeling the response from the surface during the manipulation. - Highlights: • A nanomanipulater based on a high-speed atomic force microscope was developped. • High-speed imaging provides a valuable feedback during the manipulation operation. • Operator can feel the response from the surface via a haptic device during manipulation. • Nanofabrications under real-time monitoring were successfully performed

  8. Probing Field Distributions on Waveguide Structures with an Atomic Force/Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgonjen, E.G.; Borgonjen, E.G.; Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    A 'stand-alone' Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope combined with an Atomic force Microscope, using a micro-fabricated silicon-nitride probe, is applied to the imaging of field distribution in integrated optical ridge waveguides. The electric field on the waveguide is locally probed by coupling to

  9. A Cost-Effective Atomic Force Microscope for Undergraduate Control Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. N.; Goncalves, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a simple, cost-effective and robust atomic force microscope (AFM), which has been purposely designed and built for use as a teaching aid in undergraduate controls labs. The guiding design principle is to have all components be open and visible to the students, so the inner functioning of the microscope has been made clear to…

  10. Acute radiation nephritis. Light and electron microscopic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapur, S.; Chandra, R.; Antonovych, T.

    1977-01-01

    Light and electron microscopy were used to observe acute radiation nephritis. By light microscopy the changes were of fibrinoid necrosis of the arteries and arterioles with segmental necrosis of the glomerular tufts. By electron microscopy the endocapillary cells reacted by hypertrophy and hyperplasia with increase in cytoplasmic organelles. In addition, disruption of endothelial and epithelial cells from the basement membranes were seen. It is concluded that the electron microscopic changes were unique and may be helpful in differentiating the necrotizing glomerulitis seen in other conditions, especially malignant hypertension

  11. [Morphological observation on hypopus of Caloglyphus berlesei by optical microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiao-dong; Li, Chao-pin; Wu, Hua; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shao-shen

    2016-02-01

    To understand the structure characteristics of hypopus of Caloglyphus berlesei. The hypopus of C. berlesei was collected from the feed of Chinese Polyphaga, and was made into the conventional glass specimens. The structure characteristics of hypopus of C. berlesei were observed by an optical microscope. The hypopus of C. berlesei had 4 pairs of legs, and the foot claws and tarsus were well-developed. The structural features were shown, such as the setae of tibia and setae of genu. Genital plates were obviously ossified. The research on hypopus of Caloglyphus berlesei provides the reference for its further scientific classification and research on the life cycle.

  12. Microscopic observations of condensation of water on lotus leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yang-Tse; Rodak, Daniel E.; Angelopoulos, Anastasios; Gacek, Ted

    2005-11-01

    We report an in situ observation of water condensation and evaporation on lotus leaf surfaces inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. The real-time observation shows, at the micrometer length scale, how water drops grow to large contact angles during water condensation, and decrease in size and contact angle during the evaporation phase of the experiment. To rationalize the observations, we propose a geometric model for liquid drops on rough surfaces when the size of the drop and surface roughness scale are comparable. This model suggests that when drop size and surface roughness are of the same magnitude, such as micrometer size water drops on lotus leaves, well-known equations for wetting on rough surfaces may not be applicable.

  13. A wireless centrifuge force microscope (CFM) enables multiplexed single-molecule experiments in a commercial centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tony; Patel, Dhruv S; Halvorsen, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The centrifuge force microscope (CFM) was recently introduced as a platform for massively parallel single-molecule manipulation and analysis. Here we developed a low-cost and self-contained CFM module that works directly within a commercial centrifuge, greatly improving accessibility and ease of use. Our instrument incorporates research grade video microscopy, a power source, a computer, and wireless transmission capability to simultaneously monitor many individually tethered microspheres. We validated the instrument by performing single-molecule force shearing of short DNA duplexes. For a 7 bp duplex, we observed over 1000 dissociation events due to force dependent shearing from 2 pN to 12 pN with dissociation times in the range of 10-100 s. We extended the measurement to a 10 bp duplex, applying a 12 pN force clamp and directly observing single-molecule dissociation over an 85 min experiment. Our new CFM module facilitates simple and inexpensive experiments that dramatically improve access to single-molecule analysis.

  14. Two-probe atomic-force microscope manipulator and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, A. A.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Kononenko, O. V.

    2017-06-01

    We report on a manipulator based on a two-probe atomic force microscope (AFM) with an individual feedback system for each probe. This manipulator works under an upright optical microscope with 3 mm focal distance. The design of the microscope helps us tomanipulate nanowires using the microscope probes as a two-prong fork. The AFM feedback is realized based on the dynamic full-time contact mode. The applications of the manipulator and advantages of its two-probe design are presented.

  15. Two-probe atomic-force microscope manipulator and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, A A; Stolyarov, V S; Kononenko, O V

    2017-06-01

    We report on a manipulator based on a two-probe atomic force microscope (AFM) with an individual feedback system for each probe. This manipulator works under an upright optical microscope with 3 mm focal distance. The design of the microscope helps us tomanipulate nanowires using the microscope probes as a two-prong fork. The AFM feedback is realized based on the dynamic full-time contact mode. The applications of the manipulator and advantages of its two-probe design are presented.

  16. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karcı, Özgür [NanoMagnetics Instruments Ltd., Hacettepe - İvedik OSB Teknokent, 1368. Cad., No: 61/33, 06370, Yenimahalle, Ankara (Turkey); Department of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Dede, Münir [NanoMagnetics Instruments Ltd., Hacettepe - İvedik OSB Teknokent, 1368. Cad., No: 61/33, 06370, Yenimahalle, Ankara (Turkey); Oral, Ahmet, E-mail: orahmet@metu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-10-01

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ~12 fm/√Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  17. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karcı, Özgür; Dede, Münir; Oral, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ∼12 fm/√Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system

  18. Indirect identification and compensation of lateral scanner resonances in atomic force microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D J; Youcef-Toumi, K; Fantner, G E

    2011-01-01

    Improving the imaging speed of atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires accurate nanopositioning at high speeds. However, high speed operation excites resonances in the AFM's mechanical scanner that can distort the image, and therefore typical users of commercial AFMs elect to operate microscopes at speeds below which scanner resonances are observed. Although traditional robust feedforward controllers and input shaping have proven effective at minimizing the influence of scanner distortions, the lack of direct measurement and use of model-based controllers have required disassembling the microscope to access lateral scanner motion with external sensors in order to perform a full system identification experiment, which places excessive demands on routine microscope operators. Further, since the lightly damped instrument dynamics often change from experiment to experiment, model-based controllers designed from offline system identification experiments must trade off high speed performance for robustness to modeling errors. This work represents a new way to automatically characterize the lateral scanner dynamics without addition of lateral sensors, and shape the commanded input signals in such a way that disturbing dynamics are not excited. Scanner coupling between the lateral and out-of-plane directions is exploited and used to build a minimal model of the scanner that is also sufficient to describe the nature of the distorting resonances. This model informs the design of an online input shaper used to suppress spectral components of the high speed command signals. The method presented is distinct from alternative approaches in that neither an information-complete system identification experiment nor microscope modification are required. Because the system identification is performed online immediately before imaging, no tradeoff of performance is required. This approach has enabled an increase in the scan rates of unmodified commercial AFMs from 1-4 lines s -1 to over

  19. Cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope in liquid using an optical-fiber tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung I. Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed a novel cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope (COIFM to study molecular interaction in liquid environments. The force sensor was created by attaching a chemically etched optical-fiber tip to the force sensor with UV epoxy, and characterized by imaging on a calibration grid. The performance of the COIFM was then demonstrated by measuring the force between two oxidized silicon surfaces in 1 mM KCl as a function of distance. The result was consistent with previously reported electrical double layer forces, suggesting that a COIFM using an optical-fiber tip is capable of measuring force in a liquid environment.

  20. An Atomic Force Microscopical Study of the Synaptonemal Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, C.A.J.; Dietrich, A.J.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; van Marle, J.; Heyting, C.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The chromosomal structure which is specific for meiosis, the synaptonemal complex (SC), plays a major role in chromosome pairing and the recombination of genetic material. The SC was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results of this study confirm the results of light and electron

  1. Note: A scanning electron microscope sample holder for bidirectional characterization of atomic force microscope probe tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenstein, Alon; Goh, M. Cynthia [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    A novel sample holder that enables atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips to be mounted inside a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the purpose of characterizing the AFM tips is described. The holder provides quick and easy handling of tips by using a spring clip to hold them in place. The holder can accommodate two tips simultaneously in two perpendicular orientations, allowing both top and side view imaging of the tips by the SEM.

  2. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM) phase images

    OpenAIRE

    G. Helas; M. O. Andreae

    2008-01-01

    We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly...

  3. Attachment of carbon nanotubes to atomic force microscope probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, Christopher T.; Carnally, Stewart; Roberts, Clive J.

    2007-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM) the accuracy of data is often limited by the tip geometry and the effect on this geometry of wear. One way to improve the tip geometry is to attach carbon nanotubes (CNT) to AFM tips. CNTs are ideal because they have a small diameter (typically between 1 and 20 nm), high aspect ratio, high strength, good conductivity, and almost no wear. A number of methods for CNT attachment have been proposed and explored including chemical vapour deposition (CVD), dielectrophoresis, arc discharge and mechanical attachment. In this work we will use CVD to deposit nanotubes onto a silicon surface and then investigate improved methods to pick-up and attach CNTs to tapping mode probes. Conventional pick-up methods involve using standard tapping mode or non-contact mode so as to attach only those CNTs that are aligned vertically on the surface. We have developed improved methods to attach CNTs using contact mode and reduced set-point tapping mode imaging. Using these techniques the AFM tip is in contact with a greater number of CNTs and the rate and stability of CNT pick-up is improved. The presence of CNTs on the modified AFM tips was confirmed by high-resolution AFM imaging, analysis of the tips dynamic force curves and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  4. Immobilization method of yeast cells for intermittent contact mode imaging using the atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, Tathagata; Chettoor, Antony M.; Agarwal, Pranav; Salapaka, Murti V.; Nettikadan, Saju

    2010-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used for studying the surface morphology and growth of live cells. There are relatively fewer reports on the AFM imaging of yeast cells (Kasas and Ikai, 1995), (Gad and Ikai, 1995). Yeasts have thick and mechanically strong cell walls and are therefore difficult to attach to a solid substrate. In this report, a new immobilization technique for the height mode imaging of living yeast cells in solid media using AFM is presented. The proposed technique allows the cell surface to be almost completely exposed to the environment and studied using AFM. Apart from the new immobilization protocol, for the first time, height mode imaging of live yeast cell surface in intermittent contact mode is presented in this report. Stable and reproducible imaging over a 10-h time span is observed. A significant improvement in operational stability will facilitate the investigation of growth patterns and surface patterns of yeast cells.

  5. In situ atomic force microscope imaging of supported lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Leidy, Chad; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    2001-01-01

    In situ AFM images of phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/) hydrolysis of mica-supported one- and two-component lipid bilayers are presented. For one-component DPPC bilayers an enhanced enzymatic activity is observed towards preexisting defects in the bilayer. Phase separation is observed in two-co...

  6. Microscopic mean field approximation and beyond with the Gogny force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péru S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fully consistent axially-symmetric-deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation calculations have been performed with the D1S Gogny force. A brief review on the main results obtained in this approach is presented. After a reminder on the method and on the first results concerning giant resonances in deformed Mg and Si isotopes, the multipole responses up to octupole in the deformed and heavy nucleus 238U are discussed. In order to analyse soft dipole modes in exotic nuclei, the dipole responses have been studied in Ne isotopes and in N=16 isotopes, for which results are presented. In these nuclei, the QRPA results on the low lying 2+ states are compared to the 5-Dimensional Collective Hamiltonian ones.

  7. Intersegmental interactions in supercoiled DNA: atomic force microscope study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Miloseska, Lela; Potaman, Vladimir N.; Sinden, Richard R.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2003-10-15

    Intersegmental interactions in DNA facilitated by the neutralization of electrostatic repulsion was studied as a function of salt concentration and DNA supercoiling. DNA samples with defined superhelical densities were deposited onto aminopropyl mica at different ionic conditions and imaged in air after drying of the samples. Similar to hydrodynamic data, we did not observe a collapse of supercoiled DNA, as proposed earlier by cryo-EM studies. Instead, the formation of the contacts between DNA helices within supercoiled loops with no visible space between the duplexes was observed. The length of such close contacts increased upon increasing NaCl concentration. DNA supercoiling was a critical factor for the stabilization of intersegmental contacts. Implications of the observed effect for understanding DNA compaction in the cell and for regulation DNA transactions via interaction of distantly separated DNA regions are discussed.

  8. A hybrid scanning force and light microscope for surface imaging and three-dimensional optical sectioning in differential interference contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmer, A

    1995-04-01

    The design of a scanned-cantilever-type force microscope is presented which is fully integrated into an inverted high-resolution video-enhanced light microscope. This set-up allows us to acquire thin optical sections in differential interference contrast (DIC) or polarization while the force microscope is in place. Such a hybrid microscope provides a unique platform to study how cell surface properties determine, or are affected by, the three-dimensional dynamic organization inside the living cell. The hybrid microscope presented in this paper has proven reliable and versatile for biological applications. It is the only instrument that can image a specimen by force microscopy and high-power DIC without having either to translate the specimen or to remove the force microscope. Adaptation of the design features could greatly enhance the suitability of other force microscopes for biological work.

  9. Midinfrared absorption measured at a lambda/400 resolution with an atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houel, Julien; Homeyer, Estelle; Sauvage, Sébastien; Boucaud, Philippe; Dazzi, Alexandre; Prazeres, Rui; Ortéga, Jean-Michel

    2009-06-22

    Midinfrared absorption can be locally measured using a detection combining an atomic force microscope and a pulsed excitation. This is illustrated for the midinfrared bulk GaAs phonon absorption and for the midinfrared absorption of thin SiO(2) microdisks. We show that the signal given by the cantilever oscillation amplitude of the atomic force microscope follows the spectral dependence of the bulk material absorption. The absorption spatial resolution achieved with microdisks is around 50 nanometer for an optical excitation around 22 micrometer wavelength.

  10. Refined tip preparation by electrochemical etching and ultrahigh vacuum treatment to obtain atomically sharp tips for scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Till; El Ouali, Mehdi; Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter

    2011-11-01

    A modification of the common electrochemical etching setup is presented. The described method reproducibly yields sharp tungsten tips for usage in the scanning tunneling microscope and tuning fork atomic force microscope. In situ treatment under ultrahigh vacuum (p ≤10(-10) mbar) conditions for cleaning and fine sharpening with minimal blunting is described. The structure of the microscopic apex of these tips is atomically resolved with field ion microscopy and cross checked with field emission. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  11. Refined tip preparation by electrochemical etching and ultrahigh vacuum treatment to obtain atomically sharp tips for scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagedorn, Till; Ouali, Mehdi El; Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Gruetter, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A modification of the common electrochemical etching setup is presented. The described method reproducibly yields sharp tungsten tips for usage in the scanning tunneling microscope and tuning fork atomic force microscope. In situ treatment under ultrahigh vacuum (p ≤10 -10 mbar) conditions for cleaning and fine sharpening with minimal blunting is described. The structure of the microscopic apex of these tips is atomically resolved with field ion microscopy and cross checked with field emission.

  12. AFM (Atomic force microscope and its use in studying the surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škvarla Jiří

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes the present knowledge about the use of AFM in the mineral processing research. First, the development and fundamentals of the AFM imaging are presented in relation to other imaging techniques (especially STM, Scanning tunneling microscope. Further, the role of the sensing tip-surface interactions is mentioned. Finally, the surface force measurements in the AFM force calibration mode are diskussed.

  13. „New approaches to atomic force microscope lithography on silicon"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Karen; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Rasmussen, Jan Pihl

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated new approaches to the formation of conducting nanowires on crystalline silicon surfaces using atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography. To increase processing speed and reduce wear of the AFM tip, large-scale structures are formed with a direct laser write setup, while the AFM...

  14. Surface topography characterization using an atomic force microscope mounted on a coordinate measuring machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Hansen, H.N; Kofod, N

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the construction, testing and use of an integrated system for topographic characterization of fine surfaces on parts having relatively big dimensions. An atomic force microscope (AFM) was mounted on a manual three-coordinate measuring machine (CMM) achieving free positioning o...

  15. Atomic force microscope with combined FTIR-Raman spectroscopy having a micro thermal analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Samuel D [Aiken, SC; Fondeur, Fernando F [North Augusta, SC

    2011-10-18

    An atomic force microscope is provided that includes a micro thermal analyzer with a tip. The micro thermal analyzer is configured for obtaining topographical data from a sample. A raman spectrometer is included and is configured for use in obtaining chemical data from the sample.

  16. A Computer-Controlled Classroom Model of an Atomic Force Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Tyler A.; Johnson, Matthew M.; Eklund, Peter C.; Russin, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of "seeing by feeling" as a way to circumvent limitations on sight is universal on the macroscopic scale--reading Braille, feeling one's way around a dark room, etc. The development of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in 1986 extended this concept to imaging in the nanoscale. While there are classroom demonstrations that use…

  17. Microscopical observations of Sphaerellopsis filum, a parasite of Puccinia recondita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Płachecka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sphaerellopsis filum is a well-known parasite associated with many species of rust fungi. It is of frequent occurrence as parasite of cereal rusts: Puccinia recondita, P. coronata, P. graminis, P. hordei and P. striiformis. Uredial sori of Puccinia recondita f.sp. tritici infected with Sphaerellopsis filum were examined by light and scanning microscope to determine morphology of hyperparasite as well as the parasite-hyperparasite contact. The microscopical examination of infected uredinia clearly showed the intimate connection of S. filum with its rust host.

  18. Minimizing pulling geometry errors in atomic force microscope single molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Monica; Lee, Whasil; Ke, Changhong; Marszalek, Piotr E; Cole, Daniel G; Clark, Robert L

    2008-10-01

    In atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS), it is assumed that the pulling angle is negligible and that the force applied to the molecule is equivalent to the force measured by the instrument. Recent studies, however, have indicated that the pulling geometry errors can drastically alter the measured force-extension relationship of molecules. Here we describe a software-based alignment method that repositions the cantilever such that it is located directly above the molecule's substrate attachment site. By aligning the applied force with the measurement axis, the molecule is no longer undergoing combined loading, and the full force can be measured by the cantilever. Simulations and experimental results verify the ability of the alignment program to minimize pulling geometry errors in AFM-SMFS studies.

  19. Microscopic Theory for the Role of Attractive Forces in the Dynamics of Supercooled Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Zachary E; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2015-11-13

    We formulate a microscopic, no adjustable parameter, theory of activated relaxation in supercooled liquids directly in terms of the repulsive and attractive forces within the framework of pair correlations. Under isochoric conditions, attractive forces can nonperturbatively modify slow dynamics, but at high enough density their influence vanishes. Under isobaric conditions, attractive forces play a minor role. High temperature apparent Arrhenius behavior and density-temperature scaling are predicted. Our results are consistent with recent isochoric simulations and isobaric experiments on a deeply supercooled molecular liquid. The approach can be generalized to treat colloidal gelation and glass melting, and other soft matter slow dynamics problems.

  20. New implementation of a shear-force microscope suitable to study topographical features over wide areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustione, A.; Cricenti, A.; Piacentini, M.; Felici, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    A new implementation of a shear-force microscope is described that uses a shear-force detection system to perform topographical imaging of large areas (∼1x1 mm 2 ). This implementation finds very interesting application in the study of archeological or artistic samples. Three dc motors are used to move a sample during a scan, allowing the probe tip to follow the surface and to face height differences of several tens of micrometers. This large-area topographical imaging mode exploits new subroutines that were added to the existing homemade software; these subroutines were created in Microsoft VISUAL BASIC 6.0 programming language. With this new feature our shear-force microscope can be used to study topographical details over large areas of archaeological samples in a nondestructive way. We show results detecting worn reliefs over a coin

  1. Atomic force microscopic study of the influence of physical stresses on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adya, Ashok K; Canetta, Elisabetta; Walker, Graeme M

    2006-01-01

    Morphological changes in the cell surfaces of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain NCYC 1681), and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (strain DVPB 1354), in response to thermal and osmotic stresses, were investigated using an atomic force microscope. With this microscope imaging, together with measurements of culture viability and cell size, it was possible to relate topological changes of the cell surface at nanoscale with cellular stress physiology. As expected, when the yeasts were exposed to thermostress or osmostress, their viability together with the mean cell volume decreased in conjunction with the increase in thermal or osmotic shock. Nevertheless, the viability of cells stressed for up to 1 h remained relatively high. For example, viabilities were >50% and >90% for the thermostressed, and >60% and >70% for the osmostressed S. cerevisiae and Schiz. pombe, respectively. Mean cell volume measurements, and bearing and roughness analyses of atomic force microscope images of stressed yeasts indicate that Schiz. pombe may be more resistant to physical stresses than S. cerevisiae. Overall, this study has highlighted the usefulness of atomic force microscope in studies of yeast stress physiology.

  2. Reversible mechano-electrochemical writing of metallic nanostructures with the tip of an atomic force microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Obermair

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We recently introduced a method that allows the controlled deposition of nanoscale metallic patterns at defined locations using the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM as a “mechano-electrochemical pen”, locally activating a passivated substrate surface for site-selective electrochemical deposition. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility of this process and study the long-term stability of the resulting metallic structures. The remarkable stability for more than 1.5 years under ambient air without any observable changes can be attributed to self-passivation. After AFM-activated electrochemical deposition of copper nanostructures on a polycrystalline gold film and subsequent AFM imaging, the copper nanostructures could be dissolved by reversing the electrochemical potential. Subsequent AFM-tip-activated deposition of different copper nanostructures at the same location where the previous structures were deleted, shows that there is no observable memory effect, i.e., no effect of the previous writing process on the subsequent writing process. Thus, the four processes required for reversible information storage, “write”, “read”, “delete” and “re-write”, were successfully demonstrated on the nanometer scale.

  3. Cometary dust at the smallest scale - latest results of the MIDAS Atomic Force Microscope onboard Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Mark; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid

    2015-04-01

    The MIDAS instrument onboard the Rosetta orbit is a unique combination of a dust collection and handling system and a high resolution Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). By building three-dimensional images of the dust particle topography, MIDAS addresses a range of fundamental questions in Solar System and cometary science. The first few months of dust collection and scanning revealed a deficit of smaller (micron and below) particles but eventually several 10 µm-class grains were discovered. In fact these were unexpectedly large and close to the limit of what is observable with MIDAS. As a result the sharp tip used by the AFM struck the particles from the side, causing particle breakage and distortion. Analyses so far suggest that the collected particles are fluffy aggregates of smaller sub-units, although determination of the size of these sub-units and high resolution re-imaging remains to be done. The latest findings will be presented here, including a description of the particles collected and the implications of these observations for cometary science and the Rosetta mission at comet 67P.

  4. Reversible mechano-electrochemical writing of metallic nanostructures with the tip of an atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermair, Christian; Kress, Marina; Wagner, Andreas; Schimmel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We recently introduced a method that allows the controlled deposition of nanoscale metallic patterns at defined locations using the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) as a "mechano-electrochemical pen", locally activating a passivated substrate surface for site-selective electrochemical deposition. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility of this process and study the long-term stability of the resulting metallic structures. The remarkable stability for more than 1.5 years under ambient air without any observable changes can be attributed to self-passivation. After AFM-activated electrochemical deposition of copper nanostructures on a polycrystalline gold film and subsequent AFM imaging, the copper nanostructures could be dissolved by reversing the electrochemical potential. Subsequent AFM-tip-activated deposition of different copper nanostructures at the same location where the previous structures were deleted, shows that there is no observable memory effect, i.e., no effect of the previous writing process on the subsequent writing process. Thus, the four processes required for reversible information storage, "write", "read", "delete" and "re-write", were successfully demonstrated on the nanometer scale.

  5. A compact atomic force-scanning tunneling microscope for studying microelectronics and environmental aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.

    1996-06-01

    This dissertation describes the characteristics and the construction of a compact atomic force/scanning tunneling microscope (AFM/STM). The basics and the method of preparing a tunneling junction between a chemically etched tunneling tip and a micro-manufactured cantilever is outlined by analyzing the forces between tunneling tip and cantilever as well as between force-sensing tip and sample surfaces. To our best knowledge this instrument is the first one using a commercial cantilever with only one piezoelectric tube carrying the whole tunneling sensor. The feedback control system has been optimized after a careful analysis of the electronic loop characteristics. The mode of operation has been determined by analyzing the dynamic characteristics of the scan heads and by investigating the time characteristics of the data acquisition system. The vibration isolation system has been calibrated by analyzing the characteristics of the damping setup and the stiffness of the scan head. The calculated results agree well with the measured ones. Also, a software package for data acquisition and real time display as well as for image processing and three-dimensional visualization has been developed. With this home-made software package, the images can be processed by means of a convolution filter, a Wiener filter and other 2-D FFT filters, and can be displayed in different ways. Atomic resolution images of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and graphite surfaces have been obtained in AFM and STM mode. New theoretical explanations have been given for the observed anomalous STM and AFM images of graphite by calculating the asymmetric distribution of quantum conductance and tip-surface forces on a graphite surface. This not only resolved the theoretical puzzles of STM and AFM of graphite, but also revealed the relation between atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy of graphite. Applications of STM and AFM to micro-electronic devices have been investigated

  6. Structural analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations by atomic force microscope (AFM) before and after Giemsa staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Kanda, R.; Minamihisamatsu, M.; Hayata, I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We have studied structures of chromosome aberration induced by ionizing radiation by an atomic force microscope (AFM). The AFM could visualize the fine structure of chromosomes on Giemsa stained or unstained samples, although it was difficult to visualize unstained chromosomes by light microscope. The height data of chromosomes obtained by AFM provided useful information to describe detailed structure of chromatid gaps induced by heavy ion irradiation. A fibrous structure was observed on the unstained chromosome and these structures were considered to be the 30nm fibers on the chromosome. These types of structures were observed in the gaps as well as on surface of the chromosome. Further more, other types of chromosome aberration induced by ionizing radiation visualized by AFM will be presented

  7. A multifunctional force microscope for soft matter with in situ imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Paul; Pilkington, Georgia A.; Wang, Yumo; Frechette, Joelle

    2018-04-01

    We present the multifunctional force microscope (MFM), a normal and lateral force-measuring instrument with in situ imaging. In the MFM, forces are calculated from the normal and lateral deflection of a cantilever as measured via fiber optic sensors. The motion of the cantilever is controlled normally by a linear micro-translation stage and a piezoelectric actuator, while the lateral motion of the sample is controlled by another linear micro-translation stage. The micro-translation stages allow for travel distances that span 25 mm with a minimum step size of 50 nm, while the piezo has a minimum step size of 0.2 nm, but a 100 μm maximum range. Custom-designed cantilevers allow for the forces to be measured over 4 orders of magnitude (from 50 μN to 1 N). We perform probe tack, friction, and hydrodynamic drainage experiments to demonstrate the sensitivity, versatility, and measurable force range of the instrument.

  8. Topotactic changes on η-Mo4O11 caused by biased atomic force microscope tip and cw-laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovšak, Miloš; Šutar, Petra; Goreshnik, Evgeny; Mihailovic, Dragan

    2015-11-01

    We present topotactic changes on Mo4O11 crystals induced by a biased atomic force microscope tip and continuous laser. The transformation does not change the topography of the samples, while the surface potential shows remarkable changes on areas where the biased AFM tip was applied. No structural changes were observed by Raman spectroscopy, but AFM scans revealed changes to surface potential due to laser illumination. The observed phenomenon could be potentially useful for memristive memory devices considering the fact that properties of other molybdenum oxides vary from metallic to insulators.

  9. Apparatus for observing a sample with a particle beam and an optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus for observing a sample (1) with a TEM column and an optical high resolution scanning microscope (10). The sample position when observing the sample with the TEM column differs from the sample position when observing the sample with the optical microscope in that in the latter case the

  10. [Polarized microscopic observation of the collagen change in bone healing during bone lengthening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Pei; Li, Junhui; Li, Zhuyi

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the feature and regularity of the collagen change in bone healing during bone lengthening. Bone lengthening model was made in the middle segment of the rabbit tibia. Five days after the model was established, the bone was lengthened 1.5 mm per day for 14 days. The rabbits were put to death after elongation, 7, 14, 21, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 days after elongation. The distracted area of the bone was imbedded with paraffin. After being stained by the picric acid-sirius red staining, the slice was observed under polarized microscope. The features of the collagen change in the distracted bone were as follows: (1) In the fibrous tissue of the distracted area during lengthening period and the early stage after lengthening, there was not only collagen III but also much collagen I. (2) Collagen I , II and III were observed in the cartilage. (3) Collagen I, II and III were also observed in the pseudo-growth plate. (4) Collagen I took the dominance during lengthening period and the late stage after lengthening. New bone formation in bone lengthening is under the distracted force, so the collagen changes have different features compared with that in fracture healing. Collagen I, II and III can be identified by picric acid-sirius red staining and polarized microscope, so a new method for studying the collagen typing in bone repairing is provided.

  11. Tapping mode imaging and measurements with an inverted atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sandra S F; Green, John-Bruce D

    2006-07-18

    This report demonstrates the successful use of the inverted atomic force microscope (i-AFM) for tapping mode AFM imaging of cantilever-supported samples. i-AFM is a mode of AFM operation in which a sample supported on a tipless cantilever is imaged by one of many tips in a microfabricated tip array. Tapping mode is an intermittent contact mode whereby the cantilever is oscillated at or near its resonance frequency, and the amplitude and/or phase are used to image the sample. In the process of demonstrating that tapping mode images could be obtained in the i-AFM design, it was observed that the amplitude of the cantilever oscillation decreased markedly as the cantilever and tip array were approached. The source of this damping of the cantilever oscillations was identified to be the well-known "squeeze film damping", and the extent of damping was a direct consequence of the relatively shorter tip heights for the tip arrays, as compared to those of commercially available tapping mode cantilevers with integrated tips. The functional form for the distance dependence of the damping coefficient is in excellent agreement with previously published models for squeeze film damping, and the values for the fitting parameters make physical sense. Although the severe damping reduces the cantilever free amplitude substantially, we found that we were still able to access the low-amplitude regime of oscillation necessary for attractive tapping mode imaging of fragile molecules.

  12. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Lanza, Mario, E-mail: mlanza@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nanoscience and Technology, Soochow University, 199 Ren-Ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Iglesias, Vanessa [International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal); Lewis, David [Nanonics Imaging, Har Hotzvim, Jerusalem 91487 (Israel); Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming [Laboratory of Nanofabrication and Novel Device Integration, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther [Deggendorf Institute of Technology, Edlmairstr. 6+8, 94469 Deggendorf (Germany); Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem.

  13. A combined optical and atomic force microscope for live cell investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madl, Josef [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Rhode, Sebastian [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Stangl, Herbert [Institute for Medical Chemistry, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerstr. 10, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Stockinger, Hannes [Department of Molecular Immunology, Center for Biomolecular Medicine and Pharmacology, Medical University Vienna, Lazarettgasse 19, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Schuetz, Gerhard J. [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Kada, Gerald [Scientec, Mitterbauerweg 4, 4020 Linz (Austria)]. E-mail: gerald_kada@agilent.com

    2006-06-15

    We present an easy-to-use combination of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and an epi-fluorescence microscope, which allows live cell imaging under physiological conditions. High-resolution AFM images were acquired while simultaneously monitoring either the fluorescence image of labeled membrane components, or a high-contrast optical image (DIC, differential interference contrast). By applying two complementary techniques at the same time, additional information and correlations between structure and function of living organisms were obtained. The synergy effects between fluorescence imaging and AFM were further demonstrated by probing fluorescence-labeled receptor clusters in the cell membrane via force spectroscopy using antibody-functionalized tips. The binding probability on receptor-containing areas identified with fluorescence microscopy ('receptor-positive sites') was significantly higher than that on sites lacking receptors.

  14. A combined optical and atomic force microscope for live cell investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madl, Josef; Rhode, Sebastian; Stangl, Herbert; Stockinger, Hannes; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Schuetz, Gerhard J.; Kada, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    We present an easy-to-use combination of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and an epi-fluorescence microscope, which allows live cell imaging under physiological conditions. High-resolution AFM images were acquired while simultaneously monitoring either the fluorescence image of labeled membrane components, or a high-contrast optical image (DIC, differential interference contrast). By applying two complementary techniques at the same time, additional information and correlations between structure and function of living organisms were obtained. The synergy effects between fluorescence imaging and AFM were further demonstrated by probing fluorescence-labeled receptor clusters in the cell membrane via force spectroscopy using antibody-functionalized tips. The binding probability on receptor-containing areas identified with fluorescence microscopy ('receptor-positive sites') was significantly higher than that on sites lacking receptors

  15. Combined laser and atomic force microscope lithography on aluminum: Mask fabrication for nanoelectromechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Boisen, Anja; Davis, Zachary James

    1999-01-01

    A direct-write laser system and an atomic force microscope (AFM) are combined to modify thin layers of aluminum on an oxidized silicon substrate, in order to fabricate conducting and robust etch masks with submicron features. These masks are very well suited for the production of nanoelectromecha......A direct-write laser system and an atomic force microscope (AFM) are combined to modify thin layers of aluminum on an oxidized silicon substrate, in order to fabricate conducting and robust etch masks with submicron features. These masks are very well suited for the production...... writing, and to perform submicron modifications by AFM oxidation. The mask fabrication for a nanoscale suspended resonator bridge is used to illustrate the advantages of this combined technique for NEMS. (C) 1999 American Institute of Physics. [S0003-6951(99)00221-1]....

  16. Switched capacitor charge pump used for low-distortion imaging in atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Lian Sheng; Feng, Zhi Hua

    2015-01-01

    The switched capacitor charge pump (SCCP) is an effective method of linearizing charges on piezoelectric actuators and therefore constitute a significant approach to nano-positioning. In this work, it was for the first time implemented in an atomic force microscope for low-distortion imaging. Experimental results showed that the image quality was improved evidently under the SCCP drive compared with that under traditional linear voltage drive. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Reversible electrochemical modification of the surface of a semiconductor by an atomic-force microscope probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozhukhov, A. S., E-mail: antonkozhukhov@yandex.ru; Sheglov, D. V.; Latyshev, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    A technique for reversible surface modification with an atomic-force-microscope (AFM) probe is suggested. In this method, no significant mechanical or topographic changes occur upon a local variation in the surface potential of a sample under the AFM probe. The method allows a controlled relative change in the ohmic resistance of a channel in a Hall bridge within the range 20–25%.

  18. Microscopic optical potential calculations of finite nuclei with extended skyrme forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Haiji; Ye Weilei; Gao Qin; Shen Qingbiao

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic optical potential calculations in the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation with Extended Skyrme forces are investigated. The HF equation is derived from the variation principle and the potential formula of spherical nuclei is obtained by two different ways. Then the calculations for symmetrid nuclei 16 O, 40 Ca and asymmetric nucleus 90 Zr with eight sets of Skyrme force parameters are presented. Our results show that the potential form and variating tendency with incident energy are reasonable and there apparently appears a 'wine-bottle-bottom' shape in the intermediate energy region. Furthermore, our calculations reflect shell effects clearly

  19. Microscopic derivation of the force on a dielectric fluid in an electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, H.M.; Suen, W.M.; Young, K.

    1982-01-01

    The force acting on a Clausius-Mossotti fluid in an electromagnetic field is evaluated microscopically. Owing to the modification of the two-particle density by the electric field, an additional mechanical force Δf/sup( M/) is found. When this is added to the electrical force f/sup( E/), the total force in the static case becomes identical to that deduced macroscopically by Helmholtz. The analysis is extended to various time-dependent cases, and it is pointed out that Δf/sup( M/) essentially assumes its static value on time scales longer than T/sub c/, the relaxation time of the two-particle density, but is otherwise negligibly small. Thus Peierls's theory of the momentum of light is valid only for pulses much shorter than T/sub c/; the necessary correction due to Δf/sup( M/) in other cases is given and discussed

  20. Evaluation of the roughness of the surface of porcelain systems with the atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavarria Rodriguez, Bernal

    2013-01-01

    The surface of a dental ceramic was evaluated and compared with an atomic force microscope after being treated with different systems of polishing. 14 identical ceramic Lava® Zirconia discs were used to test the different polishing systems. 3 polishing systems from different matrix houses were used to polish dental porcelain. The samples were evaluated quantitatively with an atomic force microscope in order to study the real effectiveness of each system, on the roughness average (Ra) and the maximum peak to valley roughness (Ry) of the ceramic surfaces. A considerable reduction of the surface roughness was obtained by applying different polishing systems on the surface of dental ceramics. Very reliable values of Ra and Ry were obtained by making measurements on the structure reproduced by the atomic force microscope. The advanced ceramics of zirconium oxide presented the best physical characteristics and low levels of surface roughness. A smoother surface was achieved with the application of polishing systems, thus demonstrating the reduction of the surface roughness of a dental ceramic [es

  1. Towards quantitative determination of the spring constant of a scanning force microscope cantilever with a microelectromechanical nano-force actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Sai; Herrmann, Konrad; Zhang, Zhikai; Wu, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The calibration of the performance of an SFM (scanning force microscope) cantilever has gained more and more interest in the past years, particularly due to increasing applications of SFMs for the determination of the mechanical properties of materials, such as biological structures and organic molecules. In this paper, a MEMS-based nano-force actuator with a force resolution up to nN (10 −9 N) is presented to quantitatively determine the stiffness of an SFM cantilever. The principle, structure design and realization of the nano-force actuator are detailed. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that the long-term self-calibration stability of the actuator is better than 3.7 × 10 −3 N m −1 (1σ) over 1 h. With careful calibration of the stiffness of the actuator, the MEMS actuator has the capability to determine the stiffness of various types of cantilevers (from 100 N m −1 down to 0.1 N m −1 ) with high accuracy. In addition, thanks to the large displacement and force range (up to 8 µm and 1 mN, respectively) of the actuator, the calibration procedure with our MEMS nano-force actuator features simple and active operation, and therefore applicability for different types of quantitative SFMs

  2. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Hofstadt, M. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hüttener, M.; Juárez, A. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, G., E-mail: ggomila@ibecbarcelona.eu [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. - Highlights: • Gelatine coatings used to weakly attach bacterial cells onto planar substrates. • Use of the dynamic jumping mode as a non-perturbing bacterial imaging mode. • Nanoscale resolution imaging of unperturbed single living bacterial cells. • Growth and division of single bacteria cells on planar substrates observed.

  3. Low temperature hydrogen embrittlement of niobium. II. Microscopic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Birnbaum, H.K.

    1977-01-01

    The detailed, microscopic processes which occur during the hydrogen embrittlement of pure Nb are examined using in situ SEM crack propagation studies, SEM fractography, electron diffraction and ion probe methods. These results show that the fracture process occurs in a stress induced NbH hydride phase which forms in front of the propagating crack. The experimental results are in good agreement with the stress induced hydride embrittlement mechanism which is discussed. The thermodynamics of precipitation of hydrides under external stress is discussed and calculations are presented for the stress effects on the α-β solvus temperatures. These are related to the embrittlement process and evidence is presented to support the calculated stress effects on the solvus temperature

  4. Atomic force microscopic neutron-induced alpha-autoradiography for boron imaging in detailed cellular histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, K.; Takahashi, H.; Fujita, K.; Nakazawa, M.; Yanagie, H.; Eriguchi, M.; Nakagawa, Y.; Sakurai, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The information on subcellular microdistribution of 10 B compounds a cell is significant to evaluate the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) because the damage brought by the released alpha/lithium particles is highly localized along their path, and radiation sensitivity is quite different among each cell organelles. In neutron-induced alpha-autoradiography (NIAR) technique, 10 B can be measured as tracks for the energetic charged particles from 10 B(n, alpha) 7 Li reactions in solid state track detectors. To perform the NIAR at intracellular structure level for research of 10 B uptake and/or microdosimetry in BNCT, we have developed high-resolution NIAR method with an atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM has been used for analyses of biological specimens such as proteins, DNAs and surface of living cells have, however, intracellular detailed histology of cells has been hardly resolved with AFM since flat surface of sectioned tissue has quite less topographical contrast among each organelle. In our new sample preparation method using UV processing, materials that absorb UV in a semi-thin section are selectively eroded and vaporized by UV exposure, and then fine relief for cellular organelles such as mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, filament structure and so on reveals on flat surface of the section, which can be observed with an AFM. The imaging resolution was comparable to TEM imaging of cells. This new method provides fast and cost-effective observation of histological sections with an AFM. Combining this method with NIAR technique, intracellular boron mapping would be possible. (author)

  5. Local detection of X-ray spectroscopies with an in-situ Atomic Force Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M S; Dhez, O; Denmat, S Le; Felici, R; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2008-01-01

    The in situ combination of Scanning Probe Microscopies with X-ray microbeams adds a variety of new possibilities to the panoply of synchrotron radiation techniques. This paper describes an optics-free Atomic Force Microscope that can be directly installed on most of the synchrotron radiation end-stations for combined X-ray and atomic force microscopy experiments. The instrument can be used for atomic force imaging of the investigated sample or to locally measure the X-ray absorption or diffraction, or it can also be used to mechanically interact with the sample while simultaneously taking spectroscopy or diffraction measurements. The local character of these measurements is intrinsically linked with the use of the Atomic Force Microscope tip. It is the sharp tip that gives the opportunity to measure the photons flux impinging on it, or to locally measure the absorption coefficient or the shape of the diffraction pattern. At the end an estimation of the limits of the various techniques presented is also discussed.

  6. Influence of the atomic force microscope tip on the multifractal analysis of rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapetek, Petr; Ohlidal, Ivan; Bilek, Jindrich

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of atomic force microscope tip on the multifractal analysis of rough surfaces is discussed. This analysis is based on two methods, i.e. on the correlation function method and the wavelet transform modulus maxima method. The principles of both methods are briefly described. Both methods are applied to simulated rough surfaces (simulation is performed by the spectral synthesis method). It is shown that the finite dimensions of the microscope tip misrepresent the values of the quantities expressing the multifractal analysis of rough surfaces within both the methods. Thus, it was concretely shown that the influence of the finite dimensions of the microscope tip changed mono-fractal properties of simulated rough surface to multifractal ones. Further, it is shown that a surface reconstruction method developed for removing the negative influence of the microscope tip does not improve the results obtained in a substantial way. The theoretical procedures concerning both the methods, i.e. the correlation function method and the wavelet transform modulus maxima method, are illustrated for the multifractal analysis of randomly rough gallium arsenide surfaces prepared by means of the thermal oxidation of smooth gallium arsenide surfaces and subsequent dissolution of the oxide films

  7. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM phase images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly shows deposits of distinguishable material on the surface. We apply this technique to dust aerosol particles from the Sahara collected over the Atlantic Ocean and describe micro-features on the surfaces of such particles.

  8. Investigation of specific interactions between T7 promoter and T7 RNA polymerase by force spectroscopy using atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojuan; Yao, Zhixuan; Duan, Yanting; Zhang, Xiaomei; Shi, Jinsong; Xu, Zhenghong

    2018-01-11

    The specific recognition and binding of promoter and RNA polymerase is the first step of transcription initiation in bacteria and largely determines transcription activity. Therefore, direct analysis of the interaction between promoter and RNA polymerase in vitro may be a new strategy for promoter characterization, to avoid interference due to the cell's biophysical condition and other regulatory elements. In the present study, the specific interaction between T7 promoter and T7 RNA polymerase was studied as a model system using force spectroscopy based on atomic force microscope (AFM). The specific interaction between T7 promoter and T7 RNA polymerase was verified by control experiments, and the rupture force in this system was measured as 307.2 ± 6.7 pN. The binding between T7 promoter mutants with various promoter activities and T7 RNA polymerase was analyzed. Interaction information including rupture force, rupture distance and binding percentage were obtained in vitro , and reporter gene expression regulated by these promoters was also measured according to a traditional promoter activity characterization method in vivo Using correlation analysis, it was found that the promoter strength characterized by reporter gene expression was closely correlated with rupture force and the binding percentage by force spectroscopy. These results indicated that the analysis of the interaction between promoter and RNA polymerase using AFM-based force spectroscopy was an effective and valid approach for the quantitative characterization of promoters. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Microscopic Observation of Self-Propagation of Calcifying Nanoparticles (Nanobacteria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Grace; McKay, David S.; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    2007-01-01

    Biologists typically define living organisms as carbon and water-based cellular forms with :self-replication" as the fundamental trait of the life process. However, this standard dictionary definition of life does not help scientists to categorize self-replicators like viruses, prions, proteons and artificial life. CNP also named nanobacteria were discovered in early 1990s as about 100 nanometer-sized bacteria-like particles with unique apatite mineral-shells around them, and found to be associated with pathological-calcification related diseases. Although CNP have been isolated and cultured from mammalian blood and diseased calcified tissues, and their biomineralizing properties well established, their biological nature and self-replicating capability have always been severely challenged. The terms "self-replication", "self-assembly" or "self-propagation" have been widely used for all systems including nanomachines, crystals, computer viruses and memes. In a simple taxonomy, all biological and non-biological "self replicators", have been classified into "living" or "nonliving" based on the properties of the systems and the amount of support they require to self-replicate. To enhance our understanding about self-replicating nature of CNP, we have investigated their growth in specific culture conditions using conventional inverted light microscope and BioStation IM, Nikon s latest time-lapse imaging system. Their morphological structure was examined using scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. This present study, in conjunction with previous findings of metabolic activity, antibiotic sensitivity, antibody specificity, morphological aspects and infectivity, all concomitantly validate CNP as living self-replicators.

  10. A universal fluid cell for the imaging of biological specimens in the atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasas, Sandor; Radotic, Ksenja; Longo, Giovanni; Saha, Bashkar; Alonso-Sarduy, Livan; Dietler, Giovanni; Roduit, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Recently, atomic force microscope (AFM) manufacturers have begun producing instruments specifically designed to image biological specimens. In most instances, they are integrated with an inverted optical microscope, which permits concurrent optical and AFM imaging. An important component of the set-up is the imaging chamber, whose design determines the nature of the experiments that can be conducted. Many different imaging chamber designs are available, usually designed to optimize a single parameter, such as the dimensions of the substrate or the volume of fluid that can be used throughout the experiment. In this report, we present a universal fluid cell, which simultaneously optimizes all of the parameters that are important for the imaging of biological specimens in the AFM. This novel imaging chamber has been successfully tested using mammalian, plant, and microbial cells. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A compact CCD-monitored atomic force microscope with optical vision and improved performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyue, Liu; Haijun, Zhang; Dongxian, Zhang

    2013-09-01

    A novel CCD-monitored atomic force microscope (AFM) with optical vision and improved performances has been developed. Compact optical paths are specifically devised for both tip-sample microscopic monitoring and cantilever's deflection detecting with minimized volume and optimal light-amplifying ratio. The ingeniously designed AFM probe with such optical paths enables quick and safe tip-sample approaching, convenient and effective tip-sample positioning, and high quality image scanning. An image stitching method is also developed to build a wider-range AFM image under monitoring. Experiments show that this AFM system can offer real-time optical vision for tip-sample monitoring with wide visual field and/or high lateral optical resolution by simply switching the objective; meanwhile, it has the elegant performances of nanometer resolution, high stability, and high scan speed. Furthermore, it is capable of conducting wider-range image measurement while keeping nanometer resolution. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Improved social force model based on exit selection for microscopic pedestrian simulation in subway station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑勋; 李海鹰; 孟令云; 许心越; 陈旭

    2015-01-01

    An improved social force model based on exit selection is proposed to simulate pedestrians’ microscopic behaviors in subway station. The modification lies in considering three factors of spatial distance, occupant density and exit width. In addition, the problem of pedestrians selecting exit frequently is solved as follows: not changing to other exits in the affected area of one exit, using the probability of remaining preceding exit and invoking function of exit selection after several simulation steps. Pedestrians in subway station have some special characteristics, such as explicit destinations, different familiarities with subway station. Finally, Beijing Zoo Subway Station is taken as an example and the feasibility of the model results is verified through the comparison of the actual data and simulation data. The simulation results show that the improved model can depict the microscopic behaviors of pedestrians in subway station.

  13. MIDAS - an atomic force microscope for in-situ imaging of cometary dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehringer, H.M.; Ruedenauer, F.G.; Steiger, W.

    1997-02-01

    Comets are interesting bodies, since they are considered to consist of matter remaining in essentially unchanged chemistry from the presolar nebula. Investigation of cometary matter therefore permits to draw conclusion s with respect to the composition of presolar matter. The atomic force microscope MIDAS will be the first instrument to analyze, within ESA's ROSETTA-mission priestine cometary matter in the form of dust particles emitted by comet WIRTANEN during its perihelion in 2013. Within this project, a dust model has been developed, permitting estimation of dust collection times required for statistically significant imaging of cometary particles. The dynamics of dust collection has been developed and experimental dust collection surfaces have been produced making use of modem nanostructuring techniques. Mechanical properties of 3-dimensional piezo-control elements, which are an essential part of the MIDAS microscope, have been determined. (author)

  14. Electron microscope observation of single - crystalline beryllium thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolin, J.; Poirier, J.P.; Dupouy, J.M.

    1965-01-01

    Thin foils prepared from single crystalline beryllium simples deformed at room temperature, have been observed by transmission electron microscopy. The various deformation modes have been investigated separately, from their early stages and their characteristic dislocation configurations have been observed. Basal slip is characterized at is outset by the presence of numerous dipoles and elongated prismatic loops. More pronounced cold work leads to the formation of dislocation tangles and bundles which eventually give a cellular structure. Prismatic slip begins by the cross-slip of dislocations from the basal plane into the prismatic plane. A cellular structure is equally observed in heavily deformed samples. Sessile dislocations have been observed in twin boundaries; they are produced by reactions between slip dislocations and twin dislocations. Finally, the study of samples quenched from 1100 deg. C and annealed at 200 deg. C has shown that the observed loops lie in prismatic planes and have a Burgers vector b 1/3 . (authors) [fr

  15. Microscopic analysis of the non-dissipative force on a line vortex in a superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaitan, F.

    1994-12-01

    A microscopic analysis of the non-dissipative force F nd acting on a line vortex in a type-II superconductor at T = 0 is given. All work presented assumes a charged BCS superconductor. We first examine the Berry phase induced in the BCS superconducting ground state by movement of the vortex and show how this phase enters into the hydro-dynamic action S hyd of the superconducting condensate. Appropriate variation of S hyd gives F nd and variation of the Berry phase term is seen to contribute the Magnus or lift force of classical hydrodynamics to F nd . This analysis, based on the BCS ground state of a charged superconductor, confirms in detail the arguments of Ao and Thouless within the context of the BCS model. Our Berry phase, in the limit e → 0, is seen to reproduce the Berry phase determined by these authors for a neutral superfluid. We also provide a second, independent, determination on F nd through a microscopic derivation of the continuity equation for the condensate linear momentum. This equation yields the acceleration equation for the superflow and shows that the vortex acts as a sink for the condensate linear momentum. The rate at which momentum is lost to the vortex determines F nd in this second approach and the result obtained agrees identically with the previous Berry phase calculation. The Magnus force contribution to F nd is seen in both calculations to be a consequence of the vortex topology and motion. (author). 10 refs

  16. A versatile atomic force microscope for three-dimensional nanomanipulation and nanoassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hui; Haliyo, Dogan Sinan; Regnier, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    A conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) has been successfully applied to manipulating nanoparticles (zero-dimensional), nanowires (one-dimensional) or nanotubes (one- or two-dimensional) by widely used pushing or pulling operations on a single surface. However, pick-and-place nanomanipulation in air is still a challenge. In this research, a modified AFM, called a three-dimensional (3D) manipulation force microscope (3DMFM), was developed to realize 3D nanomanipulation in air. This system consists of two individually actuated cantilevers with protruding tips that are facing each other, constructing a nanotweezer for the pick-and-place nanomanipulation. Before manipulation, one of the cantilevers is employed to position nano-objects and locate the tip of the other cantilever by image scanning. During the manipulation, these two cantilevers work collaboratively as a nanotweezer to grasp, transport and place the nano-objects with real-time force sensing. The manipulation capabilities of the nanotweezer were demonstrated by grabbing and manipulating silicon nanowires to build 3D nanowire crosses. 3D nanomanipulation and nanoassembly performed in air could become feasible through this newly developed 3DMFM.

  17. The Effect of Wood Alignment on Wood Grinding – Part 2: Fines Character and Microscopic Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Heinemann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During industrial wood grinding, logs are pressed against a rotating stone, with the logs and fibre axes parallel to the axis of the stone. For this study, wood blocks were fed into a laboratory grinder with various alignments in relation to the surface of the grinding stone. The effects of the alignment on the properties of the pulp, the amount, and the quality of the fines were measured, and a grinding mechanism is proposed. In this paper, the obtained results showed that the pulp quality was highly sensitive to the angle between the stone surface and the log, and different for fatigue-based and force-based grinding. The tests were observed using microscopic techniques and discussed in terms of fines amount and fines quality. In gentle refining, the fibre structure is loosened by fatigue before it is bent on the surface, pressure pulses produce fibrillar material, and fibres develop good bonding ability. In forced grinding, the process is “violent” and the fibre wears and is crushed immediately on the surface into small particles with low bonding ability.

  18. Track sensitivity and the surface roughness measurements of CR-39 with atomic force microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yasuda, N; Amemiya, K; Takahashi, H; Kyan, A; Ogura, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been applied to evaluate the surface roughness and the track sensitivity of CR-39 track detector. We experimentally confirmed the inverse correlation between the track sensitivity and the roughness of the detector surface after etching. The surface of CR-39 (CR-39 doped with antioxidant (HARZLAS (TD-1)) and copolymer of CR-39/NIPAAm (TNF-1)) with high sensitivity becomes rough by the etching, while the pure CR-39 (BARYOTRAK) with low sensitivity keeps its original surface clarity even for the long etching.

  19. Microscopic structure of superdeformed states in Th, U, Pu and Cm isotopes with Gogny force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girod, M.; Delaroche, J.P.; Romain, P. [CEA/DIF, DPTA/SPN, Boite Postale 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Libert, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay (France)

    2002-10-01

    The structure properties of the even-even nuclei {sup 226,} {sup 228,} {sup 230,} {sup 232,} {sup 234}Th, {sup 230,} {sup 232,} {sup 234,} {sup 236,} {sup 238,} {sup 240}U, {sup 240,} {sup 242,} {sup 244,} {sup 246}Pu, and {sup 242,} {sup 244,} {sup 246,} {sup 248}Cm have been investigated at normal and superdeformed shapes in microscopic mean-field calculations based on Gogny force. Collective levels are predicted from constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and configuration mixing calculations. Two quasiparticle states are also predicted from blocking calculations for neutron and proton configurations. Predictions are shown and compared with experimental data at superdeformed shapes. (orig.)

  20. Microscopic structure of superdeformed states in Th, U, Pu and Cm isotopes with Gogny force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girod, M.; Delaroche, J.P.; Romain, P.; Libert, J.

    2002-01-01

    The structure properties of the even-even nuclei 226, 228, 230, 232, 234 Th, 230, 232, 234, 236, 238, 240 U, 240, 242, 244, 246 Pu, and 242, 244, 246, 248 Cm have been investigated at normal and superdeformed shapes in microscopic mean-field calculations based on Gogny force. Collective levels are predicted from constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and configuration mixing calculations. Two quasiparticle states are also predicted from blocking calculations for neutron and proton configurations. Predictions are shown and compared with experimental data at superdeformed shapes. (orig.)

  1. Reliable measurement of elastic modulus of cells by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhoulong; Ngan, Alfonso H W; Tang, Bin; Wang, Anxun

    2012-01-01

    The elastic modulus of an oral cancer cell line UM1 is investigated by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope with a flat-ended tip. The commonly used Hertzian method gives apparent elastic modulus which increases with the loading rate, indicating strong effects of viscoelasticity. On the contrary, a rate-jump method developed for viscoelastic materials gives elastic modulus values which are independent of the rate-jump magnitude. The results show that the rate-jump method can be used as a standard protocol for measuring elastic stiffness of living cells, since the measured values are intrinsic properties of the cells. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Microscopic descriptions of collective SD bands in the A=190 mass region with the Gogny force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girod, M.

    1997-01-01

    In the framework of microscopic models, we present two methods for describing superdeformed (SD) band properties. The first one is the cranked Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) method, without and with inclusion of particle number projection. The second one is the Gaussian overlap approximation to the generator coordinate method (GCM+GOA) with which we treat the five quadrupole collective coordinates. Both methods use the Gogny force. Moments of inertia and excitation energies of SD bands are calculated and compared with experimental results. (orig.). With 1 fig

  3. On the calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers modified by particle attachment and lamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, James; Zhang, Zhibing; Adams, Michael J; Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael C L; Walliman, Dominic; Arkless, Stuart G

    2010-01-01

    A simple but effective method for estimating the spring constant of commercially available atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is presented, based on estimating the cantilever thickness from knowledge of its length, width, resonant frequency and the presence or absence of an added mass, such as a colloid probe at the cantilever apex, or a thin film of deposited material. The spring constant of the cantilever can then be estimated using standard equations for cantilever beams. The results are compared to spring constant calibration measurements performed using reference cantilevers. Additionally, the effect of the deposition of Cr and Ti thin films onto rectangular Si cantilevers is investigated

  4. Reliable measurement of elastic modulus of cells by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhoulong

    2012-04-01

    The elastic modulus of an oral cancer cell line UM1 is investigated by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope with a flat-ended tip. The commonly used Hertzian method gives apparent elastic modulus which increases with the loading rate, indicating strong effects of viscoelasticity. On the contrary, a rate-jump method developed for viscoelastic materials gives elastic modulus values which are independent of the rate-jump magnitude. The results show that the rate-jump method can be used as a standard protocol for measuring elastic stiffness of living cells, since the measured values are intrinsic properties of the cells. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Electromechanical Characterization of Single GaN Nanobelt Probed with Conductive Atomic Force Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. Y.; Peng, J. F.; Yan, S. A.; Zheng, X. J.

    2018-04-01

    The electromechanical characterization of the field effect transistor based on a single GaN nanobelt was performed under different loading forces by using a conductive atomic force microscope (C-AFM), and the effective Schottky barrier height (SBH) and ideality factor are simulated by the thermionic emission model. From 2-D current image, the high value of the current always appears on the nanobelt edge with the increase of the loading force less than 15 nN. The localized (I-V) characteristic reveals a typical rectifying property, and the current significantly increases with the loading force at the range of 10-190 nN. The ideality factor is simulated as 9.8 within the scope of GaN nano-Schottky diode unity (6.5-18), therefore the thermionic emission current is dominant in the electrical transport of the GaN-tip Schottky junction. The SBH is changed through the piezoelectric effect induced by the loading force, and it is attributed to the enhanced current. Furthermore, a single GaN nanobelt has a high mechanical-induced current ratio that could be made use of in a nanoelectromechanical switch.

  6. Observing human movements helps decoding environmental forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Myrka; La Scaleia, Barbara; Miller, William L; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    Vision of human actions can affect several features of visual motion processing, as well as the motor responses of the observer. Here, we tested the hypothesis that action observation helps decoding environmental forces during the interception of a decelerating target within a brief time window, a task intrinsically very difficult. We employed a factorial design to evaluate the effects of scene orientation (normal or inverted) and target gravity (normal or inverted). Button-press triggered the motion of a bullet, a piston, or a human arm. We found that the timing errors were smaller for upright scenes irrespective of gravity direction in the Bullet group, while the errors were smaller for the standard condition of normal scene and gravity in the Piston group. In the Arm group, instead, performance was better when the directions of scene and target gravity were concordant, irrespective of whether both were upright or inverted. These results suggest that the default viewer-centered reference frame is used with inanimate scenes, such as those of the Bullet and Piston protocols. Instead, the presence of biological movements in animate scenes (as in the Arm protocol) may help processing target kinematics under the ecological conditions of coherence between scene and target gravity directions.

  7. Mechanically stable tuning fork sensor with high quality factor for the atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangyoon; Park, Jun-Young; Kim, K B; Lee, Naesung; Seo, Yongho

    2014-01-01

    A quartz tuning fork was used instead of cantilever as a force sensor for the atomic force microscope. A tungsten tip was made by electrochemical etching from a wire of 50 µm diameter. In order to have mechanical stability of the tuning fork, it was attached on an alumina plate. The tungsten tip was attached on the inside end of a prong of a tuning fork. The phase shift was used as a feedback signal to control the distance between the tip and sample, and the amplitude was kept constant using a lock-in amplifier and a homemade automatic gain controller. Due to the mechanical stability, the sensor shows a high quality factor (∼10(3)), and the image quality obtained with this sensor was equivalent to that of the cantilever-based AFM. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research an Oxford Instruments Company, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States)

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  9. Morphological changes in textile fibres exposed to environmental stresses: atomic force microscopic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Montiel, Kimberley; Adya, Ashok K

    2009-10-30

    The ability of the atomic force microscope (AFM) to investigate the nanoscopic morphological changes in the surfaces of fabrics was examined for the first time. This study focussed on two natural (cotton and wool), and a regenerated cellulose (viscose) textile fibres exposed to various environmental stresses for different lengths of times. Analyses of the AFM images allowed us to measure quantitatively the surface texture parameters of the environmentally stressed fabrics as a function of the exposure time. It was also possible to visualise at the nanoscale the finest details of the surfaces of three weathered fabrics and clearly distinguish between the detrimental effects of the imposed environmental conditions. This study confirmed that the AFM could become a very powerful tool in forensic examination of textile fibres to provide significant fibre evidence due to its capability of distinguishing between different environmental exposures or forced damages to fibres.

  10. Measuring minority-carrier diffusion length using a Kelvin probe force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikler, R.; Fried, N.; Meoded, T.; Rosenwaks, Y.

    2000-01-01

    A method based on Kelvin probe force microscopy for measuring minority-carrier diffusion length in semiconductors is described. The method is based on measuring the surface photovoltage between the tip of an atomic force microscope and the surface of an illuminated semiconductor junction. The photogenerated carriers diffuse to the junction and change the contact potential difference between the tip and the sample, as a function of the distance from the junction. The diffusion length L is then obtained by fitting the measured contact potential difference using the minority-carrier continuity equation. The method was applied to measurements of electron diffusion length in GaP pn and Schottky junctions. The measured diffusion length was found to be ∼2 μm, in good agreement with electron beam induced current measurements

  11. Measurements of dispersion forces between colloidal latex particles with the atomic force microscope and comparison with Lifshitz theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzbieciak-Wodka, Magdalena; Ruiz-Cabello, F. Javier Montes; Trefalt, Gregor; Maroni, Plinio; Borkovec, Michal, E-mail: michal.borkovec@unige.ch [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Geneva, Sciences II, 30, Quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Popescu, Mihail N. [Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2014-03-14

    Interaction forces between carboxylate colloidal latex particles of about 2 μm in diameter immersed in aqueous solutions of monovalent salts were measured with the colloidal probe technique, which is based on the atomic force microscope. We have systematically varied the ionic strength, the type of salt, and also the surface charge densities of the particles through changes in the solution pH. Based on these measurements, we have accurately measured the dispersion forces acting between the particles and estimated the apparent Hamaker constant to be (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10{sup −21} J at a separation distance of about 10 nm. This value is basically independent of the salt concentration and the type of salt. Good agreement with Lifshitz theory is found when roughness effects are taken into account. The combination of retardation and roughness effects reduces the value of the apparent Hamaker constant and its ionic strength dependence with respect to the case of ideally smooth surfaces.

  12. Microscopic observation of magnon bound states and their dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Takeshi; Schauß, Peter; Endres, Manuel; Hild, Sebastian; Cheneau, Marc; Bloch, Immanuel; Gross, Christian

    2013-10-03

    The existence of bound states of elementary spin waves (magnons) in one-dimensional quantum magnets was predicted almost 80 years ago. Identifying signatures of magnon bound states has so far remained the subject of intense theoretical research, and their detection has proved challenging for experiments. Ultracold atoms offer an ideal setting in which to find such bound states by tracking the spin dynamics with single-spin and single-site resolution following a local excitation. Here we use in situ correlation measurements to observe two-magnon bound states directly in a one-dimensional Heisenberg spin chain comprising ultracold bosonic atoms in an optical lattice. We observe the quantum dynamics of free and bound magnon states through time-resolved measurements of two spin impurities. The increased effective mass of the compound magnon state results in slower spin dynamics as compared to single-magnon excitations. We also determine the decay time of bound magnons, which is probably limited by scattering on thermal fluctuations in the system. Our results provide a new way of studying fundamental properties of quantum magnets and, more generally, properties of interacting impurities in quantum many-body systems.

  13. Spring constant calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers of arbitrary shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sader, John E. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Kavli Nanoscience Institute and Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Sanelli, Julian A.; Adamson, Brian D.; Bieske, Evan J. [School of Chemistry, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Monty, Jason P.; Marusic, Ivan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Wei Xingzhan; Mulvaney, Paul [School of Chemistry, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Crawford, Simon A. [School of Botany, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); MicroNanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)

    2012-10-15

    The spring constant of an atomic force microscope cantilever is often needed for quantitative measurements. The calibration method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] for a rectangular cantilever requires measurement of the resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (typically air), and knowledge of its plan view dimensions. This intrinsically uses the hydrodynamic function for a cantilever of rectangular plan view geometry. Here, we present hydrodynamic functions for a series of irregular and non-rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers that are commonly used in practice. Cantilever geometries of arrow shape, small aspect ratio rectangular, quasi-rectangular, irregular rectangular, non-ideal trapezoidal cross sections, and V-shape are all studied. This enables the spring constants of all these cantilevers to be accurately and routinely determined through measurement of their resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (such as air). An approximate formulation of the hydrodynamic function for microcantilevers of arbitrary geometry is also proposed. Implementation of the method and its performance in the presence of uncertainties and non-idealities is discussed, together with conversion factors for the static and dynamic spring constants of these cantilevers. These results are expected to be of particular value to the design and application of micro- and nanomechanical systems in general.

  14. Spring constant calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers of arbitrary shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sader, John E.; Sanelli, Julian A.; Adamson, Brian D.; Bieske, Evan J.; Monty, Jason P.; Marusic, Ivan; Wei Xingzhan; Mulvaney, Paul; Crawford, Simon A.; Friend, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The spring constant of an atomic force microscope cantilever is often needed for quantitative measurements. The calibration method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] for a rectangular cantilever requires measurement of the resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (typically air), and knowledge of its plan view dimensions. This intrinsically uses the hydrodynamic function for a cantilever of rectangular plan view geometry. Here, we present hydrodynamic functions for a series of irregular and non-rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers that are commonly used in practice. Cantilever geometries of arrow shape, small aspect ratio rectangular, quasi-rectangular, irregular rectangular, non-ideal trapezoidal cross sections, and V-shape are all studied. This enables the spring constants of all these cantilevers to be accurately and routinely determined through measurement of their resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (such as air). An approximate formulation of the hydrodynamic function for microcantilevers of arbitrary geometry is also proposed. Implementation of the method and its performance in the presence of uncertainties and non-idealities is discussed, together with conversion factors for the static and dynamic spring constants of these cantilevers. These results are expected to be of particular value to the design and application of micro- and nanomechanical systems in general.

  15. A microscopic approach to Casimir and Casimir–Polder forces between metallic bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcellona, Pablo; Passante, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We consider the Casimir–Polder interaction energy between a metallic nanoparticle and a metallic plate, as well as the Casimir interaction energy between two macroscopic metal plates, in terms of the many-body dispersion interactions between their constituents. Expressions for two- and three-body dispersion interactions between the microscopic parts of a real metal are first obtained, both in the retarded and non-retarded limits. These expressions are then used to evaluate the overall two- and three-body contributions to the macroscopic Casimir–Polder and Casimir force, and to compare them with each other, for the two following geometries: metal nanoparticle/half-space and half-space/half-space, where all the materials are assumed perfect conductors. The above evaluation is obtained by summing up the contributions from the microscopic constituents of the bodies (metal nanoparticles). In the case of nanoparticle/half-space, our results fully agree with those that can be extracted from the corresponding macroscopic results, and explicitly show the non-applicability of the pairwise approximation for the geometry considered. In both cases, we find that, while the overall two-body contribution yields an attractive force, the overall three-body contribution is repulsive. Also, they turn out to be of the same order, consistently with the known non applicability of the pairwise approximation. The issue of the rapidity of convergence of the many-body expansion is also briefly discussed

  16. Dielectrophoretic positioning of single nanoparticles on atomic force microscope tips for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Christian; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Singh, Prabha; Wirth, Janina; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, a combination of Raman spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy, is a powerful technique to detect the vibrational fingerprint of molecules at the nanometer scale. A metal nanoparticle at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip leads to a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field when illuminated with an appropriate wavelength, resulting in an increased Raman signal. A controlled positioning of individual nanoparticles at the tip would improve the reproducibility of the probes and is quite demanding due to usually serial and labor-intensive approaches. In contrast to commonly used submicron manipulation techniques, dielectrophoresis allows a parallel and scalable production, and provides a novel approach toward reproducible and at the same time affordable tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tips. We demonstrate the successful positioning of an individual plasmonic nanoparticle on a commercial atomic force microscope tip by dielectrophoresis followed by experimental proof of the Raman signal enhancing capabilities of such tips. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Tip Effect of the Tapping Mode of Atomic Force Microscope in Viscous Fluid Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hua-Ju; Shih, Po-Jen

    2015-07-28

    Atomic force microscope with applicable types of operation in a liquid environment is widely used to scan the contours of biological specimens. The contact mode of operation allows a tip to touch a specimen directly but sometimes it damages the specimen; thus, a tapping mode of operation may replace the contact mode. The tapping mode triggers the cantilever of the microscope approximately at resonance frequencies, and so the tip periodically knocks the specimen. It is well known that the cantilever induces extra liquid pressure that leads to drift in the resonance frequency. Studies have noted that the heights of protein surfaces measured via the tapping mode of an atomic force microscope are ~25% smaller than those measured by other methods. This discrepancy may be attributable to the induced superficial hydrodynamic pressure, which is worth investigating. In this paper, we introduce a semi-analytical method to analyze the pressure distribution of various tip geometries. According to our analysis, the maximum hydrodynamic pressure on the specimen caused by a cone-shaped tip is ~0.5 Pa, which can, for example, pre-deform a cell by several nanometers in compression before the tip taps it. Moreover, the pressure calculated on the surface of the specimen is 20 times larger than the pressure without considering the tip effect; these results have not been motioned in other papers. Dominating factors, such as surface heights of protein surface, mechanical stiffness of protein increasing with loading velocity, and radius of tip affecting the local pressure of specimen, are also addressed in this study.

  18. Atomic force microscope adhesion measurements and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at different humidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Sairanen, Hannu; Korpelainen, Virpi; Husu, Hannu; Heinonen, Martti; Lassila, Antti; Reischl, Bernhard; Raiteri, Paolo; Rohl, Andrew L; Nordlund, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Due to their operation principle atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are sensitive to all factors affecting the detected force between the probe and the sample. Relative humidity is an important and often neglected—both in experiments and simulations—factor in the interaction force between AFM probe and sample in air. This paper describes the humidity control system designed and built for the interferometrically traceable metrology AFM (IT-MAFM) at VTT MIKES. The humidity control is based on circulating the air of the AFM enclosure via dryer and humidifier paths with adjustable flow and mixing ratio of dry and humid air. The design humidity range of the system is 20–60 %rh. Force–distance adhesion studies at humidity levels between 25 %rh and 53 %rh are presented and compared to an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The uncertainty level of the thermal noise method implementation used for force constant calibration of the AFM cantilevers is 10 %, being the dominant component of the interaction force measurement uncertainty. Comparing the simulation and the experiment, the primary uncertainties are related to the nominally 7 nm radius and shape of measurement probe apex, possible wear and contamination, and the atomistic simulation technique details. The interaction forces are of the same order of magnitude in simulation and measurement (5 nN). An elongation of a few nanometres of the water meniscus between probe tip and sample, before its rupture, is seen in simulation upon retraction of the tip in higher humidity. This behaviour is also supported by the presented experimental measurement data but the data is insufficient to conclusively verify the quantitative meniscus elongation. (paper)

  19. Characterizing absolute piezoelectric microelectromechanical system displacement using an atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.; Chapman, S.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) is a popular tool for the study of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials at the nanometer level. Progress in the development of piezoelectric MEMS fabrication is highlighting the need to characterize absolute displacement at the nanometer and Ångstrom scales, something Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) might do but PFM cannot. Absolute displacement is measured by executing a polarization measurement of the ferroelectric or piezoelectric capacitor in question while monitoring the absolute vertical position of the sample surface with a stationary AFM cantilever. Two issues dominate the execution and precision of such a measurement: (1) the small amplitude of the electrical signal from the AFM at the Ångstrom level and (2) calibration of the AFM. The authors have developed a calibration routine and test technique for mitigating the two issues, making it possible to use an atomic force microscope to measure both the movement of a capacitor surface as well as the motion of a micro-machine structure actuated by that capacitor. The theory, procedures, pitfalls, and results of using an AFM for absolute piezoelectric measurement are provided

  20. Characterizing absolute piezoelectric microelectromechanical system displacement using an atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J., E-mail: radiant@ferrodevices.com; Chapman, S., E-mail: radiant@ferrodevices.com [Radiant Technologies, Inc., 2835C Pan American Fwy NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107 (United States)

    2014-08-14

    Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) is a popular tool for the study of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials at the nanometer level. Progress in the development of piezoelectric MEMS fabrication is highlighting the need to characterize absolute displacement at the nanometer and Ångstrom scales, something Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) might do but PFM cannot. Absolute displacement is measured by executing a polarization measurement of the ferroelectric or piezoelectric capacitor in question while monitoring the absolute vertical position of the sample surface with a stationary AFM cantilever. Two issues dominate the execution and precision of such a measurement: (1) the small amplitude of the electrical signal from the AFM at the Ångstrom level and (2) calibration of the AFM. The authors have developed a calibration routine and test technique for mitigating the two issues, making it possible to use an atomic force microscope to measure both the movement of a capacitor surface as well as the motion of a micro-machine structure actuated by that capacitor. The theory, procedures, pitfalls, and results of using an AFM for absolute piezoelectric measurement are provided.

  1. Design of a scanning probe microscope with advanced sample treatment capabilities: An atomic force microscope combined with a miniaturized inductively coupled plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hund, Markus; Herold, Hans

    2007-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of an atomic force microscope (AFM) combined with a miniaturized inductively coupled plasma source working at a radio frequency of 27.12 MHz. State-of-the-art scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) have limited in situ sample treatment capabilities. Aggressive treatments such as plasma etching or harsh treatments such as etching in aggressive liquids typically require the removal of the sample from the microscope. Consequently, time consuming procedures are required if the same sample spot has to be imaged after successive processing steps. We have developed a first prototype of a SPM which features a quasi in situ sample treatment using a modified commercial atomic force microscope. A sample holder is positioned in a special reactor chamber; the AFM tip can be retracted by several millimeters so that the chamber can be closed for a treatment procedure. Most importantly, after the treatment, the tip is moved back to the sample with a lateral drift per process step in the 20 nm regime. The performance of the prototype is characterized by consecutive plasma etching of a nanostructured polymer film

  2. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope observes cells and tissues in open medium through silicon nitride film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Ogura, Toshihiko; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Mio, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Shinichi; Sato, Chikara

    2010-03-01

    Direct observation of subcellular structures and their characterization is essential for understanding their physiological functions. To observe them in open environment, we have developed an inverted scanning electron microscope with a detachable, open-culture dish, capable of 8 nm resolution, and combined with a fluorescence microscope quasi-simultaneously observing the same area from the top. For scanning electron microscopy from the bottom, a silicon nitride film window in the base of the dish maintains a vacuum between electron gun and open sample dish while allowing electrons to pass through. Electrons are backscattered from the sample and captured by a detector under the dish. Cells cultured on the open dish can be externally manipulated under optical microscopy, fixed, and observed using scanning electron microscopy. Once fine structures have been revealed by scanning electron microscopy, their component proteins may be identified by comparison with separately prepared fluorescence-labeled optical microscopic images of the candidate proteins, with their heavy-metal-labeled or stained ASEM images. Furthermore, cell nuclei in a tissue block stained with platinum-blue were successfully observed without thin-sectioning, which suggests the applicability of this inverted scanning electron microscope to cancer diagnosis. This microscope visualizes mesoscopic-scale structures, and is also applicable to non-bioscience fields including polymer chemistry. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A concept for automated nanoscale atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements using a priori knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recknagel, C; Rothe, H

    2009-01-01

    The nanometer coordinate measuring machine (NCMM) is developed for comparatively fast large area scans with high resolution. The system combines a metrological atomic force microscope (AFM) with a precise positioning system. The sample is moved under the probe system via the positioning system achieving a scan range of 25 × 25 × 5 mm 3 with a resolution of 0.1 nm. A concept for AFM measurements using a priori knowledge is implemented. The a priori knowledge is generated through measurements with a white light interferometer and the use of CAD data. Dimensional markup language is used as a transfer and target format for a priori knowledge and measurement data. Using the a priori knowledge and template matching algorithms combined with the optical microscope of the NCMM, the region of interest can automatically be identified. In the next step the automatic measurement of the part coordinate system and the measurement elements with the AFM sensor of the NCMM is done. The automatic measurement involves intelligent measurement strategies, which are adapted to specific geometries of the measurement feature to reduce measurement time and drift effects

  4. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E., E-mail: georg.fantner@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5–10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100–500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  5. Reduced order dynamic model for polysaccharides molecule attached to an atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Deman; Li Aiqin; Attar, Peter; Dowell, Earl H.

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic analysis and numerical simulation has been conducted of a polysaccharides molecular structure (a ten (10) single-α-D-glucose molecule chain) connected to a moving atomic force microscope (AFM). Sinusoidal base excitation of the AFM cantilevered beam is considered. First a linearized perturbation model is constructed for the complex polysaccharides molecular structure. Then reduced order (dynamic) models based upon a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) technique are constructed using global modes for both the linearized perturbation model and for the full nonlinear model. The agreement between the original and reduced order models (ROM/POD) is very good even when only a few global modes are included in the ROM for either the linear case or for the nonlinear case. The computational advantage of the reduced order model is clear from the results presented

  6. In situ measurements of human articular cartilage stiffness by means of a scanning force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imer, Raphael; Akiyama, Terunobu; Rooij, Nico F de; Stolz, Martin; Aebi, Ueli; Kilger, Robert; Friederich, Niklaus F; Wirz, Dieter; Daniels, A U; Staufer, Urs

    2007-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a painful and disabling progressive joint disease, characterized by degradation of articular cartilage. In order to study this disease at early stages, we have miniaturized and integrated a complete scanning force microscope into a standard arthroscopic device fitting through a standard orthopedic canula. This instrument will allow orthopedic surgeons to measure the mechanical properties of articular cartilage at the nanometer and micrometer scale in-vivo during a standard arthroscopy. An orthopedic surgeon assessed the handling of the instrument. First measurements of the elasticity-modulus of human cartilage were recorded in a cadaver knee non minimal invasive. Second, minimally invasive experiments were performed using arthroscopic instruments. Load-displacement curves were successfully recorded

  7. Controlling electron transfer processes on insulating surfaces with the non-contact atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevethan, Thomas; Shluger, Alexander

    2009-07-01

    We present the results of theoretical modelling that predicts how a process of transfer of single electrons between two defects on an insulating surface can be induced using a scanning force microscope tip. A model but realistic system is employed which consists of a neutral oxygen vacancy and a noble metal (Pt or Pd) adatom on the MgO(001) surface. We show that the ionization potential of the vacancy and the electron affinity of the metal adatom can be significantly modified by the electric field produced by an ionic tip apex at close approach to the surface. The relative energies of the two states are also a function of the separation of the two defects. Therefore the transfer of an electron from the vacancy to the metal adatom can be induced either by the field effect of the tip or by manipulating the position of the metal adatom on the surface.

  8. Nanoscopic morphological changes in yeast cell surfaces caused by oxidative stress: an atomic force microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Walker, Graeme M; Adya, Ashok K

    2009-06-01

    Nanoscopic changes in the cell surface morphology of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain NCYC 1681) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (strain DVPB 1354), due to their exposure to varying concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (oxidative stress), were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Increasing hydrogen peroxide concentration led to a decrease in cell viabilities and mean cell volumes, and an increase in the surface roughness of the yeasts. In addition, AFM studies revealed that oxidative stress caused cell compression in both S. cerevisiae and Schiz. pombe cells and an increase in the number of aged yeasts. These results confirmed the importance and usefulness of AFM in investigating the morphology of stressed microbial cells at the nanoscale. The results also provided novel information on the relative oxidative stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae and Schiz. pombe.

  9. Site-controlled quantum dots fabricated using an atomic-force microscope assisted technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakuma Y

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAn atomic-force microscope assisted technique is developed to control the position and size of self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs. Presently, the site precision is as good as ± 1.5 nm and the size fluctuation is within ± 5% with the minimum controllable lateral diameter of 20 nm. With the ability of producing tightly packed and differently sized QDs, sophisticated QD arrays can be controllably fabricated for the application in quantum computing. The optical quality of such site-controlled QDs is found comparable to some conventionally self-assembled semiconductor QDs. The single dot photoluminescence of site-controlled InAs/InP QDs is studied in detail, presenting the prospect to utilize them in quantum communication as precisely controlled single photon emitters working at telecommunication bands.

  10. Real time drift measurement for colloidal probe atomic force microscope: a visual sensing approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuliang, E-mail: wangyuliang@buaa.edu.cn; Bi, Shusheng [Robotics Institute, School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Huimin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Rd., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Drift has long been an issue in atomic force microscope (AFM) systems and limits their ability to make long time period measurements. In this study, a new method is proposed to directly measure and compensate for the drift between AFM cantilevers and sample surfaces in AFM systems. This was achieved by simultaneously measuring z positions for beads at the end of an AFM colloidal probe and on sample surface through an off-focus image processing based visual sensing method. The working principle and system configuration are presented. Experiments were conducted to validate the real time drift measurement and compensation. The implication of the proposed method for regular AFM measurements is discussed. We believe that this technique provides a practical and efficient approach for AFM experiments requiring long time period measurement.

  11. In situ measurements of human articular cartilage stiffness by means of a scanning force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imer, Raphael [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Jaquet-Droz 1, 2007 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Akiyama, Terunobu [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Jaquet-Droz 1, 2007 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Rooij, Nico F de [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Jaquet-Droz 1, 2007 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Stolz, Martin [Maurice E. Mueller Institute, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 70, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Aebi, Ueli [Maurice E. Mueller Institute, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 70, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Kilger, Robert [Clinics for Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, Kantonsspital, 4101 Bruderholz (Switzerland); Friederich, Niklaus F [Clinics for Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, Kantonsspital, 4101 Bruderholz (Switzerland); Wirz, Dieter [Lab. for Orthopaedic Biomechanics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 50-70, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Daniels, A U [Lab. for Orthopaedic Biomechanics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 50-70, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Staufer, Urs [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Jaquet-Droz 1, 2007 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2007-03-15

    Osteoarthritis is a painful and disabling progressive joint disease, characterized by degradation of articular cartilage. In order to study this disease at early stages, we have miniaturized and integrated a complete scanning force microscope into a standard arthroscopic device fitting through a standard orthopedic canula. This instrument will allow orthopedic surgeons to measure the mechanical properties of articular cartilage at the nanometer and micrometer scale in-vivo during a standard arthroscopy. An orthopedic surgeon assessed the handling of the instrument. First measurements of the elasticity-modulus of human cartilage were recorded in a cadaver knee non minimal invasive. Second, minimally invasive experiments were performed using arthroscopic instruments. Load-displacement curves were successfully recorded.

  12. Local work function analysis of Pt/TiO2 photocatalyst by a Kelvin probe force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiehata, K; Sasahara, A; Onishi, H

    2007-01-01

    Nanometre-sized Pt clusters were prepared on a TiO 2 (110)-(1 x 1) surface, and the lateral distribution of work function was examined by using a Kelvin probe force microscope. Local work function on the Pt clusters was smaller than that on the surrounding TiO 2 surface. Assuming that the dipole moments which perturb the work function are produced by uneven electron distribution, the decrease of the work function indicates electron transfer from the clusters to the TiO 2 surface. After decomposition of pivalate anions on the surfaces by UV irradiation, the work function increased on some Pt clusters. It is known that holes photoexcited in TiO 2 attach to pivalate anions to cause a decomposition reaction. Hence the increase of the observed work function by UV irradiation can be ascribed to the trapping of the accompanying electrons to the Pt clusters

  13. The structure of cometary dust - first results from the MIDAS Atomic Force Microscope onboard Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Romstedt, J.

    2014-12-01

    A decade after launch the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft has finally arrived at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Unlike previous cometary missions, Rosetta is not a flyby, limited to taking a snapshot of the comet at a single heliocentric distance. Instead, Rosetta intercepted the comet prior to the onset of major activity and will chart its evolution during its perihelion passage and beyond. Such a unique mission requires a unique payload; as well as the more typical remote sensing instruments, Rosetta also carries sensors to sample in situ the gas and dust environment. One of these instruments is MIDAS, an atomic force microscope designed to collect dust and image it in three dimensions with nanometre resolution. Equipped with an array of sharp tips, four of which are magnetised to allow magnetic force microscopy, MIDAS exposes targets to the incident flux after which they are moved to the microscope for analysis. As well as extending coverage of the dust size distribution down to the finest particles, MIDAS has the unique capability to determine the shape of pristine particles - to determine, for example, if they are compact or fluffy, and to look for features which may be diagnostic of their formation environment or evolution. The magnetic mode lets MIDAS probe samples for magnetic material and to map its location if present. Having been operating almost continuously after hibernation imaging empty targets before exposure, the first exposures were performed when Rosetta entered 30 km bound orbits. The first MIDAS images and analyses of collected dust grains are presented here.

  14. Under which conditions is quantum Brownian motion observable in a microscope?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helseth, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate under which conditions we can expect to observe quantum Brownian motion in a microscope. Using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we investigate quantum Brownian motion in an ohmic bath, and estimate temporal and spatial accuracy required to observe a crossover from classical to quantum behavior.

  15. Filtration of lager beer with microsieves: Flux, permeate haze and in-line microscope observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, S.; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Nijdam, W.; Raspe, Onno; van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2002-01-01

    Membrane fouling during filtration of lager beer with microsieves was studied through in-line microscope observations. It was observed that the main fouling was caused by micrometre-sized particles, presumably aggregated proteins. These particles formed flocks covering parts of the membrane surface.

  16. Calibration of an interfacial force microscope for MEMS metrology : FY08-09 activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, Jack E.; Baker, Michael Sean; Crowson, Douglas A.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Moore, Nathan W.

    2009-10-01

    Progress in MEMS fabrication has enabled a wide variety of force and displacement sensing devices to be constructed. One device under intense development at Sandia is a passive shock switch, described elsewhere (Mitchell 2008). A goal of all MEMS devices, including the shock switch, is to achieve a high degree of reliability. This, in turn, requires systematic methods for validating device performance during each iteration of design. Once a design is finalized, suitable tools are needed to provide quality assurance for manufactured devices. To ensure device performance, measurements on these devices must be traceable to NIST standards. In addition, accurate metrology of MEMS components is needed to validate mechanical models that are used to design devices to accelerate development and meet emerging needs. Progress towards a NIST-traceable calibration method is described for a next-generation, 2D Interfacial Force Microscope (IFM) for applications in MEMS metrology and qualification. Discussed are the results of screening several suitable calibration methods and the known sources of uncertainty in each method.

  17. Simultaneous topography imaging and broadband nanomechanical mapping on atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianwei; Zou, Qingze

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, an approach is proposed to achieve simultaneous imaging and broadband nanomechanical mapping of soft materials in air by using an atomic force microscope. Simultaneous imaging and nanomechanical mapping are needed, for example, to correlate the morphological and mechanical evolutions of the sample during dynamic phenomena such as the cell endocytosis process. Current techniques for nanomechanical mapping, however, are only capable of capturing static elasticity of the material, or the material viscoelasticity in a narrow frequency band around the resonant frequency(ies) of the cantilever used, not competent for broadband nanomechanical mapping, nor acquiring topography image of the sample simultaneously. These limitations are addressed in this work by enabling the augmentation of an excitation force stimuli of rich frequency spectrum for nanomechanical mapping in the imaging process. Kalman-filtering technique is exploited to decouple and split the mixed signals for imaging and mapping, respectively. Then the sample indentation generated is quantified online via a system-inversion method, and the effects of the indentation generated and the topography tracking error on the topography quantification are taken into account. Moreover, a data-driven feedforward-feedback control is utilized to track the sample topography. The proposed approach is illustrated through experimental implementation on a polydimethylsiloxane sample with a pre-fabricated pattern.

  18. Nonlinear vibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers by considering the Hertzian contact theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, A., E-mail: a_sadeghi@srbiau.ac.ir [Islamic Azad Univ., Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zohoor, H. [Sharif Univ. of Technology, Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); The Academy of Sciences if I.R. Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The nonlinear flexural vibration for a rectangular atomic force microscope cantilever is investigated by using Timoshenko beam theory. In this paper, the normal and tangential tip-sample interaction forces are found from a Hertzian contact model and the effects of the contact position, normal and lateral contact stiffness, tip height, thickness of the beam, and the angle between the cantilever and the sample surface on the nonlinear frequency to linear frequency ratio are studied. The differential quadrature method is employed to solve the nonlinear differential equations of motion. The results show that softening behavior is seen for most cases and by increasing the normal contact stiffness, the frequency ratio increases for the first mode, but for the second mode, the situation is reversed. The nonlinear-frequency to linear-frequency ratio increases by increasing the Timoshenko beam parameter, but decreases by increasing the contact position for constant amplitude for the first and second modes. For the first mode, the frequency ratio decreases by increasing both of the lateral contact stiffness and the tip height, but increases by increasing the angle α between the cantilever and sample surface. (author)

  19. Dual ion beam irradiation system for in situ observation with electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Tetuo; Hojou, Kiiti; Furuno, Sigemi; Otsu, Hitosi; Izui, Kazuhiko.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a new in situ observation system for dynamic processes under dual ion beam irradiation. The system consists of a modified 400 keV analytical electron microscope (JEOL, JEM-4000FX) and two 40 kV ion beam accelerators. This system allows evaluation of microscopic changes of structure and chemical bonding state of materials in the dynamic processes under two kinds of ion beam irradiations, that is required for the simulation test of the first wall of nuclear fusion reactors onto which He + , H + , and H 2 + ions are irradiated simultaneously. These two ion accelerators were equipped symmetrically both sides of the electron microscope and individually controlled. Each ion beam extracted from a duo-plasmatron ion gun is bent downward by an angle of 30deg with a mass-separating magnet, and introduced into specimen chamber of the electron microscope. Inside the specimen chamber the beam is deflected again by an angle of 30deg with an electrostatic prism so as to be incident on the specimen surface. Finally, two ion beams from both side are incident on the specimen surface at an angle of 60deg. The maximum ion current density of helium is more than 250μA/cm 2 at the specimen at an ion energy of 17 keV. Images of the electron microscope during dual ion beam irradiation are observed through a TV camera and recorded with a VTR. (author)

  20. Observation of a Ag protrusion on a Ag2S island using a scanning tunneling microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Ohno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A silver sulfide (Ag2S island as an ionic conductor in resistive switching memories was formed and a protrusion of silver from the Ag2S formed by an electrochemical reaction was observed using a scanning tunneling microscope.

  1. Robust approach to maximize the range and accuracy of force application in atomic force microscopes with nonlinear position-sensitive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E C C M; Vliet, K J van

    2006-01-01

    The atomic force microscope is used increasingly to investigate the mechanical properties of materials via sample displacement under an applied force. However, both the extent of forces attainable and the accuracy of those forces measurements are significantly limited by the optical lever configuration that is commonly used to infer nanoscale deflection of the cantilever. We present a robust and general approach to characterize and compensate for the nonlinearity of the position-sensitive optical device via data processing, requiring no modification of existing instrumentation. We demonstrate that application of this approach reduced the maximum systematic error on the gradient of a force-displacement response from 50% to 5%, and doubled the calibrated force application range. Finally, we outline an experimental protocol that optimizes the use of the quasi-linear range of the most commonly available optical feedback configurations and also accounts for the residual systematic error, allowing the user to benefit from the full detection range of these indirect force sensors

  2. A simulation of atomic force microscope microcantilever in the tapping mode utilizing couple stress theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    The nonlinear vibration behavior of a Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM) microcantilever under acoustic excitation force has been modeled and investigated. In dynamic AFM, the tip-surface interactions are strongly nonlinear, rapidly changing and hysteretic. First, the governing differential equation of motion and boundary conditions for dynamic analysis are obtained using the modified couple stress theory. Afterwards, closed-form expressions for nonlinear frequency and effective nonlinear damping ratio are derived utilizing perturbation method. The effect of tip connection position on the vibration behavior of the microcantilever are also analyzed. The results show that nonlinear frequency is size dependent. According to the results, an increase in the equilibrium separation between the tip and the sample surface reduces the overall effect of van der Waals forces on the nonlinear frequency, but its effect on the effective nonlinear damping ratio is negligible. The results also indicate that both the change in the distance between tip and cantilever free end and the reduction of tip radius have significant effects on the accuracy and sensitivity of the TM-AFM in the measurement of surface forces. The hysteretic behavior has been observed in the near resonance frequency response due to softening and hardening of the forced vibration response. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct Atomic Force Microscopy Observation of DNA Tile Crystal Growth at the Single-Molecule Level

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Constantine G.; Hariadi, Rizal F.; Winfree, Erik

    2012-01-01

    While the theoretical implications of models of DNA tile self-assembly have been extensively researched and such models have been used to design DNA tile systems for use in experiments, there has been little research testing the fundamental assumptions of those models. In this paper, we use direct observation of individual tile attachments and detachments of two DNA tile systems on a mica surface imaged with an atomic force microscope (AFM) to compile statistics of tile attachments and detach...

  4. MM99.50 - Surface Topography Characterization Using an Atomic Force Microscope Mounted on a Coordinate Measuring Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiffre, Leonardo De; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kofod, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the construction, testing and use of an integrated system for topographic characterization of fine surfaces on parts having relatively big dimensions. An atomic force microscope (AFM) was mounted on a manual three-coordinate measuring machine (CMM) achieving free positioning o...

  5. Reconstruction of the Tip-Surface Interaction Potential by Analysis of the Brownian Motion of an Atomic Force Microscope Tip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, O.H.; Kuipers, L.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    2000-01-01

    The thermal movement of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is used to reconstruct the tip-surface interaction potential. If a tip is brought into the vicinity of a surface, its movement is governed by the sum of the harmonic cantilever potential and the tip-surface interaction potential. By

  6. Detection of erythrocytes influenced by aging and type 2 diabetes using atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hua; Xing, Xiaobo [Chemistry Department, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhao, Hongxia [Chemistry Department, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510090 (China); Chen, Yong [Institute for Advanced Study, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Huang, Xun [Chemistry Department, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ma, Shuyuan [Chemistry Department, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ye, Hongyan [Chemistry Department, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Cai, Jiye, E-mail: tjycai@jnu.edu.cn [Chemistry Department, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2010-01-22

    The pathophysiological changes of erythrocytes are detected at the molecular scale, which is important to reveal the onset of diseases. Type 2 diabetes is an age-related metabolic disorder with high prevalence in elderly (or old) people. Up to now, there are no treatments to cure diabetes. Therefore, early detection and the ability to monitor the progression of type 2 diabetes are very important for developing effective therapies. Type 2 diabetes is associated with high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. These abnormalities may disturb the architecture and functions of erythrocytes at molecular scale. In this study, the aging- and diabetes-induced changes in morphological and biomechanical properties of erythrocytes are clearly characterized at nanometer scale using atomic force microscope (AFM). The structural information and mechanical properties of the cell surface membranes of erythrocytes are very important indicators for determining the healthy, diseased or aging status. So, AFM may potentially be developed into a powerful tool in diagnosing diseases.

  7. Mechanically modulated dewetting by atomic force microscope for micro- and nano- droplet array fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; Li, Pan; Wang, Dong; Li, Longhai; Xie, Shuangxi; Liu, Lianqing; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Wen Jung

    2014-10-06

    Organizing a material into well-defined patterns during the dewetting process provides an attractive micro-/nano-fabrication method without using a conventional lithographic process, and hence, offers potential applications in organic electronics, optics systems, and memory devices. We report here how the mechanical modification of polymer surface by an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) can be used to guide thin film dewetting evolution and break the intrinsic spatial correlation of spontaneous instability. An AFM is used to implement the mechanical modification of progressively narrow grids to investigate the influence of pattern size on the modulation of ultrathin polystyrene films dewetting evolution. For films with different initial thicknesses, when grid size is close to or below the characteristic wavelength of instability, the spinodal dewetting is suppressed, and film rupture is restricted to the cutting trench. We will show in this paper it is possible to generate only one droplet per gridded area on a thin film subsequent to nucleation dominated dewetting on a non-patterned substrate. Furthermore, when the grid periodicity exceeds the spinodal length, the number of droplets in predefined areas gradually approaches that associated with unconfined dewetting.

  8. Modelling atomic scale manipulation with the non-contact atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevethan, T; Watkins, M; Kantorovich, L N; Shluger, A L; Polesel-Maris, J; Gauthier, S

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of calculations performed to model the process of lateral manipulation of an oxygen vacancy in the MgO(001) surface using the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM). The potential energy surfaces for the manipulation as a function of tip position are determined from atomistic modelling of the MgO(001) surface interacting with a Mg terminated MgO tip. These energies are then used to model the dynamical evolution of the system as the tip oscillates and at a finite temperature using a kinetic Monte Carlo method. The manipulation process is strongly dependent on the lateral position of the tip and the system temperature. It is also found that the expectation value of the point at which the vacancy jumps depends on the trajectory of the oscillating cantilever as the surface is approached. The effect of the manipulation on the operation of the NC-AFM is modelled with a virtual dynamic AFM, which explicitly simulates the entire experimental instrumentation and control loops. We show how measurable experimental signals can result from a single controlled atomic scale event and suggest the most favourable conditions for achieving successful atomic scale manipulation experimentally

  9. Atomic force microscope cantilever as an encoding sensor for real-time displacement measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiaomei; Koenders, Ludger; Wolff, Helmut; Haertig, Frank; Schilling, Meinhard

    2010-01-01

    A tuning fork-based atomic force microscope cantilever has been investigated for application as an encoding sensor for real-time displacement measurement. The algorithm used to encode the displacement is based on the direct count of the integer pitches of a known grating, and the calculation of the fractional parts of a pitch at the beginning and during displacement. A cross-correlation technique has been adopted and applied to the real-time signal filtering process for the determination of the pitch during scanning by using a half sinusoidal waveform template. For the first investigation, a 1D sinusoidal grating with the pitch of 300 nm is used. The repeatability of displacement measurements over a distance of 70 µm is better than 2.2 nm. As the first application, the real-time displacement of a scanning stage is measured by the new encoding principle as it is moved in an open-loop mode and closed-loop mode based on its built-in capacitance sensor

  10. The asymmetrical structure of Golgi apparatus membranes revealed by in situ atomic force microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiao Xu

    Full Text Available The Golgi apparatus has attracted intense attentions due to its fascinating morphology and vital role as the pivot of cellular secretory pathway since its discovery. However, its complex structure at the molecular level remains elusive due to limited approaches. In this study, the structure of Golgi apparatus, including the Golgi stack, cisternal structure, relevant tubules and vesicles, were directly visualized by high-resolution atomic force microscope. We imaged both sides of Golgi apparatus membranes and revealed that the outer leaflet of Golgi membranes is relatively smooth while the inner membrane leaflet is rough and covered by dense proteins. With the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and Triton X-100, we confirmed the existence of lipid rafts in Golgi apparatus membrane, which are mostly in the size of 20 nm -200 nm and appear irregular in shape. Our results may be of significance to reveal the structure-function relationship of the Golgi complex and pave the way for visualizing the endomembrane system in mammalian cells at the molecular level.

  11. Detection of erythrocytes influenced by aging and type 2 diabetes using atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hua; Xing, Xiaobo; Zhao, Hongxia; Chen, Yong; Huang, Xun; Ma, Shuyuan; Ye, Hongyan; Cai, Jiye

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiological changes of erythrocytes are detected at the molecular scale, which is important to reveal the onset of diseases. Type 2 diabetes is an age-related metabolic disorder with high prevalence in elderly (or old) people. Up to now, there are no treatments to cure diabetes. Therefore, early detection and the ability to monitor the progression of type 2 diabetes are very important for developing effective therapies. Type 2 diabetes is associated with high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. These abnormalities may disturb the architecture and functions of erythrocytes at molecular scale. In this study, the aging- and diabetes-induced changes in morphological and biomechanical properties of erythrocytes are clearly characterized at nanometer scale using atomic force microscope (AFM). The structural information and mechanical properties of the cell surface membranes of erythrocytes are very important indicators for determining the healthy, diseased or aging status. So, AFM may potentially be developed into a powerful tool in diagnosing diseases.

  12. An in vitro atomic force microscopic study of commercially available dental luting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordje, Antonijevic; Denis, Brajkovic; Nenadovic, Milos; Petar, Milovanovic; Marija, Djuric; Zlatko, Rakocevic

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the surface roughness parameters of four different types of dental luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Five specimens (8 mm high and 1 mm thick) of each cement were made using metal ring steelless molds. Atomic Force Microscope was employed to analyze different surface texture parameters of the materials. Bearing ratio analysis was used to calculate the potential microgap size between the cement and implant material and to calculate the depth of the valleys on the cement surface, while power spectral density (PSD) measurements were performed to measure the percentage of the surface prone to bacterial adhesion. Glass ionomer cement showed significantly lower value of average surface roughness then the other groups of the materials (P cement experience the lowest percentage of the surface which promote bacterial colonization. Glas ionomer cements present the surface roughness parameters that are less favorable for bacterial adhesion than that of zinc phosphate, resin-modified glass ionomer and resin cements. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. AN INTELLIGENT NEURO-FUZZY TERMINAL SLIDING MODE CONTROL METHOD WITH APPLICATION TO ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seied Yasser Nikoo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a neuro-fuzzy fast terminal sliding mode control method is proposed for controlling a class of nonlinear systems with bounded uncertainties and disturbances. In this method, a nonlinear terminal sliding surface is firstly designed. Then, this sliding surface is considered as input for an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system which is the main controller. A proportinal-integral-derivative controller is also used to asist the neuro-fuzzy controller in order to improve the performance of the system at the begining stage of control operation. In addition, bee algorithm is used in this paper to update the weights of neuro-fuzzy system as well as the parameters of the proportinal-integral-derivative controller. The proposed control scheme is simulated for vibration control in a model of atomic force microscope system and the results are compared with conventional sliding mode controllers. The simulation results show that the chattering effect in the proposed controller is decreased in comparison with the sliding mode and the terminal sliding mode controllers. Also, the method provides the advantages of fast convergence and low model dependency compared to the conventional methods.

  14. Atomic Force Microscope Imaging of the Aggregation of Mouse Immunoglobulin G Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Xia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouse immunoglobulin G (Ig G1 and the mixture of Ig G1 and Ig G2 deposited on mica were imaged with an atomic force microscope at room temperature and ambient pressure. At a concentration around 1.0mg/L, the molecules were well dispersed. 2~3 days after sample preparation, both Ig G1 and the mixture could self- assemble into different shapes and further form some types of local-ordered toroidal aggregations (monotoroidal, intercrossed toroidal, concentric toroidal, etc.. The number of monomers was not identical in the different toroidal aggregations but in a same circle, the shapes of polymer self-assembled by several monomolecules were found to be almost the same. There was difference between the aggregation behavior of Ig G1 and the mixture. The mechanism of Ig G molecule aggregation was ascribed to the “Y” shape and loops structure of Ig G molecule.

  15. Photo-assisted local oxidation of GaN using an atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, J S; Hu, Z S; Lu, T Y; Chen, L W; Chen, S W; Lin, T Y; Hsiao, C-L; Chen, K-H; Chen, L-C

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces a photo-assisted atomic force microscope (AFM) local oxidation technique which is capable of producing highly smooth oxide patterns with heights reaching several tens of nanometres on both n- and p-types of GaN (and in principle on most semiconductors) without the use of chemicals. The novel methodology relies on UV illumination of the surface of the substrate during conventional AFM local oxidation. A low 1.2 V threshold voltage for n-type GaN was obtained, which can be explained by UV photo-generation of excess electron-hole pairs in the substrate near the junction, thereby reducing the electric field required to drive carrier flow through the tip-sample Schottky barrier. It was demonstrated that the presence or absence of light alone was sufficient to switch the growth of the oxide on or off. The photo-assisted AFM oxidation technique is of immediate interest to the semiconductor industry for the fabrication of GaN-based complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices and nanodevices, improves chances for AFM-type data storage, and presents new degrees of freedom for process control technique

  16. In Situ Roughness Measurements for the Solar Cell Industry Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higinio González-Jorge

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Areal roughness parameters always need to be under control in the thin film solar cell industry because of their close relationship with the electrical efficiency of the cells. In this work, these parameters are evaluated for measurements carried out in a typical fabrication area for this industry. Measurements are made using a portable atomic force microscope on the CNC diamond cutting machine where an initial sample of transparent conductive oxide is cut into four pieces. The method is validated by making a comparison between the parameters obtained in this process and in the laboratory under optimal conditions. Areal roughness parameters and Fourier Spectral Analysis of the data show good compatibility and open the possibility to use this type of measurement instrument to perform in situ quality control. This procedure gives a sample for evaluation without destroying any of the transparent conductive oxide; in this way 100% of the production can be tested, so improving the measurement time and rate of production.

  17. ON ESTIMATING FORCE-FREENESS BASED ON OBSERVED MAGNETOGRAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X. M.; Zhang, M.; Su, J. T.

    2017-01-01

    It is a common practice in the solar physics community to test whether or not measured photospheric or chromospheric vector magnetograms are force-free, using the Maxwell stress as a measure. Some previous studies have suggested that magnetic fields of active regions in the solar chromosphere are close to being force-free whereas there is no consistency among previous studies on whether magnetic fields of active regions in the solar photosphere are force-free or not. Here we use three kinds of representative magnetic fields (analytical force-free solutions, modeled solar-like force-free fields, and observed non-force-free fields) to discuss how measurement issues such as limited field of view (FOV), instrument sensitivity, and measurement error could affect the estimation of force-freeness based on observed magnetograms. Unlike previous studies that focus on discussing the effect of limited FOV or instrument sensitivity, our calculation shows that just measurement error alone can significantly influence the results of estimates of force-freeness, due to the fact that measurement errors in horizontal magnetic fields are usually ten times larger than those in vertical fields. This property of measurement errors, interacting with the particular form of a formula for estimating force-freeness, would result in wrong judgments of the force-freeness: a truly force-free field may be mistakenly estimated as being non-force-free and a truly non-force-free field may be estimated as being force-free. Our analysis calls for caution when interpreting estimates of force-freeness based on measured magnetograms, and also suggests that the true photospheric magnetic field may be further away from being force-free than it currently appears to be.

  18. Topotactic changes on η-Mo4O11 caused by biased atomic force microscope tip and cw-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovšak, Miloš; Šutar, Petra; Goreshnik, Evgeny; Mihailovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We report influencing electronic properties of η-Mo 4 O 11 . • With the biased AFM tip we induce the surface potential changes on η-Mo 4 O 11 . • We used cw-laser to induced similar effect on surface potential on η-Mo 4 O 11 . • We do not influence the surface and topography of the samples. • No change in topography of samples indicates the topotactic transformation. - Abstract: We present topotactic changes on Mo 4 O 11 crystals induced by a biased atomic force microscope tip and continuous laser. The transformation does not change the topography of the samples, while the surface potential shows remarkable changes on areas where the biased AFM tip was applied. No structural changes were observed by Raman spectroscopy, but AFM scans revealed changes to surface potential due to laser illumination. The observed phenomenon could be potentially useful for memristive memory devices considering the fact that properties of other molybdenum oxides vary from metallic to insulators.

  19. Pancam and microscopic imager observations of dust on the Spirit Rovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaughan....[], Alicia F.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Walter, Goetz

    2010-01-01

    This work describes dust deposits on the Spirit Rover over 2000 sols through examination of Pancam and Microscopic Imager observations of specific locations on the rover body, including portions of the solar array, Pancam and Mini-TES calibration targets, and the magnets. This data set reveals...... the three "cleaning events" experienced by Spirit to date, the spectral properties of dust, and the tendency of dust particles to form aggregates 100 um and larger...

  20. Electro-microscopic observations of liver lesions after intravenous inoculation of mouldy hay extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadmi, A; Griffel, B

    1985-01-01

    With the aid of the electron microscope, a number of histopathological changes in the liver of mice caused by mycotoxins from mouldy hay were examined and studied. These changes were observed in the mitochondria, the cell nucleus, and the cell membranes, and included fatty and parenchymal degeneration, plasma granulation, vacuolisation and vesiculation, glycogen secretion, incorporation into RNA, karyolysis and karyolaxis, and space of Disse constriction.

  1. Observation of microorganism colonies using a scanning-laser-beam pH-sensing microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, M.; Inoue, S.; Oishi, R.; Yoshinobu, T.; Iwasaki, H.

    1995-01-01

    The extracellular pH-distribution of colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) were observed using a newly-developed scanning-laser-beam pH-sensing microscope. Colonies were incubated either on top of agarose plates or between the pH-sensing surface and the agar. In the latter case, colony growth was observed in-situ. The colonies could be observed within a period as short as 8 h for E. coli. The pH-distribution profiles by the colonies were found to be very sharp, in agreement with simulation results. (author)

  2. Difficulties in fitting the thermal response of atomic force microscope cantilevers for stiffness calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, D G

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the difficulties of calibrating atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, in particular the effect calibrating under light fluid-loading (in air) and under heavy fluid-loading (in water) has on the ability to use thermal motion response to fit model parameters that are used to determine cantilever stiffness. For the light fluid-loading case, the resonant frequency and quality factor can easily be used to determine stiffness. The extension of this approach to the heavy fluid-loading case is troublesome due to the low quality factor (high damping) caused by fluid-loading. Simple calibration formulae are difficult to realize, and the best approach is often to curve-fit the thermal response, using the parameters of natural frequency and mass ratio so that the curve-fit's response is within some acceptable tolerance of the actual thermal response. The parameters can then be used to calculate the cantilever stiffness. However, the process of curve-fitting can lead to erroneous results unless suitable care is taken. A feedback model of the fluid–structure interaction between the unloaded cantilever and the hydrodynamic drag provides a framework for fitting a modeled thermal response to a measured response and for evaluating the parametric uncertainty of the fit. The cases of uncertainty in the natural frequency, the mass ratio, and combined uncertainty are presented and the implications for system identification and stiffness calibration using curve-fitting techniques are discussed. Finally, considerations and recommendations for the calibration of AFM cantilevers are given in light of the results of this paper

  3. X-ray holographic microscopy using the atomic-force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.; Jacobsen, C.J.; Lindaas, S.

    1993-09-01

    The present authors have been seeking for some time to improve the resolution of holographic microscopy and have engaged in a continuing series of experiments using the X1A soft x-ray undulator beam line at Brookhaven. The principle strategy for pushing the resolution lower in these experiments has been the use of polymer resists as x-ray detectors and the primary goal has been to develop the technique to become useful for examining wet biological material. In the present paper the authors report on progress in the use of resist for high-spatial-resolution x-ray detection. This is the key step in in-line holography and the one which sets the ultimate limit to the image resolution. The actual recording has always been quite easy, given a high-brightness undulator source, but the difficult step was the readout of the recorded pattern. The authors describe in what follows how they have built a special instrument: an atomic force microscope (AFM) to read holograms recorded in resist. They report the technical reasons for building, rather than buying, such an instrument and they give details of the design and performance of the device. The authors also describe the first attempts to use the system for real holography and the authors show results of both recorded holograms and the corresponding reconstructed images. Finally, the authors try to analyze the effect that these advances are likely to have on the future prospects for success in applications of x-ray holography and the degree to which the other technical systems that are needed for such success are available or within reach

  4. Development of a shear-force scanning near-field cathodoluminescence microscope for characterization of nanostructures' optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercu, N B; Troyon, M; Molinari, M

    2016-09-01

    An original scanning near-field cathodoluminescence microscope for nanostructure characterization has been developed and successfully tested. By using a bimorph piezoelectric stack both as actuator and detector, the developed setup constitutes a real improvement compared to previously reported SEM-based solutions. The technique combines a scanning probe and a scanning electron microscope in order to simultaneously offer near-field cathodoluminescence and topographic images of the sample. Share-force topography and cathodoluminescence measurements on GaN, SiC and ZnO nanostructures using the developed setup are presented showing a nanometric resolution in both topography and cathodoluminescence images with increased sensitivity compared to classical luminescence techniques. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Analyzing the Effect of Capillary Force on Vibrational Performance of the Cantilever of an Atomic Force Microscope in Tapping Mode with Double Piezoelectric Layers in an Air Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahavandi, Amir; Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the effects of forces exerted on the cantilever probe tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM). These forces vary according to the separation distance between the probe tip and the surface of the sample being examined. Hence, at a distance away from the surface (farther than d(on)), these forces have an attractive nature and are of Van der Waals type, and when the probe tip is situated in the range of a₀≤ d(ts) ≤ d(on), the capillary force is added to the Van der Waals force. At a distance of d(ts) ≤ a₀, the Van der Waals and capillary forces remain constant at intermolecular distances, and the contact repulsive force repels the probe tip from the surface of sample. The capillary force emerges due to the contact of thin water films with a thickness of h(c) which have accumulated on the sample and probe. Under environmental conditions a layer of water or hydrocarbon often forms between the probe tip and sample. The capillary meniscus can grow until the rate of evaporation equals the rate of condensation. For each of the above forces, different models are presented. The smoothness or roughness of the surfaces and the geometry of the cantilever tip have a significant effect on the modeling of forces applied on the probe tip. Van der Waals and the repulsive forces are considered to be the same in all the simulations, and only the capillary force is altered in order to evaluate the role of this force in the AFM-based modeling. Therefore, in view of the remarkable advantages of the piezoelectric microcantilever and also the extensive applications of the tapping mode, we investigate vibrational motion of the piezoelectric microcantilever in the tapping mode. The cantilever mentioned is entirely covered by two piezoelectric layers that carry out both the actuation of the probe tip and the measuringof its position.

  6. Dynamic Low-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope Freeze Drying Observation for Fresh Water Algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsen, H.T.; Ghaly, W.A.; Zahran, N.F.; Helal, A.I.

    2010-01-01

    A new perpetration method for serving in dynamic examinations of the fresh water algae is developed in connection with the Low-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope (LV-SEM) freeze drying technique. Specimens are collected from fresh water of Ismailia channel then transferred directly to freeze by liquid nitrogen and dried in the chamber of the scanning electron microscope in the low vacuum mode. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that the drying method presented the microstructure of algae. Dehydration in a graded ethanol series is not necessary in the new method. Dried algae specimen is observed in SEM high vacuum mode after conductive coating at higher resolution. Low-vacuum SEM freeze drying technique is a simple, time-saving and reproducible method for scanning electron microscopy that is applicable to various aquatic microorganisms covered with soft tissues.

  7. Microscopic observation of pattern attack by aggressive ions on finished surface of aluminium alloy sacrificial anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaifol Samsu; Muhammad Daud; Siti Radiah Mohd Kamarudin; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Azali Muhammad; Mohd Shaari Ripin; Rusni Rejab; Mohd Shariff Sattar

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a microscopic observation on submerged finished surface of aluminium alloy sacrificial anode. Experimental tests were carried out on polished surface aluminium anode exposed to seawater containing aggressive ions in order to observe of pattern corrosion attack on corroding surface of anode. Results have shown, at least under the present testing condition, that surface of sacrificial anode were attack by an aggressive ion such as chloride along grain boundaries. In addition, results of microanalysis showed that the corrosion products on surface of aluminium alloy have Al, Zn and O element for all sample and within the pit was consists of Al, Zn, O and Cl element. (author)

  8. Radiation ordering in quenched alloys observed 'in situ' in the high voltage microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendeloo, G. van; Landuyt, J. van; Amelinckx, S.

    1979-01-01

    Different alloys with a face centered cubic disordered structure have been electron irradiated in the quenched or short range order state under direct observation in a high voltage electron microscope. Ordering due to 1 MeV irradiation has been observed in Au 4 MN, Ni 4 Mo and Cu 3 Pd. Care has been taken to avoid ordering due to the thermal effect of the electron beam. It has been demonstrated that although similar states of order can be achieved by thermal and irradiation ordering, the path followed can be different. (author)

  9. Observations of a human hair shaft with an x-ray microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Hwa Shik [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 31 San, Hyoja-dong, Pohang, KyungBuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Suk-Won [Nano Mechatronics Research Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, 455-6 Masan-ri, Jinwi-myon, Pyungtaek, Kyungki-do, 451-865 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-21

    We observed the internal structures of a human hair shaft using x-ray microscopes with a spatial resolution in the range from a few microns to less than 100 nm. The energy of the x-ray used is 6.95 keV. The Zernike phase contrast together with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm enabled us to see the cuticles of scales, the cortex of macrofibrils and the medulla. All these internal features and more can easily be observed with no sample preparation including staining.

  10. Observations of a human hair shaft with an x-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Hwa Shik; Jung, Suk-Won

    2005-01-01

    We observed the internal structures of a human hair shaft using x-ray microscopes with a spatial resolution in the range from a few microns to less than 100 nm. The energy of the x-ray used is 6.95 keV. The Zernike phase contrast together with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm enabled us to see the cuticles of scales, the cortex of macrofibrils and the medulla. All these internal features and more can easily be observed with no sample preparation including staining

  11. In situ transmission electron microscope observation of the formation of fuzzy structures on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, M; Watanabe, T; Nagashima, H; Nishijima, D; Doerner, R P; Krasheninnikov, S I; Sagara, A; Yoshida, N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the formation processes of tungsten nano-structures, so called fuzz, in situ transmission electron microscope observations during helium ion irradiation and high temperature annealing have been performed. The irradiation with 3 keV He + from room temperature to 1273 K is found to cause high-density helium bubbles in tungsten with no significant change in the surface structure. At higher temperatures, surface morphology changes were observed even without helium irradiation due probably to surface diffusion of tungsten atoms driven by surface tension. It is clearly shown that this morphology change is enhanced with helium irradiation, i.e. the formation of helium bubbles. (paper)

  12. Humidity-dependent bacterial cells functional morphometry investigations using atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiyan, Hike; Vasilchenko, Alexey; Deryabin, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    The effect of a relative humidity (RH) in a range of 93-65% on morphological and elastic properties of Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli cells was evaluated using atomic force microscopy. It is shown that gradual dehumidification of bacteria environment has no significant effect on cell dimensional features and considerably decreases them only at 65% RH. The increasing of the bacteria cell wall roughness and elasticity occurs at the same time. Observed changes indicate that morphological properties of B. cereus are rather stable in wide range of relative humidity, whereas E. coli are more sensitive to drying, significantly increasing roughness and stiffness parameters at RH

  13. Humidity-Dependent Bacterial Cells Functional Morphometry Investigations Using Atomic Force Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hike Nikiyan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a relative humidity (RH in a range of 93–65% on morphological and elastic properties of Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli cells was evaluated using atomic force microscopy. It is shown that gradual dehumidification of bacteria environment has no significant effect on cell dimensional features and considerably decreases them only at 65% RH. The increasing of the bacteria cell wall roughness and elasticity occurs at the same time. Observed changes indicate that morphological properties of B. cereus are rather stable in wide range of relative humidity, whereas E. coli are more sensitive to drying, significantly increasing roughness and stiffness parameters at RH ≤ 84% RH. It is discussed the dependence of the response features on differences in cell wall structure of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells.

  14. Longitudinal tire force estimation based on sliding mode observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Hadri, A.; Cadiou, J.C.; M' Sirdi, N.K. [Versailles Univ., Paris (France). Lab. de Robotique; Beurier, G.; Delanne, Y. [Lab. Central des Ponts, Centre de Nantes (France)

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents an estimation method for vehicle longitudinal dynamics, particularly the tractive/braking force. The estimation can be used to detect a critical driving situation to improve security. It can be used also in several vehicle control systems. The main characteristics of the vehicle longitudinal dynamics were taken into account in the model used to design an observer and computer simulations. The state variables are the angular wheel velocity, vehicle velocity and the longitudinal tire force. The proposed differential equation of the tractive/braking force is derived using the concept of relaxation length. The observer designed is based on the sliding mode approach using only the angular wheel velocity measurement. The proposed method of estimation is verified through a one-wheel simulation model with a ''Magic formula'' tire model. Simulations results show an excellent reconstruction of the tire force. (orig.)

  15. Scanning electron microscopic observations of fibrous structure of cemento-dentinal junction in healthy teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratebha, B; Jaikumar, N D; Sudhakar, R

    2014-01-01

    The cemento-dentinal junction (CDJ) is a structural and biologic link between cementum and dentin present in the roots of teeth. Conflicting reports about the origin, structure and composition of this layer are present in literature. The width of this junctional tissue is reported to be about 2-4 μm with adhesion of cementum and dentin by proteoglycans and by collagen fiber intermingling. The objective of this study is to observe and report the fibrous architecture of the CDJ of healthy tooth roots. A total of 15 healthy teeth samples were collected, sectioned into halves, demineralized in 5% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, processed using NaOH maceration technique and observed under a scanning electron microscope. The CDJ appeared to be a fibril poor groove with a width of 2-4 µm. Few areas of collagen fiber intermingling could be appreciated. A detailed observation of these tissues has been presented.

  16. Microscopic observation of zenithal bistable switching in nematic devices with different surface relief structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uche, C; Elston, S J; Parry-Jones, L A

    2005-01-01

    Nematic liquid crystals have been shown to exhibit zenithal electro-optic bistability in devices containing sinusoidal and deformed sinusoidal gratings. Recently it has been shown that zenithal bistable states can also be supported at isolated edges of square gratings. In this paper, we present microscopic observations of bistability in cells containing sinusoidal gratings and long-pitch square gratings. We have also investigated a novel display based on square wells. High frame-rate video microscopy was used to obtain time-sequenced images when the devices were switched with monopolar pulses. These show that zenithal bistable switching can occur by two different processes: (i) domain growth (observed in cells containing sinusoidal gratings) and (ii) homogenous switching (observed in cells containing isolated edges

  17. Force illusions and drifts observed during muscle vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschechtko, Sasha; Cuadra, Cristian; Latash, Mark L

    2018-01-01

    We explored predictions of a scheme that views position and force perception as a result of measuring proprioceptive signals within a reference frame set by ongoing efferent process. In particular, this hypothesis predicts force illusions caused by muscle vibration and mediated via changes in both afferent and efferent components of kinesthesia. Healthy subjects performed accurate steady force production tasks by pressing with the four fingers of one hand (the task hand) on individual force sensors with and without visual feedback. At various times during the trials, subjects matched the perceived force using the other hand. High-frequency vibration was applied to one or both of the forearms (over the hand and finger extensors). Without visual feedback, subjects showed a drop in the task hand force, which was significantly smaller under the vibration of that forearm. Force production by the matching hand was consistently higher than that of the task hand. Vibrating one of the forearms affected the matching hand in a manner consistent with the perception of higher magnitude of force produced by the vibrated hand. The findings were consistent between the dominant and nondominant hands. The effects of vibration on both force drift and force mismatching suggest that vibration led to shifts in both signals from proprioceptors and the efferent component of perception, the referent coordinate and/or coactivation command. The observations fit the hypothesis on combined perception of kinematic-kinetic variables with little specificity of different groups of peripheral receptors that all contribute to perception of forces and coordinates. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We show that vibration of hand/finger extensors produces consistent errors in finger force perception. Without visual feedback, finger force drifted to lower values without a drift in the matching force produced by the other hand; hand extensor vibration led to smaller finger force drift. The findings fit the scheme with

  18. Confronting the Uncertainty in Aerosol Forcing Using Comprehensive Observational Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. S.; Regayre, L. A.; Yoshioka, M.; Pringle, K.; Sexton, D.; Lee, L.; Carslaw, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of aerosols on cloud droplet concentrations and radiative properties is the largest uncertainty in the overall radiative forcing of climate over the industrial period. In this study, we take advantage of a large perturbed parameter ensemble of simulations from the UK Met Office HadGEM-UKCA model (the aerosol component of the UK Earth System Model) to comprehensively sample uncertainty in aerosol forcing. Uncertain aerosol and atmospheric parameters cause substantial aerosol forcing uncertainty in climatically important regions. As the aerosol radiative forcing itself is unobservable, we investigate the potential for observations of aerosol and radiative properties to act as constraints on the large forcing uncertainty. We test how eight different theoretically perfect aerosol and radiation observations can constrain the forcing uncertainty over Europe. We find that the achievable constraint is weak unless many diverse observations are used simultaneously. This is due to the complex relationships between model output responses and the multiple interacting parameter uncertainties: compensating model errors mean there are many ways to produce the same model output (known as model equifinality) which impacts on the achievable constraint. However, using all eight observable quantities together we show that the aerosol forcing uncertainty can potentially be reduced by around 50%. This reduction occurs as we reduce a large sample of model variants (over 1 million) that cover the full parametric uncertainty to around 1% that are observationally plausible.Constraining the forcing uncertainty using real observations is a more complex undertaking, in which we must account for multiple further uncertainties including measurement uncertainties, structural model uncertainties and the model discrepancy from reality. Here, we make a first attempt to determine the true potential constraint on the forcing uncertainty from our model that is achievable using a comprehensive

  19. Direct atomic force microscopy observation of DNA tile crystal growth at the single-molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Constantine G; Hariadi, Rizal F; Winfree, Erik

    2012-06-27

    While the theoretical implications of models of DNA tile self-assembly have been extensively researched and such models have been used to design DNA tile systems for use in experiments, there has been little research testing the fundamental assumptions of those models. In this paper, we use direct observation of individual tile attachments and detachments of two DNA tile systems on a mica surface imaged with an atomic force microscope (AFM) to compile statistics of tile attachments and detachments. We show that these statistics fit the widely used kinetic Tile Assembly Model and demonstrate AFM movies as a viable technique for directly investigating DNA tile systems during growth rather than after assembly.

  20. Corrosion initiation of stainless steel in HCl solution studied using electrochemical noise and in-situ atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yan; Hu Ronggang; Wang Jingrun; Huang Yongxia; Lin Changjian

    2009-01-01

    An in-situ atomic force microscope (AFM), optical microscope and electrochemical noise (ECN) techniques were applied to the investigation of corrosion initiations in an early stage of 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel immersed in 0.5 M HCl solution. The electrochemical current noise data has been analyzed using discrete wavelet transform (DWT). For the first time, the origin of wavelet coefficients is discussed based on the correlation between the evolution of the energy distribution plot (EDP) of wavelet coefficients and topographic changes. It is found that the occurrence of initiation of metastable pitting at susceptive sites is resulted from the reductive breakdown of passive film of stainless steel in the diluted HCL solution. The coefficients d 4 -d 6 are originated from metastable pitting, d 7 represents the formation and growth of stable pitting while d 8 corresponds to the general corrosion.

  1. Observers for vehicle tyre/road forces estimation: experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumiati, M.; Victorino, A.; Lechner, D.; Baffet, G.; Charara, A.

    2010-11-01

    The motion of a vehicle is governed by the forces generated between the tyres and the road. Knowledge of these vehicle dynamic variables is important for vehicle control systems that aim to enhance vehicle stability and passenger safety. This study introduces a new estimation process for tyre/road forces. It presents many benefits over the existing state-of-art works, within the dynamic estimation framework. One of these major contributions consists of discussing in detail the vertical and lateral tyre forces at each tyre. The proposed method is based on the dynamic response of a vehicle instrumented with potentially integrated sensors. The estimation process is separated into two principal blocks. The role of the first block is to estimate vertical tyre forces, whereas in the second block two observers are proposed and compared for the estimation of lateral tyre/road forces. The different observers are based on a prediction/estimation Kalman filter. The performance of this concept is tested and compared with real experimental data using a laboratory car. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is a promising technique to provide accurate estimation. Thus, it can be considered as a practical low-cost solution for calculating vertical and lateral tyre/road forces.

  2. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Observation of Zero-Strain Deformation Twinning Mechanisms in Ag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Wang, J.; Gong, S. K.; Mao, S. X.

    2011-04-01

    We have observed a new deformation-twinning mechanism using the high resolution transmission electron microscope in polycrystalline Ag films, zero-strain twinning via nucleation, and the migration of a Σ3{112} incoherent twin boundary (ITB). This twinning mechanism produces a near zero macroscopic strain because the net Burgers vectors either equal zero or are equivalent to a Shockley partial dislocation. This observation provides new insight into the understanding of deformation twinning and confirms a previous hypothesis: detwinning could be accomplished via the nucleation and migration of Σ3{112} ITBs. The zero-strain twinning mechanism may be unique to low staking fault energy metals with implications for their deformation behavior.

  3. Effect of the interaction conditions of the probe of an atomic-force microscope with the n-GaAs surface on the triboelectrization phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baklanov, A. V., E-mail: baklanov@mail.ioffe.ru [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology, and Telecommunications (Russian Federation); Gutkin, A. A.; Kalyuzhnyy, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation); Brunkov, P. N. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology, and Telecommunications (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Triboelectrization as a result of the scanning of an atomic-force-microscope probe over an n-GaAs surface in the contact mode is investigated. The dependences of the local potential variation on the scanning rate and the pressing force of the probe are obtained. The results are explained by point-defect formation in the surface layers of samples under the effect of deformation of these layers during probe scanning. The charge localized at these defects in the case of equilibrium changes the potential of surface, which is subject to triboelectrization. It is shown that, for qualitative explanation of the observed dependences, it is necessary to take into account both the generation and annihilation of defects in the region experiencing deformation.

  4. Aspects of scanning force microscope probes and their effects on dimensional measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yacoot, Andrew [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Koenders, Ludger [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)], E-mail: andrew.yacoot@npl.co.uk

    2008-05-21

    The review will describe the various scanning probe microscopy tips and cantilevers used today for scanning force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Work undertaken to quantify the properties of cantilevers and tips, e.g. shape and radius, is reviewed together with an overview of the various tip-sample interactions that affect dimensional measurements. (topical review)

  5. TOPICAL REVIEW: Aspects of scanning force microscope probes and their effects on dimensional measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoot, Andrew; Koenders, Ludger

    2008-05-01

    The review will describe the various scanning probe microscopy tips and cantilevers used today for scanning force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Work undertaken to quantify the properties of cantilevers and tips, e.g. shape and radius, is reviewed together with an overview of the various tip-sample interactions that affect dimensional measurements.

  6. Aspects of scanning force microscope probes and their effects on dimensional measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacoot, Andrew; Koenders, Ludger

    2008-01-01

    The review will describe the various scanning probe microscopy tips and cantilevers used today for scanning force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Work undertaken to quantify the properties of cantilevers and tips, e.g. shape and radius, is reviewed together with an overview of the various tip-sample interactions that affect dimensional measurements. (topical review)

  7. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope with open sample space observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Mitsuo; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji; Iwamatsu, Shinnosuke; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi; Sato, Chikara

    2011-12-01

    Although conventional electron microscopy (EM) requires samples to be in vacuum, most chemical and physical reactions occur in liquid or gas. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM) can observe dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas under atmospheric pressure in real time. An electron-permeable window made of pressure-resistant 100 nm-thick silicon nitride (SiN) film, set into the bottom of the open ASEM sample dish, allows an electron beam to be projected from underneath the sample. A detector positioned below captures backscattered electrons. Using the ASEM, we observed the radiation-induced self-organization process of particles, as well as phenomena accompanying volume change, including evaporation-induced crystallization. Using the electrochemical ASEM dish, we observed tree-like electrochemical depositions on the cathode. In silver nitrate solution, we observed silver depositions near the cathode forming incidental internal voids. The heated ASEM dish allowed observation of patterns of contrast in melting and solidifying solder. Finally, to demonstrate its applicability for monitoring and control of industrial processes, silver paste and solder paste were examined at high throughput. High resolution, imaging speed, flexibility, adaptability, and ease of use facilitate the observation of previously difficult-to-image phenomena, and make the ASEM applicable to various fields. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Microscopic investigation of InGaN/GaN heterostructure laser diode degradation using Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochthofen, A; Mertin, W; Bacher, G; Furitsch, M; Bruederl, G; Strauss, U; Haerle, V

    2008-01-01

    We report on Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements on fresh and artificially aged InGaN/GaN laser test structures. In the case of an unbiased laser diode, a comparison of the surface potential between a fresh and a stressed laser diode shows a pronounced modification of the laser facet due to the aging process. Performing KPFM measurements under forward bias, a correlation between the macroscopic I-V characteristics and the microscopic voltage drop across the heterostructure layer sequence is found. This clearly demonstrates the potential of KPFM for investigating InGaN/GaN laser diode degradation

  9. Ageing effects on polymeric track detectors: studies of etched tracks at nano size scale using atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I.; Fragoso, R.; Vazquez L, C.; Saad, A. F.; El-Namrouty, A. A.; Fujii, M.

    2012-01-01

    Among several different techniques to analyze material surface, the use of Atomic Force Microscope is one of the finest method. As we know, the sensitivity to detect energetic ions is extremely affected during the storage time and conditions of the polymeric material used as a nuclear track detector. On the basis of the surface analysis of several track detector materials, we examined the detection sensitivity of these detectors exposed to alpha particles. The preliminary results revealed that the ageing effect on its sensitivity is very strong, that need to be considered on the routine applications or research experiments. The results are consistent with the experimental data in the literature. (Author)

  10. Direct characterization of spin-transfer switching of nano-scale magnetic tunnel junctions using a conductive atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jia-Mou; Yang, Dong-Chin; Lee, Ching-Ming; Ye, Lin-Xiu; Chang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Te-ho; Lee, Yen-Chi; Wu, Jong-Ching

    2013-01-01

    We present an alternative method of spin-transfer-induced magnetization switching for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using a conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) with pulsed current. The nominal MTJ cells' dimensions were 200 × 400 nm 2 . The AFM probes were coated with a Pt layer via sputtering to withstand up to several milliamperes. The pulsed current measurements, with pulse duration varying from 5 to 300 ms, revealed a magnetoresistance ratio of up to 120%, and an estimated intrinsic switching current density, based on the thermal activation model, of 3.94 MA cm −2 . This method demonstrates the potential skill to characterize nanometre-scale magnetic devices. (paper)

  11. Development of new techniques for scanning electron microscope observation using ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto, Satoshi; Sugimura, Masaharu; Kageyama, Hitoshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); JST, CREST, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Torimoto, Tsukasa [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); JST, CREST, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kuwabata, Susumu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); JST, CREST, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)], E-mail: kuwabata@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-09-01

    Based on our previous discovery that ionic liquid (IL) can be observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) without charging the liquid, we have developed several novel techniques for SEM observation. Coating of insulating sample with IL is useful for providing electronic conductivity to the samples like metal or carbon coating by vacuum vapor deposition. In this case, dilution of the IL with appropriate volatile solvent like alcohol is effective for coating thin layer of IL on the sample. As a biological sample, seaweed including IL was attempted to be observed by SEM. A seaweed leaf swollen by water was put in an IL bath and the bath was put in an outgassed desiccator to replace water in the seaweed leaf with IL. The resulting sample gave a SEM image of the swollen seaweed whose thickness was several times larger than dried one. Furthermore, the introduction of the IL in vacuum chamber allowed us to develop the in situ electrochemical SEM observation system. Using this system, we observed changes in polypyrrole film thickness caused by the redox reaction of the film and the electrochemical deposition of silver and its oxidative dissolution. It was also found that the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDX) analysis was available even for the electrode polarized in IL.

  12. Development of new techniques for scanning electron microscope observation using ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimoto, Satoshi; Sugimura, Masaharu; Kageyama, Hitoshi; Torimoto, Tsukasa; Kuwabata, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Based on our previous discovery that ionic liquid (IL) can be observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) without charging the liquid, we have developed several novel techniques for SEM observation. Coating of insulating sample with IL is useful for providing electronic conductivity to the samples like metal or carbon coating by vacuum vapor deposition. In this case, dilution of the IL with appropriate volatile solvent like alcohol is effective for coating thin layer of IL on the sample. As a biological sample, seaweed including IL was attempted to be observed by SEM. A seaweed leaf swollen by water was put in an IL bath and the bath was put in an outgassed desiccator to replace water in the seaweed leaf with IL. The resulting sample gave a SEM image of the swollen seaweed whose thickness was several times larger than dried one. Furthermore, the introduction of the IL in vacuum chamber allowed us to develop the in situ electrochemical SEM observation system. Using this system, we observed changes in polypyrrole film thickness caused by the redox reaction of the film and the electrochemical deposition of silver and its oxidative dissolution. It was also found that the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDX) analysis was available even for the electrode polarized in IL

  13. Atomistic observations and analyses of lattice defects in transmission electron microscopes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, H

    2003-01-01

    The transmission electron microscope (TEM) -accelerators was developed. TEM-Accelerator made possible to observe in situ experiments of ion irradiation and implantation. The main results are the experimental proof of new lattice defects by irradiation, the formation process and synthesized conditions of carbon onion by ion implantation, the microstructure and phase transformation conditions of graphite by ion irradiated phase transformation, the irradiation damage formation process by simultaneous irradiation of electron and ion and behavior of fullerene whisker under irradiation. The microstructural evolution of defect clusters in copper irradiated with 240-keV Cu sup + ions and a high resolution electron micrograph of carbon onions synthesized by ion implantation are explained as the examples of recent researches. (S.Y.)

  14. Anomalous Fe and Mn heterogeneity observed in microscopic inclusions in diamond using nuclear microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sideras-Haddad, E.; Hart, R.J.; Connell, S.H.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Tredoux, M.

    1999-01-01

    A Fe and Mn heterogeneity effect was observed in microscopic garnet inclusion in diamond using micro-PIXE. Results are presented and the implications of these disequilibrium element distributions during growth of garnets are discussed. The occurrence of zoning or any type of chemical inhomogeneity within inclusions encapsulated within diamond has implications on the age of formation of the inclusion and the diamond. It is believed that the age of the inclusion is that of the diamond formation itself, with subsequent isolation of the inclusion from the mantle by the diamond. The significance of the chemical heterogeneity or zoning is that it should not exist given the high temperature and long time of encapsulation

  15. Hydrogen and oxygen behaviors on Porous-Si surfaces observed using a scanning ESD ion microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Yuki; Ueda, Kazuyuki

    2004-01-01

    A scanning electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) ion microscope (SESDIM) measured the 2-D images of hydrogen and oxygen distribution on solid surfaces. A primary electron beam at 600 eV, with a pulse width of 220 ns, resulted in ion yields of H + and O + . This SESDIM is applied to the surface analysis of Porous-Si (Po-Si) partially covered with SiN films. During the heating of a specimen of the Po-Si at 800 deg. C under ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) conditions, the components of the surface materials were moved or diffused by thermal decomposition accompanied by a redistribution of hydrogen and oxygen. After cyclic heating of above 800 deg. C, the dynamic behaviors of H + and O + accompanied by the movements of the SiN layers were observed as images of H + and O + . This was because the H + and O + ions have been identified as composite materials by their kinetic energies

  16. Microscopic observation of symbiotic and aposymbiotic juvenile corals in nutrient-enriched seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yasuaki; Iguchi, Akira; Inoue, Mayuri; Mori, Chiharu; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka; Nakamura, Takashi

    2013-03-15

    Symbiotic and aposymbiotic juvenile corals, which were grown in the laboratory from the gametes of the scleractinian coral Acropora digitifera and had settled down onto plastic culture plates, were observed with a microscope under different nutrient conditions. The symbiotic corals successfully removed the surrounding benthic microalgae (BMA), whereas the aposymbiotic corals were in close physical contact with BMA. The areal growth rate of the symbiotic corals was significantly higher than that of the aposymbiotic corals. The addition of nutrients to the culture seawater increased the chlorophyll a content in the symbiotic coral polyps and enhanced the growth of some of the symbiotic corals, however the average growth rate was not significantly affected, most likely because of the competition with BMA. The comparison between the symbiotic and aposymbiotic juvenile corals showed that the establishment of a symbiotic association could be imperative for post-settlement juvenile corals to survive in high-nutrient seawater. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Origins of phase contrast in the atomic force microscope in liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Melcher, John; Carrasco, Carolina; Xu, Xianfan; Carrascosa, Jose L; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Jose de Pablo, Pedro; Raman, Arvind

    2009-01-01

    We study the physical origins of phase contrast in dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) in liquids where low-stiffness microcantilever probes are often used for nanoscale imaging of soft biological samples with gentle forces. Under these conditions, we show that the phase contrast derives primarily from a unique energy flow channel that opens up in liquids due to the momentary excitation of higher eigenmodes. Contrary to the common assumption, phase-contrast images in liquids using soft mic...

  18. A simple cryo-holder facilitates specimen observation under a conventional scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chih-Yuan; Huang, Rong-Nan; Kuo-Huang, Ling-Long; Kuo, Tai-Chih; Yang, Ya-Yun; Lin, Ching-Yeh; Jane, Wann-Neng; Chen, Shiang-Jiuun

    2012-02-01

    A pre-cryogenic holder (cryo-holder) facilitating cryo-specimen observation under a conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM) is described. This cryo-holder includes a specimen-holding unit (the stub) and a cryogenic energy-storing unit (a composite of three cylinders assembled with a screw). After cooling, the cryo-holder can continue supplying cryogenic energy to extend the observation time for the specimen in a conventional SEM. Moreover, the cryogenic energy-storing unit could retain appropriate liquid nitrogen that can evaporate to prevent frost deposition on the surface of the specimen. This device is proved feasible for various tissues and cells, and can be applied to the fields of both biology and material science. We have employed this novel cryo-holder for observation of yeast cells, trichome, and epidermal cells in the leaf of Arabidopsis thaliana, compound eyes of insects, red blood cells, filiform papillae on the surface of rat tongue, agar medium, water molecules, penicillium, etc. All results suggested that the newly designed cryo-holder is applicable for cryo-specimen observation under a conventional SEM without cooling system. Most importantly, the design of this cryo-holder is simple and easy to operate and could adapt a conventional SEM to a plain type cryo-SEM affordable for most laboratories. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Bringing light into the nano-world: What can you do with an atomic force microscope on top of your synchrotron radiation sample holder?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Mario Manuel Silveira

    2009-01-01

    This thesis had as a major objective to combine scanning probe microscopy in particular, atomic force microscopy with synchrotron light spectroscopies. The combination of these two types of spectroscopies is meant to be in-situ and in real time. Thus this thesis aimed at introducing new types of experimental techniques suitable for the investigation of nano-sized materials. The proposed new instrumentation, would provide chemical-specific contrast at unprecedented lateral resolution of up to 10-40 nanometers, thus overcoming existing limitations of the two families of spectroscopy methods and opening a wide range of research opportunities and challenges. For the purpose of combining these techniques an atomic force microscope was developed. The atomic force microscope (AFM) was developed around a quartz tuning fork crystal which was used as the sensor with which atomic forces are detected. The developed AFM was then used in several beam lines with essentially two different purposes. A first goal was to do spectroscopy, such as the measurement of an absorption edge, locally with the tip of the AFM. Such measurements were indeed done, but the lateral resolution is still dominated by the X-ray beam size rather than by the tip apex shape. The AFM tip was also used to measure Bragg peaks from crystals with sizes on the nanometer scale. A second goal was to use the AFM as an instrument to mechanical interact with nano-sized systems while the X-ray beam was used to probe changes in the lattice parameter of the studied systems. Thus the AFM tip was used to elastically indent a SiGe crystal while diffraction was simultaneously measured. It was possible to observe shifts of the Bragg peak as a consequence of the applied pressure. The in-situ combination of AFM with synchrotron light permitted, in this way, to measure the Young modulus of a crystal at the nano-scale without any kind of adjustable parameter. (author)

  20. Nanoscale electrowetting effects observed by using friction force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, Reynier; Guan, Li; Zhu, Xiao-Yang; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2011-06-21

    We report the study of electrowetting (EW) effects under strong electric field on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surface by using friction force microscopy (FFM). The friction force dependence on the electric field at nanometer scale can be closely related to electrowetting process based on the fact that at this scale frictional behavior is highly affected by capillary phenomena. By measuring the frictional signal between a conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and the PMMA surface, the ideal EW region (Young-Lippmann equation) and the EW saturation were identified. The change in the interfacial contact between the tip and the PMMA surface with the electric field strength is closely associated with the transition from the ideal EW region to the EW saturation. In addition, a reduction of the friction coefficient was observed when increasing the applied electric field in the ideal EW region. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Observationally constrained estimates of carbonaceous aerosol radiative forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chul E; Ramanathan, V; Decremer, Damien

    2012-07-17

    Carbonaceous aerosols (CA) emitted by fossil and biomass fuels consist of black carbon (BC), a strong absorber of solar radiation, and organic matter (OM). OM scatters as well as absorbs solar radiation. The absorbing component of OM, which is ignored in most climate models, is referred to as brown carbon (BrC). Model estimates of the global CA radiative forcing range from 0 to 0.7 Wm(-2), to be compared with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimate for the pre-Industrial to the present net radiative forcing of about 1.6 Wm(-2). This study provides a model-independent, observationally based estimate of the CA direct radiative forcing. Ground-based aerosol network data is integrated with field data and satellite-based aerosol observations to provide a decadal (2001 through 2009) global view of the CA optical properties and direct radiative forcing. The estimated global CA direct radiative effect is about 0.75 Wm(-2) (0.5 to 1.0). This study identifies the global importance of BrC, which is shown to contribute about 20% to 550-nm CA solar absorption globally. Because of the inclusion of BrC, the net effect of OM is close to zero and the CA forcing is nearly equal to that of BC. The CA direct radiative forcing is estimated to be about 0.65 (0.5 to about 0.8) Wm(-2), thus comparable to or exceeding that by methane. Caused in part by BrC absorption, CAs have a net warming effect even over open biomass-burning regions in Africa and the Amazon.

  2. Optimizing 1-μs-Resolution Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy on a Commercial Atomic Force Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Devin T; Faulk, Jaevyn K; Sanders, Aric W; Bull, Matthew S; Walder, Robert; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Sousa, Marcelo C; Perkins, Thomas T

    2015-10-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is widely used to mechanically measure the folding and unfolding of proteins. However, the temporal resolution of a standard commercial cantilever is 50-1000 μs, masking rapid transitions and short-lived intermediates. Recently, SMFS with 0.7-μs temporal resolution was achieved using an ultrashort (L = 9 μm) cantilever on a custom-built, high-speed AFM. By micromachining such cantilevers with a focused ion beam, we optimized them for SMFS rather than tapping-mode imaging. To enhance usability and throughput, we detected the modified cantilevers on a commercial AFM retrofitted with a detection laser system featuring a 3-μm circular spot size. Moreover, individual cantilevers were reused over multiple days. The improved capabilities of the modified cantilevers for SMFS were showcased by unfolding a polyprotein, a popular biophysical assay. Specifically, these cantilevers maintained a 1-μs response time while eliminating cantilever ringing (Q ≅ 0.5). We therefore expect such cantilevers, along with the instrumentational improvements to detect them on a commercial AFM, to accelerate high-precision AFM-based SMFS studies.

  3. Study of the mapping mechanism of ferroelectric domains with the scanning force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungk, T.

    2006-12-01

    The piezo-force microscopy (PFM) allows the mapping of ferroelectric domains until the nanometer range. In spite of its simple function principle it was hitherto not completely understood. In ordser to develop the PFM further to a quantitative analysis method its methodical aspects were analyzed. It was shown that the fundamental mapping mechanism is based on the inverse piezo-effect. Different artefacts to be found in the literature could therefore be reduced to a measurement background. Furthermore the influence of the electrode geometry was analyzed. The width of doamin walls was systematically measured and simulated with a mode, whereby a maximal resolution of 17 nm was reached. By the development of a correction procedure for the exact detection of the forces acting on the spring-beam the lateral signals measured on domain walls could by newly interpreted. So the ''Lateral Electrostatic Force Microscopy'' was developed

  4. Quantifying Hydrostatic Pressure in Plant Cells by Using Indentation with an Atomic Force Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauzamy, Léna; Derr, Julien; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2015-01-01

    Plant cell growth depends on a delicate balance between an inner drive—the hydrostatic pressure known as turgor—and an outer restraint—the polymeric wall that surrounds a cell. The classical technique to measure turgor in a single cell, the pressure probe, is intrusive and cannot be applied to small cells. In order to overcome these limitations, we developed a method that combines quantification of topography, nanoindentation force measurements, and an interpretation using a published mechanical model for the pointlike loading of thin elastic shells. We used atomic force microscopy to estimate the elastic properties of the cell wall and turgor pressure from a single force-depth curve. We applied this method to onion epidermal peels and quantified the response to changes in osmolality of the bathing solution. Overall our approach is accessible and enables a straightforward estimation of the hydrostatic pressure inside a walled cell. PMID:25992723

  5. Real-time transmission electron microscope observation of gold nanoclusters diffusing into silicon at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Tadashi; Nakajima, Yuuki; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Endo, Junji; Collard, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Gold diffusion into silicon at room temperature was observed in real time with atomic resolution. Gold nanoclusters were formed on a silicon surface by an electrical discharge between a silicon tip and a gold coated tip inside an ultrahigh-vacuum transmission electron microscope (TEM) specimen chamber. At the moment of the gold nanocluster deposition, the gold nanoclusters had a crystalline structure. The crystalline structure gradually disappeared due to the interdiffusion between silicon and gold as observed after the deposition of gold nanoclusters. The shape of the nanocluster gradually changed due to the gold diffusion into the damaged silicon. The diffusion front between silicon and gold moved toward the silicon side. From the observations of the diffusion front, the gold diffusivity at room temperature was extracted. The extracted activation energy, 0.21 eV, matched the activation energy in bulk diffusion between damaged silicon and gold. This information is useful for optimizing the hybridization between solid-state and biological nanodevices in which gold is used as an adhesive layer between the two devices.

  6. Observation of HCI-induced nanostructures with a scanning probe microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tona, Masahide; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Fujita, Yuso; Abe, Takashi; Jian, Sun; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yoshiyasu, Nobuo; Yamada, Chikashi; Sakurai, Makoto; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2007-01-01

    We present scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images, atomically resolved, of the nanostructures on various kinds of surfaces bombarded with highly charged ions (HCIs). In the STM image of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface (Xe 29+ -impact), a protrusion structure was observed with √3 x √3 R30 0 surface reconstruction around the impact site. A crater-like structure was formed on a Si(111)-(7x7) surface by an I 50+ -HCI impact. An atomic image of ∼0.1 nm in height was also observed around the missing topmost layers of the crater. In the case of a TiO 2 (110) surface, a typical nanostructure induced by a single I 51+ -HCI impact, relatively larger crater structure than that on the Si surface was observed; the height (∼1 nm) was higher than the atomic step of the TiO 2 (110)-(1x1) surface (∼0.3 nm) and the depth reached at least 1.5 nm. This implies that the degree of the HCI-radiation effect on the TiO 2 surface is higher than that of the Si(111) case

  7. Microscopic observations of osteoblast growth on micro-arc oxidized β titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsien-Te; Chung, Chi-Jen; Yang, Tsai-Ching; Tang, Chin-Hsin; He, Ju-Liang

    2013-02-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in orthopedic and dental implants, owing to their excellent physical properties and biocompatibility. By using the micro-arc oxidation (MAO), we generated anatase-rich (A-TiO2) and rutile-rich (R-TiO2) titanium dioxide coatings, individually on β-Ti alloy, in which the latter achieved an enhanced in vitro and in vivo performance. Thoroughly elucidating how the osteoblasts interact with TiO2 coatings is of worthwhile interest. This study adopts the focused ion beam (FIB) to section off the TiO2 coated samples for further scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation. The detailed crystal structures of the TiO2 coated specimens are also characterized. Experimental results indicate osteoblasts adhered more tenaciously and grew conformably with more lamellipodia extent on the R-TiO2 specimen than on the A-TiO2 and raw β-Ti specimens. FIB/SEM cross-sectional images of the cell/TiO2 interface revealed micro gaps between the cell membrane and contact surface of A-TiO2 specimen, while it was not found on the R-TiO2 specimen. Additionally, the number of adhered and proliferated cells on the R-TiO2 specimen was visually greater than the others. Closely examining EDS line scans and elemental mappings of the FIB/TEM cross-sectional images of the cell/TiO2 interface reveals both the cell body and interior space of the TiO2 coating contain nitrogen and sulfur (the biological elements in cell). This finding supports the assumption that osteoblast can grow into the porous structure of TiO2 coatings and demonstrating that the R-TiO2 coating formed by MAO serves the best for β-Ti alloys as orthopedic and dental implants.

  8. Stability enhancement of an atomic force microscope for long-term force measurement including cantilever modification for whole cell deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weafer, P. P.; McGarry, J. P.; van Es, M. H.; Kilpatrick, J. I.; Ronan, W.; Nolan, D. R.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2012-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used in the study of both morphology and mechanical properties of living cells under physiologically relevant conditions. However, quantitative experiments on timescales of minutes to hours are generally limited by thermal drift in the instrument, particularly in the vertical (z) direction. In addition, we demonstrate the necessity to remove all air-liquid interfaces within the system for measurements in liquid environments, which may otherwise result in perturbations in the measured deflection. These effects severely limit the use of AFM as a practical tool for the study of long-term cell behavior, where precise knowledge of the tip-sample distance is a crucial requirement. Here we present a readily implementable, cost effective method of minimizing z-drift and liquid instabilities by utilizing active temperature control combined with a customized fluid cell system. Long-term whole cell mechanical measurements were performed using this stabilized AFM by attaching a large sphere to a cantilever in order to approximate a parallel plate system. An extensive examination of the effects of sphere attachment on AFM data is presented. Profiling of cantilever bending during substrate indentation revealed that the optical lever assumption of free ended cantilevering is inappropriate when sphere constraining occurs, which applies an additional torque to the cantilevers "free" end. Here we present the steps required to accurately determine force-indentation measurements for such a scenario. Combining these readily implementable modifications, we demonstrate the ability to investigate long-term whole cell mechanics by performing strain controlled cyclic deformation of single osteoblasts.

  9. Influence of atomic force microscope tip-sample interaction on the study of scaling behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aue, J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1997-01-01

    Images acquired with atomic force microscopy are based on tip-sample interaction. It is shown that using scanning probe techniques for determining scaling parameters of a surface leads to an underestimate of the actual scaling dimension, due to the dilation of tip and surface. How much we

  10. Reprint of: Atmospheric scanning electron microscope observes cells and tissues in open medium through silicon nitride film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Ogura, Toshihiko; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Mio, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Shinichi; Sato, Chikara

    2010-11-01

    Direct observation of subcellular structures and their characterization is essential for understanding their physiological functions. To observe them in open environment, we have developed an inverted scanning electron microscope with a detachable, open-culture dish, capable of 8 nm resolution, and combined with a fluorescence microscope quasi-simultaneously observing the same area from the top. For scanning electron microscopy from the bottom, a silicon nitride film window in the base of the dish maintains a vacuum between electron gun and open sample dish while allowing electrons to pass through. Electrons are backscattered from the sample and captured by a detector under the dish. Cells cultured on the open dish can be externally manipulated under optical microscopy, fixed, and observed using scanning electron microscopy. Once fine structures have been revealed by scanning electron microscopy, their component proteins may be identified by comparison with separately prepared fluorescence-labeled optical microscopic images of the candidate proteins, with their heavy-metal-labeled or stained ASEM images. Furthermore, cell nuclei in a tissue block stained with platinum-blue were successfully observed without thin-sectioning, which suggests the applicability of this inverted scanning electron microscope to cancer diagnosis. This microscope visualizes mesoscopic-scale structures, and is also applicable to non-bioscience fields including polymer chemistry. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Atomic force microscopic investigation of commercial pressure sensitive adhesives for forensic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Adya, Ashok K

    2011-07-15

    Pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA), such as those used in packaging and adhesive tapes, are very often encountered in forensic investigations. In criminal activities, packaging tapes may be used for sealing packets containing drugs, explosive devices, or questioned documents, while adhesive and electrical tapes are used occasionally in kidnapping cases. In this work, the potential of using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both imaging and force mapping (FM) modes to derive additional analytical information from PSAs is demonstrated. AFM has been used to illustrate differences in the ultrastructural and nanomechanical properties of three visually distinguishable commercial PSAs to first test the feasibility of using this technique. Subsequently, AFM was used to detect nanoscopic differences between three visually indistinguishable PSAs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Origins of phase contrast in the atomic force microscope in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John; Carrasco, Carolina; Xu, Xin; Carrascosa, José L; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; José de Pablo, Pedro; Raman, Arvind

    2009-08-18

    We study the physical origins of phase contrast in dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) in liquids where low-stiffness microcantilever probes are often used for nanoscale imaging of soft biological samples with gentle forces. Under these conditions, we show that the phase contrast derives primarily from a unique energy flow channel that opens up in liquids due to the momentary excitation of higher eigenmodes. Contrary to the common assumption, phase-contrast images in liquids using soft microcantilevers are often maps of short-range conservative interactions, such as local elastic response, rather than tip-sample dissipation. The theory is used to demonstrate variations in local elasticity of purple membrane and bacteriophage 29 virions in buffer solutions using the phase-contrast images.

  13. Capillary microscopic observations on the superficial minute vessels of atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima 1972-73

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuya, Akira; Wakano, Yoichi; Otake, Masanori; Dock, D.S.

    1978-04-01

    Microscopic and photographic studies were conducted in 1972-73 at ABCC in Hiroshima on the morphology of superficial blood vessels of A-bomb survivors to determine whether the somatic effects of radiation still existed 30 years after the A-bomb. Control curves representing the relationship between age and score values assigned to morphological changes of the minute blood vessels of the fingernail fold, labial mucosa, and lingual mucosa, which could be regarded as an index of aging, were obtained. These were compared with similar curves obtained from A-bomb survivors with the aim of evaluating the effect of radiation on the aging process of these vessels. The late somatic effects of irradiation which were demonstrated 10 years after the A-bomb in a previous study (1956-57) were found to persist in the current study (1972-73) conducted 30 years after the A-bomb though not as pronounced as in the earlier study. A significant effect was observed only in the fingernail fold of those exposed to 100 rad or more under the age of 10 at the time of the bomb. A statistically significant difference was not observed for labial mucosa and lingual mucosa because the number of cases available for scoring was small, but a trend was observed for abnormalities of these two sites to be higher in frequency in the 100+ rad group under the age of 10 ATB than that of the control group. No significant difference was observed between the control and exposed with regard to radiation effect on the aging process using the relationship of score values to age as an index of aging. This is in accord with results of studies of A-bomb survivors which suggested that radiation induces life shortening attributable primarily to cancers, but not a general acceleration of the aging phenomenon. (author)

  14. Capillary microscopic observation on the superficial minute vessels of atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima, 1972--1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuya, A.; Wakano, Y.; Otake, M.; Dock, D.S.

    1977-01-01

    Microscopic and photographic studies were conducted in 1972 to 1973 at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) in Hiroshima on the morphology of superficial blood vessels of A-bomb survivors to determine whether the somatic effects of radiation still existed 30 yr after the A-bomb. Control curves representing the relationship between age and score values assigned to morphological changes of the minute blood vessels of the fingernail fold, labial mucosa, and lingual mucosa, which could be regarded as an index of aging, were obtained. These were compared with similar curves obtained from A-bomb survivors with the aim of evaluating the effect of radiation on the aging process of these vessels. The late somatic effects of irradiation which were demonstrated 10 yr after the A-bomb in a previous study (1956 to 1957) were found to persist in the current study (1972 to 1973) conducted 30 yr after the A-bomb, though not as pronounced as in the earlier study. A significant effect was observed only in the nail fold of those exposed to 100 rad or more under the age of 10 at the time of bomb (ATB). A statistically significant difference was not observed with labial and lingual mucosae because the number of cases available for score evaluation was small, but a trend was observed for abnormalities of these two sites to be higher in frequency in the group exposed to 100 rad or more under the age of 10 ATB than that of the control group. No significant difference was observed between the control and exposed with regard to radiation effect on the aging process using the relationship of score values to age as an index of aging

  15. Motion mechanics of non-adherent giant liposomes with a combined optical and atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Flores, Susana; Ortíz, Rocío

    2017-11-01

    Herein we present an investigation of the motional dynamics of single mesoscopic bodies of biological relevance with an AFM-based macromanipulation tool and an optical microscope. Giant liposomes are prominent case examples as minimal cell models; studying their mechanics provides a means to address the influence of structural components in the mechanical behaviour of living cells. However, they also pose an experimental challenge due to their lightness, fragility, and high mobility. Their entrapment in wells in a fluid of lower density allows their study under conditions of constrained motion, which enables the synchronous measurement of nanoforces with motion tracking. The procedure enables to estimate sliding friction coefficients and masses of vesicles, and sheds light upon the region between the vesicle and the underlying substrate. The present study paves the way for the investigation of motion and deformation mechanics with one combined technique and a single type of experiment traditionally vetoed to objects that can move as well as deform. Such an approach can be directly applied to cells in suspension, adherent cells or cellular 3D-assemblies so as to assess substrate biocompatibility, monitor adhesion, detachment, motility as well as deformability.

  16. Motion mechanics of non-adherent giant liposomes with a combined optical and atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Flores, Susana; Ortíz, Rocío

    2017-01-01

    Herein we present an investigation of the motional dynamics of single mesoscopic bodies of biological relevance with an AFM-based macromanipulation tool and an optical microscope. Giant liposomes are prominent case examples as minimal cell models; studying their mechanics provides a means to address the influence of structural components in the mechanical behaviour of living cells. However, they also pose an experimental challenge due to their lightness, fragility, and high mobility. Their entrapment in wells in a fluid of lower density allows their study under conditions of constrained motion, which enables the synchronous measurement of nanoforces with motion tracking. The procedure enables to estimate sliding friction coefficients and masses of vesicles, and sheds light upon the region between the vesicle and the underlying substrate. The present study paves the way for the investigation of motion and deformation mechanics with one combined technique and a single type of experiment traditionally vetoed to objects that can move as well as deform. Such an approach can be directly applied to cells in suspension, adherent cells or cellular 3D-assemblies so as to assess substrate biocompatibility, monitor adhesion, detachment, motility as well as deformability. (paper)

  17. Accurate measurement of Atomic Force Microscope cantilever deflection excluding tip-surface contact with application to force calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slattery, Ashley D.; Blanch, Adam J.; Quinton, Jamie S.; Gibson, Christopher T., E-mail: christopher.gibson@flinders.edu.au

    2013-08-15

    calibrate the cantilever spring constant using the thermal noise method, allowing complete force calibration to be accurately performed without tip-sample contact. - Highlights: • A technique for determining AFM cantilever sensitivity is developed and tested. • The error on the method is between 2–5% and does not require tip surface contact. • The method is simple to implement and can be applied to any type of cantilever. • The current method can be used to determine the spring constant of the cantilever.

  18. Atomic force microscope-assisted scanning tunneling spectroscopy under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhshouri, Amin; Hashimoto, Katsushi; Hirayama, Yoshiro

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a method of atomic force microscopy (AFM)-assisted scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) under ambient conditions. An AFM function is used for rapid access to a selected position prior to performing STS. The AFM feedback is further used to suppress vertical thermal drift of the tip-sample distance during spectroscopy, enabling flexible and stable spectroscopy measurements at room temperature. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Micropore Structure Representation of Sandstone in Petroleum Reservoirs Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yong-Qiang; Zhu Xing; Wu Jun-Zheng; Bai Wen-Guang

    2011-01-01

    The pore structure of sandstone in an oil reservoir is investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). At nanoscale resolution, AFM images of sandstone show us the fine structure. The real height data of images display the three-dimensional space structure of sandstone effectively. The three-dimensional analysis results show that the AFM images of sandstone have unique characteristics that, like fingerprints, can identify different structural properties of sandstones. The results demonstrate that AFM is an effective method used to represent original sandstone in petroleum reservoirs, and may help geologists to appreciate the sandstone in oil reservoirs fully. (general)

  20. Correlating yeast cell stress physiology to changes in the cell surface morphology: atomic force microscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Walker, Graeme M; Adya, Ashok K

    2006-07-06

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful biophysical tool in biotechnology and medicine to investigate the morphological, physical, and mechanical properties of yeasts and other biological systems. However, properties such as, yeasts' response to environmental stresses, metabolic activities of pathogenic yeasts, cell-cell/cell-substrate adhesion, and cell-flocculation have rarely been investigated so far by using biophysical tools. Our recent results obtained by AFM on one strain each of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe show a clear correlation between the physiology of environmentally stressed yeasts and the changes in their surface morphology. The future directions of the AFM related techniques in relation to yeasts are also discussed.

  1. Phase boundary in compatible and incompatible polymer blends studied by micro indentation test and microscopic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mina, M. F.; Akhtar, F.; Haque, M.E.

    2003-10-01

    The phase boundary of incompatible polymer blends such as poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/natural rubber (NR) and polyestyrene (PS)/NR as well as compatible blends such as PMMA/NR/epoxidizer NR (compatibilizer) and PS/NR/styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) block copolymer (compatibilizer) was studied by means of microhardness (H) technique and microscopy. Solution grown films of neat PMMA, PS and blended films of PMMA/NR, PS/NR, PMMA/NR/ENR and PS/NR/SBS were cast using a common solvent (toluene). While the neat PMMA and PS provide constant hardness values of 178 and 173 MPa, respectively, the binary (incompatible) and the ternary (compatible) blends show a conspicuous H-decrease (PMMA/NR=140 MPa, PS/NR=167 MPa, PMMA/NR/ENR=109 MPa and PS/NR/SBS=127 MPa). Scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy reveal clear difference of the phase boundary of compatible (smooth boundary) and incompatible (sharp boundary) blends. Besides, the compatibilizer blends are characterised by the thinnest phase boundary (30 μm), which is found about 60 μm in the incompatible blends, showing a final hardness value that demonstrates the compatibilizer to be smoothly distributed in the interface between the two blend components. Results highlight that microindentation technique, in combination with microscopic observations, is a sensitive tool for studying the breadth and quality of the interphase boundary in non- or compatibilized polymer blends and other inhomogeneous materials. (author)

  2. An atomic force microscope for the study of the effects of tip sample interactions on dimensional metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoot, Andrew; Koenders, Ludger; Wolff, Helmut

    2007-02-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed for studying interactions between the AFM tip and the sample. Such interactions need to be taken into account when making quantitative measurements. The microscope reported here has both the conventional beam deflection system and a fibre optical interferometer for measuring the movement of the cantilever. Both can be simultaneously used so as to not only servo control the tip movements, but also detect residual movement of the cantilever. Additionally, a high-resolution homodyne differential optical interferometer is used to measure the vertical displacement between the cantilever holder and the sample, thereby providing traceability for vertical height measurements. The instrument is compatible with an x-ray interferometer, thereby facilitating high resolution one-dimensional scans in the X-direction whose metrology is based on the silicon d220 lattice spacing (0.192 nm). This paper concentrates on the first stage of the instrument's development and presents some preliminary results validating the instrument's performance and showing its potential.

  3. A single-cell scraper based on an atomic force microscope for detaching a living cell from a substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Futoshi, E-mail: iwata.futoshi@shizuoka.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Adachi, Makoto; Hashimoto, Shigetaka [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2015-10-07

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) manipulator that can detach a single, living adhesion cell from its substrate without compromising the cell's viability. The micrometer-scale cell scraper designed for this purpose was fabricated from an AFM micro cantilever using focused ion beam milling. The homemade AFM equipped with the scraper was compact and standalone and could be mounted on a sample stage of an inverted optical microscope. It was possible to move the scraper using selectable modes of operation, either a manual mode with a haptic device or a computer-controlled mode. The viability of the scraped single cells was evaluated using a fluorescence dye of calcein-acetoxymethl ester. Single cells detached from the substrate were collected by aspiration into a micropipette capillary glass using an electro-osmotic pump. As a demonstration, single HeLa cells were selectively detached from the substrate and collected by the micropipette. It was possible to recultivate HeLa cells from the single cells collected using the system.

  4. Note: Fabrication of a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber for atomic force microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Han, Tingting; Song, Xiaoxue; Pan, Chengbin; Lanza, Mario, E-mail: mlanza@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano & Soft Materials, Soochow University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science & Technology, 199 Ren-Ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-10-15

    The atomic force microscope is one of the most widespread tools in science, but many suppliers do not provide a competitive solution to make experiments in controlled atmospheres. Here, we provide a solution to this problem by fabricating a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber. We corroborate the correct functioning of the chamber by studying the formation of local anodic oxidation on a silicon sample (biased under opposite polarities), an effect that can be suppressed by measuring in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. The usefulness of this chamber goes beyond the example here presented, and it could be used in many other fields of science, including physics, mechanics, microelectronics, nanotechnology, medicine, and biology.

  5. Contact stiffness and damping of liquid films in dynamic atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Rong-Guang; Leng, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties and dissipation behaviors of nanometers confined liquid films have been long-standing interests in surface force measurements. The correlation between the contact stiffness and damping of the nanoconfined film is still not well understood. We establish a novel computational framework through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for the first time to study small-amplitude dynamic atomic force microscopy (dynamic AFM) in a simple nonpolar liquid. Through introducing a tip driven dynamics to mimic the mechanical oscillations of the dynamic AFM tip-cantilever assembly, we find that the contact stiffness and damping of the confined film exhibit distinct oscillations within 6-7 monolayer distances, and they are generally out-of-phase. For the solid-like film with integer monolayer thickness, further compression of the film before layering transition leads to higher stiffness and lower damping, while much lower stiffness and higher damping occur at non-integer monolayer distances. These two alternating mechanisms dominate the mechanical properties and dissipation behaviors of simple liquid films under cyclic elastic compression and inelastic squeeze-out. Our MD simulations provide a direct picture of correlations between the structural property, mechanical stiffness, and dissipation behavior of the nanoconfined film.

  6. Contact stiffness and damping of liquid films in dynamic atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Rong-Guang; Leng, Yongsheng, E-mail: leng@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    The mechanical properties and dissipation behaviors of nanometers confined liquid films have been long-standing interests in surface force measurements. The correlation between the contact stiffness and damping of the nanoconfined film is still not well understood. We establish a novel computational framework through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for the first time to study small-amplitude dynamic atomic force microscopy (dynamic AFM) in a simple nonpolar liquid. Through introducing a tip driven dynamics to mimic the mechanical oscillations of the dynamic AFM tip-cantilever assembly, we find that the contact stiffness and damping of the confined film exhibit distinct oscillations within 6-7 monolayer distances, and they are generally out-of-phase. For the solid-like film with integer monolayer thickness, further compression of the film before layering transition leads to higher stiffness and lower damping, while much lower stiffness and higher damping occur at non-integer monolayer distances. These two alternating mechanisms dominate the mechanical properties and dissipation behaviors of simple liquid films under cyclic elastic compression and inelastic squeeze-out. Our MD simulations provide a direct picture of correlations between the structural property, mechanical stiffness, and dissipation behavior of the nanoconfined film.

  7. The possibility of multi-layer nanofabrication via atomic force microscope-based pulse electrochemical nanopatterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Uk Su; Morita, Noboru; Lee, Deug Woo; Jun, Martin; Park, Jeong Woo

    2017-05-01

    Pulse electrochemical nanopatterning, a non-contact scanning probe lithography process using ultrashort voltage pulses, is based primarily on an electrochemical machining process using localized electrochemical oxidation between a sharp tool tip and the sample surface. In this study, nanoscale oxide patterns were formed on silicon Si (100) wafer surfaces via electrochemical surface nanopatterning, by supplying external pulsed currents through non-contact atomic force microscopy. Nanoscale oxide width and height were controlled by modulating the applied pulse duration. Additionally, protruding nanoscale oxides were removed completely by simple chemical etching, showing a depressed pattern on the sample substrate surface. Nanoscale two-dimensional oxides, prepared by a localized electrochemical reaction, can be defined easily by controlling physical and electrical variables, before proceeding further to a layer-by-layer nanofabrication process.

  8. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, John E; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied - in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry - neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  9. Microscopic observation of magnetic bacteria in the magnetic field of a rotating permanent magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Pieter; Shcherbakov, Valeriy; Petersen, Nikolai

    2015-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are ubiquitous and can be found in both freshwater and marine environments. Due to intracellular chains of magnetic single domain particles, they behave like swimming compass needles. In external magnetic fields like the Earth's magnetic field, a torque is acting on the chain. This will cause the bacterium to be rotated and aligned with the external field. The swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria can be controlled with external magnetic fields, which makes it convenient to study them under a light microscope. Usually, a special set of coils arranged around a light microscope is used to control the swimming magnetotactic bacteria. Here, we present a simple mechanical system with a permanent magnet, which produces a rotating magnetic field of nearly constant amplitude in the focal plane of a light microscope. The device is placed beside the light microscope and easily adaptable to almost any microscope and thus convenient for field experiments. To describe the trajectories qualitatively, a theoretical model of the trajectories is presented. This device can be used to control the swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria and also for studying their magnetic and hydrodynamic properties.

  10. The extended wedge method: atomic force microscope friction calibration for improved tolerance to instrument misalignments, tip offset, and blunt probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, H S; Burris, D L

    2013-05-01

    One of the major challenges in understanding and controlling friction is the difficulty in bridging the length and time scales of macroscale contacts and those of the single asperity interactions they comprise. While the atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a unique ability to probe tribological surfaces in a wear-free single-asperity contact, instrument calibration challenges have limited the usefulness of this technique for quantitative nanotribological studies. A number of lateral force calibration techniques have been proposed and used, but none has gained universal acceptance due to practical considerations, configuration limitations, or sensitivities to unknowable error sources. This paper describes a simple extension of the classic wedge method of AFM lateral force calibration which: (1) allows simultaneous calibration and measurement on any substrate, thus eliminating prior tip damage and confounding effects of instrument setup adjustments; (2) is insensitive to adhesion, PSD cross-talk, transducer/piezo-tube axis misalignment, and shear-center offset; (3) is applicable to integrated tips and colloidal probes; and (4) is generally applicable to any reciprocating friction coefficient measurement. The method was applied to AFM measurements of polished carbon (99.999% graphite) and single crystal MoS2 to demonstrate the technique. Carbon and single crystal MoS2 had friction coefficients of μ = 0.20 ± 0.04 and μ = 0.006 ± 0.001, respectively, against an integrated Si probe. Against a glass colloidal sphere, MoS2 had a friction coefficient of μ = 0.005 ± 0.001. Generally, the measurement uncertainties ranged from 10%-20% and were driven by the effect of actual frictional variation on the calibration rather than calibration error itself (i.e., due to misalignment, tip-offset, or probe radius).

  11. Chronic Chagas disease: PCR-xenodiagnosis without previous microscopic observation is a useful tool to detect viable Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Saavedra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the elimination of the microscopic stage of conventional xenodiagnosis (XD to optimize the parasitological diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi in chronic Chagas disease. To this purpose we applied under informed consent two XD cages to 150 Chilean chronic chagasic patients. The fecal samples (FS of the triatomines at 30, 60 and 90 days post feeding were divided into two parts: in one a microscopic search for mobile trypomastigote and/or epimastigote forms was performed. In the other part, DNA extraction-purification for PCR directed to the conserved region of kDNA minicircles of trypanosomes (PCR-XD, without previous microscopic observation was done. An XD was considered positive when at least one mobile T. cruzi parasite in any one of three periods of incubation was observed, whereas PCR-XD was considered positive when the 330 bp band specific for T. cruzi was detected. 25 of 26 cases with positive conventional XD were PCR-XD positive (concordance 96.2%, whereas 85 of 124 cases with negative conventional XD were positive by PCR-XD (68.5%. Human chromosome 12 detected by Real-time PCR used as exogenous internal control of PCR-XD reaction allowed to discounting of PCR inhibition and false negative in 40 cases with negative PCR-XD. Conclusion: PCR-XD performed without previous microscopic observation is a useful tool for detection of viable parasites with higher efficiency then conventional XD.

  12. Chronic Chagas disease: PCR-xenodiagnosis without previous microscopic observation is a useful tool to detect viable Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Miguel; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Martínez, Gabriela; Rojas, Antonio; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the elimination of the microscopic stage of conventional xenodiagnosis (XD) to optimize the parasitological diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi in chronic Chagas disease. To this purpose we applied under informed consent two XD cages to 150 Chilean chronic chagasic patients. The fecal samples (FS) of the triatomines at 30, 60 and 90 days post feeding were divided into two parts: in one a microscopic search for mobile trypomastigote and/or epimastigote forms was performed. In the other part, DNA extraction-purification for PCR directed to the conserved region of kDNA minicircles of trypanosomes (PCR-XD), without previous microscopic observation was done. An XD was considered positive when at least one mobile T. cruzi parasite in any one of three periods of incubation was observed, whereas PCR-XD was considered positive when the 330 bp band specific for T. cruzi was detected. 25 of 26 cases with positive conventional XD were PCR-XD positive (concordance 96.2%), whereas 85 of 124 cases with negative conventional XD were positive by PCR-XD (68.5%). Human chromosome 12 detected by Real-time PCR used as exogenous internal control of PCR-XD reaction allowed to discounting of PCR inhibition and false negative in 40 cases with negative PCR-XD. PCR-XD performed without previous microscopic observation is a useful tool for detection of viable parasites with higher efficiency then conventional XD.

  13. Observer variability in the histopathologic diagnosis of microscopic colitis and subgroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiehn, Anne-Marie Kanstrup; Bjørnbak, Camilla; Warnecke, Mads

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of microscopic colitis (MC) is based on histologic findings and includes collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC). Incomplete MC (MCi) denotes patients with chronic diarrhea and a normal endoscopy and morphological changes that do not completely meet the histologic crit...

  14. Whole lifespan microscopic observation of budding yeast aging through a microfluidic dissection platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Sung Sik; Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Huberts, Daphne H E W; Lee, Luke P; Heinemann, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Important insights into aging have been generated with the genetically tractable and short-lived budding yeast. However, it is still impossible today to continuously track cells by high-resolution microscopic imaging (e.g., fluorescent imaging) throughout their entire lifespan. Instead, the field

  15. Observation of magnetic domains using a reflection mode scanning near-field optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durkam, C.; Shvets, I.V.; Lodder, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    It is demonstrated that it is possible to image magnetic domains with a resolution of better than 60 nm with the Kerr effect in a reflection-mode scanning near-field optical microscope. Images taken of tracks of thermomagnetically prewritten bits in a Co/Pt multilayer structure magnetized out-of

  16. Set-up of a high-resolution 300 mK atomic force microscope in an ultra-high vacuum compatible "3He/10 T cryostat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allwörden, H. von; Ruschmeier, K.; Köhler, A.; Eelbo, T.; Schwarz, A.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-01-01

    The design of an atomic force microscope with an all-fiber interferometric detection scheme capable of atomic resolution at about 500 mK is presented. The microscope body is connected to a small pumped "3He reservoir with a base temperature of about 300 mK. The bakeable insert with the cooling stage can be moved from its measurement position inside the bore of a superconducting 10 T magnet into an ultra-high vacuum chamber, where the tip and sample can be exchanged in situ. Moreover, single atoms or molecules can be evaporated onto a cold substrate located inside the microscope. Two side chambers are equipped with standard surface preparation and surface analysis tools. The performance of the microscope at low temperatures is demonstrated by resolving single Co atoms on Mn/W(110) and by showing atomic resolution on NaCl(001).

  17. Set-up of a high-resolution 300 mK atomic force microscope in an ultra-high vacuum compatible {sup 3}He/10 T cryostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwörden, H. von; Ruschmeier, K.; Köhler, A.; Eelbo, T.; Schwarz, A., E-mail: aschwarz@physnet.uni-hamburg.de; Wiesendanger, R. [Department of Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    The design of an atomic force microscope with an all-fiber interferometric detection scheme capable of atomic resolution at about 500 mK is presented. The microscope body is connected to a small pumped {sup 3}He reservoir with a base temperature of about 300 mK. The bakeable insert with the cooling stage can be moved from its measurement position inside the bore of a superconducting 10 T magnet into an ultra-high vacuum chamber, where the tip and sample can be exchanged in situ. Moreover, single atoms or molecules can be evaporated onto a cold substrate located inside the microscope. Two side chambers are equipped with standard surface preparation and surface analysis tools. The performance of the microscope at low temperatures is demonstrated by resolving single Co atoms on Mn/W(110) and by showing atomic resolution on NaCl(001).

  18. U.S. Air Force > About Us > Observances

    Science.gov (United States)

    flag-folding portion of a base retreat ceremony March 30, 2017, at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The formation and flag detail were comprised of women in honor of Women's History Month. (U.S. Air Force photo

  19. Atomic force and optical near-field microscopic investigations of polarization holographic gratings in a liquid crystalline azobenzene side-chain polyester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanujam, P.S.; Holme, N.C.R.; Hvilsted, S.

    1996-01-01

    Atomic force and scanning near-field optical microscopic investigations have been carried out on a polarization holographic grating recorded in an azobenzene side-chain Liquid crystalline polyester. It has been found that immediately following laser irradiation, a topographic surface grating...

  20. Measurements and observations on microscopic swelling in MX-type fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchi, C.; Ray, I.L.F.; Thiele, H.; Laar, J. van de.

    1978-01-01

    Microscopic swelling has been investigated by electron microscopy in several MX-type fuels, irradiated in fast and thermal neutron flux. The results show that fission gas bubbles in these compounds grow to large sizes if the in-pile fuel temperature rises above a critical value (swelling critical temperature Tsub(C)). A comparison has been made of the swelling rates in fuels of different composition, showing that Tsub(C) increases from carbides to nitrides. In fuels subjected to in-pile restructuring (highly rated) He-bonded pins microscopic swelling is affected by pore and grain boundary migration. The influence of these phenomena on the fuel swelling performance has been discussed

  1. Congenital adenoma of the iris and ciliary body: light and electron microscopic observations.

    OpenAIRE

    Rennie, I G; Parsons, M A; Palmer, C A

    1992-01-01

    A 23-year-old man had a lesion in the right inferior iris which appeared to have enlarged since it was first seen when the patient was aged 5 years. The lesion was excised by a partial iridocyclectomy. Histopathologically the neoplasm was composed of both pigmented and non-pigmented cells. Pseudoacini, containing acid mucopolysaccharides, were present throughout the tumour matrix. Electron microscopically the non-pigmented cells were found to possess a convoluted plasmalemma, abundant rough e...

  2. Implementing and Quantifying the Shape-Memory Effect of Single Polymeric Micro/Nanowires with an Atomic Force Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Liang; Gould, Oliver E C; Lysyakova, Liudmila; Jiang, Yi; Sauter, Tilman; Frank, Oliver; Becker, Tino; Schossig, Michael; Kratz, Karl; Lendlein, Andreas

    2018-04-23

    The implementation of shape-memory effects (SME) in polymeric micro- or nano-objects currently relies on the application of indirect macroscopic manipulation techniques, for example, stretchable molds or phantoms, to ensembles of small objects. Here, we introduce a method capable of the controlled manipulation and SME quantification of individual micro- and nano-objects in analogy to macroscopic thermomechanical test procedures. An atomic force microscope was utilized to address individual electro-spun poly(ether urethane) (PEU) micro- or nanowires freely suspended between two micropillars on a micro-structured silicon substrate. In this way, programming strains of 10±1% or 21±1% were realized, which could be successfully fixed. An almost complete restoration of the original free-suspended shape during heating confirmed the excellent shape-memory performance of the PEU wires. Apparent recovery stresses of σ max,app =1.2±0.1 and 33.3±0.1 MPa were obtained for a single microwire and nanowire, respectively. The universal AFM test platform described here enables the implementation and quantification of a thermomechanically induced function for individual polymeric micro- and nanosystems. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A miniaturized, high frequency mechanical scanner for high speed atomic force microscope using suspension on dynamically determined points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herfst, Rodolf; Dekker, Bert; Witvoet, Gert; Crowcombe, Will; Lange, Dorus de [Department of Optomechatronics, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Sadeghian, Hamed, E-mail: hamed.sadeghianmarnani@tno.nl, E-mail: h.sadeghianmarnani@tudelft.nl [Department of Optomechatronics, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    One of the major limitations in the speed of the atomic force microscope (AFM) is the bandwidth of the mechanical scanning stage, especially in the vertical (z) direction. According to the design principles of “light and stiff” and “static determinacy,” the bandwidth of the mechanical scanner is limited by the first eigenfrequency of the AFM head in case of tip scanning and by the sample stage in terms of sample scanning. Due to stringent requirements of the system, simply pushing the first eigenfrequency to an ever higher value has reached its limitation. We have developed a miniaturized, high speed AFM scanner in which the dynamics of the z-scanning stage are made insensitive to its surrounding dynamics via suspension of it on specific dynamically determined points. This resulted in a mechanical bandwidth as high as that of the z-actuator (50 kHz) while remaining insensitive to the dynamics of its base and surroundings. The scanner allows a practical z scan range of 2.1 μm. We have demonstrated the applicability of the scanner to the high speed scanning of nanostructures.

  4. Homogeneous calcium carbonate coating obtained by electrodeposition: in situ atomic force microscope observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavez, Jorge; Silva, Juan F.; Melo, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of the first stages of the crystallization of an electrochemically deposited calcium carbonate on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode has been investigated. The electrodeposition was driven applying a constant negative potential to a NaHCO 3 and CaCl 2 solution saturated with molecular oxygen. By this way, novel data about the kinetics of the crystal growth of CaCO 3 were collected from the AFM images. The results show that at the solution supersaturation levels used, the crystal growth occurred by a uniform surface nucleation mechanism. During the growth of the initial nuclei, the surface of the electrode was covered progressively by the growth of flat multilayers having triangular faces. The height of these structures ranged from one to several molecular layers of calcium carbonate. At the end of the crystallization process, the roughness of the electrode surface is reduced in average to two monolayers. Thus, our method provides a useful way to electrodeposit a nearly uniform layer of calcium carbonate on a variety of surfaces of potential applications

  5. High-speed broadband nanomechanical property quantification and imaging of life science materials using atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Juan

    Nanoscale morphological characterization and mechanical properties quantification of soft and biological materials play an important role in areas ranging from nano-composite material synthesis and characterization, cellular mechanics to drug design. Frontier studies in these areas demand the coordination between nanoscale morphological evolution and mechanical behavior variations through simultaneous measurement of these two aspects of properties. Atomic force microscope (AFM) is very promising in achieving such simultaneous measurements at high-speed and broadband owing to its unique capability in applying force stimuli and then, measuring the response at specific locations in a physiologically friendly environment with pico-newton force and nanometer spatial resolution. Challenges, however, arise as current AFM systems are unable to account for the complex and coupled dynamics of the measurement system and probe-sample interaction during high-speed imaging and broadband measurements. In this dissertation, the creation of a set of dynamics and control tools to probe-based high-speed imaging and rapid broadband nanomechanical spectroscopy of soft and biological materials are presented. Firstly, advanced control-based approaches are presented to improve the imaging performance of AFM imaging both in air and in liquid. An adaptive contact mode (ACM) imaging scheme is proposed to replace the traditional contact mode (CM) imaging by addressing the major concerns in both the speed and the force exerted to the sample. In this work, the image distortion caused by the topography tracking error is accounted for in the topography quantification and the quantified sample topography is utilized in a gradient-based optimization method to adjust the cantilever deflection set-point for each scanline closely around the minimal level needed for maintaining a stable probe-sample contact, and a data-driven iterative feedforward control that utilizes a prediction of the next

  6. Pancam and Microscopic Imager observations of dust on the Spirit Rover: Cleaning events, spectral properties, and aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Alicia F.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Sullivan, Robert; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Goetz, Walter; Madsen, Morten B.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes dust deposits on the Spirit Rover over 2000 sols through examination of Pancam and Microscopic Imager observations of specific locations on the rover body, including portions of the solar array, Pancam and Mini-TES calibration targets, and the magnets. This data set reveals the three "cleaning events" experienced by Spirit to date, the spectral properties of dust, and the tendency of dust particles to form aggregates 100 um and larger.

  7. Confocal microscopic observation of structural changes in glass-ionomer cements and tooth interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, T F; Pagliari, D; Sidhu, S K; Naasan, M A

    1998-03-01

    This study aimed to develop techniques to allow dynamic imaging of a cavity before, during and after placement of glass-ionomer restorative materials. Cavities were cut in recently extracted third molars and the teeth longitudinally sectioned. Each hemisected tooth surface was placed in green modelling compound at 90 to the optical axis of the microscope. The cavity surface was imaged using a video rate confocal microscope in conjunction with an internally focusable microscope objective. The sample on the stage was pushed up to the objective lens which 'clamped' the cover glass onto it. Water, glycerine or oil was placed below the coverglass, with oil above. Internal tooth structures were imaged by changing the internal focus of the objective. The restorative material was then placed into the cavity. Video images were stored either onto video tape or digitally, using a frame grabber, computer and mass memory storage. Software controls produced time-lapse recordings of the interface over time. Preliminary experiments have examined the placement and early maturation of conventional glass-ionomer cements and a syringeable resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Initial contact of the cement matrix and glass particles was visible as the plastic material rolled past the enamel and dentine, before making a bond. Evidence for water movement from the dentine into the cement has also been seen. After curing, the early dimensional changes in the cements due to water flux were apparent using the time-lapse facility. This new technique enables examination of developing tooth/restoration interfaces and the tracking of movement in materials.

  8. Observation of magnetic domains using a reflection-mode scanning near-field optical microscope

    OpenAIRE

    SHVETS, IGOR

    1997-01-01

    PUBLISHED It is demonstrated that it is possible to image magnetic domains with a resolution of better than 60 nm with the Kerr effect in a reflection-mode scanning near-field optical microscope. Images taken of tracks of thermomagnetically prewritten bits in a Co/Pt multilayer structure magnetized out-of plane showed optical features in a track pattern whose appearance was determined by the position of an analyzer in front of the photomultiplier tube. These features were not apparent in t...

  9. Observation of magnetic domains using a reflection mode scanning near-field optical microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Durkam, C.; Shvets, I.V.; Lodder, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    It is demonstrated that it is possible to image magnetic domains with a resolution of better than 60 nm with the Kerr effect in a reflection-mode scanning near-field optical microscope. Images taken of tracks of thermomagnetically prewritten bits in a Co/Pt multilayer structure magnetized out-of plane showed optical features in a track pattern whose appearance was determined by the position of an analyzer in front of the photomultiplier tube. These features were not apparent in the topography...

  10. Shear force distance control in a scanning near-field optical microscope: in resonance excitation of the fiber probe versus out of resonance excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapshin, D.A.; Letokhov, V.S.; Shubeita, G.T.; Sekatskii, S.K.; Dietler, G.

    2004-01-01

    The experimental results of the direct measurement of the absolute value of interaction force between the fiber probe of a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) operated in shear force mode and a sample, which were performed using combined SNOM-atomic force microscope setup, are discussed for the out-of-resonance fiber probe excitation mode. We demonstrate that the value of the tapping component of the total force for this mode at typical dither amplitudes is of the order of 10 nN and thus is quite comparable with the value of this force for in resonance fiber probe excitation mode. It is also shown that for all modes this force component is essentially smaller than the usually neglected static attraction force, which is of the order of 200 nN. The true contact nature of the tip-sample interaction during the out of resonance mode is proven. From this, we conclude that such a detection mode is very promising for operation in liquids, where other modes encounter great difficulties

  11. Magnetic Force Microscopy Observation of Perpendicular Recording Head Remanence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilekrojanavuti, P.; Saengkaew, K.; Cheowanish, I.; Damrongsak, B.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) was utilized to observe the magnetic write head remanence, which is the remaining out-of-plane magnetic field on magnetic write heads after a write current is turned off. This remnant field can write unwanted tracks or erase written tracks on a magnetic media. The write head remanence can also occur from device and slider fabrication, either by applying current to the write coil during the inspection or biasing the external magnetic field to magnetic recording heads. This remanence can attract magnetic nanoparticles, which is suspended in cleaning water or surrounding air, and cause device contamination. MFM images were used to examine locations of the remnant field on the surface of magnetic recording heads. Experimental results revealed that the remanence occurred mostly on the shield and is dependent on the initial direction of magnetic moments. In addition, we demonstrated a potential use of MFM imaging to investigate effects of different etching gases on the head remanence.

  12. Origin of phase shift in atomic force microscopic investigation of the surface morphology of NR/NBR blend film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanawan, S. [Institute of Science and Technology for Research and Development, Mahidol University, Salaya, Nakhon Pathom 73170 (Thailand)], E-mail: ststw@mahidol.ac.th; Radabutra, S.; Thamasirianunt, P.; Amornsakchai, T.; Suchiva, K. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Salaya, Nakhon Pathom 73170 (Thailand)

    2009-01-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology and surface properties of NR/NBR blend. Blends at 1/3, 1/1 and 3/1 weight ratios were prepared in benzene and formed film by casting. AFM phase images of these blends in tapping mode displayed islands in the sea morphology or matrix-dispersed structures. For blend 1/3, NR formed dispersed phase while in blends 1/1 and 3/1 phase inversion was observed. NR showed higher phase shift angle in AFM phase imaging for all blends. This circumstance was governed by adhesion energy hysteresis between the device tip and the rubber surface rather than surface stiffness of the materials, as proved by force distance measurements in the AFM contact mode.

  13. Origin of phase shift in atomic force microscopic investigation of the surface morphology of NR/NBR blend film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanawan, S; Radabutra, S; Thamasirianunt, P; Amornsakchai, T; Suchiva, K

    2009-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology and surface properties of NR/NBR blend. Blends at 1/3, 1/1 and 3/1 weight ratios were prepared in benzene and formed film by casting. AFM phase images of these blends in tapping mode displayed islands in the sea morphology or matrix-dispersed structures. For blend 1/3, NR formed dispersed phase while in blends 1/1 and 3/1 phase inversion was observed. NR showed higher phase shift angle in AFM phase imaging for all blends. This circumstance was governed by adhesion energy hysteresis between the device tip and the rubber surface rather than surface stiffness of the materials, as proved by force distance measurements in the AFM contact mode.

  14. Topotactic changes on η-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11} caused by biased atomic force microscope tip and cw-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovšak, Miloš, E-mail: milos.borovsak@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty for Mathematics and Physics, Jadranska ulica 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Šutar, Petra; Goreshnik, Evgeny [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mihailovic, Dragan [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); International Postgraduate School Jožef Stefan, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • We report influencing electronic properties of η-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11}. • With the biased AFM tip we induce the surface potential changes on η-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11}. • We used cw-laser to induced similar effect on surface potential on η-Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11}. • We do not influence the surface and topography of the samples. • No change in topography of samples indicates the topotactic transformation. - Abstract: We present topotactic changes on Mo{sub 4}O{sub 11} crystals induced by a biased atomic force microscope tip and continuous laser. The transformation does not change the topography of the samples, while the surface potential shows remarkable changes on areas where the biased AFM tip was applied. No structural changes were observed by Raman spectroscopy, but AFM scans revealed changes to surface potential due to laser illumination. The observed phenomenon could be potentially useful for memristive memory devices considering the fact that properties of other molybdenum oxides vary from metallic to insulators.

  15. Hard X-ray phase-contrast microscope for observing transparent specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagoshima, Y.; Yokoyama, Y.; Niimi, T.; Koyama, T.; Tsusaka, Y.; Matsui, J. [Himeji Institute of Technology, Graduate School of Science, Hyogo (Japan); Takai, K. [Japan synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Mikazuki, Hyogo (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    A hard X-ray transmission imaging microscope has been in use at the beamline BL24XU of Spring-8. It makes use of a phase zone plate made of tantalum as its X-ray lens, and is capable of imaging the structure as fine as 125-nm line-and-space pattern. The Zernike's phase-contrast method has been implemented to the microscope with phase plates made of gold. The photon energy was tuned to 12 keV just above the L{sub 3} absorption edge of gold (11.9 keV) in order to increase the image contrast. Polystyrene micro particles as transparent specimens were imaged clearly in the opposite image contrast with phase plates to shift the phase of the central order spectra in the back focal plane of the objective by one-quarter and three-quarters of a period, while the absorption contrast image showed little image contrast. Performance of the newly developed phase zone plate has been tested and it was confirmed that the structure as fine as 60-mm line-and-space pattern was able to be imaged. (authors)

  16. A control approach to cross-coupling compensation of piezotube scanners in tapping-mode atomic force microscope imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Shi, Jian; Su, Chanmin; Zou, Qingze

    2009-04-01

    In this article, an approach based on the recently developed inversion-based iterative control (IIC) to cancel the cross-axis coupling effect of piezoelectric tube scanners (piezoscanners) in tapping-mode atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging is proposed. Cross-axis coupling effect generally exists in piezoscanners used for three-dimensional (x-y-z axes) nanopositioning in applications such as AFM, where the vertical z-axis movement can be generated by the lateral x-y axes scanning. Such x/y-to-z cross-coupling becomes pronounced when the scanning is at large range and/or at high speed. In AFM applications, the coupling-caused position errors, when large, can generate various adverse effects, including large imaging and topography distortions, and damage of the cantilever probe and/or the sample. This paper utilizes the IIC technique to obtain the control input to precisely track the coupling-caused x/y-to-z displacement (with sign-flipped). Then the obtained input is augmented as a feedforward control to the existing feedback control in tapping-mode imaging, resulting in the cancellation of the coupling effect. The proposed approach is illustrated through two exemplary applications in industry, the pole-tip recession examination, and the nanoasperity measurement on hard-disk drive. Experimental results show that the x/y-to-z coupling effect in large-range (20 and 45 microm) tapping-mode imaging at both low to high scan rates (2, 12.2 to 24.4 Hz) can be effectively removed.

  17. Channelling phenomenon in the gamma irradiated Benzo-quinone and other compounds observed under the scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleiman, Y.M.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscope (S.E.M.), has been used to examine the gamma irradiated pure crystals of Benzo-quinone and other compounds in the polycrystaline form. After gamma irradiation, shallow lines (channels) were observed on the crystal's surfaces when the crystal layers arrangements are parallel to the photons beam direction. Holes were also observed when those layers of the crystals are in the nonparallel case. The phenomenon has been studied and analysed in connected with the H-atom bonds disruption, and H-atoms migration through the crystal's layers. (author)

  18. Water-Triggered Dimensional Swelling of Cellulose Nanofibril Films: Instant Observation Using Optical Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qing, Y.; Wu, Y.; Li, X.; Qing, Y.; Cai, Z.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the swelling behavior of cellulose nano fibril (CNF) films, the dimensional variation of untreated and phenol formaldehyde modified CNF (CNF/PF) films soaked in distilled water was examined in situ with microscopic image recording combined with pixel calculation. Results showed that a dramatic thickness increase exhibited in both CNF and CNF/PF films, despite being at different swelling levels. Compared to thickness swelling, however, the width expansion for these films is negligible. Such significant difference in dimensional swelling for CNF and PF modified films is mainly caused by nano fibril deposition and their meso structure. However, addition of PF modifier has a positive effect on the constraint of water absorption and thickness swelling, which is strongly dependent on PF loadings

  19. Observation of quantized vortices by cryocooler-based scanning Hall probe microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Y.; Konishi, Y.; Tokunaga, M.; Tamegai, T

    2004-10-01

    We have developed a scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) system utilizing closed-cycle cryocooler. The Hall probe used in this system is fabricated from a GaAs/GaAlAs two-dimensional electron gas. A stepping-motor-driven XYZ translator is used with a resolution better than 0.1 {mu}m and maximum scan range of 20 x 20 mm{sup 2}. The spatial resolution of the system is about 5 {mu}m and magnetic resolution is about 100 mG. By using this system, we have successfully resolved the quantized vortices on the cleaved surface of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+y} single crystal.

  20. Dynamics of Supported Metal Nanoparticles Observed in a CS Corrected Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    resulting in the formation of larger particles and a loss of catalytic performance. Several models of sintering in different systems have been put forward [1,2]. However, most investigations have been post mortem studies, revealing only the final state of the catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM....... The combined capabilities of ETEM and image CS correction provide unique possibilities to study this relationship. However, in order to fully quantify image contrast from such experiments, a deeper understanding of the scattering of fast electrons in the presence of gas molecules in the pole piece gap...... of the microscope is needed. As industrial catalysts are usually complex high surface area materials, they are often not suited for fundamental studies. For this purpose, model systems consisting of gold nanoparticles on sheets of low surface area boron nitride and graphite supports were produced. Sheets...

  1. Optical microscopic observation of texture anisotropy on zirconium and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamagne, Louis.

    1978-01-01

    A study of the polarisation variation produced by hexagonal metals, especially zirconium and its alloys, when the sample is turned in a plane perpendicular to the light beam illuminating it revealed a link between the texture of the sample and the shape of the curves obtained by measuring the light it reflects during rotation. The first part of this work was carried out on oriented monocrystals. The angle for which the maximum appears is shown to be directly related to the angle between the crystallographic C axis and the normal to the measurement plane. It is therefore possible to define the position of the C axis in the crystal. The second part is the practical application to polycrystalline materials deformed by rolling. Though calculations on the shape of the curves are out of the question for the moment it is easy to compare shapes obtained under well-defined conditions. Examples: - metal treated in the β form and cooled at controlled speed; - sample laminated in 2 directions and having a similar isotropy in both; - influence of a 100% lamination, one of the two directions being taken for reference. These curves show that a manufacture can be followed and modified as requested by the customer. In addition the method requires no specialised technicians and the apparatus can be fitted to all microscopes possessing polarised light [fr

  2. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: experimental observations and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, H; Su, D; Egerton, R F; Konno, M; Wu, L; Ciston, J; Wall, J; Zhu, Y

    2011-06-01

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Real-Time Observation of Carbon Nanotube Etching Process Using Polarized Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiuchen; Yao, Fengrui; Wang, Zequn; Deng, Shibin; Tong, Lianming; Liu, Kaihui; Zhang, Jin

    2017-08-01

    Controllable synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is of great importance in its further application, which attracts broad attention. As growth and etching are the two sides in the process of material crystallography and the control of the competition between them forms the foundation for modern technology of materials design and manufacture, the understanding on etching process of carbon nanotubes is still very unclear because technically it is of great challenge to characterize the dynamics in such small one-dimensional (1D) scale. Here the real-time investigation on the etching process of CNTs is reported, by the hot-wall chemical reactor equipped with a polarized optical microscope. It is discovered that the CNT etching behavior in air is totally of random, including the etching sites, termination sites, and structure dependence. Combining with the dynamic simulation, it is revealed that the random behavior reflects the unique "self-termination" phenomenon. A structure-independent etching propagation barrier of 2.4 eV is also obtained, which indicates that the etching propagation process still follows the conventional Kinetic Wulff construction theory. The results represent the new knowledge on the etching process in carbon nanotube and can contribute to its selective enrichment. Furthermore, the "self-termination" phenomenon may be a universal behavior in 1D process. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The micromorphology of the blesbuck louse Damalinia (Damalinia crenelata as observed under the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Turner

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The blesbuck is an important game animal on many game farms and reserves in South Africa. Damalinia crenelata, a biting louse, host-specific to the blesbuck, feed upon epidermal debris of this antelope, leading to severe skin irritation and dermatitis. Symptomatic scratching by the host aggravates these conditions. High infestations may lead to decreased population numbers. Live lice were collected from a blesbuck in the Rietvlei Nature Reserve and prepared for selectron microscopic investigation. Micrographs were recorded. The SEM investigation revealed several micromorphological features not previously described in D. crenelata. Besides the obvious anatomical differences in the reproductive organs of the male and female, several other differences were noted. The antennal flagellae showed morphological differences as well as certain features on the ventral surfaces of the head. Dorsally the forehead was markedly emarginated and showed an acute invagination (clypeo labral suture in the pulvinal area. The ventral surface of the head clearly demonstrated the structures of the preantennal regions such as ventral carina, pulvinus, labrum, mandibles and clypeus. The epipharynx appeared as an underlying extension of the labrum. The rims of the clypeus were more raised and thickened in the female than in that of the male. The mandibles were not notched and were noted to be angular in shape. The three segments of each of the antennae of the male were thicker and more robust than than those of the female. This could suggest sexual dimorphism in this species. The sensilla basoconica comprised 10 pegs. Pit organs were seen within the pore organs. The prothorax and mesothorax were clearly distinguished. The abdominal segments showed six pairs of spiracles. The male andfemale terminalia were confirmed to be strongly sexually dimorphic. The three pairs oflegs each terminated in a single, long and slender, claw.

  5. Electron microscope observation of single - crystalline beryllium thin foils; Observation de lames minces monocristallines de beryllium en microscopie electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antolin, J; Poirier, J P; Dupouy, J M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Thin foils prepared from single crystalline beryllium simples deformed at room temperature, have been observed by transmission electron microscopy. The various deformation modes have been investigated separately, from their early stages and their characteristic dislocation configurations have been observed. Basal slip is characterized at is outset by the presence of numerous dipoles and elongated prismatic loops. More pronounced cold work leads to the formation of dislocation tangles and bundles which eventually give a cellular structure. Prismatic slip begins by the cross-slip of dislocations from the basal plane into the prismatic plane. A cellular structure is equally observed in heavily deformed samples. Sessile dislocations have been observed in twin boundaries; they are produced by reactions between slip dislocations and twin dislocations. Finally, the study of samples quenched from 1100 deg. C and annealed at 200 deg. C has shown that the observed loops lie in prismatic planes and have a Burgers vector b 1/3<1 1 2-bar 0>. (authors) [French] On a observe en microscopie electronique par transmission des lames minces tirees d'eprouvettes monocristallines de beryllium deformees a l'ambiante. On a etudie separement les differents modes de deformation a partir de leur stade elementaire en observant les configurations de dislocations caracteristiques. Le glissement basal est caracterise a son debut par la presence de nombreux dipoles et de boucles prismatiques allongees. Des ecrouissages plus forts conduisent a la formation d'echeveaux et de gerbes qui finissent par donner une structure cellulaire. Le glissement prismatique debute par le glissement des dislocations hors du plan de base dans les plans prismatiques. On trouve egalement une structure cellulaire pour de forts ecrouissages. Dans les joints de macle, on a observe des dislocations sessiles formees par la reaction entre dislocations de macle et dislocations de glissement. Enfin l'etude d

  6. Scanning electron microscopic observations of fibrous structure of cemento-dentinal junction in healthy teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Pratebha

    2014-01-01

    Results: The CDJ appeared to be a fibril poor groove with a width of 2-4 µm. Few areas of collagen fiber intermingling could be appreciated. A detailed observation of these tissues has been presented.

  7. High-voltage electron-microscopical observation of crack-tip dislocations in silicon crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masaki; Higashida, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    Crack-tip dislocations in silicon single crystals were observed by high-voltage electron microscopy. Cracks were introduced into silicon wafers at room temperature by a Vickers indenter. The indented specimens were annealed at 823 K in order to activate dislocation emission from the crack tip under the residual stress due to the indentation. In the specimen without annealing, no dislocations were observed around the crack. On the other hand, in the specimen after the annealing, the aspect of the early stage of dislocation emission was observed, where dislocations were emitted not as a perfect dislocation but as a partial dislocation in the hinge-type plastic zone. Prominent dislocation arrays that were emitted from a crack tip were also observed, and they were found to be of shielding type, which increases the fracture toughness of those crystals

  8. Dynamical 'in situ' observation of biological samples using variable pressure scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedela, V

    2008-01-01

    Possibilities of 'in-situ' observation of non-conductive biological samples free of charging artefacts in dynamically changed surrounding conditions are the topic of this work. The observed biological sample, the tongue of a rat, was placed on a cooled Peltier stage. We studied the visibility of topographical structure depending on transition between liquid and gas state of water in the specimen chamber of VP SEM.

  9. Estimation of the radial force using a disturbance force observer for a magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, C N; Shinshi, T; Shimokohbe, A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydraulic forces in a magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump is important from the point of view of the magnetic bearing design. Direct measurement is difficult due to the absence of a rotor shaft, and computational fluid dynamic analysis demands considerable computational resource and time. To solve this problem, disturbance force observers were developed, using the radial controlled magnetic bearing of a centrifugal blood pump, to estimate the radial forces on the maglev impeller. In order to design the disturbance observer, the radial dynamic characteristics of a maglev impeller were evaluated under different working conditions. It was observed that the working fluid affects the additional mass and damping, while the rotational speed affects the damping and stiffness of the maglev system. Based on these results, disturbance force observers were designed and implemented. The designed disturbance force observers present a bandwidth of 45 Hz. In non-pulsatile conditions, the magnitude of the estimated radial thrust increases in proportion to the flowrate, and the rotational speed has little effect on the force direction. At 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, the estimated radial thrust is 0.95 N. In pulsatile conditions, this method was capable of estimating the pulsatile radial thrust with good response.

  10. Electron microscopic observation of radiation effects on the oocytes of killfish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, M; Egami, N [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1974-06-01

    The morphological changes of the ovaries, pituitary body and liver after the 2KR of X-ray irradiation were observed in female killifish. In the ovary, some the follicular cells which enclose the oocytes were destroyed in 10 hours after the irradiation. The oocytes during the period of yolk formation began to show a remarkable increase of mitochondria in the cytoplasm. On the 2nd day, myelin began to be observed. On the 3rd day, each of the organelles became completely degenerated and the cells were destroyed later. In the pituary body, an increased number of secretary granules was observed to accumulate in the cytoplasm during the 3rd day and the 10th day. In the liver cells, most of the glycogen granules disappeared during the 1st day and the 5th day. The volume of cells decreased and irregular intracellular spaces appeared.

  11. Laser Plasma Soft X-ray Microscope with Wolter Mirrors for Observation of Biological Specimens in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Masato; Aoki, Sadao

    2006-02-01

    A laser plasma soft X-ray microscope with Wolter mirrors was developed so that specimens could be set in the atmosphere. Silicon nitride membranes 100 nm thick were used as vacuum-tight windows. Using relatively large windows (0.46× 0.46 mm2), an adequate working distance for samples, which was approximately 1.2 mm, was assured. The endurance of the vacuum-tight window was measured briefly. Dry biological cells could be observed with resolution better than 100 nm. A preliminary observation of wet biological cells was carried out using a wet environmental sample holder which was composed of only two sheets of silicon nitride membrane. An X-ray micrograph of wet red blood cells from a chicken was obtained without apparent effects of radiation damage. The properties of a vacuum-tight window and a wet sample holder are discussed.

  12. Laser plasma soft x-ray microscope with Wolter mirrors for observation of biological specimens in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Masato; Aoki, Sadao

    2006-01-01

    A laser plasma soft X-ray microscope with Wolter mirrors was developed so that specimens could be set in the atmosphere. Silicon nitride membranes 100 nm thick were used as vacuum-tight windows. Using relatively large windows (0.46 x 0.46 mm 2 ), an adequate working distance for samples, which was approximately 1.2 mm, was assured. The endrance of the vacuum-tight window was measured briefly. Dry biological cells could be observed with resolution better than 100 nm. A preliminary observation of wet biological cells was carried out using a wet environmental sample holder which was composed of only two sheets of silicon nitride membrane. An X-ray micrograph of wet red blood cells from a chicken was obtained without apparent effects of radiation damage. The properties of a vacuum-tight window and a wet sample holder are discussed. (author)

  13. Design and control of multi-actuated atomic force microscope for large-range and high-speed imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani Bozchalooi, I.; Careaga Houck, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); AlGhamdi, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Department of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Dammam, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Youcef-Toumi, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This paper presents the design and control of a high-speed and large-range atomic force microscopy (AFM). A multi-actuation scheme is proposed where several nano-positioners cooperate to achieve the range and speed requirements. A simple data-based control design methodology is presented to effectively operate the AFM scanner components. The proposed controllers compensate for the coupled dynamics and divide the positioning responsibilities between the scanner components. As a result, the multi-actuated scanner behavior is equivalent to that of a single X–Y–Z positioner with large range and high speed. The scanner of the designed AFM is composed of five nano-positioners, features 6 μm out-of-plane and 120 μm lateral ranges and is capable of high-speed operation. The presented AFM has a modular design with laser spot size of 3.5 μm suitable for small cantilever, an optical view of the sample and probe, a conveniently large waterproof sample stage and a 20 MHz data throughput for high resolution image acquisition at high imaging speeds. This AFM is used to visualize etching of calcite in a solution of sulfuric acid. Layer-by-layer dissolution and pit formation along the crystalline lines in a low pH environment is observed in real time. - Highlights: • High-speed AFM imaging is extended to large lateral and vertical scan ranges. • A general multi-actuation approach to atomic force microscopy is presented. • A high-speed AFM is designed and implemented based on the proposed method. • Multi-actuator control is designed auxiliary to a PID unit to maintain flexibility. • Influence of calcite crystal structure on dissolution is visualized in video form.

  14. Spectral Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing as Observed by AIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, John M.; Susskind, Joel; Lee, Jae N.; Iredell, Lena

    2016-01-01

    AIRS V6 products contain the spectral contributions to Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), clear-sky OLR (OLR(sub CLR)), and Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing (LWCRF) in 16 bands from 100 cm(exp -1) to 3260 cm(exp -1). We show climatologies of selected spectrally resolved AIRS V6 products over the period of September 2002 through August 2016. Spectrally resolved LWCRF can better describe the response of the Earth system to cloud and cloud feedback processes. The spectral LWCRF enables us to estimate the fraction of each contributing factor to cloud forcing, i.e.: surface temperature, mid to upper tropospheric water vapor, and tropospheric temperature. This presentation also compares the spatial characteristics of LWCRF from AIRS, CERES_EBAF Edition-2.8, and MERRA-2. AIRS and CERES LWCRF products show good agreement. The OLR bias between AIRS and CERES is very close to that of OLR(sub CLR). This implies that both AIRS and CERES OLR products accurately account for the effect of clouds on OLR.

  15. Early formation of dental plaque on platic films. 1. Light microscopic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönström, A; Attström, R; Egelberg, J

    1975-02-01

    In human subjects with healthy gingiva thin transparent plastic films were applied to the buccal surfaces of premolars in the upper and lower jaws. The films were left in place for peiods of 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes. The presence of coccoid bacteria, leukocytes and epithelial cells was investigated in an area adjacent to the gingival margin. The results showed that by 15 minutes coccoid bacteria had become attached to the artificial tooth surface. The number of microorganisms gradually increased during the time of the study. Large numbers of cocci and the formation of micro-colonies were observed after 120 and 240 minutes. Increasing numbers of leukocytes and epithelial cells were also found during the period of observation.

  16. In situ Microscopic Observation of Sodium Deposition/Dissolution on Sodium Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Yuhki Yui; Masahiko Hayashi; Jiro Nakamura

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical sodium deposition/dissolution behaviors in propylene carbonate-based electrolyte solution were observed by means of in situ light microscopy. First, granular sodium was deposited at pits in a sodium electrode in the cathodic process. Then, the sodium particles grew linearly from the electrode surface, becoming needle-like in shape. In the subsequent anodic process, the sodium dissolved near the base of the needles on the sodium electrode and the so-called ?dead sodium? broke a...

  17. Electron microscopic observation of the respiratory tract of SPF piglets inoculated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, B.; Vena, M.M.; Cavalier, A.; Lannic, J. Le; Gouranton, J.; Kobisch, M.

    1992-01-01

    Seven hysterectomy derived piglets were repeatedly challenged with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae during the first week of life. Samples of trachea, bronchi and lung tissue collected 2-11 weeks post-inoculation (p.i.) were examined using light and electron microscopy. Autoradiography was used to study in more detail the site of M. hyopneumoniae multiplication. Gross lesions were observed in lung tissue and were characterized by hyperplasia of the epithelium and an increased mononuclear cell accumulation in perivascular and peribronchiolar areas. Mild lesions of the trachea and the bronchi, including epithelial hyperplasia and infiltration of the lamina propria by inflammatory cells, were noted. Electron microscopy showed that, 2-6 weeks p.i., changes in the mid-trachea and bronchi surface consisted of the loss of cilia. Mycoplasmas covered tufts of cilia remaining on the epithelial cell surface. Scanning and transmission electron micrographs showed that they were predominantly found closely associated with the top of cilia. No specialized terminal structure could be seen and no mycoplasma cells were identified lying free in the lumen nor in close contact with the plasma membrane of cells or microvilli. Some fine fibrils radiating from one mycoplasma to another or to cilia were seen at higher magnification by scanning electron microscopy. Six to eleven weeks p.i., a disrupted epithelial surface lacking cilia was observed. Cells were desquamated and shed into the lumen with cellular remains containing droplets of mucus. Autoradiography revealed that label corresponded to the observed mycoplasma distribution. At the top of cilia, a high density of labeling was visible in the zone of high mycoplasma concentration. Therefore, incorporation of the label in the mycoplasma is proof or their multiplication in the trachea. The intimate association between the mycoplasma and cilia may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of the disease caused by M. hyopneumoniae (swine

  18. Connecting macroscopic observables and microscopic assembly events in amyloid formation using coarse grained simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah S Bieler

    Full Text Available The pre-fibrillar stages of amyloid formation have been implicated in cellular toxicity, but have proved to be challenging to study directly in experiments and simulations. Rational strategies to suppress the formation of toxic amyloid oligomers require a better understanding of the mechanisms by which they are generated. We report Dynamical Monte Carlo simulations that allow us to study the early stages of amyloid formation. We use a generic, coarse-grained model of an amyloidogenic peptide that has two internal states: the first one representing the soluble random coil structure and the second one the [Formula: see text]-sheet conformation. We find that this system exhibits a propensity towards fibrillar self-assembly following the formation of a critical nucleus. Our calculations establish connections between the early nucleation events and the kinetic information available in the later stages of the aggregation process that are commonly probed in experiments. We analyze the kinetic behaviour in our simulations within the framework of the theory of classical nucleated polymerisation, and are able to connect the structural events at the early stages in amyloid growth with the resulting macroscopic observables such as the effective nucleus size. Furthermore, the free-energy landscapes that emerge from these simulations allow us to identify pertinent properties of the monomeric state that could be targeted to suppress oligomer formation.

  19. Scanning electron microscopical observation of an osteoblast/osteoclast co-culture on micropatterned orthopaedic ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halai, Mansur; Ker, Andrew; Meek, Rm Dominic; Nadeem, Danish; Sjostrom, Terje; Su, Bo; McNamara, Laura E; Dalby, Matthew J; Young, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    In biomaterial engineering, the surface of an implant can influence cell differentiation, adhesion and affinity towards the implant. On contact with an implant, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells demonstrate differentiation towards bone forming osteoblasts, which can improve osteointegration. The process of micropatterning has been shown to improve osteointegration in polymers, but there are few reports surrounding ceramics. The purpose of this study was to establish a co-culture of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells with osteoclast progenitor cells and to observe the response to micropatterned zirconia toughened alumina ceramics with 30 µm diameter pits. The aim was to establish whether the pits were specifically bioactive towards osteogenesis or were generally bioactive and would also stimulate osteoclastogenesis that could potentially lead to osteolysis. We demonstrate specific bioactivity of micropatterns towards osteogenesis, with more nodule formation and less osteoclastogenesis compared to planar controls. In addition, we found that that macrophage and osteoclast-like cells did not interact with the pits and formed fewer full-size osteoclast-like cells on the pitted surfaces. This may have a role when designing ceramic orthopaedic implants.

  20. Observing microscopic structures of a relativistic object using a time-stretch strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, E.; Evain, C.; Le Parquier, M.; Szwaj, C.; Bielawski, S.; Manceron, L.; Brubach, J.-B.; Tordeux, M.-A.; Ricaud, J.-P.; Cassinari, L.; Labat, M.; Couprie, M.-E.; Roy, P.

    2015-05-01

    Emission of light by a single electron moving on a curved trajectory (synchrotron radiation) is one of the most well-known fundamental radiation phenomena. However experimental situations are more complex as they involve many electrons, each being exposed to the radiation of its neighbors. This interaction has dramatic consequences, one of the most spectacular being the spontaneous formation of spatial structures inside electrons bunches. This fundamental effect is actively studied as it represents one of the most fundamental limitations in electron accelerators, and at the same time a source of intense terahertz radiation (Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, or CSR). Here we demonstrate the possibility to directly observe the electron bunch microstructures with subpicosecond resolution, in a storage ring accelerator. The principle is to monitor the terahertz pulses emitted by the structures, using a strategy from photonics, time-stretch, consisting in slowing-down the phenomena before recording. This opens the way to unpreceeded possibilities for analyzing and mastering new generation high power coherent synchrotron sources.

  1. Muscle Force-Velocity Relationships Observed in Four Different Functional Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivkovic, Milena Z; Djuric, Sasa; Cuk, Ivan; Suzovic, Dejan; Jaric, Slobodan

    2017-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the shape and strength of the force-velocity relationships observed in different functional movement tests and explore the parameters depicting force, velocity and power producing capacities of the tested muscles. Twelve subjects were tested on maximum performance in vertical jumps, cycling, bench press throws, and bench pulls performed against different loads. Thereafter, both the averaged and maximum force and velocity variables recorded from individual trials were used for force-velocity relationship modeling. The observed individual force-velocity relationships were exceptionally strong (median correlation coefficients ranged from r = 0.930 to r = 0.995) and approximately linear independently of the test and variable type. Most of the relationship parameters observed from the averaged and maximum force and velocity variable types were strongly related in all tests (r = 0.789-0.991), except for those in vertical jumps (r = 0.485-0.930). However, the generalizability of the force-velocity relationship parameters depicting maximum force, velocity and power of the tested muscles across different tests was inconsistent and on average moderate. We concluded that the linear force-velocity relationship model based on either maximum or averaged force-velocity data could provide the outcomes depicting force, velocity and power generating capacity of the tested muscles, although such outcomes can only be partially generalized across different muscles.

  2. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: a theoretical analysis for simple liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuma, Takeshi; Takahashi, Ohgi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-12-14

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρDS) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρDS. The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule.

  3. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: A theoretical analysis for simple liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Ken-ichi, E-mail: aman@tohoku-pharm.ac.jp; Takahashi, Ohgi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1 Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8558 (Japan); Suzuki, Kazuhiro [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Fukuma, Takeshi [Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Kobe University, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-12-14

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρ{sub DS}) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρ{sub DS}. The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule.

  4. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: A theoretical analysis for simple liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Ohgi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuma, Takeshi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρ DS ) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρ DS . The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule

  5. Observation of allotropic transformations of plutonium with a hot stage microscope; Etude des transformations allotropiques du plutonium au microscopic a platine chauffante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mars, J; Spftiet, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    A hot stage microscope designed for the examination of plutonium and its alloys is described. This apparatus was used to study the {alpha} {r_reversible} {beta} and {delta} {r_reversible} {epsilon} allotropic transformations of pure or {beta} and {delta} stabilised plutonium. The {alpha} {yields} {beta} transformation is typically a nucleation and growth process. Some particularities caused by the internal stresses due to the volume change during this transformation are examined. The kinetics has been studied as a function of these stresses and a temperature dependent activation energy for nucleation has been deduced. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation presents a memory effect which implies an orientation relationship between the two phases. This fact is probably caused by the stresses created during the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transition. The {beta} {r_reversible} {gamma} and {delta} {r_reversible} {epsilon} transformations are also diffusion governed processes. (authors) [French] On decrit un microscope a platine chauffante permettant l'examen du plutonium et de ses alliages. Cet appareil a servi a l'etude des transformations {alpha} {r_reversible} {gamma} et {delta} {r_reversible} {epsilon} du plutonium pur ou stabilise en phase {beta} et {delta}. La transformation {alpha} {yields} {beta} est une transformation typique par germination et croissance; elle presente des caracteristiques bien particulieres qui sont dues aux contraintes internes qui prennent naissance au changement de volume a la transformation; la cinetique a ete etudiee en fonction de ces contraintes, et on en a deduit une energie d'activation pour la germination variable avec la temperature. La transformation {beta} {yields} {alpha} presente un effet de memoire qui suppose une relation d'orientation entre les deux phases; ce phenomene semble lie comme auparavant aux contraintes creees par le passage {beta} {yields} {alpha}. Les transformations {beta} {r_reversible} {gamma} et {delta} {r

  6. Expansion of Shockley stacking fault observed by scanning electron microscope and partial dislocation motion in 4H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Yoshifumi; Nakata, Ryu; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Hada, Masaki; Hayashi, Yasuhiko

    2018-04-01

    We studied the dynamics of the expansion of a Shockley-type stacking fault (SSF) with 30° Si(g) partial dislocations (PDs) using a scanning electron microscope. We observed SSFs as dark lines (DLs), which formed the contrast at the intersection between the surface and the SSF on the (0001) face inclined by 8° from the surface. We performed experiments at different electron-beam scanning speeds, observing magnifications, and irradiation areas. The results indicated that the elongation of a DL during one-frame scanning depended on the time for which the electron beam irradiated the PD segment in the frame of view. From these results, we derived a formula to express the velocity of the PD using the elongation rate of the corresponding DL during one-frame scanning. We also obtained the result that the elongation velocity of the DL was not influenced by changing the direction in which the electron beam irradiates the PD. From this result, we deduced that the geometrical kink motion of the PD was enhanced by diffusing carriers that were generated by the electron-beam irradiation.

  7. Recent advances in the theory of nuclear forces and its relevance for the microscopic approach to dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machleidt, R.

    2010-01-01

    The theory of nuclear forces has made great progress since the turn of the millenium using the framework of chiral effective field theory (ChEFT). The advantage of this approach, which was originally proposed by Weinberg, is that it has a firm basis in quantum-chromodynamics and allows for quantitative calculations. Moreover, this theory generates two-nucleon forces (2NF) and many-body forces on an equal footing and provides an explanation for the empirically known fact that 2NF ≫ 3NF ≫ 4NF. I will present the recent advances in more detail and put them into historical context. In addition, I will also provide a critical evaluation of the progress made including a discussion of the limitations of the ChEFT approach. (author)

  8. Atomic force microscope visualization of lipid bilayer degradation due to action of phospholipase A(2) and Humicola lanuginosa lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balashev, Konstantin; DiNardo, N. John; Callisen, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    An important application of liquid cell Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is the study of enzyme structure and behaviour in organized molecular media that mimic in-vivo systems. In this study we demonstrate the use of AFM as a tool to study the kinetics of lipolytic enzyme reactions occurring...... activation, and enzyme reaction rates. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  9. Neutron-induced {sup 63}Ni activity and microscopic observation of copper samples exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi, E-mail: shizuma@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Quantum Energy Applications, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Endo, Satoru [Quantum Energy Applications, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Shinozaki, Kenji [Materials Joining Science and Engineering, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Fukushima, Hiroshi [Materials Physics, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

    2013-05-01

    Fast neutron activation data for {sup 63}Ni in copper samples exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb are important in evaluating neutron doses to the survivors. Up to until now, accelerator mass spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting methods have been applied in {sup 63}Ni measurements and data were accumulated within 1500 m from the hypocenter. The slope of the activation curve versus distance shows reasonable agreement with the calculation result, however, data near the hypocenter are scarce. In the present work, two copper samples obtained from the Atomic bomb dome (155 m from the hypocenter) and the Bank of Japan building (392 m) were utilized in {sup 63}Ni beta-ray measurement with a Si surface barrier detector. Additionally, microscopic observation of the metal surfaces was performed for the first time. Only upper limit of {sup 63}Ni production was obtained for copper sample of the Atomic bomb dome. The result of the {sup 63}Ni measurement for Bank of Japan building show reasonable agreement with the AMS measurement and to fast neutron activation calculations based on the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02) neutrons.

  10. Direct observation of X-ray induced atomic motion using scanning tunneling microscope combined with synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akira; Tanaka, Takehiro; Takagi, Yasumasa; Hosokawa, Hiromasa; Notsu, Hiroshi; Ohzeki, Gozo; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Yuji; Kikuta, Seishi; Aono, Masakazu

    2011-04-01

    X-ray induced atomic motion on a Ge(111)-c(2 x 8) clean surface at room temperature was directly observed with atomic resolution using a synchrotron radiation (SR)-based scanning tunneling microscope (STM) system under ultra high vacuum condition. The atomic motion was visualized as a tracking image by developing a method to merge the STM images before and after X-ray irradiation. Using the tracking image, the atomic mobility was found to be strongly affected by defects on the surface, but was not dependent on the incident X-ray energy, although it was clearly dependent on the photon density. The atomic motion can be attributed to surface diffusion, which might not be due to core-excitation accompanied with electronic transition, but a thermal effect by X-ray irradiation. The crystal surface structure was possible to break even at a lower photon density than the conventionally known barrier. These results can alert X-ray studies in the near future about sample damage during measurements, while suggesting the possibility of new applications. Also the obtained results show a new availability of the in-situ SR-STM system.

  11. Evaluation of the microscopic observational drug susceptibility assay for rapid and efficient diagnosis of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Lazarus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Tuberculosis (TB is endemic in India and the burden of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is high. Early detection of MDR-TB is of primary importance in controlling the spread of TB. The microscopic observational drug susceptibility (MODS assay has been described as a cost-effective and rapid method by which mycobacterial culture and the drug susceptibility test (DST can be done at the same time. Materials and Methods: A total of 302 consecutive sputum samples that were received in an accredited mycobacteriology laboratory for conventional culture and DST were evaluated by the MODS assay. Results: In comparison with conventional culture on Lowenstein Jensen (LJ media, the MODS assay showed a sensitivity of 94.12% and a specificity of 89.39% and its concordance with the DST by the proportion method on LJ media to isoniazid and rifampicin was 90.8% and 91.5%, respectively. The turnaround time for results by MODS was 9 days compared to 21 days by culture on LJ media and an additional 42 days for DST by the 1% proportion method. The cost of performing a single MODS assay was Rs. 250/-, compared to Rs. 950/- for culture and 1st line DST on LJ. Conclusion: MODS was found to be a sensitive and rapid alternative method for performing culture and DST to identify MDR-TB in resource poor settings.

  12. The value of microscopic-observation drug susceptibility assay in the diagnosis of tuberculosis and detection of multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertel Şelale, Denİz; Uzun, Meltem

    2018-01-01

    Inexpensive, rapid, and reliable tests for detecting the presence and drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) are urgently needed to control the transmission of tuberculosis. In this study, we aimed to assess the accuracy and speed of the microscopic-observation drug susceptibility (MODS) assay in the identification of MTBC and detection of multidrug resistance. Sputum samples from patients suspected to have tuberculosis were simultaneously tested with MODS and conventional culture [Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) culture, BACTEC MGIT™ 960 (MGIT) system], and drug susceptibility testing (MGIT system) methods. A total of 331 sputum samples were analyzed. Sensitivity and specificity of MODS assay for detection of MTBC strains were 96% and 98.8%, respectively. MODS assay detected multidrug resistant MTBC isolates with 92.3% sensitivity and 96.6% specificity. Median time to culture positivity was similar for MGIT (8 days) and MODS culture (8 days), but was significantly longer with LJ culture (20 days) (p tuberculosis and detection of multidrug resistance. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. In-Situ Microprobe Observations of Dispersed Oil with Low-Temperature Low-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsen, H.T.

    2010-01-01

    A low cost cryostat stage from high heat capacity material is designed and constructed, in attempt to apply size distribution techniques for examination of oil dispersions. Different materials were tested according to their heat capacity to keep the liquid under investigation in frozen state as long as possible during the introduction of the cryostat stage to the low-vacuum scanning electron microscope. Different concentrations of non ionic surfactant were added to artificially contaminated with 10000 ppm Balayeam base oil in 3.5 % saline water, where oil and dispersing liquid have been added and shacked well to be investigated under the microscope as fine frozen droplets. The efficiency of dispersion was examined using low temperature low-vacuum scanning electron microscope. The shape and size distributions of freeze oil droplets were studied by digital imaging processing technique in conjunction with scanning electron microscope counting method. Also elemental concentration of oil droplets was analyzed.

  14. An Atomic Force Microscope Study Revealed Two Mechanisms in the Effect of Anticancer Drugs on Rate-Dependent Young's Modulus of Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ren

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of cells have been recognized as a biomarker for cellular cytoskeletal organization. As chemical treatments lead to cell cytoskeletal rearrangements, thereby, modifications of cellular mechanical properties, investigating cellular mechanical property variations provides insightful knowledge to effects of chemical treatments on cancer cells. In this study, the effects of eight different anticancer drugs on the mechanical properties of human prostate cancer cell (PC-3 are investigated using a recently developed control-based nanoindentation measurement (CNM protocol on atomic force microscope (AFM. The CNM protocol overcomes the limits of other existing methods to in-liquid nanoindentation measurement of live cells on AFM, particularly for measuring mechanical properties of live cells. The Young's modulus of PC-3 cells treated by the eight drugs was measured by varying force loading rates over three orders of magnitude, and compared to the values of the control. The results showed that the Young's modulus of the PC-3 cells increased substantially by the eight drugs tested, and became much more pronounced as the force load rate increased. Moreover, two distinct trends were clearly expressed, where under the treatment of Disulfiram, paclitaxel, and MK-2206, the exponent coefficient of the frequency- modulus function remained almost unchanged, while with Celebrex, BAY, Totamine, TPA, and Vaproic acid, the exponential rate was significantly increased.

  15. Fabrication of amorphous silicon nanoribbons by atomic force microscope tip-induced local oxidation for thin film device applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, L; Rogel, R; Demami, F

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of induced local oxidation of amorphous silicon by atomic force microscopy. The resulting local oxide is used as a mask for the elaboration of a thin film silicon resistor. A thin amorphous silicon layer deposited on a glass substrate is locally oxidized following narrow continuous lines. The corresponding oxide line is then used as a mask during plasma etching of the amorphous layer leading to the formation of a nanoribbon. Such an amorphous silicon nanoribbon is used for the fabrication of the resistor

  16. Direct nitrate reductase assay versus microscopic observation drug susceptibility test for rapid detection of MDR-TB in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie Bwanga

    Full Text Available The most common method for detection of drug resistant (DR TB in resource-limited settings (RLSs is indirect susceptibility testing on Lowenstein-Jensen medium (LJ which is very time consuming with results available only after 2-3 months. Effective therapy of DR TB is therefore markedly delayed and patients can transmit resistant strains. Rapid and accurate tests suitable for RLSs in the diagnosis of DR TB are thus highly needed. In this study we compared two direct techniques--Nitrate Reductase Assay (NRA and Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility (MODS for rapid detection of MDR-TB in a high burden RLS. The sensitivity, specificity, and proportion of interpretable results were studied. Smear positive sputum was collected from 245 consecutive re-treatment TB patients attending a TB clinic in Kampala, Uganda. Samples were processed at the national reference laboratory and tested for susceptibility to rifampicin and isoniazid with direct NRA, direct MODS and the indirect LJ proportion method as reference. A total of 229 specimens were confirmed as M. tuberculosis, of these interpretable results were obtained in 217 (95% with either the NRA or MODS. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa agreement for MDR-TB diagnosis was 97%, 98% and 0.93 with the NRA; and 87%, 95% and 0.78 with the MODS, respectively. The median time to results was 10, 7 and 64 days with NRA, MODS and the reference technique, respectively. The cost of laboratory supplies per sample was low, around 5 USD, for the rapid tests. The direct NRA and MODS offered rapid detection of resistance almost eight weeks earlier than with the reference method. In the study settings, the direct NRA was highly sensitive and specific. We consider it to have a strong potential for timely detection of MDR-TB in RLS.

  17. Functionalization of atomic force microscope tips by dielectrophoretic assembly of Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Andreia G; Ananias, Duarte; Andre, Paulo S; Ferreira, Rute A sa; Carlos, Luis D; Kholkin, Andrei L; Rocha, J

    2008-01-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip has been coated with photoluminescent Eu 3+ -doped Gd 2 O 3 nanorods using a dielectrophoresis technique, which preserves the red emission of the nanorods (quantum yield 0.47). The performance of the modified tips has been tested by using them for regular topography imaging in tapping and contact modes. Both a regular AFM standard grid and a patterned surface (of an organic-inorganic methacrylate Zr-based oxo-cluster and poly(oxyethylene)/siloxane hybrid) have been used. Similar depth values have been measured using a conventional silicon tip and the nanorod-modified tip. The tips before and after use exhibit similar SEM images and photoluminescence spectra and, thus, seem to be stable under working conditions. These tips should find applications in scanning near-field optical microscopy and other scanning techniques

  18. Formation and characterization of thin films from phthalocyanine complexes: An electrosynthesis study using the atomic-force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Vergara, M.E. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecatronica, Escuela de Ingenieria, Universidad Anahuac del Norte, Avenida Lomas de la Anahuac s/n, Col. Lomas Anahuac, 52786, Huixquilucan (Mexico)]. E-mail: elena.sanchez@anahuac.mx; Islas Bernal, I.F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivera, M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz Rebollo, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacan, 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez Bada, J.R. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de Mexico, Calle del Puente 222, Col. Ejidos de Huipulco, 14380, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-05-07

    ({mu}-Cyano)(phthalocyaninato)metal(III) [PcMCN]{sub n} species with a central transition metal ion, such as Fe(III) and Co(III), were used to prepare molecular films on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode substrate by using the cyclic voltammetry technique. In order to investigate the influence of the ligand on the film properties, 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone and 2,6-dihydroxyanthraquinone as bivalent ligands were employed. The structure of the molecular materials was analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. The in situ film formation, texture, composition and conductivity of each film were further investigated using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and the four-probe technique, respectively. The [PcMCN]{sub n} complexes provided conductive films with an electrical conductivity of 1 x 10{sup -6} {omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1} at 298 K.

  19. Formation and characterization of thin films from phthalocyanine complexes: An electrosynthesis study using the atomic-force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Vergara, M.E.; Islas Bernal, I.F.; Rivera, M.; Ortiz Rebollo, A.; Alvarez Bada, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    (μ-Cyano)(phthalocyaninato)metal(III) [PcMCN] n species with a central transition metal ion, such as Fe(III) and Co(III), were used to prepare molecular films on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode substrate by using the cyclic voltammetry technique. In order to investigate the influence of the ligand on the film properties, 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone and 2,6-dihydroxyanthraquinone as bivalent ligands were employed. The structure of the molecular materials was analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. The in situ film formation, texture, composition and conductivity of each film were further investigated using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and the four-probe technique, respectively. The [PcMCN] n complexes provided conductive films with an electrical conductivity of 1 x 10 -6 Ω -1 cm -1 at 298 K

  20. Folding kinetics of WW domains with the united residue force field for bridging microscopic motions and experimental measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rui; Maisuradze, Gia G; Suñol, David; Todorovski, Toni; Macias, Maria J; Xiao, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A; Czaplewski, Cezary; Liwo, Adam

    2014-12-23

    To demonstrate the utility of the coarse-grained united-residue (UNRES) force field to compare experimental and computed kinetic data for folding proteins, we have performed long-time millisecond-timescale canonical Langevin molecular dynamics simulations of the triple β-strand from the Formin binding protein 28 WW domain and six nonnatural variants, using UNRES. The results have been compared with available experimental data in both a qualitative and a quantitative manner. Complexities of the folding pathways, which cannot be determined experimentally, were revealed. The folding mechanisms obtained from the simulated folding kinetics are in agreement with experimental results, with a few discrepancies for which we have accounted. The origins of single- and double-exponential kinetics and their correlations with two- and three-state folding scenarios are shown to be related to the relative barrier heights between the various states. The rate constants obtained from time profiles of the fractions of the native, intermediate, and unfolded structures, and the kinetic equations fitted to them, correlate with the experimental values; however, they are about three orders of magnitude larger than the experimental ones for most of the systems. These differences are in agreement with the timescale extension derived by scaling down the friction of water and averaging out the fast degrees of freedom when passing from all-atom to a coarse-grained representation. Our results indicate that the UNRES force field can provide accurate predictions of folding kinetics of these WW domains, often used as models for the study of the mechanisms of proein folding.

  1. Observing Fluorescent Probes in Living Cells using a Low-Cost LED Flashlight Retrofitted to a Common Vintage Light Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Babbitt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available While the application of molecular biological techniques based upon fluorescent probes has rapidly expanded over recent decades, the equipment cost of fluorescent microscopy has largely prevented its adoption in the college and high school classroom. We offer a simple solution to this problem by describing in detail how to build with simple tools, a fluorescent microscope using a common brand of colored LED flashlights and second-hand components of vintage Nikon microscopes. This extremely low cost solution is qualitatively compared to an expensive modern Zeiss system.

  2. Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using standard and inverted static methods assisted by FIB-milled spatial markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slattery, Ashley D; Blanch, Adam J; Quinton, Jamie S; Gibson, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    Static methods to determine the spring constant of AFM cantilevers have been widely used in the scientific community since the importance of such calibration techniques was established nearly 20 years ago. The most commonly used static techniques involve loading a trial cantilever with a known force by pressing it against a pre-calibrated standard or reference cantilever. These reference cantilever methods have a number of sources of uncertainty, which include the uncertainty in the measured spring constant of the standard cantilever, the exact position of the loading point on the reference cantilever and how closely the spring constant of the trial and reference cantilever match. We present a technique that enables users to minimize these uncertainties by creating spatial markers on reference cantilevers using a focused ion beam (FIB). We demonstrate that by combining FIB spatial markers with an inverted reference cantilever method, AFM cantilevers can be accurately calibrated without the tip of the test cantilever contacting a surface. This work also demonstrates that for V-shaped cantilevers it is possible to determine the precise loading position by AFM imaging the section of the cantilever where the two arms join. Removing tip-to-surface contact in both the reference cantilever method and sensitivity calibration is a significant improvement, since this is an important consideration for AFM users that require the imaging tip to remain in pristine condition before commencing measurements. Uncertainties of between 5 and 10% are routinely achievable with these methods. (paper)

  3. Microscopic calculation of sub-barrier fusion cross section and barrier distribution using M3Y-type forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.; Ramadan, Kh.A.

    2000-01-01

    The heavy-ion (HI) potential between spherical and deformed nuclei is derived using an M3Y-type nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. The calculation of the exchange part of the HI potential was improved by using a finite-range NN exchange force instead of the zero-range pseudo-potential which is usually used in deriving the potential between deformed nuclei. We consider an 154 Sm- 16 O nuclear pair as an example to show the effect of finite range on the nucleus-nucleus potential for different deformation parameters and at different orientation angles of the deformed target nucleus. We calculated the fusion cross section and the barrier distribution in the WKB approximation and studied their dependence on the orientation and deformation of the target nucleus. The variations found due to improving the exchange part enhance the fusion cross section below the Coulomb barrier by a factor of about four. It has been found that both the cross section and the barrier distribution are very sensitive to the deformation parameters at energies below the Coulomb barrier. (author)

  4. Microscopic calculation of sub-barrier fusion cross section and barrier distribution using M3Y-type forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, M.; Ramadan, Kh.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2000-10-01

    The heavy-ion (HI) potential between spherical and deformed nuclei is derived using an M3Y-type nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. The calculation of the exchange part of the HI potential was improved by using a finite-range NN exchange force instead of the zero-range pseudo-potential which is usually used in deriving the potential between deformed nuclei. We consider an {sup 154}Sm-{sup 16}O nuclear pair as an example to show the effect of finite range on the nucleus-nucleus potential for different deformation parameters and at different orientation angles of the deformed target nucleus. We calculated the fusion cross section and the barrier distribution in the WKB approximation and studied their dependence on the orientation and deformation of the target nucleus. The variations found due to improving the exchange part enhance the fusion cross section below the Coulomb barrier by a factor of about four. It has been found that both the cross section and the barrier distribution are very sensitive to the deformation parameters at energies below the Coulomb barrier. (author)

  5. Method of mechanical holding of cantilever chip for tip-scan high-speed atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Shingo [Department of Physics, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio [Department of Physics, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology of the Japan Science and Technology Agency, 7 Goban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    In tip-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) that scans a cantilever chip in the three dimensions, the chip body is held on the Z-scanner with a holder. However, this holding is not easy for high-speed (HS) AFM because the holder that should have a small mass has to be able to clamp the cantilever chip firmly without deteriorating the Z-scanner’s fast performance, and because repeated exchange of cantilever chips should not damage the Z-scanner. This is one of the reasons that tip-scan HS-AFM has not been established, despite its advantages over sample stage-scan HS-AFM. Here, we present a novel method of cantilever chip holding which meets all conditions required for tip-scan HS-AFM. The superior performance of this novel chip holding mechanism is demonstrated by imaging of the α{sub 3}β{sub 3} subcomplex of F{sub 1}-ATPase in dynamic action at ∼7 frames/s.

  6. Microelectromechanical system device for calibration of atomic force microscope cantilever spring constants between 0.01 and 4 N/m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Hedley, John; Clifford, Charles A.; Chen Xinyong; Allen, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    Calibration of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is necessary for the measurement of nano-newton and pico-newton forces, which are critical to analytical application of AFM in the analysis of polymer surfaces, biological structures and organic molecules. Previously we have described microfabricated array of reference spring (MARS) devices for AFM cantilever spring-constant calibration. Hitherto, these have been limited to the calibration of AFM cantilevers above 0.03 N/m, although they can be used to calibrate cantilevers of lower stiffness with reduced accuracy. Below this limit MARS devices similar to the designs hitherto described would be fragile and difficult to manufacture with reasonable yield. In this work we describe a device we call torsional MARS. This is a large-area torsional mechanical resonator, manufactured by bulk micromachining of a 'silicon-on-insulator' wafer. By measuring its torsional oscillation accurately in vacuum we can deduce its torsional spring constant. The torsional reference spring spans the range of spring constant (from 4 down to 0.01 N/m) that is important in biological AFM, allowing even the most compliant AFM cantilever to be calibrated easily and rapidly

  7. Observation of He bubbles in ion irradiated fusion materials by conductive atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongyu [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Li, Ruihuan [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yang, Deming [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Wu, Yunfeng; Niu, Jinhai; Yang, Qi [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Zhao, Jijun [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Dongping, E-mail: dongping.liu@dlnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Fujian Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Electronic Science, Aeronautics, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Using a non-destructive conductive atomic force microscope combined with the Ar{sup +} etching technique, we demonstrate that nanoscale and conductive He bubbles are formed in the implanted layer of single-crystalline 6H-SiC irradiated with 100 keV He{sup +}. We find that the surface swelling of irradiated SiC samples is well correlated with the growth of elliptic He bubbles in the implanted layer. First-principle calculations are performed to estimate the internal pressure of the He bubble in the void of SiC. Analysis indicates that nanoscale He bubbles acting as a captor capture the He atoms diffusing along the implanted layer at an evaluated temperature and result in the surface swelling of irradiated SiC materials.

  8. An accuracy improvement method for the topology measurement of an atomic force microscope using a 2D wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeomin; Noh, Suwoo; Jeong, Jiseong; Park, Kyihwan

    2018-05-01

    The topology image is constructed from the 2D matrix (XY directions) of heights Z captured from the force-feedback loop controller. For small height variations, nonlinear effects such as hysteresis or creep of the PZT-driven Z nano scanner can be neglected and its calibration is quite straightforward. For large height variations, the linear approximation of the PZT-driven Z nano scanner fail and nonlinear behaviors must be considered because this would cause inaccuracies in the measurement image. In order to avoid such inaccuracies, an additional strain gauge sensor is used to directly measure displacement of the PZT-driven Z nano scanner. However, this approach also has a disadvantage in its relatively low precision. In order to obtain high precision data with good linearity, we propose a method of overcoming the low precision problem of the strain gauge while its feature of good linearity is maintained. We expect that the topology image obtained from the strain gauge sensor showing significant noise at high frequencies. On the other hand, the topology image obtained from the controller output showing low noise at high frequencies. If the low and high frequency signals are separable from both topology images, the image can be constructed so that it is represented with high accuracy and low noise. In order to separate the low frequencies from high frequencies, a 2D Haar wavelet transform is used. Our proposed method use the 2D wavelet transform for obtaining good linearity from strain gauge sensor and good precision from controller output. The advantages of the proposed method are experimentally validated by using topology images. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Living Matter Observations with a Novel Hyperspectral Supercontinuum Confocal Microscope for VIS to Near-IR Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca R. Bertani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A broad range hyper-spectroscopic microscope fed by a supercontinuum laser source and equipped with an almost achromatic optical layout is illustrated with detailed explanations of the design, implementation and data. The real novelty of this instrument, a confocal spectroscopic microscope capable of recording high resolution reflectance data in the VIS-IR spectral range from about 500 nm to 2.5 μm wavelengths, is the possibility of acquiring spectral data at every physical point as defined by lateral coordinates, X and Y, as well as at a depth coordinate, Z, as obtained by the confocal optical sectioning advantage. With this apparatus we collect each single scanning point as a whole spectrum by combining two linear spectral detector arrays, one CCD for the visible range, and one InGaAs infrared array, simultaneously available at the sensor output channel of the home made instrument. This microscope has been developed for biomedical analysis of human skin and other similar applications. Results are shown illustrating the technical performances of the instrument and the capability in extracting information about the composition and the structure of different parts or compartments in biological samples as well as in solid statematter. A complete spectroscopic fingerprinting of samples at microscopic level is shown possible by using statistical analysis on raw data or analytical reflectance models based on Abelés matrix transfer methods.

  10. State and force observers based on multibody models and the indirect Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjurjo, Emilio; Dopico, Daniel; Luaces, Alberto; Naya, Miguel Ángel

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this work is to present two new methods to provide state observers by combining multibody simulations with indirect extended Kalman filters. One of the methods presented provides also input force estimation. The observers have been applied to two mechanism with four different sensor configurations, and compared to other multibody-based observers found in the literature to evaluate their behavior, namely, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF), and the indirect extended Kalman filter with simplified Jacobians (errorEKF). The new methods have some more computational cost than the errorEKF, but still much less than the UKF. Regarding their accuracy, both are better than the errorEKF. The method with input force estimation outperforms also the UKF, while the method without force estimation achieves results almost identical to those of the UKF. All the methods have been implemented as a reusable MATLAB® toolkit which has been released as Open Source in https://github.com/MBDS/mbde-matlab.

  11. Time-series observation of the spreading out of microvessel endothelial cells with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Dong; Ma Wanyun; Liao Fulong; Yeh Meiling; Ouyang Zhigang; Sun Yunxu

    2003-01-01

    The spreading out of microvessel endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis and the post-injury healing of endothelial cells. In our study, a physical force applied with an atomic force microscopic (AFM) cantilever tip in contact mode partly broke the peripheral adhesion that just-confluent cultured rat cerebral microvessel endothelial cells had formed with basal structures and resulted in the cells actively withdrawing from the stimulated area. Time-series changes in cell extension were imaged using tapping mode AFM, in conjunction with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, intensified charge-coupled device and field emission scanning electron microscopy. We also interpreted phase images of living endothelial cells. The results showed that formation of a fibronectin molecule monolayer is key to the spreading out of the cells. Lamellipods as well as filopods would spread out in temporal and spatial distribution following the formation of fibronectin layer. In addition, a lattice-like meshwork of filopods formed in the regions leading lamellipods, which would possibly provide a fulcrum for the filaments of the cytoskeleton within the leading cell body periphery

  12. An optimal pole-matching observer design for estimating tyre-road friction force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Mohammad; Johari Majd, Vahid; Saghafi, Behrooz; Sojoodi, Mahdi

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, considering the dynamical model of tyre-road contacts, we design a nonlinear observer for the on-line estimation of tyre-road friction force using the average lumped LuGre model without any simplification. The design is the extension of a previously offered observer to allow a muchmore realistic estimation by considering the effect of the rolling resistance and a term related to the relative velocity in the observer. Our aim is not to introduce a new friction model, but to present a more accurate nonlinear observer for the assumed model. We derive linear matrix equality conditions to obtain an observer gain with minimum pole mismatch for the desired observer error dynamic system. We prove the convergence of the observer for the non-simplified model. Finally, we compare the performance of the proposed observer with that of the previously mentioned nonlinear observer, which shows significant improvement in the accuracy of estimation.

  13. Global Positioning System: Observations on Quarterly Reports from the Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-17

    Positioning System : Observations on Quarterly Reports from the Air Force The satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS) provides positioning , navigation...infrastructure, and transportation safety. The Department of Defense (DOD)—specifically, the Air Force—develops and operates the GPS system , which...programs, including the most recent detailed assessment of the next generation operational control system (OCX)

  14. Microscopic origin of the 1.3 G0 conductance observed in oxygen-doped silver quantum point contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Tu, Xingchen

    2014-11-21

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. Besides the peak at one conductance quantum, G0, two additional features at ∼0.4 G0 and ∼1.3 G0 have been observed in the conductance histograms of silver quantum point contacts at room temperature in ambient conditions. In order to understand such feature, here we investigate the electronic transport and mechanical properties of clean and oxygen-doped silver atomic contacts by employing the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that, unlike clean Ag single-atom contacts showing a conductance of 1 G0, the low-bias conductance of oxygen-doped Ag atomic contacts depends on the number of oxygen impurities and their binding configuration. When one oxygen atom binds to an Ag monatomic chain sandwiched between two Ag electrodes, the low-bias conductance of the junction always decreases. In contrast, when the number of oxygen impurities is two and the O-O axis is perpendicular to the Ag-Ag axis, the transmission coefficients at the Fermi level are, respectively, calculated to be 1.44 for the junction with Ag(111) electrodes and 1.24 for that with Ag(100) electrodes, both in good agreement with the measured value of ∼1.3 G0. The calculated rupture force (1.60 nN for the junction with Ag(111) electrodes) is also consistent with the experimental value (1.66 ± 0.09 nN), confirming that the measured ∼1.3 G0 conductance should originate from Ag single-atom contacts doped with two oxygen atoms in a perpendicular configuration.

  15. The force-free configuration of flux ropes in geomagnetotail: Cluster observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. Y.; Shen, C.; Zhang, Y. C.; Rong, Z. J.; Li, X.; Dunlop, M.; Ma, Y. H.; Liu, Z. X.; Carr, C. M.; Rème, H.

    2014-08-01

    Unambiguous knowledge of magnetic field structure and the electric current distribution is critical for understanding the origin, evolution, and related dynamic properties of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs). In this paper, a survey of 13 MFRs in the Earth's magnetotail are conducted by Cluster multipoint analysis, so that their force-free feature, i.e., the kind of magnetic field structure satisfying J × B = 0, can be probed directly. It is showed that the selected flux ropes with the bipolar signature of the south-north magnetic field component generally lie near the equatorial plane, as expected, and that the magnetic field gradient is rather weak near the axis center, where the curvature radius is large. The current density (up to several tens of nA/m2) reaches their maximum values as the center is approached. It is found that the stronger the current density, the smaller the angles between the magnetic field and current in MFRs. The direct observations show that only quasi force-free structure is observed, and it tends to appear in the low plasma beta regime (in agreement with the theoretic results). The quasi force-free region is generally found to be embedded in the central portion of the MFRs, where the current is approximately field aligned and proportional to the strength of core field. It is shown that ~60% of surveyed MFRs can be globally approximated as force free. The force-free factor α is found to be nonconstantly varied through the quasi force-free MFR, suggesting that the force-free structure is nonlinear.

  16. Stress relaxation and creep on living cells with the atomic force microscope: a means to calculate elastic moduli and viscosities of cell components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Flores, Susana; Toca-Herrera, Jose Luis; Benitez, Rafael; Vivanco, Maria dM

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present a unified method to study the mechanical properties of cells using the atomic force microscope. Stress relaxation and creep compliance measurements permitted us to determine, the relaxation times, the Young moduli and the viscosity of breast cancer cells (MCF-7). The results show that the mechanical behaviour of MCF-7 cells responds to a two-layered model of similar elasticity but differing viscosity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with an actin-depolymerising agent results in an overall decrease in both cell elasticity and viscosity, however to a different extent for each layer. The layer that undergoes the smaller decrease (36-38%) is assigned to the cell membrane/cortex while the layer that experiences the larger decrease (70-80%) is attributed to the cell cytoplasm. The combination of the method presented in this work, together with the approach based on stress relaxation microscopy (Moreno-Flores et al 2010 J. Biomech. 43 349-54), constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study cell mechanics. This methodology can also be extended to study the mechanical properties of biomaterials in general.

  17. Anti-drift and auto-alignment mechanism for an astigmatic atomic force microscope system based on a digital versatile disk optical head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, E-T; Illers, H; Wang, W-M; Hwang, I-S; Jusko, L; Danzebrink, H-U

    2012-01-01

    In this work, an anti-drift and auto-alignment mechanism is applied to an astigmatic detection system (ADS)-based atomic force microscope (AFM) for drift compensation and cantilever alignment. The optical path of the ADS adopts a commercial digital versatile disc (DVD) optical head using the astigmatic focus error signal. The ADS-based astigmatic AFM is lightweight, compact size, low priced, and easy to use. Furthermore, the optical head is capable of measuring sub-atomic displacements of high-frequency AFM probes with a sub-micron laser spot (~570 nm, FWHM) and a high-working bandwidth (80 MHz). Nevertheless, conventional DVD optical heads suffer from signal drift problems. In a previous setup, signal drifts of even thousands of nanometers had been measured. With the anti-drift and auto-alignment mechanism, the signal drift is compensated by actuating a voice coil motor of the DVD optical head. A nearly zero signal drift was achieved. Additional benefits of this mechanism are automatic cantilever alignment and simplified design.

  18. Characterization of age-hardening behavior of eutectic region in squeeze-cast A356-T5 alloy using nanoindenter and atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, S.W. [Advanced Manufacturing Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan)]. E-mail: youn.sung-won@aist.go.jp; Kang, C.G. [National Laboratory of Thixo/Rheo Forming, School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: cgkang@pusan.ac.kr

    2006-06-15

    The nano/microstructure, the aging response (in T5 heat treatment), and the mechanical/tribological properties of the eutectic regions in squeeze-cast A356 alloy parts were investigated using nano/micro-indentation and mechanical scratching, combined with optical microscopy and atomic force microscope (AFM). Most eutectic Si crystals in the A356 alloy showed a modified morphology as fine-fibers. The loading curve for the eutectic region was more irregular than that of the primary Al region due to the presence of various particles of varying strength. In addition, the eutectic region showed lower pile-up and higher elastic recovery than the primary Al region. The aging responses of the eutectic regions in the squeeze-cast A356 alloys aged at 150 deg. C for different times (0, 2, 4, 8, 10, 16, 24, 36, and 72 h) were investigated. As the aging time increased, acicular Si particles in the eutectic regions gradually came to a fine structure. Both Vickers hardness (H {sub V}) and indentation (H {sub IT}) test results showed almost the same trend of aging curves, and the peak was obtained at the same aging time of 10 h. A remarkable size-dependence of the tests was found. The friction coefficient for the eutectic region was lower than that for the primary Al region.

  19. Observation of Phase Objects by Using an X-ray Microscope with a Foucault Knife-Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, N.; Sasaya, T.; Imai, Y.; Iwata, S.; Zama, K.; Aoki, S.

    2011-09-01

    An x-ray microscope with a zone plate was assembled at the synchrotron radiation source of BL3C, Photon Factory. A Foucault knife-edge was set at the back focal plate of the objective zone plate and phase retrieval was tested by scanning the knife-edge. A preliminary result shows that scanning the knife-edge during exposure was effective for phase retrieval. Phase-contrast tomography was investigated using differential projection images calculated from two Schlieren images with the oppositely oriented knife-edges. Fairly good reconstruction images of polystyrene beads and spores could be obtained.

  20. Observation of Phase Objects by Using an X-ray Microscope with a Foucault Knife-Edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, N.; Sasaya, T.; Imai, Y.; Iwata, S.; Zama, K.; Aoki, S.

    2011-01-01

    An x-ray microscope with a zone plate was assembled at the synchrotron radiation source of BL3C, Photon Factory. A Foucault knife-edge was set at the back focal plate of the objective zone plate and phase retrieval was tested by scanning the knife-edge. A preliminary result shows that scanning the knife-edge during exposure was effective for phase retrieval. Phase-contrast tomography was investigated using differential projection images calculated from two Schlieren images with the oppositely oriented knife-edges. Fairly good reconstruction images of polystyrene beads and spores could be obtained.

  1. Apical root resorption caused by orthodontic forces: A brief review and a long-term observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkara, Ahu; Karaman, Ali I; Kau, Chung H

    2012-10-01

    External apical root resorption (ARR) is a common iatrogenic consequence of orthodontic treatment. One of the aims of this article is to present a brief overview of the literature, including; diagnosis and etiology, with emphasis on orthodontic forces to facilitate an understand of the prevention or management of ARR in orthodontic patients. We also present a long-term follow-up observation of severe ARR, including the last obtained cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) records, to demonstrate the effect of orthodontic forces on ARR.

  2. Observational evidence for remote forcing of the west India coastal current

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Suresh, I.; Shankar, D.; Sundar, D.; Jayakumar, S.; Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.; Pednekar, P.S.

    OF THE WICC and Shetye, 1997] was forced both remotely and locally at periods exceeding 10 days; at periods less than 10 days, the WICC was locally forced. The next section describes the data used; Section 3 de- scribes the relationship between sea level... in the vicinity of the anemome- ter. The along-shore component of the wind is shown in Fig- ure 3; also plotted is the along-shore wind decimated with a 0.75 day −1 (∼ 32 hours) filter to remove the sea-breeze cycle. During the ICMAM observations, sea level...

  3. Structural analysis of γ radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations observed by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Shuang; Chen Ying; Ge Shili; Liu Xiulin; Zhou Pingkun; Zhang Sa; Zhang Detian

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To find a new method for the measurement of radiation-induced damage, the structures of normal chromosomes and 60 Co γ-ray-induced chromosomal aberration were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Methods: Normal and irradiated chromosomes of human peripheral blood lymphocytes were prepared, then three-dimensional structure and height of chromosomes were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Results: Three-dimensional structures of normal chromosomes and dicentric aberration in irradiated chromosomes were observed clearly. The data of chromosome height were helpful to recognizing the dicentric aberrations. Conclusion: Atomic force microscopy providing three-dimension image and linear measurement is a new and valuable tool for structural analysis of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations

  4. Microwave Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Makes ultra-high-resolution field measurements. The Microwave Microscope (MWM) has been used in support of several NRL experimental programs involving sea...

  5. Determining the sputter yields of molybdenum in low-index crystal planes via electron backscattered diffraction, focused ion beam and atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.S., E-mail: 160184@mail.csc.com.tw [New Materials Research and Development Department, China Steel Corporation, 1 Chung Kang Road, Hsiao Kang, Kaohsiung 812, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiu, C.H.; Hong, I.T.; Tung, H.C. [New Materials Research and Development Department, China Steel Corporation, 1 Chung Kang Road, Hsiao Kang, Kaohsiung 812, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chien, F.S.-S. [Department of Physics, Tunghai University, 1727, Sec. 4, Xitun Dist., Taiwan Boulevard, Taichung 407, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-09-15

    Previous literature has used several monocrystalline sputtering targets with various crystalline planes, respectively, to investigate the variations of the sputter yield of materials in different crystalline orientations. This study presents a method to measure the sputtered yields of Mo for the three low-index planes (100), (110), and (111), through using an easily made polycrystalline target. The procedure was firstly to use electron backscattered diffraction to identify the grain positions of the three crystalline planes, and then use a focused ion beam to perform the micro-milling of each identified grain, and finally the sputter yields were calculated from the removed volumes, which were measured by atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that the sputter yield of the primary orientations for Mo varied as Y{sub (110)} > Y{sub (100)} > Y{sub (111)}, coincidental with the ranking of their planar atomic packing densities. The concept of transparency of ion in the crystalline substance was applied to elucidate these results. In addition, the result of (110) orientation exhibiting higher sputter yield is helpful for us to develop a Mo target with a higher deposition rate for use in industry. By changing the deformation process from straight rolling to cross rolling, the (110) texture intensity of the Mo target was significantly improved, and thus enhanced the deposition rate. - Highlights: • We used EBSD, FIB and AFM to measure the sputter yields of Mo in low-index planes. • The sputter yield of the primary orientations for Mo varied as Y{sub (110)} > Y{sub (100)} > Y{sub (111)}. • The transparency of ion was used to elucidate the differences in the sputter yield. • We improved the sputter rate of polycrystalline Mo target by adjusting its texture.

  6. Modeling of contact theories for the manipulation of biological micro/nanoparticles in the form of circular crowned rollers based on the atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korayem, M. H.; Khaksar, H.; Taheri, M.

    2013-01-01

    This article has dealt with the development and modeling of various contact theories for biological nanoparticles shaped as cylinders and circular crowned rollers for application in the manipulation of different biological micro/nanoparticles based on Atomic Force Microscope. First, the effective contact forces were simulated, and their impact on contact mechanics simulation was investigated. In the next step, the Hertz contact model was simulated and compared for gold and DNA nanoparticles with the three types of spherical, cylindrical, and circular crowned roller type contact geometries. Then by reducing the length of the cylindrical section in the circular crowned roller geometry, the geometry of the body was made to approach that of a sphere, and the results were compared for DNA nanoparticles. To anticipatory validate the developed theories, the results of the cylindrical and the circular crowned roller contacts were compared with the results of the existing spherical contact simulations. Following the development of these contact models for the manipulation of various biological micro/nanoparticles, the cylindrical and the circular crowned roller type contact theories were modeled based on the theories of Lundberg, Dowson, Nikpur, Heoprich, and Hertz for the manipulation of biological micro/nanoparticles. Then, for a more accurate validation, the results obtained from the simulations were compared with those obtained by the finite element method and with the experimental results available in previous articles. The previous research works on the simulation of nanomanipulation have mainly investigated the contact theories used in the manipulation of spherical micro/nanoparticles. However since in real biomanipulation situations, biological micro/nanoparticles of more complex shapes need to be displaced in biological environments, this article therefore has modeled and compared, for the first time, different contact theories for use in the biomanipulation of

  7. Observations of Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves forced by Extratropical Wave Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiladis, G. N.; Biello, J. A.; Straub, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    It is well established by observations that deep tropical convection can in certain situations be forced by extratropical Rossby wave activity. Such interactions are a well-known feature of regions of upper level westerly flow, and in particular where westerlies and equatorward wave guiding by the basic state occur at low enough latitudes to interact with tropical and subtropical moisture sources. In these regions convection is commonly initiated ahead of upper level troughs, characteristic of forcing by quasi-geostrophic dynamics. However, recent observational evidence indicates that extratropical wave activity is also associated with equatorial convection even in regions where there is a "critical line" to Rossby wave propagation at upper levels, that is, where the zonal phase speed of the wave is equal to the zonal flow speed. A common manifestation of this type of interaction involves the initiation of convectively coupled Kelvin waves, as well as mixed Rossby-gravity (MRG) waves. These waves are responsible for a large portion of the convective variability within the ITCZ over the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic sectors, as well as within the Amazon Basin of South America. For example, Kelvin waves originating within the western Pacific ITCZ are often triggered by Rossby wave activity propagating into the Australasian region from the South Indian Ocean extratropics. At other times, Kelvin waves are seen to originate along the eastern slope of the Andes. In the latter case the initial forcing is sometimes linked to a low-level "pressure surge," initiated by wave activity propagating equatorward from the South Pacific storm track. In yet other cases, such as over Africa, the forcing appears to be related to wave activity in the extratropics which is not necessarily propagating into low latitudes, but appears to "project" onto the Kelvin structure, in line with past theoretical and modeling studies. Observational evidence for extratropical forcing of Kelvin and MRG

  8. Electron microscope observations of impact crater debris amongst contaminating particulates on materials surfaces exposed in space in low-Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, L. E.; Rivas, J. M.; Quinones, S.; Niou, C.-S.; Advani, A. H.; Marquez, B.

    1993-01-01

    Debris particles extracted from a small sampling region on the leading edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft have been examined by analytical transmission electron microscopy and the elemental frequency observed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry and compared with upper atmosphere (Earth) particle elemental frequency and the average elemental compositions of interplanetary dust particles. A much broader elemental distribution was observed for the exposed spacecraft surface debris milieu. Numerous metal microfragment analyses, particularly aluminum and stainless steel, were compared with scanning electron microscope observations-of impact crater features, and the corresponding elemental spectra on selected LDEF aluminium tray clamps and stainless steel bolts. The compositions and melt features for these impact craters and ejecta have been shown to be consistent with microcrystalline debris fragments in the case of aluminum, and these observations suggest an ever changing debris milieu on exposed surfaces for space craft and space system materials.

  9. Tropically driven and externally forced patterns of Antarctic sea ice change: reconciling observed and modeled trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, David P.; Deser, Clara

    2017-09-01

    Recent work suggests that natural variability has played a significant role in the increase of Antarctic sea ice extent during 1979-2013. The ice extent has responded strongly to atmospheric circulation changes, including a deepened Amundsen Sea Low (ASL), which in part has been driven by tropical variability. Nonetheless, this increase has occurred in the context of externally forced climate change, and it has been difficult to reconcile observed and modeled Antarctic sea ice trends. To understand observed-model disparities, this work defines the internally driven and radiatively forced patterns of Antarctic sea ice change and exposes potential model biases using results from two sets of historical experiments of a coupled climate model compared with observations. One ensemble is constrained only by external factors such as greenhouse gases and stratospheric ozone, while the other explicitly accounts for the influence of tropical variability by specifying observed SST anomalies in the eastern tropical Pacific. The latter experiment reproduces the deepening of the ASL, which drives an increase in regional ice extent due to enhanced ice motion and sea surface cooling. However, the overall sea ice trend in every ensemble member of both experiments is characterized by ice loss and is dominated by the forced pattern, as given by the ensemble-mean of the first experiment. This pervasive ice loss is associated with a strong warming of the ocean mixed layer, suggesting that the ocean model does not locally store or export anomalous heat efficiently enough to maintain a surface environment conducive to sea ice expansion. The pervasive upper-ocean warming, not seen in observations, likely reflects ocean mean-state biases.

  10. Tropically driven and externally forced patterns of Antarctic sea ice change: reconciling observed and modeled trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, David P.; Deser, Clara

    2018-06-01

    Recent work suggests that natural variability has played a significant role in the increase of Antarctic sea ice extent during 1979-2013. The ice extent has responded strongly to atmospheric circulation changes, including a deepened Amundsen Sea Low (ASL), which in part has been driven by tropical variability. Nonetheless, this increase has occurred in the context of externally forced climate change, and it has been difficult to reconcile observed and modeled Antarctic sea ice trends. To understand observed-model disparities, this work defines the internally driven and radiatively forced patterns of Antarctic sea ice change and exposes potential model biases using results from two sets of historical experiments of a coupled climate model compared with observations. One ensemble is constrained only by external factors such as greenhouse gases and stratospheric ozone, while the other explicitly accounts for the influence of tropical variability by specifying observed SST anomalies in the eastern tropical Pacific. The latter experiment reproduces the deepening of the ASL, which drives an increase in regional ice extent due to enhanced ice motion and sea surface cooling. However, the overall sea ice trend in every ensemble member of both experiments is characterized by ice loss and is dominated by the forced pattern, as given by the ensemble-mean of the first experiment. This pervasive ice loss is associated with a strong warming of the ocean mixed layer, suggesting that the ocean model does not locally store or export anomalous heat efficiently enough to maintain a surface environment conducive to sea ice expansion. The pervasive upper-ocean warming, not seen in observations, likely reflects ocean mean-state biases.

  11. Observation and Numerical Experiments for Drag Coefficient Under Typhoon Wind Forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Huiqiu; ZHOU Liangming; LI Shuiqing; WANG Zhifeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study on drag coefficients under typhoon wind forcing based on observations and numerical experiments.The friction velocity and wind speed are measured at a marine observation platform in the South China Sea.Three typhoons:SOULIK (2013),TRAMI (2013) and FITOW (2013) are observed at a buoy station in the northeast sea area of Pingtan Island.A new parameterization is formulated for the wind drag coefficient as a function of wind speed.It is found that the drag coefficient (Ca) increases linearly with the slope of 0.083× 10-3 for wind speed less than 24 m s-1.To investigate the drag coefficient under higher wind conditions,three numerical experiments are implemented for these three typhoons using SWAN wave model.The wind input data are objective reanalysis datasets,which are assimilated with many sources and provided every six hours with the resolution of 0.125° ×0.125°.The numerical simulation results show a good agreement with wave observation data under typhoon wind forcing.The results indicate that the drag coefficient levels off with the linear slope of 0.012× 10-3 for higher wind speeds (less than 34 m s-1) and the new parameterization improvese the simulation accuracy compared with the Wu (1982) default used in SWAN.

  12. Observational determination of surface radiative forcing by CO2 from 2000 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, D R; Collins, W D; Gero, P J; Torn, M S; Mlawer, E J; Shippert, T R

    2015-03-19

    The climatic impact of CO2 and other greenhouse gases is usually quantified in terms of radiative forcing, calculated as the difference between estimates of the Earth's radiation field from pre-industrial and present-day concentrations of these gases. Radiative transfer models calculate that the increase in CO2 since 1750 corresponds to a global annual-mean radiative forcing at the tropopause of 1.82 ± 0.19 W m(-2) (ref. 2). However, despite widespread scientific discussion and modelling of the climate impacts of well-mixed greenhouse gases, there is little direct observational evidence of the radiative impact of increasing atmospheric CO2. Here we present observationally based evidence of clear-sky CO2 surface radiative forcing that is directly attributable to the increase, between 2000 and 2010, of 22 parts per million atmospheric CO2. The time series of this forcing at the two locations-the Southern Great Plains and the North Slope of Alaska-are derived from Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer spectra together with ancillary measurements and thoroughly corroborated radiative transfer calculations. The time series both show statistically significant trends of 0.2 W m(-2) per decade (with respective uncertainties of ±0.06 W m(-2) per decade and ±0.07 W m(-2) per decade) and have seasonal ranges of 0.1-0.2 W m(-2). This is approximately ten per cent of the trend in downwelling longwave radiation. These results confirm theoretical predictions of the atmospheric greenhouse effect due to anthropogenic emissions, and provide empirical evidence of how rising CO2 levels, mediated by temporal variations due to photosynthesis and respiration, are affecting the surface energy balance.

  13. In-situ Crystallization of Highly Volatile Commercial Mold Flux Using an Isolated Observation System in the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Yong; Ryu, Jae Wook; Sohn, Il

    2014-08-01

    The in situ crystallization behavior of highly volatile commercial mold fluxes for medium carbon steels was investigated using the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) equipped with an optimized isolated observation system. The highly volatile compounds of the mold flux were suppressed during heating allowing direct observation in the CLSM. Cooling rates of 25, 50, 100, 400, and 800 K/min were incorporated and continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams of 4 different commercial mold fluxes for medium carbon steels were developed. Identification of the crystalline phase was conducted with XRD and SEM-EDS analysis. A cuspidine crystalline was observed in all samples at various cooling rates. With higher basicity, CaF2, and NaF, the crystallization of the fluxes was enhanced according to the CCT diagram. As the slag structure becomes depolymerized, the diffusion rate of the cathodic ions seems to increase.

  14. Observation of nuclear track in organic material by atomic force microscopy in real time during etching

    CERN Document Server

    Palmino, F; Labrune, J C

    1999-01-01

    The developments of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allow to investigated solid surfaces with a nanometer scale. These techniques are useful methods allowing direct observation of surface morphologies. Particularly in the nuclear track fields, they offer a new tool to give many new informations on track formation. In this paper we present the preliminary results of a new use of this technique to characterize continuously the formation of the revealed track in a cellulose nitrate detector (LR115) after an alpha particle irradiation. For that, a specific cell has been used to observe, by nano-observations, the evolution of track shapes simultaneously with chemical treatment. Thus, the track shape evolution has been studied; visualizing the evolution of the tracks in real time, in situ during the chemical etching process.

  15. Microscopic Polyangiitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body, specifically the feet, lower legs and, in bed-ridden patients, the buttocks. The skin findings of cutaneous ... that are in contact with the lungs’ microscopic air sacs – the condition may quickly pose a threat ...

  16. Scanning Tunneling Microscopic Observation of Adatom-Mediated Motifs on Gold-Thiol Self-assembled Monolayers at High Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yun; Chi, Qijin; Hush, Noel S.

    2009-01-01

    the structural motifs observed on surfaces at low coverage and on gold nanoparticles to the observed spectroscopic properties of high-coverage SAMs formed by methanethiol. However, the significant role attributed to intermolecular steric packing effects suggests a lack of generality for the adatom-mediated motif......Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed by chemisorption of a branched-chain alkanethiol, 2-methyl-1-propanethiol, on Au(111) surfaces were studied by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under electrochemical potential control and analyzed using extensive density functional theory (DFT...... two R−S−Au−S−R adatom-mediated motifs per surface cell, with steric-induced variations in the adsorbate alignment inducing the observed STM image contrasts. Observed pits covering 5.6 ± 0.5% of the SAM surface are consistent with this structure. These results provide the missing link from...

  17. Observing how others lift light or heavy objects: time-dependent encoding of grip force in the primary motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaerts, Kaat; de Beukelaar, Toon T; Swinnen, Stephan P; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2012-07-01

    During movement observation, corticomotor excitability of the observer's primary motor cortex (M1) is modulated according to the force requirements of the observed action. Here, we explored the time course of observation-induced force encoding. Force-related changes in M1-excitability were assessed by delivering transcranial magnetic stimulations at distinct temporal phases of an observed reach-grasp-lift action. Temporal changes in force-related electromyographic activity were also assessed during active movement execution. In observation conditions in which a heavy object was lifted, M1-excitability was higher compared to conditions in which a light object was lifted. Both during observation and execution, differential force encoding tended to gradually increase from the grasping phase until the late lift phase. Surprisingly, however, during observation, force encoding was already present at the early reach phase: a time point at which no visual cues on the object's weight were available to the observer. As the observer was aware that the same weight condition was presented repeatedly, this finding may indicate that prior predictions concerning the upcoming weight condition are reflected by M1 excitability. Overall, findings may provide indications that the observer's motor system represents motor predictions as well as muscular requirements to infer the observed movement goal.

  18. Observation of potential barriers on barium strontium titanate PTCR ceramics by electrostatic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manfredini, J.P.; Paulin Filho, P.I.; Gheno, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    A composition of PTCR ceramic based in barium titanate with isovalent replacement of part of barium by strontium using lanthanum and manganese as additives was investigated. The transition temperature, typical of these materials, was shifted below the room temperature by the presence of strontium, whose behavior was detected by tests of DC resistivity and impedance spectroscopy. The observation of potential barriers at grain boundaries was possible through the technique of electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The results also showed the presence of space charges in regions inside grains, possibly at subgrain boundaries. (author)

  19. Observation and Manipulation of Polymers by Scanning Tunneling and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-13

    Observation and Manipulation of Polymers by Scanning Tunneling and Atomic Force Microscooy 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) M.M. Dovek, T.R. Albrecht, S.W.J. Kuan, C.A...COUNT FIELD GOP SU8 -GROUP 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if ncosay and kIti1I by block numbor) ~AM\\~ v~~\\~A Dhe properties of monolayer films of...organic materi s are importantl i--V~ ety of technologies. We have employed the STM and AFM t study’ LanD~ ..-odgett films of a varie ’ty of polymers

  20. Microscopic origin of the 1.3 G0 conductance observed in oxygen-doped silver quantum point contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Minglang; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. Besides the peak at one conductance quantum, G0, two additional features at ∼0.4 G0 and ∼1.3 G0 have been observed in the conductance histograms of silver quantum point contacts at room temperature in ambient conditions

  1. Microscopic calculation of four-nucleon scattering observables in dd → dd and dd → p3H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    The four-body equations of Alt, Grassberger and Sandhas are solved for a system of four nucleons, using realistic NN interactions. The results of the calculations are compared with data for the reactions and dd → dd and dd → p 3 H. Preliminary calculations indicate that the nucleon-nucleon p-waves have a strong effect on 4N observables. (orig.)

  2. Novel scanning probe microscope instrumentation with applications in nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphry, M.J.

    2000-10-01

    A versatile scanning probe microscope controller has been constructed. Its suitability for the control of a range of different scanning probe microscope heads has been demonstrated. These include an ultra high vacuum scanning tunnelling microscope, with which atomic resolution images of Si surfaces was obtained, a custom-built atomic force microscope, and a custom-built photon emission scanning tunnelling microscope. The controller has been designed specifically to facilitate data acquisition during molecular manipulation experiments. Using the controller, the fullerene molecule C 60 has been successfully manipulated on Si(100)-2x1 surfaces and detailed data has been acquired during the manipulation process. Evidence for two distinct modes of manipulation have been observed. A repulsive mode with success rates up to 90% was found to occur with tunnel gap impedances below 2GΩ, while between 2GΩ and 8GΩ attractive manipulation events were observed, with a maximum success rate of ∼8%. It was also found that the step size between feedback updates had a significant effect on tip stability, and that dwell time of the STM tip at each data point had a critical effect on manipulation probability. A multi-function scanning probe microscope head has been developed capable of operation as a scanning tunnelling microscope and an atomic force microscope in vacuum and a magnetic field of 7T. The custom-built controller also presented here was used to control the head. A three-axis inertial sliding motor was developed for the head, capable of reproducible step sizes of <1000A. In addition, an optical fibre interferometer was constructed with a sensitivity of 0.2A/√Hz. Preliminary development of a magnetic resonance force microscope mode has also been performed, with initial results showing such a system to be feasible. (author)

  3. Scanning tunneling microscope observation and magnetic anisotropy of molecular beam epitaxy-grown Fe/Pt superlattices with (111) and (001) orientations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Kato, T.; Iwata, S.; Tsunashima, S.; Uchiyama, S.

    2004-01-01

    The surface morphology and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy for (001) and (111) oriented [Pt(nML)/Fe(nML)] 10 superlattices were investigated. From in situ scanning tunneling microscope observation, the small grain whose diameter was about 5-10 nm and height was 0.2-0.4 nm, was observed in the Fe(2 ML) surface grown at room temperature on the Pt(111) seed layer, while the surface of the Fe deposited at 150 deg. C was covered with flat terraces and steps. It is found that the (111) oriented films were all in-plane magnetized. On the other hand, the (001) films were in-plane magnetized at room temperature, perpendicular magnetized at 100 deg. C and 150 deg. C

  4. In situ direct observation of photocorrosion in ZnO crystals in ionic liquid using a laser-equipped high-voltage electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ishioka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ZnO photocatalysts in water react with environmental water molecules and corrode under illumination. ZnO nanorods in water can also grow because of water splitting induced by UV irradiation. To investigate their morphological behavior caused by crystal growth and corrosion, here we developed a new laser-equipped high-voltage electron microscope and observed crystal ZnO nanorods immersed in ionic liquid. Exposing the specimen holder to a laser with a wavelength of 325 nm, we observed the photocorrosion in situ at the atomic scale for the first time. This experiment revealed that Zn and O atoms near the interface between the ZnO nanorods and the ionic liquid tended to dissolve into the liquid. The polarity and facet of the nanorods were strongly related to photocorrosion and crystal growth.

  5. Magnetic force microscopy: advanced technique for the observation of magnetic domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenjo, A.; Garcia, J. M.; Vazquez, M.

    2001-01-01

    An overview on the Magnetic Force Microscopy, MFM, as an advanced technique to observe magnetic domains and walls is displayed. Basic concepts are first introduced on the domain structure formation as well as on other techniques to observe magnetic domains. Afterwards, the MFM instrumentation is described making also an emphasis in micro magnetic consideration to interpret the images. Finally, a set of selected advanced magnetic materials with different domain structures is chosen to show the wide possibilities of this techniques to characterise the surface magnetic behaviour. The domain structure of materials as commercial magnetic recording media, thin films and multilayers, amorphous micro tubes, nanocrystalline ribbons, perovskites or magnetic nano wires is shown. (Author) 16 refs

  6. Observation of multicellular spinning behavior of Proteus mirabilis by atomic force microscopy and multifunctional microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanxia; Deng, Yuanxin; Luo, Shuxiu; Deng, Yu; Guo, Linming; Xu, Weiwei; Liu, Lei; Liu, Junkang

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to observe the multicellular spinning behavior of Proteus mirabilis by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and multifunctional microscopy in order to understand the mechanism underlying this spinning movement and its biological significance. Multifunctional microscopy with charge-coupled device (CCD) and real-time AFM showed changes in cell structure and shape of P. mirabilis during multicellular spinning movement. Specifically, the morphological characteristics of P. mirabilis, multicellular spinning dynamics, and unique movement were observed. Our findings indicate that the multicellular spinning behavior of P. mirabilis may be used to collect nutrients, perform colonization, and squeeze out competitors. The movement characteristics of P. mirabilis are vital to the organism's biological adaptability to the surrounding environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Electron microscopic observations and DNA chain fragmentation studies on apoptosis in bone tumor cells induced by 153Sm-EDTMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Xiao Dong; Han Xiaofeng

    1997-01-01

    The morphological changes observed by electron microscopy indicate that after internal irradiation with 153 Sm-EDTMP bone tumor cells displayed feature of apoptosis, such as margination of condensed chromatin, chromatin fragmentation, as well as the membrane bounded apoptotic bodies formation. The quantification analysis of fragmentation DNA for bone tumor cells induced by 153 Sm-EDTMP shows that the DNA fragmentation is enhanced with the prolongation of internally irradiated time. These characteristics suggest that 153 Sm-EDTMP internal irradiation could induce bone tumor cells to go to apoptosis

  8. Microscopic Theory of Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the microscopic method has been applied to the notoriously difficult problem of nuclear fission with unprecedented success. In this paper, we discuss some of the achievements and promise of the microscopic method, as embodied in the Hartree-Fock method using the Gogny finite-range effective interaction, and beyond-mean-field extensions to the theory. The nascent program to describe induced fission observables using this approach at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented

  9. Martian Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic imager (circular device in center) is in clear view above the surface at Meridiani Planum, Mars, in this approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The image was taken on the 9th sol of the rover's journey. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm. The arrow is pointing to the lens of the instrument. Note the dust cover, which flips out to the left of the lens, is open. This approximated color image was created using the camera's violet and infrared filters as blue and red.

  10. Observation of microscopic bone structure during bone formation. Application of micro-computed tomography for evaluation of bone quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Hiromitsu; Mizukawa, Nobuyoshi; Mishima, Katsuaki; Takagi, Shin; Sugahara, Toshio

    1998-01-01

    Bone formation in the autogenous periosteum of the tibia grafted to the floor of the mouth to bridge the mandible was studied by micro-CT to assess its efficacy in evaluating bone formation in rabbits. On soft radiographs, bone formation was observed from both ends of the periosteum on day 14. The bone increased in width and extended medially; contact was made in the center on day 28. The time course of the development of bone trabeculae was well demonstrated three-dimensionally on micro-CT. Indices of bone quality such as Tb-Th, Tb.N, and BV, which reflect the growth of trabeculae, increased gradually from days 14 to 21 and more rapidly from days 21 to 28, whereas Tb. S decreased gradually after grafting. The results suggest that micro-CT is useful in evaluating bone formation three-dimensionally. (author)

  11. Observations of the upper ocean response to storm forcing in the South Atlantic Roaring Forties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Marsh

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available In the austral summer of 1992–1993 the passage of a storm system drove a strong upper ocean response at 45°S in the mid-South Atlantic. Good in situ observations were obtained. CTD casts revealed that the mixed layer deepened by ~40 m over 4 days. Wind stirring dominated over buoyancy flux-driven mixing during the onset of high winds. Doppler shear currents further reveal this to be intimately related to inertial dynamics. The penetration depth of inertial currents, which are confined to the mixed layer, increases with time after a wind event, matched by a downward propagation of low values of the Richardson number. This suggests that inertial current shear is instrumental in producing turbulence at the base of the mixed layer. Evolution of inertial transport is simulated using a time series of ship-observed wind stress. Simulated transport is only 30–50% of the observed transport, suggesting that much of the observed inertial motion was forced by an earlier (possibly remote storm. Close proximity of the subtropical front further complicates the upper ocean response to the storm. A simple heat balance for the upper 100 m reveals that surface cooling and mixing (during the storm can account for only a small fraction of an apparent ~1 °C mixed layer cooling.

  12. System pressure effects on reflooding phenomena observed in the SCTF Core-I forced flooding tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Sudo, Yukio; Sobajima, Makoto; Iwamura, Takamichi; Osakabe, Masahiro; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka

    1983-06-01

    The Slab Core Test Facility was constructed to investigate two-dimensional thermo-hydrodynamics in the core and the interaction in fluid behavior between the core and the upper plenum during the last part of blowdown, refill and reflood phases of a posturated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The present report described the analytical results on the effects of system pressure on reflooding phenomena observed in Tests Sl-SH2, Sl-01 and Sl-02 which are belonging to the SCTF Core-I forced-feed reflooding test series. Nominal system pressures in these tests are 0.4, 0.2 and 0.15 MPa, respectively. By comparison among the data of these three tests, the effects of system pressure on thermo-hydrodynamic behavior in the pressure vessel including the core and the primary coolant loops of the SCTF can be clarified under the forced flooding condition. Major items investigated in the present report are (1) overall temperature behaviors in the core, (2) change of heat transfer coefficient and heat flux at the rod surface before the quench, (3) two-dimensional thermo-hydrodynamic behaviors in the core and upper plenum and (4) hot leg carryover. (author)

  13. Microscopic observation of ferroelectric domains in SrTiO3 using birefringence imaging techniques under high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaka, Hirotaka; Nozaki, Hirofumi; Miura, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Phase transitions in SrTiO 3 between quantum paraelectric, coherent paraelectric, and electric-field-induced ferroelectric states are governed by tetragonal domains with quantum fluctuations. However, their characteristics are still unclear. To observe the electric-field-induced ferroelectric state using birefringence imaging techniques, we developed a suitable sample holder to apply high electric fields of up to E ≃ 5 kV/cm and temperatures down to T = 20 K. From birefringence imaging measurements of the ferroelectric LiNbO 3 with varying electric field, distributions of the electric field in the sample stage were found to be negligible. In SrTiO 3 , a huge-retardance area corresponding to the ferroelectric domains appears at E > 2 kV/cm and T ≤ 60 K even though the paraelectric domains partially remain. Furthermore, the fast-axis direction rotates by 90° at the ferroelectric phase transition because of an electrostrictive effect in ferroelectrics. The phase diagram of the critical electric field and temperature agrees with previous reports obtained from dielectric and neutron scattering measurements. (author)

  14. Electron microscopic observation of 137Cs-irradiated rat testis. Production of basal laminae for germ cells, despite their absence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Hajime; Esaki, Michiyo

    2003-01-01

    Whole body γ-ray irradiation of rats with caesium-137 ( 137 Cs) at embryonic day 20 induced marked reduction of the weight of the testis. Body weight and other tissues, however, seemed to remain normal. By light microscopy, complete loss of germ cells was observed in the testis. Other components, such as Sertoli cells and interstitial cells, seemed to be normal. The testes from day 8 postpartum rats contained very few spermatogonia compared with newborn rats, indicating loss of germ cells between days 0 and 8. In the adult, 137 Cs-irradiated testes showed two conspicuous features other than the loss of germ cells: empty vacuolar spaces between Sertoli cells and multilayered seminiferous tubule basal laminae (lamina densa). The junctional structures (ectoplasmic specializations) between Sertoli cells, however, seemed normal. The thickness of each layer of multilayered basal laminae was the same as that of normal rats and electron-lucent layers similar to lamina lucida were interposed between them. Of the empty vacuolar spaces between Sertoli cells, basal laminae bridge the gap. The basal laminae contained laminin, type IV collagen and heparan sulphate proteoglycan evenly distributed among layers, suggesting a normal composition. Rough estimation of the amount of basal laminae deposited in 137 Cs-irradiated rats indicates that it is within a range similar to that in normal testis. These features imply that Sertoli cells are, in part, determined perinatally to produce basal laminae for germ-line cells. (author)

  15. Satellite observed impacts of wildfires on regional atmosphere composition and shortwave radiative forcing: multiple cases study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y.; Li, R.; Huang, J.; Bergeron, Y.; Fu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Emissions of aerosols and trace gases from wildfires and the direct shortwave radiative forcing were studied using multi-satellite/sensor observations from Aqua Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Aqua Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Aqua Cloud's and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). The selected cases occurred in Northeast of China (NEC), Siberia of Russia, California of America have dominant fuel types of cropland, mixed forest and needleleaf forest, respectively. The Fire radiative power (FRP) based emission coefficients (Ce) of aerosol, NOx (NO2+NO), formaldehyde (HCHO), and carbon monoxide (CO) showed significant differences from case to case. 1) the FRP of the cropland case in NEC is strongest, however, the Ce of aerosol is the lowest (20.51 ± 2.55 g MJ-1). The highest Ce of aerosol is 71.34 ± 13.24 g MJ-1 in the needleleaf fire case in California. 2) For NOx, the highest Ce existed in the cropland case in NEC (2.76 ± 0.25 g MJ-1), which is more than three times of those in the forest fires in Siberia and California. 3) The Ce of CO is 70.21±10.97 and 88.38±46.16 g MJ-1 in the forest fires in Western Siberia and California, which are about four times of that in cropland fire. 4) The variation of Ce of HCHO are relatively small among cases. Strong spatial correlations are found among aerosol optical depth (AOD), NOx, HCHO, and CO. The ratios of NOx to AOD, HCHO, and CO in the cropland case in NEC show much higher values than those in other cases. Although huge differences of emissions and composition ratios exist among cases, the direct shortwave (SW) radiative forcing efficiency (SWARFE) of smoke at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) are in good agreement, with the shortwave radiative forcing efficiencies values of 20.09 to 22.93 per unit AOD. Results in this study reveal noteworthy variations of the FRP-based emissions coefficient and relative chemical composition in the smoke

  16. Preparation and Loading Process of Single Crystalline Samples into a Gas Environmental Cell Holder for In Situ Atomic Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopic Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straubinger, Rainer; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-06-01

    A reproducible way to transfer a single crystalline sample into a gas environmental cell holder for in situ transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis is shown in this study. As in situ holders have only single-tilt capability, it is necessary to prepare the sample precisely along a specific zone axis. This can be achieved by a very accurate focused ion beam lift-out preparation. We show a step-by-step procedure to prepare the sample and transfer it into the gas environmental cell. The sample material is a GaP/Ga(NAsP)/GaP multi-quantum well structure on Si. Scanning TEM observations prove that it is possible to achieve atomic resolution at very high temperatures in a nitrogen environment of 100,000 Pa.

  17. Potential profile and photovoltaic effect in nanoscale lateral pn junction observed by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Roland; Moraru, Daniel; Mizuno, Takeshi; Jablonski, Ryszard; Tabe, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale pn junctions have been investigated by Kelvin probe force microscopy and several particular features were found. Within the depletion region, a localized noise area is observed, induced by temporal fluctuations of dopant states. Electronic potential landscape is significantly affected by dopants with ground-state energies deeper than in bulk. Finally, the effects of light illumination were studied and it was found that the depletion region shifts its position as a function of light intensity. This is ascribed to charge redistribution within the pn junction as a result of photovoltaic effect and due to the impact of deepened-level dopants. - Highlights: • In pn nano-junctions, temporal potential fluctuations are found in depletion layer. • Fluctuations are due to frequent capture and emission of free carriers by dopants. • Depletion layer position shifts as a function of the intensity of irradiated light. • The depletion layer shifts are due to changes of deep-level dopants' charge states

  18. Atomic force microscopy observation of lipopolysaccharide-induced cardiomyocyte cytoskeleton reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqun; Chen, Tangting; Zhou, Xiang; Huang, Qiaobing; Jin, Chunhua

    2013-08-01

    We applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to observe lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intracellular cytoskeleton reorganization in primary cardiomyocytes from neonatal mouse. The nonionic detergent Triton X-100 was used to remove the membrane, soluble proteins, and organelles from the cell. The remaining cytoskeleton can then be directly visualized by AFM. Using three-dimensional technique of AFM, we were able to quantify the changes of cytoskeleton by the "density" and total "volume" of the cytoskeleton fibers. Compared to the control group, the density of cytoskeleton was remarkably decreased and the volume of cytoskeleton was significantly increased after LPS treatment, which suggests that LPS may induce the cytoskeleton reorganization and change the cardiomyocyte morphology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational eXperiment - University of Washington instrumented C-131A aircraft Data Set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TARFOX_UWC131A is the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational eXperiment (TARFOX) - University of Washington instrumented C-131A aircraft data set. The...

  20. RED DRAGON FRUIT (Hylocereus costaricensis Britt. Et R. PEEL EXTRACT AS A NATURAL DYE ALTERNATIVE IN MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATION OF PLANT TISSUES: THE PRACTICAL GUIDE IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni Wagiyanti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prepared slide of plant tissue needs to be staining to facilitate observations under microscope. Laboratorium activities in schools usually use synthetic dyes which expensive and can be damaged the student. Therefore the exploration of alternative dyes need to be established, such as utilizing of red dragon fruit (Hylocereus castaricensis Britt. Et R.. This study aims to (1 find out the best concentration of dragon fruit peel extract for staining plant tissue prepared slide and (2 to develop the practical guide related to plant tissue observation. The qualitative research used different concentration of red dragon fruit peel extract, namely: 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, 90%, and 100% with 3 repetitions. Data were obtained from observation photos of prepared slide. The result showed that the most contrast prepared slide was used red dragon fruit extract in 60% concentration. The result use to arrange practical guide in observation of plant tissues which is validated by material expert. The validation result showed “very good” criteria (86.01%.

  1. Atomic force microscope and scanning tunneling microscope studies of superlattices and density waves in Fe doped NbSe2, TaSe2, TaS2 and in NbSe3 doped with Fe, Co, Cr, and V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.V.; Dai, Z.; Gong, Y.; Slough, C.G.; Xue, Q.

    1994-01-01

    Results of atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscope (STM) studies of superlattices and long-range modulations induced by impurities in transition metal chalcogenides are presented. Superlattices formed by Fe intercalation into the van der Waals gaps of 2H--NbSe 2 , 2H--TaSe 2 and 2H--TaS 2 show ordered occupation of the octahedral holes and STM spectroscopy shows density-wave energy gaps existing in the antiferromagnetic phases. In NbSe 3 , interstitial impurities such as Fe, Co, Cr, and V induce long-range modulated structures that can be detected at room temperature with AFM scans. These modulations modify the charge-density wave structure forming at low temperature and STM spectroscopy has been used to measure these changes

  2. Large-scale laboratory observations of wave forces on a highway bridge superstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    The experimental setup and data are presented for a laboratory experiment conducted to examine realistic wave forcing on a highway bridge : superstructure. The experiments measure wave conditions along with the resulting forces, pressures, and struct...

  3. Age-dependence of power spectral density and fractal dimension of bone mineralized matrix in atomic force microscope topography images: potential correlates of bone tissue age and bone fragility in female femoral neck trabeculae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Petar; Djuric, Marija; Rakocevic, Zlatko

    2012-11-01

    There is an increasing interest in bone nano-structure, the ultimate goal being to reveal the basis of age-related bone fragility. In this study, power spectral density (PSD) data and fractal dimensions of the mineralized bone matrix were extracted from atomic force microscope topography images of the femoral neck trabeculae. The aim was to evaluate age-dependent differences in the mineralized matrix of human bone and to consider whether these advanced nano-descriptors might be linked to decreased bone remodeling observed by some authors and age-related decline in bone mechanical competence. The investigated bone specimens belonged to a group of young adult women (n = 5, age: 20-40 years) and a group of elderly women (n = 5, age: 70-95 years) without bone diseases. PSD graphs showed the roughness density distribution in relation to spatial frequency. In all cases, there was a fairly linear decrease in magnitude of the power spectra with increasing spatial frequencies. The PSD slope was steeper in elderly individuals (-2.374 vs. -2.066), suggesting the dominance of larger surface morphological features. Fractal dimension of the mineralized bone matrix showed a significant negative trend with advanced age, declining from 2.467 in young individuals to 2.313 in the elderly (r = 0.65, P = 0.04). Higher fractal dimension in young women reflects domination of smaller mineral grains, which is compatible with the more freshly remodeled structure. In contrast, the surface patterns in elderly individuals were indicative of older tissue age. Lower roughness and reduced structural complexity (decreased fractal dimension) of the interfibrillar bone matrix in the elderly suggest a decline in bone toughness, which explains why aged bone is more brittle and prone to fractures. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  4. A Student-Built Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkens, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Many introductory and nanotechnology textbooks discuss the operation of various microscopes including atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM), and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In a nanotechnology laboratory class, students frequently utilize microscopes to obtain data without a thought about the detailed operation of the tool itself.…

  5. Observations of black carbon aerosols characteristics over an urban environment: Radiative forcing and related implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Samina; Alam, Khan; Chishtie, Farrukh; Bibi, Humera; Rahman, Said

    2017-12-15

    With observations of black carbon (BC) aerosol concentrations, optical and radiative properties were obtained over the urban city of Karachi during the period of March 2006-December 2008. BC concentrations were continuously measured using an Aethalometer, while optical and radiative properties were estimated through the Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) and Santa Barbra DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) models, respectively. For the study period, the measured BC concentrations were higher during January, February and November, while lower during May, June, July and August. A maximum peak value was observed during January 2007 while the minimum value was observed during June 2006. The Short Wave (SW) BC Aerosol Radiative Forcing (ARF) both at Top of the Atmosphere (ToA) and within ATMOSphere (ATMOS) were positive during all the months, whereas negative SW BC ARF was found at the SurFaCe (SFC). Overall, SW BC ARF was higher during January, February and November, while relatively lower ARF was found during May, June, July and August. Conversely, the Long Wave (LW) BC ARF at ToA and SFC remained positive, whereas within ATMOS it shifted towards positive values (heating effect) during June-August. Finally, the net (SW+LW) BC ARF were found to be positive at ToA and in ATMOS, while negative at SFC. Moreover, a systematic increase in Atmospheric Heating Rate (AHR) was found during October to January. Additionally, we found highest correlation between Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD abs ) and SW BC ARF within ATMOS followed by SFC and ToA. Overall, the contribution of BC to the total ARF was found to greater than 84% for the whole observational period while contributing up to 93% during January 2007. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Microscopic observations of sonoporation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeghimi, Aya; Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2017-03-01

    Background Sonoporation promises a local gene/drug delivery with a high therapeutic efficacy and low toxicity level. However, the mechanisms orchestrating the molecules uptake are still unclear. Here, we investigate the effects of sonoporation on the plasma membrane of U-87 MG cells, either immediately or at different times post-sonoporation, using electron microscopy, and also the implication of cytoskeleton during the sonoporation process. Methods In our set-up, the U-87 MG cells were seeded on 18 mm diameter cover slips, placed in 24-well plates. The acoustic exposure conditions consisted of ultrasound pulses at 1 MHz, 1W/cm2 with duty cycle of 20% for 60 seconds. BR14® microbubbles were added to the cell medium before sonoporation at a microbubble/cell ratio of 5. These acoustic parameters were obtained as a result of a prior optimization experiments. Membrane permeabilization after sonoporation was assessed using SYTOX® Green dye (1 µM), as a model drug which does not cross the membrane of normal cells. The cell mortality was measured with propidium iodide staining. The alterations, on the plasma membrane, after sonoporation were monitored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cell samples were processed immediately (0 min) and every 5 min up to 60 min post-sonoporation and coated by platinum sputtering (5 nm). For immunofluorescence experiments, the cells were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde, and then incubated with TRITC-labeled Phalloidin, used to stain the actin cytoskeleton. Tubulin antibody Alexa Fluor® 555 conjugate was used to label the microtubules. Results Our results showed that immediately after ultrasound and microbubble exposure, dark and spherical structures appear on the plasma membrane. These structures have a diameter ranging from few nanometers to 160 nm. These structures are transient, since 15 min post-sonoporation, almost half of these structures disappeared. The decrease in the number of permeant structures is accentuated over time to be fully resorbed 60 min post-sonoporation, consequently the cells still metabolically active. Moreover, flow cytometry results show a positive correlation between membrane permeabilization and the number of these electron dense structures. Indeed, 60% of SYTOX® Green incorporation is achieved immediately after sonoporation, to decay over time and therefore as a function of the presence of these permeant structures on the cell membrane. These structures are named here "permeation structures". To define the nature of the TPS structures the cells were treated with Genistein, an inhibitor of caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Scanning Electron microscopy images showed a significant diminution of the number of TPS for cells incubated with Genistein, suggesting that a large part of these structures are caveolae still open. Moreover, immunofluorescence analysis showed a depolymerization of actin and tubulin cytoskeleton, immediately after sonoporation. This depolymerization is accompanied with a massive uptake of SYTOX® Green, while the use of cytochalasin D and nocodazole (inhibitors of actin and tubulin polymerization) induced a decrease in the percentage of SYTOX® Green incorporation. Conclusion In conclusion, our findings reveal the reversibility of sonoporation effects on the cell membrane, and show that the caveolae-mediated endocytosis is a dominant pathway involved in the sonoporation process of U-87 MG cells, with a probable involvement of other endocytic and non-endocytic pathways. Otherwise, the study of sonoporation on cytoskeleton gives evidence on the involvement of endocytosis during the sonoporation process (entry and transport of molecules).

  7. Understanding Transient Forcing with Plasma Instability Model, Ionospheric Propagation Model and GNSS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, K.; Zettergren, M. D.; Datta-Barua, S.

    2017-12-01

    Fluctuations in the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals observed as amplitude and phase scintillations are produced by plasma density structures in the ionosphere. Phase scintillation events in particular occur due to structures at Fresnel scales, typically about 250 meters at ionospheric heights and GNSS frequency. Likely processes contributing to small-scale density structuring in auroral and polar regions include ionospheric gradient-drift instability (GDI) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), which result, generally, from magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions (e.g. reconnection) associated with cusp and auroral zone regions. Scintillation signals, ostensibly from either GDI or KHI, are frequently observed in the high latitude ionosphere and are potentially useful diagnostics of how energy from the transient forcing in the cusp or polar cap region cascades, via instabilities, to small scales. However, extracting quantitative details of instabilities leading to scintillation using GNSS data drastically benefits from both a model of the irregularities and a model of GNSS signal propagation through irregular media. This work uses a physics-based model of the generation of plasma density irregularities (GEMINI - Geospace Environment Model of Ion-Neutral Interactions) coupled to an ionospheric radio wave propagation model (SIGMA - Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere) to explore the cascade of density structures from medium to small (sub-kilometer) scales. Specifically, GEMINI-SIGMA is used to simulate expected scintillation from different instabilities during various stages of evolution to determine features of the scintillation that may be useful to studying ionospheric density structures. Furthermore we relate the instabilities producing GNSS scintillations to the transient space and time-dependent magnetospheric phenomena and further predict characteristics of scintillation in different geophysical

  8. Modelled radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect with multi-observation evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Myhre

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution global aerosol model (Oslo CTM2 driven by meteorological data and allowing a comparison with a variety of aerosol observations is used to simulate radiative forcing (RF of the direct aerosol effect. The model simulates all main aerosol components, including several secondary components such as nitrate and secondary organic carbon. The model reproduces the main chemical composition and size features observed during large aerosol campaigns. Although the chemical composition compares best with ground-based measurement over land for modelled sulphate, no systematic differences are found for other compounds. The modelled aerosol optical depth (AOD is compared to remote sensed data from AERONET ground and MODIS and MISR satellite retrievals. To gain confidence in the aerosol modelling, we have tested its ability to reproduce daily variability in the aerosol content, and this is performing well in many regions; however, we also identified some locations where model improvements are needed. The annual mean regional pattern of AOD from the aerosol model is broadly similar to the AERONET and the satellite retrievals (mostly within 10–20%. We notice a significant improvement from MODIS Collection 4 to Collection 5 compared to AERONET data. Satellite derived estimates of aerosol radiative effect over ocean for clear sky conditions differs significantly on regional scales (almost up to a factor two, but also in the global mean. The Oslo CTM2 has an aerosol radiative effect close to the mean of the satellite derived estimates. We derive a radiative forcing (RF of the direct aerosol effect of −0.35 Wm−2 in our base case. Implementation of a simple approach to consider internal black carbon (BC mixture results in a total RF of −0.28 Wm−2. Our results highlight the importance of carbonaceous particles, producing stronger individual RF than considered in the recent IPCC estimate; however, net RF is less different

  9. An Entomopathogenic Strain of Beauveria bassiana against Frankliniella occidentalis with no Detrimental Effect on the Predatory Mite Neoseiulus barkeri: Evidence from Laboratory Bioassay and Scanning Electron Microscopic Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengyong; Gao, Yulin; Zhang, Yaping; Wang, Endong; Xu, Xuenong; Lei, Zhongren

    2014-01-01

    Among 28 isolates of Beauveria bassiana tested for virulence against F. occidentalis in laboratory bioassays, we found strain SZ-26 as the most potent, causing 96% mortality in adults at 1×107 mL−1conidia after 4 days. The effect of the strain SZ-26 on survival, longevity and fecundity of the predatory mite Neoseiulus (Amblyseius) barkeri Hughes were studied under laboratory conditions. The bioassay results showed that the corrected mortalities were less than 4 and 8% at 10 days following inoculation of the adult and the larvae of the predator, respectively, with 1×107 conidia mL−1 of SZ-26. Furthermore, no fungal hyphae were found in dead predators. The oviposition and postoviposition durations, longevity, and fecundity displayed no significant differences after inoculation with SZ-26 using first-instar larvae of F. occidentalis as prey in comparison with untreated predator. In contrast, the preoviposition durations were significantly longer. Observations with a scanning electron microscope, revealed that many conidia were attached to the cuticles of F. occidentalis at 2 h after treatment with germ tubes oriented toward cuticle at 24 h, penetration of the insect cuticle at 36 h, and finally, fungal colonization of the whole insect body at 60 h. In contrast, we never observed penetration of the predator's cuticle and conidia were shed gradually from the body, further demonstrating that B. bassiana strain SZ-26 show high toxicity against F. occidentalis but no pathogenicity to predatory mite. PMID:24454744

  10. An entomopathogenic strain of Beauveria bassiana against Frankliniella occidentalis with no detrimental effect on the predatory mite Neoseiulus barkeri: evidence from laboratory bioassay and scanning electron microscopic observation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyong Wu

    Full Text Available Among 28 isolates of Beauveria bassiana tested for virulence against F. occidentalis in laboratory bioassays, we found strain SZ-26 as the most potent, causing 96% mortality in adults at 1×10(7 mL(-1conidia after 4 days. The effect of the strain SZ-26 on survival, longevity and fecundity of the predatory mite Neoseiulus (Amblyseius barkeri Hughes were studied under laboratory conditions. The bioassay results showed that the corrected mortalities were less than 4 and 8% at 10 days following inoculation of the adult and the larvae of the predator, respectively, with 1×10(7 conidia mL(-1 of SZ-26. Furthermore, no fungal hyphae were found in dead predators. The oviposition and postoviposition durations, longevity, and fecundity displayed no significant differences after inoculation with SZ-26 using first-instar larvae of F. occidentalis as prey in comparison with untreated predator. In contrast, the preoviposition durations were significantly longer. Observations with a scanning electron microscope, revealed that many conidia were attached to the cuticles of F. occidentalis at 2 h after treatment with germ tubes oriented toward cuticle at 24 h, penetration of the insect cuticle at 36 h, and finally, fungal colonization of the whole insect body at 60 h. In contrast, we never observed penetration of the predator's cuticle and conidia were shed gradually from the body, further demonstrating that B. bassiana strain SZ-26 show high toxicity against F. occidentalis but no pathogenicity to predatory mite.

  11. Light and electron microscopic observation of regenerated fungiform taste buds in patients with recovered taste function after severing chorda tympani nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takehisa; Ito, Tetsufumi; Narita, Norihiko; Yamada, Takechiyo; Manabe, Yasuhiro

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mean number of regenerated fungiform taste buds per papilla and perform light and electron microscopic observation of taste buds in patients with recovered taste function after severing the chorda tympani nerve during middle ear surgery. We performed a biopsy on the fungiform papillae (FP) in the midlateral region of the dorsal surface of the tongue from 5 control volunteers (33 total FP) and from 7 and 5 patients with and without taste recovery (34 and 29 FP, respectively) 3 years 6 months to 18 years after surgery. The specimens were observed by light and transmission electron microscopy. The taste function was evaluated by electrogustometry. The mean number of taste buds in the FP of patients with completely recovered taste function was significantly smaller (1.9 +/- 1.4 per papilla; p taste buds. Nerve fibers and nerve terminals were also found in the taste buds. It was clarified that taste buds containing taste cells and nerve endings do regenerate in the FP of patients with recovered taste function.

  12. Ultrastructural organization of premature condensed chromosomes at S-phase as observed by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yihui; Zhang Xiaohong; Bai Jing; Mao Renfang; Zhang Chunyu; Lei Qingquan; Fu Songbin

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we used calyculin A to induce premature condensed chromosomes (PCC). S-phase PCC is as 'pulverized' appearance when viewed by light microscopy. Then, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the ultrastructual organization of S-phase PCC. S-phase PCC shows ridges and grooves as observed by AFM. After trypsin treatment, chromosome surface roughness is increased and chromosome thickness is decreased. At high magnification, the ridges are composed of densely packed 30 nm chromatin fibers which form chromosome axis. Around the ridges, many 30 nm chromatin fibers radiate from center. Some of the 30 nm chromatin fibers are free ends. The grooves are not real 'gap', but several 30 nm chromatin fibers which connect two ridges and form 'grid' structure. There are four chromatin fibers detached from chromosome: two free straight 30 nm chromatin fibers, one loop chromatin fiber and one straight combining with loop chromatin fiber. These results suggested that the S-phase PCC was high-order organization of 30 nm chromatin fibers and the 30 nm chromatin fibers could exist as loops and free ends

  13. Motor imagery during action observation increases eccentric hamstring force: an acute non-physical intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Matthew; Taylor, Stephen; Chesterton, Paul; Vogt, Stefan; Eaves, Daniel Lloyd

    2018-06-01

    Rehabilitation professionals typically use motor imagery (MI) or action observation (AO) to increase physical strength for injury prevention and recovery. Here we compared hamstring force gains for MI during AO (AO + MI) against two pure MI training groups. Over a 3-week intervention physically fit adults imagined Nordic hamstring exercises in both legs and synchronized this with a demonstration of the same action (AO + MI), or they purely imagined this action (pure MI), or imagined upper-limb actions (pure MI-control). Eccentric hamstring strength gains were assessed using ANOVAs, and magnitude-based inference (MBI) analyses determined the likelihood of clinical/practical benefits for the interventions. Hamstring strength only increased significantly following AO + MI training. This effect was lateralized to the right leg, potentially reflecting a left-hemispheric dominance in motor simulation. MBIs: The right leg within-group treatment effect size for AO + MI was moderate and likely beneficial (d = 0.36), and only small and possibly beneficial for pure MI (0.23). Relative to pure MI-control, effects were possibly beneficial and moderate for AO + MI (0.72), although small for pure MI (0.39). Since hamstring strength predicts injury prevalence, our findings point to the advantage of combined AO + MI interventions, over and above pure MI, for injury prevention and rehabilitation. Implications for rehabilitation While hamstring strains are the most common injury across the many sports involving sprinting and jumping, Nordic hamstring exercises are among the most effective methods for building eccentric hamstring strength, for injury prevention and rehabilitation. In the acute injury phase it is crucial not to overload damaged soft tissues, and so non-physical rehabilitation techniques are well suited to this phase. Rehabilitation professionals typically use either motor imagery or action observation techniques to safely improve physical

  14. Collaborative Research. Separating Forced and Unforced Decadal Predictability in Models and Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DelSole, Timothy [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    2015-08-31

    The purpose of the proposed research was to identify unforced predictable components on decadal time scales, distinguish these components from forced predictable components, and to assess the reliability of model predictions of these components. The question of whether anthropogenic forcing changes decadal predictability, or gives rise to new forms of decadal predictability, also will be

  15. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  16. Chromatin Structure in Bands and Interbands of Polytene Chromosomes Imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Avogadro, A.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van der Werf, Kees; Otto, Cornelis; Kraan, Yvonne M.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Polytene chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster, observed from squash preparations, and chromosomes from Chironomus thummi thummi, investigated under physiological conditions, are imaged using an Atomic Force Microscope. Various chromatin fiber structures can be observed with high detail in fixed

  17. Study of the mapping mechanism of ferroelectric domains with the scanning force microscope; Untersuchung der Abbildungsmechanismen ferroelektrischer Domaenen mit dem Rasterkraftmikroskop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungk, T.

    2006-12-15

    The piezo-force microscopy (PFM) allows the mapping of ferroelectric domains until the nanometer range. In spite of its simple function principle it was hitherto not completely understood. In ordser to develop the PFM further to a quantitative analysis method its methodical aspects were analyzed. It was shown that the fundamental mapping mechanism is based on the inverse piezo-effect. Different artefacts to be found in the literature could therefore be reduced to a measurement background. Furthermore the influence of the electrode geometry was analyzed. The width of doamin walls was systematically measured and simulated with a mode, whereby a maximal resolution of 17 nm was reached. By the development of a correction procedure for the exact detection of the forces acting on the spring-beam the lateral signals measured on domain walls could by newly interpreted. So the ''Lateral Electrostatic Force Microscopy'' was developed.

  18. Ultra-Fine Bubble Distributions in a Plant Factory Observed by Transmission Electron Microscope with a Freeze-Fracture Replica Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Uchida

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Water containing ultra-fine bubbles (UFB may promote plant growth. But, as UFBs are too small to distinguish from other impurities in a nutrient solution, it is not known if UFBs survive transport from the water source to the rhizosphere. Here we use the freeze-fracture replica method and a transmission electron microscope (TEM to observe UFBs in the nutrient solutions used in a crop-growing system known as a plant factory. In this factory, TEM images taken from various points in the supply line indicate that the concentration of UFBs in the nutrient solution is conserved, starting from their addition to the nutrient solution in the buffer tank, through the peat-moss layer, all the way to the rhizosphere. Measurements also show that a thin film formed on the surface of UFBs in the nutrient solution, with greater film thickness at the rhizosphere. This film is considered to be made from the accumulation of impurities coming from solute and the peat-moss layer.

  19. Evaluation of Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility (MODS) and the string test for rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Meredith H; Reimer-McAtee, Melissa J; Gilman, Robert H; Lozano, Daniel; Saravia, Ruth; Pajuelo, Monica; Bern, Caryn; Castro, Rosario; Espinoza, Magaly; Vallejo, Maya; Solano, Marco; Challapa, Roxana; Torrico, Faustino

    2015-06-06

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the most common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death in HIV-positive people worldwide. Diagnosing TB is difficult, and is more challenging in resource-scarce settings where culture-based diagnostic methods rely on poorly sensitive smear microscopy by Ziehl-Neelsen stain (ZN). We performed a cross-sectional study examining the diagnostic utility of Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility liquid culture (MODS) versus traditional Ziehl-Neelsen staining (ZN) and Lowenstein Jensen culture (LJ) of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) in HIV-infected patients in Bolivia. For sputum scarce individuals we assessed the value of the string test and induced sputum for TB diagnosis. The presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in the sputum of 107 HIV-positive patients was evaluated by ZN, LJ, and MODS. Gastric secretion samples obtained by the string test were evaluated by MODS in 102 patients. The TB-HIV co-infection rate of HIV patients with respiratory symptoms by sputum sample was 45 % (48/107); 46/48 (96 %) were positive by MODS, 38/48 (79 %) by LJ, and 30/48 (63 %) by ZN. The rate of MDRTB was 9 % (4/48). Median time to positive culture was 10 days by MODS versus 34 days by LJ (p Bolivia.

  20. Cassava varietal screening for cooking quality: relationship between dry matter, starch content, mealiness and certain microscopic observations of the raw and cooked tuber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safo-Kantanka, O.; Owusu-Nipah, J.

    1992-01-01

    Thirteen cassava (Manihot esculenta L Crantz) varieties from three successive annual harvests were screened for the mealiness of the cooked tuber, and the elasticity and smoothness of the pounded paste. Six were selected for further studies based on their mealiness and the starch and dry matter contents were determined. The diameter of the starch granules of the selected varieties and those of an irradiated M1V2 population were measured. Microscopic examinations of the raw and cooked cells of the irradiated M1V2 population were made. Correlations among all the parameters were studied. Varietal and seasonal differences in cooking quality were observed. There was no consistent relationship between mealiness of the boiled tuber and the elasticity and smoothness of the pounded paste. Varieties that were mealy were high in dry matter and starch content. The starch granules of mealy varieties were larger than those of nonmealy ones. There were no differences between mealy and non-mealy varieties in the arrangement of the cells or ‘cell condition’, of the raw tubers. However, the cells of the cooked tubers were held less cohesively, ie there was more ‘cell disorganisation’, in mealy varieties than in non-mealy ones

  1. Interannual Variation in Offshore Advection of Amazon-Orinoco Plume Waters: Observations, Forcing Mechanisms, and Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, S.; Vandemark, D. C.; Gaultier, L.; Lee, T.; Jonsson, B. F.; Gierach, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) and sea surface temperature (SST) variations in the tropical Atlantic east of the Lesser Antilles, a region impacted by freshwater advection from the Amazon and Orinoco Rivers have potential implications to late-summer tropical cyclones (TCs). This study examines these variations during late summer and their forcing mechanisms using observations. During the period 2010-2014, the largest difference in plume-affected area, defined as the extent covered by SSS lower than 35.5 pss, is found between 2011 and 2014. Plume waters covered 92% (60%) of the study region in 2011 (2014) with the averaged SSS in the study region being 2-pss lower in 2011. Lagrangian particle tracking based on satellite-derived ocean currents is used to diagnose the impacts of the river plumes on SSS and SST during 2010-2014. Northward freshwater flux in the summer of 2014 is significantly weaker than those in 2010-2013. This is not due to interannual discharge variability, but significant changes in eddy-driven transport and cross-shore winds. In particular, the stronger cross-shore wind in May 2014 restricted offshore freshwater flow, leading to a smaller extent of the plume-affected area. Persistent SST gradients are often found near the plume edge, which may have implication to ocean-atmosphere coupling associated with TC-related convection. SST in the study region is 1°C higher in 2010 than in other years, and is related to basin-scale ocean-atmosphere processes. Interannual variation in Amazon advective pathways and the associated SSS changes are also influenced by changes in the ITCZ position between 2011 and 2014.

  2. Prediction of the fertility of stallion frozen-thawed semen using a combination of computer-assisted motility analysis, microscopical observation and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battut, I Barrier; Kempfer, A; Lemasson, N; Chevrier, L; Camugli, S

    2017-07-15

    Spermatozoa from some stallions do not maintain an acceptable fertility after freezing and thawing. The selection of frozen ejaculates that would be suitable for insemination is mainly based on post-thaw motility, but the prediction of fertility remains limited. A recent study in our laboratory has enabled the determination of a new protocol for the evaluation of fresh stallion semen, combining microscopical observation, computer-assisted motility analysis and flow cytometry, and providing a high level of fertility prediction. The purpose of the present experiment was to perform similar investigations on frozen semen. A panel of tests evaluating a large number of compartments or functions of the spermatozoa was applied to a population of 42 stallions, 33 of which showing widely differing fertilities (17-67% pregnancy rate per cycle [PRC]). Variability was evaluated by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV=SD/mean) and the intra-class correlation or "repeatability" for each variable. For paired variables, mean within-stallion CV% was significantly lower than between-stallion CV%, which was significantly lower than total CV%. Within-ejaculate repeatability, determined by analysing 6 straws for each of 10 ejaculates, ranged from 0.60 to 0.97. Within-stallion repeatability, determined by analysing at least 5 ejaculates for each of 38 stallions, ranged from 0.12 to 0.95. Principal component regression using a combination of 25 variables, including motility, morphology, viability, oxidation level, acrosome integrity, DNA integrity and hypoosmotic resistance, accounted for 94.5% of the variability regarding fertility, and was used to calculate a prediction of the PRC with a mean standard deviation of 2.2. The difference between the observed PRC and the calculated value ranged from -3.4 to 4.2. The 90% confidence interval (90CI) for the prediction of the PRC for the stallions of unknown fertility ranged from 8 to 30 (mean = 17). The best-fit model using only

  3. Reserve Forces: Observations on Recent National Guard Use in Overseas and Homeland Missions and Future Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    St. Laurent, Janet A

    2004-01-01

    ... than an operational force designed for continued overseas deployments. Moreover, units with certain specialties military police, transportation, and combat arms have been in high demand, resulting in lengthy and repeated deployments...

  4. Observation of aggregation triggered by Resonance Energy Transfer (RET) induced intermolecular pairing force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyong; Wang, Weizhi; Ke, Lin; Zhang, Nan

    2017-07-20

    In this report, we showed the existence of RET induced intermolecular pairing force by comparing their fluorescence behaviors under room illumination vs standing in dark area for either PFluAnt solution or PFluAnt&PFOBT mixture. Their prominent emission attenuation under room illumination brought out the critical role of photo, i.e. RET induced intermolecular pairing force in induction of polymer aggregation. Constant UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectra in terms of both peak shapes and maximum wavelengths implied no chemical decomposition was involved. Recoverable fluorescence intensity, fluorescence lifetime as well as NMR spectra further exclude photo induced decomposition. The controllable on/off state of RET induced intermolecular pairing force was verified by the masking effect of outside PFluAnt solution which function as filter to block the excitation of inside PFluAnt and thus off the RET induced intermolecular pairing force. Theoretical calculation suggest that magnitude of RET induced intermolecular pairing force is on the same scale as that of van der Waals interaction. Although the absolute magnitude of RET induced intermolecular pairing force was not tunable, its effect can be magnified by intentionally turn it "on", which was achieved by irradiance with 5 W desk lamp in this report.

  5. Investigating the influence of anthropogenic forcing on observed mean and extreme sea level pressure trends over the Mediterranean Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhordarian, Armineh

    2012-01-01

    We investigate whether the observed mean sea level pressure (SLP) trends over the Mediterranean region in the period from 1975 to 2004 are significantly consistent with what 17 models projected as response of SLP to anthropogenic forcing (greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols, GS). Obtained results indicate that the observed trends in mean SLP cannot be explained by natural (internal) variability. Externally forced changes are detectable in all seasons, except spring. The large-scale component (spatial mean) of the GS signal is detectable in all the 17 models in winter and in 12 of the 17 models in summer. However, the small-scale component (spatial anomalies about the spatial mean) of GS signal is only detectable in winter within 11 of the 17 models. We also show that GS signal has a detectable influence on observed decreasing (increasing) tendency in the frequencies of extremely low (high) SLP days in winter and that these changes cannot be explained by internal climate variability. While the detection of GS forcing is robust in winter and summer, there are striking inconsistencies in autumn, where analysis points to the presence of an external forcing, which is not GS forcing.

  6. Exploring the retention properties of CaF2 nanoparticles as possible additives for dental care application with tapping-mode atomic force microscope in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasem, Matthias; Köser, Joachim; Hess, Sylvia; Gnecco, Enrico; Meyer, Ernst

    2014-01-13

    Amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) is used to determine the retention properties of CaF2 nanoparticles adsorbed on mica and on tooth enamel in liquid. From the phase-lag of the forced cantilever oscillation the local energy dissipation at the detachment point of the nanoparticle was determined. This enabled us to compare different as-synthesized CaF2 nanoparticles that vary in shape, size and surface structure. CaF2 nanoparticles are candidates for additives in dental care products as they could serve as fluorine-releasing containers preventing caries during a cariogenic acid attack on the teeth. We show that the adherence of the nanoparticles is increased on the enamel substrate compared to mica, independently of the substrate roughness, morphology and size of the particles.

  7. Exploring the retention properties of CaF2 nanoparticles as possible additives for dental care application with tapping-mode atomic force microscope in liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Wasem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM is used to determine the retention properties of CaF2 nanoparticles adsorbed on mica and on tooth enamel in liquid. From the phase-lag of the forced cantilever oscillation the local energy dissipation at the detachment point of the nanoparticle was determined. This enabled us to compare different as-synthesized CaF2 nanoparticles that vary in shape, size and surface structure. CaF2 nanoparticles are candidates for additives in dental care products as they could serve as fluorine-releasing containers preventing caries during a cariogenic acid attack on the teeth. We show that the adherence of the nanoparticles is increased on the enamel substrate compared to mica, independently of the substrate roughness, morphology and size of the particles.

  8. Apoptosis study of the macrophage via near-field scanning optical microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D-C; Chen, K-Y; Chen, G-Y; Chen, S-H; Wun, S-J

    2008-01-01

    The cell apoptosis phenomenon was studied by traditional optical microscope with much lower resolution and also observed by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) with nano-resolution recently. They both detect the cell apoptosis through the change of cell topography. In this study, the cell apoptosis was investigated via Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscope (NSOM). The cell topography, with nano-scaled resolution, and its optical characteristics were observed by NSOM at the same measurement scanning. The macrophage was chosen as the cell investigated. To understand the cell apoptosis process is the goal set for the research. The apoptosis process was related to the variations of the optical characteristics of the cell

  9. Carbonaceous aerosols over China--review of observations, emissions, and climate forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linpeng; Zhou, Xuehua; Ma, Yujie; Cao, Zhaoyu; Wu, Ruidong; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols have been attracting attention due to the influence on visibility, air quality, and regional climate. Statistical analyses based on concentration levels, spatial-temporal variations, correlations, and organic carbon (OC) to element carbon (EC) ratios from published data of OC and EC in particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) were carried out in order to give a carbonaceous aerosol profile in China. The results showed maxima for OC of 29.5 ± 18.2 μg C m(-3) and for EC of 8.4 ± 6.3 μg C m(-3) in winter and minima for OC of 12.9 ± 7.7 μg C m(-3) in summer and for EC of 4.6 ± 2.8 μg C m(-3) in spring. In addition, OC and EC both had higher concentrations in urban than those in rural sites. Carbonaceous aerosol levels in China are about three to seven times higher compared to those in the USA and Europe. OC and EC occupied 20 ± 6 and 7 ± 3% of PM2.5 mass and 17 ± 7 and 5 ± 3% of PM10 mass, respectively, implying that carbonaceous aerosols are the main component of PM, especially OC. Secondary organic carbon (SOC) was a significant portion of PM and contributed 41 ± 26% to OC and 8 ± 6% to PM2.5 mass. The OC/EC ratio was 3.63 ± 1.73, which, along with the good correlation between OC and EC and the OC to EC slope of 2.29, signifies that coal combustion and/or vehicular exhaust is the dominated carbonaceous aerosol source in China. These provide a primary observation-based understanding of carbonaceous aerosol pollution in China and have a great significance in improving the emission inventory and climate forcing evaluation.

  10. Bioassay and Scanning Electron Microscopic Observations Reveal High Virulence of Entomopathogenic Fungus, Beauveria bassiana, on the Onion Maggot (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wu, Shengyong; Xing, Zhenlong; Wang, Xiaoqing; Lei, Zhongren

    2016-12-01

    When flies were dipped in 1 × 10 8 conidia/ml conidia suspensions and then kept in the incubator (22 ± 1 °C, 70 ± 5% RH), scanning electron microscope observations revealed that, at 2 h, the majority of adhering Beauveria bassiana conidia were attached to either the wing surface or the interstitial area between the macrochaetae on the thorax and abdomen of the onion maggot adults. Germ tubes were being produced and had oriented toward the cuticle by 18 h. Penetration of the insect cuticle had occurred by 36 h, and by 48 h, germ tubes had completely penetrated the cuticle. Fungal mycelia had emerged from the insect body and were proliferating after 72 h. The superficial area and structure of the wings and macrochaetae may facilitate the attachment of conidia and enable effective penetration. The susceptibility of adults to 12 isolates, at a concentration of 1 × 10 7 conidia/ml, was tested in laboratory experiments. Eight of the more potent strains caused in excess of 85% adult mortality 8 d post inoculation, while the median lethal time (LT 50 ) of these strains was bassiana strains are highly virulent to onion maggot adults and should be considered as potential biocontrol agents against the adult flies. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Microscopic observation drug-susceptibility assay vs. Xpert® MTB/RIF for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in a rural African setting: a cost-utility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikman-Jorgensen, Philip E; Llenas-García, Jara; Pérez-Porcuna, Tomàs M; Hobbins, Michael; Ehmer, Jochen; Mussa, Manuel A; Ascaso, Carlos

    2017-06-01

    To compare the cost-utility of microscopic observation drug-susceptibility assay (MODS) and Xpert ® MTB/RIF implementation for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in rural northern Mozambique. Stochastic transmission compartmental TB model from the healthcare provider perspective with parameter input from direct measurements, systematic literature reviews and expert opinion. MODS and Xpert ® MTB/RIF were evaluated as replacement test of smear microscopy (SM) or as an add-on test after a negative SM. Costs were calculated in 2013 USD, effects in disability-adjusted life years (DALY). Willingness to pay threshold (WPT) was established at once the per capita Gross National Income of Mozambique. MODS as an add-on test to negative SM produced an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of 5647.89USD/DALY averted. MODS as a substitute for SM yielded an ICER of 5374.58USD/DALY averted. Xpert ® MTB/RIF as an add-on test to negative SM yielded ICER of 345.71USD/DALY averted. Xpert ® MTB/RIF as a substitute for SM obtained an ICER of 122.13USD/DALY averted. TB prevalence and risk of infection were the main factors impacting MODS and Xpert ® MTB/RIF ICER in the one-way sensitivity analysis. In the probabilistic sensitivity analysis, Xpert ® MTB/RIF was most likely to have an ICER below the WPT, whereas MODS was not. Our cost-utility analysis favours the implementation of Xpert ® MTB/RIF as a replacement of SM for all TB suspects in this rural high TB/HIV prevalence African setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Nuclei fluorescence microscopic observation on early embryonic development of mitogynogenetic diploid induced by hydrostatic pressure treatment in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhengmei; Zhu, Xiangping; You, Feng; Wu, Zhihao; Cao, Yuanshui

    2015-05-01

    Sperm genetic material of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) was inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation. The nuclear phase changes during early embryonic development of diploid, haploid, and mitogynogenetic diploid induced by hydrostatic pressure treatment were observed under fluorescent microscope with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining. The parameters of hydrostatic pressure treatment were 600 kg/cm(2) for 6 minutes at prometaphase stage. The data showed that developmental timing sequence of diploid and haploid fertilized eggs was similar. The cell cycle was about 48 minutes, including interphase (about 21 minutes), prophase (about 3 minutes), prometaphase (about 6 minutes), metaphase (about 6 minutes), anaphase (around 9 minutes), and telophase (about 3 minutes). After entering the fertilized egg, ultraviolet-inactivated sperm formed a male pronucleus and became a dense chromatin body in the cytoplasm. Dense chromatin body did not participate in nuclear division and unchanged all the time. For hydrostatic pressure-treated embryos, the first nuclear division and cytokinesis after treatment proceeded normally after about 15 minutes recovery. During the second mitosis, having undergone interphase, prophase, and prometaphase stage, chromosomes began to slowly spread around and scattered in the cell but not entered into metaphase and anaphase. The second nuclear division and cytokinesis was inhibited. The occurrence frequency of developmentally delayed embryos also showed that the second cleavage of about 80% treated eggs was inhibited. The inhibition of the second cleavage resulted to chromosome set doubling. So chromosome set doubling for mitogynogenetic flounder diploid induced by hydrostatic pressure treatment, performed at prometaphase stage, was mainly due to inhibition of the second mitosis rather than the first one. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Polarizability of DNA Block Copolymer Nanoparticles Observed by Electrostatic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sowwan, Mukhles; Faroun, Maryam; Mentovich, Elad; Ibrahim, Imad; Haboush, Shayma; Alemdaroglu, Fikri Emrah; Kwak, Minseok; Richter, Shachar; Herrmann, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In this study, DNA block copolymer (DBC) micelles with a polystyrene (PS) core and a single-stranded (ss) DNA shell were doped with ferrocene (Fc) molecules. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology of the doped and undoped block copolymer aggregates. We show that

  14. Si{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase change material studied by an atomic force microscope nano-tip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yanbo; Min Guoquan; Zhang Jing; Zhou Weimin; Wan Yongzhong; Zhang Jianping; Li Xiaoli [Laboratory of Nano-Technology, Shanghai Nanotechnology Promotion Center, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhang Ting; Niu Xiaoming; Song Zhitang; Feng Songlin, E-mail: liuyanbo@snpc.org.c, E-mail: tzhang@mail.sim.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2009-06-01

    The Si{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase change material has been studied by applying a nano-tip (30 nm in diameter) on an atomic force microscopy system. Memory switching from a high resistance state to a low resistance state has been achieved, with a resistance change of about 1000 times. In a typical I-V curve, the current increases significantly after the voltage exceeds approx4.3 V. The phase transformation of a Si{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film was studied in situ by means of in situ X-ray diffraction and temperature dependent resistance measurements. The thermal stability of Si{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} was characterized and compared as well.

  15. CME Dynamics Using STEREO and LASCO Observations: The Relative Importance of Lorentz Forces and Solar Wind Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Nishtha; Subramanian, Prasad; Vourlidas, Angelos; Bothmer, Volker

    2017-09-01

    We seek to quantify the relative contributions of Lorentz forces and aerodynamic drag on the propagation of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We use Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model fits to a representative set of 38 CMEs observed with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. We find that the Lorentz forces generally peak between 1.65 and 2.45 R⊙ for all CMEs. For fast CMEs, Lorentz forces become negligible in comparison to aerodynamic drag as early as 3.5 - 4 R⊙. For slow CMEs, however, they become negligible only by 12 - 50 R⊙. For these slow events, our results suggest that some of the magnetic flux might be expended in CME expansion or heating. In other words, not all of it contributes to the propagation. Our results are expected to be important in building a physical model for understanding the Sun-Earth dynamics of CMEs.

  16. Micropatterning of bacteria on two-dimensional lattice protein surface observed by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y.J.; Jo, W.; Lim, J.; Park, S.; Kim, Y.S.; Kim, Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we characterized the two-dimensional lattice of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a chemical and physical barrier against bacterial adhesion, using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The lattice of BSA on glass surface was fabricated by micro-contact printing (μCP), which is a useful way to pattern a wide range of molecules into microscale features on different types of substrates. The contact-mode AFM measurements showed that the average height of the printed BSA monolayer was 5-6 nm. Escherichia coli adhered rapidly on bare glass slide, while the bacterial adhesion was minimized on the lattices in the range of 1-3 μm 2 . Especially, the bacterial adhesion was completely inhibited on a 1 μm 2 lattice. The results suggest that the anti-adhesion effects are due by the steric repulsion forces exerted by BSA

  17. Effects of substrates on biofilm formation observed by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y.J.; Lee, N.R.; Jo, W.; Jung, W.K.; Lim, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Formation of biofilm is known to be strongly dependent on substrates including topography, materials, and chemical treatment. In this study, a variety of substrates are tested for understanding biofilm formation. Sheets of aluminum, steel, rubber, and polypropylene have been used to examine their effects on formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. In particular, the morphological variation, transition, and adhesiveness of biofilm were investigated through local measurement by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Mechanism of removing biofilm from adhering to substrate is also analyzed, thus the understanding of the mechanism can be potentially useful to prevent the biofilm formation. The results reveal that formation of biofilm can remain on rough surface regardless of substrates in hot water, which may easily induce extra-polymeric substances detachment from bacterial surface. By probing using AFM, local force-distance characterization of extra-cellular materials extracted from the bacteria can exhibit the progress of the biofilm formation and functional complexities.

  18. Overseas Contingency Operations: Observations on the Use of Force Management Levels in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    made 18 recommendations in prior work cited in this statement. DOD has implemented 12 of them. Continued attention is needed to ensure that some...of logical steps to examine the mission; develop, analyze, and compare courses of action; select the best course of action; and produce a plan or...provide a complete picture of U.S. forces engaged in operations. Chairwoman Hartzler, Ranking Member Speier, and Members of the Subcommittee, this

  19. Nanoscale observation of local bound charges of patterned protein arrays by scanning force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y J; Jo, W; Kim, S; Park, S; Kim, Y S

    2008-01-01

    A protein patterned surface using micro-contact printing methods has been investigated by scanning force microscopy. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) was utilized for imaging the topography and detecting the electrical properties such as the local bound charge distribution of the patterned proteins. It was found that the patterned IgG proteins are arranged down to 1 μm, and the 90 deg. rotation of patterned anti-IgG proteins was successfully undertaken. Through the estimation of the effective areas, it was possible to determine the local bound charges of patterned proteins which have opposite electrostatic force behaviors. Moreover, we studied the binding probability between IgG and anti-IgG in a 1 μm 2 MIMIC system by topographic and electrostatic signals for applicable label-free detections. We showed that the patterned proteins can be used for immunoassay of proteins on the functional substrate, and that they can also be used for bioelectronics device application, indicating distinct advantages with regard to accuracy and a label-free detection

  20. Multimodal sensing and imaging technology by integrated scanning electron, force, and nearfield microwave microscopy and its application to submicrometer studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hänßler, Olaf C.

    2018-01-01

    The work covers a multimodal microscope technology for the analysis, manipulation and transfer of materials and objects in the submicrometer range. An atomic force microscope (AFM) allows imaging of the surface topography and a Scanning Microwave Microscope (SMM) detects electromagnetic properties, both operating in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The described technology demonstrator allows to observe the region-of-interest live with the SEM, while at the same time a characterization w...

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of microscopic observation drug susceptibility test versus Xpert MTB/Rif test for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV patients in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walusimbi, Simon; Kwesiga, Brendan; Rodrigues, Rashmi; Haile, Melles; de Costa, Ayesha; Bogg, Lennart; Katamba, Achilles

    2016-10-10

    Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility (MODS) and Xpert MTB/Rif (Xpert) are highly sensitive tests for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). This study evaluated the cost effectiveness of utilizing MODS versus Xpert for diagnosis of active pulmonary TB in HIV infected patients in Uganda. A decision analysis model comparing MODS versus Xpert for TB diagnosis was used. Costs were estimated by measuring and valuing relevant resources required to perform the MODS and Xpert tests. Diagnostic accuracy data of the tests were obtained from systematic reviews involving HIV infected patients. We calculated base values for unit costs and varied several assumptions to obtain the range estimates. Cost effectiveness was expressed as costs per TB patient diagnosed for each of the two diagnostic strategies. Base case analysis was performed using the base estimates for unit cost and diagnostic accuracy of the tests. Sensitivity analysis was performed using a range of value estimates for resources, prevalence, number of tests and diagnostic accuracy. The unit cost of MODS was US$ 6.53 versus US$ 12.41 of Xpert. Consumables accounted for 59 % (US$ 3.84 of 6.53) of the unit cost for MODS and 84 % (US$10.37 of 12.41) of the unit cost for Xpert. The cost effectiveness ratio of the algorithm using MODS was US$ 34 per TB patient diagnosed compared to US$ 71 of the algorithm using Xpert. The algorithm using MODS was more cost-effective compared to the algorithm using Xpert for a wide range of different values of accuracy, cost and TB prevalence. The cost (threshold value), where the algorithm using Xpert was optimal over the algorithm using MODS was US$ 5.92. MODS versus Xpert was more cost-effective for the diagnosis of PTB among HIV patients in our setting. Efforts to scale-up MODS therefore need to be explored. However, since other non-economic factors may still favour the use of Xpert, the current cost of the Xpert cartridge still needs to be reduced further by more than

  2. Microscopic observation of bulking sludge formation and measures to fight it in activated sludge systems; Mikroskopische Betrachtung der Blaehschlammbildung und Massnahmen zur Bekaempfung in Belebungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heine, W.; Sekoulov, I.; Burkhardt, H.; Behrendt, J. [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany). Arbeitsbereich Abwasserwirtschaft

    1999-07-01

    The available results clearly show the suitability of digital microscopic image analysis for early detection of threatening bulking sludge events. Recognizing imminent bulking sludge events early on permits countering them effectively with simple and unspecific means. (orig.) [German] Die bisher erzielten Ergebnisse zeigen deutlich die Eignung der digitalen mikroskopischen Bildanalyse zur Frueherkennung drohender Blaehschlammereignisse. Wird ein drohendes Blaehschlammereignis fruehzeitig erkannt, so ist eine effektive Blaehschlammbekaempfung mit einfachen und unspezifischen Massnahmen moeglich. (orig.)

  3. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  4. Direct observation of deformation of nafion surfaces induced by methanol treatment by using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umemura, Kazuo; Kuroda, Reiko; Gao Yanfeng; Nagai, Masayuki; Maeda, Yuta

    2008-01-01

    We successfully characterized the effect of methanol treatment on the nanoscopic structures of a nafion film, which is widely used in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to repetitively image a particular region of a nafion sample before and after methanol solutions were dropped onto the nafion film and dried in air. When the surface was treated with 20% methanol for 5 min, many nanopores appeared on the surface. The number of nanopores increased when the sample was treated twice or thrice. By repetitive AFM imaging of a particular region of the same sample, we found that the shapes of the nanopores were deformed by the repeated methanol treatment, although the size of the nanopores had not significantly changed. The creation of the nanopores was affected by the concentration of methanol. Our results directly visualized the effects of methanol treatment on the surface structures of a nafion film at nanoscale levels for the first time

  5. Solar and magnetospheric forcing of the low latitude thermospheric mass density as observed by CHAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Müller

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the dependence of the thermospheric mass density at equatorial latitudes on the influence of various drivers. This statistical study is based on CHAMP accelerometer measurements. Our aim is to delineate the influences of the different contributions. For the isolation of the effects we make use of a dedicated data selection procedure and/or removal of disturbing effects. In a first step all readings are normalised to an altitude of 400 km. For the investigation of the solar influences only magnetically quiet days (Ap≤15 are considered. The dependence on solar flux can well be described by a linear relation within the flux range F10.7=80–240. The slope is twice as steep on the day side as on the night side. The air density exhibits clear annual and semi-annual variations with maxima at the equinoxes and a pronounced minimum around June solstice. The thermosphere maintains during quiet days a day to night mass density ratio very close to 2, which is independent of solar flux level or season. The magnetospheric input causing thermospheric density enhancement can well be parameterised by the am activity index. The low latitude density responds with a delay to changes of the index by about 3 h on the dayside and 4–5 h on the night side. The magnetospheric forcing causes an additive contribution to the quiet-time density, which is linearly correlated with the am index. The slopes of density increases are the same on the day and night sides. We present quantitative expressions for all the dependences. Our results suggest that all the studied forcing terms can be treated as linear combinations of the respective contribution.

  6. Liquid and vapour-phase antifungal activities of selected essential oils against candida albicans: microscopic observations and chemical characterization of cymbopogon citratus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Anushree

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of essential oils for controlling Candida albicans growth has gained significance due to the resistance acquired by pathogens towards a number of widely-used drugs. The aim of this study was to test the antifungal activity of selected essential oils against Candida albicans in liquid and vapour phase and to determine the chemical composition and mechanism of action of most potent essential oil. Methods Minimum Inhibitory concentration (MIC of different essential oils in liquid phase, assayed through agar plate dilution, broth dilution & 96-well micro plate dilution method and vapour phase activity evaluated through disc volatilization method. Reduction of C. albicans cells with vapour exposure was estimated by kill time assay. Morphological alteration in treated/untreated C. albicans cells was observed by the Scanning electron microscopy (SEM/Atomic force microscopy (AFM and chemical analysis of the strongest antifungal agent/essential oil has been done by GC, GC-MS. Results Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus essential oil exhibited the strongest antifungal effect followed by mentha (Mentha piperita and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus essential oil. The MIC of lemon grass essential oil in liquid phase (288 mg/l was significantly higher than that in the vapour phase (32.7 mg/l and a 4 h exposure was sufficient to cause 100% loss in viability of C. albicans cells. SEM/AFM of C. albicans cells treated with lemon grass essential oil at MIC level in liquid and vapour phase showed prominent shrinkage and partial degradation, respectively, confirming higher efficacy of vapour phase. GC-MS analysis revealed that lemon grass essential oil was dominated by oxygenated monoterpenes (78.2%; α-citral or geranial (36.2% and β-citral or neral (26.5%, monoterpene hydrocarbons (7.9% and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (3.8%. Conclusion Lemon grass essential oil is highly effective in vapour phase against C. albicans, leading to deleterious

  7. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  8. Design and verification of a simple 3D dynamic model of speed skating which mimics observed forces and motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kruk, E; Veeger, H E J; van der Helm, F C T; Schwab, A L

    2017-11-07

    Advice about the optimal coordination pattern for an individual speed skater, could be addressed by simulation and optimization of a biomechanical speed skating model. But before getting to this optimization approach one needs a model that can reasonably match observed behaviour. Therefore, the objective of this study is to present a verified three dimensional inverse skater model with minimal complexity, which models the speed skating motion on the straights. The model simulates the upper body transverse translation of the skater together with the forces exerted by the skates on the ice. The input of the model is the changing distance between the upper body and the skate, referred to as the leg extension (Euclidean distance in 3D space). Verification shows that the model mimics the observed forces and motions well. The model is most accurate for the position and velocity estimation (respectively 1.2% and 2.9% maximum residuals) and least accurate for the force estimations (underestimation of 4.5-10%). The model can be used to further investigate variables in the skating motion. For this, the input of the model, the leg extension, can be optimized to obtain a maximal forward velocity of the upper body. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural and electrical evolution of He ion irradiated hydrocarbon films observed by conductive atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Hongyu; Yang, Deming; Sun, Li; Yang, Qi; Niu, Jinhai; Bi, Zhenhua; Liu, Dongping

    2013-01-01

    Polymer-like hydrocarbon films are irradiated with 100 keV He ion at the fluences of 1.0 × 10 15 –1.0 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 or at the irradiation temperature ranging from 25 to 600 °C. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) has been used to evaluate the nanoscale electron conducting properties of these irradiated hydrocarbon films. Nanoscale and conducting defects have been formed in the hydrocarbon films irradiated at a relatively high ion fluence (1.0 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 ) or an elevated sample temperature. Analysis indicates that He ion irradiation results in the evolution of polymer-like hydrocarbon into a dense structure containing a large fraction of sp 2 carbon clusters. The sp 2 carbon clusters formed in irradiated hydrocarbon films can contribute to the formation of filament-like conducting channels with a relatively high local field-enhancing factor. Measurements indicate that the growth of nanoscale defects due to He ion irradiation can result in the surface swelling of irradiated hydrocarbon films at a relatively high ion fluences or elevated temperature

  10. Structural and electrical evolution of He ion irradiated hydrocarbon films observed by conductive atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongyu [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Yang, Deming [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Sun, Li [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Physics, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian 116023 (China); Yang, Qi; Niu, Jinhai; Bi, Zhenhua [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Liu, Dongping, E-mail: dongping.liu@dlnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Fujian Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Electronic Science, Aeronautics, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Polymer-like hydrocarbon films are irradiated with 100 keV He ion at the fluences of 1.0 × 10{sup 15}–1.0 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} or at the irradiation temperature ranging from 25 to 600 °C. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) has been used to evaluate the nanoscale electron conducting properties of these irradiated hydrocarbon films. Nanoscale and conducting defects have been formed in the hydrocarbon films irradiated at a relatively high ion fluence (1.0 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}) or an elevated sample temperature. Analysis indicates that He ion irradiation results in the evolution of polymer-like hydrocarbon into a dense structure containing a large fraction of sp{sup 2} carbon clusters. The sp{sup 2} carbon clusters formed in irradiated hydrocarbon films can contribute to the formation of filament-like conducting channels with a relatively high local field-enhancing factor. Measurements indicate that the growth of nanoscale defects due to He ion irradiation can result in the surface swelling of irradiated hydrocarbon films at a relatively high ion fluences or elevated temperature.

  11. Premature Extinction of the Weather Observer: How Much Risk is the Air Force Assuming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    sensors emit light which is scattered when it impacts airborne meteors . A separate collec- tion function of the sensor correlates the amount of...in-flight planning for a home base or al- ternate recovery. Mid-term impacts of surface weather observations on operations fall more in the realm of

  12. Constraining the models' response of tropical low clouds to SST forcings using CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, G.; Del Genio, A. D.; Ackerman, A. S.; Brient, F.; Fridlind, A. M.; Kelley, M.; Elsaesser, G.

    2017-12-01

    Low-cloud response to a warmer climate is still pointed out as being the largest source of uncertainty in the last generation of climate models. To date there is no consensus among the models on whether the tropical low cloudiness would increase or decrease in a warmer climate. In addition, it has been shown that - depending on their climate sensitivity - the models either predict deeper or shallower low clouds. Recently, several relationships between inter-model characteristics of the present-day climate and future climate changes have been highlighted. These so-called emergent constraints aim to target relevant model improvements and to constrain models' projections based on current climate observations. Here we propose to use - for the first time - 10 years of CALIPSO cloud statistics to assess the ability of the models to represent the vertical structure of tropical low clouds for abnormally warm SST. We use a simulator approach to compare observations and simulations and focus on the low-layered clouds (i.e. z fraction. Vertically, the clouds deepen namely by decreasing the cloud fraction in the lowest levels and increasing it around the top of the boundary-layer. This feature is coincident with an increase of the high-level cloud fraction (z > 6.5km). Although the models' spread is large, the multi-model mean captures the observed variations but with a smaller amplitude. We then employ the GISS model to investigate how changes in cloud parameterizations affect the response of low clouds to warmer SSTs on the one hand; and how they affect the variations of the model's cloud profiles with respect to environmental parameters on the other hand. Finally, we use CALIPSO observations to constrain the model by determining i) what set of parameters allows reproducing the observed relationships and ii) what are the consequences on the cloud feedbacks. These results point toward process-oriented constraints of low-cloud responses to surface warming and environmental

  13. Observed Responses of Mesospheric Water Vapor to Solar Cycle and Dynamical Forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsberg, Ellis; Damadeo, Robert; Natarajan, Murali; Bhatt, Praful

    2018-04-01

    This study focuses on responses of mesospheric water vapor (H2O) to the solar cycle flux at Lyman-α wavelength and to dynamical forcings according to the multivariate El-Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index. The zonal-averaged responses are for latitudes from 60°S to 60°N and pressure-altitudes from 0.01 to 1.0 hPa, as obtained from multiple linear regression analyses of time series of H2O from the Halogen Occultation Experiment for July 1992 to November 2005. The results compare very well with those from a separate simultaneous temporal and spatial (STS) method that also confirms that there are no significant sampling biases affecting both sets of results. Distributions of the seasonal amplitudes for temperature and H2O are in accord with the seasonal net circulation. In general, the responses of H2O to ENSO are anticorrelated with those of temperature. H2O responses to multivariate ENSO index are negative in the upper mesosphere and largest in the Northern Hemisphere; responses in the lower mesosphere are more symmetric with latitude. H2O responses to the Lyman-α flux (Lya) vary from strong negative values in the uppermost mesosphere to very weak, positive values in the tropical lowermost mesosphere. However, the effects of those H2O responses to the solar activity extend to the rest of the mesosphere via dynamical processes. Profiles of the responses to ENSO and Lya also agree reasonably with published results for H2O at the low latitudes from the Microwave Limb Sounder.

  14. STM-SQUID probe microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Tadayuki; Tachiki, Minoru; Itozaki, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a STM-SQUID probe microscope. A high T C SQUID probe microscope was combined with a scanning tunneling microscope for investigation of samples at room temperature in air. A high permeability probe needle was used as a magnetic flux guide to improve the spatial resolution. The probe with tip radius of less than 100 nm was prepared by microelectropolishing. The probe was also used as a scanning tunneling microscope tip. Topography of the sample surface could be measured by the scanning tunneling microscope with high spatial resolution prior to observation by SQUID microscopy. The SQUID probe microscope image could be observed while keeping the distance from the sample surface to the probe tip constant. We observed a topographic image and a magnetic image of Ni fine pattern and also a magnetically recorded hard disk. Furthermore we have investigated a sample vibration method of the static magnetic field emanating from a sample with the aim of achieving a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio

  15. Variations in local elastic modulus along the length of the aorta as observed by use of a scanning haptic microscope (SHM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, Takeshi; Oie, Tomonori; Takamizawa, Keiichi; Murayama, Yoshinobu; Fukuda, Toru; Omata, Sadao; Kanda, Keiichi; Nakayama, Yasuhide

    2011-12-01

    Variations in microscopic elastic structures along the entire length of canine aorta were evaluated by use of a scanning haptic microscope (SHM). The total aorta from the aortic arch to the abdominal aorta was divided into 6 approximately equal segments. After embedding the aorta in agar, it was cut into horizontal circumferential segments to obtain disk-like agar portions containing ring-like samples of aorta with flat surfaces (thickness, approximately 1 mm). The elastic modulus and topography of the samples under no-load conditions were simultaneously measured along the entire thickness of the wall by SHM by using a probe with a diameter of 5 μm and a spatial resolution of 2 μm at a rate of 0.3 s/point. The elastic modulus of the wall was the highest on the side of the luminal surface and decreased gradually toward the adventitial side. This tendency was similar to that of the change in the elastin fiber content. During the evaluation of the mid-portion of each tunica media segment, the highest elastic modulus (40.8 ± 3.5 kPa) was identified at the thoracic section of the aorta that had the highest density of elastic fibers. Under no-load conditions, portions of the aorta with high elastin density have a high elastic modulus.

  16. Sub-Angstrom oscillation amplitude non-contact atomic force microscopy for lateral force gradient measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atabak, Mehrdad; Unverdi, Ozhan; Ozer, H. Ozguer; Oral, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    We report the first results from novel sub-Angstrom oscillation amplitude non-contact atomic force microscopy developed for lateral force gradient measurements. Quantitative lateral force gradients between a tungsten tip and Si(1 1 1)-(7 x 7) surface can be measured using this microscope. Simultaneous lateral force gradient and scanning tunnelling microscope images of single and multi atomic steps are obtained. In our measurement, tunnel current is used as feedback. The lateral stiffness contrast has been observed to be 2.5 N/m at single atomic step, in contrast to 13 N/m at multi atomic step on Si(1 1 1) surface. We also carried out a series of lateral stiffness-distance spectroscopy. We observed lateral stiffness-distance curves exhibit sharp increase in the stiffness as the sample is approached towards the surface. We usually observed positive stiffness and sometimes going into slightly negative region.

  17. Observed linkages between the northern annular mode/North Atlantic Oscillation, cloud incidence, and cloud radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Thompson, David W. J.; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Minghong

    2014-03-01

    The signature of the northern annular mode/North Atlantic Oscillation (NAM/NAO) in the vertical and horizontal distribution of tropospheric cloudiness is investigated in CloudSat and CALIPSO data from June 2006 to April 2011. During the Northern Hemisphere winter, the positive polarity of the NAM/NAO is marked by increases in zonally averaged cloud incidence north of ~60°N, decreases between ~25 and 50°N, and increases in the subtropics. The tripolar-like anomalies in cloud incidence associated with the NAM/NAO are largest over the North Atlantic Ocean basin/Middle East and are physically consistent with the NAM/NAO-related anomalies in vertical motion. Importantly, the NAM/NAO-related anomalies in tropospheric cloud incidence lead to significant top of atmosphere cloud radiative forcing anomalies that are comparable in amplitude to those associated with the NAM/NAO-related temperature anomalies. The results provide observational evidence that the most prominent pattern of Northern Hemisphere climate variability is significantly linked to variations in cloud radiative forcing. Implications for two-way feedback between extratropical dynamics and cloud radiative forcing are discussed.

  18. Observation of self-assembled fluorescent beads by scanning near-field optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y.J.; Jo, W.; Kim, Min-Gon; Kyu Park, Hyun; Hyun Chung, Bong

    2006-01-01

    Optical response and topography of fluorescent latex beads both on flat self-assembled monolayer and on a micron-patterned surface with poly(dimethylsiloxane) are studied. Scanning near-field optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy were utilized together for detecting fluorescence and imaging topography of the patterned latex beads, respectively. As a result, the micro-patterned latex beads where a specific chemical binding occurred show a strong signal, whereas no signals are observed in the case of nonspecific binding. With fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), it is convenient to measure fluorescence signal from the patterned beads allowing us to monitor the small balls of fluorescent latex

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Absolute polarimetry observations of 33 pulsars (Force+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, M. M.; Demorest, P.; Rankin, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    The observations were carried out in the summer of 2011 using the 100-m Robert C. Byrd GBT and the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI) in coherent filterbank mode. Full-Stokes spectra were acquired in an 800 MHz bandwidth centred at 1500 MHz radio frequency; the ~1200-1300 MHz airport radar analogue filter was used, resulting in a ~700 MHz effective bandwidth. The filterbank frequency resolution was 1.5 MHz, or 512 channels across the full band. (2 data files).

  20. Observations and Modeling of Turbulent Air-Sea Coupling in Coastal and Strongly Forced Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Suslow, David G.

    The turbulent fluxes of momentum, mass, and energy across the ocean-atmosphere boundary are fundamental to our understanding of a myriad of geophysical processes, such as wind-wave generation, oceanic circulation, and air-sea gas transfer. In order to better understand these fluxes, empirical relationships were developed to quantify the interfacial exchange rates in terms of easily observed parameters (e.g., wind speed). However, mounting evidence suggests that these empirical formulae are only valid over the relatively narrow parametric space, i.e. open ocean conditions in light to moderate winds. Several near-surface processes have been observed to cause significant variance in the air-sea fluxes not predicted by the conventional functions, such as a heterogeneous surfaces, swell waves, and wave breaking. Further study is needed to fully characterize how these types of processes can modulate the interfacial exchange; in order to achieve this, a broad investigation into air-sea coupling was undertaken. The primary focus of this work was to use a combination of field and laboratory observations and numerical modeling, in regimes where conventional theories would be expected to breakdown, namely: the nearshore and in very high winds. These seemingly disparate environments represent the marine atmospheric boundary layer at its physical limit. In the nearshore, the convergence of land, air, and sea in a depth-limited domain marks the transition from a marine to a terrestrial boundary layer. Under extreme winds, the physical nature of the boundary layer remains unknown as an intermediate substrate layer, sea spray, develops between the atmosphere and ocean surface. At these ends of the MABL physical spectrum, direct measurements of the near-surface processes were made and directly related to local sources of variance. Our results suggest that the conventional treatment of air-sea fluxes in terms of empirical relationships developed from a relatively narrow set of

  1. Kaluza-Klein-Carmeli Metric from Quaternion-Clifford Space, Lorentz' Force, and Some Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianto V.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available It was known for quite long time that a quaternion space can be generalized to a Clifford space, and vice versa; but how to find its neat link with more convenient metric form in the General Relativity theory, has not been explored extensively. We begin with a representation of group with non-zero quaternions to derive closed FLRW metric [1], and from there obtains Carmeli metric, which can be extended further to become 5D and 6D metric (which we propose to call Kaluza-Klein-Carmeli metric. Thereafter we discuss some plausible implications of this metric, beyond describing a galaxy’s spiraling motion and redshift data as these have been done by Carmeli and Hartnett [4, 5, 6]. In subsequent section we explain Podkletnov’s rotating disc experiment. We also note possible implications to quantum gravity. Further observations are of course recommended in order to refute or verify this proposition.

  2. Food toxin detection with atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Externally introduced toxins or internal spoilage correlated pathogens and their metabolites are all potential sources of food toxins. To prevent and protect unsafe food, many food toxin detection techniques have been developed to detect various toxins for quality control. Although several routine m...

  3. A comparison between highly resolved S-component observations and model calculations using force-free magnetic field extrapolations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seehafer, N.; Hildebrandt, J.; Krueger, A.; Akhmedov, Sh.; Gel'frejkh, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive model calculations of solar radio emission features were presented for the complex of solar active regions Hale No 16862, 16863, and 16864 on May 27, 1980 using force-free extrapolated magnetic fields with constant α and a treatment of radiative transfer of S-component emission. The photospheric magnetic field data were taken from magnetographic measurements whereas the required height distribution of temperature and electron density have been adopted from semi-empirical sunspot models based on recent X-, EUV-, optical, and radio observations. In contrast to the simpler magnetic field structure used in other studies, the complex source structure of the S-component emission is clearly represented by other characteristics. The results of the calculations are compared with the observations of the WRST (6 cm) and RATAN-600 (3.2 cm). (author)

  4. Prediction of human observer performance in a 2-alternative forced choice low-contrast detection task using channelized Hotelling observer: Impact of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Lifeng; Leng Shuai; Chen Lingyun; Kofler, James M.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Carter, Rickey E. [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Efficient optimization of CT protocols demands a quantitative approach to predicting human observer performance on specific tasks at various scan and reconstruction settings. The goal of this work was to investigate how well a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) can predict human observer performance on 2-alternative forced choice (2AFC) lesion-detection tasks at various dose levels and two different reconstruction algorithms: a filtered-backprojection (FBP) and an iterative reconstruction (IR) method. Methods: A 35 Multiplication-Sign 26 cm{sup 2} torso-shaped phantom filled with water was used to simulate an average-sized patient. Three rods with different diameters (small: 3 mm; medium: 5 mm; large: 9 mm) were placed in the center region of the phantom to simulate small, medium, and large lesions. The contrast relative to background was -15 HU at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times using automatic exposure control each at 60, 120, 240, 360, and 480 quality reference mAs on a 128-slice scanner. After removing the three rods, the water phantom was again scanned 100 times to provide signal-absent background images at the exact same locations. By extracting regions of interest around the three rods and on the signal-absent images, the authors generated 21 2AFC studies. Each 2AFC study had 100 trials, with each trial consisting of a signal-present image and a signal-absent image side-by-side in randomized order. In total, 2100 trials were presented to both the model and human observers. Four medical physicists acted as human observers. For the model observer, the authors used a CHO with Gabor channels, which involves six channel passbands, five orientations, and two phases, leading to a total of 60 channels. The performance predicted by the CHO was compared with that obtained by four medical physicists at each 2AFC study. Results: The human and model observers were highly correlated at each dose level for each lesion size for both FBP and IR. The

  5. Prediction of human observer performance in a 2-alternative forced choice low-contrast detection task using channelized Hotelling observer: Impact of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lifeng; Leng Shuai; Chen Lingyun; Kofler, James M.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Carter, Rickey E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Efficient optimization of CT protocols demands a quantitative approach to predicting human observer performance on specific tasks at various scan and reconstruction settings. The goal of this work was to investigate how well a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) can predict human observer performance on 2-alternative forced choice (2AFC) lesion-detection tasks at various dose levels and two different reconstruction algorithms: a filtered-backprojection (FBP) and an iterative reconstruction (IR) method. Methods: A 35 × 26 cm 2 torso-shaped phantom filled with water was used to simulate an average-sized patient. Three rods with different diameters (small: 3 mm; medium: 5 mm; large: 9 mm) were placed in the center region of the phantom to simulate small, medium, and large lesions. The contrast relative to background was −15 HU at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times using automatic exposure control each at 60, 120, 240, 360, and 480 quality reference mAs on a 128-slice scanner. After removing the three rods, the water phantom was again scanned 100 times to provide signal-absent background images at the exact same locations. By extracting regions of interest around the three rods and on the signal-absent images, the authors generated 21 2AFC studies. Each 2AFC study had 100 trials, with each trial consisting of a signal-present image and a signal-absent image side-by-side in randomized order. In total, 2100 trials were presented to both the model and human observers. Four medical physicists acted as human observers. For the model observer, the authors used a CHO with Gabor channels, which involves six channel passbands, five orientations, and two phases, leading to a total of 60 channels. The performance predicted by the CHO was compared with that obtained by four medical physicists at each 2AFC study. Results: The human and model observers were highly correlated at each dose level for each lesion size for both FBP and IR. The Pearson's product

  6. Transmission positron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, Masao; Kogure, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Miyoshi; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Oshima, Ryuichiro; Matsuya, Miyuki

    2006-01-01

    Immediate and near-future plans for transmission positron microscopes being built at KEK, Tsukuba, Japan, are described. The characteristic feature of this project is remolding a commercial electron microscope to a positron microscope. A point source of electrons kept at a negative high voltage is changed to a point source of positrons kept at a high positive voltage. Positional resolution of transmission microscopes should be theoretically the same as electron microscopes. Positron microscopes utilizing trapping of positrons have always positional ambiguity due to the diffusion of positrons

  7. Effect of solvent quality and chain density on normal and frictional forces between electrostatically anchored thermoresponsive diblock copolymer layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    An, Junxue; Liu, Xiaoyan; Dedinaite, Andra

    2017-01-01

    microscope colloidal probe technique. The surface forces are purely repulsive at temperatures capillary condensation of a polymer-rich phase is observed close to the bulk phase separation temperature...

  8. Tumor response to ionizing radiation and combined 2-deoxy-D-glucose application in EATC tumor bearing mice: monitoring of tumor size and microscopic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latz, D.; Thonke, A.; Jueling-Pohlit, L.; Pohlit, W.

    1993-01-01

    The present study deals with the changes induced by two fractionation schedules (5x9 Gy and 10x4.5 Gy; 30 MeV-electrons) of ionizing radiations and 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (2-DG) application on EATC tumor bearing swiss albino mice. The monitoring of tumor response was carried out by means of calliper measurement on the macroscopic level and by histopathological examination of tumor preparations stained with hematoxiline and eosine on the microscopic level. The tumor material was assessed at suitable intervals after treatment by killing the animals. The tumor response was analysed in the histological preparations and the thickness of the tumor band was determined quantitatively by an ocularmicrometric technique. Tumor damage was most extensive in the combined treated animals (5x9 Gy + 2-DG). Only in this group local tumor control was achievable. The histological analysis of tumor preparations revealed additional data about treatment-induced changes in the tumor compared to the measurement of the tumor volume with mechanical callipers. We also found that the treatment outcome could be predicted from the histopathological analysis. It is concluded that studies involving histopathological examinations may give some insight into the way cancer is controlled by radiotherapy and may be of value in prognosis and selection of treatment in patients. (orig.) [de

  9. Ionic liquid-based observation technique for nonconductive materials in the scanning electron microscope: Application to the characterization of a rare earth ore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Waters, Kristian; Demers, Hendrix; Gauvin, Raynald

    2014-03-01

    A new approach for preparing geological materials is proposed to reduce charging during their characterization in a scanning electron microscope. This technique was applied to a sample of the Nechalacho rare earth deposit, which contains a significant amount of the minerals fergusonite and zircon. Instead of covering the specimen surface with a conductive coating, the sample was immersed in a dilute solution of ionic liquid and then air dried prior to SEM analysis. Imaging at a wide range of accelerating voltages was then possible without evidence of charging when using the in-chamber secondary and backscattered electrons detectors, even at 1 kV. High resolution x-ray and electron backscatter diffraction mapping were successfully obtained at 20 and 5 kV with negligible image drifting and permitted the characterization of the microstructure of the zircon/fergusonite-Y aggregates encased in the matrix minerals. Because of the absence of a conductive layer at the surface of the specimen, the Kikuchi band contrast was improved and the backscatter electron signal increased at both 5 and 20 kV as confirmed by Monte Carlo modeling. These major developments led to an improvement of the spatial resolution and efficiency of the above characterization techniques applied to the rare earth ore and it is expected that they can be applied to other types of ores and minerals. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Lobular and cellular patterns of early hepatic glycogen deposition in the rat as observed by light and electron microscopic radioautography after injection of 3H-galactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, J.E.; Hung, J.T.; Garfield, S.A.; Cardell, R.R. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Very low hepatic glycogen levels are achieved by overnight fasting of adrenalectomized (ADX) rats. Subsequent injection of dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, stimulates marked increases in glycogen synthesis. Using this system and injecting 3 H-galactose as a glycogen precursor 1 hr prior to sacrifice, the intralobular and intracellular patterns of labeled glycogen deposition were studied by light (LM) and electron (EM) microscopic radioautography. LM radioautography revealed that 1 hr after DEX treatment, labeling patterns for both periportal and centrilobular hepatocytes resembled those in rats with no DEX treatment: 18% of the hepatocytes were unlabeled, and 82% showed light labeling. Two hours after treatment with DEX, 14% of the hepatocytes remained unlabeled, and 78% were lightly labeled; however, 8% of the cells, located randomly throughout the lobule, were intensely labeled. An increased number of heavily labeled cells (26%) appeared 3 hr after DEX treatment; and by 5 hr 91% of the hepatocytes were intensely labeled. Label over the periportal cells at this time was aggregated, whereas centrilobular cells displayed dispersed label. EM radioautographs showed that 2 to 3 hr after DEX injection initial labeling of hepatocytes, regardless of their intralobular location, occurred over foci of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and small electron-dense particles of presumptive glycogen, and in areas of SER and distinct glycogen particles. After 5 hrs of treatment with DEX, the intracellular distribution of label reflected the glycogen patterns characteristic of periportal or centrilobular regions

  11. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  12. Attempt of correlative observation of morphological synaptic connectivity by combining confocal laser-scanning microscope and FIB-SEM for immunohistochemical staining technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonomura, Takahiro; Furuta, Takahiro; Nakatani, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Yo; Honma, Satoru; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    Ten years have passed since a serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) method was developed [1]. In this innovative method, samples were automatically sectioned with an ultramicrotome placed inside a scanning electron microscope column, and the block surfaces were imaged one after another by SEM to capture back-scattered electrons. The contrast-inverted images obtained by the SBF-SEM were very similar to those acquired using conventional TEM. SFB-SEM has made easy to acquire image stacks of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the mesoscale, which is taken with the confocal laser-scanning microcopy(CF-LSM).Furthermore, serial-section SEM has been combined with the focused ion beam (FIB) milling method [2]. FIB-incorporated SEM (FIB-SEM) has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional images with a higher z-axis resolution com- pared to ultramicrotome-equipped SEM.We tried immunocytochemistry for FIB-SEM and correlated this immunoreactivity with that in CF-LSM. Dendrites of neurons in the rat neostriatum were visualized using a recombinant viral vector. Moreover, the thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2). After detection of the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites by using CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for EM by using immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB) methods, respectively.We showed that conventional immuno-cytochemical staining for TEM was applicable to FIB-SEM. Furthermore, several synaptic contacts, which were thought to exist on the basis of CF-LSM findings, were confirmed with FIB-SEM, revealing the usefulness of the combined method of CF-LSM and FIB-SEM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Light and electron microscopic observations on the organization of skin and associated glands of two caecilian amphibians from Western Ghats of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Arun; Reston Saroja, Beyo; Kotharambath, Ramachandran; Mohammad Abdulkader, Akbarsha; Oommen, Oommen V; Lekha, Divya

    2018-03-01

    We adopted light and electron microscopy to understand the structure of the skin of two species of caecilians, Ichthyophis tricolor and Uraeotyphlus cf. oxyurus, from Western Ghats of Kerala, India. The surface of the skin of these caecilians contains an irregular pattern of microridges. Oval, round and polymorphic glandular openings are randomly distributed all over the skin surface. Most of the openings are funnel shaped. The epithelial cells along the rim of the opening descend into the tunnel of the duct. A few glandular openings protrude slightly above the epithelium of the duct. The skin is formed of epidermis and dermis. Small flat disk-like dermal scales, composed of a basal plate of several layers of unmineralized collagen fibers topped with a discontinuous layer of mineralized globular squamulae, are lodged in pouches in the transverse ridges of the skin. Each pouch contains 1-4 scales, which might differ in size. The scales are almost similar between species, yet the difference can be useful in distinguishing between the two species. Flask cells and Merkel cells are present in the epidermis. Two types of glands, mucous and granular, are present in the dermis. The mucous glands are densely packed with mucous vesicles. Darkly stained mucous producing cells are located around the periphery of the gland. Secretory mucous vesicles differ in their organization and distribution. The granular glands are located perpendicular to the skin surface. The granule producing cells of the gland are located near the periphery. There are differently stained spherical secretory granules of various sizes in the cytoplasm. Thus, the use of different microscopic techniques contributed fascinatingly to the first ever understanding of organization of the skin of two selected caecilian species from Western Ghats, revealing certain features to differ between them. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimation of Longitudinal Force and Sideslip Angle for Intelligent Four-Wheel Independent Drive Electric Vehicles by Observer Iteration and Information Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Te; Chen, Long; Xu, Xing; Cai, Yingfeng; Jiang, Haobin; Sun, Xiaoqiang

    2018-04-20

    Exact estimation of longitudinal force and sideslip angle is important for lateral stability and path-following control of four-wheel independent driven electric vehicle. This paper presents an effective method for longitudinal force and sideslip angle estimation by observer iteration and information fusion for four-wheel independent drive electric vehicles. The electric driving wheel model is introduced into the vehicle modeling process and used for longitudinal force estimation, the longitudinal force reconstruction equation is obtained via model decoupling, the a Luenberger observer and high-order sliding mode observer are united for longitudinal force observer design, and the Kalman filter is applied to restrain the influence of noise. Via the estimated longitudinal force, an estimation strategy is then proposed based on observer iteration and information fusion, in which the Luenberger observer is applied to achieve the transcendental estimation utilizing less sensor measurements, the extended Kalman filter is used for a posteriori estimation with higher accuracy, and a fuzzy weight controller is used to enhance the adaptive ability of observer system. Simulations and experiments are carried out, and the effectiveness of proposed estimation method is verified.

  15. Science 101: How Does an Electron Microscope Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to popular opinion, electron microscopes are not used to look at electrons. They are used to look for structure in things that are too small to observe with an optical microscope, or to obtain images that are magnified much more than is obtainable with an optical microscope. To understand how electron microscopes work, it will help to go…

  16. Observing how others lift light or heavy objects: which visual cues mediate the encoding of muscular force in the primary motor cortex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaerts, Kaat; Swinnen, Stephan P; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2010-06-01

    Observers are able to judge quite accurately the weights lifted by others. Only recently, neuroscience has focused on the role of the motor system to accomplish this task. In this respect, a previous transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study showed that the muscular force requirements of an observed action are encoded by the primary motor cortex (M1). Overall, three distinct visual sources may provide information on the applied force of an observed lifting action, namely, (i) the perceived kinematics, (ii) the hand contraction state and finally (iii) intrinsic object properties. The principal aim of the present study was to disentangle these three visual sources and to explore their importance in mediating the encoding of muscular force requirements in the observer's motor system. A series of experiments are reported in which TMS was used to measure 'force-related' responses from the hand representation in left M1 while subjects observed distinct action-stimuli. Overall, results indicated that observation-induced activity in M1 reflects the level of observed force when kinematic cues of the lift (exp. 1) or cues on the hand contraction state (exp. 2) are available. Moreover, when kinematic cues and intrinsic object properties provide distinct information on the force requirements of an observed lifting action, results from experiment 3 indicated a strong preference for the use of kinematic features in mapping the force requirements of the observed action. In general, these findings support the hypothesis that the primary motor cortex contributes to action observation by mapping the muscle-related features of observed actions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  18. Microscopic and macroscopic models for pedestrian crowds

    OpenAIRE

    Makmul, Juntima

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with microscopic and macroscopic models for pedes- trian crowds. In the first chapter, we consider pedestrians exit choices and model human behaviour in an evacuation process. Two microscopic models, discrete and continuous, are studied in this chapter. The former is a cellular automaton model and the latter is a social force model. Different numerical test cases are investigated and their results are compared. In chapter 2, a hierarchy of models for...

  19. Nanoparticle movement: Plasmonic forces and physical constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batson, P.E.; Reyes-Coronado, A.; Barrera, R.G.; Rivacoba, A.; Echenique, P.M.; Aizpurua, J.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticle structures observed in aberration-corrected electron microscopes exhibit many types of behavior, some of which are dominated by intrinsic conditions, unrelated to the microscope environment. Some behaviors are clearly driven by the electron beam, however, and the question arises as to whether these are similar to intrinsic mechanisms, useful for understanding nanoscale behavior, or whether they should be regarded as unwanted modification of as-built specimens. We have studied a particular kind of beam–specimen interaction – plasmon dielectric forces caused by the electric fields imposed by a passing swift electron – identifying four types of forced motion, including both attractive and repulsive forces on single nanoparticles, and coalescent and non-coalescent forces in groups of two or more nanoparticles. We suggest that these forces might be useful for deliberate electron beam guided movement of nanoparticles. -- Highlights: ► We investigate the interaction of metal nanoparticles with a high energy electron beam. ► We find forces ranging from 0.1 to 50 pN forces between the metal particles and the beam. ► At moderate distances, dielectric forces are usually small and attractive. ► At sub-Nm distances the forces become repulsive, pushing nanoparticles away from the electron beam. ► While the repulsive behavior is predicted by electromagnetic theory, the detailed origin of the behavior is not yet understood.

  20. Dust aerosol properties and radiative forcing observed in spring during 2001-2014 over urban Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xingna; Lü, Rui; Kumar, K Raghavendra; Ma, Jia; Zhang, Qiuju; Jiang, Yilun; Kang, Na; Yang, Suying; Wang, Jing; Li, Mei

    2016-08-01

    The ground-based characteristics (optical and radiative properties) of dust aerosols measured during the springtime between 2001 and 2014 were investigated over urban Beijing, China. The seasonal averaged aerosol optical depth (AOD) during spring of 2001-2014 was about 0.78 at 440 nm. During dust days, higher AOD occurred associated with lower Ångström exponent (AE). The mean AE440-870 in the springtime was about 1.0, indicating dominance of fine particles over the region. The back-trajectory analysis revealed that the dust was transported from the deserts of Inner Mongolia and Mongolia arid regions to Beijing. The aerosol volume size distribution showed a bimodal distribution pattern, with its highest peak observed in coarse mode for all episodes (especially for dust days with increased volume concentration). The single scattering albedo (SSA) increased with wavelength on dust days, indicating the presence of more scattering particles. Furthermore, the complex parts (real and imaginary) of refractive index showed distinct characteristics with lower imaginary values (also scattering) on dust days. The shortwave (SW; 0.2-4.0 μm) and longwave (LW; 4-100 μm) aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) values were computed from the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model both at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and the bottom of atmosphere (BOA) during dust and non-dust (dust free) days, and the corresponding heating rates and forcing efficiencies were also estimated. The SW (LW) ARF, therefore, produced significant cooling (warming) effects at both the TOA and the BOA over Beijing.