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Sample records for foot care programme

  1. Health education programmes to improve foot self-care practices and foot problems among older people with diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Sharoni, Siti Khuzaimah; Minhat, Halimatus Sakdiah; Mohd Zulkefli, Nor Afiah; Baharom, Anisah

    2016-09-01

    To assess the effectiveness of health education programmes to improve foot self-care practices and foot problems among older people with diabetes. The complications of diabetes among older people are a major health concern. Foot problems such as neuropathy, ulcer and ultimately amputation are a great burden on older people with diabetes. Diabetes foot education programmes can influence the behaviour of older people in practising foot self-care and controlling the foot problems. However, the educational approaches used by the educators are different. Therefore, it is important to assess the education programmes from various evidence-based practices. Six databases, EBSCOhost medical collections (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection), SAGE, Wiley Online Library, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink and Web of Science, were used to search for articles published from January 2000 to March 2015. The search was based on the inclusion criteria and keywords including 'foot', 'care' and 'diabetes'. Fourteen studies were assessed and reviewed in the final stage. Health education programmes varied according to their design, setting, approach, outcome measured and results. Foot assessment, verbal and written instructions and discussion were proved to improve the foot self-care and foot problems. Subsequent follow-ups and evaluations had a significant effect. An improvement was observed in foot self-care scores and foot problems (such as neuropathy, foot disability, lesion, ulcer, tinea pedis and callus grade) after implementation of the health education programme. The findings of this study support the claim that a health education programme increases the foot self-care scores and reduces the foot problems. However, there were certain methodological concerns in the reviewed articles, indicating the need for further evaluation. In future, researchers and practitioners must implement a vigorous education programme focusing on diabetes foot self-care among the

  2. Protocol for the Foot in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis trial (FiJIA: a randomised controlled trial of an integrated foot care programme for foot problems in JIA

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    Hendry Gordon J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot and ankle problems are a common but relatively neglected manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Studies of medical and non-medical interventions have shown that clinical outcome measures can be improved. However existing data has been drawn from small non-randomised clinical studies of single interventions that appear to under-represent the adult population suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis. To date, no evidence of combined therapies or integrated care for juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients with foot and ankle problems exists. Methods/design An exploratory phase II non-pharmacological randomised controlled trial where patients including young children, adolescents and adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and associated foot/ankle problems will be randomised to receive integrated podiatric care via a new foot care programme, or to receive standard podiatry care. Sixty patients (30 in each arm including children, adolescents and adults diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be recruited from 2 outpatient centres of paediatric and adult rheumatology respectively. Participants will be randomised by process of minimisation using the Minim software package. The primary outcome measure is the foot related impairment measured by the Juvenile Arthritis Disability Index questionnaire's impairment domain at 6 and 12 months, with secondary outcomes including disease activity score, foot deformity score, active/limited foot joint counts, spatio-temporal and plantar-pressure gait parameters, health related quality of life and semi-quantitative ultrasonography score for inflammatory foot lesions. The new foot care programme will comprise rapid assessment and investigation, targeted treatment, with detailed outcome assessment and follow-up at minimum intervals of 3 months. Data will be collected at baseline, 6 months and 12 months from baseline

  3. A self-efficacy education programme on foot self-care behaviour among older patients with diabetes in a public long-term care institution, Malaysia: a Quasi-experimental Pilot Study.

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    Sharoni, Siti Khuzaimah Ahmad; Abdul Rahman, Hejar; Minhat, Halimatus Sakdiah; Shariff Ghazali, Sazlina; Azman Ong, Mohd Hanafi

    2017-06-08

    A pilot self-efficacy education programme was conducted to assess the feasibility, acceptability and potential impact of the self-efficacy education programme on improving foot self-care behaviour among older patients with diabetes in a public long-term care institution. A prequasi-experimental and postquasi-experimental study was conducted in a public long-term care institution in Selangor, Malaysia. Patients with diabetes aged 60 years and above who fulfilled the selection criteria were invited to participate in this programme. Four self-efficacy information sources; performance accomplishments, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion and physiological information were translated into programme interventions. The programme consisted of four visits over a 12-week period. The first visit included screening and baseline assessment and the second visit involved 30 min of group seminar presentation. The third and fourth visits entailed a 20-min one-to-one follow-up discussion and evaluation. A series of visits to the respondents was conducted throughout the programme. The primary outcome was foot self-care behaviour. Foot self-efficacy (efficacy-expectation), foot care outcome expectation, knowledge of foot care, quality of life, fasting blood glucose and foot condition were secondary outcomes. Data were analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics (McNemar's test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test) using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences V.20.0. Fifty-two residents were recruited but only 31 met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis at baseline and at 12 weeks postintervention. The acceptability rate was moderately high. At postintervention, foot self-care behaviour (p<0.001), foot self-efficacy (efficacy-expectation), (p<0.001), foot care outcome expectation (p<0.001), knowledge of foot care (p<0.001), quality of life (physical symptoms) (p=0.003), fasting blood glucose (p=0.010), foot hygiene (p=0.030) and anhydrosis (p=0

  4. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  5. Preventative foot care in people with diabetes: Quality patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: preventative foot care; diabetes; risk stratification: self care. Introduction ... diabetes is considered to be a key indicator of the quality of foot ... loss of protective sensation, the importance of foot monitoring on a daily basis, the proper ...

  6. Review Article The challenge of diabetic foot care: Review of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    amputation.1 This review of the literature will cover the nature and ... experience of establishing a diabetic foot service at Queen. Elizabeth .... In these studies the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy ... diabetes education, the Step by Step Foot Care Programme .... long distances for patients to travel to the clinic; delays.

  7. Foot Problems in a Group of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Unmet Need for Foot Care

    OpenAIRE

    Borman, Pinar; Ayhan, Figen; Tuncay, Figen; Sahin, Mehtap

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the foot involvement in a group of RA patients in regard to symptoms, type and frequency of deformities, location, radiological changes, and foot care. Patients and Methods: A randomized selected 100 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were recruited to the study. Data about foot symptoms, duration and location of foot pain, pain intensity, access to services related to foot, treatment, orthoses and assistive devices, and usefulness of therapie...

  8. Living With Diabetes: Foot Care

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    ... Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers Food & Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor ... it just as you would before bathing a baby. Never use hot water bottles, heating pads, or ...

  9. Diabetes: Good Diabetes Management and Regular Foot Care Help Prevent Severe Foot Sores

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    Amputation and diabetes: How to protect your feet Good diabetes management and regular foot care help prevent severe foot sores that ... and may require amputation. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes complications can include nerve damage and poor blood ...

  10. Preventative foot care in people with diabetes: Quality patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foot ulceration and amputation cause extensive burden on individuals and health care systems. One of the reasons for the poor outcome of foot complications in developing countries is the lack of patient education. Due to the multi-factorial pathology of diabetic foot ulceration, the person with diabetes should receive health ...

  11. Foot problems in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: an unmet need for foot care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Pinar; Ayhan, Figen; Tuncay, Figen; Sahin, Mehtap

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the foot involvement in a group of RA patients in regard to symptoms, type and frequency of deformities, location, radiological changes, and foot care. A randomized selected 100 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were recruited to the study. Data about foot symptoms, duration and location of foot pain, pain intensity, access to services related to foot, treatment, orthoses and assistive devices, and usefulness of therapies were determined by the questionnaire. Radiological changes were assessed according to modified Larsen scoring system. The scores of disease activity scale of 28 joints and Health Assessment Questionnaire indicating the functional status of RA patients were collected from patient files. A total of 100 RA patients (90 female, 10 male) with a mean age of 52.5 ±10.9 years were enrolled to the study. Eighty-nine of the 100 patients had experienced foot complaints/symptoms in the past or currently. Foot pain and foot symptoms were reported as the first site of involvement in 14 patients. Thirty-six patients had ankle pain and the most common sites of the foot symptoms were ankle (36%) and forefoot (30%) followed by hindfoot (17%) and midfoot (7%) currently. Forty-nine of the patients described that they had difficulty in performing their foot care. Insoles and orthopedic shoes were prescribed in 39 patients, but only 14 of them continued to use them. The main reasons for not wearing them were; 17 not helpful (43%), 5 made foot pain worse (12.8%), and 3 did not fit (7.6%). Foot symptoms were reported to be decreased in 24 % of the subjects after the medical treatment and 6 patients indicated that they had underwent foot surgery. Current foot pain was significantly associated with higher body mass index and longer disease duration, and duration of morning stiffness. The radiological scores did not correlate with duration of foot symptoms and current foot pain (p>0.05) but the total number of foot deformities was

  12. Are we telling the diabetic patients adequately about foot care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Din, M.J.U.; Jadoon, R.J.; Farooq, U.; Alam, M.A.; Qureshi, A.; Shah, S.U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus affects more than 285 million people worldwide. The prevalence is expected to rise to 439 million by the year 2030. Diabetic foot ulcers precede 84 percentage of non-traumatic amputations in diabetics. One lower limb is lost every 30 seconds around the world because of diabetic foot ulceration. Apart from being lengthy, the treatment of diabetic foot is also very expensive. There is very limited emphasis on foot care in diabetic patients. Even in developed countries patients feel that they do not have adequate knowledge about foot care. This study was conducted to find out how much information is imparted by doctors to diabetic patients about foot care. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in admitted patients of the Department of Medicine, DHQ Hospital, Abbottabad from May 2014 to June 2015. 139 diabetic patients more than 25 years of age were included by non-probability consecutive sampling. Results: The mean age was 57.17 ( percentage 11.1) years. 35.3 percentage of patients were male and 64.7 percentage were female. The mean duration of diabetes in patients was 8.3 (±6) years. Only 36.7 percentage of patients said that their doctor told them about foot care. Less than 40 percentage of patients knew that they should daily inspect their feet, wash them with gentle warm water, and dry them afterwards. Only 25.2 percentage of the participants knew how to manage corns or calluses on feet. 66.5 percentage of patients knew that they should not walk bare foot. Overall, 63 percentage of our patients had less than 50 percentage knowledge of the 11 points regarding foot care that the investigators asked them. Conclusion: Diabetic foot problems are the one of the costliest, most disabling and disheartening complication of diabetes mellitus. Doctors are not properly telling diabetic patients about foot care. There is a deficiency of knowledge among the diabetic patients regarding foot care. (author)

  13. A programmable and portable NMES device for drop foot correction and blood flow assist applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Paul P; Corley, Gavin J; O'Keeffe, Derek T; Conway, Richard; Olaighin, Gearóid

    2009-04-01

    The Duo-STIM, a new, programmable and portable neuromuscular stimulation system for drop foot correction and blood flow assist applications is presented. The system consists of a programmer unit and a portable, programmable stimulator unit. The portable stimulator features fully programmable, sensor-controlled, constant-voltage, dual-channel stimulation and accommodates a range of customized stimulation profiles. Trapezoidal and free-form adaptive stimulation intensity envelope algorithms are provided for drop foot correction applications, while time dependent and activity dependent algorithms are provided for blood flow assist applications. A variety of sensor types can be used with the portable unit, including force sensitive resistor-based foot switches and MEMS-based accelerometer and gyroscope devices. The paper provides a detailed description of the hardware and block-level system design for both units. The programming and operating procedures for the system are also presented. Finally, functional bench test results for the system are presented.

  14. Diabetic foot care: Self reported knowledge and practice among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus (DM) foot complications are a leading cause of mortality in developing countries and the prevalence of diabetes is expected to increase in the next decades in these countries. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and practice of foot care among diabetes patients attending ...

  15. Foot examinations of diabetes patients by primary health care nurses in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Barbara; Arroll, Bruce; Sheridan, Nicolette; Kenealy, Timothy; Stewart, Alistair; Scragg, Robert

    2014-07-01

    To identify factors associated with patients receiving foot examinations by primary health care nurses. A cross-sectional survey of 287 randomly sampled primary health care nurses, from a total of 1091 in Auckland, completed a postal self-administered questionnaire and telephone interview. Biographical and diabetes management details were collected for 265 diabetes patients consulted by the nurses on a randomly selected day. A response rate of 86% was achieved. Nurses examined patient's feet in 46% of consultations. Controlling for demographic variables, foot examinations were associated with age, odds ratio (1.25, 95% CI 0.57-2.74) for patients aged 51-65 years and >66 years (2.50, 1.08-5.75) compared with those ≤50 years, consultations by district compared with practice nurses (14.23, 95% CI 3.82-53.05), special programme consultations compared with usual follow-up consults (8.81, 95% CI 2.99-25.93) and length of consultation (1.89, 0.72-4.97) for 15-30 min and (4.45, 95% CI 1.48-13.41) >30 min compared with consultations ≤15 min, or for wound care (2.58, 1.01-6.61). Diabetes foot examinations by primary health care nurses varies greatly, and are associated with characteristics of the patient (age, need for wound care) and the consultation (district nurses, diabetes programme and duration). Copyright © 2013 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A leadership programme for critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofts, Linda

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes the genesis, design and implementation of a leadership programme for critical care. This was an initiative funded by the National Health Service (NHS) Nursing Leadership Project and had at the core of its design flexibility to meet the needs of the individual hospitals, which took part in it. Participation was from the multi-disciplinary critical care team. Six NHS hospitals took part in the programme which was of 20 days duration and took place on hospital sites. The programme used the leadership model of as its template and had a number of distinct components; a baseline assessment, personal development, principles of leadership and critical case reviews. The programme was underpinned by three themes; working effectively in multi-professional teams to provide patient focussed care, managing change through effective leadership and developing the virtual critical care service. Each group set objectives pertinent to their own organisation's needs. The programme was evaluated by a self-reporting questionnaire; group feedback and feedback from stakeholders. Programme evaluation was positive from all the hospitals but it was clear that the impact of the programme varied considerably between the groups who took part. It was noted that there was some correlation between the success of the programme and organisational 'buy in' as well as the organisational culture within which the participants operated. A key feature of the programme success was the critical case reviews, which were considered to be a powerful learning tool and medium for group learning and change management.

  17. Diabetic foot infection treatment and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigna, Emanuele; Fino, Pasquale; Onesti, Maria G; Amorosi, Vittoria; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-04-01

    Foot infections in diabetic patients are a common, complex and costly problem. They are potentially adverse with progression to deeper spaces and tissues and are associated with severe complications. The management of diabetic foot infection (DFI) requires a prompt and systematic approach to achieve more successful outcomes and to ultimately avoid amputations. This study reviews a multi-step treatment for DFIs. Between September 2010 and September 2012, a total of about 37 patients were consulted for DFI. The treatment algorithm included four steps, that is, several types of debridement according to the type of wound, the application of negative pressure therapy (NPT), other advanced dressings, a targeted antibiotic therapy local or systemic as the case may, and, if necessary, reconstructive surgery. This treatment protocol showed excellent outcomes, allowing us to avoid amputation in most difficult cases. Only about 8% of patients require amputation. This treatment protocol and a multidisciplinary approach with a specialised team produced excellent results in the treatment of DFI and in the management of diabetic foot in general, allowing us to improve the quality of life of diabetic patients and also to ensure cost savings. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The association between foot-care self efficacy beliefs and actual foot-care behaviour in people with peripheral neuropathy: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swerissen Hal

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy often do not implement the foot-care behavioural strategies that are suggested by many health professionals. The concept of self-efficacy has been shown to be an effective predictor of behaviour in many areas of health. This study investigated the relationships between foot-care self-efficacy beliefs, self-reported foot-care behaviour and history of diabetes-related foot pathology in people with diabetes and loss of protective sensation in their feet. Methods Ninety-six participants were included in this cross-sectional study undertaken in a regional city of Australia. All participants had diabetes and clinically diagnosed loss of protective sensation in their feet. The participants completed a self-report pen-paper questionnaire regarding foot-care self efficacy beliefs (the "Foot Care Confidence Scale" and two aspects of actual foot-care behaviour-preventative behaviour and potentially damaging behaviour. Pearson correlation coefficients were then calculated to determine the association between foot-care self-efficacy beliefs and actual reported foot-care behaviour. Multiple analysis of variance was undertaken to compare mean self-efficacy and behaviour subscale scores for those with a history of foot pathology, and those that did not. Results A small positive correlation (r = 0.2, p = 0.05 was found between self-efficacy beliefs and preventative behaviour. There was no association between self-efficacy beliefs and potentially damaging behaviour. There was no difference in self-efficacy beliefs in people that had a history of foot pathology compared to those that did not. Conclusion There is little association between foot-care self-efficacy beliefs and actual foot-care behaviour. The usefulness of measuring foot-care self-efficacy beliefs to assess actual self foot-care behaviour using currently available instruments is limited in people with diabetes and loss of protective

  19. Case Study: Evidence-Based Interventions Enhancing Diabetic Foot Care Behaviors among Hospitalized DM Patients

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    Titis Kurniawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improving diabetic patients’ foot care behaviors is one of the most effective strategies in minimizing diabetic foot ulceration and its further negative impacts, either in diabetic hospitalized patients or outpatients.Purpose: To describe foot care knowledge and behaviors among hospitalized diabetic patients, to apply selected foot care knowledge and behaviors improvement evidence, and to evaluate its effectiveness.Method: Four diabetic patients who were under our care for at least three days and could communicate in Thai language were selected from a surgical ward in a university hospital. The authors applied educational program based on patients’ learning needs, provided diabetic foot care leaflet, and assisted patients to set their goal and action plans. In the third day of treatment, we evaluated patients’ foot care knowledge and their goal and action plan statements in improving foot care behaviors.Result: Based on the data collected among four hospitalized diabetic patients, it was shown that all patients needed foot care behaviors improvement and the educational program improved hospitalized patients’ foot care knowledge and their perceived foot care behaviors. The educational program that combined with goal setting and action plans method was easy, safe, and seemed feasibly applicable for diabetic hospitalized patients.Conclusion: The results of this study provide valuable information for improvement of hospitalized diabetic patients’ foot care knowledge and behaviors. The authors recommend nurses to use this evidence-based practice to contribute in improving the quality of diabetic care.Keywords: Intervention, diabetic foot care, hospitalized diabetic patients

  20. Validity of the Mexican version of the combined Foot Care Confidence / Foot-Care Behavior scale for diabetes

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    Jaime A. García-Inzunza

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To 1 translate / transculturally adapt the original (English-language combined Foot Care Confidence Scale / Foot-Care Behavior instrument (FCCS-FCB to produce a Mexican-Spanish version and 2 determine its validity and reliability in a population with diabetes in Tijuana, Mexico. METHODS: The original FCCS-FCB was translated (and back-translated, the content validated (by a group of health professional experts, and the instrument applied to 304 patients 23-78 years old in diabetes support groups in Tijuana, Mexico. Internal consistency for the study constructs ("self-efficacy," and risk / preventive foot self-care behaviors was measured using Cronbach's alpha. The constructs were validated using principal component factor analysis. RESULTS: The Cronbach's alpha values for internal consistency were 0.782 for self-efficacy and 0.505 for behaviors. Based on the analysis, two factors explained 49.1% of the total variance for self-efficacy, and six factors explained 57.7% of the total variance for behaviors. The results were consistent with those for the original (English version of the FCCS-FCB. CONCLUSIONS: The Mexican version of the FCCS-FCB is a reliable and valid instrument recommended for use with Mexican-Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes.

  1. Diabetic foot wound care practices among patients visiting a tertiary care hospital in north India

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    Samreen Khan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic foot syndrome is one of the most common and devastating preventable complications of diabetes resulting in major economic consequences for the patients, their families, and the society. Aims & Objectives: The present study was carried out to assess knowledge, attitude and practices of Diabetic Foot Wound Care among the patients suffering from Diabetic Foot and to correlate them with the socio-demographic parameters. Material & Methods: It was a Hospital based cross-sectional study involving clinically diagnosed adult (>18 years patients of Diabetic Foot visiting the Surgery and Medicine OPDs at Teerthankar Mahaveer Medical College & Research Centre, Moradabad, India. Results: Significant association KAP (Knowledge, Attitude and Practices score was seen with age of the patient, education, addiction, family history of Diabetes Mellitus, prior receipt of information regarding Diabetic foot-care practices, compliance towards the treatment and the type of foot wear used. Conclusions: The results highlight areas especially Health education, use of safe footwear and life style adjustments, where efforts to improve knowledge and practice may contribute to the prevention of development of Foot ulcers and amputation. 

  2. Implementation of an HACCP model in foot and mouth disease control programmes.

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    van Gelderen, C J; Durrieu, M; Schudel, A A

    2015-12-01

    The organisation and structure of the official Veterinary Services (OVS) are designed to meet a specific aim--the health certification of animal health, welfare and food safety in the production and processing stage. Disease prevention and control calls for programmes and projects that, depending on the characteristics of each disease, may involve any branch of the OVS, from the laboratory to field activities. For the purpose of this work, the model used is that of a country that is 'free from foot and mouth disease with vaccination' in accordance with the conditions stipulated in Chapter 8.8. of the World Organisation for Animal Health Terrestrial Animal Health Code. These conditions state that, to maintain this health status, a programme of monitoring and continuous control of the relevant variables must be implemented. This is achieved by applying good practice and identifying the critical control points in all processes, using a checklist that simplifies the task. The system that is developed can also serve as a guide for internal or external programme audits.

  3. Self-efficacy of foot care behaviour of elderly patients with diabetes

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    Maizatul Nadwa Mohd Razi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elderly patients with diabetes are at a high risk of contracting diabetic foot problems. Self-efficacy is essential to help improve foot care behaviour. Aim: To identify levels of self-efficacy and foot care behaviour and their relationship with demographic characteristics in elderly patients with diabetes Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in two general hospitals in Malaysia from May to June 2015. Diabetes patients aged 60 years with specific inclusion criteria were invited to participate in this study. The respondents were interviewed using a set of validated questionnaires. Data were analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics (multiple linear regression using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0. Results: Levels of foot self-efficacy (mean+31.39; standard deviation=7.76 and foot care behaviour (mean=25.37; SD=5.88 were high. There was a positive significant relationship between foot selfefficacy (β = 0.41, p < 0.001 and gender (β = 0.30, p < 0.001 with foot care behaviour. Conclusion: Self-efficacy can be incorporated in diabetes education to improve foot care behaviour. High-risk patients should be taught proper foot inspection and protection as well as the merits of skin care to prevent the occurrence of diabetic foot problems.

  4. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of foot care in patients with diabetes at central rural India

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    Bharati Amar Taksande

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic foot syndrome is one of the common and most devastating preventable complications of diabetes mellitus (DM. It is associated with morbidity and premature mortality due to long-term complications affecting foot. The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes should have a comprehensive foot examination once per year. Most of the foot problems can be prevented with careful foot care. It may take effort and time to build up good foot care habits, but self-care is essential. Aim: The main aim of the study is to analyze the knowledge, attitude, and practice of foot care in patients with DM in central rural India. Methodology: This study was conducted at a rural educational hospital in central part of India over 200 patients who have Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. They were evaluated for their knowledge about foot care and footwear practices. A structured and validated questionnaire was administered to cases. Results: Around 82.9% of the patients were aware of the disease and 23.2% were aware of the complications of the DM. In 63% of the patients, foot care examination and education regarding foot complications were not suggested by their treating physicians. Annual examination of feet by the physician and self-examination were not known facts to the diabetic population. Conclusion: It is necessary to firstly develop awareness of diabetes mellitus and the related complications, one amongst which is foot care. Certain educational strategies should be established for both the consultant physician and also the common man to create awareness for effective foot care.

  5. The Assessment of Social Support and Self-Care Requisites for Preventing Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Diabetic Foot Patients

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    Mohammad Taher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Diabetic foot as one of the most common complications of diabetes is involved in more than %25 of diabetic patients’ lives, and if not treated properly can lead to amputation up to %20. The lack of self-care is the underlying cause of mortality, morbidity and chronic complications of diabetes. Identification and rectifying of diabetic foot care needs of patients can additionally reduce readmission; also, %85 of diabetic foot problems can be prevented. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 130patients with diabetic foot from Shahid Modarres hospital were selected using census method. Data in forms of demographic questionnaire, self-care requisites assessment tool for preventing diabetic foot ulcer, and Social Support Behavior Scale were completed by patients and then were collected. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16. Results: In this study, a significant relationship was found between self-care and social support (P<0.05. This means that people with better social support reported better self-care than those with weaker social support. A significant relationship in level of education and monthly income with self-care was seen, as well as in level of education, monthly income and marital status with social support (P<0.001. Conclusions: The results showed that social support can be considered as an effective factor in individual self-care behaviors, and with regard to this factor in educational, treatment and care programs of patients, can improve their self-care, in addition to decreasing economic costs, and improve their qualities of lives as well.

  6. Evaluation of "care of the foot" as a risk factor for diabetic foot ulceration: the role of internal physicians.

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    Oguejiofor, O C; Oli, J M; Odenigbo, C U

    2009-03-01

    Several risk factors predispose the diabetic patient to foot ulceration, including "inadequate care of the foot". This risk factor for foot ulceration has not been previously evaluated among Nigeria diabetic patients and is the objective of this study. One hundred and twenty (120) diabetic patients with and without symptoms of peripheral neuropathy receiving care at the medical outpatient department (MOPD) and the diabetic clinic of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi were recruited consecutively as they presented. They were administered structured questionnaires to assess some variables concerning care of their feet as provided to them by their physicians. Among the 120 diabetic participants, 83 (69.2%) had neuropathic symptoms (the symptomatic participants) while 37 (30.8%) were asymptomatic (the asymptomatic participants). Eighty (80; 96.4%) of the symptomatic vs 36 (97.3%) of the asymptomatic participants had never had their feet examined by their physician. Also, 26 (31.3%) of the symptomatic vs 12 (32.4%) of the asymptomatic participants had never received any form of advice on how to take special care of their feet by their physician, and 26 (31.3%) of the symptomatic vs 6 (16.2%) of the asymptomatic participants walked unshod most times in their immediate surroundings. Physicians do not provide adequate care to the feet of their diabetic patients irrespective of the presence or absence of neuropathic symptoms, making this variable a critical risk factor for diabetic foot ulceration and amputation. Continuing medical education to health care providers emphasizing adequate "care of the foot" of the diabetic patient, will reduce avoidable loss of limbs to diabetes.

  7. The relationship between self-efficacy and diabetic foot self-care

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    Stacey Wendling, MSN, RN, FNP, CFCN

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: This study adds to the body of knowledge regarding self-efficacy and diabetic foot self-care behaviors. Further research is needed to explore the relationship of gender, diabetes education attendance, and foot self-care behaviors as influencing factors in LEA prevention.

  8. The process of implementing a rural VA wound care program for diabetic foot ulcer patients.

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    Reiber, Gayle E; Raugi, Gregory J; Rowberg, Donald

    2007-10-01

    Delivering and documenting evidence-based treatment to all Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) foot ulcer patients has wide appeal. However, primary and secondary care medical centers where 52% of these patients receive care are at a disadvantage given the frequent absence of trained specialists to manage diabetic foot ulcers. A retrospective review of diabetic foot ulcer patient records and a provider survey were conducted to document the foot ulcer problem and to assess practitioner needs. Results showed of the 125 persons with foot ulcers identified through administrative data, only, 21% of diabetic foot patients were correctly coded. Chronic Care and Microsystem models were used to prepare a tailored intervention in a VA primary care medical center. The site Principal Investigators, a multidisciplinary site wound care team, and study investigators jointly implemented a diabetic foot ulcer program. Intervention components include wound care team education and training, standardized good wound care practices based on strong scientific evidence, and a wound care template embedded in the electronic medical record to facilitate data collection, clinical decision making, patient ordering, and coding. A strategy for delivering offloading pressure devices, regular case management support, and 24/7 emergency assistance also was developed. It took 9 months to implement the model. Patients were enrolled and followed for 1 year. Process and outcome evaluations are on-going.

  9. Foot care education and self management behaviors in diverse veterans with diabetes

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    Jonathan M Olson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan M Olson1, Molly T Hogan2, Leonard M Pogach3, Mangala Rajan3, Gregory J Raugi4, Gayle E Reiber51University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Department of Veterans Affairs, New Jersey Healthcare System, Center for Healthcare Knowledge Management, East Orange, NJ, USA; 4Division of Dermatology, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, USA; 5Research and Development, VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: The objective of this study was to examine differences in self-reported diabetes foot care education, self management behaviors, and barriers to good foot care among veterans with diabetes by race and ethnicity. Data was collected using the Veterans Health Administration Footcare Survey, a validated tool that assessed demographic, general health, diabetes and foot self-care information, barriers to foot self-care, receipt of professional foot care, and satisfaction with current care. We mailed surveys to a random sample of patients with diabetes from eight VA medical centers. Study participants were 81% White; 13% African American; 4% Asian, and 2% American Indian and Pacific Islanders. The majority of respondents felt that they did not know enough about foot self-care. There were large gaps between self-reported knowledge and actual foot care practices, even among those who reported “knowing enough” on a given topic. There were significant differences in self-reported foot care behaviors and education by race and ethnicity. These findings document the need for culturally-specific self-management education to address unique cultural preferences and barriers to care.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, diabetic foot, patient self-management, ethnic groups, education

  10. African Primary Care Research: Performing a programme evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Dudley, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article is part of a series on Primary Care Research in the African context and focuses on programme evaluation. Different types of programme evaluation are outlined: developmental, process, outcome and impact. Eight steps to follow in designing your programme evaluation are then described in some detail: engage stakeholders; establish what is known; describe the programme; define the evaluation and select a study design; define the indicators; plan and manage data collection an...

  11. Awareness and practices of foot self-care in patients with diabetes at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-25

    Jan 25, 2013 ... Schmidt S, Mayer H, Panfil EM. Diabetes foot self-care practices in the German population. J Clin Nurs. 2008;17(21): 2920-2926. 16. Jayaprakash P, Bhanseli A, Dutta P, Anatharaman R. Magnitude of foot problems in diabetes in developing world: a study of 1044 patients. Diabet Med. 2009;26(9):939-942.

  12. Social Media as a Platform for Information About Diabetes Foot Care: A Study of Facebook Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, Tasnima; Al Mamun, Mohammad; Lasker, Mohammad A A; Ahmed, Syed Walid; Shommu, Nusrat; Rumana, Nahid; Turin, Tanvir C

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes is one of the most challenging chronic health conditions in the current era. Diabetes-related foot problems need proper patient education, and social media could a play role to disseminate proper information. A systematic search was performed on Facebook groups using the key words "diabetes foot care", "diabetes foot", "diabetes foot management" and "podiatric care". The search resulted in 57 groups and detailed activity information was collected from those groups. Usefulness of each relevant post was determined. Regression analysis was performed to explore the factors associated with the level of usefulness of diabetes foot care-related Facebook groups. Our search resulted in a total of 16 eligible diabetes foot care-related Facebook groups with a total of 103 eligible posts. The average number of group members for the selected groups were 265.75 with an interquartile range of 3.5-107.75. Of the total 103 timeline posts, 45.6% posts were categorized as useful, while the remaining posts were not useful. Top mentioned diabetes foot care practice was "Checking feet daily". Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that the level of usefulness of diabetes foot care-related Facebook groups were significantly associated with the type of posts and no association was found with presence of "likes" and presence of comment. Facebook being a widely used social networking system, patient welfare organizations, doctors, nurses and podiatrists could use this platform to provide support to educating diabetes patients and their caregivers by disseminating useful and authentic knowledge and information related to diabetes foot care. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A shift in priority in diabetic foot care and research: 75% of foot ulcers are preventable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration poses a heavy burden on the patient and the healthcare system, but prevention thereof receives little attention. For every euro spent on ulcer prevention, ten are spent on ulcer healing, and for every randomized controlled trial conducted on prevention, ten are conducted on

  14. Improving diabetic foot care in a nurse-managed safety-net clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joann M; Virden, Mary D

    2013-05-01

    This article is a description of the development and implementation of a Comprehensive Diabetic Foot Care Program and assessment tool in an academically affiliated nurse-managed, multidisciplinary, safety-net clinic. The assessment tool parallels parameters identified in the Task Force Foot Care Interest Group of the American Diabetes Association's report published in 2008, "Comprehensive Foot Examination and Risk Assessment." Review of literature, Silver City Health Center's (SCHC) 2009 Annual Report, retrospective chart review. Since the full implementation of SCHC's Comprehensive Diabetic Foot Care Program, there have been no hospitalizations of clinic patients for foot-related complications. The development of the Comprehensive Diabetic Foot Assessment tool and the implementation of the Comprehensive Diabetic Foot Care Program have resulted in positive outcomes for the patients in a nurse-managed safety-net clinic. This article demonstrates that quality healthcare services can successfully be developed and implemented in a safety-net clinic setting. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. Podiatric care for diabetic patients with foot problems: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, P.M.; Dekker, J.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Dekker, E.; Bakker, K.; Dooren, J.; Rauwerda, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe podiatric care for diabetic patients with foot problems and to explore the changes in knowledge, self-care behaviour and physical functioning after podiatric care. the treatment characteristics of 26 diabetic patients referred to podiatry were assessed. Prior

  16. Impact of health-care accessibility and social deprivation on diabetes related foot disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leese, G P; Feng, Z; Leese, R M; Dibben, C; Emslie-Smith, A

    2013-04-01

    To determine whether geography and/or social deprivation influences the occurrence of foot ulcers or amputations in patients with diabetes. A population-based cohort of people with diabetes (n = 15 983) were identified between 2004 and 2006. Community and hospital data on diabetes care, podiatry care and onset of ulceration and amputation was linked using a unique patient identifier, which is used for all patient contacts with health-care professionals. Postcode was used to calculate social deprivation and distances to general practice and hospital care. Over 3 years' follow-up 670 patients with diabetes developed new foot ulcers (42 per 1000) and 99 proceeded to amputation (6 per 1000). The most deprived quintile had a 1.7-fold (95% CI 1.2-2.3) increased risk of developing a foot ulcer. Distance from general practitioner or hospital clinic and lack of attendance at community retinal screening did not predict foot ulceration or amputation. Previous ulcer (OR 15.1, 95% CI 11.6-19.6), insulin use (OR 2.7, 95% CI 2.1-3.5), absent foot pulses (5.9: 4.7-7.5) and impaired monofilament sensation (OR 6.5, 95% CI 5.0-8.4) all predicted foot ulceration. Previous foot ulcer, absent pulses and impaired monofilaments also predicted amputation. Social deprivation is an important factor, especially for the development of foot ulcers. Geographical aspects such as accessibility to the general practitioner or hospital clinic are not associated with foot ulceration or amputation in this large UK cohort study. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  17. An Eye Care Outreach Programme in the Federal Capital Territory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To describe an eye care outreach programme in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) and the findings therefrom. Main Outcome Measures: Causes of blindness and ocular morbidity, prevalence of blindness. Methods: The programme was sponsored largely by the Bartimaeus Trust. Eighteen communities with a ...

  18. Infection and Foot Care in Diabetics Seeking Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Bhubaneswar, Odisha State, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem that can cause a number of serious complications. Foot ulceration is one of its most common complications. Poor foot care knowledge and practices are important risk factors for foot problems among diabetics. The present study was undertaken in the diabetes outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital to assess the practices regarding foot care in diabetes, find out the determinants of foot ulcer in diabetics, and offer suggestions to improve care. After informed consent, a total of 124 diabetics were interviewed to collect all relevant information. The diabetic foot care practice responses were converted into scores and for the sake of analysis were inferred as poor (0–5, fair (6-7, and good (>7 practices. Of the study population, 68.5% (85/124 consisted of men. The disease was diagnosed within the last 5 years for 66% (81/124 of the study participants. Of the study subjects, 83% (103/124 were on oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs, 15.3% (19 on insulin, and 2 on diet control only. Among them about 18.5% had a history of foot ulcer. 37.9% reported using special slippers, 12% diabetics used slippers indoors, and 66.9% used slippers while using toilet. Of the study subjects, 67.8% said that feet should be inspected daily. 27.4% said they regularly applied oil/moisturizer on their feet. There is a need on part of the primary or secondary physician and an active participation of the patient to receive education about foot care as well as awareness regarding risk factors, recognition, clinical evaluation, and thus prevention of the complications of diabetes.

  19. [Preparation and antimicrobial effect of aromatic, natural and bacteriostatic foot wash with skin care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Su-Hua; Zhao, Guo-Xiang; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Ling-Ling

    2013-06-01

    To prepare the aromatic, natural and bacteriostatic foot wash with skin care and research the inhibition effect on the different bacteria and pathogenic fungus which cause dermatophytosis. It was prepared by using Sophoraflavescens and Dictamnus dasycarpus as materials with the addition of Aloe extract, essential oil, surfactant, etc. The antifungal and antibacterial activity was researched by the levitation liquid quantitative method. The foot wash smelled faintly scent. The use of this product can produce a rich foam. The inhibitory rate were all more than 90%. The preparation process of the foot wash was simple. It has obviously bacteriostatic and fungistatic effect.

  20. Foot care knowledge and practices and the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy among people with diabetes attending a secondary care rural hospital in southern India

    OpenAIRE

    Hanu George; P S Rakesh; Manjunath Krishna; Reginald Alex; Vinod Joseph Abraham; Kuryan George; Jasmin H Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a multifaceted disease and foot ulceration is one of its most common complications. Poor foot care knowledge and practices are important risk factors for foot problems among people with diabetes. Aims: To assess the knowledge and practices regarding foot care and to estimate the proportion of people with peripheral neuropathy among people with diabetes. Settings and Design: The cross-sectional study was conducted in 212 consecutive diabetes patients attending ...

  1. National infection prevention and control programmes: Endorsing quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempliuk, Valeska; Ramon-Pardo, Pilar; Holder, Reynaldo

    2014-01-01

    Core components Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In addition to pain and suffering, HAIs increase the cost of health care and generates indirect costs from loss of productivity for patients and society as a whole. Since 2005, the Pan American Health Organization has provided support to countries for the assessment of their capacities in infection prevention and control (IPC). More than 130 hospitals in 18 countries were found to have poor IPC programmes. However, in the midst of many competing health priorities, IPC programmes are not high on the agenda of ministries of health, and the sustainability of national programmes is not viewed as a key point in making health care systems more consistent and trustworthy. Comprehensive IPC programmes will enable countries to reduce the mobility, mortality and cost of HAIs and improve quality of care. This paper addresses the relevance of national infection prevention and control (NIPC) programmes in promoting, supporting and reinforcing IPC interventions at the level of hospitals. A strong commitment from national health authorities in support of national IPC programmes is crucial to obtaining a steady decrease of HAIs, lowering health costs due to HAIs and ensuring safer care.

  2. "They just scraped off the calluses": a mixed methods exploration of foot care access and provision for people with rheumatoid arthritis in south-western Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Gordon J; Gibson, Kathryn A; Pile, Kevin; Taylor, Luke; Du Toit, Verona; Burns, Joshua; Rome, Keith

    2013-08-13

    There is little indication that foot health services in Australia are meeting modern day recommendations for Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients. The overall objective of this study was to explore the current state of foot health services for patients with RA with an emphasis on identifying barriers to the receipt of appropriate foot care in South-West Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. A mixed (quantitative and qualitative) approach was adopted. Indications for appropriate access to foot care were determined by comparing the foot health, disease and socio-demographic characteristics of patients with unmet foot care demands, foot care users and patients with no demands for foot care. Perceptions of provision of, and access to, foot care were explored by conducting telephone-based interviews using an interpretative phenomenology approach with thematic analysis. Twenty-nine participants took part in the cross-sectional quantitative research study design, and 12 participants took part in the interpretative phenomenological approach (qualitative study). Foot care access appeared to be driven predominantly by the presence of rearfoot deformity, which was significantly worse amongst participants in the foot care user group (p = 0.02). Five main themes emerged from the qualitative data: 1) impact of disease-related foot symptoms, 2) footwear difficulties, 3) medical/rheumatology encounters, 4) foot and podiatry care access and experiences, and 5) financial hardship. Foot care provision does not appear to be driven by appropriate foot health characteristics such as foot pain or foot-related disability. There may be significant shortfalls in footwear and foot care access and provision in Greater Western Sydney. Several barriers to adequate foot care access and provision were identified and further efforts are required to improve access to and the quality of foot care for people who have RA. Integration of podiatry services within rheumatology centres could resolve unmet

  3. The Guyana Diabetes and Foot Care Project: Improved Diabetic Foot Evaluation Reduces Amputation Rates by Two-Thirds in a Lower Middle Income Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, R. Gary; Martin, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background. Type 2 diabetes is the fourth leading cause of death in Guyana, South America. A complex, interprofessional, quality improvement intervention to improve foot and diabetes care was rolled out in two phases. Methods & Findings. Phase 1: Establishment of an Interprofessional Diabetic Foot Center (DFC) of Excellence to improve foot care and reduce diabetes-related amputations at the national referral hospital. Phase 2: Regionalization to cover 90% of the Guyanese population and expansion to include improved management of diabetes and hypertension. Fourteen key opinion leaders were educated and 340 health care professionals from 97 facilities trained. Eight centers for the evaluation and treatment of foot ulcers were established and 7567 people with diabetes evaluated. 3452 participants had foot screening and 48% were deemed high risk; 10% of these had undocumented foot ulcers. There was a 68% reduction in rate of major amputations (P diabetes with women (F/M = 2.09) and increased risk of major amputation in men [odds ratio 2.16 (95% CI 1.83, 2.56)] were documented. Conclusions. This intervention improved foot care with reduction in major amputations sustained over 5 years. PMID:26089901

  4. Geriatric Foot Care: A Model Educational Program for Mid-Level Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Patricia K.; Krissak, Ruth; Caruso, Frank; Teasdall, Robert

    2002-01-01

    An educational program on geriatric foot care was completed by 59 nurse practitioners, 12 physicians' assistants, and 1 physician. The 3 1/2 day program included interactive sessions, observation, and hands-on patient care. Posttest results and 6-month follow-up showed significant knowledge increases and incorporation of learning into practice.…

  5. Physician education programme improves quality of diabetes care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To determine if a physician education programme and a structured consultation schedule would improve the quality of diabetes patient care in a diabetes clinic. Setting. Two tertiary care diabetes clinics at Kalafong Hospital, Pretoria. Study design. Quasi-experimental controlled before-and-after study. Methods.

  6. Impact of a diabetic foot care education program on lower limb amputation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Wahbi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah M Al-WahbiDepartment of Surgery, King Abdulaziz Medical City and King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyahd, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: Diabetic foot complications are a leading cause of lower extremity amputation. With the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in the Arab world, specifically in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the rate of amputation will rise significantly. A diabetic foot care program was implemented at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in 2002. The program was directed at health care staff and patients to increase their awareness about diabetic foot care and prevention of complications. The purpose of this study was to perform a primary evaluation of the program’s impact on the rate of lower extremity amputation due to diabetic foot complications.Method: This pilot study was the first analysis of the diabetic foot care program and examined two groups of participants for comparison, ie, a “before” group having had diabetic foot ulcers managed between 1983, when the hospital was first established, and 2002 when the program began and an “after group” having had foot ulcers managed between 2002 and 2004, in the program’s initial phase. A total of 41 charts were randomly chosen retrospectively. A data sheet containing age, gender, medical data, and the presentation, management, and outcome of diabetic foot cases was used for the analysis.Results: The before group contained 20 patients (17 males and the after group contained 21 patients (16 males. There was no difference between the two groups with regard to age and comorbidities. The rate of amputation was 70% in the before group and 61.9% in the after group. There was a decrease in the percentage of toe amputation in the after group and an increase in the percentage of below-knee amputation in the before group. However, these changes were not significant.Conclusion: The program, although evaluated at an early

  7. Differences in foot self-care and lifestyle between men and women with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Angela Rossaneis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate differences with regard to foot self-care and lifestyle between men and women with diabetes mellitus. Method: cross-sectional study conducted in a sample of 1,515 individuals with diabetes mellitus aged 40 years old or older. Poisson regression models were used to identity differences in foot self-care deficit and lifestyle between sexes, adjusting for socioeconomic and clinical characteristics, smoking and alcohol consumption. Results: foot self-care deficit, characterized by not regularly drying between toes; not regularly checking feet; walking barefoot; poor hygiene and inappropriately trimmed nails, was significantly higher among men, though men presented a lower prevalence of feet scaling and use of inappropriate shoes when compared to women. With regard to lifestyle, men presented less healthy habits, such as not adhering to a proper diet and taking laboratory exams to check for lipid profile at the frequency recommended. Conclusion: the nursing team should take into account gender differences concerning foot self-care and lifestyle when implementing educational activities and interventions intended to decrease risk factors for foot ulceration.

  8. Foot Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... straight across and not too short Your foot health can be a clue to your overall health. For example, joint stiffness could mean arthritis. Tingling ... foot checks are an important part of your health care. If you have foot problems, be sure ...

  9. Effectivity of Foot Care Education Program in Improving Knowledge, Self-Efficacy and Foot Care Behavior of Diabetes Mellitus Patients in Banjarbaru, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdalena Mahdalena

    2016-11-01

    Masalah kaki diabetik di Indonesia masih merupakan masalah besar dan masih memerlukan perhatian yang optimal. Edukasi perawatan kaki adalah salah satu upaya yang harus dilakukan dalam mencegah masalah kaki untuk pasien diabetes melitus. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis efektivitas program pendidikan perawatan kaki dalam meningkatkan pengetahuan, efikasi diri, dan perilaku perawatan kaki pasien diabetes di wilayah Banjarbaru. Jenis penelitian yang digunakan adalah quasi experimental dengan prepost test, dilakukan di puskesmas wilayah Banjarbaru tahun 2013. Kelompok intervensi diberikan program pendidikan perawatan kaki. Sampel berjumlah 48 pasien (32 orang kelompok intervensi dan 16 orang kelompok kontrol menggunakan teknik purposive sampling. Variabel yang diukur adalah pengetahuan, efikasi diri, dan perilaku perawatan kaki pasien diabetes melitus. Perlakuan yang diberikan pada responden berupa pendidikan kesehatan tentang perawatan kaki sebanyak dua kali. Setiap variabel diukur dua kali sebelum dan setelah intervensi. Uji pengetahuan diukur menggunakan Diabetic Foot Care Knowledge Questionnaire, efikasi diri diukur menggunakan Foot Care Confident Scale Self-Efficacy, dan perilaku perawatan kaki dinilai menggunakan Behavior Foot Care Questionnaire. Analisis data menggunakan Manova. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan perbedaan yang signifikan pada tingkat pengetahuan (nilai p = 0,001, efikasi diri (nilai p = 0,000 dan perilaku perawatan kaki (nilai p = 0,000 sebelum dan setelah intervensi.

  10. The Care Accelerator R&D Programme in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Napoly, O.; Aleksan, A.; Devred, A.; den Ouden, A.

    CARE, an ambitious and coordinated programme of accelerator research and developments oriented towards high energy physics projects, has been launched in January 2004 by the main European laboratories and the European Commission. This project aims at improving existing infrastructures dedicated to

  11. Clinical profile and management outcome of diabetic foot ulcers in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, K.; Akhtar, T.; Talib, A.; Naqvi, I.H.

    2008-01-01

    To determine major risk factors and management outcome of diabetic foot ulcers in order to prevent amputation. One-hundred and sixteen consecutive diabetic patients, with foot ulcers of Wagner's grade 1 to 4 were assessed at baseline for demographic information, detailed history, neuropathy, peripheral pulses and frequency of diabetic complication. Glycemic control was determined on the basis of HbA1c levels. Appropriate medical and surgical treatments were carried out and patients were followed-up until healing or for 6 months as end point of study. Outcome was recorded as healed, incomplete healing and amputated. Results: A majority of subjects had type 2 diabetes (95.7%) with male predominance (66%). The mean age was 54.29 +- 7.71 years. Most of the patients were overweight, hyperglycemic and had diabetes > 10 years duration. Neuropathic ulcers were found in 91 (78.4%) patients, while rest of the 25 (22.6 %) had neuroischemic ulcers. Wound cultures revealed polymicrobial organisms. Foot ulcers of 89 (77.7%) patients healed without amputation and 17 (14.7%) patients had minor or major amputations. Long-duration of diabetes, poor glycemic control and type of foot ulcers had effect on prognosis (p<0.05). Effective glycemic control, optimal wound care, aggressive medical management and timely surgical intervention may decrease disabling morbidity with better outcome of diabetic foot ulcer. (author)

  12. Health locus of control and self-care behaviors in diabetic foot patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abredari, Hamid; Bolourchifard, Fariba; Rassouli, Maryam; Nasiri, Navideh; Taher, Mohammad; Abedi, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot affects more than 25% of diabetic patients and finally up to 20% of cases result in amputation. The most important factor resulting in severe complications or even death is lack of self-care. Health locus of control has been introduced as one of health factors and predicting factors of self-care. This research was performed for analyzing the correlation between self-care behaviors and health locus of control in diabetic foot patients. In this descriptive study, 120 patients with diabetic foot were chosen using convenience sampling from endocrine clinic and wards of endocrine and vascular surgery of Teleqani Hospital of Shahid Beheshti Medical University. The data were gathered by demographic, self-care behavior, and health locus of control questionnaires. The t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and spearman coefficient were used to analyze the data. RESULTS of this research showed that there is a direct and significant relation between selfcare behaviors and internal health locus of control (plocus of control (plocus of control improve and strengthen patients' self-care behaviors and their involvement in treatment.

  13. Knowledge and Practice of Diabetic Foot Care in an InPatient Setting at a Tertiary Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Muhammad-Lutfi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Good knowledge and practice regarding diabetic foot care will reduce the risk of diabetic foot complications and ultimately amputation. This study is conducted to assess patients’ knowledge and compliance of diabetic foot care. A cross sectional study performed on patients who were admitted to HSNZ from the 1st September 2013 to 30th April 2014 for diabetic foot infections. They were interviewed with a questionnaire of 15 ‘yes’ or ‘no’ questions on foot care knowledge and practice. Score of 1 was given for each ‘yes’ answer. The level of knowledge and practice, whether good or poor, was determined based on the median score of each category. The result was tested using a chi-square test in SPSS version 17. A total of 157 patients were included in this study with a mean age of 56.33 years (31-77. There were 72 male (45.9% and 85 female (54.1% patients with the majority of them being Malays (154 patients, 98.1%. Majority of the patients (58% had poor foot care knowledge while 97 patients (61.8% had poor diabetic foot care practice as compared to the median score. Based on the chi square test of relatedness, there was no significant association between knowledge and practice with any of the variables. In conclusion, the majority of patients admitted for diabetic foot infections had poor knowledge and practice of diabetic foot care. Education regarding foot care strategies should be emphasized and empowered within the diabetic population

  14. The CARE accelerator R&D programme in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    Napoly, Olivier; den Ouden, Andres; Devred, Arnaud; Garoby, Roland; Garvey, Terence; Ghigo, Andrea; Gschwendtner, Edda; Losito, Roberto; Mais, Helmut; Palladino, V; Proch, Dieter; Richard, F; Rinolfi, Louis; Ruggiero, Francesco; Scandale, Walter; Schulte, Daniel; Vretenar, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    CARE, an ambitious and coordinated programme of accelerator research and developments oriented towards high energy physics projects, has been launched in January 2004 by the main European laboratories and the European Commission. This project aims at improving existing infrastructures dedicated to future projects such as linear colliders, upgrades of hadron colliders and high intensity proton drivers. We describe the CARE R&D plans, mostly devoted to advancing the performance of the superconducting technology, both in the fields of RF cavities for electron or proton acceleration and of high field magnets, as well as to developing high intensity electron and proton injectors. We highlight some results and progress obtained so far.

  15. Mobile phone text messaging to improve knowledge and practice of diabetic foot care in a developing country: Feasibility and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Zeinab M

    2017-06-01

    To test the feasibility and effectiveness of using mobile phone text messaging to reinforce learning and the practice of diabetic foot care in a developing country. Ongoing learning reinforcement (2-3 times weekly) by text messaging followed an informal class on diabetic foot care in a community clinic setting. Subjects with cell phone access and no history of diabetic foot wounds or current wounds were recruited for participation (N = 225). Foot examinations and pretesting by survey occurred just before patients departed the clinic; the posttest survey and a final foot examination occurred 12 weeks later. The survey included basic demographic items along with items to measure knowledge and current foot care practices. One sample t tests (raw scores) and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared knowledge and practice before and after intervention. Initially, a majority of the sample (76%) reported poor levels of foot care. After 12 weeks text messaging is an economical, feasible, and effective method for educators to improve diabetic self-care, even in a developing country. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Construction of elderly identity within an education programme for care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    , the paper focuses on how elderly identity is constructed within an adult basic education programme in the social and health care sector in Denmark. The programme being involved is for adults who would like to work in the social and health care sector at a basic level; the programme consists of theoretical...... an educational research project; however as the programme being studied is withinThe Basic Social and Health Education Programmes in Denmark, Elderly Identity is an important subtheme....

  17. Pervasive Home Care - Technological support for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Bo

    2006-01-01

    of the patient in collaboration with patient and home care clinicians. My main research method has been qualitative analysis of the empirical results generated during an experimental project using Participatory Design (PD) to investigate potential futures in the treatment of patients with diabetic foot ulcers...... the need arises for moving treatment and care involving specialised knowledge from the hospital to the home. In this dissertation I use the term Home Care" for the multidisciplinary investigation of how this movement can be supported with technology enabling the expert to carry on a treatment in the home...... approach that I outline in this dissertation. Furthermore I describe the results of the project contributing to three related scientific fields: home care technologies, telemedicine and computer supported cooperative work (CSCW). The main conclusion towards home care technologies is that the many visionary...

  18. Competing in value-based health care: keys to winning the foot race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Kamran S; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Ellis, Scott J

    2014-05-01

    The US health care system is transitioning to a value-based model of health care in which providers will be rewarded for delivering services that achieve excellent clinical outcomes with efficient cost utilization. The concept of "value" in health care (defined as health outcomes achieved per dollar spent) is rapidly spreading as physicians and health systems brace for the paradigm shift from "fee-for-volume" to "fee-for-value" reimbursement. What constitutes good value versus poor value in health care remains nebulous at this time. Various specialties across medicine and within orthopaedics are seeking to better demonstrate value delivered to patients, payers, and policy makers. The objective of this article is to develop a framework for defining and measuring value in foot and ankle surgery. In this new era of health care, we believe that a working knowledge of value and its determinants will be imperative for foot and ankle surgeons to unify research and quality improvement efforts so as to demonstrate the value of services rendered within the subspecialty. Level V, expert opinion.

  19. Losing connections and receiving support to reconnect: experiences of frail older people within care programmes implemented in primary care settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, J.; Cox, K.; De La Haye, J.; Mevissen, G.; Heijing, S.; van Schayck, O.C.P.; Widdershoven, G.; Abma, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate whether care provided in the care programmes matched the needs of older people. Background: Care programmes were implemented in primary-care settings in the Netherlands to identify frail older people and to prevent further

  20. Foot care knowledge and practices and the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy among people with diabetes attending a secondary care rural hospital in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Hanu; Rakesh, Ps; Krishna, Manjunath; Alex, Reginald; Abraham, Vinod Joseph; George, Kuryan; Prasad, Jasmin H

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multifaceted disease and foot ulceration is one of its most common complications. Poor foot care knowledge and practices are important risk factors for foot problems among people with diabetes. To assess the knowledge and practices regarding foot care and to estimate the proportion of people with peripheral neuropathy among people with diabetes. The cross-sectional study was conducted in 212 consecutive diabetes patients attending the out-patient department of a rural secondary care hospital. A questionnaire which included demographic details, knowledge questionnaire, and Nottingham assessment of functional foot care was administered. The Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument was used to identify peripheral neuropathy. Descriptive analysis with frequency distribution for knowledge and practice scores, univariate analysis, and multiple logistic regressions to find significant variables associated with good knowledge and practice scores. About 75% had good knowledge score and 67% had good foot care practice score. Male gender (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.16-4.79), poor education status (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.19-4.28), and lesser duration of diabetes (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.15-4.41) were significantly associated with poor knowledge on foot care. Poor knowledge was associated with poor foot care practices (OR 3.43, 95% CI 1.75-6.72). The prevalence of neuropathy was 47% (95% CI 40.14-53.85) and it was associated with longer duration of the disease (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.18-4.04). There exist deficiencies in knowledge and practices regarding foot care. Male gender, low education, and lesser duration of diabetes are associated with poor knowledge scores. The prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is high.

  1. Foot care knowledge and practices and the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy among people with diabetes attending a secondary care rural hospital in southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanu George

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a multifaceted disease and foot ulceration is one of its most common complications. Poor foot care knowledge and practices are important risk factors for foot problems among people with diabetes. Aims: To assess the knowledge and practices regarding foot care and to estimate the proportion of people with peripheral neuropathy among people with diabetes. Settings and Design: The cross-sectional study was conducted in 212 consecutive diabetes patients attending the out-patient department of a rural secondary care hospital Materials and Methods: A questionnaire which included demographic details, knowledge questionnaire, and Nottingham assessment of functional foot care was administered. The Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument was used to identify peripheral neuropathy. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analysis with frequency distribution for knowledge and practice scores, univariate analysis, and multiple logistic regressions to find significant variables associated with good knowledge and practice scores. Results: About 75% had good knowledge score and 67% had good foot care practice score. Male gender (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.16-4.79, poor education status (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.19-4.28, and lesser duration of diabetes (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.15-4.41 were significantly associated with poor knowledge on foot care. Poor knowledge was associated with poor foot care practices (OR 3.43, 95% CI 1.75-6.72. The prevalence of neuropathy was 47% (95% CI 40.14-53.85 and it was associated with longer duration of the disease (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.18-4.04. Conclusion: There exist deficiencies in knowledge and practices regarding foot care. Male gender, low education, and lesser duration of diabetes are associated with poor knowledge scores. The prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is high.

  2. Developing consumer involvement in rural HIV primary care programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamary, Edward M; Toevs, Kim; Burnworth, Karla B; Becker, Lin

    2004-06-01

    As part of a broader medical and psychosocial needs assessment in a rural region of northern California, USA, five focus groups were conducted to explore innovative approaches to creating a system of consumer involvement in the delivery of HIV primary care services in the region. A total of five focus groups (n = 30) were conducted with clients from three of five counties in the region with the highest number of HIV patients receiving primary care. Participants were recruited by their HIV case managers. They were adults living with HIV, who were receiving health care, and who resided in a rural mountain region of northern California. Group discussions explored ideas for new strategies and examined traditional methods of consumer involvement, considering ways they could be adapted for a rural environment. Recommendations for consumer involvement included a multi-method approach consisting of traditional written surveys, a formal advisory group, and monthly consumer led social support/informal input groups. Specific challenges discussed included winter weather conditions, transportation barriers, physical limitations, confidentiality concerns, and needs for social support and education. A multiple-method approach would ensure more comprehensive consumer involvement in the programme planning process. It is also evident that methods for incorporating consumer involvement must be adapted to the specific context and circumstances of a given programme.

  3. Complications and nursing care in interventional treatment of diabetic foot via radial artery access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lingyun; Zhou Xiaoxiang; Zeng Yongmei; Chen Junfei; Lai Lisha; Pang Pengfei; Zhu Kangshun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of interventional treatment via radial artery access for diabetic foot and to summarize its complications and nursing care. Methods: The interventional treatment via radial artery access was performed in twenty patients with diabetic foot. The preoperative psychological nursing care, the nursing of the punctured site of radial artery and the indwelling catheter, the complications of the puncture site and thrombolytic therapy were reviewed and retrospectively analyzed. Results: Some complications occurred in eight cases, including hematoma at puncture site (n= 1), oozing of blood (n=3), gingival bleeding (n=1) and pain (n=3). No retention of urine or infection occurred. Conclusion: It is very important to pay enough attention to the nursing care of puncture site and indwelling catheter sheath and to make a close observation of patient's condition in order to reduce the occurrence of complications. Rich clinical experience and careful observation after the operation can definitely reduce the occurrence of thrombolytic complications and improve the patient's living quality. (authors)

  4. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Foot Care in the Management of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Toupin-April, Karine; Wells, George; Smith, Christine A; Pugh, Arlanna G; Stinson, Jennifer N; Duffy, Ciarán M; Gifford, Wendy; Moher, David; Sherrington, Catherine; Cavallo, Sabrina; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne; Rahman, Prinon; Marcotte, Rachel; Taki, Jade; Bisaillon, Jacinthe; King, Judy; Coda, Andrea; Hendry, Gordon J; Gauvreau, Julie; Hayles, Martin; Hayles, Kay; Feldman, Brian; Kenny, Glen P; Li, Jing Xian; Briggs, Andrew M; Martini, Rose; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann; Maltais, Désirée B; Tupper, Susan; Bigford, Sarah; Bisch, Marg

    2016-07-01

    To create evidence-based guidelines evaluating foot care interventions for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). An electronic literature search of the following databases from database inception to May 2015 was conducted: MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), Cochrane CENTRAL, and clinicaltrials.gov. The Ottawa Panel selection criteria targeted studies that assessed foot care or foot orthotic interventions for the management of JIA in those aged 0 to ≤18 years. The Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale was used to evaluate study quality, of which only high-quality studies were included (score, ≥5). A total of 362 records were screened, resulting in 3 full-text articles and 1 additional citation containing supplementary information included for the analysis. Two reviewers independently extracted study data (intervention, comparator, outcome, time period, study design) from the included studies by using standardized data extraction forms. Directed by Cochrane Collaboration methodology, the statistical analysis produced figures and graphs representing the strength of intervention outcomes and their corresponding grades (A, B, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-). Clinical significance was achieved when an improvement of ≥30% between the intervention and control groups was present, whereas P>.05 indicated statistical significance. An expert panel Delphi consensus (≥80%) was required for the endorsement of recommendations. All included studies were of high quality and analyzed the effects of multidisciplinary foot care, customized foot orthotics, and shoe inserts for the management of JIA. Custom-made foot orthotics and prefabricated shoe inserts displayed the greatest improvement in pain intensity, activity limitation, foot pain, and disability reduction (grades A, C+). The use of customized foot orthotics and prefabricated shoe inserts seems to be a good choice for managing foot pain and function in JIA. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation

  5. Cognitive representations of peripheral neuropathy and self-reported foot-care behaviour of people at high risk of diabetes-related foot complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrin, B. M.; Swerissen, H.; Payne, C. B.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the cognitive representations of peripheral neuropathy and self-reported foot-care behaviour in an Australian sample of people with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. Methods: This cross-sectional study was undertaken with 121 participants with diabetes...... and peripheral neuropathy. Cognitive representations of peripheral neuropathy were measured by the Patients' Interpretation of Neuropathy questionnaire and two aspects of self-foot-care behaviour were measured using a self-report questionnaire. Hierarchical cluster analysis using the average linkage method...... was used to identify distinct illness schemata related to peripheral neuropathy. Results: Three clusters of participants were identified who exhibited distinct illness schemata related to peripheral neuropathy. One cluster had more misperceptions about the nature of peripheral neuropathy, one cluster...

  6. Association of British Clinical Diabetologists (ABCD): survey of specialist diabetes care services in the UK, 2000. 3. Podiatry services and related foot care issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winocour, P H; Morgan, J; Ainsworth, A; Williams, D R R

    2002-07-01

    To examine the provision of, and variations in, podiatry and other services for diabetic foot care in the UK. A postal survey of secondary care providers of diabetes services in the UK in 2000. Following two reminders a 77% response rate was achieved. The responses indicated that 97% had a state-registered podiatrist attached to the service, providing three (median) sessions each week for diabetes care, although only 44% had availability at all diabetic clinics, and only 3% had availability at paediatric diabetic services. Podiatry access at all diabetic clinics increased the likelihood of associated preventative as opposed to reactive ('trouble shooting') care (P podiatry input to patient education was common (84%), only 6% had received formal training in education. Guidelines and strategies for management of active foot problems were available in 50-74% of cases. Orthotic input was highly variable, and absent in 15% of responses. Podiatrist fitting and application of foot protective apparatus was only recorded in 22-61% of responses. Access to isotopic and/or MR foot imaging and peripheral angiography and angioplasty was recorded in 75-83% of responses. Separate specialist foot clinics were available in 49%, and where this was the case the use of newer foot ulcer healing applications was higher (P podiatry support to diabetes care over the last 10 years, the level of access and the nature of the services provided is much less than recommended in many advisory documents. The strategy of a co-ordinated 'team' approach to foot care still takes place in less than 50% of centres. There are clear regional differences in diabetes foot care services. Both providers and purchasers of diabetes services may not have given sufficient attention to this area, given the relatively small number of documented bids for service improvements in this area, and the very low success rate of such bids.

  7. Enhancing health care non-technical skills: the TINSELS programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Morris; Box, Helen; Halliwell, Jo-Anne; Farrell, Michael; Parker, Linda; Stewart, Alison

    2015-12-01

    Training in 'non-technical skills', i.e. social (communication and teamwork) and cognitive (analytical and personal behaviour) skills, in health care have been of great interest over the last decade. Whereas the majority of publications focus on 'whether' such education can be successful, they overlook 'how' they enhance skills. We designed and piloted a theoretically robust teaching package that addresses non-technical skills in the context of medicine safety through simulation-based interprofessional learning: the Training In Non-technical Skills to Enhance Levels of Medicines Safety (TINSELS) programme. A modified Delphi process was completed to identify learning outcomes, and multi-professional teams were recruited through local publicity. The faculty staff developed a three-session simulation-based intervention: firstly, a simulated ward encounter with multiple medicine-related activities; secondly, an extended debriefing and facilitated discussion; and finally, a 'chamber of horrors', where interprofessional teams identified potential sources of error. Each session was completed in the simulation suite with between six and nine participants, lasted approximately 90 minutes and took place over 2 weeks. Full details of the course will be presented to facilitate dissemination. Training in 'non-technical skills' in health care have been of great interest over the last decade Feedback was collected on a Likert scale after the course (1, strongly disagree; 5, strongly agree). Mean scores were all greater than 4, with qualitative feedback noting the fidelity of the authentic interprofessional groups. A previously validated safety attitudes questionnaire found changes in attitudes towards handover of care and perceptions of safety in the workplace. An original, simulation-based, multi-professional training programme has been developed with learning and assessment materials available for widespread replication. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Content, participants and outcomes of three diabetes care programmes in three low and middle income countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olmen, J. van; Ku, G.M.; Darras, C.; Kalobu, J.C.; Bewa, E.; Pelt, M. van; Hen, H.; Acker, K. van; Eggermont, N.; Schellevis, F.; Kegels, G.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To improve access and quality of diabetes care for people in low-income countries, it is important to understand which elements of diabetes care are effective. This paper analyses three diabetes care programmes in the DR Congo, Cambodia and the Philippines. Methods: Three programmes offering

  9. Content, participants and outcomes of three diabetes care programmes in three low and middle income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Olmen, J.; Marie, K.G.; Christian, D.; Clovis, K.J.; Emery, B.; Maurits, V.P.; Heang, H.; Kristien, V.A.; Natalie, E.; Francois, S.; Guy, K.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To improve access and quality of diabetes care for people in low-income countries, it is important to understand which elements of diabetes care are effective. This paper analyses three diabetes care programmes in the DR Congo, Cambodia and the Philippines. Methods Three programmes offering

  10. Sustaining quality in the community: trends in the performance of a structured diabetes care programme in primary care over 16 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, F; McHugh, S M; Harkins, V; Marsden, P; Kearney, P M

    2018-04-29

    To examine the quality of care delivered by a structured primary care-led programme for people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus in 1999-2016. The Midland Diabetes Structured Care Programme provides structured primary care-led management. Trends over time in care processes were examined (using a chi-squared trend test and age- and gender-adjusted logistic regression). Screening and annual review attendance were reviewed. A composite of eight National Institute for Health and Care Excellence-recommended processes was used as a quality indicator. Participants who were referred to diabetes nurse specialists were compared with those not referred (Student's t-test, Pearson's chi-squared test, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test). Proportions achieving outcome targets [HbA 1c ≤58 mmol/mol (7.5%), blood pressure ≤140/80 mmHg, cholesterol diabetes aged ≥18 years: 1998/1999 (n=336); 2003 (n=843); 2008 (n=988); and 2016 (n=1029). Recording of some processes improved significantly over time (HbA 1c , cholesterol, blood pressure, creatinine), and in 2016 exceeded 97%. Foot assessment and annual review attendance declined. In 2016, only 29% of participants had all eight National Institute for Health and Care Excellence processes recorded. A higher proportion of people with diabetes who were referred to a diabetes nurse specialist had poor glycaemic control compared with those not referred. The proportions meeting blood pressure and lipid targets increased over time. Structured primary care led to improvements in the quality of care over time. Poorer recording of some processes, a decline in annual review attendance, and participants remaining at high risk suggest limits to what structured care alone can achieve. Engagement in continuous quality improvement to target other factors, including attendance and self-management, may deliver further improvements. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  11. A Cyclical Approach to Continuum Modeling: A Conceptual Model of Diabetic Foot Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L. Carvour

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available “Cascade” or “continuum” models have been developed for a number of diseases and conditions. These models define the desired, successive steps in care for that disease or condition and depict the proportion of the population that has completed each step. These models may be used to compare care across subgroups or populations and to identify and evaluate interventions intended to improve outcomes on the population level. Previous cascade or continuum models have been limited by several factors. These models are best suited to processes with stepwise outcomes—such as screening, diagnosis, and treatment—with a single defined outcome (e.g., treatment or cure for each member of the population. However, continuum modeling is not well developed for complex processes with non-sequential or recurring steps or those without singular outcomes. As shown here using the example of diabetic foot care, the concept of continuum modeling may be re-envisioned with a cyclical approach. Cyclical continuum modeling may permit incorporation of non-sequential and recurring steps into a single continuum, while recognizing the presence of multiple desirable outcomes within the population. Cyclical models may simultaneously represent the distribution of clinical severity and clinical resource use across a population, thereby extending the benefits of traditional continuum models to complex processes for which population-based monitoring is desired. The models may also support communication with other stakeholders in the process of care, including health care providers and patients.

  12. Structured health care for subjects with diabetic foot ulcers results in a reduction of major amputation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objective We tested the effects of structured health care for the diabetic foot in one region in Germany aiming to reduce the number of major amputations. Research design and methods In a prospective study we investigated patients with diabetic foot in a structured system of outpatient, in-patient and rehabilitative treatment. Subjects were recruited between January 1st, 2000 and December 31, 2007. All participants underwent a two-year follow-up. The modified University of Texas Wound Classification System (UT) was the basis for documentation and data analysis. We evaluated numbers of major amputations, rates of ulcer healing and mortality. In order to compare the effect of the structured health care program with usual care in patients with diabetic foot we evaluated the same parameters at another regional hospital without interdisciplinary care of diabetic foot (controls). Results 684 patients with diabetic foot and 508 controls were investigated. At discharge from hospital 28.3% (structured health care program, SHC) vs. 23.0% (controls) of all ulcers had healed completely. 51.5% (SHC) vs. 49.8% (controls) were in UT grade 1. Major amputations were performed in 32 subjects of the structured health care program group (4.7%) vs. 110 (21.7%) in controls (p<0.0001). Mortality during hospitalization was 2.5% (SHC) vs. 9.4% in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions With the structured health care program we achieved a significant reduction of major amputation rates by more than 75% as compared to standard care. PMID:23497152

  13. Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Hobday, E, fl. 1905, artist

    2003-01-01

    A photograph of an illustrated programme listing dances. The illustration shows a snake charmer playing to a snake while another man watches. Buildings and trees can be seen behind a wall in the distance. In the lower right-hand corner of the programme is the signature 'E. Hobday'. The programme is almost certainly related to the Punjab Ball, Lahore. It is placed next to the Punjab Ball Menu in the album and the Menu is also illustrated by 'E. Hobday'.

  14. Diabetic Foot Care: Developing Culturally Appropriate Educational Tools for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Northern Territory, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jennifer; Obersteller, Elizabeth A.; Rennie, Linda; Whitbread, Cherie

    2001-01-01

    Participatory research in Australia's Northern Territory sought opinions from nurses, general practitioners, Aboriginal health workers, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders on the development of culturally relevant foot care education for Indigenous people with diabetes. They decided to use a visual approach (posters and flip charts) to…

  15. Physician education programme improves quality of diabetes care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diabetes have been compiled and circulated to health care workers, but ... studied and attempted to improve the quality of diabetes care in primary care ..... project indicators in the Indian Health Service primary care setting. Diabetes Care ...

  16. Effectiveness of combined laser-puncture and conventional wound care to accelerate diabetic foot ulcer healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiningsih Srilestari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Impaired wound healing is a common complication of diabetes. It has complex pathophysiologic mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. Our study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of combined laser-puncture and conventional wound care in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.Methods: This was a double-blind controlled randomized clinical trial on 36 patients, conducted at the Metabolic Endocrine Outpatient Clinic, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, between May and August 2015. Stimulation by laser-puncture (the treatment group or sham stimulation (the control group were performed on top of the standard wound care. Laser-puncture or sham were done on several acupuncture points i.e. LI4 Hegu, ST36 Zusanli, SP6 Sanyinjiao and KI3 Taixi bilaterally, combined with irradiation on the ulcers itself twice a week for four weeks. The mean reduction in ulcer sizes (week 2–1, week 3–1, week 4–1 were measured every week and compared between the two groups and analyzed by Mann-Whitney test.Results: The initial median ulcer size were 4.75 (0.10–9.94 cm2 and 2.33 (0.90–9.88 cm2 in laser-puncture and sham groups, respectively (p=0.027. The median reduction of ulcer size at week 2–1 was -1.079 (-3.25 to -0.09 vs -0.36 (-0.81 to -1.47 cm2, (p=0.000; at week 3–1 was -1.70 (-3.15 to -0.01 vs -0.36 (-0.80 to -0.28 cm2, (p=0.000; and at week 4–1 was -1.22 (-2.72 to 0.00 vs -0.38 (-0.74 to -0.57 cm2, (p=0.012.Conclusion: Combined laser-puncture and conventional wound care treatment are effective in accelerating the healing of diabetic foot ulcer.

  17. Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... early. Start OverDiagnosisThe cause may be FEMORAL ANTEVERSION, TIBIAL TORSION or METATARSUS ADDUCTUS, commonly called intoeing. Self CareSee your doctor. Start OverDiagnosisYou may have a STRESS FRACTURE of the bones in your foot. The pain ...

  18. Differences in foot self-care and lifestyle between men and women with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossaneis, Mariana Angela; Haddad, Maria do Carmo Fernandez Lourenço; Mathias, Thaís Aidar de Freitas; Marcon, Sonia Silva

    2016-08-15

    to investigate differences with regard to foot self-care and lifestyle between men and women with diabetes mellitus. cross-sectional study conducted in a sample of 1,515 individuals with diabetes mellitus aged 40 years old or older. Poisson regression models were used to identity differences in foot self-care deficit and lifestyle between sexes, adjusting for socioeconomic and clinical characteristics, smoking and alcohol consumption. foot self-care deficit, characterized by not regularly drying between toes; not regularly checking feet; walking barefoot; poor hygiene and inappropriately trimmed nails, was significantly higher among men, though men presented a lower prevalence of feet scaling and use of inappropriate shoes when compared to women. With regard to lifestyle, men presented less healthy habits, such as not adhering to a proper diet and taking laboratory exams to check for lipid profile at the frequency recommended. the nursing team should take into account gender differences concerning foot self-care and lifestyle when implementing educational activities and interventions intended to decrease risk factors for foot ulceration. investigar as diferenças no autocuidado com os pés e no estilo de vida entre mulheres e homens diabéticos. estudo transversal realizado com uma amostra de 1.515 diabéticos com 40 anos ou mais. Foram utilizados modelos de regressão de Poisson para identificar diferenças entre os sexos na prevalência de déficit de autocuidado com os pés e no estilo de vida, ajustando-se por características socioeconômicas, clínicas, tabagismo e alcoolismo. a prevalência de déficit de autocuidado com os pés, caracterizada por baixa frequência de secagem dos espaços interdigitais; da não avaliação periódica dos pés; do hábito de andar descalço; de higiene insatisfatória e corte inadequado de unhas foi significativamente maior entre os homens. Contudo, eles apresentaram menor prevalência na prática de escaldar os pés e no uso

  19. Newborn care practices and home-based postnatal newborn care programme – Mewat, Haryana, India, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latika Nath Sinha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, the Home Based Postnatal Newborn Care programme by Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs under the National Rural Health Mission was initiated in 2011 to reduce neonatal mortality rates (NMRs. ASHAs get cash incentives for six postnatal home visits for newborn care. We studied newborn care practices among mothers in Mewat, Haryana, having a high NMR and determined risk factors for unsafe practices and described the knowledge and skills of ASHAs during home visits. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among mothers who had delivered a child during the previous seven months using cluster sampling. We interviewed mothers and ASHAs in the selected subcentres using semi–structured questionnaires on the six safe newborn care practices, namely safe breastfeeding, keeping cord and eyes clean, wrapping baby, kangaroo care, delayed bathing and hand washing. Results: We interviewed 320 mothers, 61 ASHAs and observed 19 home visits. Overall, 60% of mothers adopted less than three safe practices. Wrapping newborns (96% and delayed bathing (64% were better adopted than cord care (49%, safe breastfeeding (48%, hand washing (30%, kangaroo care (20% and eye care (9%. Cultural beliefs and traditional birth attendants influenced the mother’s practices. The lack of supervision by auxiliary nurse midwives (ANM, delayed referral and transportation were the other challenges. Conclusion: Knowledge–practice gaps existed among mothers counselled by ASHAs. Poor utilization of reproductive and child health services decreased opportunities for ASHA–mother dialogue on safe practices. Recommendations included training ANMs, training TBAs as ASHAs, innovative communication strategies for ASHAs and improved referral system.

  20. Prevalence, impact and care of foot problems in people with rheumatoid arthritis: results from a United Kingdom based cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oonagh Wilson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis (RA derive from a combination of inflammation, altered foot mechanics, deformity and secondary skin lesions. Guidelines recommend regular review of patients’ feet, but the extent to which the general population of RA patients report foot symptoms and access foot care has not been established. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence, impact and care of foot problems in all patients with RA in one geographical area and identify factors associated with accessing foot care. Methods Cross-sectional survey of a random sample of patients with RA, who resided within a single community-based National Health Service (NHS podiatry service. The questionnaire collected demographic data (age, gender, local deprivation score, clinical data (disease duration, arthritis medications, disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ, current foot problems, foot care accessed (podiatry, orthotics and/or orthopaedics and care received, measures of impact (Foot Impact Scale and ability to work. Results Of 1003 total eligible patients in the target population, 739 were posted survey packs. Of these 413 (56% replied. Responders and non-responders had similar age (63.5 yr. vs.61.5 yr, gender (74.1%F vs. 75.2%F, and highest deprivation category (13.3% vs.15.9%. Of the responders 92.1% reported current foot problems: articular 73.8%, cutaneous lesions 65.4%, structural 57.6%, extra-articular 42.6%. Responders’ median (IQR disease duration 10 (5–20 years, HAQ 1.5 (0.75–2.0, FISIF 10 (6–14 and FISAP 16 (7–23 and 37.8% reported impacts on work. While 69.5% had accessed foot care there were differences in the route of access (by gender and whether independent or NHS provision and were older (64.9 yr. vs 60.4 yr. p = 0.001, had longer disease duration (12 yr. vs 7 yr. p < 0.001 and had a greater proportion of females (72.2% vs 61.7% p = 0.04 than those who had not accessed

  1. Hypertension and obesity among HIV patients in a care programme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of hypertension and obesity among HIV patients enrolled in the Sex Worker Outreach Programme (SWOP), Nairobi, Kenya. Design: A retrospective a study. Setting: SWOP managed by the University of Manitoba, Nairobi team. Subjects: We selected clinic visit records from HIV ...

  2. “They just scraped off the calluses”: a mixed methods exploration of foot care access and provision for people with rheumatoid arthritis in south-western Sydney, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There is little indication that foot health services in Australia are meeting modern day recommendations for Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients. The overall objective of this study was to explore the current state of foot health services for patients with RA with an emphasis on identifying barriers to the receipt of appropriate foot care in South-West Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Methods A mixed (quantitative and qualitative) approach was adopted. Indications for appropriate access to foot care were determined by comparing the foot health, disease and socio-demographic characteristics of patients with unmet foot care demands, foot care users and patients with no demands for foot care. Perceptions of provision of, and access to, foot care were explored by conducting telephone-based interviews using an interpretative phenomenology approach with thematic analysis. Results Twenty-nine participants took part in the cross-sectional quantitative research study design, and 12 participants took part in the interpretative phenomenological approach (qualitative study). Foot care access appeared to be driven predominantly by the presence of rearfoot deformity, which was significantly worse amongst participants in the foot care user group (p = 0.02). Five main themes emerged from the qualitative data: 1) impact of disease-related foot symptoms, 2) footwear difficulties, 3) medical/rheumatology encounters, 4) foot and podiatry care access and experiences, and 5) financial hardship. Conclusions Foot care provision does not appear to be driven by appropriate foot health characteristics such as foot pain or foot-related disability. There may be significant shortfalls in footwear and foot care access and provision in Greater Western Sydney. Several barriers to adequate foot care access and provision were identified and further efforts are required to improve access to and the quality of foot care for people who have RA. Integration of podiatry services within

  3. Financial incentives for disease management programmes and integrated care in German social health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greb, Stefan; Focke, Axel; Hessel, Franz; Wasem, Jürgen

    2006-10-01

    As a result of recent health care reforms sickness funds and health care providers in German social health insurance face increased financial incentives for implementing disease management and integrated care. Sickness funds receive higher payments form the risk adjustment system if they set up certified disease management programmes and induce patients to enrol. If health care providers establish integrated care projects they are able to receive extra-budgetary funding. As a consequence, the number of certified disease management programmes and the number of integrated care contracts is increasing rapidly. However, contracts about disease management programmes between sickness funds and health care providers are highly standardized. The overall share of health care expenses spent on integrated care still is very low. Existing integrated care is mostly initiated by hospitals, is based on only one indication and is not fully integrated. However, opportunity to invest in integrated care may open up innovative processes, which generate considerable productivity gains. What is more, integrated care may serve as gateway for the introduction of more widespread selective contracting.

  4. Economic evaluation of occupational health and safety programmes in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, J; Tompa, E; Koehoorn, M; de Boer, H; Macdonald, S; Alamgir, H

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based resource allocation in the public health care sector requires reliable economic evaluations that are different from those needed in the commercial sector. To describe a framework for conducting economic evaluations of occupational health and safety (OHS) programmes in health care developed with sector stakeholders. To define key resources and outcomes to be considered in economic evaluations of OHS programmes and to integrate these into a comprehensive framework. Participatory action research supported by mixed qualitative and quantitative methods, including a multi-stakeholder working group, 25 key informant interviews, a 41-member Delphi panel and structured nominal group discussions. We found three resources had top priority: OHS staff time, training the workers and programme planning, promotion and evaluation. Similarly, five outcomes had top priority: number of injuries, safety climate, job satisfaction, quality of care and work days lost. The resulting framework was built around seven principles of good practice that stakeholders can use to assist them in conducting economic evaluations of OHS programmes. Use of a framework resulting from this participatory action research approach may increase the quality of economic evaluations of OHS programmes and facilitate programme comparisons for evidence-based resource allocation decisions. The principles may be applicable to other service sectors funded from general taxes and more broadly to economic evaluations of OHS programmes in general. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. WAGNER’S GRADING OF DIABETIC FOOT LESIONS-A TERTIARY CARE EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Mohan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE OF STUDY: Diabetic foot is the most common complication of diabetes. Amputation which is the end result of diabetic foot disease is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Since it is crucial to identify those at an increased risk of diabetic foot complications, a detailed study of the natural history of diabetic foot, various clinical characteristics, according to Wagner grading of lesions, their outcome and management protocol followed in our hospital was undertaken in our hospital. AIM AND OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of diabetic foot lesions based on Wagner grading system, outcome and management protocol followed in our hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective study done on hundred diabetic foot patients in our own hospital over a period of one and half year. Data was obtained from a questionnaire developed to record the medical history, examination details, investigations reports, treatment details and final outcome at the end of stay. Infection was classified based on Meggitt-Wagner, classification/grading. RESULTS: Diabetic foot was very common in elderly age group (>55yrs 54% and male dominant (87%. Majority of them had diabetes for more than five years (47% and complications of diabetes were present on admission in 15% of them. Grade I(29%, Grade III (27% & Grade IV (24% lesions based on Wagner’s grading accounted for majority of diabetic foot lesions. Multiple toe disarticulation/ above knee / below knee amputation accounted for a quarter (23% of surgical interventions in our hospital. The glycemic control in most of patients was very poor with RBS>200 mg/dl (70% and glycosylated hemoglobin>7g% (74% of them. A quarter of the patients stayed for at least a month in the hospital (25%. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that diabetic foot in various forms accounts for significant morbidity in the surgical wards. Wagner’s grade I (29% Grade III (27%, Grade IV (24% constituted majority of lesions. Factors contributing

  6. Effects of a surgical ward care protocol following open colon surgery as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, BoYeoul; Park, SungHee; Park, KyuJoo; Ryoo, SeungBum

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the effects of a standardised care protocol as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme on the management of patients who underwent open colon surgery at the University Hospital, South Korea. Patients who undergo open colon surgery often have concerns about their care as they prepare for hospitalisation. By shortening hospital stay lengths, enhanced recovery after surgery programmes could reduce the number of opportunities for patient education and communication with nurses. Therefore, our surgical team developed an enhanced recovery after surgery programme, applied using a care protocol for patients with colorectal cancer, that spans the entire recovery process. A retrospective, comparative study was conducted using a care protocol as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme. Comparisons were made before and after the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol. Records of 219 patients who underwent open colon surgery were retrospectively audited. The records were grouped according to the care protocol used (enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol or traditional care programme). The outcomes, including postoperative bowel function recovery, postoperative pain control, recovery time and postoperative complications, were compared between two categories. Patients who were managed using the programme with a care protocol had shorter hospital stays, fewer complications, such as postoperative ileus wound infections, and emergency room visits than those who were managed using the traditional care programme. The findings can be used to facilitate the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol following open colon surgery. We present a care protocol that enables effective management using consistent and standardised education providing bedside care for patients who undergo open colon surgery. This care protocol empowers long

  7. Evaluating fundamentals of care: The development of a unit-level quality measurement and improvement programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Jenny M; Bell, Jeanette; Koziol-McLain, Jane

    2018-06-01

    The project aimed to develop a unit-level quality measurement and improvement programme using evidence-based fundamentals of care. Feedback from patients, families, whānau, staff and audit data in 2014 indicated variability in the delivery of fundamental aspects of care such as monitoring, nutrition, pain management and environmental cleanliness at a New Zealand District Health Board. A general inductive approach was used to explore the fundamentals of care and design a measurement and improvement programme, the Patient and Whānau Centred Care Standards (PWCCS), focused on fundamental care. Five phases were used to explore the evidence, and design and test a measurement and improvement framework. Nine identified fundamental elements of care were used to define expected standards of care and develop and test a measurement and improvement framework. Four six-monthly peer reviews have been undertaken since June 2015. Charge Nurse Managers used results to identify quality improvements. Significant improvement was demonstrated overall, in six of the 27 units, in seven of the nine standards and three of the four measures. In all, 89% (n = 24) of units improved their overall result. The PWCCS measurement and improvement framework make visible nursing fundamentals of care in line with continuous quality improvement to increase quality of care. Delivering fundamentals of care is described by nurses as getting ?back to basics'. Patient and family feedback supports the centrality of fundamentals of care to their hospital experience. Implementing a unit-level fundamentals of care quality measurement and improvement programme clarifies expected standards of care, highlights the contribution of fundamentals of care to quality and provides a mechanism for ongoing improvements. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Development and evaluation of a newborn care education programme in primiparous mothers in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sharmila; Adachi, Kumiko; Petrini, Marcia A; Shrestha, Sarita; Rana Khagi, Bina

    2016-11-01

    the health and survival of newborns depend on high levels of attention and care from caregivers. The growth and development of some infants are unhealthy because of their mother's or caregiver's lack of knowledge or the use of inappropriate or traditional child-rearing practices that may be harmful. to develop a newborn care educational programme and evaluate its impact on infant and maternal health in Nepal. a randomised controlled trial. one hundred and forty-three mothers were randomly assigned to the intervention (n=69) and control (n=74) groups. Eligible participants were primiparous mothers who had given birth to a single, full-term, healthy infant, and were without a history of obstetric, medical, or psychological problems. prior to being discharged from the postnatal unit, the intervention group received our structured newborn care education programme, which consisted of one-on-one educational sessions lasting 10-15minutes each and one postpartum follow-up telephone support within two weeks after discharge, in addition to the hospital's routine general newborn care education. The control group received only the regular general newborn care education. Outcomes were measured by using Newborn care Knowledge Questionnaires, Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Adults and infant health and care status. the number of mothers attending the health centre due to the sickness of their babies was significantly decreased in the intervention group compared to the control group. Moreover, the intervention group had significant increases in newborn care knowledge and confidence, and decreases in anxiety, compared with the control group. the structured newborn care education programme enhanced the infant and mother health. Moreover, it increased maternal knowledge of newborn care and maternal confidence; and reduced anxiety in primiparous mothers. Thus, this educational programme could be integrated into routine educational programs to

  9. Investigation of the Performance of Foot and Eye Care in Patients with Type II Diabetes in Fasa: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khani Jeihooni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Diabetic foot ulcers and eye problems are the most frequent complications of patients with diabetes and can be controlled with care. This study aimed at investigating the situation of foot and eye care in patients with type II diabetes based on the Theory of Planned Behavior of Fasa. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, simple randomized sampling was used to select 151 patients with type II diabetes, who had referred to Shariati Teaching Hospital diabetic clinic, during year 2016. Data were gathered using a questionnaire including demographic data and measure theory of planned behavior (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention and the care of feet and eyes. Next, the data were entered in the SPSS statistical software, version 20 and analyzed using independent t test and descriptive statistical methods. P values of < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The mean age of participants was 52.17±12.41 and the mean duration of diabetes was 76.62±4.9. Knowledge on the care of feet and eyes was low. Foot and eye care, subjective norm and people are going to be at a moderate level. Among knowledge, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention, there was a significant correlation with performance (P<0.05. Knowledge, attitudes, perceived behavioral control, subjective norms, and intention were predictors of foot care and eye performance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Overall, variables predicted 31.6% of the performance of foot care and 28.4% of eye care. Conclusions: According to this study, design and implementation of training programs theory centered on promoting foot care and eye performance is recommended for patients with diabetes.

  10. Introducing innovation in a management development programme for a UK primary care organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul; Hampson, Libby; Scott, Jonathan; Bower, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the introduction of innovation as part of a management development programme at a primary care organisation, a legal form known as a Primary Care Trust (PCT), in the UK. The paper draws on experience of managing a successful management development programme for a PCT. The report of the case study analyses the key events that took place between 2008 and 2010, from direct observation, surveys, discussion and documentary evidence. The Northern PCT has partnerships with a number of educational providers to deliver their leadership and management development programmes. A close working relationship had developed and the programme is bespoke - hence it is current and of practical use to the UK's National Health Service (NHS). In addition, there are regular meetings, with module leaders gaining a firsthand understanding of the organisation's needs and aspirations. This has resulted in a very focused and personalised offering and a genuine involvement in the programme and individuals concerned. The research was conducted among a relatively small sample, and there is a lack of previous literature evidence to make significant comparisons. The paper identifies key implications for practitioners and educators in this area. This paper is one of few to investigate innovation and improvement in the NHS, and is unique in that it uses the lenses of a management development programme to explore this important, and under-researched, topic.

  11. Developing a diabetes prevention education programme for community health-care workers in Thailand: formative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sranacharoenpong, Kitti; Hanning, Rhona M

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate barriers to and supports for implementing a diabetes prevention education programme for community health-care workers (CHCWs) in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. The study also aimed to get preliminary input into the design of a tailored diabetes prevention education programme for CHCWs. Thailand has faced under-nutrition and yet, paradoxically, the prevalence of diseases of over-nutrition, such as obesity and diabetes, has escalated. As access to diabetes prevention programme is limited in Thailand, especially in rural and semi-urban areas, it becomes critical to develop a health information delivery system that is relevant, cost-effective, and sustainable. Health-care professionals (n = 12) selected from health centres within one district participated in in-depth interviews. In addition, screened people at risk for diabetes participated in interviews (n = 8) and focus groups (n = 4 groups, 23 participants). Coded transcripts from audio-taped interviews or focus groups were analysed by hand and using NVivo software. Concept mapping illustrated the findings. Health-care professionals identified potential barriers to programme success as a motivation for regular participation, and lack of health policy support for programme sustainability. Health-care professionals identified opportunities to integrate health promotion and disease prevention into CHCWs' duties. Health-care professionals recommended small-group workshops, hands-on learning activities, case studies, and video presentations that bring knowledge to practice within their cultural context. CHCWs should receive a credit for continuing study. People at risk for diabetes lacked knowledge of nutrition, diabetes risk factors, and resources to access health information. They desired two-way communication with CHCWs. Formative research supports the need for an effective, sustainable programme to support knowledge translation to CHCWs and at-risk populations in the

  12. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis L Kodner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each. It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a “whole systems” approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program

  13. A neuromuscular exercise programme versus standard care for patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eshoj, Henrik; Rasmussen, Sten; Frich, Lars Henrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anterior shoulder dislocation is a common injury and may have considerable impact on shoulder-related quality of life (QoL). If not warranted for initial stabilising surgery, patients are mostly left with little to no post-traumatic rehabilitation. This may be due to lack of evidence......-based exercise programmes. In similar, high-impact injuries (e.g. anterior cruciate ligament tears in the knee) neuromuscular exercise has shown large success in improving physical function and QoL. Thus, the objective of this trial is to compare a nonoperative neuromuscular exercise shoulder programme...... dislocations due to at least one traumatic event will be randomised to 12 weeks of either a standardised, individualised or physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular shoulder exercise programme or standard care (self-managed shoulder exercise programme). Patients will be stratified according to injury status...

  14. The current status of foot self-care knowledge, behaviours, and analysis of influencing factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Li

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: The status of foot self-care knowledge and behaviours are not optimistic. According to the patients' own characteristics, the theory of knowledge, attitude and practice applies to encouraging patients to go for periodic inspection and education about diabetic complications so as to enhance the knowledge and promote the self-care behaviours.

  15. Improving Quality of the Child Care Environment through a Consultancy Programme for Centre Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmerhorst, Katrien O. W.; Fukkink, Ruben G.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne A.; Gevers Deynoot-Schaub, Mirjam J. J. M.; Tavecchio, Louis W. C.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a newly developed on-site consultancy programme to improve global quality of the child care environment in non-parental child care centres for 0- to 4-year-old children as measured with the ITERS-R/ECERS-R. Using a randomised controlled trial with a pretest, posttest, and follow-up test, we compared 35…

  16. A randomized clinical trial of oral hygiene care programmes during stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ruoxi; Lam, Otto L T; Lo, Edward C M; Li, Leonard S W; McGrath, Colman

    2017-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of an advanced oral hygiene care programme (AOHCP) and a conventional oral hygiene care programme (COHCP) in improving oral hygiene, and reducing gingival bleeding among patients with stroke during outpatient rehabilitation. Subjects were randomized to receive (i) the COHCP comprising a manual toothbrush, toothpaste, and oral hygiene instruction, or (ii) the AOHCP comprising a powered toothbrush, 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthrinse, toothpaste, and oral hygiene instruction. Dental plaque, gingival bleeding, and other clinical oral health outcomes were assessed at baseline, the end of the clinical trial, and the end of observation period. Development of infectious complications was also monitored. Participants of both programmes had a significant reduction in the percentages of sites with moderate to abundant dental plaque (p<0.001) and with gingival bleeding (p<0.05). Those in the AOHCP had significantly less plaque and gingival bleeding than those in the COHCP controlling for other factors at the end of the clinical trial period (both p<0.001) and the observational period (plaque: p<0.05, gingival bleeding: p<0.01). Although both oral hygiene care programmes were effective in terms of plaque and gingival bleeding control, the AOHCP was more effective than the COHCP in reducing dental plaque and gingival bleeding. This study highlighted the value of oral hygiene programmes within stroke outpatient rehabilitation and provides evidence to advocate for the inclusion of oral hygiene care programmes within stroke outpatient rehabilitation for patients with normal cognitive abilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sustainability of recurrent expenditure on public social welfare programmes: expenditure analysis of the free maternal care programme of the Ghana National Health Insurance Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankrah Odame, Emmanuel; Akweongo, Patricia; Yankah, Ben; Asenso-Boadi, Francis; Agyepong, Irene

    2014-05-01

    Sustainability of public social welfare programmes has long been of concern in development circles. An important aspect of sustainability is the ability to sustain the recurrent financial costs of programmes. A free maternal care programme (FMCP) was launched under the Ghana National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in 2008 with a start-up grant from the British Government. This article examines claims expenditure under the programme and the implications for the financial sustainability of the programme, and the lessons for donor and public financing of social welfare programmes. Records of reimbursement claims for services and medicines by women benefitting from the policy in participating facilities in one sub-metropolis in Ghana were analysed to gain an understanding of the expenditure on this programme at facility level. National level financial inflow and outflow (expenditure) data of the NHIS, related to implementation of this policy for 2008 and 2009, were reviewed to put the facility-based data in the national perspective. A total of US$936 450.94 was spent in 2009 by the scheme on FMCP in the sub-metropolis. The NHIS expenditure on the programme for the entire country in 2009 was US$49.25 million, exceeding the British grant of US$10.00 million given for that year. Subsequently, the programme has been entirely financed by the National Health Insurance Fund. The rapidly increasing, recurrent demands on this fund from the maternal delivery exemption programme-without a commensurate growth on the amounts generated annually-is an increasing threat to the sustainability of the fund. Provision of donor start-up funding for programmes with high recurrent expenditures, under the expectation that government will take over and sustain the programme, must be accompanied by clear long-term analysis and planning as to how government will sustain the programme.

  18. Evaluation of a social franchising and telemedicine programme and the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia, Bihar, India.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanan, M.; Giardili, S.; Das, V.; Rabin, T. L.; Raj, S. S.; Schwartz, J. I.; Seth, A.; Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. D.; Miller, G.; Vera-Hernández, M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact on the quality of the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia in Bihar, India, of a large-scale, social franchising and telemedicine programme - the World Health Partners' Sky Program. METHODS: We investigated changes associated with the programme in the knowledge and performance of health-care providers by carrying out 810 assessments in a representative sample of providers in areas where the programme was and was not implemented. Providers were ...

  19. Evaluation of a social franchising and telemedicine programme and the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia, Bihar, India

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanan, Manoj; Giardili, Soledad; Das, Veena; Rabin, Tracy L; Raj, Sunil S; Schwartz, Jeremy I; Seth, Aparna; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Miller, Grant; Vera-Hern?ndez, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the impact on the quality of the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia in Bihar, India, of a large-scale, social franchising and telemedicine programme ? the World Health Partners? Sky Program. Methods We investigated changes associated with the programme in the knowledge and performance of health-care providers by carrying out 810 assessments in a representative sample of providers in areas where the programme was and was not implemented. Provider...

  20. Delivery of care to diabetic patients with foot ulcers in daily practice: results of the Eurodiale Study, a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prompers, L.; Huijberts, M.; Apelqvist, J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims To determine current management and to identify patient-related factors and barriers that influence management strategies in diabetic foot disease. Methods The Eurodiale Study is a prospective cohort study of 1232 consecutive individuals presenting with a new diabetic foot ulcer in 14 centres...... suggest that current guidelines are too general and that healthcare organizational barriers and personal beliefs result in underuse of recommended therapies. Action should be undertaken to overcome these barriers and to guarantee the delivery of optimal care for the many individuals with diabetic foot...... across Europe. We determined the use of management strategies: referral, use of offloading, vascular imaging and revascularization. Results Twenty-seven percent of the patients had been treated for > 3 months before referral to a foot clinic. This varied considerably between countries (6-55%). At study...

  1. Quality of care in reproductive health programmes: monitoring and evaluation of quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwast, B E

    1998-12-01

    As 200 million women become pregnant every year, at least 30 million will develop life-threatening complications requiring emergency treatment at any level of society where they live. But it is a basic human right that pregnancy be made safe for all women as complications are mostly unpredictable. This requires reproductive health programmes which are responsive to women's and their families' needs and expectations on the one hand and enhancement of community participation, high quality obstetric services, and both provider collaboration and satisfaction on the other. Monitoring and evaluation of these facets need to be an integral part of any safe motherhood programme, not only to assess progress, but also to use this information for subsequent planning and implementation cycles of national programmes. Lessons learned from ten years' implementation of Safe Motherhood programmes indicate that process and outcome indicators are more feasible for short-term evaluation purposes than impact indicators, such as maternal mortality reduction. The former are described in this paper with relevant country examples. This is the third, and last, article in a series on quality of care in reproductive health programmes. The first (Kwast 1998a) contains an overview of concepts, assessments, barriers and improvements of quality of care. The second (Kwast 1998b) addresses education issues for quality improvement.

  2. Evaluation of a nurse-led dementia education and knowledge translation programme in primary care: A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Ullah, Shahid; He, Guo-Ping; De Bellis, Anita

    2017-02-01

    The lack of dementia education programmes for health professionals in primary care is one of the major factors contributing to the unmet demand for dementia care services. To determine the effectiveness of a nurse-led dementia education and knowledge translation programme for health professionals in primary care; participants' satisfaction with the programme; and to understand participants' perceptions of and experiences in the programme. A cluster randomized controlled trial was used as the main methodology to evaluate health professionals' knowledge, attitudes and care approach. Focus groups were used at the end of the project to understand health professionals' perceptions of and experiences in the programme. Fourteen community health service centres in a province in China participated in the study. Seven centres were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group respectively and 85 health professionals in each group completed the programme. A train-the-trainer model was used to implement a dementia education and knowledge translation programme. Outcome variables were measured at baseline, on the completion of the programme and at 3-month follow-up. A mixed effect linear regression model was applied to compare the significant differences of outcome measures over time between the two groups. Focus groups were guided by four semi-structured questions and analysed using content analysis. Findings revealed significant effects of the education and knowledge translation programme on participants' knowledge, attitudes and a person-centred care approach. Focus groups confirmed that the programme had a positive impact on dementia care practice. A dementia education and knowledge translation programme for health professionals in primary care has positive effects on their knowledge, attitudes, care approach and care practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Implementing primary health care: some problems of creating national programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, J P; Walt, G

    1984-07-01

    While there is a great deal of agreement about the principles underlying Primary Health Care (PHC), there exist many problems, political, planning and management, involved in putting the approach into effect. Some of these difficulties are discussed. It is clear that the PHC approach is essentially political; the way it is implemented in each country will reflect the political priorities and systems of that country. Moreover, ministries of health are not known for their strong position in the ministerial pecking order. Finance and planning ministeries would have to be won over to the importance of the concept of PHC to try to eexpand the health budget and to change the emphasis of existing resource allocation patterns. Costs incurred by a PHC approach ( e.g., expensive transport and communication systems), and resources needed to finance it may be available; however, they may not be channelled to the politically less articulate groups in rural areas. Political implications are not limited to national levels; considerable conflict may exist between different status groups and classes at the village level, thus sabotaging PHC plans. Professional politics will also be played at all levels. It is equally essential to recognize the historical context in which PHC is being introduced. Many countries have inherited colonial infrastructures. Changing the values, perceptions, expectations, administration and organization that accompany such systems is extremely hard, and to put PHC into effect demands radical changes. The planning difficulties which beset PHC are related to the still large private provision of social services like health, and to a flourishing traditional private sector in many developing countries. These may limit the implementation of a national health policy and PHC may thus result in a very patchy service throughout the country. The level of centralized planning will also affect resource allocation and therefore the policy, planning and implementation

  4. Evaluating the systematic implementation of the 'Let Me Decide' advance care planning programme in long term care through focus groups: staff perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cornally, Nicola

    2015-11-01

    The \\'Let Me Decide\\' Advance Care Planning (LMD-ACP) programme offers a structured approach to End-of-Life (EoL) care planning in long-term care for residents with and without capacity to complete an advance care directive\\/plan. The programme was implemented in three homes in the South of Ireland, with a view to improving quality of care at end of life. This paper will present an evaluation of the systematic implementation of the LMD-ACP programme in the homes.

  5. Bacteriology of diabetic foot in tertiary care hospital; frequency, antibiotic susceptibility and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjad, S.S.; Shams, N.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic foot being one of the frequent and disabling complications of diabetes. In view of widespread regional variation in causative organisms and antimicrobial susceptibility, the current study aimed to determine frequency of causative organisms, their antimicrobial susceptibility and associated risk factors. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 6 months' duration at dept. of Medicine; PIMS Hospital Islamabad. Type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients with diabetic foot ulcer were enrolled after informed consent. Patients already receiving antibiotics, having no growth on culture and >3 weeks' duration of ulcer were excluded. Sample from wound was sent for culture and sensitivity. Antibiotic susceptibility testing identified the susceptible and resistant strains of organisms. Results: Among 114 patients (66.67% males and 33.33% females); mean age was 55.11+-11.96 years. Staphylococcus aureus was identified in 46%, E. coli in 28%, Pseudomonas in 6%, Klebsiella in 3.5% and other organisms in 17%. 92% of S. aureus was sensitive to Vancomycin and 67% to Clindamycin. Amongst E. coli, 81% showed sensitivity to Imipenem, 69% to Aminoglycosides and 31% to Quinolones. Glycaemic control was unsatisfactory in 65.8%. Peripheral vascular disease was found in 46% patients and sensory neuropathy in 94%. Conclusion: Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent isolate amongst gram positive organisms while E. coli amongst gram-negatives. Vancomycin is suggested to be the drug of choice for gram positive and Imipenem for gram negative organisms. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy according to susceptibility patterns would reduce the morbidity and emergence of multidrug resistant organisms in diabetic foot infections. (author)

  6. Virological investigation of hand, foot, and mouth disease in a tertiary care center in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra M Vijayaraghavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD remains a common problem in India, yet its etiology is largely unknown as diagnosis is based on clinical characteristics. There are very few laboratory-based molecular studies on HFMD outbreaks. Aim: The aim of this study was to characterize HFMD-related isolates by molecular techniques. Settings and Design: Between 2005 and 2008, during two documented HFMD outbreaks, 30 suspected HFMD cases presented at the Outpatient Unit of the Department of Dermatology, Christian Medical College (CMC, Vellore. Seventy-eight clinical specimens (swabs from throat, mouth, rectum, anus, buttocks, tongue, forearm, sole, and foot were received from these patients at the Department of Clinical Virology, CMC, for routine diagnosis of hand, foot, and mouth disease. Materials and Methods: Samples from these patients were cultured in Vero and rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cell lines. Isolates producing enterovirus-like cytopathogenic effect (CPE in cell culture were identified by a nested reverse transcription-based polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and sequenced. The nucleotide sequences were analyzed using the BioEdit sequence program. Homology searches were performed using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST algorithm. Statistical Analysis used: The statistical analysis was performed using Epi Info version 6.04b and Microsoft Excel 2002 (Microsoft Office XP. Results: Of the 30 suspected HFMD cases, only 17 (57% were laboratory confirmed and Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 was identified as the etiological agent in all these cases. Conclusions: Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 was identified as the virus that caused the HFMD outbreaks in Vellore between 2005 and 2008. Early confirmation of HFMD helps to initiate control measures to interrupt virus transmission. In the laboratory, classical diagnostic methods, culture and serological tests are being replaced by molecular techniques. Routine surveillance systems will help understand the

  7. Parent education programmes for special health care needs children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Alun C; Liang, Rachel P-T; Frydenberg, Erica; Higgins, Rosemary O; Murphy, Barbara M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this review was to examine parent education programmes for families with children with special health care needs, to better design interventions focusing on the psychosocial aspects of living with a child's chronic condition. Studies of familial coping with children with special health care needs indicate high levels of parenting stress, with families with children with special health care needs at risk of major psychological and social disturbances and financial strain. Despite increased knowledge of the factors affecting children with special health care needs themselves, evidence for the effectiveness of preventative and treatment interventions in the form of parent education programmes remains limited. Systematic review using PRISMA guidelines. Multi database Boolean searches in EBSCO Discovery Services using the search terms 'complex/special health care needs children', 'child/pediatric/congenital heart disease', 'chronic illness (including diabetes, cancer and cystic fibrosis)', 'family coping', 'siblings' AND 'parenting/family support programs' were conducted. Analysis of 13 included studies showed evidence for the effectiveness of both mixed-health condition and condition-specific parenting programmes delivered in a variety of modes. Three common core intervention approaches were: use of narrative therapy enabling families to tell their own stories, thus facilitating emotional processing and (co-) construction of meaning; a focus on strengthening protective factors such as enhancing parents' skills in communication, and behavioural management and provision of psycho-education to deepen parents' understanding of their child's condition and associated developmental challenges. Irrespective of the type of outcome measures used in the studies, the review showed that there were positive gains and improvements across a range of areas of family functioning such as mental health, parenting, communication and problem-solving skills postprogramme

  8. An activity-based cost analysis of the Honduras community-based, integrated child care (AIN-C) programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, John L; Villalobos, Carlos A; De Mattos, Annette C

    2008-11-01

    The Honduras AIN-C programme is a preventive health and nutrition programme of the Honduras Ministry of Health (MOH) that relies on volunteers to help mothers monitor and maintain the adequate growth of young children. A quasi-experimental, design-based evaluation found that the programme achieved near-universal coverage and was effective in improving mothers' child-rearing knowledge, attitudes and practices, including feeding and appropriate care-giving and care-seeking practices for children with diarrhoea and acute respiratory illness. The programme is widely regarded as a model. This study was undertaken to provide the first comprehensive estimates of the cost of the AIN-C programme, with the goal of providing a programme and financial planning tool for Honduras. An additional comparison of study findings was also undertaken to determine the cost of the AIN-C programme's community-based services relative to a similar facility-based service. Expressed in mid-2005 US dollars, the study found that after the programme is phased-in: (1) the annual, recurrent cost per child under 2 years participating in the programme is $6.43; (2) the annual, incremental budget requirements per child under 2 years participating in the programme are $3.90; (3) the cost of an AIN-C monthly growth monitoring and counselling session per child is 11% of the cost of a traditional MOH, facility-based growth and development consultation per child; and (4) the effect of mothers substituting AIN-C monitor care for MOH facility-based care 'saves' 203 000 outpatient visits a year, with a potential cost saving of $1.66 million, the equivalent of 60% of the recurrent cost of the programme and roughly equal to the annual incremental budget requirements of the programme. Sensitivity analysis of the cost estimates is performed to provide insight, for countries considering introducing a similar programme, into how modifications of key characteristics of the programme affect its costs.

  9. Improving care of post-infarct patients: effects of disease management programmes and care according to international guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Renee; Kirchberger, Inge; Hunger, Matthias; Heier, Margit; Leidl, Reiner; von Scheidt, Wolfgang; Meisinger, Christa; Holle, Rolf

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac disease management programmes (CHD-DMPs) and secondary cardiovascular prevention guidelines aim to improve complex care of post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients. In Germany, CHD-DMPs, in addition to incorporating medical care according to guidelines (guideline-care), also ensure regular quarterly follow-up. Thus, our aim was to examine whether CHD-DMPs increase the frequency of guideline-care and whether CHD-DMPs and guideline-care improve survival over 4 years. The study included 975 post-MI patients, registered by the KORA-MI Registry (Augsburg, Germany), who completed a questionnaire in 2006. CHD-DMP enrolment was reported by physicians. Guideline-care was based on patient reports regarding medical advice (smoking, diet, or exercise) and prescribed medications (statins and platelet aggregation inhibitors plus beta-blockers or renin-angiotensin inhibitors). All-cause mortality until December 31, 2010 was based on municipal registration data. Cox regression analyses were adjusted for age, sex, education, years since last MI, and smoking and diabetes. Physicians reported that 495 patients were CHD-DMP participants. CHD-DMP participation increased the likelihood of receiving guideline-care (odds ratio 1.55, 95% CI 1.20; 2.02) but did not significantly improve survival (hazard rate 0.90, 95% CI 0.64-1.27). Guideline-care significantly improved survival (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.28; 0.59). Individual guideline-care components, which significantly improved survival, were beta-blockers, statins and platelet aggregation inhibitors. However, these improved survival less than guideline-care. This study shows that CHD-DMPs increase the likelihood of guideline care and that guideline care is the important component of CHD-DMPs for increasing survival. A relatively high percentage of usual care patients receiving guideline-care indicate high quality of care of post-MI patients. Reasons for not implementing guideline-care should be investigated.

  10. Wound healing outcomes in a diabetic foot ulcer outpatient clinic at an acute care hospital: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, S H; McLaren, A-M

    2017-10-01

    Patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) have an increased risk of lower extremity amputation. A retrospective chart review of patients with DFUs attending the Foot Treatment and Assessment chiropodist-led outpatient clinic at an inner-city academic hospital was conducted to determine wound healing outcomes and characteristics contributing to outcomes. We reviewed the complete clinical history of 279 patients with 332 DFUs spanning over a five-year period. The mean age of patients was 61.5±12.5 years and most patients (83.5%) had one DFU. The majority of wounds (82.5%) were in the forefoot. Overall, 267/332 (80.5%) wounds healed. A greater proportion of wounds healed in the forefoot (82.5%) and midfoot (87.1%) than hindfoot (51.9%; phealing. Our findings are the first to demonstrate the benefits of chiropodists leading an acute care outpatient clinic in the management of DFUs in Canada and delivers wound healing outcomes equivalent to or exceeding those previously published.

  11. Expanded programme on immunization and primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, R N

    1982-09-01

    The ultimate objective of the Expanded Program on Immunication, better known as EPI, is to reduce the morbidity of the diseases for which vaccine is available. The EPI is a key component of the country effort to provide Health for All by the year 2000. It is planned that by 1990 immunization services will be available for all infants against diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, tuberculosis, and poliomyelitis and for all school children for diptheria, tetanus, and typhoid, and for all pregnant women against tetanus. The immunization services will be a part of the comprehensive health care and will be integrated with all hospitals and dispensaries in urban areas and primary health centers/subcenters in the rural areas. Outreach operations are encouraged to bring these services as close to the mother and children as possible. Steps have already been taken to make the country self-sufficient in the production of different quality vaccines to meet the program requirements. New vaccines will be added where found to be epidemiologically necessary and administratively feasible. The vaccination program is effective only if given at the right age. A national immunization schedule has been prepared which emphasizes vaccination of all infants with 1 dose of BCG, 3 doses of DPT and polio at a minimum interval of 1 month, by the 1st birthday. School entrants are given a booster dose of DT and 2 doses of typhoid vaccine at an interval of 1 month. The children leaving primary school and leaving high school are given 1 booster dose of tetanus toxoid. In case of history of tetanus toxoid immunization in the earlier preganancy, 1 booster dose is adequate. Important components of management of EPI are cold chain maintenance, record keeping and evaluation, uniform vaccination coverage standards, and communication with the public through various media. A table gives the number of children/women proposed to be covered with full course of vaccine during each year of the 6th Plan. Disease

  12. Medical care of type 2 diabetes in German disease management programmes: a population-based evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Reneé G; Schunk, Michaela V; Meisinger, Christine; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Leidl, Reiner; Holle, Rolf

    2011-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes disease management programmes (DDMPs) are offered by German social health insurance to promote healthcare consistent with evidence-based medical guidelines. The aim of this study was to compare healthcare quality and medical endpoints between diabetes management programme participants and patients receiving usual care designated as controls. All patients with type 2 diabetes (age range: 36-81) in a cross-sectional survey of a cohort study, performed by the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg, received a self-administered questionnaire regarding their diabetes care. Physical examination and laboratory tests were also performed. The analysis only included patients with social health insurance and whose participation status in a diabetes disease management program was validated by the primary physician (n = 166). Regression analyses, adjusting for age, sex, education, diabetes duration, baseline waist circumference and clustering regarding primary physician were conducted. Evaluation of healthcare processes showed that those in diabetes disease management programmes (n = 89) reported medical examination of eyes and feet and medical advice regarding diet [odds ratio (OR): 2.39] and physical activity (OR: 2.87) more frequently, received anti-diabetic medications (OR: 3.77) and diabetes education more often (OR: 2.66) than controls. Both groups had satisfactory HbA(1c) control but poor low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control. Blood pressure goals (management programmes (OR: 2.21). German diabetes disease management programmes are associated with improved healthcare processes and blood pressure control. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control must be improved for all patients with diabetes. Further research will be required to assess the long-term effects of this diabetes disease management programme. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. An interdisciplinary approach to palliative care - context and challenges in basic education programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangild Stølen, Karen Marie; Breum, Wanda Elisabeth; Andersen, Tanja Thinggaard

    Background: In Denmark, persons diagnosed with life-threatening diseases are an essential key task in Danish Health system. Work carried out by health care professionals with these patients and their families requires specific professional expertise. A holistic approach focused on the physical, p...... in the palliative area, the physiotherapy and psychomotor education programmes have made valuable contributions to developing the understanding of palliative care to the benefit of patients with life-threatening illnesses and their families......., psychological, social and existential perspectives is necessary in order to be able to meet the needs of these people. The health education programmes should therefore offer instruction in palliative care. On this background, University College Capital has developed an interdisciplinary elective course....... Results: The three courses that have been carried out with the participation of 60 nursing students, 12 physiotherapy students and two psychomotor- therapist students two students have shown that the students and staff from the three programmes have benefitted greatly from the different professional...

  14. Optimal allocation of resources over health care programmes: dealing with decreasing marginal utility and uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al, Maiwenn J; Feenstra, Talitha L; Hout, Ben A van

    2005-07-01

    This paper addresses the problem of how to value health care programmes with different ratios of costs to effects, specifically when taking into account that these costs and effects are uncertain. First, the traditional framework of maximising health effects with a given health care budget is extended to a flexible budget using a value function over money and health effects. Second, uncertainty surrounding costs and effects is included in the model using expected utility. Other approaches to uncertainty that do not specify a utility function are discussed and it is argued that these also include implicit notions about risk attitude.

  15. Professional commitment to changing chronic illness care: results from disease management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Karin; Strating, Mathilde; Huijsman, Robbert; Nieboer, Anna

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate to what extent primary care professionals are able to change their systems for delivering care to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and what professional and organizational factors are associated with the degree of process implementation. Quasi-experimental design with 1 year follow-up after intervention. Three regional COPD management programmes in the Netherlands, in which general practices cooperated with regional hospitals. All participating primary care professionals (n = 52). COPD management programme. Professional commitment, organizational context and degree of process implementation. Professionals significantly changed their systems for delivering care to COPD patients, namely self-management support, decision support, delivery system design and clinical information systems. Associations were found between organizational factors, professional commitment and changes in processes of care. Group culture and professional commitment appeared to be, to a moderate degree, predictors of process implementation. COPD management was effective; all processes improved significantly. Moreover, theoretically expected associations between organizational context and professional factors with the implementation of COPD management were indeed confirmed to some extent. Group culture and professional commitment are important facilitators.

  16. Ranking of healthcare programmes based on health outcome, health costs and safe delivery of care in hospital pharmacy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisseau, Lionel; Bussières, Jean-François; Bois, Denis; Vallée, Marc; Racine, Marie-Claude; Bonnici, André

    2013-02-01

    To establish a consensual and coherent ranking of healthcare programmes that involve the presence of ward-based and clinic-based clinical pharmacists, based on health outcome, health costs and safe delivery of care. This descriptive study was derived from a structured dialogue (Delphi technique) among directors of pharmacy department. We established a quantitative profile of healthcare programmes at five sites that involved the provision of ward-based and clinic-based pharmaceutical care. A summary table of evidence established a unique quality rating per inpatient (clinic-based) or outpatient (ward-based) healthcare programme. Each director rated the perceived impact of pharmaceutical care per inpatient or outpatient healthcare programme on three fields: health outcome, health costs and safe delivery of care. They agreed by consensus on the final ranking of healthcare programmes. A ranking was assigned for each of the 18 healthcare programmes for outpatient care and the 17 healthcare programmes for inpatient care involving the presence of pharmacists, based on health outcome, health costs and safe delivery of care. There was a good correlation between ranking based on data from a 2007-2008 Canadian report on hospital pharmacy practice and the ranking proposed by directors of pharmacy department. Given the often limited human and financial resources, managers should consider the best evidence available on a profession's impact to plan healthcare services within an organization. Data are few on ranking healthcare programmes in order to prioritize which healthcare programme would mostly benefit from the delivery of pharmaceutical care by ward-based and clinic-based pharmacists. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. Losing connections and receiving support to reconnect: experiences of frail older people within care programmes implemented in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindels, Jill; Cox, Karen; De La Haye, Jean; Mevissen, Ger; Heijing, Servé; van Schayck, Onno C P; Widdershoven, Guy; Abma, Tineke A

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether care provided in the care programmes matched the needs of older people. Care programmes were implemented in primary-care settings in the Netherlands to identify frail older people and to prevent further deterioration of health. In total, 23 older people participated in in-depth interviews. Within this study, three older people participated as co-researchers; they gathered and analysed the data together with the academic researchers. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. Two categories emerged from the data: 'Losing connections' and 'Receiving support to reconnect.' 'Losing connections' reflects the needs of older people and 'Receiving support to reconnect' reflects their experience and the appreciated aspects of the provided care. A relationship of trust with the practice nurse (PN) appeared to be an important aspect of care, as it fostered the sharing of feelings and issues other than physical or medical problems that could not be shared with the general practitioner. The PNs are experienced as connectors, who help to restore feelings of connectedness and older peoples' access to resources in the community. The relationship with the PN was experienced as valuable because of the feelings of 'connectedness' it created. Through this connectedness, older people could discuss feelings of loneliness, depression and frustration in receiving and acquiring the appropriate resources and services with the PNs. Furthermore, the relationship with the PN helped the older people to gain access to other health professionals and services. The results imply that care for frail older people should include an awareness of the importance of the trusting relationship. Nurses can play a vital role in creating a trusting relationship and are able to bridge the gap between older people and other professionals and services. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. HIV care continuum in Rwanda: a cross-sectional analysis of the national programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsanzimana, Sabin; Kanters, Steve; Remera, Eric; Forrest, Jamie I; Binagwaho, Agnes; Condo, Jeanine; Mills, Edward J

    2015-05-01

    Rwanda has made remarkable progress towards HIV care programme with strong national monitoring and surveillance. Knowledge about the HIV care continuum model can help to improve outcomes in patients. We aimed to quantify engagement, mortality, and loss to follow-up of patients along the HIV care continuum in Rwanda in 2013. We collated data for individuals with HIV who participated in the national HIV care programme in Rwanda and calculated the numbers of individuals or proportions of the population at each stage and the transition probabilities between stages of the continuum. We calculated factors associated with mortality and loss to follow-up by fitting Cox proportional hazards regression models, one for the stage of care before antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and another for stage of care during ART. An estimated 204,899 individuals were HIV-positive in Rwanda in 2013. Among these individuals, 176,174 (86%) were in pre-ART or in ART stages and 129,405 (63%) had initiated ART by the end of 2013. 82·1% (95% CI 80·7-83·4) of patients with viral load measurements (n=3066) were virally suppressed (translating to 106,371 individuals or 52% of HIV-positive individuals). Mortality was 0·6% (304 patients) in the pre-ART stage and 1·0% (1255 patients) in the ART stage; 2247 (3·9%) patients were lost to follow-up in pre-ART stage and 2847 (2·2%) lost in ART stage. Risk factors for mortality among patients in both pre-ART and ART stages included older age, CD4 cell count at initiation, and male sex. Risk factors for loss to follow-up among patients at both pre-ART and ART stages included younger age (age 10-29 year) and male sex. The HIV care continuum is a multitrajectory pathway in which patients have many opportunities to leave and re-engage in care. Knowledge about the points at which individuals are most likely to leave care could improve large-scale delivery of HIV programmes. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  19. Developing a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff in long-stay care facilities in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Adeline; O'Shea, Eamon; Casey, Dympna; Murphy, Kathy; Dempsey, Laura; Smyth, Siobhan; Hunter, Andrew; Murphy, Edel; Devane, Declan; Jordan, Fionnuala

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the steps used in developing and piloting a structured education programme - the Structured Education Reminiscence-based Programme for Staff (SERPS). The programme aimed to prepare nurses and care assistants to use reminiscence when caring for people with dementia living in long-term care. Reminiscence involves facilitating people to talk or think about their past. Structured education programmes are used widely as interventions in randomised controlled trials. However, the process of developing a structured education programme has received little attention relative to that given to evaluating the effectiveness of such programmes. This paper makes explicit the steps followed to develop the SERPS, thereby making a contribution to the methodology of designing and implementing effective structured education programmes. The approach to designing the SERPS was informed by the Van Meijel et al. (2004) model (Journal of Advanced Nursing 48, 84): (1) problem definition, (2) accumulation of building blocks for intervention design, (3) intervention design and (4) intervention validation. Grounded theory was used (1) to generate data to shape the 'building blocks' for the SERPS and (2) to explore residents, family and staff's experience of using/receiving reminiscence. Analysis of the pilot data indicated that the programme met its objective of preparing staff to use reminiscence with residents with dementia. Staff were positive both about the SERPS and the use of reminiscence with residents with dementia. This paper outlines a systematic approach to developing and validating a structured education programme. Participation in a structured education programme is more positive for staff if they are expected to actively implement what they have learnt. Ongoing support during the delivery of the programme is important for successful implementation. The incorporation of client and professional experience in the design phase is a key strength of this approach

  20. Factors influencing retention in care after starting antiretroviral therapy in a rural South African programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom H Boyles

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of patients with HIV in Africa has improved with the widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART but these successes are threatened by low rates of long-term retention in care. There are limited data on predictors of retention in care, particularly from rural sites.Prospective cohort analysis of outcome measures in adults from a rural HIV care programme in Madwaleni, Eastern Cape, South Africa. The ART programme operates from Madwaleni hospital and seven primary care feeder clinics with full integration between inpatient and outpatient services. Outreach workers conducted home visits for defaulters.1803 adults initiated ART from June 2005 to May 2009. At the end of the study period 82.4% were in active care or had transferred elsewhere, 11.1% had died and 6.5% were lost to follow-up (LTFU. Independent predictors associated with an increased risk of LTFU were CD4 nadir >200, initiating ART as an inpatient or while pregnant, and younger age, while being in care for >6 months before initiating ART was associated with a reduced risk. Independent factors associated with an increased risk of mortality were baseline CD4 count 6 months before initiating ART and initiating ART while pregnant were associated with a reduced risk.Serving a socioeconomically deprived rural population is not a barrier to successful ART delivery. Patients initiating ART while pregnant and inpatients may require additional counselling and support to reduce LTFU. Providing HIV care for patients not yet eligible for ART may be protective against being LTFU and dying after ART initiation.

  1. Note On Research Design For The Study Of Community Participation In Health Care Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifkin Susan B

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available After describing types of research designs for the study of community participation in health care programmes, this paper examines one methodology, the quantitative methodology, the quantitative methodology, in detail. It presents some of the major attractions and limitations of this approach. The attractions include the need for evaluation of success and failure and of cost effectiveness of programmes. The limitations include the inability of the approach to deal with definitions and interventions that cannot be quantitified and the difficulty of identifying casual relationship between interventions and outcomes. These characteristics are illustrated by a case by a medical school in Asia. Research design, research developments and research outcomes are described and analysed. The paper concludes that an alternative analysis which examines the linkages between participation and health improvements would be more useful as it would allow the political, social and economic dimensions of community participation to be examined.

  2. Evaluating impact of a multi-dimensional education programme on perceived performance of primary care professionals in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Sanjoti; Bush, Robert; Cook, Susan; Grant, Phillipa

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate an educational programme, 'Diabetes Connect: Connecting Professions', which was developed to enhance communication across primary care networks, to support best practice in clinical interventions and progress multidisciplinary team work to benefit patients in diabetes care. A total of 26 workshops were successfully delivered for 309 primary care professionals across the state of Queensland in Australia from November 2011. It consists of two separate, but complementary training elements: a series of online clinical education training modules and state-wide interprofessional learning workshops developed to enhance professional competencies. The evaluation design included completion of online surveys by the participants at two time points: first upon registering for the online modules or workshops; second, one week after attending a workshop. The survey included questions to evaluate the change in role performance measures. Overall, significant increases in participants' current knowledge, perceived ability to adopt this knowledge at work and willingness to change professional behaviour in the short term were observed. The study suggests that for maximum benefit both, workshop and online training, should be combined and made available widely. Future programmes should use a randomised trial design to test the delivery model.

  3. Short-term effectiveness of a culturally tailored educational intervention on foot self-care among type 2 diabetes patients in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adarmouch, Latifa; Elyacoubi, Abdelhadi; Dahmash, Latifeh; El Ansari, Nawal; Sebbani, Majda; Amine, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Self-management education (SME) is an important yet unacknowledged aspect of diabetes care. Despite the raise of diabetes and its complications with significant burden in developing countries, research on SME interventions in Morocco is lacking. To assess the effectiveness of a culturally tailored SME intervention on foot-care self-management practices among type 2 diabetes patients and to identify factors associated with practices variation. We designed a pre-post prospective quasi-experimental study and recruited patients with type 2 diabetes aged 30 years old or above. The intervention consisted of an interactive group discussion using different materials: a narrative video, a PowerPoint presentation and a printed guide. Foot-care practices were assessed prior to the session and one month later using 2 items from the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA). Binary logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with a favorable variation, defined as an increase in the mean frequency score of foot-care by a minimum of 1 day/week. A total of 199 participants were recruited and 133 completed the second assessment. Mean age was 55.2 ± 11.2 years old. Women represented 67% and 72% of participants was illiterate. The foot-care score mean increased from 3.5 ± 2.9 days to 5.9 ± 1.8 days one month after the intervention (mean variation was 2.4 ± 3.1 days; p education about diabetic foot was associated with lower likelihood of a favorable variation (OR = 0.26; 95%CI: 0.08-0.78). There was a general improvement in foot-care practices after the intervention. Our findings suggest the role of literacy and previous patient education in shaping the observed variation. Culturally tailored interventions targeting other disease management domains are needed in our context.

  4. Evaluation of a social franchising and telemedicine programme and the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia, Bihar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanan, Manoj; Giardili, Soledad; Das, Veena; Rabin, Tracy L; Raj, Sunil S; Schwartz, Jeremy I; Seth, Aparna; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Miller, Grant; Vera-Hernández, Marcos

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the impact on the quality of the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia in Bihar, India, of a large-scale, social franchising and telemedicine programme - the World Health Partners' Sky Program. We investigated changes associated with the programme in the knowledge and performance of health-care providers by carrying out 810 assessments in a representative sample of providers in areas where the programme was and was not implemented. Providers were assessed using hypothetical patient vignettes and the standardized patient method both before and after programme implementation, in 2011 and 2014, respectively. Differences in providers' performance between implementation and nonimplementation areas were assessed using multivariate difference-in-difference linear regression models. The programme did not significantly improve health-care providers' knowledge or performance with regard to childhood diarrhoea or pneumonia in Bihar. There was a persistent large gap between knowledge of appropriate care and the care actually delivered. Social franchising has received attention globally as a model for delivering high-quality care in rural areas in the developing world but supporting data are scarce. Our findings emphasize the need for sound empirical evidence before social franchising programmes are scaled up.

  5. Evaluation of a social franchising and telemedicine programme and the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia, Bihar, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardili, Soledad; Das, Veena; Rabin, Tracy L; Raj, Sunil S; Schwartz, Jeremy I; Seth, Aparna; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Miller, Grant; Vera-Hernández, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the impact on the quality of the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia in Bihar, India, of a large-scale, social franchising and telemedicine programme – the World Health Partners’ Sky Program. Methods We investigated changes associated with the programme in the knowledge and performance of health-care providers by carrying out 810 assessments in a representative sample of providers in areas where the programme was and was not implemented. Providers were assessed using hypothetical patient vignettes and the standardized patient method both before and after programme implementation, in 2011 and 2014, respectively. Differences in providers’ performance between implementation and nonimplementation areas were assessed using multivariate difference-in-difference linear regression models. Findings The programme did not significantly improve health-care providers’ knowledge or performance with regard to childhood diarrhoea or pneumonia in Bihar. There was a persistent large gap between knowledge of appropriate care and the care actually delivered. Conclusion Social franchising has received attention globally as a model for delivering high-quality care in rural areas in the developing world but supporting data are scarce. Our findings emphasize the need for sound empirical evidence before social franchising programmes are scaled up. PMID:28479635

  6. Orchestrating care through the fast-track perspective: A qualitative content analysis of the provision of individualised nursing care in orthopaedic fast-track programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2017-02-01

    The lack of individualised care in orthopaedic regimes is often explained by the extended use of patient pathways and clinical guidelines. The aim of this study was to illuminate orthopaedic nurses' perceptions and experiences of providing individual nursing care for older patients in standardised fast-track programmes after total hip or knee replacement. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted with orthopaedic nurses in orthopaedic wards at three Danish hospitals between April and June of 2015. Data were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis according to Graneheim and Lundman. The main theme of the overall interpretation was Orchestrating care through the fast-track perspective, accompanied by three sub-themes: Identifying and legitimising relevant individual care in the fast-track programme, Struggling to fit all patients in the fast-track programme and Justifying individualised care-related actions in the fast-track programme. The study concluded that, even though the nurses struggled to comply with the programme, they still found themselves compromising their nursing care and ethics to follow the standardised regime. There is a need to establish more specific inclusion criteria to maintain the effective elements in the programme and to facilitate nurses' opportunities to offer individual care, thereby ensuring that fragile patients have access to other possibilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genital infections and syndromic diagnosis among HIV-infected women in HIV care programmes in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djomand, Gaston; Gao, Hongjiang; Singa, Benson; Hornston, Sureyya; Bennett, Eddas; Odek, James; McClelland, R Scott; John-Stewart, Grace; Bock, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Control of genital infections remains challenging in most regions. Despite advocacy by the World Health Organization for syndromic case management, there are limited data on the syndromic approach, especially in HIV care settings. This study compared the syndromic approach with laboratory diagnosis among women in HIV care in Kenya. A mobile team visited 39 large HIV care programmes in Kenya and enrolled participants using population-proportionate sampling. Participants provided behavioural and clinical data with genital and blood specimens for lab testing. Among 1063 women, 68.4% had been on antiretroviral therapy >1 year; 58.9% were using cotrimoxazole prophylaxis; 51 % had CD4+T-lymphocytes Kenya have high rates of vaginal infections. Syndromic diagnosis was a poor predictor of those infections. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Physiotherapy programme reduces fatigue in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyszora, Anna; Budzyński, Jacek; Wójcik, Agnieszka; Prokop, Anna; Krajnik, Małgorzata

    2017-09-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a common and relevant symptom in patients with advanced cancer that significantly decreases their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a physiotherapy programme on CRF and other symptoms in patients diagnosed with advanced cancer. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. Sixty patients diagnosed with advanced cancer receiving palliative care were randomized into two groups: the treatment group (n = 30) and the control group (n = 30). The therapy took place three times a week for 2 weeks. The 30-min physiotherapy session included active exercises, myofascial release and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques. The control group did not exercise. The outcomes included Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) and satisfaction scores. The exercise programme caused a significant reduction in fatigue scores (BFI) in terms of severity of fatigue and its impact on daily functioning. In the control group, no significant changes in the BFI were observed. Moreover, the physiotherapy programme improved patients' general well-being and reduced the intensity of coexisting symptoms such as pain, drowsiness, lack of appetite and depression. The analysis of satisfaction scores showed that it was also positively evaluated by patients. The physiotherapy programme, which included active exercises, myofascial release and PNF techniques, had beneficial effects on CRF and other symptoms in patients with advanced cancer who received palliative care. The results of the study suggest that physiotherapy is a safe and effective method of CRF management.

  9. The effectiveness of a promotion programme on hand hygiene compliance and nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picheansathian, Wilawan; Pearson, Alan; Suchaxaya, Prakin

    2008-08-01

    This quasi-experimental study aimed to identify the impact of a promotion programme on hand hygiene practices and its effect on nosocomial infection rates in a neonatal intensive care unit of a university hospital in Thailand. The study populations were 26 nursing personnel. After implementing a hand hygiene promotion programme, compliance with hand hygiene among nursing personnel improved significantly from 6.3% before the programme to 81.2% 7 months after the programme. Compliance rate did not correlate with the intensity of patient care. Nosocomial infection rate did not decrease after the intervention, probably because of the multifactorial nature of infections. All participants agreed that promotion programme implemented in this project motivated them to practise better hand hygiene. This study indicated that multiple approaches and persistent encouragement are key factors leading to a sustained high level of appropriate hand hygiene practices among nursing personnel.

  10. Integrated care programmes for adults with chronic conditions: a meta-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Nahara Anani; Berchtold, Peter; Ullman, Klara; Busato, André; Egger, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    To review systematic reviews and meta-analyses of integrated care programmes in chronically ill patients, with a focus on methodological quality, elements of integration assessed and effects reported. Meta-review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses identified in Medline (1946-March 2012), Embase (1980-March 2012), CINHAL (1981-March 2012) and the Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews (issue 1, 2012). Methodological quality assessed by the 11-item Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) checklist; elements of integration assessed using a published list of 10 key principles of integration; effects on patient-centred outcomes, process quality, use of healthcare and costs. Twenty-seven systematic reviews were identified; conditions included chronic heart failure (CHF; 12 reviews), diabetes mellitus (DM; seven reviews), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; seven reviews) and asthma (five reviews). The median number of AMSTAR checklist items met was five: few reviewers searched for unpublished literature or described the primary studies and interventions in detail. Most reviews covered comprehensive services across the care continuum or standardization of care through inter-professional teams, but organizational culture, governance structure or financial management were rarely assessed. A majority of reviews found beneficial effects of integration, including reduced hospital admissions and re-admissions (in CHF and DM), improved adherence to treatment guidelines (DM, COPD and asthma) or quality of life (DM). Few reviews showed reductions in costs. Systematic reviews of integrated care programmes were of mixed quality, assessed only some components of integration of care, and showed consistent benefits for some outcomes but not others. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care.

  11. Why a carefully designed, nurse-led intervention failed to meet expectations : The case of the Care Programme for Palliative Radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vahedi Nikbakht-van de Sande, C.V.; Braat, C.; Vissers, A.P.; Delnoij, D.; Staa, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the research Implement and evaluate the Care Programme for Palliative Radiotherapy (CPPR) in the Outpatient Clinic of the Department of Radiotherapy, Erasmus MC-Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Methods Participatory Action Research (PAR). Qualitative descriptive design:

  12. Child oral health concerns amongst parents and primary care givers in a Sure Start local programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, B; Clarke, W; McEvoy, W; Periam, K; Zoitopoulos, L

    2010-09-01

    To conduct an oral health promotion needs assessment amongst parents and primary care givers of pre-school children in a South East London Sure Start Local Programme (SSLP). To explore the oral health concerns and oral health literacy with regard to children's oral health amongst parents and primary care givers in a South East London SSLP. A qualitative study using four in-depth focus groups with a purposive sample of 20 participants. Data were analysed using the framework method. The SSLP was identified as an important source of information, support and social interaction for participants. Participants rated the informal networks of the programme as equally authoritative as other formal sources of information. Oral health concerns included: introducing healthy eating, establishing tooth brushing, teething and access to dental care. While participants had adequate knowledge of how to prevent oral disease they cited many barriers to acting on their knowledge which included: parents' tiredness, lack of confidence in parenting skills, confusing information, widespread availability of sugary foods and drinks, and lack of local child friendly dentists. Parenting skills and the social support provided by the SSLP appeared to be integral to the introduction of positive oral health behaviours. SSLPs were seen as a trusted source of support and information for carers of pre-school children. Integration of oral health promotion into SSLPs has the potential to tap into early interventions which tackle the wider support needs of carers of pre-school children while also supporting the development of positive oral health behaviours.

  13. The development, implementation and evaluation of a transitional care programme to improve outcomes of frail older patients after hospitalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heim, Noor; Rolden, Herbert; van Fenema, Esther M

    2016-01-01

    samples. CONCLUSIONS: by involving stakeholders in designing and developing the transitional care programme, commitment of healthcare providers was secured. Feasible innovations in integrated transitional care for frail older patients after hospitalisation were sustainably implemented from within......BACKGROUND: fragmented healthcare systems are poorly suited to treat the increasing number of older patients with multimorbidity. OBJECTIVE: to report on the development, implementation and evaluation of a regional transitional care programme, aimed at improving the recovery rate of frail...... hospitalised older patients. METHODS: the programme was drafted in co-creation with organisations representing older adults, care providers and knowledge institutes. Conducting an action research project, the incidence of adverse outcomes within 3 months after hospital admission, and long-term care expenses...

  14. Understanding the drivers of interprofessional collaborative practice among HIV primary care providers and case managers in HIV care programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavronicolas, Heather A; Laraque, Fabienne; Shankar, Arti; Campbell, Claudia

    2017-05-01

    Care coordination programmes are an important aspect of HIV management whose success depends largely on HIV primary care provider (PCP) and case manager collaboration. Factors influencing collaboration among HIV PCPs and case managers remain to be studied. The study objective was to test an existing theoretical model of interprofessional collaborative practice and determine which factors play the most important role in facilitating collaboration. A self-administered, anonymous mail survey was sent to HIV PCPs and case managers in New York City. An adapted survey instrument elicited information on demographic, contextual, and perceived social exchange (trustworthiness, role specification, and relationship initiation) characteristics. The dependent variable, perceived interprofessional practice, was constructed from a validated scale. A sequential block wise regression model specifying variable entry order examined the relative importance of each group of factors and of individual variables. The analysis showed that social exchange factors were the dominant drivers of collaboration. Relationship initiation was the most important predictor of interprofessional collaboration. Additional influential factors included organisational leadership support of collaboration, practice settings, and frequency of interprofessional meetings. Addressing factors influencing collaboration among providers will help public health programmes optimally design their structural, hiring, and training strategies to foster effective social exchanges and promote collaborative working relationships.

  15. Women's participation in rural credit programmes in Bangladesh and their demand for formal health care: is there a positive impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, P

    1999-08-01

    Within the overall aim of poverty alleviation, development efforts have included credit and self-employment programmes. In Bangladesh, the major beneficiaries of such group-based credit programmes are rural women who use the loans to initiate small informal income-generating activities. This paper explores the benefits of women's participation in credit programmes on their own health seeking. Using data from a sample of 1798 households from rural Bangladesh, conducted in 1991-1992 through repeated random sampling of 87 districts covered by Grameen Bank, Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) and Bangladesh Rural Development Board (BRDB), this paper addresses the question: does women's participation in credit programmes significantly affect their use of formal health care? A non-unitary household preference model is suggested to test the hypothesis that women's empowerment through participation in these programmes results in greater control of resources for their own demand for formal health care. The analysis controls for endogeneity due to self-selection and other unobserved village level factors through the use of a weighted two stage instrumental variable approach with village level fixed effects. The findings indicate a positive impact of women's participation in credit programmes on their demand for formal health care. The policy simulations on the results of this study highlight the importance of credit programmes as a health intervention in addition to being a mechanism for women's economic empowerment.

  16. Diabetes - taking care of your feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes - foot care - self-care; Diabetic foot ulcer - foot care; Diabetic neuropathy - foot care ... Diabetes can damage the nerves and blood vessels in your feet. This damage can cause numbness and ...

  17. The role of care in nutrition programmes: current research and a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, P L; Bentley, M; Pelto, G

    2000-02-01

    The importance of cultural and behavioural factors in children's nutrition, particularly with regard to feeding, has been recognized only recently. The combination of evidence regarding the importance of caregiving behaviour for good nutrition, and improved strategies for measuring behaviour have led to a renewed interest in care. The UNICEF conceptual framework suggests that care, in addition to food security and health care services, are critical for children's survival, growth and development. The present paper focuses on the care practice of complementary feeding, specifically behavioural factors such as parental interaction patterns, feeding style and adaptation of feeding to the child's motor abilities (self-feeding or feeding by others). Three kinds of feeding styles (Birch & Fisher, 1995) are identified: controlling; laissez-faire; responsive. Probable effects of each feeding style on nutrient intake are described. A number of studies of feeding behaviour have suggested that the laissez-faire style is most frequently observed among families and communities with a higher prevalence of malnourished children. Nutrition interventions that have been able to show significant effects on outcomes, such as the Hearth Model in Vietnam (Sternin et al. 1997), have usually incorporated behavioural components in their intervention. At this time, there have been no tests of the efficacy of behavioural interventions to improve feeding practices. Research is needed to understand behavioural factors in complementary feeding, and to identify and test intervention strategies designed to improve nutrient intake of young children. Finally, the paper concludes with a discussion of how nutrition programmes might change if care were incorporated.

  18. Home Care Providers to the Rescue: A Novel First-Responder Programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steen M Hansen

    Full Text Available To describe the implementation of a novel first-responder programme in which home care providers equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs were dispatched in parallel with existing emergency medical services in the event of a suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA.We evaluated a one-year prospective study that trained home care providers in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and using an AED in cases of suspected OHCA. Data were collected from cardiac arrest case files, case files from each provider dispatch and a survey among dispatched providers. The study was conducted in a rural district in Denmark.Home care providers were dispatched to 28 of the 60 OHCAs that occurred in the study period. In ten cases the providers arrived before the ambulance service and subsequently performed CPR. AED analysis was executed in three cases and shock was delivered in one case. For 26 of the 28 cases, the cardiac arrest occurred in a private home. Ninety-five per cent of the providers who had been dispatched to a cardiac arrest reported feeling prepared for managing the initial resuscitation, including use of AED.Home care providers are suited to act as first-responders in predominantly rural and residential districts. Future follow-up will allow further evaluation of home care provider arrivals and patient survival.

  19. Home Care Providers to the Rescue: A Novel First-Responder Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Steen M.; Brøndum, Stig; Thomas, Grethe; Rasmussen, Susanne R.; Kvist, Birgitte; Christensen, Anette; Lyng, Charlotte; Lindberg, Jan; Lauritsen, Torsten L. B.; Lippert, Freddy K.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Hansen, Poul A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe the implementation of a novel first-responder programme in which home care providers equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were dispatched in parallel with existing emergency medical services in the event of a suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods We evaluated a one-year prospective study that trained home care providers in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and using an AED in cases of suspected OHCA. Data were collected from cardiac arrest case files, case files from each provider dispatch and a survey among dispatched providers. The study was conducted in a rural district in Denmark. Results Home care providers were dispatched to 28 of the 60 OHCAs that occurred in the study period. In ten cases the providers arrived before the ambulance service and subsequently performed CPR. AED analysis was executed in three cases and shock was delivered in one case. For 26 of the 28 cases, the cardiac arrest occurred in a private home. Ninety-five per cent of the providers who had been dispatched to a cardiac arrest reported feeling prepared for managing the initial resuscitation, including use of AED. Conclusion Home care providers are suited to act as first-responders in predominantly rural and residential districts. Future follow-up will allow further evaluation of home care provider arrivals and patient survival. PMID:26509532

  20. Implementation and evaluation of a clinical data management programme in a primary care centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, J

    2014-11-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) support clinical management, administration, quality assurance, research, and service planning. The aim of this study was to evaluate a clinical data management programme to improve consistency, completeness and accuracy of EHR information in a large primary care centre with 10 General Practitioners (GPs). A Clinical Data Manager was appointed to implement a Data Management Strategy which involved coding consultations using ICPC-2 coding, tailored support and ongoing individualised feedback to clinicians. Over an eighteen month period there were improvements in engagement with and level of coding. Prior to implementation (August 2011) 4 of the 10 GPs engaged in regular coding and 69% of their consultation notes were coded. After 12 months, all 10 GPs and 6 nurses were ICPC-2 coding their consultations and monthly coding levels had increased to 98%. This structured Data Management Strategy provides a feasible sustainable way to improve information management in primary care.

  1. Improving homeless persons’ utilization of primary care : Lessons to be learned from an outreach programme in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elissen, A.M.J.; van Raak, A.J.A.; Derck, E.W.C.C.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Faced with rising homelessness, countries around the world are in need of innovative approaches to caring for those without shelter, who, more often than not, suffer from severe health problems. We conducted a case study of an innovative Dutch Primary Care for the Homeless (PCH) programme to gain

  2. Joint recovery programme versus usual care - An economic evaluation of a clinical pathway for joint replacement surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunenberg, DE; van Steyn, MJ; Sluimer, JC; Bekebrede, LL; Bulstra, SK; Joore, MA

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness of a clinical pathway for patients undergoing joint replacement, the Joint Recovery Programme (JRP), as compared with usual care. The existing care process was revised to contain costs and shorten

  3. Stakeholder analysis of the Programme for Improving Mental health carE (PRIME): baseline findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makan, Amit; Fekadu, Abebaw; Murhar, Vaibhav; Luitel, Nagendra; Kathree, Tasneem; Ssebunya, Joshua; Lund, Crick

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge generated from evidence-based interventions in mental health systems research is seldom translated into policy and practice in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Stakeholder analysis is a potentially useful tool in health policy and systems research to improve understanding of policy stakeholders and increase the likelihood of knowledge translation into policy and practice. The aim of this study was to conduct stakeholder analyses in the five countries participating in the Programme for Improving Mental health carE (PRIME); evaluate a template used for cross-country comparison of stakeholder analyses; and assess the utility of stakeholder analysis for future use in mental health policy and systems research in LMIC. Using an adapted stakeholder analysis instrument, PRIME country teams in Ethiopia, India, Nepal, South Africa and Uganda identified and characterised stakeholders in relation to the proposed action: scaling-up mental health services. Qualitative content analysis was conducted for stakeholder groups across countries, and a force field analysis was applied to the data. Stakeholder analysis of PRIME has identified policy makers (WHO, Ministries of Health, non-health sector Ministries and Parliament), donors (DFID UK, DFID country offices and other donor agencies), mental health specialists, the media (national and district) and universities as the most powerful, and most supportive actors for scaling up mental health care in the respective PRIME countries. Force field analysis provided a means of evaluating cross-country stakeholder power and positions, particularly for prioritising potential stakeholder engagement in the programme. Stakeholder analysis has been helpful as a research uptake management tool to identify targeted and acceptable strategies for stimulating the demand for research amongst knowledge users, including policymakers and practitioners. Implementing these strategies amongst stakeholders at a country level will

  4. Range of Motion and Plantar Pressure Evaluation for the Effects of Self-Care Foot Exercises on Diabetic Patients with and Without Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrahoglu, Lale; Koşan, Umut; Sirin, Tuba Cerrahoglu; Ulusoy, Aslihan

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to investigate whether a home exercise for self-care program that consists of range of motion (ROM), stretching, and strengthening exercises could improve ROM for foot joints and plantar pressure distribution during walking in diabetic patients to prevent diabetic foot complications. Seventy-six diabetic patients were recruited (38 with neuropathy and 38 without neuropathy). Neuropathy and nonneuropathy groups were randomly divided into a home exercise group (n = 19) and a control group (n = 19). Exercise groups performed their own respective training programs for 4 weeks, whereas no training was done in the control group. Total contact area and plantar pressure under six foot areas before and after the exercise program were measured. Ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joint ROM were measured before and after the exercise program. In the exercise group, there were significant improvements in ROM for the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints (P .05). A home exercise program could be an effective preventive method for improving ROM for foot joints and plantar pressure distribution in diabetic patients independent of the presence of neuropathy.

  5. Economic (gross cost) analysis of systematically implementing a programme of advance care planning in three Irish nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Ronan; Murphy, Aileen; O'Caoimh, Rónán; Cornally, Nicola; Svendrovski, Anton; Daly, Brian; Fizgerald, Carol; Twomey, Cillian; McGlade, Ciara; Molloy, D William

    2016-04-26

    Although advance care planning (ACP) and the use of advanced care directives (ACD) and end-of-life care plans are associated with a reduction in inappropriate hospitalisation, there is little evidence supporting the economic benefits of such programmes. We assessed the economic impact (gross savings) of the Let Me Decide (LMD) ACP programme in Ireland, specifically the impact on hospitalisations, bed days and location of resident deaths, before and after systematic implementation of the LMD-ACP combined with a palliative care education programme. The LMD-ACP was introduced into three long-term care (LTC) facilities in Southern Ireland and outcomes were compared pre and post implementation. In addition, 90 staff were trained in a palliative care educational programme. Economic analysis including probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed. The uptake of an ACD or end-of-life care post-implementation rose from 25 to 76%. Post implementation, there were statistically significant decreases in hospitalisation rates from baseline (hospitalisation incidents declined from 27.8 to 14.6%, z = 3.96, p Economic analysis suggested a cost-reduction related to reduced hospitalisations ranging between €10 and €17.8 million/annum and reduction in ambulance transfers, estimated at €0.4 million/annum if these results were extrapolated nationally. When unit costs and LOS estimates were varied in scenario analyses, the expected cost reduction owing to reduced hospitalisations, ranged from €17.7 to €42.4 million nationally. Implementation of the LMD-ACP (ACD/end-of-life care plans combined with palliative care education) programme resulted in reduced rates of hospitalisation. Despite an increase in LOS, likely reflecting more complex care needs of admitted residents, gross costs were reduced and scenario analysis projected large annual savings if these results were extrapolated to the wider LTC population in Ireland.

  6. Charcot Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damage (neuropathy). The bones are weakened enough to fracture, and with continued walking, the foot eventually changes ... difference. Advanced therapies for foot wounds are saving limbs, restoring ... in the feet come from the lower back. Pressure or chemical change in the nerve ...

  7. COMET: a multicomponent home-based disease-management programme versus routine care in severe COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Romain; Casan-Clara, Pere; Koehler, Dieter; Tognella, Silvia; Viejo, Jose Luis; Dal Negro, Roberto W; Díaz-Lobato, Salvador; Reissig, Karina; Rodríguez González-Moro, José Miguel; Devouassoux, Gilles; Chavaillon, Jean-Michel; Botrus, Pierre; Arnal, Jean-Michel; Ancochea, Julio; Bergeron-Lafaurie, Anne; De Abajo, Carlos; Randerath, Winfried J; Bastian, Andreas; Cornelissen, Christian G; Nilius, Georg; Texereau, Joëlle B; Bourbeau, Jean

    2018-01-01

    The COPD Patient Management European Trial (COMET) investigated the efficacy and safety of a home-based COPD disease management intervention for severe COPD patients.The study was an international open-design clinical trial in COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 s management intervention or to the usual management practices at the study centre. The disease management intervention included a self-management programme, home telemonitoring, care coordination and medical management. The primary end-point was the number of unplanned all-cause hospitalisation days in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population. Secondary end-points included acute care hospitalisation days, BODE (body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnoea and exercise) index and exacerbations. Safety end-points included adverse events and deaths.For the 157 (disease management) and 162 (usual management) patients eligible for ITT analyses, all-cause hospitalisation days per year (mean±sd) were 17.4±35.4 and 22.6±41.8, respectively (mean difference -5.3, 95% CI -13.7 to -3.1; p=0.16). The disease management group had fewer per-protocol acute care hospitalisation days per year (p=0.047), a lower BODE index (p=0.01) and a lower mortality rate (1.9% versus 14.2%; pmanagement intervention did not significantly reduce unplanned all-cause hospitalisation days, but reduced acute care hospitalisation days and mortality in severe COPD patients. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  8. The Role of Team Climate in Improving the Quality of Chronic Care Delivery: A Longitudinal Study among Professionals Working with Chronically Ill Adolescents in Transitional Care Programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Objectives:This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes inimproving the quality of chronic care delivery and(2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) teamclimate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time.

  9. Effect of horticultural therapy on wellbeing among dementia day care programme participants: A mixed-methods study (Innovative Practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jodi; Mitchell, Gary; Webber, Catherine; Johnson, Karen

    2016-04-11

    Fourteen people attending an adult day programme were recruited to a structured horticultural therapy programme which took place over 10 weeks. The effects were assessed using Dementia Care Mapping and questionnaires completed by family carers. High levels of wellbeing were observed while the participants were engaged in horticultural therapy, and these were sustained once the programme was completed. This study adds to the growing evidence on the benefits of horticultural therapy for people with dementia who have enjoyed gardening in the past. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Effect of an education programme for patients with osteoarthritis in primary care - a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjärnung Åsa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative disease, considered to be one of the major public health problems. Research suggests that patient education is feasible and valuable for achieving improvements in quality of life, in function, well-being and improved coping. Since 1994, Primary Health Care in Malmö has used a patient education programme directed towards OA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of this education programme for patients with OA in primary health care in terms of self-efficacy, function and self-perceived health. Method The study was a single-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT in which the EuroQol-5D and Arthritis self-efficacy scale were used to measure self-perceived health and self-efficacy and function was measured with Grip Ability Test for the upper extremity and five different functional tests for the lower extremity. Results We found differences between the intervention group and the control group, comparing the results at baseline and after 6 months in EuroQol-5D (p Conclusion This study has shown that patient education for patients with osteoarthritis is feasible in a primary health care setting and can improve self-perceived health as well as function in some degree, but not self-efficacy. Further research to investigate the effect of exercise performance on function, as well as self-efficacy is warranted. Trial registration The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov. Registration number: NCT00979914

  11. The personal value of being part of a Tropical Health Education Trust (THET) links programme to develop a palliative care degree programme in Sub Saharan Africa: a descriptive study of the views of volunteer UK health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, B A; Kirton, J A; Downing, J; Frame, K

    2015-12-14

    There is a global need to expand palliative care services to reach the increasing number requiring end of life care. In developing countries where the incidences of cancer are rising there is an urgent need to develop the palliative care workforce. This paper reports on a UK Department for international development (DFID) initiative funded through the Tropical Health Education Trust (THET) where palliative care staff, both clinical and academic, volunteered to help to develop, support and deliver a degree in palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of the study was to explore the personal impact on the health care professionals of being part of this initiative. An evaluation approach using a confidential electronic survey containing quantitative and qualitative questions was distributed to all 17 volunteers on the programme, three months after completion of the first cohort. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and content thematic analysis. Ethical review deemed the study to be service evaluation. 82 % (14) responded and several themes emerged from the data including the positive impact on teaching and educational skills; clinical practice and finally personal development. Using a score of 1-10 (1-no impact, 10 maximum impact) 'Lifestyle choices - life work balance' (rating 7.83) had the most impact. This approach to supporting the development of palliative care in Sub-Saharan Africa through skill sharing in supporting the delivery of a degree programme in palliative care was successful in terms of delivery of the degree programme, material development and mentorship of local staff. Additionally, this study shows it provided a range of positive impacts on the volunteer health care professionals from the UK. Professional impacts including increased management skills, and being better prepared to undertake a senior role. However it is the personal impact including lifestyle choices which the volunteers reported as the highest impact

  12. Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Eefsting, J.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; Pot, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to

  13. Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Eefsting, J.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Hertogh, C.M.; Pot, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to

  14. [An art education programme for groups in the psycho-oncological after-care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geue, Kristina; Buttstädt, Marianne; Richter, Robert; Böhler, Ursula; Singer, Susanne

    2011-03-01

    In this paper the formal and contentual structure of the outpatient art education programme for oncological patients is presented. The group intervention was comprised of 22 separate sessions. The course consisted of 3 phases. The first unit helped to foster mutual understanding and to learn various experimental drawing techniques using a given topic. The second unit merged into the shaping of personal thoughts and feelings with the aim of encouraging self-perception and reflection. The aim in the third phase is to create a personal book. The effects of the intervention for the participants were examined in studies. The art therapist as well as the supervisor sees development of better coping strategies, contact with other patients and enhancement of scope of action through the regular activities as main effects. Participants reported the enlargement of means of expression, emotional stabilization, coping with illness, personal growth and contacts with other patients as meanings. This art education course enlarges the field of psycho-oncological interventions in outpatient care with a low-treshhold and resource-oriented creative programme. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Inpatient care of mentally ill people in prison: results of a year's programme of semistructured inspections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, John L; Lyne, Maggi

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the facilities for inpatient care of mentally disordered people in prison. Design Semistructured inspections conducted by doctor and nurse. Expected standards were based on healthcare quality standards published by the Prison Service or the NHS. Setting 13 prisons with inpatient beds in England and Wales subject to the prison inspectorate's routine inspection programme during 1997-8. Main outcomes measures Appraisals of quality of care against published standards. Results The 13 prisons had 348 beds, 20% of all beds in prisons. Inpatient units had between 3 and 75 beds. No doctor in charge of inpatients had completed specialist psychiatric training. 24% of nursing staff had mental health training; 32% were non-nursing trained healthcare officers. Only one prison had occupational therapy input; two had input from a clinical psychologist. Most patients were unlocked for about 3.5 hours a day and none for more than nine hours a day. Four prisons provided statistics on the use of seclusion. The average length of an episode of seclusion was 50 hours. Conclusion The quality of services for mentally ill prisoners fell far below the standards in the NHS. Patients' lives were unacceptably restricted and therapy limited. The present policy dividing inpatient care of mentally disordered prisoners between the prison service and the NHS needs reconsideration. PMID:10764360

  16. The role of team climate in improving the quality of chronic care delivery: a longitudinal study among professionals working with chronically ill adolescents in transitional care programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Nieboer, Anna P

    2014-05-22

    This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes in improving the quality of chronic care delivery and (2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time. This longitudinal study was undertaken with professionals working in hospitals and rehabilitation units that participated in the transition programme 'On Your Own Feet Ahead!' in the Netherlands. A total of 145/180 respondents (80.6%) filled in the questionnaire at the beginning of the programme (T1), and 101/173 respondents (58.4%) did so 1 year later at the end of the programme (T2). A total of 90 (52%) respondents filled in the questionnaire at both time points. Two-tailed, paired t tests were used to investigate improvements over time and multilevel analyses to investigate the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery. Transition programme. Quality of chronic care delivery measured with the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care Short version (ACIC-S). The overall ACIC-S score at T1 was 5.90, indicating basic or intermediate support for chronic care delivery. The mean ACIC-S score at T2 significantly improved to 6.70, indicating advanced support for chronic care. After adjusting for the quality of chronic care delivery at T1 and significant respondents' characteristics, multilevel regression analyses showed that team climate at T1 (pteam climate (pteam climate to enhance the quality of chronic care delivery to chronically ill adolescents. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Effect of a training programme on blood culture contamination rate in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, M M; Arias-Rivera, S; Fraile-Gamo, P; Jareño-Collado, R; López-Román, S; Vadillo-Obesso, P; García-González, S; Pulido-Martos, M T; Sánchez-Muñoz, E I; Cacho-Calvo, J; Martín-Pellicer, A; Panadero-Del Olmo, L; Frutos-Vivar, F

    2018-03-30

    Blood culture contamination can occur from extraction to processing; its rate should not exceed 3%. To evaluate the impact of a training programme on the rate of contaminated blood cultures after the implementation of sample extraction recommendations based on the best evidence. Prospective before-after study in a polyvalent intensive care unit with 18 beds. Two phases were established (January-June 2012, October 2012-October 2015) with a training period between them. Main recommendations: sterile technique, surgical mask, double skin disinfection (70° alcohol and 2% alcoholic chlorhexidine), 70° alcohol disinfection of culture flasks and injection of samples without changing needles. Including all blood cultures of patients with extraction request. demographic, severity, pathology, reason for admission, stay and results of blood cultures (negative, positive and contaminated). Basic descriptive statistics: mean (standard deviation), median (interquartile range) and percentage (95% confidence interval). Calculated contamination rates per 100 blood cultures extracted. Bivariate analysis between periods. Four hundred and eight patients were included. Eight hundred and forty-one blood cultures were taken, 33 of which were contaminated. In the demographic variables, severity, diagnosis and stay of patients with contaminated samples, no differences were observed from those with uncontaminated samples. Pre-training vs post-training contamination rates: 14 vs 5.6 per 100 blood cultures extracted (P=.00003). An evidence-based training programme reduced the contamination of samples. It is necessary to continue working on the planning of activities and care to improve the detection of pollutants and prevent contamination of samples. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwijsen, S A; Gerritsen, D L; Eefsting, J A; Smalbrugge, M; Hertogh, C M P M; Pot, A M

    2015-01-01

    Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to diminishing the challenging behaviour of residents, improve job satisfaction and reduce the care staff's feelings of burnout. To determine the effects of a care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia on the burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff. The care programme was implemented according to a stepped wedge design in which care units were randomly divided over five groups with different time points of starting with implementation. 17 Dutch dementia special care units. Care staff members of the 17 units. The care programme consists of an education package and of various structured assessment tools that guide professionals through the multidisciplinary detection, analysis, treatment and evaluation of treatment of challenging behaviour. Burnout, job satisfaction and job demands were measured before implementation, halfway through the implementation process and after all the care units had implemented the care programme. Burnout was measured with the Dutch version of the Maslach burnout inventory (UBOS-C, three subscales); job satisfaction and job demands were measured with subscales of the Leiden Quality of Work Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to determine effects. Care staff could not be blinded for the intervention. Of the 1441 questionnaires, 645 were returned (response 45%, 318 control measurements, 327 intervention measurements) by 380 unique care staff members. Significant effects were found on job satisfaction (0.93, 95% CI 0.48-1.38). On the other outcomes, no significant changes in the scores were found. Positive effects of using the Grip on Challenging behaviour care programme were found on job

  19. Diabetes and Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... too much pressure on your toes. If your feet have changed shape, such as from Charcot’s foot, you may need ... care visit if you have changes in the shape of your feet loss of feeling in your feet peripheral artery ...

  20. Implementation of a web-based national child health-care programme in a local context: A complex facilitator role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, Johanna; Olander, Ewy; Anderberg, Peter; Berglund, Johan Sanmartin

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate child health-care coordinators' experiences of being a facilitator for the implementation of a new national child health-care programme in the form of a web-based national guide. The study was based on eight remote, online focus groups, using Skype for Business. A qualitative content analysis was performed. The analysis generated three categories: adapt to a local context, transition challenges and led by strong incentives. There were eight subcategories. In the latent analysis, the theme 'Being a facilitator: a complex role' was formed to express the child health-care coordinators' experiences. Facilitating a national guideline or decision support in a local context is a complex task that requires an advocating and mediating role. For successful implementation, guidelines and decision support, such as a web-based guide and the new child health-care programme, must match professional consensus and needs and be seen as relevant by all. Participation in the development and a strong bottom-up approach was important, making the web-based guide and the programme relevant to whom it is intended to serve, and for successful implementation. The study contributes valuable knowledge when planning to implement a national web-based decision support and policy programme in a local health-care context.

  1. TB Notification from Private Health Sector in Delhi, India: Challenges Encountered by Programme Personnel and Private Health Care Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahasweta Satpati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify the challenges encountered by private health care providers (PHCP to notify tuberculosis cases through a programme developed web-based portal mechanism called “NIKSHAY.” Study Design. It is a descriptive qualitative study conducted at two revised national tuberculosis control programme (RNTCP districts of New Delhi. The study included in-depth interviews of PHCP registered with “NIKSHAY” and RNTCP programme personnel. Grounded theory was used to conceptualise the latent social patterns in implementation of tuberculosis case notification process and promptly identifying their challenges. Results. The analysis resulted in identification of three broad themes: (a system implementation by RNTCP: it emphasizes the TB notification process by the RNTCP programme personnel; (b challenges faced by PHCP for TB notification with five different subthemes; and (c perceived gaps and suggestions: to improvise the TB notification process for the private health sector. The challenges encountered by PHCP were mainly related to unsystematic planning and suboptimal implementation by programme personnel at the state and district level. The PHCP lacked clarity on the need for TB notification. Conclusion. Implementation of TB notification among private health care providers requires systematic planning by the programme personnel. The process should be user-friendly with additional benefits to the patients.

  2. Quality of care in patients with psoriasis: an initial clinical study of an international disease management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korte, J; Van Onselen, J; Kownacki, S; Sprangers, M A G; Bos, J D

    2005-01-01

    Patients with psoriasis have to cope with their disease for many years or even throughout their entire life. To provide optimal care, a disease management programme was developed. This programme consisted of disease education, disease management training, and psychological support, together with topical treatment. To test a disease management programme in dermatological practice, to assess patients' satisfaction with this programme, and adherence to topical treatment. Additionally, disease severity and quality of life were assessed. An initial clinical investigation was conducted in 10 European treatment centres. A total of 330 patients were included. Patient satisfaction, adherence, disease severity and quality of life were measured with study-specific and standardized self-report questionnaires. Patients reported a high degree of satisfaction with the programme, and a high degree of adherence to topical treatment. Disease severity and quality of life significantly improved. The programme was well received by the participating professionals. The disease management programme was found to be a useful tool in the management of psoriasis, providing patients with relief from the burden of psoriasis in everyday life. A full-scale evaluation is recommended.

  3. Preparing palliative home care nurses to act as facilitators for physicians' learning: Evaluation of a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pype, Peter; Mertens, Fien; Wens, Johan; Stes, Ann; Van den Eynden, Bart; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-05-01

    Palliative care requires a multidisciplinary care team. General practitioners often ask specialised palliative home care teams for support. Working with specialised nurses offers learning opportunities, also called workplace learning. This can be enhanced by the presence of a learning facilitator. To describe the development and evaluation of a training programme for nurses in primary care. The programme aimed to prepare palliative home care team nurses to act as facilitators for general practitioners' workplace learning. A one-group post-test only design (quantitative) and semi-structured interviews (qualitative) were used. A multifaceted train-the-trainer programme was designed. Evaluation was done through assignments with individual feedback, summative assessment through videotaped encounters with simulation-physicians and individual interviews after a period of practice implementation. A total of 35 nurses followed the programme. The overall satisfaction was high. Homework assignments interfered with the practice workload but showed to be fundamental in translating theory into practice. Median score on the summative assessment was 7 out of 14 with range 1-13. Interviews revealed some aspects of the training (e.g. incident analysis) to be too difficult for implementation or to be in conflict with personal preferences (focus on patient care instead of facilitating general practitioners' learning). Training palliative home care team nurses as facilitator of general practitioners' workplace learning is a feasible but complex intervention. Personal characteristics, interpersonal relationships and contextual variables have to be taken into account. Training expert palliative care nurses to facilitate general practitioners' workplace learning requires careful and individualised mentoring. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Tailored educational supportive care programme on sleep quality and psychological distress in patients with heart failure: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yia-Ling; Chiou, Ai-Fu; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2016-09-01

    Up to 74% of patients with heart failure report poor sleep in Taiwan. Poor symptom management or sleep hygiene may affect patients' sleep quality. An effective educational programme was important to improve patients' sleep quality and psychological distress. However, research related to sleep disturbance in patients with heart failure is limited in Taiwan. To examine the effects of a tailored educational supportive care programme on sleep disturbance and psychological distress in patients with heart failure. randomised controlled trial. Eighty-four patients with heart failure were recruited from an outpatient department of a medical centre in Taipei, Taiwan. Patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=43) or the control group (n=41). Patients in the intervention group received a 12-week tailored educational supportive care programme including individualised education on sleep hygiene, self-care, emotional support through a monthly nursing visit at home, and telephone follow-up counselling every 2 weeks. The control group received routine nursing care. Data were collected at baseline, the 4th, 8th, and 12th weeks after patients' enrollment. Outcome measures included sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, anxiety, and depression. The intervention group exhibited significant improvement in the level of sleep quality and daytime sleepiness after 12 weeks of the supportive nursing care programme, whereas the control group exhibited no significant differences. Anxiety and depression scores were increased significantly in the control group at the 12th week (p.05). Compared with the control group, the intervention group had significantly greater improvement in sleep quality (β=-2.22, pquality and psychological distress in patients with heart failure. We suggested that this supportive nursing care programme should be applied to clinical practice in cardiovascular nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Why a carefully designed, nurse-led intervention failed to meet expectations: the case of the Care Programme for Palliative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi Nikbakht-Van de Sande, C V M; Braat, C; Visser, A Ph; Delnoij, D M J; van Staa, A L

    2014-04-01

    Implement and evaluate the Care Programme for Palliative Radiotherapy (CPPR) in the Outpatient Clinic of the Department of Radiotherapy, Erasmus MC-Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Participatory Action Research (PAR). Qualitative descriptive design: participatory observations, semi-structured interviews with patients and professionals and focus groups with professionals; content analysis of documents. Patients with impending paraplegia due to metastatic spinal cord compression, nurse practitioners (NPs), nurse manager, staff and ward nurses, radiographers, radiotherapists and medical doctors. After a shift from inpatient to outpatient radiotherapy treatment, patients and healthcare professionals perceived shortcomings in the oncological chain care. The CPPR was developed in a participative way giving a key role to the NP. Evaluation after implementation of the programme showed that patients and professionals were predominantly positive about its effects. However, implementation was not sustained due to lack of institutional and managerial support. The technological innovation far preceded the organisational changes needed to provide innovative, patient-centred care. Implementing this programme with a central role for the NP was seen as the solution to the problems identified. However, in spite of the systematic approach using PAR, the programme was not successful in bringing about sustained improvements. NPs fulfil a valuable role in the care and support of patients with palliative care needs but need institutional support. More attention should have paid to the organisational context. Involve all relevant actors; use a participatory approach to enhance commitment; ensure the support of management during the whole project. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding and improving access to prompt and effective malaria treatment and care in rural Tanzania: the ACCESS Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Manuel W; Iteba, Nelly; Makemba, Ahmed; Mshana, Christopher; Lengeler, Christian; Obrist, Brigit; Schulze, Alexander; Nathan, Rose; Dillip, Angel; Alba, Sandra; Mayumana, Iddy; Khatib, Rashid A; Njau, Joseph D; Mshinda, Hassan

    2007-06-29

    Prompt access to effective treatment is central in the fight against malaria. However, a variety of interlinked factors at household and health system level influence access to timely and appropriate treatment and care. Furthermore, access may be influenced by global and national health policies. As a consequence, many malaria episodes in highly endemic countries are not treated appropriately. The ACCESS Programme aims at understanding and improving access to prompt and effective malaria treatment and care in a rural Tanzanian setting. The programme's strategy is based on a set of integrated interventions, including social marketing for improved care seeking at community level as well as strengthening of quality of care at health facilities. This is complemented by a project that aims to improve the performance of drug stores. The interventions are accompanied by a comprehensive set of monitoring and evaluation activities measuring the programme's performance and (health) impact. Baseline data demonstrated heterogeneity in the availability of malaria treatment, unavailability of medicines and treatment providers in certain areas as well as quality problems with regard to drugs and services. The ACCESS Programme is a combination of multiple complementary interventions with a strong evaluation component. With this approach, ACCESS aims to contribute to the development of a more comprehensive access framework and to inform and support public health professionals and policy-makers in the delivery of improved health services.

  7. Understanding and improving access to prompt and effective malaria treatment and care in rural Tanzania: the ACCESS Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Sandra

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prompt access to effective treatment is central in the fight against malaria. However, a variety of interlinked factors at household and health system level influence access to timely and appropriate treatment and care. Furthermore, access may be influenced by global and national health policies. As a consequence, many malaria episodes in highly endemic countries are not treated appropriately. Project The ACCESS Programme aims at understanding and improving access to prompt and effective malaria treatment and care in a rural Tanzanian setting. The programme's strategy is based on a set of integrated interventions, including social marketing for improved care seeking at community level as well as strengthening of quality of care at health facilities. This is complemented by a project that aims to improve the performance of drug stores. The interventions are accompanied by a comprehensive set of monitoring and evaluation activities measuring the programme's performance and (health impact. Baseline data demonstrated heterogeneity in the availability of malaria treatment, unavailability of medicines and treatment providers in certain areas as well as quality problems with regard to drugs and services. Conclusion The ACCESS Programme is a combination of multiple complementary interventions with a strong evaluation component. With this approach, ACCESS aims to contribute to the development of a more comprehensive access framework and to inform and support public health professionals and policy-makers in the delivery of improved health services.

  8. Linking research to practice: the organisation and implementation of The Netherlands health and social care improvement programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovretveit, John; Klazinga, Niek

    2013-01-01

    Both public and private health and social care services are facing increased and changing demands to improve quality and reduce costs. To enable local services to respond to these demands, governments and other organisations have established large scale improvement programmes. These usually seek to

  9. Grip on challenging behaviour: a multidisciplinary care programme for managing behavioural problems in nursing home residents with dementia. Study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Bosmans, J.E.; Tulder, M.W. van; Eefsting, J.A.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Pot, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Behavioural problems are common in nursing home residents with dementia and they often are burdensome for both residents and nursing staff. In this study, the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a new care programme for managing behavioural problems will be evaluated. METHODS/DESIGN:

  10. Grip on challenging behaviour: a multidisciplinary care programme for managing behavioural problems in nursing home residents with dementia. Study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Bosmans, J.E.; van Tulder, M.W.; Eefsting, J.A.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Pot, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Behavioural problems are common in nursing home residents with dementia and they often are burdensome for both residents and nursing staff. In this study, the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a new care programme for managing behavioural problems will be evaluated. Methods/Design.

  11. Behaviors Predicting Foot Lesions in Patients with Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Suico, Jeffrey G; Marriott, Deanna J; Vinicor, Frank; Litzelman, Debra K

    1998-01-01

    Associations between specific foot-care behaviors and foot lesions in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus were prospectively investigated. Data from a randomized controlled trial for preventing diabetic foot lesions were analyzed as a prospective cohort using logistic regression. Independent variables included foot-care behaviors, patient self-foot examination, going barefoot, availability of foot-care assistance, and visits to health-care providers. The dependent variable w...

  12. An evaluation of an interprofessional master's level programme in children's palliative care. Part 1 the students' evaluation of the programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nicholl, Honor

    2014-04-01

    In 2010\\/12 an innovative children\\'s palliative care interprofessional educational project funded by the Irish Hospice Foundation was undertaken in a University faculty (Trinity College Dublin). This initiative responded to international educational recommendations to meet the palliative care needs of children. The project involved the development and delivery of 3 standalone modules at Master\\'s level and a substantive research evaluation of the project to examine stakeholders and students perspectives to provide an insight into their experiences and to gather data for future developments. The research evaluation was conducted in two parts, part one sought students\\' evaluation and part two sought stakeholders\\

  13. Exploring weight loss services in primary care and staff views on using a web-based programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J Ware

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Demand is increasing for primary care to deliver effective weight management services to patients, but research suggests that staff feel inadequately resourced for such a role. Supporting service delivery with a free and effective web-based weight management programme could maximise primary care resource and provide cost-effective support for patients. However, integration of ehealth into primary care may face challenges.Objectives To explore primary care staff experiences of delivering weight management services and their perceptions of a web-based weight management programme to aid service delivery.Methods Focus groups were conducted with primary care physicians, nurses and healthcare assistants (n = 36 involved in delivering weight loss services. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis.Results Participants thought that primary care should be involved in delivering weight management, especially when weight was aggravating health problems. However, they felt under-resourced to deliver these services and unsure as to the effectiveness of their input, as routine services were not evaluated. Beliefs that current services were ineffective resulted in staff reluctance to allocate more resources. Participants were hopeful that supplementing practice with a web-based weight management programme would enhance patient services and promote service evaluation.Conclusions Although primary care staff felt they should deliver weight loss services, low levels of faith in the efficacy of current treatments resulted in provision of under-resourced and ‘ad hoc’ services. Integration of a web-based weight loss programme that promotes service evaluation and provides a cost-effective option for supporting patients may encourage practices to invest more in weight management services.

  14. Exploring weight loss services in primary care and staff views on using a web-based programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Lisa J; Williams, Sarah; Bradbury, Katherine; Brant, Catherine; Little, Paul; Hobbs, F D Richard; Yardley, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Demand is increasing for primary care to deliver effective weight management services to patients, but research suggests that staff feel inadequately resourced for such a role. Supporting service delivery with a free and effective web-based weight management programme could maximise primary care resource and provide cost-effective support for patients. However, integration of e-health into primary care may face challenges. To explore primary care staff experiences of delivering weight management services and their perceptions of a web-based weight management programme to aid service delivery. Focus groups were conducted with primary care physicians, nurses and healthcare assistants (n = 36) involved in delivering weight loss services. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Participants thought that primary care should be involved in delivering weight management, especially when weight was aggravating health problems. However, they felt under-resourced to deliver these services and unsure as to the effectiveness of their input, as routine services were not evaluated. Beliefs that current services were ineffective resulted in staff reluctance to allocate more resources. Participants were hopeful that supplementing practice with a web-based weight management programme would enhance patient services and promote service evaluation. Although primary care staff felt they should deliver weight loss services, low levels of faith in the efficacy of current treatments resulted in provision of under-resourced and 'ad hoc' services. Integration of a web-based weight loss programme that promotes service evaluation and provides a cost-effective option for supporting patients may encourage practices to invest more in weight management services.

  15. Improving CKD Diagnosis and Blood Pressure Control in Primary Care: A Tailored Multifaceted Quality Improvement Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Humphreys

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health issue. From 2009 to 2014, the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Greater Manchester (NIHR CLAHRC GM in England ran 4 phased, 12-month quality improvement (QI projects with 49 primary care practices in GM. Two measureable aims were set – halve undiagnosed CKD in participating practices using modelled estimates of prevalence; and optimise blood pressure (BP control (<140/90 mm Hg in CKD patients without proteinuria; <130/80 mm Hg in CKD patients with proteinuria for 75% of recorded cases of CKD. The 4 projects ran as follows: P1 = Project 1 with 19 practices (September 2009 to September 2010, P2 = Project 2 with 11 practices (March 2011 to March 2012, P3 = Project 3 with 12 practices (September 2012 to October 2013, and P4 = Project 4 with 7 practices (April 2013 to March 2014. Methods: Multifaceted intervention approaches were tailored based on a contextual analysis of practice support needs. Data were collected from practices by facilitators at baseline and again at project close, with self-reported data regularly requested from practices throughout the projects. Results: Halving undiagnosed CKD as per aim was exceeded in 3 of the 4 projects. The optimising BP aim was met in 2 projects. Total CKD cases after the programme increased by 2,347 (27% from baseline to 10,968 in a total adult population (aged ≥18 years of 231,568. The percentage of patients who managed to appropriate BP targets increased from 34 to 74% (P1, from 60 to 83% (P2, from 68 to 71% (P3, and from 63 to 76% (P4. In nonproteinuric CKD patients, 88, 90, 89, and 91%, respectively, achieved a target BP of <140/90 mm Hg. In proteinuric CKD patients, 69, 46, 48, and 45%, respectively, achieved a tighter target of <130/80 mm Hg. Analysis of national data over similar timeframes indicated that practices participating in the programme achieved

  16. Systematic review of economic evaluations of human cell-derived wound care products for the treatment of venous leg and diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langer Astrid

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue engineering is an emerging field. Novel bioengineered skin substitutes and genetically derived growth factors offer innovative approaches to reduce the burden of diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers for both patients and health care systems. However, they frequently are very costly. Based on a systematic review of the literature, this study assesses the cost-effectiveness of these growth factors and tissue-engineered artificial skin for treating chronic wounds. Methods On the basis of an extensive explorative search, an appropriate algorithm for a systematic database search was developed. The following databases were searched: BIOSIS Previews, CRD databases, Cochrane Library, EconLit, Embase, Medline, and Web of Science. Only completed and published trial- or model-based studies which contained a full economic evaluation of growth factors and bioengineered skin substitutes for the treatment of chronic wounds were included. Two reviewers independently undertook the assessment of study quality. The relevant studies were assessed by a modified version of the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria (CHEC list and a published checklist for evaluating model-based economic evaluations. Results Eleven health economic evaluations were included. Three biotechnology products were identified for which topical growth factors or bioengineered skin substitutes for the treatment of chronic leg ulceration were economically assessed: (1 Apligraf®, a bilayered living human skin equivalent indicated for the treatment of diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers (five studies; (2 Dermagraft®, a human fibroblast-derived dermal substitute, which is indicated only for use in the treatment of full-thickness diabetic foot ulcers (one study; (3 REGRANEX® Gel, a human platelet-derived growth factor for the treatment of deep neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers (five studies. The studies considered in this review were of varying and partly low

  17. Integrating multiple programme and policy approaches to hepatitis C prevention and care for injection drug users: a comprehensive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhead, Guthrie S; Klein, Susan J; Candelas, Alma R; O'Connell, Daniel A; Rothman, Jeffrey R; Feldman, Ira S; Tsui, Dennis S; Cotroneo, Richard A; Flanigan, Colleen A

    2007-10-01

    New York State is home to an estimated 230,000 individuals chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and roughly 171,500 active injection drug users (IDUs). HCV/HIV co-infection is common and models of service delivery that effectively meet IDUs' needs are required. A HCV strategic plan has stressed integration. HCV prevention and care are integrated within health and human service settings, including HIV/AIDS organisations and drug treatment programmes. Other measures that support comprehensive HCV services for IDUs include reimbursement, clinical guidelines, training and HCV prevention education. Community and provider collaborations inform programme and policy development. IDUs access 5 million syringes annually through harm reduction/syringe exchange programmes (SEPs) and a statewide syringe access programme. Declines in HCV prevalence amongst IDUs in New York City coincided with improved syringe availability. New models of care successfully link IDUs at SEPs and in drug treatment to health care. Over 7000 Medicaid recipients with HCV/HIV co-infection had health care encounters related to their HCV in a 12-month period and 10,547 claims for HCV-related medications were paid. The success rate of transitional case management referrals to drug treatment is over 90%. Training and clinical guidelines promote provider knowledge about HCV and contribute to quality HCV care for IDUs. Chart reviews of 2570 patients with HIV in 2004 documented HCV status 97.4% of the time, overall, in various settings. New HCV surveillance systems are operational. Despite this progress, significant challenges remain. A comprehensive, public health approach, using multiple strategies across systems and mobilizing multiple sectors, can enhance IDUs access to HCV prevention and care. A holisitic approach with integrated services, including for HCV-HIV co-infected IDUs is needed. Leadership, collaboration and resources are essential.

  18. Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers in the Home: Video Consultations as an Alternative to Outpatient Hospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Clemensen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether video consultations in the home can support a viable alternative to visits to the hospital outpatient clinic for patients with diabetic foot ulcers. And furthermore whether patients, relatives, visiting nurses, and experts at the hospital will experience satisfaction and increased confidence with this new course of treatment. Participatory design methods were applied as well as field observations, semistructured interviews, focus groups, and qualitative analysis of transcriptions of telemedical consultations conducted during a pilot test. This study shows that it is possible for experts at the hospital to conduct clinical examinations and decision making at a distance, in close cooperation with the visiting nurse and the patient. The visiting nurse experienced increased confidence with the treatment of the foot ulcer and characterized the consultations as a learning situation. All patients expressed satisfaction and felt confidence with this new way of working.

  19. A pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reygan, Finn C G

    2012-05-09

    OBJECTIVE: The international literature points to the specific cancer risks and palliative care needs of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) populations. However, with the exception of a programme in the USA, there is a lack of training internationally for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. In Ireland, a training project funded by the Irish Cancer Society, the Irish Hospice Foundation and the Health Service Executive developed a training pilot programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. METHODS: Over 200 (N = 201) oncology and palliative care staff participated in 17 brief, 50-min trainings in pilot sites. Evaluation of the training included self-report questionnaires at the end of each training and an evaluation interview with one participant from each of the four sites. RESULTS: The majority of participants reported that they would recommend the training to their colleagues, were interested in further training in the area and found the training useful for their practice. They also reported becoming more familiar with LGB-related language and terminology, became more knowledgeable of LGB health issues and reported becoming more confident in providing care to LGB patients. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations are that the training be made available across the health services in Ireland and included in postgraduate courses for trainee health and social care professionals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Foot pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that you were born with or develops later Injury Shoes that fit poorly or do not have much cushioning Too much walking or other sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, which becomes red, swollen, ...

  1. A disease management programme for patients with diabetes mellitus is associated with improved quality of care within existing budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuten, L M G; Vrijhoef, H J M; Landewé-Cleuren, S; Schaper, N; Van Merode, G G; Spreeuwenberg, C

    2007-10-01

    To assess the impact of a disease management programme for patients with diabetes mellitus (Type 1 and Type 2) on cost-effectiveness, quality of life and patient self-management. By organizing care in accordance with the principles of disease management, it is aimed to increase quality of care within existing budgets. Single-group, pre-post design with 2-year follow-up in 473 patients. Substantial significant improvements in glycaemic control, health-related quality of life (HRQL) and patient self-management were found. No significant changes were detected in total costs of care. The probability that the disease management programme is cost-effective compared with usual care amounts to 74%, expressed in an average saving of 117 per additional life year at 5% improved HRQL. Introduction of a disease management programme for patients with diabetes is associated with improved intermediate outcomes within existing budgets. Further research should focus on long-term cost-effectiveness, including diabetic complications and mortality, in a controlled setting or by using decision-analytic modelling techniques.

  2. The impact of the Dementia ABC educational programme on competence in person-centred dementia care and job satisfaction of care staff.

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    Rokstad, Anne Marie Mork; Døble, Betty Sandvik; Engedal, Knut; Kirkevold, Øyvind; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Selbaek, Geir

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the Dementia ABC educational programme on the participants' competence in person-centred care and on their level of job satisfaction. The development of person-centred care for people with dementia is highly recommended, and staff training that enhances such an approach may positively influence job satisfaction and the possibility of recruiting and retaining competent care staff. The study is a longitudinal survey, following participants over a period of 24 months with a 6-month follow-up after completion of the programme. A total of 1,795 participants from 90 municipalities in Norway are included, and 580 from 52 municipalities completed all measurements. The person-centred care assessment tool (P-CAT) is used to evaluate person-centredness. The psychosocial workplace environment and job satisfaction questionnaire is used to investigate job satisfaction. Measurements are made at baseline, and after 12, 24 and 30 months. A statistically significant increase in the mean P-CAT subscore of person-centred practice and the P-CAT total score is found at 12, 24 and 30 months compared to baseline. A statistically significant decrease in scores in the P-CAT subscore for organisational support is found at all points of measurement compared to baseline. Statistically significant increases in satisfaction with workload, personal and professional development, demands balanced with qualifications and variation in job tasks as elements of job satisfaction are reported. The evaluation of the Dementia ABC educational programme identifies statistically significant increases in scores of person-centredness and job satisfaction, indicating that the training has a positive impact. The results indicate that a multicomponent training programme including written material, multidisciplinary reflection groups and workshops has a positive impact on the development of person-centred care practice and the job satisfaction of care

  3. Awareness among tertiary care doctors about Pharmacovigilance Programme of India: Do endocrinologists differ from others?

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    Pramod Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Reporting adverse drug reactions (ADRs associated with drug use is an important factor in patient safety. Majority of ADRs are preventable through improved prescribing and monitoring. Endocrinologists prescribe drugs with actions on almost all organs and for relatively longer durations. ADR are expected following the use of these drugs. Pharmacovigilance is the study of drug-related adverse effects aimed at protecting patients and public from drug-related harms. The concept of pharmacovigilance is relatively new in India, and this survey is an attempt to explore awareness among doctors of an establishing institution of national importance. Materials and Methods: The survey was conducted on faculty and resident doctors by administering a written structured questionnaire in a voluntary manner. The questionnaire contained questions meant to evaluate their awareness, understanding, and misconception about ADR reporting. Identity of the responder was kept confidential. Results: A total of 106 (faculty = 56; residents = 50 participated in survey. The most common cause cited for not reporting an ADR was “do not know how to report” by 64.15%. Majority of them (64% had no information about the Pharmacovigilance Programme of India (PvPI, and only few (8.5% had actually reported or published an ADR. Interpretation and Conclusions: ADRs are major public health problem that needs to be addressed at all levels of health care. High index of clinical suspicion are crucial for their timely detection and management. Various educational interventions have shown to improve medical professionals' awareness, understanding about ADRs and in their reporting behavior. PvPI is an important initiative toward ensuring patient safety.

  4. Integrating care for people with mental illness: the Care Programme Approach in England and its implications for long-term conditions management

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    Nick Goodwin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This policy paper considers what the long-term conditions policies in England and other countries could learn from the experience of the Care Programme Approach (CPA. The CPA was introduced in England in April 1991 as the statutory framework for people requiring support in the community for more severe and enduring mental health problems. The CPA approach is an example of a long-standing 'care co-ordination' model that seeks to develop individualised care plans and then attempt to integrate care for patients from a range of providers.Policy description: The CPA experience is highly relevant to both the English and international debates on the future of long-term conditions management where the agenda has focused on developing co-ordinated care planning and delivery between health and social care; to prioritise upstream interventions that promote health and wellbeing; and to provide for a more personalised service.Conclusion: This review of the CPA experience suggests that there is the potential for better care integration for those patients with multiple or complex needs where a strategy of personalised care planning and pro-active care co-ordination is provided. However, such models will not reach their full potential unless a number of preconditions are met including: clear eligibility criteria; standardised measures of service quality; a mix of governance and incentives to hold providers accountable for such quality; and genuine patient involvement in their own care plans.Implications: Investment and professional support to the role of the care co-ordinator is particularly crucial. Care co-ordinators require the requisite skills and competencies to act as a  care professional  to the patient as well as to have the power to exert authority among other care professionals to ensure multidisciplinary care plans are implemented successfully. Attention to inter-professional practice, culture, leadership and organisational

  5. Integrating care for people with mental illness: the Care Programme Approach in England and its implications for long-term conditions management

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    Nick Goodwin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This policy paper considers what the long-term conditions policies in England and other countries could learn from the experience of the Care Programme Approach (CPA. The CPA was introduced in England in April 1991 as the statutory framework for people requiring support in the community for more severe and enduring mental health problems. The CPA approach is an example of a long-standing 'care co-ordination' model that seeks to develop individualised care plans and then attempt to integrate care for patients from a range of providers. Policy description: The CPA experience is highly relevant to both the English and international debates on the future of long-term conditions management where the agenda has focused on developing co-ordinated care planning and delivery between health and social care; to prioritise upstream interventions that promote health and wellbeing; and to provide for a more personalised service. Conclusion: This review of the CPA experience suggests that there is the potential for better care integration for those patients with multiple or complex needs where a strategy of personalised care planning and pro-active care co-ordination is provided. However, such models will not reach their full potential unless a number of preconditions are met including: clear eligibility criteria; standardised measures of service quality; a mix of governance and incentives to hold providers accountable for such quality; and genuine patient involvement in their own care plans. Implications: Investment and professional support to the role of the care co-ordinator is particularly crucial. Care co-ordinators require the requisite skills and competencies to act as a  care professional  to the patient as well as to have the power to exert authority among other care professionals to ensure multidisciplinary care plans are implemented successfully. Attention to inter-professional practice, culture, leadership and organisational

  6. Mycetoma foot

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    Somnath Gooptu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is an uncommon chronic granulomatous infective disease of the skin, dermis and subcutaneous tissues predominantly seen in tropical countries. A patient presented to our hospital with the swelling of the left foot with a healed sinus and a painful nodule. He gave a history of sinuses in the left foot from which there was discharge of yellow granules. Culture of the ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology of the nodule revealed growths of Nocardia species. The patient was treated with a multi-drug therapy along with debridement of the painful nodule. He experienced symptomatic relief and a regression of the swelling within the three months of follow-up so far. Due to the relatively slow progression of the disease, patients are diagnosed at a late stage. Hence, emphasis should be placed on health education and the importance of wearing footwear.

  7. From theoretical concepts to policies and applied programmes: the landscape of integration of oral health in primary care.

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    Harnagea, Hermina; Lamothe, Lise; Couturier, Yves; Esfandiari, Shahrokh; Voyer, René; Charbonneau, Anne; Emami, Elham

    2018-02-15

    Despite its importance, the integration of oral health into primary care is still an emerging practice in the field of health care services. This scoping review aims to map the literature and provide a summary on the conceptual frameworks, policies and programs related to this concept. Using the Levac et al. six-stage framework, we performed a systematic search of electronic databases, organizational websites and grey literature from 1978 to April 2016. All relevant original publications with a focus on the integration of oral health into primary care were retrieved. Content analyses were performed to synthesize the results. From a total of 1619 citations, 67 publications were included in the review. Two conceptual frameworks were identified. Policies regarding oral heath integration into primary care were mostly oriented toward common risk factors approach and care coordination processes. In general, oral health integrated care programs were designed in the public health sector and based on partnerships with various private and public health organizations, governmental bodies and academic institutions. These programmes used various strategies to empower oral health integrated care, including building interdisciplinary networks, training non-dental care providers, oral health champion modelling, enabling care linkages and care coordinated process, as well as the use of e-health technologies. The majority of studies on the programs outcomes were descriptive in nature without reporting long-term outcomes. This scoping review provided a comprehensive overview on the concept of integration of oral health in primary care. The findings identified major gaps in reported programs outcomes mainly because of the lack of related research. However, the results could be considered as a first step in the development of health care policies that support collaborative practices and patient-centred care in the field of primary care sector.

  8. Impact of a person-centred dementia care training programme on hospital staff attitudes, role efficacy and perceptions of caring for people with dementia: A repeated measures study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surr, C A; Smith, S J; Crossland, J; Robins, J

    2016-01-01

    People with dementia occupy up to one quarter of acute hospital beds. However, the quality of care delivered to this patient group is of national concern. Staff working in acute hospitals report lack of knowledge, skills and confidence in caring for people with dementia. There is limited evidence about the most effective approaches to supporting acute hospital staff to deliver more person-centred care. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a specialist training programme for acute hospital staff regarding improving attitudes, satisfaction and feelings of caring efficacy, in provision of care to people with dementia. A repeated measures design, with measures completed immediately prior to commencing training (T1), after completion of Foundation level training (T2: 4-6 weeks post-baseline), and following Intermediate level training (T3: 3-4 months post-baseline). One NHS Trust in the North of England, UK. 40 acute hospital staff working in clinical roles, the majority of whom (90%) were nurses. All participants received the 3.5 day Person-centred Care Training for Acute Hospitals (PCTAH) programme, comprised of two levels, Foundation (0.5 day) and Intermediate (3 days), delivered over a 3-4 months period. Staff demographics and previous exposure to dementia training were collected via a questionnaire. Staff attitudes were measured using the Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire (ADQ), satisfaction in caring for people with dementia was captured using the Staff Experiences of Working with Demented Residents questionnaire (SEWDR) and perceived caring efficacy was measured using the Caring Efficacy Scale (CES). The training programme was effective in producing a significant positive change on all three outcome measures following intermediate training compared to baseline. A significant positive effect was found on the ADQ between baseline and after completion of Foundation level training, but not for either of the other measures. Training acute hospital staff in

  9. Cost-Utility Analysis of Heberprot-P as an Add-on Therapy to Good Wound Care for Patients in Slovakia with Advanced Diabetic Foot Ulcer

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    Tomas Tesar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To explore whether Heberprot-P (an epidermal growth factor is a cost-effective option for the treatment of advanced diabetic foot ulcer as an add-on therapy to good wound care (GWC in Slovakia from the perspective of health care payers.Methods: A Markov model was constructed to compare the costs and effects of Heberprot-P plus GWC to those of GWC alone from the perspective of health care payers. The 52-week clinical trial period was extended to 5- and 10-year time horizons. Transition probabilities were calculated based on a previous clinical trial of Heberprot, utility values were derived from the scientific literature, and cost vectors were collected from the General Health Insurance Fund database in Slovakia. A one-way deterministic sensitivity analysis was employed to explore the influence of uncertainty for each input parameter on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER.Results: Based on the ICER threshold of €30,030 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY recommended by the Slovak Ministry of Health, Heberprot-P therapy plus GWC is not a cost-effective alternative to GWC alone over a 10-year time horizon. The ICER increases if a longer time horizon is applied, as the incremental costs are similar, but the aggregated utility gain from avoided amputation is lower. Based on the sensitivity analysis, the utility multiplier for the health state “no ulcer after small amputation” had the most impact on the ICER; however, the model was robust to changes in all input parameters.Conclusions: Heberprot-P, as an add-on therapy to GWC in the treatment of advanced diabetic foot ulcer, is not a cost-effective alternative to GWC alone. However, if the unit cost of Heberprot-P were to be reduced to <€273, its ICER would be <€30,030.

  10. Integrating palliative care within acute stroke services: developing a programme theory of patient and family needs, preferences and staff perspectives

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    Burton Christopher R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palliative care should be integrated early into the care trajectories of people with life threatening illness such as stroke. However published guidance focuses primarily on the end of life, and there is a gap in the evidence about how the palliative care needs of acute stroke patients and families should be addressed. Synthesising data across a programme of related studies, this paper presents an explanatory framework for the integration of palliative and acute stroke care. Methods Data from a survey (n=191 of patient-reported palliative care needs and interviews (n=53 exploring experiences with patients and family members were explored in group interviews with 29 staff from 3 United Kingdom stroke services. A realist approach to theory building was used, constructed around the mechanisms that characterise integration, their impacts, and mediating, contextual influences. Results The framework includes two cognitive mechanisms (the legitimacy of palliative care and individual capacity, and behavioural mechanisms (engaging with family; the timing of intervention; working with complexity; and the recognition of dying through which staff integrate palliative and stroke care. A range of clinical (whether patients are being ‘actively treated’, and prognostic uncertainty and service (leadership, specialty status and neurological focus factors appear to influence how palliative care needs are attended to. Conclusions Our framework is the first, empirical explanation of the integration of palliative and acute stroke care. The specification in the framework of factors that mediate integration can inform service development to improve the outcomes and experiences of patients and families.

  11. Improved fatigue in individuals with multiple sclerosis after participating in a short-term self-care programme.

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    Navipour, Hassan; Madani, Hossein; Mohebbi, Mohammad R; Navipour, Reza; Roozbayani, Parviz; Paydar, Afshin

    2006-01-01

    Fatigue is among the most common, yet least understood symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The debilitating symptoms of MS can have adverse effects on the sufferer's self-esteem. We report the effect of a short-term self-managed graded exercise programme on fatigue and self-esteem of patients with MS. Thirty-four (age range: 20-50, mean: 29.7 years; M:F 0.7:1.0) patients with MS who lived in Tehran and were not physically disabled entered the study. Self-esteem score was measured with the Persian translation of the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. Fatigue was evaluated with a visual analogue scale. The patients performed the self-managed techniques for 6 weeks. Self-esteem and fatigue were evaluated once more after the self-managed graded exercise programme. On paired sample test, the self-esteem score of the patients was significantly different before (53.9) and after (68.1) the self-managed graded exercise programme (Pself-care training as an alternative in rehabilitation of the patients with MS. Self-managed graded exercise programme may be considered as an alternative to direct nursing services for patients with MS.

  12. Impact of the mother-nurse partnership programme on mother and infant outcomes in paediatric cardiac intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Ju-Yeon; Kim, Hee Soon

    2018-04-04

    To identify the effects of a mother-nurse partnership programme based on the core components of information sharing, negotiation and participation in care. Specifically, we examined the programme's effects on parental satisfaction, parental self-efficacy, perceived partnership and anxiety, as well as infants' time to reach full oral feeding and length of postoperative hospital stay, following cardiac surgery on infants at a paediatric intensive care unit with a restrictive visiting policy. Quasi-experimental study. An analysis of covariance was used to investigate between-group differences while ensuring homogeneity. A paediatric cardiac ICU. Parental satisfaction, parental self-efficacy, perceived partnership and anxiety. Data from 37 and 36 mothers in the control and experimental groups respectively, were analysed. Compared with controls, experimental group mothers reported significantly higher parental satisfaction (F = 39.29, p partnership (F = 62.30, p < .001) and lower anxiety (F = 12.93, p < .001), upon transfer to the ward. Infant outcomes did not differ between the groups. This programme appears to facilitate collaboration between nurses and mothers and positively influences mothers' emotional and cognitive outcomes following infants' cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. An assessment of implementation of Community Oriented Primary Care in Kenyan family medicine postgraduate medical education programmes

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    Ian J. Nelligan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Family medicine postgraduate programmes in Kenya are examining the benefits of Community-Oriented Primary Care (COPC curriculum, as a method to train residents in population-based approaches to health care delivery. Whilst COPC is an established part of family medicine training in the United States, little is known about its application in Kenya. We sought to conduct a qualitative study to explore the development and implementation of COPC curriculum in the first two family medicine postgraduate programmes in Kenya. Method: Semi-structured interviews of COPC educators, practitioners, and academic stakeholders and focus groups of postgraduate students were conducted with COPC educators, practitioners and academic stakeholders in two family medicine postgraduate programmes in Kenya. Discussions were transcribed, inductively coded and thematically analysed. Results: Two focus groups with eight family medicine postgraduate students and interviews with five faculty members at two universities were conducted. Two broad themes emerged from the analysis: expected learning outcomes and important community-based enablers. Three learning outcomes were (1 making a community diagnosis, (2 understanding social determinants of health and (3 training in participatory research. Three community-based enablers for sustainability of COPC were (1 partnerships with community health workers, (2 community empowerment and engagement and (3 institutional financial support. Conclusions: Our findings illustrate the expected learning outcomes and important communitybased enablers associated with the successful implementation of COPC projects in Kenya and will help to inform future curriculum development in Kenya.

  14. Community participation in primary health care projects of the Muldersdrift Health and Development Programme

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    M. Barker

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available After numerous teething problems (1974-1994, the Department of Nursing Education of WITS University took responsibility for the Muldersdrift Health and Development Programme (MHDP. The nursing science students explored and implemented an empowerment approach to community participation. The students worked with MHDP health workers to improve health through community participation, in combination with primary health care (PHC activities and the involvement of a variety of community groups. As the PHC projects evolved overtime, the need arose to evaluate the level of community participation and how much community ownership was present over decision-making and resources. This led to the question “What was the level of community participation in PHC projects of the MHDP?” Based on the question the following objectives were set, i.e. i to evaluate the community participation in PHC initiatives; ii to provide the project partners with motivational affirmation on the level of community participation criteria thus far achieved; iii to indicate to participants the mechanisms that should still be implemented if they wanted to advance to higher levels of community participation; iv to evaluate the MHDP’s implementation of a people-centred approach to community participation in PHC; and v the evaluation of the level of community participation in PHC projects in the MHDP. An evaluative, descriptive, contextual and quantitative research design was used. Ethical standards were adhered to throughout the study. The MHDP had a study population of twentythree (N=23 PHC projects. A purposive sample of seven PHC initiatives was chosen according to specific selection criteria and evaluated according to the “Criteria to evaluate community participation in PHC projects” instrument (a quantitative tool. Structured group interviews were done with PHC projects’ executive committee members. The Joint Management Committee’s data was collected through mailed

  15. The effects of a household conditional cash transfer programme on coverage and quality of antenatal care: a secondary analysis of Indonesia's pilot programme.

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    Triyana, Margaret; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2017-10-22

    To analyse the effectiveness of a household conditional cash transfer programme (CCT) on antenatal care (ANC) coverage reported by women and ANC quality reported by midwives. The CCT was piloted as a cluster randomised control trial in 2007. Intent-to-treat parameters were estimated using linear regression and logistic regression. Secondary analysis of the longitudinal CCT impact evaluation survey, conducted in 2007 and 2009. This included 6869 pregnancies and 1407 midwives in 180 control subdistricts and 180 treated subdistricts in Indonesia. ANC component coverage index, a composite measure of each ANC service component as self-reported by women, and ANC provider quality index, a composite measure of ANC service provided as self-reported by midwives. Each index was created by principal component analysis (PCA). Specific ANC component items were also assessed. The CCT was associated with improved ANC component coverage index by 0.07 SD (95% CI 0.002 to 0.141). Women were more likely to receive the following assessments: weight (OR 1.56 (95% CI 1.25 to 1.95)), height (OR 1.41 (95% CI 1.247 to 1.947)), blood pressure (OR 1.36 (95% CI 1.045 to 1.761)), fundal height measurements (OR 1.65 (95% CI 1.372 to 1.992)), fetal heart beat monitoring (OR 1.29 (95% CI 1.006 to 1.653)), external pelvic examination (OR 1.28 (95% CI 1.086 to 1.505)), iron-folic acid pills (OR 1.42 (95% CI 1.081 to 1.859)) and information on pregnancy complications (OR 2.09 (95% CI 1.724 to 2.551)). On the supply side, the CCT had no significant effect on the ANC provider quality index based on reports from midwives. The CCT programme improved ANC coverage for women, but midwives did not improve ANC quality. The results suggest that enhanced ANC utilisation may not be sufficient to improve health outcomes, and steps to improve ANC quality are essential for programme impact. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No

  16. Enfermedad arterial periférica y pié diabético en pacientes en programa de hemodiálisis Peripheral arterial disease and diabetic foot in patients on haemodialysis programme

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    Azucena García Viejo

    2012-12-01

    and prevention of ulcers and amputations of lower limbs. Material and methods: Transversal descriptive observational study. Carried out with 51 patients included in the haemodialysis programme of the Unit in Segovia. Analyses were carried out of the different risk factors that influence the presence of arteriopathy and diabetic foot, and the different relationships between them as well as a stratification of the risk in the population studied. Results: 45% of the patients present peripheral arterial disease and 58% have sensitivity alterations. Diabetes firstly and cardiovascular diseases are the factors that have the most influence in these problems. Conclusions: Categorizing our patients according to risk will make it possible to plan strategies to prevent the appearance of these complications. The absence of previous examination shows inadequate monitoring. The high prevalence of these pathologies makes protocolized monitoring necessary.

  17. Outcomes in knowledge, attitudes and confidence of nursing staff working in nursing and residential care homes following a dementia training programme.

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    Scerri, Anthony; Scerri, Charles

    2017-11-08

    Dementia training programmes for staff working in long-term care settings have been found to be effective in improving staff outcomes. This study investigated the impact of a dementia training programme for all Maltese nursing staff working in public nursing/residential homes on their knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Additionally, we identified the predictors of these domains before and after the programme. A 14-hour training programme focusing on dementia management, care and policy was developed for all nursing staff working in public nursing and residential homes in Malta. A pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the participants' knowledge of dementia, attitudes and confidence in working with residents with dementia using validated tools. Demographic variables were measured and compared with each staff domain. The majority of nursing staff attended the training programme with 261 fully completed questionnaires being collected pre-training and 214 post-training. The programme significantly improved nursing staff knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Stepwise regression analysis of each staff domain showed that the strongest predictor in all models at pre-training was the intensity of previous training programmes. Furthermore, staff who attended previous training continued to improve in their attitudes and confidence following programme completion. The study continues to shed further evidence on the impact of dementia training programs on staff outcomes. It also indicated that the intensity of previous participation in dementia training programmes was related to the participants' knowledge, attitudes and confidence and that continual exposure to training had a cumulative effect.

  18. Effectiveness of an NGO primary health care programme in rural Bangladesh: evidence from the management information system.

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    Mercer, Alec; Khan, Mobarak Hossain; Daulatuzzaman, Muhammad; Reid, Joanna

    2004-07-01

    This paper considers evidence of the effectiveness of a non-governmental organization (NGO) primary health care programme in rural Bangladesh. It is based on data from the programme's management information system reported by 27 partner NGOs from 1996-2002. The data indicate relatively high coverage has been achieved for reproductive and child health services, as well as lower infant and child mortality. On the basis of a crude indicator of socio-economic status, the programme is poverty-focused. There is good service coverage among the poorest one-third and others, and the infant and child mortality differential has been eliminated over recent years. A rapid decline in infant mortality among the poorest from 1999-2002 reflects a reduction in neonatal mortality of about 50%. Allowing for some under-reporting and possible misclassification of deaths to the stillbirths category, neonatal mortality is relatively low in the NGO areas. The lower child and maternal mortality for the NGO areas combined, compared with estimates for Bangladesh in recent years, may at least in part be due to high coverage of reproductive and child health services. Other development programmes implemented by many of the NGOs could also have contributed. Despite the limited resources available, and the lower infant and child mortality already achieved, there appears to be scope for further prevention of deaths, particularly those due to birth asphyxia, acute respiratory infection, diarrhoeal disease and accidents. Maternal mortality in the NGO areas was lower in 2000-02 than the most recent estimate for Bangladesh. Further reduction is likely to depend on improved access to qualified community midwives and essential obstetric care at government referral facilities.

  19. Helping doctors in training to STEP-UP: A leadership and quality improvement programme in the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Grainne; McKeever, Kris; Flanagan, Catherine; O'Kane, Donal; McQuillan, Bernie; Cash, Johnny; Jack, Cathy; Lundy, Claire

    2018-05-01

    Medical engagement in healthcare organisations can improve service development and patient experience. Doctors in training have limited opportunities to engage in service improvement work and develop leadership skills. We describe the Specialist Trainees Engaged in Leadership Programme (STEP) , a programme developed to introduce concepts of medical leadership and quality improvement skills in the Belfast Trust. STEP started in 2013 and over 140 trainees have now participated in the programme. Over 42 quality improvement projects have been completed with the support of the programme. Evaluation of STEP has demonstrated an improvement across all domains explored throughout the duration of the programme, with benefits for the individual trainee and the wider organisation. We describe the programme in detail. The STEP curriculum can easily be adapted to meet the needs of NHS trainees, allowing them to understand the objectives and strategy of their employers and improve their ability to plan and deliver safe, effective, patient-centred care.

  20. Implementing care programmes for frail older people: A project management perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, J.; Cox, K.; Abma, T.A.; van Schayck, O.C.P.; Widdershoven, G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the issues that influenced the implementation of programmes designed to identify and support frail older people in the community in the Netherlands. Methods: Qualitative research methods were used to investigate the perspectives of project leaders, project members and members

  1. The effectiveness of antenatal care programmes to reduce infant mortality and preterm birth in socially disadvantaged and vulnerable women in high-income countries: a systematic review

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    Brocklehurst Peter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant mortality has shown a steady decline in recent years but a marked socioeconomic gradient persists. Antenatal care is generally thought to be an effective method of improving pregnancy outcomes, but the effectiveness of specific antenatal care programmes as a means of reducing infant mortality in socioeconomically disadvantaged and vulnerable groups of women has not been rigorously evaluated. Methods We conducted a systematic review, focusing on evidence from high income countries, to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative models of organising or delivering antenatal care to disadvantaged and vulnerable groups of women vs. standard antenatal care. We searched Medline, Embase, Cinahl, PsychINFO, HMIC, CENTRAL, DARE, MIDIRS and a number of online resources to identify relevant randomised and observational studies. We assessed effects on infant mortality and its major medical causes (preterm birth, congenital anomalies and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS Results We identified 36 distinct eligible studies covering a wide range of interventions, including group antenatal care, clinic-based augmented care, teenage clinics, prenatal substance abuse programmes, home visiting programmes, maternal care coordination and nutritional programmes. Fifteen studies had adequate internal validity: of these, only one was considered to demonstrate a beneficial effect on an outcome of interest. Six interventions were considered 'promising'. Conclusions There was insufficient evidence of adequate quality to recommend routine implementation of any of the programmes as a means of reducing infant mortality in disadvantaged/vulnerable women. Several interventions merit further more rigorous evaluation.

  2. Prison mental health in-reach teams in England: the care programme approach and sexual abuse/violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Charles G D; Forrester, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    Prison mental health in-reach teams have doubled in size over the past decade and case-loads have reduced. Since 2010 it has been mandatory for keyworkers to ask whether prisoners with serious mental illness being treated under the care programme approach have experienced sexual or physical abuse. This is known as routine enquiry and should take place for these prisoners but NHS England, the commissioners, do not audit this activity. It is time to review current interventions and their associated outcomes. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  3. Effect of a structured diabetes education programme in primary care on hospitalizations and emergency department visits among people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus: results from the Patient Empowerment Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C K H; Wong, W C W; Wan, Y F; Chan, A K C; Chan, F W K; Lam, C L K

    2016-10-01

    To assess whether a structured diabetes education programme, the Patient Empowerment Programme, was associated with a lower rate of all-cause hospitalization and emergency department visits in a population-based cohort of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care. A cohort of 24 250 patients was evaluated using a linked administrative database during 2009-2013. We selected 12 125 patients with Type 2 diabetes who had at least one Patient Empowerment Programme session attendance. Patients who did not participate in the Patient Empowerment Programme were matched one-to-one with patients who did, using the propensity score method. Hospitalization events and emergency department visits were the events of interest. Cox proportional hazard and negative binomial regressions were performed to estimate the hazard ratios for the initial event, and incidence rate ratios for the number of events. During a median 30.5 months of follow-up, participants in the Patient Empowerment Programme had a lower incidence of an initial hospitalization event (22.1 vs 25.2%; hazard ratio 0.879; P Patient Empowerment Programme. Participation in the Patient Empowerment Programme was associated with a significantly lower number of emergency department visits (incidence rate ratio 0.903; P patients annually in those who did not participate in the Patient Empowerment Programme vs. 36.2 per 100 patients annually in those who did. There were significantly fewer hospitalization episodes (incidence rate ratio 0.854; P patients annually in those who did not participate in the Patient Empowerment Programme vs. 16.9 hospitalizations per 100 patients annually in those who did. Among patients with Type 2 diabetes, the Patient Empowerment Programme was shown to be effective in delaying the initial hospitalization event and in reducing their frequency. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  4. High satisfaction with an individualised stroke care programme after hospitalisation of patients with a TIA or minor stroke: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, Mark L. J.; Kwa, Vincent I. H.; Dahmen, Rutger

    2008-01-01

    Many hospitalised patients with a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke develop subtle cognitive disorders and emotional problems a few weeks after discharge, and are dissatisfied with the care they have received, even with specialised stroke care programmes. Therefore, an individualised

  5. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Find a Surgeon Find a Foot & Ankle Orthopaedic Surgeon Page Content Who ... your prescribed treatment (surgical and/or non-surgical) ​ Find a Surgeon ​ Click here to find a foot ...

  6. Unappreciated epidemiology: the churn effect in a regional HIV care programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, M J; Krentz, H B

    2009-08-01

    High levels of geographic mobility in and out of HIV care centres (i.e. the churn effect) can disrupt the continuity of patient care, misalign prevention services, impact local prevalence data perturbing optimal allocation of resources, and contribute to logical challenges in repeated transfer of health records. We report on the clinical, demographic, and administrative impact of high population turnover within HIV populations.

  7. Systematic review of the use of data from national childhood obesity surveillance programmes in primary care: a conceptual synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, E J; Ells, L J; Rubin, G P; Hunter, D J

    2015-11-01

    This study reviewed the use in primary care of national surveillance data for children to determine the data's potential utility to inform policy and practice decisions on how to prevent and treat childhood obesity. We reviewed the 28 countries identified by the World Obesity Federation as having high-quality comparable body mass index data for children. Literature published from any period up to December 2013 was included. Peer review literature was searched using Web of Science (Core Collection, MEDLINE). Grey literature was searched using the Internet by country name, programme name and national health and government websites. We included studies that (i) use national surveillance obesity data in primary care, or (ii) explore practitioner or parent perspectives about the use of such data. The main uses of national surveillance data in primary care were to identify and recruit obese children and their parents to participate in school and general practice-based research and/or interventions, and to inform families of children's measurements. Findings indicate a need for school staff and practitioners to receive additional training and support to sensitively communicate with families. Translation of these findings into policy and practice could help to improve current uses of national child obesity surveillance data in primary care. © 2015 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity.

  8. A programmable point-of-care device for external CSF drainage and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkins, Jeffrey R; Subbian, Vignesh; Beyette, Fred R

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a prototype of a programmable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) external drainage system that can accurately measure the dispensed fluid volume. It is based on using a miniature spectrophotometer to collect color data to inform drain rate and pressure monitoring. The prototype was machined with 1 μm dimensional accuracy. The current device can reliably monitor the total accumulated fluid volume, the drain rate, the programmed pressure, and the pressure read from the sensor. Device requirements, fabrication processes, and preliminary results with an experimental set-up are also presented.

  9. The benefits and costs of a master's programme in primary health care: a cross-sectional postal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimtsiou, Zoi; Sidhu, Kalwant; Jones, Roger

    2010-11-01

    Master's programmes can provide continuing professional development, equipping GPs to teach, research, and lead general practice. A previous evaluation of the MSc in primary health care found that graduates were contributing significantly to the discipline of general practice. Given the changes in general practice over the last 10 years, it was considered useful to investigate longer-term outcomes. To assess the benefits GPs have derived from the MSc in terms of the intended learning outcomes and their own plans for involvement in research and teaching. A cross-sectional survey using a postal questionnaire. Department of Primary Care and Public Health Sciences, King's College London. A postal questionnaire was sent to the graduates of MSc in primary health care from 1997 until 2008. A total of 50 completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 76%). After graduation, 22 GPs had completed another degree or diploma and 21 had work accepted for publication, resulting in 74 papers. Nine held academic posts at lecturer or senior lecturer level, 21 were GP trainers, and 21 undergraduate teachers. Twenty-five GPs held more than one teaching-related post. The majority of the graduates confirmed the attainment of the MSc's intended outcomes. Positive influences of the MSc were identified, including career development, personal development, and job satisfaction. Graduates reported a number of benefits to themselves, their practices, and their patients. As the requirements for continuing professional development of GPs become more stringent, and with the advent of revalidation, the current ad hoc approach to career development in general practice is becoming unsustainable. To enhance its credibility as an academic discipline, general practice must continue to develop its capacity for research and scholarship. Master's programmes are likely to have an important role in supporting professional development in general practice in the future.

  10. Training, supervision and quality of care in selected integrated community case management (iCCM) programmes: A scoping review of programmatic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Capblanch, Xavier; Marceau, Claudine

    2014-12-01

    To describe the training, supervision and quality of care components of integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) programmes and to draw lessons learned from existing evaluations of those programmes. Scoping review of reports from 29 selected iCCM programmes purposively provided by stakeholders containing any information relevant to understand quality of care issues. The number of people reached by iCCM programmes varied from the tens of thousands to more than a million. All programmes aimed at improving access of vulnerable populations to health care, focusing on the main childhood illnesses, managed by Community Health Workers (CHW), often selected bycommunities. Training and supervision were widely implemented, in different ways and intensities, and often complemented with tools (eg, guides, job aids), supplies, equipment and incentives. Quality of care was measured using many outcomes (eg, access or appropriate treatment). Overall, there seemed to be positive effects for those strategies that involved policy change, organisational change, standardisation of clinical practices and alignment with other programmes. Positive effects were mostly achieved in large multi-component programmes. Mild or no effects have been described on mortality reduction amongst the few programmes for which data on this outcome was available to us. Promising strategies included teaming-up of CHW, micro-franchising or social franchising. On-site training and supervision of CHW have been shown to improve clinical practices. Effects on caregivers seemed positive, with increases in knowledge, care seeking behaviour, or caregivers' basic disease management. Evidence on iCCM is often of low quality, cannot relate specific interventions or the ways they are implemented with outcomes and lacks standardisation; this limits the capacity to identify promising strategies to improve quality of care. Large, multi-faceted, iCCM programmes, with strong components of training, supervision, which

  11. Training, supervision and quality of care in selected integrated community case management (iCCM) programmes: A scoping review of programmatic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch–Capblanch, Xavier; Marceau, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Aim To describe the training, supervision and quality of care components of integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) programmes and to draw lessons learned from existing evaluations of those programmes. Methods Scoping review of reports from 29 selected iCCM programmes purposively provided by stakeholders containing any information relevant to understand quality of care issues. Results The number of people reached by iCCM programmes varied from the tens of thousands to more than a million. All programmes aimed at improving access of vulnerable populations to health care, focusing on the main childhood illnesses, managed by Community Health Workers (CHW), often selected bycommunities. Training and supervision were widely implemented, in different ways and intensities, and often complemented with tools (eg, guides, job aids), supplies, equipment and incentives. Quality of care was measured using many outcomes (eg, access or appropriate treatment). Overall, there seemed to be positive effects for those strategies that involved policy change, organisational change, standardisation of clinical practices and alignment with other programmes. Positive effects were mostly achieved in large multi–component programmes. Mild or no effects have been described on mortality reduction amongst the few programmes for which data on this outcome was available to us. Promising strategies included teaming–up of CHW, micro–franchising or social franchising. On–site training and supervision of CHW have been shown to improve clinical practices. Effects on caregivers seemed positive, with increases in knowledge, care seeking behaviour, or caregivers’ basic disease management. Evidence on iCCM is often of low quality, cannot relate specific interventions or the ways they are implemented with outcomes and lacks standardisation; this limits the capacity to identify promising strategies to improve quality of care. Conclusion Large, multi–faceted, iCCM programmes, with strong

  12. 'My wig has been my journey's companion': perceived effects of an aesthetic care programme for Italian women suffering from chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannini, L; Verderame, F; Cucchiara, G; Zinna, B; Alba, A; Ferrara, M

    2012-09-01

    This study explored the perceived effects of an aesthetic care/wig programme for Italian women suffering from chemotherapy-induced alopecia. Despite advances in the treatment of many side effects of chemotherapy, alopecia remains difficult to resolve. Literature suggests that patients' reactions to alopecia and camouflaging strategies depend on their gender, individual characteristics, social context, and culture. A qualitative study was designed involving 20 patients from Sicily (Italy), who participated in an aesthetic care programme. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was conducted on transcriptions. Our findings showed that, even if expected, alopecia is experienced as a traumatic event that challenges a woman's femininity, as reported by many other enquiries. Diverging from other studies, the wig is perceived as very helpful, since it camouflages baldness and reduces the 'sick aspect' related to alopecia. Patients consider their wig to be a 'friend', and it appears that through the aesthetic care programme they received support they otherwise would not have sought. We conclude that aesthetic care/wig programmes can help women affected by alopecia to cope with cancer 'stigma', especially in those rural contexts where psychosocial programmes are not frequently embraced by patients due to environmental and cultural barriers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Inclusion of the equity focus and social determinants of health in health care education programmes in Colombia: a qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rincón, Erwin H; Pimentel-González, Juan P; Orozco-Beltrán, Domingo; Carratalá-Munuera, Concepción

    2016-06-01

    The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Colombian Ministry of Health and Social Protection have determined a need for an approach to include Equity Focus (EF) and Social Determinants of Health (SDH) in health training programmes in Colombia. We studied the incorporation of EF and SDH in the curricula of several universities in Colombia to identify opportunities to strengthen their inclusion. Qualitative methodology was performed in two stages: (i) initial exploration (self-administered questionnaires and review of curricula) and (ii) validation of the information (semi-structured interviews). The inclusion of the EF and SDH in university curricula is regarded as an opportunity to address social problems. This approach addresses a broad cross-section of the curriculum, especially in the subjects of public health and Primary Health Care (PHC), where community outreach generates greater internalization by students. The dominance of the biomedical model of study plans and practice scenarios focusing on disease and little emphasis on community outreach are factors that limit the inclusion of the approach. The inclusion of EF and SDH in university curricula in Colombia has primarily focused on increasing the knowledge of various subjects oriented towards understanding the social dynamics or comprehensiveness of health and disease and, in some programmes, through practical courses in community health and PHC. Increased integration of EF and SDH in subjects or modules with clinical orientation is recommended. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Foot morphometric phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agić, Ante

    2007-06-01

    Knowledge of the foot morphometry is important for proper foot structure and function. Foot structure as a vital part of human body is important for many reasons. The foot anthropometric and morphology phenomena are analyzed together with hidden biomechanical descriptors in order to fully characterize foot functionality. For Croatian student population the scatter data of the individual foot variables were interpolated by multivariate statistics. Foot morphometric descriptors are influenced by many factors, such as life style, climate, and things of great importance in human society. Dominant descriptors related to fit and comfort are determined by the use 3D foot shape and advanced foot biomechanics. Some practical recommendations and conclusions for medical, sportswear and footwear practice are highlighted.

  15. Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES). Users and programmers manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Manderscheid, Jane M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1990-01-01

    This manual describes how to use the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES) computer program. The primary function of the code is to calculate the fast fracture reliability or failure probability of macroscopically isotropic ceramic components. These components may be subjected to complex thermomechanical loadings, such as those found in heat engine applications. The program uses results from MSC/NASTRAN or ANSYS finite element analysis programs to evaluate component reliability due to inherent surface and/or volume type flaws. CARES utilizes the Batdorf model and the two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function to describe the effect of multiaxial stress states on material strength. The principle of independent action (PIA) and the Weibull normal stress averaging models are also included. Weibull material strength parameters, the Batdorf crack density coefficient, and other related statistical quantities are estimated from four-point bend bar or unifrom uniaxial tensile specimen fracture strength data. Parameter estimation can be performed for single or multiple failure modes by using the least-square analysis or the maximum likelihood method. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit tests, ninety percent confidence intervals on the Weibull parameters, and Kanofsky-Srinivasan ninety percent confidence band values are also provided. The probabilistic fast-fracture theories used in CARES, along with the input and output for CARES, are described. Example problems to demonstrate various feature of the program are also included. This manual describes the MSC/NASTRAN version of the CARES program.

  16. Use of programme budgeting and marginal analysis as a framework for resource reallocation in respiratory care in North Wales, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, J M; Brown, G; Thomas, K; Johnstone, F; Vandenblink, V; Pethers, B; Jones, A; Edwards, R T

    2016-09-01

    Since the global financial crisis, UK NHS spending has reduced considerably. Respiratory care is a large cost driver for Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board, the largest health board in Wales. Under the remit of 'prudent healthcare' championed by the Welsh Health Minister, a Programme Budgeting Marginal Analysis (PBMA) of the North Wales respiratory care pathway was conducted. A PBMA panel of directors of medicines management, therapies finance, planning, public health and healthcare professionals used electronic voting to establish criteria for decision-making and vote on candidate interventions in which to disinvest and invest. A sum of £86.9 million was spent on respiratory care in 2012-13. Following extensive discussion of 13 proposed candidate interventions facilitated by a chairperson, 4 candidates received recommendations to disinvest, 7 to invest and 2 to maintain current activity. Marginal analysis prioritized mucolytics and high antibiotic prescribing as areas for disinvestment, and medicines waste management and pulmonary rehabilitation for investment. This exercise demonstrates the potential for health boards to use evidence-based approaches to reach potentially controversial disinvestment and investment decisions. Initial progress has begun with communication from the Medical Director in relation to the disinvestment in mucolytics prescribing and possible redirection of funding options being explored. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health.

  17. Innovation in Systems of Care in Acute Phase of Ischemic Stroke. The Experience of the Catalan Stroke Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M. Vivanco-Hidalgo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Stroke, and mainly ischemic stroke, is the second cause of death and disability. To confront the huge burden of this disease, innovative stroke systems of care are mandatory. This requires the development of national stroke plans to offer the best treatment to all patients eligible for reperfusion therapies. Key elements for success include a high level of organization, close cooperation with emergency medical services for prehospital assessment, an understanding of stroke singularity, the development of preassessment tools, a high level of commitment of all stroke teams at Stroke Centres, the availability of a disease-specific registry, and local government involvement to establish stroke care as a priority. In this mini review, we discuss recent evidence concerning different aspects of stroke systems of care and describe the success of the Catalan Stroke Programme as an example of innovation. In Catalonia, reperfusion treatment rates have increased in recent years and currently are among the highest in Europe (17.3% overall, 14.3% for IVT, and 6% for EVT in 2016.

  18. Characteristics of a self-management support programme applicable in primary health care: a qualitative study of users' and health professionals' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Hilde Strøm; Steinsbekk, Aslak; Solbjør, Marit; Granbo, Randi; Garåsen, Helge

    2014-11-08

    Development of more self-management support programmes in primary health care has been one option used to enhance positive outcomes in chronic disease management. At present, research results provide no consensus on what would be the best way to develop support programmes into new settings. The aim of the present study was therefore to explore users' and health professionals' perceptions of what would be the vital elements in a self - management support programme applicable in primary health care, how to account for them, and why. Four qualitative, semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted in Central Norway. The informants possessed experience in development, provision, or participation in a self-management support programme. Data was analysed by the Systematic Text Condensation method. The results showed an overall positive expectation to the potential benefits of development of a self-management support programme in primary health care. Despite somewhat different arguments and perspectives, the users and the health professionals had a joint agreement on core characteristics; a self-management support programme in primary health care should therefore be generic, not disease specific, and delivered in a group- based format. A special focus should be on the everyday- life of the participants. The most challenging aspect was a present lack of competence and experience among health professionals to moderate self-management support programmes. The development and design of a relevant and applicable self-management support programme in primary health care should balance the interests of the users with the possibilities and constraints within each municipality. It would be vital to benefit from the closeness of the patients' every-day life situations. The user informants' perception of a self-management support programme as a supplement to regular medical treatment represented an expanded understanding of the self-management support concept. An exploring

  19. Prison mental health in-reach teams, serious mental illness and the Care Programme Approach in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Charlie; Webster, Russell

    2017-08-01

    The delivery of prison mental health services in England is examined over the last 12 years. Resources for services have grown significantly during this period and improved organisational models for the delivery of services are now in place. During this period however the challenges of working in the prison environment have increased. The paper argues that a history of sexual abuse or violence are common amongst prisoners and the Care Programme Approach (CPA) provides the vehicle to assess these histories through the use of routine enquiry. Commissioners of prison mental health services now need to ensure that teams are delivering cogent trauma-based interventions where relevant and the outcomes are measured. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of complex integrated care programmes: the approach in North West London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Felix; Pappas, Yannis; Bardsley, Martin; Harris, Matthew; Curry, Natasha; Holder, Holly; Blunt, Ian; Soljak, Michael; Gunn, Laura; Majeed, Azeem; Car, Josip

    2013-01-01

    Background Several local attempts to introduce integrated care in the English National Health Service have been tried, with limited success. The Northwest London Integrated Care Pilot attempts to improve the quality of care of the elderly and people with diabetes by providing a novel integration process across primary, secondary and social care organisations. It involves predictive risk modelling, care planning, multidisciplinary management of complex cases and an information technology tool to support information sharing. This paper sets out the evaluation approach adopted to measure its effect. Study design We present a mixed methods evaluation methodology. It includes a quantitative approach measuring changes in service utilization, costs, clinical outcomes and quality of care using routine primary and secondary data sources. It also contains a qualitative component, involving observations, interviews and focus groups with patients and professionals, to understand participant experiences and to understand the pilot within the national policy context. Theory and discussion This study considers the complexity of evaluating a large, multi-organisational intervention in a changing healthcare economy. We locate the evaluation within the theory of evaluation of complex interventions. We present the specific challenges faced by evaluating an intervention of this sort, and the responses made to mitigate against them. Conclusions We hope this broad, dynamic and responsive evaluation will allow us to clarify the contribution of the pilot, and provide a potential model for evaluation of other similar interventions. Because of the priority given to the integrated agenda by governments internationally, the need to develop and improve strong evaluation methodologies remains strikingly important. PMID:23687478

  1. Evaluation of complex integrated care programmes: the approach in North West London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Greaves

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several local attempts to introduce integrated care in the English National Health Service have been tried, with limited success. The Northwest London Integrated Care Pilot attempts to improve the quality of care of the elderly and people with diabetes by providing a novel integration process across primary, secondary and social care organisations. It involves predictive risk modelling, care planning, multidisciplinary management of complex cases and an information technology tool to support information sharing. This paper sets out the evaluation approach adopted to measure its effect. Study design: We present a mixed methods evaluation methodology. It includes a quantitative approach measuring changes in service utilization, costs, clinical outcomes and quality of care using routine primary and secondary data sources. It also contains a qualitative component, involving observations, interviews and focus groups with patients and professionals, to understand participant experiences and to understand the pilot within the national policy context. Theory and discussion: This study considers the complexity of evaluating a large, multi-organisational intervention in a changing healthcare economy. We locate the evaluation within the theory of evaluation of complex interventions. We present the specific challenges faced by evaluating an intervention of this sort, and the responses made to mitigate against them. Conclusions: We hope this broad, dynamic and responsive evaluation will allow us to clarify the contribution of the pilot, and provide a potential model for evaluation of other similar interventions. Because of the priority given to the integrated agenda by governments internationally, the need to develop and improve strong evaluation methodologies remains strikingly important

  2. Evaluation of complex integrated care programmes: the approach in North West London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Greaves

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several local attempts to introduce integrated care in the English National Health Service have been tried, with limited success. The Northwest London Integrated Care Pilot attempts to improve the quality of care of the elderly and people with diabetes by providing a novel integration process across primary, secondary and social care organisations. It involves predictive risk modelling, care planning, multidisciplinary management of complex cases and an information technology tool to support information sharing. This paper sets out the evaluation approach adopted to measure its effect.Study design: We present a mixed methods evaluation methodology. It includes a quantitative approach measuring changes in service utilization, costs, clinical outcomes and quality of care using routine primary and secondary data sources. It also contains a qualitative component, involving observations, interviews and focus groups with patients and professionals, to understand participant experiences and to understand the pilot within the national policy context.Theory and discussion: This study considers the complexity of evaluating a large, multi-organisational intervention in a changing healthcare economy. We locate the evaluation within the theory of evaluation of complex interventions. We present the specific challenges faced by evaluating an intervention of this sort, and the responses made to mitigate against them.Conclusions: We hope this broad, dynamic and responsive evaluation will allow us to clarify the contribution of the pilot, and provide a potential model for evaluation of other similar interventions. Because of the priority given to the integrated agenda by governments internationally, the need to develop and improve strong evaluation methodologies remains strikingly important

  3. Integration of antenatal care services with health programmes in low– and middle– income countries: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyra E de Jongh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antenatal care (ANC presents a potentially valuable platform for integrated delivery of additional health services for pregnant women–services that are vital to reduce the persistently high rates of maternal and neonatal mortality in low– and middle–income countries (LMICs. However, there is limited evidence on the impact of integrating health services with ANC to guide policy. This review assesses the impact of integration of postnatal and other health services with ANC on health services uptake and utilisation, health outcomes and user experience of care in LMICs.

  4. The impact of consumer involvement in research: an evaluation of consumer involvement in the London Primary Care Studies Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Katrina; Carter, Mary; Mahtani, Vinita; Barnard, Angela; Hawton, Annie; Britten, Nicky

    2008-06-01

    The value of consumer involvement in health services research is widely recognized. While there is a growing body of evidence about the principles of good consumer involvement, there is little research about the effect that involvement can have on the research. This evaluation assessed the level and impact of consumer involvement in the London Primary Care Studies Programme (LPCSP), all of whose individual projects had to demonstrate substantial involvement as a condition of funding. To evaluate consumer involvement in the LPSCP and understand what impact consumers had on the research process and outcomes. A multi-method case study approach was undertaken, using survey techniques, interviews, focus groups, observation and scrutiny of written documents. The overall data set comprised 61 questionnaires, 44 semi-structured interviews, 2 focus groups and 15 hours of observation of meetings. Eleven primary care-based research projects which together made up the LPCSP. An in-depth description of consumer involvement in the Programme was produced. Nine projects had consumers as co-applicants, four projects had been completed before the evaluation began and one was still ongoing at the time of the evaluation. Of the eight projects which have produced final reports, all met their aims and objectives. Consumers had had an additional impact in the research, in the initial design of the study, in recruitment of the research subjects, in developing data collection tools, in collecting the data, in analysis and disseminating the findings. Consumer involvement in National Health Service research is a relatively recent policy development and while there is an increasing amount of literature about how and why consumers should be involved in research, there is less evidence about the impact of such involvement. This evaluation provides evidence about the impact that consumers have not only on the research process but also on the outcomes of the research.

  5. In-hospital costs of diabetic foot disease treated by a multidisciplinary foot team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, Willem D.; Luiten, Jacky; van Dongen, Jelle; Kuppens, Bram; Van Neck, Johan W.; Polinder, Suzanne; Castro Cabezas, Manuel; Coert, J. Henk

    2017-01-01

    Background The diabetic foot imposes significant burden on healthcare systems. Obtaining knowledge on the extent of the costs of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is of value to health care researchers investigating cost-effectiveness of interventions that prevent these costly complications. Objectives To

  6. Changing hospital care: evaluation of a multi-layered organisational development and quality improvement programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dückers, M.L.A

    2009-01-01

    In the last decades many different policy changes have been initiated in the Dutch hospital sector to optimise health care delivery: national agenda-setting, increased competition and transparency, a new system of hospital reimbursement based on diagnosis-treatment-combinations, intensified

  7. Evaluation of a Staff Training Programme using Positive Psychology coaching with film and theatre elements in care homes: views and attitudes of residents, staff and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Ledgerd, Ritchard; Orrell, Martin

    2017-03-01

    There is a recognised need to improve staff training in care homes. The aim of this study was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of the Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP), a staff training programme aimed at enhancing staff-resident communication. Focus groups were conducted with residents able to provide consent; staff and relatives and managers were interviewed in two care homes. A theoretical framework was developed to interpret the impact of CCSEP using Framework Analysis. Residents noted that the programme appeared to result in staff interacting more with them, as well as enjoying working together as a team. Staff reported an improved sense of teamwork, developing more positive attitudes towards residents, as well as their concerns about using theatrical techniques in the care setting. Relatives identified care home organisational aspects as being barriers to implementation, and some regarded CCSEP simply as 'entertainment' rather than 'creative care'. This study provides an insight into the potential of this staff training programme to improve staff-resident interactions. However, participants' varying views of CCSEP highlight the need to brief staff, residents and relatives before implementation so as to enable full understanding of the aim. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Boundaries of confidentiality in nursing care for mother and child in HIV programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Våga, Bodil Bø; Moland, Karen Marie; Blystad, Astrid

    2016-08-01

    Confidentiality lies at the core of medical ethics and is the cornerstone for developing and keeping a trusting relationship between nurses and patients. In the wake of the HIV epidemic, there has been a heightened focus on confidentiality in healthcare contexts. Nurses' follow-up of HIV-positive women and their susceptible HIV-exposed children has proved to be challenging in this regard, but the ethical dilemmas concerning confidentiality that emerge in the process of ensuring HIV-free survival of the third party - the child - have attracted limited attention. The study explores challenges of confidentiality linked to a third party in nurse-patient relationships in a rural Tanzanian HIV/AIDS context. The study was carried out in rural and semi-urban settings of Tanzania where the population is largely agro-pastoral, the formal educational level is low and poverty is rife. The HIV prevalence of 1.5% is low compared to the national prevalence of 5.1%. Data were collected during 9 months of ethnographic fieldwork and consisted of participant observation in clinical settings and during home visits combined with in-depth interviews. The main categories of informants were nurses employed in prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV programmes and HIV-positive women enrolled in these programmes. Based on information about the study aims, all informants consented to participate. Ethical approval was granted by ethics review boards in Tanzania and Norway. The material indicates a delicate balance between the nurses' attempt to secure the HIV-free survival of the babies and the mothers' desire to preserve confidentiality. Profound confidentiality-related dilemmas emerged in actual practice, and indications of a lack of thorough consideration of the implication of a patient's restricted disclosure came to light during follow-up of the HIV-positive women and the third party - the child who is at risk of HIV infection through mother's milk. World Health Organization

  9. Orchestrating care through the fast-track perspective: Orthopaedic nurses’ perceptions and experiences of providing individualised nursing care in older patients’ standardised fast-track programmes after total hip or knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttcher Berthelsen, Connie; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    The lack of individualised care in orthopaedic regimes is often explained by the extended use of patient pathways and clinical guidelines. The aim of this study was to illuminate orthopaedic nurses' perceptions and experiences of providing individual nursing care for older patients in standardised...... fast-track programmes after total hip or knee replacement. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted with orthopaedic nurses in orthopaedic wards at three Danish hospitals between April and June of 2015. Data were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis according to Graneheim...... and Lundman. The main theme of the overall interpretation was Orchestrating care through the fast-track perspective, accompanied by three sub-themes: Identifying and legitimising relevant individual care in the fast-track programme, Struggling to fit all patients in the fast-track programme and Justifying...

  10. Does the Janani Suraksha Yojana cash transfer programme to promote facility births in India ensure skilled birth attendance? A qualitative study of intrapartum care in Madhya Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Chaturvedi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Access to facility delivery in India has significantly increased with the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY cash transfer programme to promote facility births. However, a decline in maternal mortality has only followed secular trends as seen from the beginning of the decade well before the programme began. We, therefore, examined the quality of intrapartum care provided in facilities under the JSY programme to study whether it ensures skilled attendance at birth. Design: 1 Non-participant observations (n=18 of intrapartum care during vaginal deliveries at a representative sample of 11 facilities in Madhya Pradesh to document what happens during intrapartum care. 2 Interviews (n=10 with providers to explore reasons for this care. Thematic framework analysis was used. Results: Three themes emerged from the data: 1 delivery environment is chaotic: delivery rooms were not conducive to safe, women-friendly care provision, and coordination between providers was poor. 2 Staff do not provide skilled care routinely: this emerged from observations that monitoring was limited to assessment of cervical dilatation, lack of readiness to provide key elements of care, and the execution of harmful/unnecessary practices coupled with poor techniques. 3 Dominant staff, passive recipients: staff sometimes threatened, abused, or ignored women during delivery; women were passive and accepted dominance and disrespect. Attendants served as ‘go-betweens’ patients and providers. The interviews with providers revealed their awareness of the compromised quality of care, but they were constrained by structural problems. Positive practices were also observed, including companionship during childbirth and women mobilising in the early stages of labour. Conclusions: Our observational study did not suggest an adequate level of skilled birth attendance (SBA. The findings reveal insufficiencies in the health system and organisational structures to provide an

  11. Does the Janani Suraksha Yojana cash transfer programme to promote facility births in India ensure skilled birth attendance? A qualitative study of intrapartum care in Madhya Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sarika; De Costa, Ayesha; Raven, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Access to facility delivery in India has significantly increased with the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) cash transfer programme to promote facility births. However, a decline in maternal mortality has only followed secular trends as seen from the beginning of the decade well before the programme began. We, therefore, examined the quality of intrapartum care provided in facilities under the JSY programme to study whether it ensures skilled attendance at birth. 1) Non-participant observations (n=18) of intrapartum care during vaginal deliveries at a representative sample of 11 facilities in Madhya Pradesh to document what happens during intrapartum care. 2) Interviews (n=10) with providers to explore reasons for this care. Thematic framework analysis was used. Three themes emerged from the data: 1) delivery environment is chaotic: delivery rooms were not conducive to safe, women-friendly care provision, and coordination between providers was poor. 2) Staff do not provide skilled care routinely: this emerged from observations that monitoring was limited to assessment of cervical dilatation, lack of readiness to provide key elements of care, and the execution of harmful/unnecessary practices coupled with poor techniques. 3) Dominant staff, passive recipients: staff sometimes threatened, abused, or ignored women during delivery; women were passive and accepted dominance and disrespect. Attendants served as 'go-betweens' patients and providers. The interviews with providers revealed their awareness of the compromised quality of care, but they were constrained by structural problems. Positive practices were also observed, including companionship during childbirth and women mobilising in the early stages of labour. Our observational study did not suggest an adequate level of skilled birth attendance (SBA). The findings reveal insufficiencies in the health system and organisational structures to provide an 'enabling environment' for SBA. We highlight the need to ensure

  12. The National Accreditation Board for Hospital and Health Care Providers accreditation programme in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyani, Girdhar J; Krishnamurthy, B

    2014-01-01

    Quality in health care is important as it is directly linked with patient safety. Quality as we know is driven either by regulation or by market demand. Regulation in most developing countries has not been effective, as there is shortage of health care providers and governments have to be flexible. In such circumstances, quality has taken a back seat. Accreditation symbolizes the framework for quality governance of a hospital and is based on optimum standards. Not only is India establishing numerous state of the art hospitals, but they are also experiencing an increase in demand for quality as well as medical tourism. India launched its own accreditation system in 2006, conforming to standards accredited by ISQua. This article shows the journey to accreditation in India and describes the problems encountered by hospitals as well as the benefits it has generated for the industry and patients.

  13. Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Diabetic Foot URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Diabetic Foot - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  14. Loss to follow-up among children in pre-ART care under the National AIDS Programme, Tamil Nadu, South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A. M. V.; Chinnakali, P.; Rajendran, M.; Valan, A. S.; Rewari, B. B.; Swaminathan, S.

    2017-01-01

    Setting: Children aged Tamil Nadu, India, during the year 2012. Design: This was a retrospective cohort study involving a review of programme records. Results: Of 656 children registered for HIV care, 20 (3%) were not assessed for ART eligibility. Of those remaining, 226 (36%) were not ART eligible and entered pre-ART care. Among these, at 1 year of registration, 50 (22%) were LTFU, 40 (18%) were transferred out and 136 (60%) were retained in care at the same centre. The child's age, sex, World Health Organization stage or occurrence of opportunistic infection were not associated with LTFU. Conclusion: One in five children registered under pre-ART care were lost to follow-up. Stronger measures to prevent LTFU and reinforce retrieval actions are necessary in the existing National HIV Programme. PMID:28695080

  15. A needs analysis for a non-abusive intervention programme in the School of Health Care Sciences at the University of Pretoria

    OpenAIRE

    LO Fouché; R du Toit

    2006-01-01

    Due to feedback from students, student abuse during fieldwork, was brought to the attention of the researchers. The study aimed to determine whether a need for a nonabusive intervention programme (NIP) existed amongst the School of Health Care Science students at the University of Pretoria. All students enrolled at the School of Health Care Sciences completed a questionnaire. An overwhelming response indicated that the majority of students (95.85%) have a need for a non-abusive intervention p...

  16. Systematic Medical Appraisal, Referral and Treatment (SMART) Mental Health Programme for providing innovative mental health care in rural communities in India

    OpenAIRE

    Maulik, P. K.; Devarapalli, S.; Kallakuri, S.; Praveen, D.; Jha, V.; Patel, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. India has few mental health professionals to treat the large number of people suffering from mental disorders. Rural areas are particularly disadvantaged due to lack of trained health workers. Ways to improve care could be by training village health workers in basic mental health care, and by using innovative methods of service delivery. The ongoing Systematic Medical Appraisal, Referral and Treatment Mental Health Programme will assess the acceptability, feasibility and prelimina...

  17. Contribution of the education of the prospective fathers to the success of maternal health care programme.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhalerao V; Galwankar M; Kowli S; Kumar R; Chaturvedi R

    1984-01-01

    The role of involving prospective fathers in the care of pregnant women attending the Mother Craft Clinic of the Malavani Health Center in Bombay, India was evaluated. Beginning in October 1982, pregnant women attending the Clinic were requested to ask their husands to meet the resident medical officer of the center who was available on the premises of the Center on all days and evenings including the holidays. 1 of the medico-social workers explained to the women the reason and the need fo...

  18. Development of a training programme for home health care workers to promote preventive activities focused on a healthy lifestyle : an intervention mapping approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, Maaike E.; Dijkstra, Arie; de Winter, Andrea F.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lifestyle is an important aspect in maintaining good health in older adults, and home health care (HHC) workers can play an important role in promoting a healthy lifestyle. However, there is limited evidence in the literature regarding how to develop an effective training programme to

  19. Perspectives of older people engaging in nurse-led cardiovascular prevention programmes: a qualitative study in primary care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, Suzanne A.; van den Eerenbeemt, Karin D. M.; Pols, Jeanette; van Bussel, Emma F.; Richard, Edo; Moll van Charante, Eric P.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular prevention programmes are increasingly being offered to older people. To achieve the proposed benefits, adherence is crucial. Understanding the reasons for adherence and non-adherence can improve preventive care. To gain insight into what motivates older people living in the community

  20. Perspectives of older people engaging in nurse-led cardiovascular prevention programmes: a qualitative study in primary care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, S.A.; Eerenbeemt, K.D. van den; Pols, J.; Bussel, E.F. van; Richard, E.; Moll van Charante, E.P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular prevention programmes are increasingly being offered to older people. To achieve the proposed benefits, adherence is crucial. Understanding the reasons for adherence and non-adherence can improve preventive care. AIM: To gain insight into what motivates older people living

  1. Impact of antimicrobial stewardship programme on hospitalized patients at the intensive care unit: a prospective audit and feedback study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdour, Maher R; Hallak, Hussein O; Aldeyab, Mamoon A; Nasif, Mowaffaq A; Khalili, Aliaa M; Dallashi, Ahamad A; Khofash, Mohammad B; Scott, Michael G

    2018-04-01

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics is one of the most important factors contributing to the emergence of drug resistant pathogens. The purpose of this study was to measure the clinical impact of antimicrobial stewardship programme (ASP) interventions on hospitalized patients at the Intensive care unit at Palestinian Medical Complex. A prospective audit with intervention and feedback by ASP team within 48-72 h of antibiotic administration began in September 2015. Four months of pre-ASP data were compared with 4 months of post-ASP data. Data collected included clinical and demographic data; use of antimicrobials measured by defined daily doses, duration of therapy, length of stay, readmission and all-cause mortality. Overall, 176 interventions were made the ASP team with an average acceptance rate of 78.4%. The most accepted interventions were dose optimization (87.0%) followed by de-escalation based on culture results with an acceptance rate of 84.4%. ASP interventions significantly reduces antimicrobial use by 24.3% (87.3 defined daily doses/100 beds vs. 66.1 defined daily doses/100 beds P < 0.001). The median (interquartile range) of length of stay was significantly reduced post ASP [11 (3-21) vs. 7 (4-19) days; P < 0.01]. Also, the median (interquartile range) of duration of therapy was significantly reduced post-ASP [8 (5-12) days vs. 5 (3-9); P = 0.01]. There was no significant difference in overall 30-day mortality or readmission between the pre-ASP and post-ASP groups (26.9% vs. 23.9%; P = 0.1) and (26.1% vs. 24.6%; P = 0.54) respectively. Our prospective audit and feedback programme was associated with positive impact on antimicrobial use, duration of therapy and length of stay. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. The development and piloting of the REnal specific Advanced Communication Training (REACT) programme to improve Advance Care Planning for renal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, Katherine; Shepherd, Kate; Bryan, Liz; Brown, Heather; Carey, Irene; Matthews, Beverley; O'Donoghue, Donal; Vinen, Katie; Murtagh, Fliss E M

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, the End-Stage Kidney Disease population has increased and is ever more frail, elderly and co-morbid. A care-focused approach needs to be incorporated alongside the disease focus, to identify those who are deteriorating and improve communication about preferences and future care. Yet many renal professionals feel unprepared for such discussions. To develop and pilot a REnal specific Advanced Communication Training (REACT) programme to address the needs of End-Stage Kidney Disease patients and renal professionals. Two-part study: (1) development of the REnal specific Advanced Communication Training programme informed by multi-professional focus group and patient survey and (2) piloting of the programme. The REnal specific Advanced Communication Training programme was piloted with 16 participants (9 renal nurses/health-care assistants and 7 renal consultants) in two UK teaching hospitals. The focus group identified the need for better information about end-of-life phase, improved awareness of patient perspectives, skills to manage challenging discussions, 'hands on' practice in a safe environment and follow-up to discuss experiences. The patient survey demonstrated a need to improve communication about concerns, treatment plans and decisions. The developed REnal specific Advanced Communication Training programme was acceptable and feasible and was associated with a non-significant increase in confidence in communicating about end-of-life issues (pre-training: 6.6/10, 95% confidence interval: 5.7-7.4; post-training: 6.9/10, 95% confidence interval: 6.1-7.7, unpaired t-test - p = 0.56), maintained at 3 months. There is a need to improve end-of-life care for End-Stage Kidney Disease patients, to enable them to make informed decisions about future care. Challenges include prioritising communication training among service providers.

  3. [Dynamics of interdisciplinary around a health care network: simultaneous programme design and evaluation planning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, H; Mantovani, J; Raffy, C; Cayla, F; Clément, S

    2005-12-01

    This article reports on the evaluation experience of a multiple sclerosis care network in the Midi-Pyrénées region (MIPSEP). It shows how an evaluation team composed of public health doctors and sociologists progressively and naturally evolved from having a purely external observation role towards having a collaborative role actively working with the network's members and partners. A qualitative method was chosen for the data collection through interviews with the network's actors, and the frameworks for reference were constituted from official texts which defined the networks and their missions. Coming from a curative and healing culture, the network's actors were concerned primarily about how to organise themselves in order to better respond to the needs expressed by the patients. The various professional backgrounds and cultures, faced with different perspectives from innovation and confronted with the related difficulties, participated in a collective expertise exercise and collaborated in the construction process. This example supports an open, qualitative, evolutionary evaluation approach which is done in close proximity to the field and work on the ground. The study is timely given the current explosion of debate on evaluation methods. With a great deal of exchange and reflection on suitable tools and indicators as well as the respective roles of researchers, care givers and decision-makers, the results of this study advocate to favour multidisciplinary approaches, including opening up this process to funders and planning authorities rather than over-theorising about it, which only serves to enclose and paralyse a process that, on the contrary, should aim to be more inclusive. This could be a useful way to decompartmentalise and break down existing barriers within the health system.

  4. Contribution of the education of the prospective fathers to the success of maternal health care programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalerao, V R; Galwankar, M; Kowli, S S; Kumar, R; Chaturvedi, R M

    1984-01-01

    The role of involving prospective fathers in the care of pregnant women attending the Mother Craft Clinic of the Malavani Health Center in Bombay, India was evaluated. Beginning in October 1982, pregnant women attending the Clinic were requested to ask their husands to meet the resident medical officer of the center who was available on the premises of the Center on all days and evenings including the holidays. 1 of the medico-social workers explained to the women the reason and the need for their husbands coming and meeting the doctor at the Center. The outcome of the maternal health care program for the 270 women whose husbands were invited and came (Group 1) was compared with the outcome of the same program, under the same roof, for 405 women whose husbands could not be invited (Group 2). The husbands who attended the center were educated individually and in groups about their role in nutrition and health of their wives during pregnancy and their responsibility in subsequent child rearing. The physiology of pregnancy, complications of pregnancy, and the possible ways and means of preventing the complications were explained in detail. The husbands were also told to encourage their wives to attend the antenatal clinic of the center as often as possible. There was no difference in the socioeconomic, educational, cultural, and religious background of the 2 groups of women who were similar in parity distribution. The main difference between the 2 groups was a significantly lower perinatal mortality in Group 1. Only 60 of the 405 Group 2 women were considered eligible for postpartum sterilization (para 3 and higher). In contrast, 41 of the 270 Group 1 women were considered eligible for postpartum sterilization and 110 women accepted. The excess of those who accepted over those who were eligible came form the lower paras. This effort confirms that the involvement of prospective fathers is possible and pays good dividends even in an uneducated and low socioeconomic

  5. Integration of HIV Care into Community Management of Acute Childhood Malnutrition Permits Good Outcomes: Retrospective Analysis of Three Years of a Programme in Lusaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadi, Beatrice; Imikendu, Mercy; Sakala, Milika; Banda, Rosemary; Kelly, Paul

    2016-01-01

    While HIV has had a major impact on health care in southern Africa, there are few data on its impact on acute malnutrition in children in the community. We report an analysis of outcomes in a large programme of community management of acute malnutrition in the south of Lusaka. Over 3 years, 68,707 assessments for undernutrition were conducted house-to-house, and children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) or moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) were enrolled into either Outpatient Therapeutic Programme (OTP) or Supplementary Feeding Programme (SFP) respectively. Case records were analysed using tabulation and unconditional logistic regression. 1,859 children (889 boys, 970 girls; median age 16 months) with MAM (n = 664) or SAM (n = 1,195) were identified. Of 1,796 children whose parents consented to testing, 185 (10.3%) were HIV positive. Altogether 1,163 (62.6%) were discharged as recovered from acute malnutrition. Case fatality while in the programme was 4.2% in children with SAM and 0.5% in those with MAM (RR of SAM 10.9; 95%CI 3.4,34.8; Pmalnutrition programme, incorporating HIV care, can achieve low mortality even in a population heavily affected by HIV.

  6. Art, music, story: The evaluation of a person-centred arts in health programme in an acute care older persons' unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Karen; Tesch, Leigh; Dawborn, Jacqueline; Courtney-Pratt, Helen

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of an arts in health programme delivered by a specialised artist within an acute older person's unit. Acute hospitals must meet the increasingly complex needs of older people who experience multiple comorbidities, often including cognitive impairment, either directly related to their admission or longer term conditions, including dementia. A focus on physical illness, efficiency and tasks within an acute care environment can all divert attention from the psychosocial well-being of patients. This focus also decreases capacity for person-centred approaches that acknowledge and value the older person, their life story, relationships and the care context. The importance of arts for health and wellness, including responsiveness to individual need, is well established: however, there is little evidence about its effectiveness for older people in acute hospital settings. We report on a collaborative arts in health programme on an acute medical ward for older people. The qualitative study used collaborative enquiry underpinned by a constructivist approach to evaluate an arts programme that involved participatory art-making activities, customised music, song and illustration work, and enlivening the unit environment. Data sources included observation of art activities, semi-structured interviews with patients and family members, and focus groups with staff. Data were transcribed and thematically analysed using a line by line approach. The programme had positive impacts for the environment, patients, families and staff. The environment exhibited changes as a result of programme outputs; patients and families were engaged and enjoyed activities that aided recovery from illness; and staff also enjoyed activities and importantly learnt new ways of working with patients. An acute care arts in health programme is a carefully nuanced programme where the skills of the arts health worker are critical to success. Utilising such skill, continued focus on person

  7. Contribution of the education of the prospective fathers to the success of maternal health care programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalerao V

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of involving prospective fathers in the care of pregnant women attending the Mother Craft Clinic of the Malavani Health Center in Bombay, India was evaluated. Beginning in October 1982, pregnant women attending the Clinic were requested to ask their husands to meet the resident medical officer of the center who was available on the premises of the Center on all days and evenings including the holidays. 1 of the medico-social workers explained to the women the reason and the need for their husbands coming and meeting the doctor at the Center. The outcome of the maternal health care program for the 270 women whose husbands were invited and came (Group 1 was compared with the outcome of the same program, under the same roof, for 405 women whose husbands could not be invited (Group 2. The husbands who attended the center were educated individually and in groups about their role in nutrition and health of their wives during pregnancy and their responsibility in subsequent child rearing. The physiology of pregnancy, complications of pregnancy, and the possible ways and means of preventing the complications were explained in detail. The husbands were also told to encourage their wives to attend the antenatal clinic of the center as often as possible. There was no difference in the socioeconomic, educational, cultural, and religious background of the 2 groups of women who were similar in parity distribution. The main difference between the 2 groups was a significantly lower perinatal mortality in Group 1. Only 60 of the 405 Group 2 women were considered eligible for postpartum sterilization (para 3 and higher. In contrast, 41 of the 270 Group 1 women were considered eligible for postpartum sterilization and 110 women accepted. The excess of those who accepted over those who were eligible came form the lower paras. This effort confirms that the involvement of prospective fathers is possible and pays good dividends even in an uneducated and low

  8. An evaluation of a palliative care outreach programme for children with Burkitt lymphoma in rural Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamannai, Mona; Kaah, Joel; Mbah, Glenn; Ndimba, Joseph; D'Souza, Catherine; Wharin, Paul; Hesseling, Peter B

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care (PC) is the most appropriate treatment for patients with life-limiting, incurable diseases, but it is a relatively new concept in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). A lack of curative treatment options for some conditions creates a great need for PC, but such services are rarely provided in SSA. More research into PC in SSA is urgently needed to create an evidence base to confirm the importance of appropriate PC services. To gain a better understanding of the needs of patients and their families visited by a children's PC nurse in Cameroon and to identify aspects of the service that can be improved. A qualitative study design with semi-structured interviews was used. Tape-recorded interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed. Twelve interviews were conducted with patients, carers and nurses. Financial aid, general disease improvement and prayers were the directly expressed needs of service recipients. Specialist training in children's PC was the main need expressed by the nurses. Open communication about clinical status and treatment failure, more detailed counselling, more distraction for patients and respite for carers were identified as underlying needs. It is possible to provide an effective children's PC service that meets the most urgent needs of recipients in a rural setting in SSA. Recommendations include improved counselling, specialist education for staff, expansion of local support networks and more frequent home visits. More studies are needed to help define the need for PC in children with life-limiting diseases.

  9. [The Alliance Programme: an integrated care pathway for patients with schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Bent; Sigsgaard, Anne; Gregersen, Jane; Meilvang, Bente; Halldorsson, Lene Leth; Christensen, Anders; Kirk, Else; Hansen, Vagn

    2008-11-10

    Experiences and results of implementation of an integrated care pathway (ICP) for patients with schizophrenia are described. The participants of the ICP were the hospital psychiatry unit, the community mental health team and the social psychiatry unit. The article reviews the collaboration in connection with patient hospitalization and discharge. The study includes 224 patients, who fulfill the ICD 10 criteria for schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder. The patients were interviewed at admission to and discharge from the Psychiatric Department. During hospitalization, the staff filled in a check list establishing whether the established procedures were complied with in each individual case. The Outpatient Section filled in a similar check list. In addition, information from the local registry concerning the hospitalization pattern during the first 12 months after discharge was obtained. As a result of the ICP, collaboration was stimulated. During the first year disagreement between sectors with regard to the degree of compliance with the introduced procedures during hospitalization was observed (p > 0.05). Disagreement concerning the degree of compliance with procedures at admission was observed throughout the observation period (p > 0.05). Neither frequency of re-hospitalization nor inpatient bed costs were significantly reduced. ICP required considerable resource allocation, and the results of the effort were minimal. The ineffective initiatives were subsequently phased out.

  10. Perceived self-efficacy, personality and bioethics before a heart rehabilitation programme in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madueño Caro, Antonio J; Mellado Fernández, Manuel Luis; Delgado Pacheco, Juana; Muñoz Ayllon, Marta; Pardos Lafarga, Manuel; Saez García, Laura

    There is a clear evidence of the benefit of cardiac rehabilitation after a cardiovascular event on patients' mood and perceived self-efficacy in terms of their own health care. Our aim is to define the correlation between mood-related variables, biotype and self-efficacy in this population. Descriptive study. The entire population of patients discharged from thecardiac rehabilitation unit over 12 months. Universal anthropometric and psychometric (general self-efficacy scale, Salamanca personality traits questionnaire, Hamilton anxiety scale and Beck depression inventory) variables are determined. Descriptive statistics and association between variables (correlation) is determined. This study involved 88 patients, response rate 92%. The average age was 53 years old, 80.23% were males. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations for the main dependent variable and associated variables is performed. Significant evidence is shown, self-efficacy is negatively correlated with anxiety (r=-0.4009) and depression (r=-0.4152), as well as dependent(r=-03 175) and impulsive (r=-0.4243) personality traits. Higher levels of anxiety positively correlate with endomorph biotype (r=0.3304), and depression-associated symptoms (r=0.2563). Age and gender do not correlate with self-perceived efficacy. Self-efficacy in the study population is correlated with personality traits, mood and body biotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. [Analysis of a Family-centred Care Programme with Follow-up Home-visits in Neonatology - In Times of the Directive from G-BA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüning, B M; Reimann, M; Sahlmen, S; Leibold, S; Nabring, J C; Felderhoff-Müser, U

    2016-07-01

    Marked progress in neonatology changed care of very preterm infants (VLBW) over the last decades - but also the attitude towards family-centred care (FCC). With the directive of the German Federal Joined Committee (G-BA), politicians recognize the necessity of neonatal FCC. To evaluate time and personnel costs necessary at a centre of established FCC. Elternberatung "Frühstart" is a FCC programme for VLBW and seriously ill neonates from preganancy at risk to follow-up home-visits delivered by one interdisciplinary team. Analysis (2011-2014): 1.) Number of cases /participation in programme, 2.) resources of time, 3) and personnel, 4.) funding, 5) economic impact. 1.1.2011-31.12.2014: 441 cases (total cases: 2 212) participated in the programme. Participation of VLBW: mean 92% (86.4-97,2%). Costs of time are highest in neonates with congenital malformations: median 13.8 h, VLBW: median 11,2 h. Transition to home is most time intensive: median 7,3 (0-42.5) h. In average of 3.1 full-time nurses (part-time workers) are able to counsel 48 families/quarter. In severe cases funding is partly provided by health care insurances for social medical aftercare: positive applications: mean 92.7% (79.6-97.7%). Participation in the FCC programme in neonatology is high and costs of time are manageable. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Prevention of recurrent foot ulcers with plantar pressure-based in-shoe orthoses: the CareFUL prevention multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrecht, Jan S; Hurley, Timothy; Mauger, David T; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of in-shoe orthoses that were designed based on shape and barefoot plantar pressure in reducing the incidence of submetatarsal head plantar ulcers in people with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and a history of similar prior ulceration. Single-blinded multicenter randomized controlled trial with subjects randomized to wear shape- and pressure-based orthoses (experimental, n = 66) or standard-of-care A5513 orthoses (control, n = 64). Patients were followed for 15 months, until a study end point (forefoot plantar ulcer or nonulcerative plantar forefoot lesion) or to study termination. Proportional hazards regression was used for analysis. There was a trend in the composite primary end point (both ulcers and nonulcerative lesions) across the full follow-up period (P = 0.13) in favor of the experimental orthoses. This trend was due to a marked difference in ulcer occurrence (P = 0.007) but no difference in the rate of nonulcerative lesions (P = 0.76). At 180 days, the ulcer prevention effect of the experimental orthoses was already significant (P = 0.003) when compared with control, and the benefit of the experimental orthoses with respect to the composite end point was also significant (P = 0.042). The hazard ratio was 3.4 (95% CI 1.3-8.7) for the occurrence of a submetatarsal head plantar ulcer in the control compared with experimental arm over the duration of the study. We conclude that shape- and barefoot plantar pressure-based orthoses were more effective in reducing submetatarsal head plantar ulcer recurrence than current standard-of-care orthoses, but they did not significantly reduce nonulcerative lesions. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  13. Prevention of Recurrent Foot Ulcers With Plantar Pressure–Based In-Shoe Orthoses: The CareFUL Prevention Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrecht, Jan S.; Hurley, Timothy; Mauger, David T.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of in-shoe orthoses that were designed based on shape and barefoot plantar pressure in reducing the incidence of submetatarsal head plantar ulcers in people with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and a history of similar prior ulceration. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Single-blinded multicenter randomized controlled trial with subjects randomized to wear shape- and pressure-based orthoses (experimental, n = 66) or standard-of-care A5513 orthoses (control, n = 64). Patients were followed for 15 months, until a study end point (forefoot plantar ulcer or nonulcerative plantar forefoot lesion) or to study termination. Proportional hazards regression was used for analysis. RESULTS There was a trend in the composite primary end point (both ulcers and nonulcerative lesions) across the full follow-up period (P = 0.13) in favor of the experimental orthoses. This trend was due to a marked difference in ulcer occurrence (P = 0.007) but no difference in the rate of nonulcerative lesions (P = 0.76). At 180 days, the ulcer prevention effect of the experimental orthoses was already significant (P = 0.003) when compared with control, and the benefit of the experimental orthoses with respect to the composite end point was also significant (P = 0.042). The hazard ratio was 3.4 (95% CI 1.3–8.7) for the occurrence of a submetatarsal head plantar ulcer in the control compared with experimental arm over the duration of the study. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that shape- and barefoot plantar pressure–based orthoses were more effective in reducing submetatarsal head plantar ulcer recurrence than current standard-of-care orthoses, but they did not significantly reduce nonulcerative lesions. PMID:24760263

  14. Knowledge and implementation of the National Malaria Control Programme among health-care workers in primary health-care centers in Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temitope Wunmi Ladi-Akinyemi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lack of capacity to implement programs effectively and low public education about malaria is some of the factors that Nigeria governments must address to effectively combat malaria. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study assessed the knowledge and implementation of the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP among health-care workers in the primary health-care centers in Ogun state. Three hundred and twenty-five respondents were recruited into the study using cluster sampling method. A pretested self-administered questionnaire was used to collect necessary information. Analysis and statistical calculation was done using SPSS version 20.0. Relationships between categorical variables were tested using Chi-square test with P value at 0.05. Results: One hundred and twenty-five (38.5% of the respondents were from Ado-odo/Ota local government areas (LGAs, 120 (36.9% of the respondents were from Ijebu-ode LGA and 80 (24.6% were from Ewekoro LGA. About 37.8% of the respondents were within age range of 45–54 years, with mean of 41.7 ± 8.5. Over 90% of the respondents knew the mode of transmission of malaria, <50% of them could identified case definition of simple and complicated malaria. Large percentage of the respondents knew the signs and symptoms of simple malaria. The respondents who were older (P = 0.004 with more than 15-year work experience (P = 0.006 had good knowledge score of the NMCP. Conclusion: Knowledge and implementation of NMCP by health-care workers in some of the LGAs in this study was inadequate. Regular visit to the health facilities, especially those in the remote areas by the staff of malaria control unit were recommended.

  15. Primary care in the village. An approach to village self-help health programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyadi, A; Sadjimin, T; Rohde, J E

    1977-07-01

    The health clinic run in Kalirandu, Indonesia, by Foster Parents Plan, a private philanthropic welfare organization is described. In 1974 the Plan was serving 3000 families through 4 clinics, providing general curative services, pre- and postnatal services, family planning, dental care, and referral to the local urban hospital where needed. Each clinic treated about 100 patients per day at a cost of $1 per client family per month. However, few inocculations were given and few preventive health checks were requested. When the number of Plan families grew to 9500 while the population of the served communities grew to 400,000 with no increase in clinic budget, a different approach was tried. Instead of serving only the families helped direactly by the Plan, a total community service was developed. Plan personnel began to encourage use of the government health clinics. A rural health insurance system was developed which entitles the families to preventive health services. Plan medical staff and the local health center trained volunteers from Kalirandu in the use of a few simple medicines. The volunteers were selected by the village headmen and generally have elementary school education and a position of responsibility. This health "kader" works without payment and has 10-15 families living near him for whom he is responsible. At the time of writing there were over 500 kaders trained. Inservice courses are conducted to keep them up-to-date. An acceptors club was formed to motivate use of family planning. Seeking a more active role in village life, the acceptors club then took on child nutrition as a project, weighing children and reminding mothers of inoculations. The self-help momentum is spreading to housing and better farming practices, which is providing more vegetable gardens and better sources of Vitamin A. It is emphasized that this type of group responsibility cannot be imposed from outside. It is community leaders within that provide the motivation for self

  16. Introduction of a breast cancer care programme including ultra short hospital stay in 4 early adopter centres: framework for an implementation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kok, Mascha; Frotscher, Caroline N A; van der Weijden, Trudy; Kessels, Alfons G H; Dirksen, Carmen D; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Roukema, Jan A; Bell, Antoine V R J; van der Ent, Fred W; von Meyenfeldt, Maarten F

    2007-07-02

    Whereas ultra-short stay (day care or 24 hour hospitalisation) following breast cancer surgery was introduced in the US and Canada in the 1990s, it is not yet common practice in Europe. This paper describes the design of the MaDO study, which involves the implementation of ultra short stay admission for patients after breast cancer surgery, and evaluates whether the targets of the implementation strategy are reached. The ultra short stay programme and the applied implementation strategy will be evaluated from the economic perspective. The MaDO study is a pre-post-controlled multi-centre study, that is performed in four hospitals in the Netherlands. It includes a pre and post measuring period of six months each with six months of implementation in between in at least 40 patients per hospital per measurement period. Primary outcome measure is the percentage of patients treated in ultra short stay. Secondary endpoints are the percentage of patients treated according to protocol, degree of involvement of home care nursing, quality of care from the patient's perspective, cost-effectiveness of the ultra short stay programme and cost-effectiveness of the implementation strategy. Quality of care will be measured by the QUOTE-breast cancer instrument, cost-effectiveness of the ultra short stay programme will be measured by means of the EuroQol (administered at four time-points) and a cost book for patients. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed from a societal perspective. Cost-effectiveness of the implementation strategy will be measured by determination of the costs of implementation activities. This study will reveal barriers and facilitators for implementation of the ultra short stay programme. Moreover, the results of the study will provide information about the cost-effectiveness of the ultra short stay programme and the implementation strategy. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN77253391.

  17. Evaluation of nurses’ changing perceptions when trained to implement a self-management programme for dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roets-Merken, Lieve M; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J F J; Zuidema, Sytse U; Dees, Marianne K; Hermsen, Pieter G J M; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Graff, Maud J L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To gain insights into the process of nurses’ changing perceptions when trained to implement a self-management programme for dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care, and into the factors that contributed to these changes in their perceptions. Design Qualitative study alongside a cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 17 long-term care homes spread across the Netherlands. Participants 34 licensed practical nurses supporting 54 dual sensory impaired older adults. Intervention A 5-month training programme designed to enable nurses to support the self-management of dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care. Primary outcomes Nurses’ perceptions on relevance and feasibility of the self-management programme collected from nurses’ semistructured coaching diaries over the 5-month training and intervention period, as well as from trainers’ reports. Results Nurses’ initial negative perceptions on relevance and feasibility of the intervention changed to positive as nurses better understood the concept of autonomy. Through interactions with older adults and by self-evaluations of the effect of their behaviour, nurses discovered that their usual care conflicted with client autonomy. From that moment, nurses felt encouraged to adapt their behaviour to the older adults’ autonomy needs. However, nurses’ initial unfamiliarity with conversation techniques required a longer exploration period than planned. Once client autonomy was understood, nurses recommended expanding the intervention as a generic approach to all their clients, whether dual sensory impaired or not. Conclusions Longitudinal data collection enabled exploration of nurses’ changes in perceptions when moving towards self-management support. The training programme stimulated nurses to go beyond ‘protocol thinking’, discovering client autonomy and exploring the need for their own behavioural adaptations. Educational programmes for practical nurses should offer

  18. Predictors of long-term change of a physical activity promotion programme in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Grandes, Gonzalo; Ortega Sánchez-Pinilla, Ricardo; Torcal, Jesus; Montoya, Imanol

    2014-02-04

    Further research is needed to improve the evidence regarding determinants of physical activity (PA) as a crucial step to plan higher effective intervention strategies. The goal of the present study is to identify socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of primary care (PHC) insufficiently active patients that are associated with longitudinal changes in the level of physical activity. Longitudinal analysis of baseline socio-demographic and clinical predictors of physical activity change in insufficiently active PHC patients who participated in a PA-promoting multi-centre randomized clinical trial conducted from October 2003 through March 2006. The primary outcome measure was the self-reported physical activity assessed with the 7-day Physical Activity Recall (PAR), at baseline, 6, 12 and 24 months. Baseline covariates included sex, age, social class, anthropometric measures and other cardiovascular risk factors or associated diseases (Diabetes, HTA, tobacco use, etc.), and stage of readiness to change PA. Generalized linear mixed models were used to estimate longitudinal association of studied variables on PA change over the three follow-up measurements. A total of 3691 patients (85% of the 4317 recruited in the trial) with at least one follow-up measurement were included in the longitudinal analysis. At baseline, analysed patients (mean age: 50.6 years; 64.6% women) devoted 34.7 minutes and 2.36 metabolic equivalent hours per week (MET.h/week) to moderate and vigorous physical activity. Older age, male gender, higher social class, lower BMI, diagnosis of diabetes or hypertension, and measurement season were significant predictors of PA longitudinal change. The effect of baseline readiness to change on PA dose was modified by time, showing a positive gradient in favour of those with more readiness to change that increases significantly at 12 and 24 months (p-value interaction < .0001). Identified baseline characteristics such as readiness to change and

  19. Prevalence of malnutrition among HIV-infected children in Central and West-African HIV-care programmes supported by the Growing Up Programme in 2011: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesson, Julie; Masson, David; Adonon, Arsène; Tran, Caroline; Habarugira, Capitoline; Zio, Réjane; Nicimpaye, Léoncie; Desmonde, Sophie; Serurakuba, Goreth; Kwayep, Rosine; Sare, Edith; Konate, Tiefing; Nimaga, Abdoulaye; Saina, Philemon; Kpade, Akossiwa; Bassuka, Andrée; Gougouyor, Gustave; Leroy, Valériane

    2015-05-26

    The burden of malnutrition among HIV-infected children is not well described in sub-Saharan Africa, even though it is an important problem to take into account to guarantee appropriate healthcare for these children. We assessed the prevalence of malnutrition and its associated factors among HIV-infected children in HIV care programmes in Central and West-Africa. A cross-sectional study was conducted from September to December 2011 among the active files of HIV-infected children aged 2-19 years old, enrolled in HIV-care programmes supported by the Sidaction Growing Up Programme in Benin, Burundi, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Chad and Togo. Socio-demographics characteristics, anthropometric, clinical data, and nutritional support were collected. Anthropometric indicators, expressed in Z-scores, were used to define malnutrition: Height-for-age (HAZ), Weight-for-Height (WHZ) for children children ≥5 years. Three types of malnutrition were defined: acute malnutrition (WHZ/BAZ malnutrition (HAZ malnutrition (WHZ/BAZ malnutrition. Overall, 1350 HIV-infected children were included; their median age was 10 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 7-13 years), 49 % were girls. 80 % were on antiretroviral treatment (ART), for a median time of 36 months. The prevalence of malnutrition was 42 % (95 % confidence interval [95% CI]: 40-44 %) with acute, chronic and mixed malnutrition at 9 % (95% CI: 6-12 %), 26 % (95% CI: 23-28 %), and 7 % (95% CI: 5-10 %), respectively. Among those malnourished, more than half of children didn't receive any nutritional support at the time of the survey. Acute malnutrition was associated with male gender, severe immunodeficiency, and the absence of ART; chronic malnutrition with male gender and age (malnutrition with male gender, age (malnutrition. The prevalence of malnutrition in HIV-infected children even on ART remains high in HIV care programmes. Anthropometric measurements and appropriate nutritional care of malnourished HIV

  20. Depression and anxiety, an Indicated Prevention (DIP protocol in homes for the elderly: feasibility and (cost effectiveness of a stepped care programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beekman Aartjan TF

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive and anxiety disorders are a very common, serious and underdetected problem in homes for the elderly. Elderly persons in residential homes are at high risk for developing major depressive and anxiety disorders, and, therefore, deserve attention with regard to prevention. Methods/Design This protocol describes a randomised trial on the feasibility and (cost effectiveness of a stepped-care programme for prevention of depressive and anxiety disorders in homes for the elderly. The main outcome measure is the incidence of depressive and anxiety disorder in one year with a two years follow up. Secondary outcomes are symptoms of depression and anxiety, quality of life, direct health care costs and satisfaction with treatment. Discussion The number of studies examining the effects of preventive interventions on the incidence of mental disorders in the elderly population is very small. However, indicated prevention by means of a stepped-care programme seems to be an important option for decreasing the burden of illness for residents and their caregivers. This study contributes to the body of knowledge in this field. Positive effects may contribute to further use and development of tailored, (cost- effective and easy to use interventions in a preventive stepped-care programme. Trial Registration The Dutch Cochrane Centre, ISRCTN27540731

  1. Effects of a supportive educational nursing care programme on fatigue and quality of life in patients with heart failure: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Chieh; Huang, Jin-Long; Ho, Wen-Chao; Chiou, Ai-Fu

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue is a common symptom in patients with heart failure that is easy to ignore. In addition, fatigue may affect patients' physical function and psychosocial conditions that can impair their quality of life. An effective nursing care programme is required to alleviate patients' fatigue and improve their quality of life. To investigate the effects of a supportive educational nursing care programme on fatigue and quality of life in patients with heart failure. A randomised controlled trial design was used. Ninety-two patients with heart failure were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n=47) or a control group (n=45). The patients in the intervention group participated in 12 weeks of a supportive educational nursing care programme including fatigue assessment, education, coaching self-care and evaluation. The intervention was conducted by a cardiac nurse during four face-to-face interviews and three follow-up telephone interviews. Fatigue and quality of life were assessed at the baseline and 4 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks after enrollment in both groups. The participants in the intervention group exhibited a significant decrease in the level of fatigue after 12 weeks, whereas those in the control group exhibited no significant changes. Compared with the control group, the intervention group exhibited a significantly greater decrease in the level of fatigue and significantly greater improvement in quality of life after 12 weeks of intervention. The supportive educational nursing care programme was recommended to alleviate fatigue and improve quality of life in patients with heart failure. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  2. Diabetes: foot ulcers and amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Dereck L

    2011-08-26

    Diabetic foot ulceration is full-thickness penetration of the dermis of the foot in a person with diabetes. Severity is classified using the Wagner system, which grades it from 1 to 5. The annual incidence of ulcers among people with diabetes is 2.5% to 10.7% in resource-rich countries, and the annual incidence of amputation for any reason is 0.25% to 1.8%. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent foot ulcers and amputations in people with diabetes? What are the effects of treatments in people with diabetes with foot ulceration? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 50 systematic reviews and RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: debridement, human cultured dermis, human skin equivalent, patient education, pressure off-loading with felted foam or pressure-relief half-shoe, pressure off-loading with total-contact or non-removable casts, screening and referral to foot-care clinics, systemic hyperbaric oxygen for non-infected ulcers, systemic hyperbaric oxygen in infected ulcers, therapeutic footwear, topical growth factors, and wound dressings.

  3. Community perceptions on malaria and care-seeking practices in endemic Indian settings: policy implications for the malaria control programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Ashis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The focus of India’s National Malaria Programme witnessed a paradigm shift recently from health facility to community-based approaches. The current thrust is on diagnosing and treating malaria by community health workers and prevention through free provision of long-lasting insecticidal nets. However, appropriate community awareness and practice are inevitable for the effectiveness of such efforts. In this context, the study assessed community perceptions and practice on malaria and similar febrile illnesses. This evidence base is intended to direct the roll-out of the new strategies and improve community acceptance and utilization of services. Methods A qualitative study involving 26 focus group discussions and 40 key informant interviews was conducted in two districts of Odisha State in India. The key points of discussion were centred on community perceptions and practice regarding malaria prevention and treatment. Thematic analysis of data was performed. Results The 272 respondents consisted of 50% females, three-quarter scheduled tribe community and 30% students. A half of them were literates. Malaria was reported to be the most common disease in their settings with multiple modes of transmission by the FGD participants. Adoption of prevention methods was seasonal with perceived mosquito density. The reported use of bed nets was low and the utilization was determined by seasonality, affordability, intoxication and alternate uses of nets. Although respondents were aware of malaria-related symptoms, care-seeking from traditional healers and unqualified providers was prevalent. The respondents expressed lack of trust in the community health workers due to frequent drug stock-outs. The major determinants of health care seeking were socio-cultural beliefs, age, gender, faith in the service provider, proximity, poverty, and perceived effectiveness of available services. Conclusion Apart from the socio-cultural and behavioural

  4. A needs analysis for a non-abusive intervention programme in the School of Health Care Sciences at the University of Pretoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LO Fouché

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to feedback from students, student abuse during fieldwork, was brought to the attention of the researchers. The study aimed to determine whether a need for a nonabusive intervention programme (NIP existed amongst the School of Health Care Science students at the University of Pretoria. All students enrolled at the School of Health Care Sciences completed a questionnaire. An overwhelming response indicated that the majority of students (95.85% have a need for a non-abusive intervention programme (NIP. A significant need was identified especially among Nursing-, Physiotherapy- and Radiography students, 2nd and 4,h year students, and within a psychiatric fieldwork setting. Two surprise findings were firstly, that students who have no history of abuse have a greater need for an intervention programme than students with a history of abuse. Secondly superiors in the field are responsible for the majority of abusive incidences reported by students. The implementation of a non-abusive intervention programme (NIP to help students handle abusive incidences effectively and humanely is strongly recommended.

  5. Factors Associated with Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Benin – City, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors Associated with Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Benin – City, Nigeria. ... reported precipitating factors of DFU were puncture wounds (20.4%) and burns/scalds ... The most commonly identified risk factors for DFU were improper foot-care ...

  6. Feasibility and effectiveness of the implementation of a primary prevention programme for type 2 diabetes in routine primary care practice: a phase IV cluster randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez Alvaro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study is to perform an independent evaluation of the feasibility and effectiveness of an educational programme for the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes (DM2 in high risk populations in primary care settings, implanted within the Basque Health Service - Osakidetza. Methods/design This is a prospective phase IV cluster clinical trial conducted under routine conditions in 14 primary health care centres of Osakidetza, randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. We will recruit a total sample of 1089 individuals, aged between 45 and 70 years old, without diabetes but at high risk of developing the condition (Finnish Diabetes Risk Score, FINDRISC ≥ 14 and follow them up for 2 years. Primary health care nursing teams of the intervention centres will implement DE-PLAN, a structured educational intervention program focused on changing healthy lifestyles (diet and physical activity; while the patients in the control centres will receive the usual care for the prevention and treatment of DM2 currently provided in Osakidetza. The effectiveness attributable to the programme will be assessed by comparing the changes observed in patients exposed to the intervention and those in the control group, with respect to the risk of developing DM2 and lifestyle habits. In terms of feasibility, we will assess indicators of population coverage and programme implementation. Discussion The aim of this study is to provide the scientific basis for disseminate the programme to the remaining primary health centres in Osakidetza, as a novel way of addressing prevention of DM2. The study design will enable us to gather information on the effectiveness of the intervention as well as the feasibility of implementing it in routine practice. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01365013

  7. [Oral health hygiene education programme for nursing personnel to improve oral health of residents in long-term care facilities 2010 in Frankfurt/Main, Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarkowski, G; Allroggen, S; Köster-Schmidt, A; Bausback-Schomakers, S; Frank, M; Heudorf, U

    2013-06-01

    Many studies have shown the urgent need for improving oral health hygiene in nursing home residents. Deficits in the knowledge of the personnel about dental and oral hygiene are often cited as one of the causes. Therefore, an oral health education programme was provided to the personnel of 20 nursing homes in Frankfurt/Main. Here the results of the assessment of the impact of the education programme on knowledge and attitudes of the personnel as well as on oral health of the residents are presented. In May/June 2010, 471 nurses in 20 nursing homes in the Frankfurt/Main, Germany, received a two-hour education programme on oral health. The lessons were held by dentists with special education in geriatric dentistry. The personnel were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding knowledge and attitudes on oral health care before the education programme and 4-6 months afterwards. The oral health status of 313 residents (i. e., about 10% of the total residents) was examined by two dentists. Before and 4-6 months after education of the caregivers, the following data were recorded in the residents: number of teeth, caries, plaque index (PI), sulcus bleeding index (SBI), community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITN) and denture hygiene index (DHI). By attending the lessons, good improvements in knowledge of the caregivers could be obtained. The education programme was rated as very good/good by 85% of the nurses, having reduced their fear of oral care in the seniors and having gained more competence in practical oral hygiene procedures. Mean age of the residents was 80±13 years. About 32% of the residents were edentulous. Teeth were carious in 53% of the residents. Initially, one half of the residents exhibited plaque index>2, in 29% of the residents a severe and in 59% of them a very severe parodontitis was found (CPITN 3 or, respectively, 4). At 4-6 months after the education programme, an improvement in oral and dental hygiene of the residents could be

  8. Diabetic foot workshop: Improving technical and educational skills for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalaa, Maryam; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Shahbazi, Samimeh; Shayeganmehr, Zahra; Abooeirad, Maryam; Amini, Mohammad Reza; Adibi, Hossien; Mehrdad, Neda

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus as one of the most common metabolic disorders has some complications, one of the main ones is diabetic foot (DF). Appropriate care and education prevents 85% of diabetic foot amputations. An ideal management to prevent and treat diabetic foot necessitates a close collaboration between the health team members and the diabetic patient. Therefore, improving nurses' knowledge about DF care and advancement in the quality of care provided by the nurses could significantly improve diabetic foot prevention and management. Therefore, the aim of DF workshop was to improve technical and educational skills of the nurses to prevent and manage diabetic foot. Considering the vital role of the nurses in providing DF care, EMRI decided to conduct Diabetic foot workshop for them. The following five steps were designed for the 14 coordinating sessions in the workshop: Goals definition, deciding about attendees, location selection, creating agenda, and developing a follow-up plan. "Diabetic Foot Workshop for Nurses" provides appropriate training to DF nurses at the national level; and combining theory and practice in this workshop not only increases nurses' knowledge, but also improves their skills in the field of the diabetic foot. Providing education and care to patients by DF nurse specialists instead of general nurses could be an important output of this workshop, which may lead to DF prevention and amputation decrease in the long term.

  9. Diabetic foot ulcers: Part II. Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Mayer, Dieter; Goodman, Laurie; Botros, Mariam; Armstrong, David G; Woo, Kevin; Boeni, Thomas; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Kirsner, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    The management of diabetic foot ulcers can be optimized by using an interdisciplinary team approach addressing the correctable risk factors (ie, poor vascular supply, infection control and treatment, and plantar pressure redistribution) along with optimizing local wound care. Dermatologists can initiate diabetic foot care. The first step is recognizing that a loss of skin integrity (ie, a callus, blister, or ulcer) considerably increases the risk of preventable amputations. A holistic approach to wound assessment is required. Early detection and effective management of these ulcers can reduce complications, including preventable amputations and possible mortality. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Feasibility and benefits of group-based exercise in residential aged care adults: a pilot study for the GrACE programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Fien

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to examine the feasibility and benefits of a group resistance training exercise programme for improving muscle function in institutionalised older adults. A feasibility and acceptability study was designed for a residential aged care (RAC facility, based on the Gold Coast, Australia. Thirty-seven adults, mean age 86.8 ± 6.1 years (30 females living in a RAC facility. Participants were allocated into an exercise (n = 20 or control (n = 17 group. The exercise group, the Group Aged Care Exercise (GrACE programme, performed 12 weeks of twice weekly resistance exercises. Feasibility was measured via recruitment rate, measurement (physiological and surveys completion rate, loss-to-follow-up, exercise session adherence, adverse events, and ratings of burden and acceptability. Muscle function was assessed using gait speed, sit-to-stand and handgrip strength assessments. All intervention participants completed pre- and post-assessments, and the exercise intervention, with 85% (n = 17 of the group attending ≥ 18 of the 24 sessions and 15% (n = 3 attending all sessions. Acceptability was 100% with exercise participants, and staff who had been involved with the programme strongly agreed that the participants “Benefited from the programme.” There were no adverse events reported by any participants during the exercise sessions. When compared to the control group, the exercise group experienced significant improvements in gait speed (F(4.078 = 8.265, p = 0.007, sit to stand performance (F(3.24 = 11.033, p = 0.002 and handgrip strength (F(3.697 = 26.359, p < 0.001. Resistance training via the GrACE programme is feasible, safe and significantly improves gait speed, sit-to-stand performance and handgrip strength in RAC adults.

  11. The foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Imaging of the foot and ankle can be difficult because of the complex anatomy. Familiarity with the bony and ligamentous anatomy is essential for proper evaluation of radiographic findings. Therefore, pertinent anatomy is discussed as it applies to specific injuries. Special views, tomography, arthrography, and other techniques may be indicated for complete evaluation of foot and ankle trauma

  12. (ARV) treatment training programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    Keywords:ARV, training, evaluation, HIV, health care provider. RÉSUMÉ .... workers, adequate laboratory facilities for measuring viral load and .... questionnaire guide, the head of unit of the ART ...... begins its scale-up programme. Some of ...

  13. Foot Function, Foot Pain, and Falls in Older Adults: The Framingham Foot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awale, Arunima; Hagedorn, Thomas J; Dufour, Alyssa B; Menz, Hylton B; Casey, Virginia A; Hannan, Marian T

    2017-01-01

    Although foot pain has been linked to fall risk, contributions of pain severity, foot posture, or foot function are unclear. These factors were examined in a cohort of older adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of foot pain, severity of foot pain, and measures of foot posture and dynamic foot function with reported falls in a large, well-described cohort of older adults from the Framingham Foot Study. Foot pain, posture, and function were collected from Framingham Foot Study participants who were queried about falls over the past year (0, 1, and ≥2 falls). Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the relation of falls with foot pain, pain severity, foot posture, and foot function adjusting for covariates. The mean age of the 1,375 participants was 69 years; 57% were female, and 21% reported foot pain (40% mild pain, 47% moderate pain, and 13% severe pain). One-third reported falls in the past year (1 fall: n = 263, ≥2 falls: n = 152). Foot pain was associated with a 62% increased odds of recurrent falls. Those with moderate and severe foot pain showed increased odds of ≥2 falls (OR 1.78, CI 1.06-2.99, and OR 3.25, CI 1.65-7.48, respectively) compared to those with no foot pain. Foot function was not associated with falls. Compared to normal foot posture, those with planus foot posture had 78% higher odds of ≥2 falls. Higher odds of recurrent falls were observed in individuals with foot pain, especially severe foot pain, as well as in individuals with planus foot posture, indicating that both foot pain and foot posture may play a role in increasing the risk of falls among older adults. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Lasting impact of an implemented self-management programme for people with type 2 diabetes referred from primary care: a one-group, before-after design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fløde, Mari; Iversen, Marjolein M; Aarflot, Morten; Haltbakk, Johannes

    2017-12-01

    Research interventions in uniform clinical settings and in patients fulfilling well-defined inclusion criteria might show a more pronounced effect than implementing the same intervention in existing practice. Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) is complex, and should be assessed in existing practice as it is an intervention widely implemented. To examine the impact of an established group-based DSME in unselected people with type 2 diabetes referred from primary care. A one-group, before-after design was used for assessments before, immediately after, and 3 months after participation in a group-based DSME programme conducted at two Learning and Mastering Centres in Norway between November 2013 and June 2014. Participants completed a questionnaire before (n = 115), immediately after (n = 95) and 3 months after (n = 42) the DSME programme. Primary outcome measure was diabetes knowledge (Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test). Also patient activation (Patient Activation Measure [PAM]) and self-efficacy (General Self-Efficacy scale [GSE]) were measured. Changes in outcome measures were analysed using paired t-tests for normally distributed data and Wilcoxon signed-rank test for skewed data. Mean knowledge improved significantly from baseline (p < 0.001). Changes persisted at the 3-month assessment. Mean PAM scores improved significantly from baseline (p < 0.001), and changes persisted for 3 months. Mean GSE scores improved from baseline (p = 0.022) and persisted for 3 months. However, when results were stratified for participants who responded at all three time points, GSE showed no change during the study period. The complexity self-management in the individual is challenging to reflect in DSME. This implemented DSME programme for people with type 2 diabetes improved levels of diabetes knowledge and patient activation, persisting for at least 3 months. Hence, the DSME programme appears to be robust beyond standardised research settings, in educating unselected

  15. Initial evaluation of the training programme for health care professionals on the use of Malaysian clinical practice guidelines for management of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, S; Koh, C T; Mohd Aminuddin, M Y; Krishnasamy, M; Suhaila, M Z

    2013-09-01

    The Malaysian Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) for Management of Dementia (second edition) was launched in April 2010 by the Ministry of Health Malaysia. A training programme for the management of dementia, involving all categories of staff working at primary and secondary centres, was implemented to ensure that care delivery for people with dementia was in accordance with the guidelines. The study aimed to look into improving knowledge and understanding of dementia following training, and to evaluate the effectiveness of the training programme using a clinical audit indicator recommended in the guidelines. The study entailed 2 phases (at national and state levels). The first phase involved the CPG training programme run as a 1.5-day workshop, in which participants filled up pre- and post-workshop questionnaires. A second phase involved analysing all the referral letters to the memory clinic at the Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru 1 year before and after the training programme. There was a significant improvement in knowledge about dementia and its management among the health care professionals following training. The mean percentage score for the pre-workshop test was 63% while for the post-workshop test it was 78%, giving a difference of 15%. Although there was an overall improvement in knowledge gain following training in both specialist and non-specialist groups, these differences were not statistically significant (t = 1.32; 95% confidence interval, -2.61 to 9.61; p = 0.25). The proportion of referrals with a possible diagnosis of dementia from primary clinic referrals to the memory clinic also increased from 18% to 44% after training. There was an overall improvement in the knowledge about dementia among the health care professionals following the training, which was reflected in the increase in referrals to the memory clinic. Although the initial results appeared to be promising, a multicentre study is warranted to conclude that the training had been

  16. From root to fruit – flourishing in change. Evaluation of a development programme for practice development facilitators in end-of-life care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Dickson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This paper outlines the structure, processes and outcomes of a 12-month development programme for nurses who were transitioning from a practice-based training role to a practice development role. The programme was part of organisational commitment to develop a person-centred culture. A new team of practice development facilitators across the UK was formed at Marie Curie, a UK-based charity supporting persons with palliative and end-of-life care needs. Aim: The overall aim of the programme was to enable practice development facilitators to engage with the theory and practice of practice development, and to develop as enablers in the delivery of person-centred practice. Method: A co-designed, multimethod evaluation of the programme, which adopted emancipatory practice development and active learning methodologies. Data collection included fourth-generation evaluation, reflective writing, participant stories and examples of practice change. Findings: The programme supported a change in focus of participants’ role from technical to emancipatory. The team identified new ways of engaging together that enabled them to embody person-centredness. By experiencing active learning, they came to a better understanding of themselves and their practice. Throughout the programme, the team experienced a range of organisational challenges that impacted on their progress. Development of facilitation skills and a strong community of practice will enhance the embeddedness and sustainability of the new role. Conclusions: Facilitators of practice development can be catalysts in the development of person-centred cultures, which are indicative of flourishing organisations. To be sustainable, initiatives such as this one need to be included in organisational strategy. A sense of wellbeing and renewed commitment to develop practice in ways that keep person-centred care at its heart can be experienced through experiencing human flourishing. Key messages:

  17. Diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-based wound management: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic foot ulcers have a significant impact on the individual patient's quality of life, potential morbidity and even mortality. Diabetic foot ulcers also consume a gradually increasing portion of our health care budget. Whenever possible the focus should be on prevention rather than cure. All diabetic patients must have both ...

  18. Role of footcare education in diabetic foot status and glycaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prevalence of type 2 diabetes among the adult population is rising globally. As the case detection rates of diabetes increase in adult Nigerians, managing the attendant (foot) complications has become an important health challenge. Poor practice of foot care and poor glycaemic control is potential risk for ...

  19. Impact of an alcohol misuse intervention for health care workers --2: Employee assistance programme utilization, on-the-job injuries, job loss and health services utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, Sandra C; McMillan, Garnett; Gregory, Cindy

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of an enhanced substance misuse (SM) prevention/early intervention programme on referrals to an employee assistance programme, health care utilization rates, on-the-job injury rates and job termination rates among health care professionals employed in a managed care organization. The intervention was implemented at one site, with the remaining sites serving as the comparison group. Existing data from hospital databases were used to compare events occurring in the periods before and after initiation of the intervention. To account for baseline differences in age, gender and job class, logistic regression models produced adjusted means for events per employee month-at-risk. We found that employee assistance referrals and non-SM-related in-patient hospitalizations increased significantly post-intervention, while rates of total out-patient SM-related visits decreased at both the intervention and comparison sites post-intervention. There was a small, statistically significant decrease in the monthly rate (OR = 0.92) of non-SM out-patient utilization at the intervention site, once the intervention was in place. No differences potentially attributable to the intervention were detected in job turnover or injury rates. We conclude that, while the intervention did not appear to affect health care utilization for SM-related problems, it was associated with increased referrals for employee assistance.

  20. Foot morphology of Turkish football players according to foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Football is the most popular sport in the world. Foot morphology and foot preference are important factors in football player's performance. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the foot morphology of elite football players with different foot preferences. 407 male football players participated in this study. 328 of ...

  1. Programmable Bio-nanochip Platform: A Point-of-Care Biosensor System with the Capacity To Learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Michael P; Simmons, Glennon; Wong, Jorge; McDevitt, John T

    2016-07-19

    The combination of point-of-care (POC) medical microdevices and machine learning has the potential transform the practice of medicine. In this area, scalable lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices have many advantages over standard laboratory methods, including faster analysis, reduced cost, lower power consumption, and higher levels of integration and automation. Despite significant advances in LOC technologies over the years, several remaining obstacles are preventing clinical implementation and market penetration of these novel medical microdevices. Similarly, while machine learning has seen explosive growth in recent years and promises to shift the practice of medicine toward data-intensive and evidence-based decision making, its uptake has been hindered due to the lack of integration between clinical measurements and disease determinations. In this Account, we describe recent developments in the programmable bio-nanochip (p-BNC) system, a biosensor platform with the capacity for learning. The p-BNC is a "platform to digitize biology" in which small quantities of patient sample generate immunofluorescent signal on agarose bead sensors that is optically extracted and converted to antigen concentrations. The platform comprises disposable microfluidic cartridges, a portable analyzer, automated data analysis software, and intuitive mobile health interfaces. The single-use cartridges are fully integrated, self-contained microfluidic devices containing aqueous buffers conveniently embedded for POC use. A novel fluid delivery method was developed to provide accurate and repeatable flow rates via actuation of the cartridge's blister packs. A portable analyzer instrument was designed to integrate fluid delivery, optical detection, image analysis, and user interface, representing a universal system for acquiring, processing, and managing clinical data while overcoming many of the challenges facing the widespread clinical adoption of LOC technologies. We demonstrate the p

  2. Development of a training programme for home health care workers to promote preventive activities focused on a healthy lifestyle: an intervention mapping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Maaike E; Dijkstra, Arie; de Winter, Andrea F; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2015-07-09

    Lifestyle is an important aspect in maintaining good health in older adults, and home health care (HHC) workers can play an important role in promoting a healthy lifestyle. However, there is limited evidence in the literature regarding how to develop an effective training programme to improve the physical activity level and fruit and vegetable consumption of older adults within a HHC setting. The aim of this paper is to describe how Intervention Mapping (IM) was used to develop a training programme to promote preventive activities of HHC workers relating to the physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake of older adults living at home. IM, a systematic theory and evidence-based approach was used to develop, implement and evaluate the training programme. This entailed a literature search, a survey, semi-structured interviews and consultation with HHC workers and various field experts, and a pilot training session. The determinants associated with the provision of preventive activities were identified, and an overview was created of those objectives, matching methods and practical applications that could influence these determinants. The performance objectives for the HHC workers were early detection and monitoring, promoting a healthy lifestyle, informing colleagues, continuing allocated preventive activities and referring to other experts and facilities. Findings were translated into a comprehensive training programme for HHC workers focused on motivating older adults to adopt and maintain a healthier lifestyle. IM was a useful tool in the development of a theory-based training programme to promote preventive activities by HHC workers relating to fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity of older adults.

  3. Nurse management of 'same day' consultation for patients with minor illnesses: results of an extended programme in primary care in Catalonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrellas, Núria; Vidal, Angel; Amat, Gemma; Lejardi, Yolanda; del Puig Deulofeu, Maria; Buendia, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    This paper is a report of a study to assess the feasibility and efficacy of a programme of nurse management for patients requesting same day consultation for minor illnesses in primary care. The efficacy of such programmes has been demonstrated in randomized studies but there is little information on these programmes in highly populated areas. Patients seeking same day consultation for one of 23 preselected minor illnesses (16 for adults, 7 for paediatric patients) from March 2009 to April 2010 were seen by trained nurses who followed predefined algorithms. If signs of alarm were detected, patients were referred to a general practitioner. A total of 629,568 consultations were performed, 575,189 in adults and 54,379 in paediatric patients. Case resolution was achieved in 61.8% of adult and 75.6% of paediatric patients. In adults, the highest resolution rates (>90%) were obtained for burns, skin injury and emergency contraception, and the lowest for lower urinary symptoms (46.7%), sore throat (45.7%), pink eye (45.5%) and upper respiratory symptoms (41.4%). In paediatric patients, the highest resolution rates (>90%) were obtained for stomach cramps and burns and the lowest for cough (36.2%). A return to consultation during a 7-day period for the same reason as the first consultation was low, 4% for adults and 2.4% for paediatric patients. An extended programme of nurse management for same day consultation of patients with minor illnesses showed an acceptably high rate of resolution and low rate of return to consultation. The application of such programmes in extensive areas is feasible and effective. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. A tailored relocation stress intervention programme for family caregivers of patients transferred from a surgical intensive care unit to a general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seul; Oh, HyunSoo; Suh, YeonOk; Seo, WhaSook

    2017-03-01

    To develop and examine a relocation stress intervention programme tailored for the family caregivers of patients scheduled for transfer from a surgical intensive care unit to a general ward. Family relocation stress syndrome has been reported to be similar to that exhibited by patients, and investigators have emphasised that nurses should make special efforts to relieve family relocation stress to maximise positive contributions to the well-being of patients by family caregivers. A nonequivalent control group, nonsynchronised pretest-post-test design was adopted. The study subjects were 60 family caregivers of patients with neurosurgical or general surgical conditions in the surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital located in Incheon, South Korea. Relocation stress and family burden were evaluated at three times, that is before intervention, immediately after transfer and four to five days after transfer. This relocation stress intervention programme was developed for the family caregivers based on disease characteristics and relocation-related needs. In the experimental group, relocation stress levels significantly and continuously decreased after intervention, whereas in the control group, a slight nonsignificant trend was observed. Family burden levels in the control group increased significantly after transfer, whereas burden levels in the experimental group increased only marginally and nonsignificantly. No significant between-group differences in relocation stress or family burden levels were observed after intervention. Relocation stress levels of family caregivers were significantly decreased after intervention in the experimental group, which indicates that the devised family relocation stress intervention programme effectively alleviated family relocation stress. The devised intervention programme, which was tailored to disease characteristics and relocation-related needs, may enhance the practicality and efficacy of relocation stress

  5. The KwaZulu-Natal Child Eye Care Programme: Delivering refractive error services to primary school learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Mahraj

    2011-12-01

    sion screeners screened 239 606 primary school children from February 2007 to May 2008. Seven percent (15 944 of the children failed the vision screening and were referred for optometric assessments. Of the 15 944 children that failed the vision screening, 10 707 children were examined by optometrists and 1083 were found to have a refractive error and were therefore supplied with spectacles. The study indicates that a short-term programme to address a backlog of services can reach many underserved children. This programme identified many challenges of implementing a vision screening programme such as poor uptake of refractive services by learners in the absence of an appropriate referral system and high attrition of trained vision screeners. (S Afr Optom 2011 70(2 61-68

  6. Can an alert in primary care electronic medical records increase participation in a population-based screening programme for colorectal cancer? COLO-ALERT, a randomised clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiriguet-Capdevila, Carolina; Fuentes-Peláez, Antonio; Reina-Rodríguez, Dolores; De León-Gallo, Rosa; Mendez-Boo, Leonardo; Torán-Monserrat, Pere; Muñoz-Ortiz, Laura; Rivero-Franco, Irene; Vela-Vallespín, Carme; Vilarrubí-Estrella, Mercedes; Torres-Salinas, Miquel; Grau-Cano, Jaume; Burón-Pust, Andrea; Hernández-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is an important public health problem in Spain. Over the last decade, several regions have carried out screening programmes, but population participation rates remain below recommended European goals. Reminders on electronic medical records have been identified as a low-cost and high-reach strategy to increase participation. Further knowledge is needed about their effect in a population-based screening programme. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an electronic reminder to promote the participation in a population-based colorectal cancer screening programme. Secondary aims are to learn population’s reasons for refusing to take part in the screening programme and to find out the health professionals’ opinion about the official programme implementation and on the new computerised tool. This is a parallel randomised trial with a cross-sectional second stage. Participants: all the invited subjects to participate in the public colorectal cancer screening programme that includes men and women aged between 50–69, allocated to the eleven primary care centres of the study and all their health professionals. The randomisation unit will be the primary care physician. The intervention will consist of activating an electronic reminder, in the patient’s electronic medical record, in order to promote colorectal cancer screening, during a synchronous medical appointment, throughout the year that the intervention takes place. A comparison of the screening rates will then take place, using the faecal occult blood test of the patients from the control and the intervention groups. We will also take a questionnaire to know the opinions of the health professionals. The main outcome is the screening status at the end of the study. Data will be analysed with an intention-to-treat approach. We expect that the introduction of specific reminders in electronic medical records, as a tool to facilitate and encourage direct referral by

  7. A study of dynamic foot pressure measurement in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka D Madhale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic foot ulcer is a major source of morbidity and a leading cause of hospitalization. It is estimated that approximately 20% of hospital admissions among patients with diabetes mellitus are due to diabetic foot ulcer. It can lead to infection, gangrene, amputation, and even death if appropriate care is not provided. Overall, the lower limb amputation in diabetic patients is 15 times higher than in non-diabetics. In the majority of cases, the cause for the foot ulcer is the altered architecture of the foot due to neuropathy resulting in abnormal pressure points on the soles. Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner and check its reliability and validity which can help to prevent foot ulceration. Design/Methodology/Approach: In the present study, a low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner is developed, and dynamic plantar pressures in a group of 110 Indian patients with diabetes with or without neuropathy and foot ulcers are measured. Practical Implications: If these pressure points can be detected, ulcers can be prevented by providing offloading footwear. Originality/Value: Differences are found in dynamic foot pressures in different study groups, namely, diabetic patients, patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, patients with foot ulcers, and nondiabetics. The differences are significant (P < 0.01, which showed the validity of the tool. Reliability and consistency of the tool was checked by test–retest method. Paper Type: Original Research work. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, it is concluded that the scanner is successfully developed and it can measure foot pressures. It is a novel device to proactively monitor foot health in diabetics in an effort to prevent and reduce diabetic foot complications.

  8. Standardizing foot-type classification using arch index values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christopher Kevin; Weil, Rich; de Boer, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The lack of a reliable classification standard for foot type makes drawing conclusions from existing research and clinical decisions difficult, since different foot types may move and respond to treatment differently. The purpose of this study was to determine interrater agreement for foot-type classification based on photo-box-derived arch index values. For this correlational study with two raters, a sample of 11 healthy volunteers with normal to obese body mass indices was recruited from both a community weight-loss programme and a programme in physical therapy. Arch index was calculated using AutoCAD software from footprint photographs obtained via mirrored photo-box. Classification as high-arched, normal, or low-arched foot type was based on arch index values. Reliability of the arch index was determined with intra-class correlations; agreement on foot-type classification was determined using quadratic weighted kappa (κw). Average arch index was 0.215 for one tester and 0.219 for the second tester, with an overall range of 0.017 to 0.370. Both testers classified 6 feet as low-arched, 9 feet as normal, and 7 feet as high-arched. Interrater reliability for the arch index was ICC=0.90; interrater agreement for foot-type classification was κw=0.923. Classification of foot type based on arch index values derived from plantar footprint photographs obtained via mirrored photo-box showed excellent reliability in people with varying BMI. Foot-type classification may help clinicians and researchers subdivide sample populations to better differentiate mobility, gait, or treatment effects among foot types.

  9. Standardizing Foot-Type Classification Using Arch Index Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Rich; de Boer, Emily

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The lack of a reliable classification standard for foot type makes drawing conclusions from existing research and clinical decisions difficult, since different foot types may move and respond to treatment differently. The purpose of this study was to determine interrater agreement for foot-type classification based on photo-box-derived arch index values. Method: For this correlational study with two raters, a sample of 11 healthy volunteers with normal to obese body mass indices was recruited from both a community weight-loss programme and a programme in physical therapy. Arch index was calculated using AutoCAD software from footprint photographs obtained via mirrored photo-box. Classification as high-arched, normal, or low-arched foot type was based on arch index values. Reliability of the arch index was determined with intra-class correlations; agreement on foot-type classification was determined using quadratic weighted kappa (κw). Results: Average arch index was 0.215 for one tester and 0.219 for the second tester, with an overall range of 0.017 to 0.370. Both testers classified 6 feet as low-arched, 9 feet as normal, and 7 feet as high-arched. Interrater reliability for the arch index was ICC=0.90; interrater agreement for foot-type classification was κw=0.923. Conclusions: Classification of foot type based on arch index values derived from plantar footprint photographs obtained via mirrored photo-box showed excellent reliability in people with varying BMI. Foot-type classification may help clinicians and researchers subdivide sample populations to better differentiate mobility, gait, or treatment effects among foot types. PMID:23729964

  10. Healing ulcers and preventing their recurrences in the diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Raja Sabapathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen percent of people with diabetes develop an ulcer in the course of their lifetime. Eighty-five percent of the major amputations in diabetes mellitus are preceded by an ulcer. Management of ulcers and preventing their recurrence is important for the quality of life of the individual and reducing the cost of care of treatment. The main causative factors of ulceration are neuropathy, vasculopathy and limited joint mobility. Altered bio-mechanics due to the deformities secondary to neuropathy and limited joint mobility leads to focal points of increased pressure, which compromises circulation leading to ulcers. Ulcer management must not only address the healing of ulcers but also should correct the altered bio-mechanics to reduce the focal pressure points and prevent recurrence. An analysis of 700 patients presenting with foot problems to the Diabetic Clinic of Ganga Hospital led to the stratification of these patients into four classes of incremental severity. Class 1 – the foot at risk, Class 2 – superficial ulcers without infection, Class 3 – the crippled foot and Class 4 – the critical foot. Almost 77.5% presented in either Class 3 or 4 with complicated foot ulcers requiring major reconstruction or amputation. Class 1 foot can be managed conservatively with foot care and appropriate foot wear. Class 2 in addition to measures for ulcer healing would need surgery to correct the altered bio-mechanics to prevent the recurrence. The procedures called surgical offloading would depend on the site of the ulcer and would need an in-depth clinical study of the foot. Class 3 would need major reconstructive procedures and Class 4 would need amputation since it may be life-threatening. As clinicians, our main efforts must be focused towards identifying patients in Class 1 and offer advice on foot care and Class 2 where appropriate surgical offloading procedure would help preserve the foot.

  11. The diabetic foot

    OpenAIRE

    Nabuurs-Franssen, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    The diabetic foot presents a complex interplay of neuropathic, macrovascular, and microvascular disease on an abnormal metabolic background, complicated by an increased susceptibility to mechanical, thermal, and chemical injury and decreased healing ability. The abnormalities of diabetes, once present, are not curable. But most severe foot abnormalities in the diabetic are due to neglect of injury and are mostly preventable. The physician must ensure that the diabetic patient learns the princ...

  12. Athlete's Foot: Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, M L

    1989-10-01

    In brief: Athletes are particularly prone to athlete's foot because they are generally more exposed than others to conditions that encourage fungal growth, eg, communal showers and locker rooms. Diagnosis of athlete's foot rests on clinical suspicion and laboratory testing. Treatment may consist of topical antifungal agents and, for more resistant cases, oral griseofulvin. Preventive measures include keeping the feet dry, wearing nonocclusive leather shoes or sandals and absorbent cotton socks, and applying talcum or antifungal powder at least twice daily.

  13. A new methodology for cost-effectiveness studies of domestic radon remediation programmes: Quality-adjusted life-years gained within Primary Care Trusts in Central England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coskeran, Thomas; Denman, Antony; Phillips, Paul; Gillmore, Gavin; Tornberg, Roger

    2006-01-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas, high levels of which are associated with geological formations such as those found in Northamptonshire and North Oxfordshire in the UK. The UK's National Radiological Protection Board have designated both districts as radon Affected Areas. Radiation levels due to radon, therefore, exceed 200 Bq m -3 , the UK's domestic Action Level, in over one percent of domestic properties. Because of radon's radioactivity, exposure to the gas can potentially cause lung cancer, and has been linked to some 2000 deaths a year in the UK. Consequently, when radiation levels exceed the Action Level, remediation against radon's effects is recommended to householders. This study examines the cost-effectiveness of remediation measures in Northamptonshire and North Oxfordshire by estimating cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained in four Primary Care Trusts, organisations that play a key public health policy role in the UK's National Health Service. The study is the first to apply this approach to estimating the cost-effectiveness of radon remediation programmes. Central estimates of cost per quality-adjusted life-year in the four Primary Care Trusts range from Pounds 6143 to Pounds 10 323. These values, when assessed against generally accepted criteria, suggest the remediation programmes in the trusts were cost-effective. Policy suggestions based on the estimates, and designed to improve cost-effectiveness further, are proposed for the four Primary Care Trusts and the UK's National Health Service

  14. [Minor foot amputations in diabetic foot syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, C; Eckhard, M; Szalay, G; Heiss, C

    2016-10-01

    The treatment strategy for diabetic foot syndrome must take into account protective sensibility of the foot, open wounds, infection status, and the rules of septic bone surgery. Interventions are classified as elective, prophylactic, curative, or emergency. Amputations in the forefoot and midfoot region are performed as ray amputations (including metatarsal), which can often be carried out as "inner" amputations. Gentle tissue treatment mandatory because of greater risk of revision with re-amputation compared to classical amputation. Good demarcation of infection, acute osteomyelitis, osteolytic lesions, neurotropic ulcer, arterial and venous blood flow to the other toes, gangrene of other toes with metatarsal affection. Arterial occlusive disease, infection of neighboring areas, avoidable amputations, poorly healing ulcers on the lower leg. Primary dorsal approach; minimal incisional distance (5 cm) to minimize skin necrosis risk. Atraumatic preparation, minimize hemostasis to not compromise the borderline perfusion situation. In amputations, plantar skin preparation and longer seams placed as dorsal as possible, either disarticulated and maintain cartilage, or round the cortical metatarsal bone after resection. Diabetes control. Braun splint, mobilization in a shoe with forefoot decompression and hindfoot support, physiotherapy. Antibiotics based on resistance testing. If no complications, dressing change on postoperative day 1. Optimal wound drainage by lowering foot several times a day; drainage removal after 12-24 h. Insoles and footwear optimization. Amputations require continued attention and if necessary treatment to avoid sequelae. Insufficient treatment associated with recurrent ulceration and altered anatomy.

  15. Education for diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Batista

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to stratify the risk in a consecutive group of diabetic patients presenting, for the first time, in a diabetic foot clinic. Additional aims were to investigate the preventive measures in the local health system and to evaluate the level of patient’s awareness about diabetic foot-associated morbidity. Methods: Fifty consecutive adult diabetic patients referred to a Diabetic Foot Clinic of a Municipal Public Hospital comprised the sample for this observational study. The enrollment visit was considered as the first health-system intervention for potential foot morbidity. The average time elapsed since a diagnosis of diabetes among patients was five years. Rresults: At the time of presentation, 94% of sample was not using appropriate footwear. Pedal pulses (dorsalis pedis and/or posterior tibial arteries were palpable in 76% of patients. Thirty subjects (60% had signs of peripheral neuropathy. Twenty-one subjects (42% had clinical deformity. There was a positive correlation between a history of foot ulcer, the presence of peripheral neuropathy, and the presence of foot deformity (p < 0.004 in each correlation. Cconclusions: Informing and educating the patients and those interested in this subject and these problems is essential for favorable outcomes in this scenario.

  16. Evaluation of a hepatitis C clinical care coordination programme's effect on treatment initiation and cure: A surveillance-based propensity score matching approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, R; Ford, M M; Moore, M S; Lim, S; Perumalswami, P; Weiss, J; Wyatt, B; Shukla, S; Litwin, A; Reynoso, S; Laraque, F

    2018-05-14

    Hepatitis C (HCV) is a viral infection that if left untreated can severely damage the liver. Project INSPIRE was a 3 year HCV care coordination programme in New York City (NYC) that aimed to address barriers to treatment initiation and cure by providing patients with supportive services and health promotion. We examined whether enrolment in Project INSPIRE was associated with differences in HCV treatment and cure compared with a demographically similar group not enrolled in the programme. INSPIRE participants in 2015 were matched with a cohort of HCV-infected persons identified in the NYC surveillance registry, using full optimal matching on propensity scores and stratified by INSPIRE enrolment status. Conditional logistic regression was used to assess group differences in the two treatment outcomes. Two follow-up sensitivity analyses using individual pair-matched sets and the full unadjusted cohort were also conducted. Treatment was initiated by 72% (790/1130) of INSPIRE participants and 36% (11 960/32 819) of study-eligible controls. Among initiators, 65% (514/790) of INSPIRE participants compared with 47% (5641/11 960) of controls achieved cure. In the matched analysis, enrolment in INSPIRE increased the odds of treatment initiation (OR: 5.25, 95% CI: 4.47-6.17) and cure (OR: 2.52, 95% CI: 2.00-3.16). Results from the sensitivity analyses showed agreement with the results from the full optimal match. Participation in the HCV care coordination programme significantly increased the probability of treatment initiation and cure, demonstrating that care coordination for HCV-infected individuals improves treatment outcomes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Systematic Medical Appraisal, Referral and Treatment (SMART) Mental Health Programme for providing innovative mental health care in rural communities in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulik, P K; Devarapalli, S; Kallakuri, S; Praveen, D; Jha, V; Patel, A

    2015-01-01

    India has few mental health professionals to treat the large number of people suffering from mental disorders. Rural areas are particularly disadvantaged due to lack of trained health workers. Ways to improve care could be by training village health workers in basic mental health care, and by using innovative methods of service delivery. The ongoing Systematic Medical Appraisal, Referral and Treatment Mental Health Programme will assess the acceptability, feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of a task-shifting mobile-based intervention using mixed methods, in rural Andhra Pradesh, India. The key components of the study are an anti-stigma campaign followed by a mobile-based mental health services intervention. The study will be done across two sites in rural areas, with intervention periods of 1 year and 3 months, respectively. The programme uses a mobile-based clinical decision support tool to be used by non-physician health workers and primary care physicians to screen, diagnose and manage individuals suffering from depression, suicidal risk and emotional stress. The key aim of the study will be to assess any changes in mental health services use among those screened positive following the intervention. A number of other outcomes will also be assessed using mixed methods, specifically focussed on reduction of stigma, increase in mental health awareness and other process indicators. This project addresses a number of objectives as outlined in the Mental Health Action Plan of World Health Organization and India's National Mental Health Programme and Policy. If successful, the next phase will involve design and conduct of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

  18. High incidence of hypermethioninaemia in a single neonatal intensive care unit detected by a newly introduced neonatal screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hoedt, A. E.; van Kempen, A. A.; Boelen, A.; Duran, M.; Kemper-Proper, E. A.; Oey-Spauwen, M. J. W.; Wijburg, F. A.; Bosch, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    From 1 January 2007 an expanded neonatal screening programme was initiated in the Netherlands, including homocystinuria with methionine as the primary marker. During the first 2 months hypermethioninaemia was detected in 14 newborns who, after proper evaluation, were demonstrated not to have

  19. Classification of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Game, Frances

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the relative importance of factors involved in the development of diabetic foot problems can vary in both their presence and severity between patients and lesions. This may be one of the reasons why outcomes seem to vary centre to centre and why some treatments may seem more effective in some people than others. There is a need therefore to classify and describe lesions of the foot in patients with diabetes in a manner that is agreed across all communities but is simple to use in clinical practice. No single system is currently in widespread use, although a number have been published. Not all are well validated outside the system from which they were derived, and it has not always been made clear the clinical purposes to which such classifications should be put to use, whether that be for research, clinical description in routine clinical care or audit. Here the currently published classification systems, their validation in clinical practice, whether they were designed for research, audit or clinical care, and the strengths and weaknesses of each are explored. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Should measurement of maximum urinary flow rate and residual urine volume be a part of a "minimal care" assessment programme in female incontinence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Pia; Mouritsen, L; Andersen, J Thorup

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of routine measurements of urinary flow rate and residual urine volume as a part of a "minimal care" assessment programme for women with urinary incontinence in detecting clinical significant bladder emptying problems. MATERIAL AND METHODS....... Twenty-six per cent had a maximum flow rate less than 15 ml/s, but only 4% at a voided volume > or =200 ml. Residual urine more than 149 ml was found in 6%. Two women had chronic retention with overflow incontinence. Both had typical symptoms with continuous leakage, stranguria and chronic cystitis...

  1. Perioperative nursing for patients with diabetic foot receiving endovascular interventional therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yang; Wang Feng; Li Ke; Li Cheng; Ji Donghua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of perioperative nursing on the living quality of patients with diabetic foot who are treated with endovascular interventional therapy. Methods: Specific perioperative nursing care plan was accordingly designed for 43 patients with diabetic foot. Endovascular balloon angioplasty and stent implantation were formed in these patients to treat their diabetic foot. The clinical results were observed. Results: Perioperative nursing effectively improved patient's limb blood supply, enhanced the healing of diabetic foot ulceration and increased the possibility of limb preservation. Conclusion: Endovascular therapy combined with corresponding perioperative nursing care can benefit more patients with diabetic foot. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of the quality of care of a multi-disciplinary risk factor assessment and management programme (RAMP for diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fung Colman SC

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a common chronic disease associated with multiple clinical complications. Management guidelines have been established which recommend a risk-stratified approach to managing these patients in primary care. This study aims to evaluate the quality of care (QOC and effectiveness of a multi-disciplinary risk assessment and management programme (RAMP for type 2 diabetic patients attending government-funded primary care clinics in Hong Kong. The evaluation will be conducted using a structured and comprehensive evidence-based evaluation framework. Method/design For evaluation of the quality of care, a longitudinal study will be conducted using the Action Learning and Audit Spiral methodologies to measure whether the pre-set target standards for criteria related to the structure and process of care are achieved. Each participating clinic will be invited to complete a Structure of Care Questionnaire evaluating pre-defined indicators which reflect the setting in which care is delivered, while process of care will be evaluated against the pre-defined indicators in the evaluation framework. Effectiveness of the programme will be evaluated in terms of clinical outcomes, service utilization outcomes, and patient-reported outcomes. A cohort study will be conducted on all eligible diabetic patients who have enrolled into RAMP for more than one year to compare their clinical and public service utilization outcomes of RAMP participants and non-participants. Clinical outcome measures will include HbA1c, blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic, lipids (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and future cardiovascular diseases risk prediction; and public health service utilization rate will include general and specialist outpatient, emergency department attendances, and hospital admissions annually within 5 years. For patient-reported outcomes, a total of 550 participants and another 550 non-participants will be

  3. Developing a programme theory to explain how primary health care teams learn to respond to intimate partner violence: a realist case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicolea, Isabel; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; San Sebastian, Miguel; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Marchal, Bruno

    2015-06-09

    Despite the progress made on policies and programmes to strengthen primary health care teams' response to Intimate Partner Violence, the literature shows that encounters between women exposed to IPV and health-care providers are not always satisfactory, and a number of barriers that prevent individual health-care providers from responding to IPV have been identified. We carried out a realist case study, for which we developed and tested a programme theory that seeks to explain how, why and under which circumstances a primary health care team in Spain learned to respond to IPV. A realist case study design was chosen to allow for an in-depth exploration of the linkages between context, intervention, mechanisms and outcomes as they happen in their natural setting. The first author collected data at the primary health care center La Virgen (pseudonym) through the review of documents, observation and interviews with health systems' managers, team members, women patients, and members of external services. The quality of the IPV case management was assessed with the PREMIS tool. This study found that the health care team at La Virgen has managed 1) to engage a number of staff members in actively responding to IPV, 2) to establish good coordination, mutual support and continuous learning processes related to IPV, 3) to establish adequate internal referrals within La Virgen, and 4) to establish good coordination and referral systems with other services. Team and individual level factors have triggered the capacity and interest in creating spaces for team leaning, team work and therapeutic responses to IPV in La Virgen, although individual motivation strongly affected this mechanism. Regional interventions did not trigger individual and/ or team responses but legitimated the workings of motivated professionals. The primary health care team of La Virgen is involved in a continuous learning process, even as participation in the process varies between professionals. This

  4. Modelling foot height and foot shape-related dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shuping; Goonetilleke, Ravindra S; Witana, Channa P; Lee Au, Emily Yim

    2008-08-01

    The application of foot anthropometry to design good-fitting footwear has been difficult due to the lack of generalised models. This study seeks to model foot dimensions so that the characteristic shapes of feet, especially in the midfoot region, can be understood. Fifty Hong Kong Chinese adults (26 males and 24 females) participated in this study. Their foot lengths, foot widths, ball girths and foot heights were measured and then evaluated using mathematical models. The results showed that there were no significant allometry (p > 0.05) effects of foot length on ball girth and foot width. Foot height showed no direct relationship with foot length. However, a normalisation with respect to foot length and foot height resulted in a significant relationship for both males and females with R(2) greater than 0.97. Due to the lack of a direct relationship between foot height and foot length, the current practice of grading shoes with a constant increase in height or proportionate scaling in response to foot length is less than ideal. The results when validated with other populations can be a significant way forward in the design of footwear that has an improved fit in the height dimension.

  5. Health locus of control theory in diabetes: a worthwhile approach in managing diabetic foot ulcers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylski, M

    2010-06-01

    The current global epidemic of type two diabetes mellitus has led to an accompanying increase in both foot ulceration and amputations, which pose significant health problems to populations worldwide. If improved treatment options are to be offered, then we clearly need a better understanding of all aspects of this disease. To date the major focus of diabetes research has been on physical factors, which are undeniably important, but there has been little acknowledgement of the significant psychological effects that can influence health and delay wound healing. The 'health locus of control' (HLC) theory, a psychological theory concerning patients' perceptions of how much control they have over life events (both positive and negative) may well be of use in this patient group. It has been suggested that concordance with treatment is improved when patients have a high 'internal' HLC (as measured by a questionnaire), which aligns with the belief that they have greater control over their health. It has further been suggested that through the implementation of 'group-care' education programmes, patients' attitudes can change, with a shift towards higher 'internal' HLC values. Thus a new approach in patient management might be to implement such education programmes, in the hope of improving adherence to treatment regimens and, hence, patient outcomes. To date there has been little conclusive evidence of the application of this theory, and although various studies have been performed in diabetic populations, only one study has been conducted specifically regarding diabetic foot ulcers. Clearly more research is needed.

  6. Effective public involvement in the HoST-D Programme for dementia home care support: From proposal and design to methods of data collection (innovative practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Clarissa; Roe, Brenda; Hodgson, Anthony; Britt, David; Clarkson, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Public involvement is an important element in health and social care research. However, it is little evaluated in research. This paper discusses the utility and impact of public involvement of carers and people with dementia in a five-year programme on effective home support in dementia, from proposal and design to methods of data collection, and provides a useful guide for future research on how to effectively involve the public. The Home SupporT in Dementia (HoST-D) Programme comprises two elements of public involvement, a small reference group and a virtual lay advisory group. Involving carers and people with dementia is based on the six key values of involvement - respect, support, transparency, responsiveness, fairness of opportunity, and accountability. Carers and people with dementia gave opinions on study information, methods of data collection, an economic model, case vignettes, and a memory aid booklet, which were all taken into account. Public involvement has provided benefits to the programme whilst being considerate of the time constraints and geographical locations of members.

  7. Influence of a preschool preventive dental programme on caries prevalence, oral care and secretory immunity to Streptococcus mutans in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, K L; de Paula Ramos, S; Seixas, G F; Bozza, A; Couto de Almeida, R S; Dezan Garbelini, C C

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate oral hygiene habits, decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) and surfaces (DMFS), dental care, dietetic habits and anti-Streptococcus mutans salivary secretory Immunoglobulin A (SIgA) in young adults who attended a preventive programme during preschool age. The study group (Baby Clinic) comprised 72 patients, aged 18-25 years, who had participated in the Baby Clinic preventive programme. The control group was age- and gender-matched. The patients were examined and unstimulated whole saliva was sampled for detection of anti-S. mutansSIgA antibodies. Control patients presented increased DMFS scores (P  .05). Baby Clinic patients presented better periodontal status (P < .005), less calculus (P < .005) and bleeding on probing (P < .005), and reported visiting dental services more regularly (P < .05). Adjusted multivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that DMFT was associated with study group (P < .05), gender (P < .05), parents' education (P < .05), carbohydrate intake (P < .001) and levels of anti-S. mutansSIgA (P < .007). DMFS was associated with time elapsed since the last visit to the dentist (P < .005) and weekly carbohydrate intake (P < .005). Preventive programmes for preschool children positively impact on DMFS and periodontal status in young adults, but have no long-term effects on dietary or hygiene habits. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Heart failure programmes in countries with a primary care-based health care system. Are additional trials necessary? Design of the DEAL-HF study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Porte, PWFBA; Lok, DJA; van Wijngaarden, J; Cornel, JH; Pruijsers-Lamers, D; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Hoes, AW

    Background: Several randomised studies of heart failure (HF) management programmes in the United States, Australia and Europe have shown a considerable reduction in hospitalisation rates for HE In this article, a comprehensive review of these studies will be provided and their applicability to

  9. The prevalence of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Jill; Hale, Claire; Helliwell, Philip; Hill, Jackie; Nelson, E Andrea

    2008-02-15

    To establish the prevalence of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in secondary care. A postal survey of all patients with RA (n = 1,130) under the care of rheumatologists in Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK was performed. The prevalence data were validated through clinical examination, case-note review, and contact with health professionals. The false-negative rate was investigated in a subsample of patients (n = 70) who denied any history of ulceration. The postal survey achieved a 78% response rate. Following validation, the point prevalence of foot ulceration was 3.39% and the overall prevalence was 9.73%. The false-positive rate was initially high at 21.21%, but use of diagrammatic questionnaire data to exclude leg ulceration reduced the rate to 10.76%. The false-negative rate was 11.76%. The most common sites for ulceration were the dorsal aspect of hammer toes, the metatarsal heads, and the metatarsophalangeal joint in patients with hallux abducto valgus, with 33% of patients reporting multiple sites of ulceration. Patients with open-foot and healed-foot ulceration had significantly longer RA disease duration, reported significantly greater use of special footwear, and had a higher prevalence of foot surgery than ulcer-free patients. Foot ulceration affects a significant proportion of patients with RA. Further work is needed to establish risk factors for foot ulceration in RA and to target foot health provision more effectively.

  10. Characteristics and comprehensiveness of adult HIV care and treatment programmes in Asia-Pacific, sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duda, Stephany N; Farr, Amanda M; Lindegren, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    in the International epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS completed a site survey from 2009 to 2010, including sites in the Asia-Pacific region (n=20), Latin America and the Caribbean (n=7), North America (n=7), Central Africa (n=12), East Africa (n=51), Southern Africa (n=16) and West Africa (n=15). We computed...... a measure of the comprehensiveness of care based on seven World Health Organization-recommended essential HIV services. RESULTS: Most sites reported serving urban (61%; region range (rr): 33-100%) and both adult and paediatric populations (77%; rr: 29-96%). Only 45% of HIV clinics that reported treating...... services. Newer sites and sites in settings with low rankings on the UN Human Development Index (HDI), especially those in the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief focus countries, tended to offer a more comprehensive array of essential services. HIV care programme characteristics...

  11. Healthcare Quality Improvement and 'work engagement'; concluding results from a national, longitudinal, cross-sectional study of the 'Productive Ward-Releasing Time to Care' Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark; Butterworth, Tony; Wells, John Sg

    2017-08-01

    Concerns about patient safety and reducing harm have led to a particular focus on initiatives that improve healthcare quality. However Quality Improvement (QI) initiatives have in the past typically faltered because they fail to fully engage healthcare professionals, resulting in apathy and resistance amongst this group of key stakeholders. Productive Ward: Releasing Time to Care (PW) is a ward-based QI programme created to help ward-based teams redesign and streamline the way that they work; leaving more time to care for patients. PW is designed to engage and empower ward-based teams to improve the safety, quality and delivery of care. The main objective of this study was to explore whether PW sustains the 'engagement' of ward-based teams by examining the longitudinal effect that the national QI programme had on the 'work-engagement' of ward-based teams in Ireland. Utilising the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale questionnaire (UWES-17), we surveyed nine PW (intervention) sites from typical acute Medical/Surgical, Rehabilitation and Elderly services (representing the entire cohort of a national phase of PW implementation in Ireland) and a cohort of matched control sites. The numbers surveyed from the PW group at T1 (up to 3 months after commencing the programme) totalled 253 ward-team members and 249 from the control group. At T2 (12 months later), the survey was repeated with 233 ward-team members from the PW sites and 236 from the control group. Overall findings demonstrated that those involved in the QI initiative had higher 'engagement' scores at T1 and T2 in comparison to the control group. Total 'engagement' score (TES), and its 3 dimensions, were all significantly higher in the PW group at T1, but only the Vigour dimension remained significantly higher at T2 (p = 0.006). Our results lend some support to the assertions of the PW initiative itself and suggest that when compared to a control group, ward-based teams involved in the QI programme are more likely

  12. A Self-Management Programme of Activity Coping and Education - SPACE for COPD(C) - in primary care: The protocol for a pragmatic trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Claire LA; Kanabar, Pratiksha; Mitchell, Katy; Schreder, Sally; Houchen-Wolloff, Linzy; Bankart, M John G; Apps, Lindsay; Hewitt, Stacey; Harvey-Dunstan, Theresa; Singh, Sally J

    2017-07-10

    National guidance for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) suggests that self-management support be provided for patients. Our institution has developed a standardised, manual-based, supported self-management programme: Self-Management Programme of Activity Coping and Education (SPACE for COPD(C)). SPACE was previously piloted on a 1-2-1 basis, delivered by researchers, to individuals with COPD. Discussions with stakeholders highlighted considerable interest in delivering the SPACE for COPD(C) intervention as a group-based self-management programme facilitated by healthcare professionals (HCPs) in primary care settings. The study aims are to explore the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy for the intervention to be delivered and supported by HCPs and to examine whether group-based delivery of SPACE for COPD(C), with sustained support, improves patient outcomes following the SPACE for COPD(C) intervention. A prospective, multi-site, single-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted, with follow-up at 6 and 9 months. Participants will be randomly assigned to either the control group (usual care) or intervention group (a six-session, group-based SPACE for COPD(C)self-management programme delivered over 5 months). The primary outcome is change in COPD assessment test at 6 months.A discussion session will be conducted with HCPs who deliver the intervention to discuss and gain insight into any potential facilitators/barriers to implementing the intervention in practice. Furthermore, we will conduct semi-structured focus groups with intervention participants to understand feasibility and acceptability. All qualitative data will be analysed thematically. The project has received a favourable opinion from South Hampshire B Research Ethics Committee, REC reference: 14/SC/1169 and full R&D approval from the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust: 152408.Study results will be disseminated through appropriate peer-reviewed journals, national

  13. Imaging of Charcot foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlemann, Rainer; Schmitz, Annette

    2014-01-01

    The onset of a Charcot foot ist a feared complication of a long lasting diabetes mellitus. A peripheral neuropathy and continuous weight bearing of the foot subsequent to repeated traumas depict the conditions. There exist three types of a Charcot foot, an atrophic, a hypertophic and a mixed type. In early stages a differentiation from osteoarthritis is difficult. Subluxation or luxation within the Lisfranc's joint is typical. The joints of the foot could rapidly and extensively be destroyed or may present the morphology of a 'superosteoarthritis'. Often, soft tissue infections or osteomyelitis evolve from ulcers of the skin as entry points. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis necessitate MR imaging as plain radiography offers only low sensitivity for detection of an osteomyelitis. The existence of periosteal reactions is not a proof for osteomyelitis. Bone marrow edema and soft tissue edema also appear in a non infected Charcot foot. The range of soft tissue infections goes from cellulitis over phlegmon to abscesses. The ghost sign is the most suitable diagnostic criterion for osteomyelitis. In addition, the penumbra sign or the existence of a sinus tract between a skin ulcer and the affected bone may be helpful. (orig.)

  14. The effect of an e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer programme on implementation of suicide guidelines in mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beurs, Derek P; de Groot, Marieke H; de Keijser, Jos; Mokkenstorm, Jan; van Duijn, Erik; de Winter, Remco F P; Kerkhof, Ad J F M

    2015-04-01

    Randomized studies examining the effect of training of mental health professionals in suicide prevention guidelines are scarce. We assessed whether professionals benefited from an e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer programme aimed at the application of the Dutch multidisciplinary suicide prevention guideline. 45 psychiatric departments from all over the Netherlands were clustered in pairs and randomized. In the experimental condition, all of the staff of psychiatric departments was trained by peers with an e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer programme. Guideline adherence of individual professionals was measured by means of the response to on-line video fragments. Multilevel analyses were used to establish whether variation between conditions was due to differences between individual professionals or departments. Multilevel analysis showed that the intervention resulted in an improvement of individual professionals. At the 3 month follow-up, professionals who received the intervention showed greater guideline adherence, improved self-perceived knowledge and improved confidence as providers of care than professionals who were only exposed to traditional guideline dissemination. Subgroup analyses showed that improved guideline adherence was found among nurses but not among psychiatrists and psychologists. No significant effect of the intervention on team performance was found. The ICT environment in departments was often technically inadequate when displaying the video clips clip of the survey. This may have caused considerable drop-out and possibly introduced selection bias, as professionals who were strongly affiliated to the theme of the study might have been more likely to finish the study. Our results support the idea that an e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer programme is an effective strategy for implementing clinical guidelines and improving care for suicidal patients. Netherlands Trial Register (NTR3092 www.trialregister.nl). Copyright © 2015 The

  15. Implementation of foot thermometry plus mHealth to prevent diabetic foot ulcers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo-Porras, Maria; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Sacksteder, Katherine A; Gilman, Robert H; Malaga, German; Armstrong, David G; Miranda, J Jaime

    2016-04-19

    Diabetic foot neuropathy (DFN) is one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus; its early diagnosis and intervention can prevent foot ulcers and the need for amputation. Thermometry, measuring the temperature of the feet, is a promising emerging modality for diabetic foot ulcer prevention. However, patient compliance with at-home monitoring is concerning. Delivering messages to remind patients to perform thermometry and foot care might be helpful to guarantee regular foot monitoring. This trial was designed to compare the incidence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) between participants who receive thermometry alone and those who receive thermometry as well as mHealth (SMS and voice messaging) over a year-long study period. This is an evaluator-blinded, randomized, 12-month trial. Individuals with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged between 18-80 years, having a present dorsalis pedis pulse in both feet, are in risk group 2 or 3 using the diabetic foot risk classification system (as specified by the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot), have an operating cell phone or a caregiver with an operating cell phone, and have the ability to provide informed consent will be eligible to participate in the study. Recruitment will be performed in diabetes outpatient clinics at two Ministry of Health tertiary hospitals in Lima, Peru. participants in both groups will receive education about foot care at the beginning of the study and they will be provided with a thermometry device (TempStat™). TempStat™ is a tool that captures a thermal image of the feet, which, depending on the temperature of the feet, shows different colors. In this study, if a participant notes a single yellow image or variance between one foot and the contralateral foot, they will be prompted to notify a nurse to evaluate their activity within the previous 2 weeks and make appropriate recommendations. In addition to thermometry, participants in the intervention arm

  16. A Pragmatic Randomised, Controlled Trial of Intensive Care follow up programmes in improving Longer-term outcomes from critical illness. The PRACTICAL study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsey Craig

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of intensive care (ICU patients experience significant problems with physical, psychological, and social functioning for some time after discharge from ICU. These problems have implications not just for patients, but impose a continuing financial burden for the National Health Service. To support recovery, a number of hospitals across the UK have developed Intensive Care follow-up clinics. However, there is a lack of evidence base to support these, and this study aims to test the hypothesis that intensive care follow up programmes are effective and cost-effective at improving physical and psychological quality of life in the year after intensive care discharge. Methods/Design This is a multi-centre, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Patients (n = 270 will be recruited prior to hospital discharge from three intensive care units in the UK, and randomised to one of two groups. The control group will receive standard in-hospital follow-up and the intervention group will participate in an ICU follow-up programme with clinic appointments 2–3 and 9 months after ICU discharge. The primary outcome measure is Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL 12 months after ICU discharge as measured by the Short Form-36. Secondary measures include: HRQoL at six months; Quality-adjusted life years using EQ-5D; posttraumatic psychopathology as measured by Davidson Trauma Scale; and anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at both six and twelve months after ICU discharge. Contacts with health services in the twelve months after ICU discharge will be measured as part of the economic analysis. Discussion The provision of intensive care follow-up clinics within the UK has developed in an ad hoc manner, is inconsistent in both the number of hospitals offering such a service or in the type of service offered. This study provides the opportunity to evaluate such services both in terms of patient benefit and

  17. Pathophysiology diabetic foot ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafril, S.

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is known to have many complications. Diabetes and its complications are rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and one of the most distressing is Diabetic Foot Ulcer (DFU). Chronic wound complications are a growing concern worldwide, and the effect is a warning to public health and the economy. The etiology of a DFU is multifaceted, and several components cause added together create a sufficient impact on ulceration: neuropathy, vasculopathy, immunopathy, mechanical stress, and neuroarthropathy. There are many classifications of the diabetic foot. About 50% of patients with foot ulcers due to DM present clinical signs of infection. It is essential to manage multifactorial etiology of DFU to get a good outcome.

  18. Foot muscles strengthener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris T. Glavač

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous experience in the correction of flat feet consisted of the use of insoles for shoes and exercises with toys, balls, rollers, inclined planes, etc. A device for strengthening foot muscles is designed for the correction of flat feet in children and, as its name suggests, for strengthening foot muscles in adults. The device is made of wood and metal, with a mechanism and technical solutions, enabling the implementation of specific exercises to activate muscles responsible for the formation of the foot arch. It is suitable for home use with controlled load quantities since it has calibrated springs. The device is patented with the Intellectual Property Office, Republic of Serbia, as a petty patent.

  19. Clinical Impact of a Pharmaceutical Care Programme Developed in a Family Health Unit: Results of a Pharmacist-Physician Collaboration in the Treatment of Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Condinho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The positive impact of pharmacist-physician collaborative care has been reported in the international literature, although examples of this impact are limited in Portugal. We aim to underline the clinical added value for hypertensive patients that results from pharmacist-physician collaborations. Methods: A community trial was conducted at a Portuguese family health unit for 19 months. The intervention group was randomly selected from the global records and members of the group received pharmaceutical care in addition to physician care. The comparison group received only physician care. Both groups were comparable at the beginning of the study. In the intervention group, we analysed the hypertensive patients to evaluate the impact of pharmacist-physician collaboration on the patients’ blood pressure levels. This evaluation was performed by comparing the obtained blood pressure levels with the levels at baseline and between the groups. Results: A total of 17 patients with hypertension were enrolled in the pharmaceutical care programme, 12 of whom were female. The mean age was 68.50±3.26 years and, on average, each patient consumed 6.06±0.93 medicinal products. Thirteen patients were uncontrolled. Compared with the baseline, the intervention group achieved mean reductions of 28.85±5.90 mmHg (p < 0.0005 and 11.23±2.75 mmHg (p < 0.005 in their systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. Considering the comparison group, improvements of 18.63±6.44 mmHg (p = 0.011 in systolic blood pressure and 9.03±2.63 mmHg ( p < 0.005 in diastolic blood pressure were observed. Conclusion: Pharmacist-physician collaborative care adds clinical value to the typical physician care provided to hypertensive patients within the context of a Portuguese family health unit.

  20. Effects of Training Programme on HIV/AIDS Prevention among Primary Health Care Workers in Oyo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuwon, Ademola; Funmilayo, Fawole; Oladepo, Oladimeji; Osungbade, Kayode; Asuzu, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to train primary health care workers to be trainers and implementers of community-based AIDS prevention activities in Oyo State, Nigeria, by describing an evaluation of the project. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 148 primary health care workers recruited from the 33 local government areas (LGA) of the…

  1. Challenges in the management of support and care programmes for child-headed households in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human, Sarie P; van Rensburg, Gisela H

    2011-10-01

    The present study reports on data collected in a larger study on 'A situational analysis of child-headed households in South Africa'. The purpose of this study was to explore the management and control of available and required services, resources and safety nets for children in child-headed households. The significance of having a better understanding of the challenges, limitations but importance for government structures to manage and control programmes will enhance the implementation and maintenance of focused and sustainable support structures and programmes which will effectively address the needs of child-headed households. An exploratory and descriptive, quantitative survey was conducted to provide information on government structures at a national level and the nine provinces in South Africa. The population consisted of the Departments of Social Development, Education, Health and Agriculture, at both national and provincial levels. The main findings included a lack of clarity regarding the concept and definition of a child-headed household, lack of empirical data, a diversity of needs and challenges in terms of location and geographical distribution of available infrastructure and support systems; programmes that are not inclusive and integrated; and contradictions in the stipulations and implementation of existing policies and capacity and human resources shortages. It was concluded that the magnitude, uniqueness and complexity of the phenomenon necessitate effective and sound scientific management principles. This is achieved by providing legal clarity of the concept; developing relevant policies and ensuring effective implementation thereof; rigorous monitoring and evaluation based on comprehensive empirical data; and protecting the rights and safety of these children and ensuring an enabling environment for all stakeholders to address needs and challenges. The role of the nurse manager is to ensure a holistic approach to children living in child

  2. Co-producing a digital educational programme for registered children's nurses to improve care of children and young people admitted with self-harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Asam; Carter, Timothy; Rychwalska-Brown, Lucy; Wharrad, Heather; Manning, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of hospital admissions for self-harm in children and young people (CYP), there is paucity of registered children's nurse (rCN) training or involvement of children to improve care for this often stigmatized patient group. This article describes a participatory approach towards using co-production with CYP and rCN to develop a digital educational programme to improve nurses' knowledge, attitudes and confidence in caring for CYP with self-harm injuries. A priority-setting workshop with rCNs was used to establish consensus of information needs. This was followed by an e-learning content development workshop undertaken with CYP whom had previously experienced hospital admissions for self-harm injuries. Findings from the nurse priority-setting workshop identified three educational priorities: (1) knowledge of self-harm, (2) effective communication and (3) risk management. The CYP subsequently developed these topic areas to ensure the contents and design of the e-learning resource had fidelity by reflecting the experiences of CYP and needs when cared for in hospital. This article illustrates that involving service users to co-develop educational materials is a feasible and important step in designing educational resources and ensures the content is relevant, appropriate and sensitive to both the recipient of care and those responsible for its delivery.

  3. Nursing staffs self-perceived outcome from a rehabilitation 24/7 educational programme - a mixed-methods study in stroke care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, M I; Esbensen, B A; Kirk, K; Pedersen, L; Martinsen, B; Iversen, H; Mathiesen, L L; Poulsen, I

    2018-01-01

    During the past two decades, attempts have been made to describe nurses' contributions to the rehabilitation of inpatients following stroke. There is currently a lack of interventions that integrate the diversity of nurses' role and functions in stroke rehabilitation and explore their effect on patient outcomes. Using a systematic evidence- and theory-based design, we developed an educational programme, Rehabilitation 24/7, for nursing staff working in stroke rehabilitation aiming at two target behaviours; working systematically with a rehabilitative approach in all aspects of patient care and working deliberately and systematically with patients' goals. The aim of this study was to assess nursing staff members' self-perceived outcome related to their capability, opportunity and motivation to work with a rehabilitative approach after participating in the stroke Rehabilitation 24/7 educational programme. A convergent mixed-method design was applied consisting of a survey and semi-structured interviews. Data collection was undertaken between February and June 2016. Data from the questionnaires ( N  = 33) distributed before and after the intervention were analysed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon sign rank test. The interviews ( N  = 10) were analysed using deductive content analysis. After analysing questionnaires and interviews separately, the results were merged in a side by side comparison presented in the discussion. The results from both the quantitative and qualitative analyses indicate that the educational programme shaped the target behaviours that we aimed to change by addressing the nursing staff's capability, opportunity and motivation and hence could strengthen the nursing staff's contribution to inpatient stroke rehabilitation. A number of behaviours changed significantly, and the qualitative results indicated that the staff experienced increased focus on their role and functions in rehabilitation practice. Our study provides an

  4. The National Institute of Health Research (NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC for Leicestershire, Northamptonshire and Rutland (LNR: a programme protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunskill Nigel

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In October 2008, the National Institute for Health Research launched nine new research projects to develop and investigate methods of translating research evidence into practice. Given the title Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC, all involve collaboration between one or more universities and the local health service, but they are adopting different approaches to achieve translation. Methods The translation and implementation programme of this CLAHRC has been built around a pragmatic framework for undertaking research to address live concerns in the delivery of care, in partnership with the managers, practitioners, and patients of the provider organisations of the CLAHRC. Focused on long-term conditions, the constituent research themes are prevention, early detection, self-management, rehabilitation, and implementation. Individual studies have various designs, and include both randomised trials of new ways to deliver care and qualitative studies of, for example, means of identifying barriers to research translation. A mix of methods will be used to evaluate the CLAHRC as a whole, including use of public health indicators, social research methods, and health economics. Discussion This paper describes one of the nine collaborations, that of Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, and Rutland. Drawing a distinction between translation as an organising principle for healthcare providers and implementation as a discrete activity, this collaboration is built on a substantial programme of applied research intended to create both research generation and research use capacity in provider organisations. The collaboration in Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, and Rutland has potential to provide evidence on how partnerships between practitioners, patients, and researchers can improve the transfer of evidence into practice.

  5. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot in the leg Is older Has ...

  6. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle surgeons are the surgical ... every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? After completing undergraduate education, the foot ...

  7. Task shifting an inpatient triage, assessment and treatment programme improves the quality of care for hospitalised Malawian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Daniel; Preidis, Geoffrey A; Milazi, Robert; Spinler, Jennifer K; Lufesi, Norman; Mwansambo, Charles; Hosseinipour, Mina C; McCollum, Eric D

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to improve paediatric inpatient surveillance at a busy referral hospital in Malawi with two new programmes: (i) the provision of vital sign equipment and implementation of an inpatient triage programme (ITAT) that includes a simplified paediatric severity-of-illness score, and (ii) task shifting ITAT to a new cadre of healthcare workers called 'vital sign assistants' (VSAs). This study, conducted on the paediatric inpatient ward of a large referral hospital in Malawi, was divided into three phases, each lasting 4 weeks. In Phase A, we collected baseline data. In Phase B, we provided three new automated vital sign poles and implemented ITAT with current hospital staff. In Phase C, VSAs were introduced and performed ITAT. Our primary outcome measures were the number of vital sign assessments performed and clinician notifications to reassess patients with high ITAT scores. We enrolled 3994 patients who received 5155 vital sign assessments. Assessment frequency was equal between Phases A (0.67 assessments/patient) and B (0.61 assessments/patient), but increased 3.6-fold in Phase C (2.44 assessments/patient, P shifting ITAT to VSAs may improve outcomes in paediatric hospitals in the developing world. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. How common are foot problems among individuals with diabetes? Diabetic foot ulcers in the Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoekenbroek, Robert M.; Lokin, Joost L. C.; Nielen, Mark M.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Koelemay, Mark J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Contemporary data on diabetic foot ulcer prevalence are scarce. Most studies were conducted in the 1990s, reporting incidence rates of 1.9-2.6%. Since then the prevalence of diabetes has doubled and the organisation of diabetes care has undergone major changes. Up-to-date data that

  9. Diagnostic value of newborn foot length to predict gestational age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutia Farah Fawziah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background  Identification of gestational age, especially within 48 hours of birth, is crucial for newborns, as the earlier preterm status is detected, the earlier the child can receive optimal management. Newborn foot length is an anthropometric measurement which is easy to perform, inexpensive, and potentially efficient for predicting gestational age. Objective  To analyze the diagnostic value of newborn foot length in predicting gestational age. Methods  This diagnostic study was performed between October 2016 and February 2017 in the High Care Unit of Neonates at Dr. Moewardi General Hospital, Surakarta. A total of 152 newborns were consecutively selected and underwent right foot length measurements before 96 hours of age. The correlation between newborn foot length to classify as full term and gestational age was analyzed with Spearman’s correlation test because of non-normal data distribution. The cut-off point of newborn foot length was calculated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve and diagnostic values of newborn foot length were analyzed by 2 x 2 table with SPSS 21.0 software. Results There were no significant differences between male and female newborns in terms of gestational age, birth weight, choronological age, and newborn foot length (P>0.05. Newborn foot length and gestational age had a significant correlation (r=0.53; P=0.000. The optimal cut-off newborn foot length to predict full term status was 7.1 cm. Newborn foot length below 7.1 cm had sensitivity 75%, specificity 98%, positive predictive value 94.3%, negative predictive value 90.6%, positive likelihood ratio 40.5, negative likelihood ratio 0.25, and post-test probability 94.29%, to predict preterm status in newborns. Conclusion  Newborn foot length can be used to predict gestational age, especially for the purpose of differentiating between preterm and full term newborns.

  10. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the ball of the foot when walking, running and jumping. Sesamoid injuries can involve the bones, tendons and/or surrounding ... on the ball of the foot, such as running, basketball, football, golf, tennis and ballet. ... of Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot There are three types of ...

  11. Foot Health Facts for Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common foot problems affecting athletes: Prevent Foot & Ankle Running Injuries (downloadable PDF) Back-to-School Soccer Season Surgeons ... and Ankle Soccer is hard on the feet! Injuries to the foot and ankle can occur from running and side-to-side cutting, sliding or tackling ...

  12. Referral from primary care to a physical activity programme: establishing long-term adherence? A randomized controlled trial. Rationale and study design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puig-Ribera Anna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Declining physical activity is associated with a rising burden of global disease. There is little evidence about effective ways to increase adherence to physical activity. Therefore, interventions are needed that produce sustained increases in adherence to physical activity and are cost-effective. The purpose is to assess the effectiveness of a primary care physical activity intervention in increasing adherence to physical activity in the general population seen in primary care. Method and design Randomized controlled trial with systematic random sampling. A total of 424 subjects of both sexes will participate; all will be over the age of 18 with a low level of physical activity (according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, IPAQ, self-employed and from 9 Primary Healthcare Centres (PHC. They will volunteer to participate in a physical activity programme during 3 months (24 sessions; 2 sessions a week, 60 minutes per session. Participants from each PHC will be randomly allocated to an intervention (IG and control group (CG. The following parameters will be assessed pre and post intervention in both groups: (1 health-related quality of life (SF-12, (2 physical activity stage of change (Prochaska's stages of change, (3 level of physical activity (IPAQ-short version, (4 change in perception of health (vignettes from the Cooperative World Organization of National Colleges, Academies, and Academic Associations of Family Physicians, COOP/WONCA, (5 level of social support for the physical activity practice (Social Support for Physical Activity Scale, SSPAS, and (6 control based on analysis (HDL, LDL and glycated haemoglobin. Participants' frequency of visits to the PHC will be registered over the six months before and after the programme. There will be a follow up in a face to face interview three, six and twelve months after the programme, with the reduced version of IPAQ, SF-12, SSPAS, and Prochaska's stages

  13. Prevalence of transfusion-transmitted viral pathogens among health-care workers and risk mitigation programme in a paediatric tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Nayyar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The health-care workers (HCWs are at an occupational risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens, mainly, HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus. HBV is currently the only blood-borne virus for which a vaccine is available. All health-care institutions must encourage the HCWs to undergo screening for blood-borne pathogens.

  14. Quality of antenatal and delivery care before and after the implementation of a prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programme in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvaux, Thérèse; Konan, Jean-Paul Diby; Aké-Tano, Odile; Gohou-Kouassi, Valérie; Bosso, Patrice Emery; Buvé, Anne; Ronsmans, Carine

    2008-08-01

    To assess whether implementation of a prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) programme in Côte d'Ivoire improved the quality of antenatal and delivery care services. Quality of antenatal and delivery care services was assessed in five urban health facilities before (2002-2003) and after (2005) the implementation of a PMTCT programme through review of facility data; observation of antenatal consultations (n = 606 before; n = 591 after) and deliveries (n = 229 before; n = 231 after) and exit interviews of women; and interviews of health facility staff. HIV testing was never proposed at baseline and was proposed to 63% of women at the first ANC visit after PMTCT implementation. The overall testing rate was 42% and 83% of tested HIV-infected pregnant women received nevirapine. In addition, inter-personal communication and confidentiality significantly improved in all health facilities. In the maternity ward, quality of obstetrical care at admission, delivery and post-partum care globally improved in all facilities after the implementation of the programme although some indicators remained poor, such as filling in the partograph directly during labour. Episiotomy rates among primiparous women dropped from 64% to 25% (P implementation. Global scores for quality of antenatal and delivery care significantly improved in all facilities after the implementation of the programme. Introducing comprehensive PMTCT services can improve the quality of antenatal and delivery care in general.

  15. Childhood obesity management shifting from health care system to school system: intervention study of school-based weight management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Albert; Ho, Mandy; Keung, Vera M W; Kwong, Amy C M

    2014-11-03

    Home and school environments conducive for unhealthy eating and physical inactivity are precursors of obesity. The aim of this study is evaluation of the effectiveness of a multi-component school-based weight management programme for overweight and obese primary school children via a home-school joint venture. This study made use of variety of behavioural modification strategies integrating into the Health Promoting School approach to promote healthy lifestyles. The participants were overweight and obese students aged between 8 and 12 from six participating schools. The interventions involved students attending ten 75 minutes after-school sessions and one 3-hour week-end session of practical interactive and fun activities on healthy eating and exercise, and meal plan together with parents and printed tailor-made management advices. Parents received an introductory seminar with 2 sets of specially designed exercise for their overweight children. The tools to measure bodyweight and fat percentage and standing height were bio-impedance body fat scale and a portable stadiometer. Self-administered questionnaire was used to measure knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. McNemar test was utilized to compare the proportions of behaviour changes within the same group to assess for the trends of changes. BMI z-score and body fat percentage of intervention participants at baseline, 4 month and 8 month were compared pair-wisely using tests of within subject contrasts in repeated measures ANOVA to assess for programme sustainability. Those students in the intervention group reduced their BMI z-score (-0.21, 95% CI -0.34 to -0.07, P = 0.003) and body fat (-2.67%, 95% CI -5.12 to -0.22, P = 0.033) compared to wait list control group with statistical significant, and the intervention group also had a significant reduction in BMI z-score (-0.06, 95% CI -0.11, -0.007, P = 0.028) and body fat (-1.71%, 95% CI, -3.44 to 0.02, P = 0.052) after a 4 month maintenance period. Improvement of

  16. A longitudinal study to identify the influence of quality of chronic care delivery on productive interactions between patients and (teams of) healthcare professionals within disease management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-09-19

    The chronic care model is an increasingly used approach to improve the quality of care through system changes in care delivery. While theoretically these system changes are expected to increase productive patient-professional interaction empirical evidence is lacking. This study aims to identify the influence of quality of care on productive patient-professional interaction. Longitudinal study in 18 Dutch regions. Questionnaires were sent to all 5076 patients participating in 18 Disease Management Programmes (DMPs) in 2010 (2676 (53%) respondents). One year later (T1), 4693 patients still participating in the DMPs received a questionnaire (2191 (47%) respondents) and 2 years later (in 2012; T2) 1722 patients responded (out of 4350; 40% response). DMPs Patients' perceptions of the productivity of interactions (measured as relational coordination/coproduction of care) with professionals. Patients were asked about communication dimensions (frequent, accurate, and problem-solving communication) and relationship dimensions (shared goals and mutual respect). After controlling for background characteristics these results clearly show that quality of chronic care (T0), first-year changes in quality of chronic care (T1-T0) and second-year changes in quality of chronic care (T2-T1) predicted productive interactions between patients and professionals at T2 (all at p≤0.001). Furthermore, we found a negative relationship between lower educational level and productive interactions between patients and professionals 2 years later. We can conclude that successfully dealing with the consequences of chronic illnesses requires proactive patients who are able to make productive decisions together with their healthcare providers. Since patients and professionals share responsibility for management of the chronic illness, they must also share control of interactions and decisions. The importance of patient-centeredness is growing and this study reports a first example of how quality

  17. Conocimientos, destrezas y conductas ante el cuidado de los pies en un grupo de amputados diabéticos Knowledge, abilities and behaviours in foot care in a group of diabetic amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Suárez Pérez

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Se conoce que el cuidado de los pies, uno de los mayores retos en la atención a personas diabéticas, no se enfoca adecuadamente en las consultas de rutina por lo cual se pierde la función preventiva de las complicaciones en miembros inferiores y su máxima manifestación: la amputación. Para lograr un acercamiento a este problema el trabajo tuvo como objetivo determinar la información y las orientaciones prácticas que tenía un grupo de pacientes diabéticos que sufrían una amputación en el momento del estudio. Se entrevistaron 105 diabéticos hospitalizados en las salas de Angiología de 2 hospitales generales. La entrevista se dirigió a recoger información que permitiera caracterizar el actual proceso de amputación y determinar la información y las orientaciones prácticas que sobre el cuidado de los pies en general y su proceso particular de amputación, habían recibido estas personas. Se encontró que el 62,5 % del grupo no revisaba periódicamente sus pies y el 42,4 % no identificó como peligrosas algunas prácticas caseras ante callosidades, cortado de uñas, etc. Solamente el 29,5 % pudo identificar 1 ó 2 cuidados prácticos de los pies. Se comprobó que no habían recibido información práctica al respecto y que en el 52,4 %, el inicio de la presente complicación fue por descuido, errores de conducta o ignorancia de cómo proceder. Se concluyó que una intervención educativa podría haber contribuido sustancialmente a reducir las amputacionesIt is known that foot care, one of the biggest challenges for diabetic persons care, is not adequately approached in regular appointments and that is why the function of preventing the occurrence of complications in lower limbs and its top manifestation, that is, amputation, is lost. To address this problem, the present paper was aimed at determining the information and practical orientations received by a group of diabetic patients suffering from amputation at the time of the study

  18. The role of social risk in an early preventative care programme for infants born very preterm: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spittle, Alicia J; Treyvaud, Karli; Lee, Katherine J; Anderson, Peter J; Doyle, Lex W

    2018-01-01

    To examine the differential effects of an early intervention programme for infants born preterm on neurodevelopment and parental mental health according to family social risk. One hundred and twenty infants born earlier than 30 weeks' gestation were randomized to early intervention (n=61) or control groups (n=59). Cognitive, language, and motor outcomes were assessed by blinded assessors at 2 years, 4 years, and 8 years, and primary caregivers completed questionnaires on their anxiety and depression. Outcomes at each time point were compared between groups using linear regression with an interaction term for social risk (higher/lower). There was evidence of interactions between intervention group and social risk for cognition at 2 years and 4 years, motor function at 4 years, and language at 8 years, with a greater intervention effect in children from higher social risk environments. In contrast, the impact of early intervention on parental depressive symptoms was greater for parents of lower social risk than for those of higher social risk. Effects of early intervention on outcomes for children born preterm and their caregivers varied according to family social risk. Family social risk should be considered when implementing early intervention programmes for children born preterm and their families. Intervention is associated with better early cognitive functioning for children in higher social risk families. Positive effects of intervention for the high risk group were not sustained at school-age. Intervention has a greater effect on primary caregiver mental health in the lower social risk group compared with higher social risk. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  19. How Does Counselling in a Stationary Health Care Setting Affect the Attendance in a Standardised Sports Club Programme? Process Evaluation of a Quasi-Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Titze

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Actions in partnership across sectors is one principle for the promotion of health behaviours. The objective of this study was to describe the participation in a sports club-based exercise programme—named JACKPOT—following an intervention in a health care setting. Focus was given to the recruitment into JACKPOT, the attendance level, and whether the different programme elements were implemented as intented. The practicability of the project was also retrospectively rated. Participants were 238 inactive people (50% women between 30 and 65 years of age who attended a health resort. Of these, 77% were assigned to the intervention group (IG. The recruitment into the 12 JACKPOT sessions and the attendance levels were recorded via attendance lists. The implementation of the intervention standards was assessed with structured interviews and participatory observation. The Pragmatic Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary (PRECIS-2 tool served to rate the practicability of the project. Almost 50% of the IG subjects attended JACKPOT sessions at least once and 54% of the attenders visited ≥75% of the 12 sessions. Some of the programme elements were not delivered fully. The process evaluation results showed that the project worked in a real-world setting, and also uncovered potential reasons such as incomplete information delivery for the moderate recruitment and attendance level.

  20. The Diabetic Foot Attack: "'Tis Too Late to Retreat!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas, Prashanth R J; Edmonds, Michael; Kavarthapu, Venu; Rashid, Hisham; Ahluwalia, Raju; Pankhurst, Christian; Papanas, Nikolaos

    2018-03-01

    The "diabetic foot attack" is one of the most devastating presentations of diabetic foot disease, typically presenting as an acutely inflamed foot with rapidly progressive skin and tissue necrosis, at times associated with significant systemic symptoms. Without intervention, it may escalate over hours to limb-threatening proportions and poses a high amputation risk. There are only best practice approaches but no international protocols to guide management. Immediate recognition of a typical infected diabetic foot attack, predominated by severe infection, with prompt surgical intervention to debride all infected tissue alongside broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is vital to ensure both limb and patient survival. Postoperative access to multidisciplinary and advanced wound care therapies is also necessary. More subtle forms exist: these include the ischemic diabetic foot attack and, possibly, in a contemporary categorization, acute Charcot neuroarthropathy. To emphasize the importance of timely action especially in the infected and ischemic diabetic foot attack, we revisit the concept of "time is tissue" and draw parallels with advances in acute myocardial infarction and stroke care. At the moment, international protocols to guide management of severe diabetic foot presentations do not specifically use the term. However, we believe that it may help increase awareness of the urgent actions required in some situations.

  1. EQUIP training the trainers: an evaluation of a training programme for service users and carers involved in training mental health professionals in user-involved care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, C; Grundy, A; Meade, O; Callaghan, P; Lovell, K

    2017-08-01

    alongside ongoing support and supervision. Mental health nurses (and other health professionals) will be better able to involve service users and carers in care planning. Service users and carers may feel more involved in care planning in future. Introduction Limited evidence exists on service user and carer perceptions of undertaking a training course for delivering care planning training to qualified mental health professionals. We know little about trainee motivations for engaging with such train the trainers courses, experiences of attending courses and trainees' subsequent experiences of codelivering training to health professionals, hence the current study. Aim To obtain participants' views on the suitability and acceptability of a training programme that aimed to prepare service users and carers to codeliver training to health professionals. Method Semi-structured interviews with nine service users and carers attending the training programme. Transcripts were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Results Participants' reasons for attending training included skill development and making a difference to mental health practice. Course content was generally rated highly but may benefit from review and/or extension to allow the range of topics and resulting professional training programme to be covered in more depth. Trainees who delivered the care planning training reported a mix of expectations, support experiences, preparedness and personal impacts. Implications for Practice Mental health nurses are increasingly coproducing and delivering training with service users and carers. This study identifies possibilities and pitfalls in this endeavour, highlighting areas where user and carer involvement and support structures might be improved in order to fully realize the potential for involvement in training. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Foot anthropometry and morphology phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agić, Ante; Nikolić, Vasilije; Mijović, Budimir

    2006-12-01

    Foot structure description is important for many reasons. The foot anthropometric morphology phenomena are analyzed together with hidden biomechanical functionality in order to fully characterize foot structure and function. For younger Croatian population the scatter data of the individual foot variables were interpolated by multivariate statistics. Foot structure descriptors are influenced by many factors, as a style of life, race, climate, and things of the great importance in human society. Dominant descriptors are determined by principal component analysis. Some practical recommendation and conclusion for medical, sportswear and footwear practice are highlighted.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of a cardiovascular disease primary prevention programme in a primary health care setting. Results of the Polish part of the EUROACTION project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sović, Nevena; Pająk, Andrzej; Jankowski, Piotr; Duenas, Alejandra; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Wolfshaut-Wolak, Renata; Stepaniak, Urszula; Kawalec, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    Well designed cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention programmes appear to be generally applicable and effective in reducing exposure to risk factors and the incidence of disease. However, introducing them broadly into clinical practice would have a significant impact on the healthcare budget, and requires careful consideration. The purpose of this health economic analysis was to assess the potential cost-effectiveness of the model nurse-led, comprehensive CVD primary prevention programme which was prepared and introduced in the EUROACTION project, in high-risk patients in Poland. A Markov model was developed to assess the long-term costs of preventive intervention. The health states modelled were: event-free (all patients at the beginning of observation), stable angina first year, acute myocardial infarction, stable angina subsequent year, myocardial infarction subsequent year, CVD death, and other causes of death. Health benefits from the reduction in risk factors were estimated based on Framingham risk function assuming the probability of defined health states according to British registers. The time horizon of the analysis was ten years, and one Markov cycle length was one year. The analysis was prepared from the healthcare payer's perspective. A willingness to pay threshold of three gross domestic product (GDP) per capita / quality-adjusted life years (QALY) was used. Univariate sensitivity analysis was conducted. Results were presented as an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) expressed as an incremental cost per QALY. In Poland, EUROACTION intervention resulted mainly in reductions in the prevalence of smoking (by 14%) and high blood pressure (by 7%). Intervention on other risk factors, including blood lipids, was found to be less effective. Estimated ICERs were 19,524 PLN for men and 82,262 PLN for women. The programme was even more cost-effective in smokers i.e. estimated ICERs were 12,377 PLN in men and 53,471 PLN in women. The results were most

  4. The Emotional Resources Group: Provisional outcome data for a pilot six-session emotion regulation programme for secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Thomas; Doughty, Caitriona; Summers, Andrew; Wiffen, Benjamin; Stanley, Zoe; McAlpine, Susan

    2018-06-01

    To examine the effectiveness of a new, six-session emotion regulation group intervention designed for the secondary care setting: The Emotional Resources Group (ERG). In this pilot study, participants were recruited by referral from secondary care mental health services. Forty-seven individuals participated in the study. Participants who attended the ERG were compared on measures of emotion regulation, well-being, and self-efficacy, pre- and post-intervention. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated highly statistically significant improvements in measures of emotion regulation, well-being, and self-efficacy, accompanied by large effect sizes. In addition, improvements in emotion regulation produced good rates of both reliable and clinically significant change. The ERG may be an effective, brief intervention to improve emotion regulation in the secondary care setting, worthy of further evaluation. Clinical implications Emotion regulation may be an appropriate treatment target to improve well-being and self-efficacy in a transdiagnostic population. The ERG may be effective as a brief emotion regulation intervention for secondary care mental health settings. Outcomes of the ERG appear to be equivalent to other more intensive group-based emotion regulation interventions. The ERG's tailored design may be responsible for positive outcomes. Limitations There was a small sample size. There was no control group. There was no follow-up data. © 2018 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Care of Older People in Nursing Homes: An Intensive Programme as an Educational Activity within Erasmus-Socrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzabassaki, Stella; Alabaster, Erica S.; And, Kati; Larsson, Ulla; de Vree, Willem

    2003-01-01

    An intensive 3-year program provided cross-national training in holistic care for European nursing home staff. Data from 38 teachers and 57 students indicated that the goals of transcultural awareness, skill development, and increased knowledge were achieved. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  6. Can an EASYcare based dementia training programme improve diagnostic assessment and management of dementia by general practitioners and primary care nurses? The design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucassen PL

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early diagnosis of dementia benefits both patient and caregiver. Nevertheless, dementia in primary care is currently under-diagnosed. Some educational interventions developed to improve dementia diagnosis and management were successful in increasing the number of dementia diagnoses and in changing attitudes and knowledge of health care staff. However, none of these interventions focussed on collaboration between GPs and nurses in dementia care. We developed an EASYcare-based Dementia Training Program (DTP aimed at stimulating collaboration in dementia primary care. We expect this program to increase the number of cognitive assessments and dementia diagnoses and to improve attitudes and knowledge of GPs and nurses. Methods The DTP is a complex educational intervention that consists of two workshops, a coaching program, access to an internet forum, and a Computerized Clinical Decision Support System on dementia diagnostics. One hundred duos of GPs and nurses will be recruited, from which 2/3 will be allocated to the intervention group and 1/3 to the control group. The effects of implementation of the DTP will be studied in a cluster-randomised controlled trial. Primary outcomes will be the number of cognitive assessments and dementia diagnoses in a period of 9 months following workshop participation. Secondary outcomes are measured on GP and nurse level: adherence to national guidelines for dementia, attitude, confidence and knowledge regarding dementia diagnosis and management; on patient level: number of emergency calls, visits and consultations and patient satisfaction; and on caregiver level: informal caregiver burden and satisfaction. Data will be collected from GPs' electronic medical records, self-registration forms and questionnaires. Statistical analysis will be performed using the MANOVA-method. Also, exploratory analyses will be performed, in order to gain insight into barriers and facilitators for implementation and

  7. Biomechanically acquired foot types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    Over the years, orthopedics of the foot has gone through many stages and phases, each of which has spawned a whole vocabulary of its own. According the author, today we are in the biomechanical age, which represents a step forward in understanding the mechanisms governing the functions of the lower extremity. A great deal of scientific research on the various foot types and pathological entities is now being performed. This paper discusses how, from a radiographic point of view, a knowledge of certain angular relationships must be achieved before one can perform a biomechanical evaluation. In order to validate the gross clinical findings, following an examination of a patient, a biomechanical evaluation can be performed on the radiographs taken. It must be remembered, however, that x-rays are never the sole means of making a diagnosis. They are just one of many findings that must be put together to arrive at a pertinent clinical assessment or diagnosis

  8. Development of Foot Massage Program on Nausea and Vomiting for Cancer Patients: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ketut Guru Prapti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to develop a foot massage program to support care activity in reducing nausea and vomiting for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Two phases, a literature review and the development of a foot massage program were conducted. The literature review was to analyze state of the art massage techniques by reviewing problems, related theories and supporting evidence. Method: Eight published studies in the English language were reviewed. A massage can be performed for different durations, from 10 minutes up to 60 minutes for three to six weeks and can be applied on various body areas. We found that the soft stroke/effleurage seems to be the best method and is most suitable for patients with cancer. It is also evident that foot massaging can be applied as a modality to reduce nausea and vomiting for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Result: We developed a foot massage program specifically for patients with cancer. The foot massage program comprised of three sessions, including 1 education session, 2 preparation session, and 3 foot massage session. In the education session, patients obtain brief information about the definition of a foot massage, the benefits and contraindication of foot massaging. During the preparation phase, foot soaking and warming up are performed. Subsequently, the foot massage is applied and should last for 30 minutes. Further research is recommended to test the effectiveness of the proposed foot massage program for nausea and vomiting in cancer patients across countries including Indonesia. Key Words: Foot massage program, chemotherapy, nausea and vomiting

  9. Microbicides Development Programme: Engaging the community in the standard of care debate in a vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soteli Selephina

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV prevention research in resource-limited countries is associated with a variety of ethical dilemmas. Key amongst these is the question of what constitutes an appropriate standard of health care (SoC for participants in HIV prevention trials. This paper describes a community-focused approach to develop a locally-appropriate SoC in the context of a phase III vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza City, northwest Tanzania. Methods A mobile community-based sexual and reproductive health service for women working as informal food vendors or in traditional and modern bars, restaurants, hotels and guesthouses has been established in 10 city wards. Wards were divided into geographical clusters and community representatives elected at cluster and ward level. A city-level Community Advisory Committee (CAC with representatives from each ward has been established. Workshops and community meetings at ward and city-level have explored project-related concerns using tools adapted from participatory learning and action techniques e.g. chapati diagrams, pair-wise ranking. Secondary stakeholders representing local public-sector and non-governmental health and social care providers have formed a trial Stakeholders' Advisory Group (SAG, which includes two CAC representatives. Results Key recommendations from participatory community workshops, CAC and SAG meetings conducted in the first year of the trial relate to the quality and range of clinic services provided at study clinics as well as broader standard of care issues. Recommendations have included streamlining clinic services to reduce waiting times, expanding services to include the children and spouses of participants and providing care for common local conditions such as malaria. Participants, community representatives and stakeholders felt there was an ethical obligation to ensure effective access to antiretroviral drugs and to provide supportive community-based care for women identified

  10. Microbicides Development Programme: Engaging the community in the standard of care debate in a vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallely, Andrew; Shagi, Charles; Lees, Shelley; Shapiro, Katherine; Masanja, Joseph; Nikolau, Lawi; Kazimoto, Johari; Soteli, Selephina; Moffat, Claire; Changalucha, John; McCormack, Sheena; Hayes, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Background HIV prevention research in resource-limited countries is associated with a variety of ethical dilemmas. Key amongst these is the question of what constitutes an appropriate standard of health care (SoC) for participants in HIV prevention trials. This paper describes a community-focused approach to develop a locally-appropriate SoC in the context of a phase III vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza City, northwest Tanzania. Methods A mobile community-based sexual and reproductive health service for women working as informal food vendors or in traditional and modern bars, restaurants, hotels and guesthouses has been established in 10 city wards. Wards were divided into geographical clusters and community representatives elected at cluster and ward level. A city-level Community Advisory Committee (CAC) with representatives from each ward has been established. Workshops and community meetings at ward and city-level have explored project-related concerns using tools adapted from participatory learning and action techniques e.g. chapati diagrams, pair-wise ranking. Secondary stakeholders representing local public-sector and non-governmental health and social care providers have formed a trial Stakeholders' Advisory Group (SAG), which includes two CAC representatives. Results Key recommendations from participatory community workshops, CAC and SAG meetings conducted in the first year of the trial relate to the quality and range of clinic services provided at study clinics as well as broader standard of care issues. Recommendations have included streamlining clinic services to reduce waiting times, expanding services to include the children and spouses of participants and providing care for common local conditions such as malaria. Participants, community representatives and stakeholders felt there was an ethical obligation to ensure effective access to antiretroviral drugs and to provide supportive community-based care for women identified as HIV positive during

  11. Five-year cost-effectiveness of the Patient Empowerment Programme (PEP) for type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jinxiao; McGhee, Sarah M; So, Ching; Chau, June; Wong, Carlos K H; Wong, William C W; Lam, Cindy L K

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluated the short-term cost-effectiveness of the Patient Empowerment Programme (PEP) for diabetes mellitus (DM) in Hong Kong. Propensity score matching was used to select a matched group of PEP and non-PEP subjects. A societal perspective was adopted to estimate the cost of PEP. Outcome measures were the cumulative incidence of all-cause mortality and diabetic complication over a 5-year follow-up period and the number needed to treat (NNT) to avoid 1 event. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of cost per event avoided was calculated using the PEP cost per subject multiplied by the NNT. The PEP cost per subject from the societal perspective was US$247. There was a significantly lower cumulative incidence of all-cause mortality (2.9% vs 4.6%, P US$14 465, US$19 617 and US$30 796, respectively. The extra amount allocated to managing PEP was small and it appears cost-effective in the short-term as an addition to RAMP. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Integration of comprehensive women's health programmes into health systems: cervical cancer prevention, care and control in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binagwaho, Agnes; Ngabo, Fidele; Wagner, Claire M; Mugeni, Cathy; Gatera, Maurice; Nutt, Cameron T; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2013-09-01

    Although it is highly preventable and treatable, cervical cancer is the most common and most deadly cancer among women in Rwanda. By mobilizing a diverse coalition of partnerships, Rwanda became the first country in Africa to develop and implement a national strategic plan for cervical cancer prevention, screening and treatment. Rwanda - a small, landlocked nation in East Africa with a population of 10.4 million - is well positioned to tackle a number of "high-burden" noncommunicable diseases. The country's integrated response to infectious diseases has resulted in steep declines in premature mortality over the past decade. In 2011-2012, Rwanda vaccinated 227,246 girls with all three doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Among eligible girls, three-dose coverage rates of 93.2% and 96.6% were achieved in 2011 and 2012, respectively. The country has also initiated nationwide screening and treatment programmes that are based on visual inspection of the cervix with acetic acid, testing for HPV DNA, cryotherapy, the loop electrosurgical excision procedure and various advanced treatment options. Low-income countries should begin to address cervical cancer by integrating prevention, screening and treatment into routine women's health services. This requires political will, cross-sectoral collaboration and planning, innovative partnerships and robust monitoring and evaluation. With external support and adequate planning, high nationwide coverage rates for HPV vaccination and screening for cervical cancer can be achieved within a few years.

  13. The diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestring, T.; Fiedler, R.; Greitemann, B.; Sciuk, J.; Peters, P.E.

    1995-01-01

    Familiarity with the spectrum of findings in the different imaging modalities appears essential. Radiographically, significant changes include Charcot joints of the tarsus (destructive type) and bone absorption of the forefoot (mutilating type). In diabetic foot problems, magnetic resonance imaging and leukocyte scintigraphy appear to be the most effective tools for detection of osteomyelitis, and a negative study makes osteomyelitis unlikely. However, the findings of both techniques in active, noninfected neuropathic osteoarthropathy may be indistinguishable from those of osteomyelitis. (orig.) [de

  14. Normal foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    The foot may be thought of as a bag of bones tied tightly together and functioning as a unit. The bones re expected to maintain their alignment without causing symptomatology to the patient. The author discusses a normal radiograph. The bones must have normal shape and normal alignment. The density of the soft tissues should be normal and there should be no fractures, tumors, or foreign bodies

  15. Perception of quality of care in HIV/AIDS programmes among patients in a tertiary health care facility in Anambra State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwabueze, S A; Adogu, P O U; Ilika, A L; Asuzu, M C; Adinma, E D

    2011-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement is linked to the use of timely and useful feedback from clients in Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) care. HIV experts and care professionals agree that consumer involvement, such as patient satisfaction survey, is an essential part of HIV care and policy making today. The introduction ofAnti-Retroviral Treatment (ART) services in Nigeria has significantly impacted positively on the overall well being of People Living with HIV and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (PLWHA). However, there is little understanding of their satisfaction and perception of quality of care provided. Consequently, this study was carried out to assess patients' satisfaction with ambulatory HIV/AIDS care in a tertiary health facility in Anambra State. The study design is cross-sectional. A total of 150 patients from Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi were selected using systematic sampling technique from the daily AntiRetroviral (ARV) clinic register obtained from the medical records department of the centre. Data were collected using a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 13. The mean age of the respondents was 38.3 +/- 9.1. Majority (50.7%) of the patients was married, and most of them (74.7%) were semi-skilled workers. There was a statistically significant difference in the numbers of those who spent >240 naira for transportation to the clinic, compared to those who spent 30 minutes are significantly larger than the number that spent 750 naira than those who spend <750 naira on non-HIV related laboratory (20 versus 9) tests. PLWHAs in this facility were least satisfied with access to care, while they expressed greatest satisfaction with good patient care and quality of service by staff. The overall satisfaction score of the subjects was 4.04 +/- 0.33. HIV patients' overall satisfaction with the services provided to them was quite high. Therefore, there is need to sustain the current

  16. Foot ulcers in the diabetic patient, prevention and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephanie C; Driver, Vickie R; Wrobel, James S; Armstrong, David G

    2007-01-01

    Lower extremity complications in persons with diabetes have become an increasingly significant public health concern in both the developed and developing world. These complications, beginning with neuropathy and subsequent diabetic foot wounds frequently lead to infection and lower extremity amputation even in the absence of critical limb ischemia. In order to diminish the detrimental consequences associated with diabetic foot ulcers, a com-mon-sense-based treatment approach must be implemented. Many of the etiological factors contributing to the formation of diabetic foot ulceration may be identified using simple, inexpensive equipment in a clinical setting. Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers can be accomplished in a primary care setting with a brief history and screening for loss of protective sensation via the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. Specialist clinics may quantify neuropathy, plantar foot pressure, and assess vascular status with Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial blood pressure indices. These measurements, in conjunction with other findings from the history and physical examination, may enable clinicians to stratify patients based on risk and help determine the type of intervention. Other effective clinical interventions may include patient education, optimizing glycemic control, smoking cessation, and diligent foot care. Recent technological advanced combined with better understanding of the wound healing process have resulted in a myriad of advanced wound healing modalities in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. However, it is imperative to remember the fundamental basics in the healing of diabetic foot ulcers: adequate perfusion, debridement, infection control, and pressure mitigation. Early recognition of the etiological factors along with prompt management of diabetic foot ulcers is essential for successful outcome. PMID:17583176

  17. Using workshops to develop theories of change in five low and middle income countries: lessons from the programme for improving mental health care (PRIME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Theory of Change (ToC) approach has been used to develop and evaluate complex health initiatives in a participatory way in high income countries. Little is known about its use to develop mental health care plans in low and middle income countries where mental health services remain inadequate. Aims ToC workshops were held as part of formative phase of the Programme for Improving Mental Health Care (PRIME) in order 1) to develop a structured logical and evidence-based ToC map as a basis for a mental health care plan in each district; (2) to contextualise the plans; and (3) to obtain stakeholder buy-in in Ethiopia, India, Nepal, South Africa and Uganda. This study describes the structure and facilitator’s experiences of ToC workshops. Methods The facilitators of the ToC workshops were interviewed and the interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed together with process documentation from the workshops using a framework analysis approach. Results Thirteen workshops were held in the five PRIME countries at different levels of the health system. The ToC workshops achieved their stated goals with the contributions of different stakeholders. District health planners, mental health specialists, and researchers contributed the most to the development of the ToC while service providers provided detailed contextual information. Buy-in was achieved from all stakeholders but valued more from those in control of resources. Conclusions ToC workshops are a useful approach for developing ToCs as a basis for mental health care plans because they facilitate logical, evidence based and contextualised plans, while promoting stakeholder buy in. Because of the existing hierarchies within some health systems, strategies such as limiting the types of participants and stratifying the workshops can be used to ensure productive workshops. PMID:24808923

  18. Diabetic Foot Risk Factors in Patients with Diabetes at the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hosseini

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives Diabetic foot problems are one of the major causes of mortality and disability in diabetic patients. It is considered one of the costliest conditions for health care systems. This study is designed to identify diabetic foot risk factors in patients with diabetes mellitus at Kamkar Hospital diabetes clinic in Qom, Iran during 2006.MethodsThis study was performed on 140 diabetes mellitus patients at the Kamkar Hospital diabetic clinic. International working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF guidelines were used for physical exam of diabetic foot in these patients. The physical exam consisted of inspection of foot appearance for deformity, skin keratosis and ulcer, and neurological and arterial pulse exam of the lower extremities of these patients. Patients in this study were divided into four risk groups based on the IWGDF guidelines. ANOVA method was used for analysis and comparison of the results with P<0.05 considered as significant. ResultsMean age of the participants in this study was 52.4±11.2 years old from which 67.1% were female, 37.1% of patients were illiterate, and 10% were active smokers. Mean duration of diabetes in these patients was 8.9 years. Mean body mass index (BMI was 29.4± 4.4 and HbA1C was 9.3 ± 1.9. Percentages of the patients with retinopathy and nephropathy were 33.6% and 17.7% respectively. 95% of the patients did not know the correct way of nail clipping, 95.5% were wearing uncomfortable shoes, and 14.3% of patients had history of foot ulcer. None of the them had any education about foot care. Physical examination with monofilament, ankle reflex and vibration perception were defected in 28.6%, 52.5%, and 32.1% of patients respectively. 37.7% of patients had a decreased lower extremity pulse that was not felt by touch. Based on the IWGDF classifications, 70% of the patients were in the higher-risk group for diabetic foot ulcer. In the high risk group, age, duration of diabetes, illiteracy was

  19. Assessing the relationship between healthcare market competition and medical care quality under Taiwan's National Health Insurance programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chih-Hsien; Lu, Ning; Tang, Chao-Hsiun; Chang, Hui-Chih; Huang, Kuo-Cherh

    2018-06-04

    There is still significant uncertainty as to whether market competition raises or lowers clinical quality in publicly funded healthcare systems. We attempted to assess the effects of market competition on inpatient care quality of stroke patients in a retrospective study of the universal single-payer health insurance system in Taiwan. In this 11-year population-based study, we conducted a pooled time-series cross-sectional analysis with a fixed-effects model and the Hausman test approach by utilizing two nationwide datasets: the National Health Insurance Research Database and the National Hospital and Services Survey in Taiwan. Patients who were admitted to a hospital for ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke were enrolled. After excluding patients with a previous history of stroke and those with different types of stroke, 247 379 ischemic and 79 741 hemorrhagic stroke patients were included in our analysis. Four outcome indicators were applied: the in-hospital mortality rate, 30-day post-operative complication rate, 14-day re-admission rate and 30-day re-admission rate. Market competition exerted a negative or negligible effect on the medical care quality of stroke patients. Compared to hospitals located in a highly competitive market, in-hospital mortality rates for hemorrhagic stroke patients were significantly lower in moderately (β = -0.05, P markets (β = -0.05, P market competition on the quality of care of ischemic stroke patients was insignificant. Simply fostering market competition might not achieve the objective of improving the quality of health care. Other health policy actions need to be contemplated.

  20. Canada's nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peden, W.

    1976-01-01

    Although Canada has developed the CANDU type reactor, and has an ambitious programme of nuclear power plant construction, there has been virtually no nuclear controversy. This progress was seen as a means to bring Canada out of the 'resource cow' era, and onto a more equal footing with technologically elite nations. However the Indian nuclear explosion test, waste storage problems, contamination problems arising from use of uranium ore processing waste as land fill and subsidised sale of nuclear power plants to Argentina and South Korea have initiated public and parliamentary interest. Some economists have also maintained that Canada is approaching over-supply of nuclear power and over-investment in plant. Canada has no official overall energy production plan and alternative sources have not been evaluated. (JIW)

  1. Australian Diabetes Foot Network: management of diabetes-related foot ulceration - a clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Shan M; Gurr, Joel M; Allard, Bernard P; Holland, Emma L; Horsley, Mark W; Kamp, Maarten C; Lazzarini, Peter A; Nube, Vanessa L; Sinha, Ashim K; Warnock, Jason T; Alford, Jan B; Wraight, Paul R

    2012-08-20

    Appropriate assessment and management of diabetes-related foot ulcers (DRFUs) is essential to reduce amputation risk. Management requires debridement, wound dressing, pressure off-loading, good glycaemic control and potentially antibiotic therapy and vascular intervention. As a minimum, all DRFUs should be managed by a doctor and a podiatrist and/or wound care nurse. Health professionals unable to provide appropriate care for people with DRFUs should promptly refer individuals to professionals with the requisite knowledge and skills. Indicators for immediate referral to an emergency department or multidisciplinary foot care team (MFCT) include gangrene, limb-threatening ischaemia, deep ulcers (bone, joint or tendon in the wound base), ascending cellulitis, systemic symptoms of infection and abscesses. Referral to an MFCT should occur if there is lack of wound progress after 4 weeks of appropriate treatment.

  2. Health effects of the Chernobyl accident and special health care programmes. Report of the UN Chernobyl Forum Expert Group 'Health'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.; Repacholi, M.; Carr, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Twenty years have passed since the worst nuclear reactor accident in the world occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. The radioactive contamination which resulted from the explosion and fire in the first few days spread over large areas of neighbouring Belarus and the Russian Federation, with most of the fallout in Belarus. While national and local authorities did not immediately disclose the scale of the accident, the mitigation measures, such as distribution of potassium iodine pills, food restriction, and mass evacuation from areas where the radioactive contamination was greatest, undoubtedly reduced the health impact of the radiation exposure and saved many lives. The accident caused severe social and economic disruption and had significant environmental and health impact. This was aggravated by the political and economical changes in the three affected states related to the break-down of the Soviet Union. In the aftermath of the accident the international scientific and medical community collaborated closely with national experts dealing with health effects of the accident in the affected countries. There is a substantial body of international collaborative projects on the situation, which should lead to advancement in radiation sciences. However, considerable speculation and disinformation remains about the possible health impact of the accident for the millions of affected people. To address the health, environmental and socioeconomic consequences of the Chernobyl accident, the United Nations in 2003 launched an Inter-Agency initiative, the Chernobyl Forum. The Forum's Secretariat, led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and several other international organizations collaborated with the governments of the affected countries. The purpose of the Chernobyl Forum was to review the consequences of the accident, issue technical reports and, based

  3. A survey of foot problems in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, G; Gardner-Medwin, J; Watt, G F; Woodburn, J

    2008-12-01

    Evidence suggests that foot problems are common in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), with prevalence estimates over 90%. The aim of this survey was to describe foot-related impairment and disability associated with JIA and foot-care provision in patients managed under modern treatment paradigms, including disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biologic therapies. The Juvenile Arthritis Foot Disability Index (JAFI), Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ), and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) were recorded in 30 consecutive established JIA patients attending routine outpatient clinics. Foot deformity score, active/limited joint counts, walking speed, double-support time (s) (DS) and step length symmetry index % (SI) were also measured. Foot-care provision in the preceding 12 months was determined from medical records. Sixty-three per cent of children reported some foot impairment, with a median (range) JAFI subscale score of 1 (0-3); 53% reported foot-related activity limitation, with a JAFI subscale score of 1 (0-4); and 60% reported participation restriction, with a JAFI subscale score of 1 (0-3). Other reported variables were CHAQ 0.38 (0-2), VAS pain 22 (0-79), foot deformity 6 (0-20), active joints 0 (0-7), limited joints 0 (0-31), walking speed 1.09 m/s (0.84-1.38 m/s), DS 0.22 s (0.08-0.26 s) and SI +/-4.0% (+/-0.2-+/-31.0%). A total of 23/30 medical records were reviewed and 15/23 children had received DMARDS, 8/23 biologic agents and 20/23 multiple intra-articular corticosteroid injections. Ten children received specialist podiatry care comprising footwear advice, orthotic therapy and silicone digital splints together with intrinsic muscle strengthening exercises. Despite frequent use of DMARD/biologic therapy and specialist podiatry-led foot care, foot-related impairment and disability persists in some children with JIA.

  4. International Programme for Resource Use in Critical Care (IPOC)--a methodology and initial results of cost and provision in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, D; Sheppard, L; Mills, G H; Jacobs, P; Rapoport, J; Bourne, R S; Guidet, B; Csomos, A; Prien, T; Anderson, G; Edbrooke, D L

    2006-01-01

    A standardized top-down costing method is not currently available internationally. An internally validated method developed in the UK was modified for use in critical care in different countries. Costs could then be compared using the World Health Organization's Purchasing Power Parities (WHO PPPs). This was an observational, retrospective, cross-sectional, multicentre study set in four European countries: France, UK, Germany and Hungary. A total of 329 adult intensive care units (ICUs) participated in the study. The costs are reported in international dollars ($) derived from the WHO PPP programme. The results show significant differences in resource use and costs of ICUs over the four countries. On the basis of the sum of the means for the major components, the average cost per patient day in UK hospitals was $1512, in French hospitals $934, in German hospitals $726 and in Hungarian hospitals $280. The reasons for such differences are poorly understood but warrant further investigation. This information will allow us to better adjust our measures of international ICU costs.

  5. Self-management of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a qualitative investigation from the perspective of participants in a nurse-led, shared-care programme in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Albine; van der Bruggen, Harry; Widdershoven, Guy; Spreeuwenberg, Cor

    2008-03-18

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem. Little is known about how people with type 2 diabetes experience self-management in a nurse-led, shared-care programme. The purpose of this article is to report an empirically grounded conceptualization of self-management in the context of autonomy of people with type 2 diabetes. This study has a qualitative descriptive, and exploratory design with an inductive approach. Data were collected by means of in-depth interviews. The sample consisted of older adults with type 2 diabetes in a nurse-led, shared-care setting. The data analysis was completed by applying the constant comparative analysis as recommended in grounded theory. People with type 2 diabetes use three kinds of self-management processes: daily, off-course, and preventive. The steps for daily self-management are adhering, adapting, and acting routinely. The steps for off-course self-management are becoming aware, reasoning, deciding, acting, and evaluating. The steps for preventive self-management are experiencing, learning, being cautious, and putting into practice. These processes are interwoven and recurring. Self-management consists of a complex and dynamic set of processes and it is deeply embedded in one's unique life situation. Support from diabetes specialist nurses and family caregivers is a necessity of self-managing diabetes.

  6. Integration of antenatal care services with health programmes in low- and middle-income countries: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jongh, Thyra E; Gurol-Urganci, Ipek; Allen, Elizabeth; Zhu, Nina Jiayue; Atun, Rifat

    2016-06-01

    Antenatal care (ANC) presents a potentially valuable platform for integrated delivery of additional health services for pregnant women-services that are vital to reduce the persistently high rates of maternal and neonatal mortality in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, there is limited evidence on the impact of integrating health services with ANC to guide policy. This review assesses the impact of integration of postnatal and other health services with ANC on health services uptake and utilisation, health outcomes and user experience of care in LMICs. Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL Plus, POPLINE and Global Health were searched for studies that compared integrated models for delivery of postnatal and other health services with ANC to non-integrated models. Risk of bias of included studies was assessed using the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) criteria and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, depending on the study design. Due to high heterogeneity no meta-analysis could be conducted. Results are presented narratively. 12 studies were included in the review. Limited evidence, with moderate- to high-risk of bias, suggests that integrated service delivery results in improved uptake of essential health services for women, earlier initiation of treatment, and better health outcomes. Women also reported improved satisfaction with integrated services. The reported evidence is largely based on non-randomised studies with poor generalizability, and therefore offers very limited policy guidance. More rigorously conducted and geographically diverse studies are needed to better ascertain and quantify the health and economic benefits of integrating health services with ANC.

  7. Relationship between static foot posture and foot mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McPoil Thomas G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is not uncommon for a person's foot posture and/or mobility to be assessed during a clinical examination. The exact relationship, however, between static posture and mobility is not known. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of association between static foot posture and mobility. Method The static foot posture and foot mobility of 203 healthy individuals was assessed and then analyzed to determine if low arched or "pronated" feet are more mobile than high arched or "supinated" feet. Results The study demonstrated that those individuals with a lower standing dorsal arch height and/or a wider standing midfoot width had greater mobility in their foot. In addition, those individuals with higher Foot Posture Index (FPI values demonstrated greater mobility and those with lower FPI values demonstrated less mobility. Finally, the amount of foot mobility that an individual has can be predicted reasonably well using either a 3 or 4 variable linear regression model. Conclusions Because of the relationship between static foot posture and mobility, it is recommended that both be assessed as part of a comprehensive evaluation of a individual with foot problems.

  8. Use of point-of-care HbA1c measurement to estimate the level of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus among 67-year-old participants in a cardiovascular screening programme in the municipality of Viborg, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper Winkler; Dahl, Marie; Yderstræde, Knud Bonnet

    2018-01-01

    Aims To determine the prevalence of unidentified diabetes mellitus among 67‐year‐olds in Denmark participating in a screening programme focusing on cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and to describe glycaemic levels in individuals according to point‐of‐care HbA1c combined with self‐reported dia...

  9. The clinical assessment study of the foot (CASF: study protocol for a prospective observational study of foot pain and foot osteoarthritis in the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA affects approximately 10% of adults aged over 60 years. The foot joint complex is commonly affected by OA, yet there is relatively little research into OA of the foot, compared with other frequently affected sites such as the knee and hand. Existing epidemiological studies of foot OA have focussed predominantly on the first metatarsophalangeal joint at the expense of other joints. This three-year prospective population-based observational cohort study will describe the prevalence of symptomatic radiographic foot OA, relate its occurrence to symptoms, examination findings and life-style-factors, describe the natural history of foot OA, and examine how it presents to, and is diagnosed and managed in primary care. Methods All adults aged 50 years and over registered with four general practices in North Staffordshire, UK, will be invited to participate in a postal Health Survey questionnaire. Respondents to the questionnaire who indicate that they have experienced foot pain in the preceding twelve months will be invited to attend a research clinic for a detailed clinical assessment. This assessment will consist of: clinical interview; physical examination; digital photography of both feet and ankles; plain x-rays of both feet, ankles and hands; ultrasound examination of the plantar fascia; anthropometric measurement; and a further self-complete questionnaire. Follow-up will be undertaken in consenting participants by postal questionnaire at 18 months (clinic attenders only and three years (clinic attenders and survey participants, and also by review of medical records. Discussion This three-year prospective epidemiological study will combine survey data, comprehensive clinical, x-ray and ultrasound assessment, and review of primary care records to identify radiographic phenotypes of foot OA in a population of community-dwelling older adults, and describe their impact on symptoms, function and

  10. Cold immersion recovery responses in the diabetic foot with neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharara, Manish; Viswanathan, Vijay; Cobb, Jonathan E

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this article was to investigate the effectiveness of testing cold immersion recovery responses in the diabetic foot with neuropathy using a contact thermography system based on thermochromic liquid crystals. A total of 81 subjects with no history of diabetic foot ulceration were assigned to neuropathy, non neuropathy and healthy groups. Each group received prior verbal and written description of the test objectives and subsequently underwent a comprehensive foot care examination. The room temperature and humidity were consistently maintained at 24 degrees C and less than 50%, respectively, with air conditioning. The right foot for each subject was located on the measurement platform after cold immersion in water at 18-20 degrees C. Whole-field thermal images of the plantar foot were recorded for 10 minutes. Patients with diabetes with neuropathy show the highest 'delta temperature', that is difference between the temperature after 10-minute recovery period and baseline temperature measured independently at all the three sites tested, that is first metatarsal head (MTH), second MTH and heel. This clinical study showed for the first time the evidence of poor recovery times for the diabetic foot with neuropathy when assessing the foot under load. A temperature deficit (because of poor recovery to baseline temperature) suggests degeneration of thermoreceptors, leading to diminished hypothalamus-mediated activity in the diabetic neuropathic group.

  11. Proceedings of the national seminar and awareness programme on applications of radioisotopes and radiation technology in industry and health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durairaj, S.; Madan, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    The National Seminar and Awareness Program on Applications of Radioisotopes and Radiation Technology in Industry and Health care is an important national event to learn about the challenges in the development and proliferation of application of radioisotopes and radiation technologies, and in appreciation of the role of these technologies to the benefit of public at large. This program endeavors to disseminate knowledge about lesser known and widely applied technologies and send the right message to the people for their greater acceptance. Applications of radioisotopes and radiation technology in industry such as oil, gas, chemical, petrochemical, steel, mining, paper, mineral and automobile and health care such as non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of a range of important and common conditions like cancer and cardiovascular diseases and radiation processed polymer containing hydrogel for use for bum dressing, and medical and agricultural products sterilization, have seen a significant growth in our country in the last fifty years. The indigenous capacity for the development and utilization of these technologies must be further strengthened. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. The contribution of a non-governmental organisation's Community Based Tuberculosis Care Programme to case finding in Myanmar: trend over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Htet Myet Win; Saw, Saw; Isaakidis, Petros; Khogali, Mohammed; Reid, Anthony; Hoa, Nguyen Binh; Zaw, Ko Ko; Thein, Saw; Aung, Si Thu

    2017-04-03

    It is estimated that the standard, passive case finding (PCF) strategy for detecting cases of tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar has not been successful: 26% of cases are missing. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as active case finding (ACF) by community volunteers, have been initiated since 2011. This study aimed to assess the contribution of a Community Based TB Care Programme (CBTC) by local non-government organizations (NGOs) to TB case finding in Myanmar over 4 years. This was a descriptive study using routine, monitoring data. Original data from the NGOs were sent to a central registry within the National TB Programme and data for this study were extracted from that database. Data from all 84 project townships in five regions and three states in Myanmar were used. The project was launched in 2011. Over time, the number of presumptive TB cases that were referred decreased, except in the Yangon Region, although in some areas, the numbers fluctuated. At the same time, there was a trend for the proportion of cases treated, compared to those referred, that decreased over time (P = 0.051). Overall, among 84 townships, the contribution of CBTC to total case detection deceased from 6% to 4% over time (P < 0.001). Contrary to expectations and evidence from previous studies in other countries, a concerning reduction in TB case finding by local NGO volunteer networks in several areas in Myanmar was recorded over 4 years. This suggests that measures to support the volunteer network and improve its performance are needed. They may include discussion with local NGOs human resources personnel, incentives for the volunteers, closer supervision of volunteers and improved monitoring and evaluation tools.

  13. Integrating an infectious disease programme into the primary health care service: a retrospective analysis of Chagas disease community-based surveillance in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Ken; Zúniga, Concepción; Nakamura, Jiro; Hanada, Kyo

    2015-03-24

    Integration of disease-specific programmes into the primary health care (PHC) service has been attempted mostly in clinically oriented disease control such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis but rarely in vector control. Chagas disease is controlled principally by interventions against the triatomine vector. In Honduras, after successful reduction of household infestation by vertical approach, the Ministry of Health implemented community-based vector surveillance at the PHC services (health centres) to prevent the resurgence of infection. This paper retrospectively analyses the effects and process of integrating a Chagas disease vector surveillance system into health centres. We evaluated the effects of integration at six pilot sites in western Honduras during 2008-2011 on; surveillance performance; knowledge, attitude and practice in schoolchildren; reports of triatomine bug infestation and institutional response; and seroprevalence among children under 15 years of age. The process of integration of the surveillance system was analysed using the PRECEDE-PROCEED model for health programme planning. The model was employed to systematically determine influential and interactive factors which facilitated the integration process at different levels of the Ministry of Health and the community. Overall surveillance performance improved from 46 to 84 on a 100 point-scale. Schoolchildren's attitude (risk awareness) score significantly increased from 77 to 83 points. Seroprevalence declined from 3.4% to 0.4%. Health centres responded to the community bug reports by insecticide spraying. As key factors, the health centres had potential management capacity and influence over the inhabitants' behaviours and living environment directly and through community health volunteers. The National Chagas Programme played an essential role in facilitating changes with adequate distribution of responsibilities, participatory modelling, training and, evaluation and advocacy. We found that Chagas

  14. Impact of a short home-based yoga programme on blood pressure in patients with hypertension: a randomized controlled trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, M; Rogers, K; Erdal, B; Chalmers, J P; Sundquist, K; Midlöv, P

    2016-10-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate yoga's impact on blood pressure (BP) and quality of life (QOL) and on stress, depression and anxiety in patients with hypertension in a primary care setting. We conducted a multi-centre randomized controlled trial with follow-up after 12-week intervention completion. Adult primary care patients diagnosed with hypertension were randomly allocated to yoga or usual care. The intervention group performed a short home-based Kundalini yoga programme 15 min twice-daily during the 12-week intervention period. At baseline and follow-up, the participants underwent standardized BP measurements and completed questionnaires on QOL, stress, anxiety and depression. Data obtained from 191 patients (mean age 64.7 years, s.d. 8.4) allocated to yoga intervention (n=96) and control group (n=95), with a total proportion of 52% women, showed a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic BP for both groups (-3.8/-1.7 mm Hg for yoga and -4.5/-3.0 mm Hg for control groups, respectively). However, the BP reduction for the yoga group was not significantly different from control. There were small but significant improvements for the yoga group in some of the QOL and depression measures (P<0.05, Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, HADS-D) compared with control. The findings of our study, which is the largest study from an OECD country (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) to date, do not support the suggestion from previous smaller studies that yoga lowers the BP. Further clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings. However, the yoga patients had other health benefits.

  15. Up-Beat UK: A programme of research into the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression in primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pariante Carmine M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary heart disease and depression are both common health problems and by 2020 will be the two leading causes of disability worldwide. Depression has been found to be more common in patients with coronary heart disease but the nature of this relationship is uncertain. In the United Kingdom general practitioners are now being remunerated for case-finding for depression in patients with coronary heart disease, however it is unclear how general practitioners should manage these patients. We aim to explore the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression in a primary care population and to develop an intervention for patients with coronary heart disease and depression. Methods/design This programme of research will consist of 4 inter-related studies. A 4 year prospective cohort study of primary care patients with coronary heart disease will be conducted to explore the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression. Within this, a nested case-control biological study will investigate genetic and blood-biomarkers as predictors of depression in this sample. Two qualitative studies, one of patients' perspectives of treatments for coronary heart disease and co-morbid depression and one of primary care professionals' views on the management of patients with coronary heart disease and depression will inform the development of an intervention for this patient group. A feasibility study for a randomised controlled trial will then be conducted. Discussion This study will provide information on the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression that will allow health services to determine the efficiency of case-finding for depression in this patient group. The results of the cohort study will also provide information on risk factors for depression. The study will provide evidence on the efficacy and feasibility of a joint patient and professional led intervention and data necessary to plan a

  16. The 2BFit study: is an unsupervised proprioceptive balance board training programme, given in addition to usual care, effective in preventing ankle sprain recurrences? Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Mechelen Willem

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is strong evidence that athletes have a twofold risk for re-injury after a previous ankle sprain, especially during the first year post-injury. These ankle sprain recurrences could result in disability and lead to chronic pain or instability in 20 to 50% of these cases. When looking at the high rate of ankle sprain recurrences and the associated chronic results, ankle sprain recurrence prevention is important. Objective To evaluate the effect of a proprioceptive balance board training programme on ankle sprain recurrences, that was applied to individual athletes after rehabilitation and treatment by usual care. Methods/Design This study was designed as a randomized controlled trial with a follow-up of one year. Healthy individuals between 12 and 70 years of age, who were actively participating in sports and who had sustained a lateral ankle sprain up to two months prior to inclusion, were eligible for inclusion in the study. The intervention programme was compared to usual care. The intervention programme consisted of an eight-week proprioceptive training, which started after finishing usual care and from the moment that sports participation was again possible. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and every month for 12 months. The primary outcome of this study was the incidence of recurrent ankle injuries in both groups within one year after the initial sprain. Secondary outcomes were severity and etiology of re-injury and medical care. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated from a societal perspective. A process evaluation was conducted for the intervention programme. Discussion The 2BFit trial is the first randomized controlled trial to study the effect of a non-supervised home-based proprioceptive balance board training programme in addition to usual care, on the recurrence of ankle sprains in sports. Results of this study could possibly lead to changes in practical guidelines on the treatment of ankle sprains. Results will

  17. Developing an assessment in dental public health for clinical undergraduates attending a primary dental care outreach programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, R D; Waterhouse, P J; Maguire, A; Hind, V; Lloyd, J; Tabari, D; Lowry, R J

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a Dental Public Health (DPH) assessment within the Primary Dental Care Outreach (PDCO) course at Newcastle University. The assessment was piloted alongside the delivery of the Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS) curriculum in accordance with established learning outcomes. To design and implement a pilot summative assessment, incorporating patients' social histories obtained by undergraduate students attending primary dental care outreach clinics. Undergraduates were tasked with obtaining a detailed social history from a patient seen during their two-year outreach attachment. Each student submitted a written account of their patient's social history and placed this in context by researching a number of demographic and social variables centred upon their patient's home residence. The final component involved writing a concise case feature for a nominated newspaper based upon the case history, where students were encouraged to identify one or more public health messages using language appropriate to a lay readership. Seventy one clinical undergraduates (98.6% of the year-group) subsequently submitted all components of the assessment. Eighty six per cent of the year-group was deemed to have passed the assessment with 9.9% achieving a 'Merit' grade and 76% a 'Satisfactory' grade. Following the assessment, students and clinical teachers were asked for their feedback through a focus group for staff, and a brief feedback form for students. Undergraduates subsequently reported greater awareness of the significance and importance of obtaining a detailed social history and its relevance when devising appropriate and realistic treatment plans. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Characteristics of patients in a ward of Academic Internal Medicine: implications for medical care, training programmes and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becchi, Maria Angela; Pescetelli, Michele; Caiti, Omar; Carulli, Nicola

    2010-06-01

    To describe the characteristics of "delayed discharge patients" and the factors associated with "delayed discharges", we performed a 12-month observational study on patients classified as "delayed discharge patients" admitted to an Academic Internal Medicine ward. We assessed the demographic variables, the number and severity of diseases using the Geriatric Index of Comorbidity (GIC), the cognitive, affective and functional status using, respectively, the Mini Mental Stare Examination, the Geriatric Depression Scale and the Barthel Index. We assessed the total length of stay (T-LHS), the total inappropriate length of stay (T-ILHS), the median length of stays (M-LHS), the median inappropriate length of stay (M-ILHS) and evaluated the factors associated with delayed discharge. "Delayed discharge patients" were 11.9% of all patients. The mean age was 81.9 years, 74.0% were in the IV class of GIC and 33.5% were at the some time totally dependent and affected by severe or non-assessable cognitive impairments. The patients had 2584 T-LHS, of which 1058 (40.9%) were T-ILHS. Their M-LHS was 15 days, and the M-ILHS was 5 days. In general, the greater the LHS, the greater is the ILHS (Spearman's rho + 0.68, P < 0.001). Using a multivariate analysis, only the absence of formal aids before hospitalisation is independently associated with delayed discharge (F = 4.39, P = 0.038). The majority of the delays (69%) resulted from the difficulty in finding beds in long-term hospital wards, but the longest M-ILHS (9 days) was found in patients waiting for the Geriatric Evaluation Unit. The profile of patients and the pattern of hospital utilisation suggest a need to reorient the health care system, and to develop appropriate resources for the academic functions of education, research and patient care.

  19. Contemporary Evaluation and Management of the Diabetic Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpio, Bauer E.

    2012-01-01

    Foot problems in patients with diabetes remain a major public health issue and are the commonest reason for hospitalization of patients with diabetes with prevalence as high as 25%. Ulcers are breaks in the dermal barrier with subsequent erosion of underlying subcutaneous tissue that may extend to muscle and bone, and superimposed infection is a frequent and costly complication. The pathophysiology of diabetic foot disease is multifactorial and includes neuropathy, infection, ischemia, and abnormal foot structure and biomechanics. Early recognition of the etiology of these foot lesions is essential for good functional outcome. Managing the diabetic foot is a complex clinical problem requiring a multidisciplinary collaboration of health care workers to achieve limb salvage. Adequate off-loading, frequent debridement, moist wound care, treatment of infection, and revascularization of ischemic limbs are the mainstays of therapy. Even when properly managed, some of the foot ulcers do not heal and are arrested in a state of chronic inflammation. These wounds can frequently benefit from various adjuvants, such as aggressive debridement, growth factors, bioactive skin equivalents, and negative pressure wound therapy. While these, increasingly expensive, therapies have shown promising results in clinical trials, the results have yet to be translated into widespread clinical practice leaving a huge scope for further research in this field. PMID:24278695

  20. Crispv programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovicj, N.

    CRISPV (Criticality and Spectrum code) is a multigroup neutron spectrum code for homogeneous reactor cores and is actually a somewhat modified version of the original CRISP programme. It is a combination of DATAPREP-II and BIGG-II programmes. It is assumed that the reactor cell is a cylindrical fuel rod in the light or heavy water moderator. DATEPREP-II CODE forms the multigroup data for homogeneous reactor and prepares the input parameters for the BIGG-II code. It has its own nuclear data library on a separate tape in binary mode. BIGG-II code is a multigroup neutron spectrum and criticality code for a homogenized medium. It has as well its own separate data library. In the CRISPV programme the overlay structure enables automatic handling of data calculated in the DATAPREP-II programme and needed in the BIGG-II core. Both programmes are written in FORTRAN for CDC 3600. Using the programme is very efficient and simple

  1. Multicentre randomised study of the effect and experience of an early inhome programme (PreHomeCare) for preterm infants using video consultation and smartphone applications compared with inhospital consultations: protocol of the PreHomeCare study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägi-Pedersen, Mai-Britt; Norlyk, Annelise; Dessau, Ram; Stanchev, Hristo; Kronborg, Hanne

    2017-03-09

    Although premature infants and their parents are discharged earlier to inhomecare programmes, how to optimally support parents during this transition remains unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of early inhomecare (PreHomeCare) including video consultations and mobile applications with those of inhospital consultations regarding breast feeding, parental confidence and parent-infant interactions. A randomised controlled intervention study will be conducted in four neonatal departments offering PreHomeCare (ie, premature infant inhomecare) in Denmark. Parents of hospitalised premature infants who fulfil the inclusion criteria for PreHomeCare will be randomised during hospitalisation to either the intervention (n=80) or control group (n=80) using 1:1 block randomisation. During PreHomeCare, the intervention group will receive a smartphone application with a video system and an infant scale, and the control group will receive usual care (ie, hospital consultations). Additionally, both groups will have planned nurse consultations two to three times a week: the intervention group through video consultations and the control group through inhospital consultations. Data collection will occur at inclusion/baseline, at the end of PreHomeCare and 1 month after discharge using questionnaires and hospital records. The primary outcome is the proportion of exclusively breastfed infants 1 month after discharge/end of PreHomeCare, the secondary outcomes are parent-infant interactions measured by the Mother and baby interaction scale and family confidence in caring for infants measured by the Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale. The process evaluation will consist of two qualitative studies: a field study and an interview study. Data collection will initially involve field observations of three scheduled video consultations with six families from the intervention group. These families will also be interviewed 1 month after PreHomeCare has ended. The project

  2. The implementation of the Care Programme Approach for service users with a learning disability. Building Bridges to the same Old Horizons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M

    2017-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: People with mental health problems and learning disabilities often do not receive the care they require. The Care Programme Approach (CPA) is meant to help with this. However, there have been many problems in the past with the introduction of the CPA into mental health services. There is no literature which explores what factors help or hinder the introduction of the CPA for service users with a mental health and learning disability, especially from the perspective of those responsible for overseeing this process. WHAT DOES THIS ARTICLE ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: The implementation of the CPA for this service user group is fragmented, and services are not working together in partnership. The CPA is being effectively implemented for people who are deemed to present with a risk to themselves or others. If a service user does not present with a high risk, they are not provided care through the CPA. Service users were not involved in the development or introduction of the policy in practice. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Services need to work better at engaging service users when they are developing and introducing new policies. Rather than applying the CPA for all service users, across all services, it should only be considered for those deemed to present with a high risk. It is effectively implemented for these people. For those not deemed to present with a high risk, services should consider using alternative service user led care planning frameworks. Introduction The Care Programme Approach was introduced in England to ensure services met the needs of people with mental health problems and a concurrent learning disability (dual diagnosis). The CPA implementation was patchy and services failed to work in partnership. Aim This study aimed to explore the factors shaping the recent implementation of the CPA for service users with a dual diagnosis. Method A single case study approach was undertaken. Data were collected through

  3. The cost-effectiveness of a structured education pulmonary rehabilitation programme for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary care: the PRINCE cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Paddy; O'Shea, Eamon; Casey, Dympna; Murphy, Kathy; Devane, Declan; Cooney, Adeline; Mee, Lorraine; Kirwan, Collette; McCarthy, Bernard; Newell, John

    2013-11-25

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of a structured education pulmonary rehabilitation programme (SEPRP) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) relative to usual practice in primary care. The programme consisted of group-based sessions delivered jointly by practice nurses and physiotherapists over 8 weeks. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis alongside a cluster randomised controlled trial. 32 general practices in Ireland. 350 adults with COPD, 69% of whom were moderately affected. Intervention arm (n=178) received a 2 h group-based SEPRP session per week over 8 weeks delivered jointly by a practice nurse and physiotherapist at the practice surgery or nearby venue. The control arm (n=172) received the usual practice in primary care. Incremental costs, Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ) scores, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained estimated using the generic EQ5D instrument, and expected cost-effectiveness at 22 weeks trial follow-up. The intervention was associated with an increase of €944 (95% CIs 489 to 1400) in mean healthcare cost and €261 (95% CIs 226 to 296) in mean patient cost. The intervention was associated with a mean improvement of 1.11 (95% CIs 0.35 to 1.87) in CRQ Total score and 0.002 (95% CIs -0.006 to 0.011) in QALYs gained. These translated into incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of €850 per unit increase in CRQ Total score and €472 000 per additional QALY gained. The probability of the intervention being cost-effective at respective threshold values of €5000, €15 000, €25 000, €35 000 and €45 000 was 0.980, 0.992, 0.994, 0.994 and 0.994 in the CRQ Total score analysis compared to 0.000, 0.001, 0.001, 0.003 and 0.007 in the QALYs gained analysis. While analysis suggests that SEPRP was cost-effective if society is willing to pay at least €850 per one-point increase in disease-specific CRQ, no evidence exists when effectiveness was measured in QALYS gained. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN52 403 063.

  4. Managing the diabetic foot in resource-poor settings: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas ZG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Zulfiqarali G Abbas1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Abbas Medical Centre, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Abstract: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common noncommunicable diseases globally. In Africa, rates of diabetes are increasing, so there is a parallel increase of foot complications. Peripheral neuropathy is the main risk factor for foot ulceration in people with diabetes in developing nations, but peripheral arterial disease is also increasing in number owing to the change in lifestyle and increasing urbanization. Ulceration arising from peripheral neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, and trauma are highly susceptible to secondary infection and gangrene, and are hence associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Government funding is very limited in many developing countries, and diabetes and its complications impose a heavy burden on health services. In particular, the outcomes of foot complications are often poor, and this is the result of various factors including lack of awareness of the need for foot care among patients, relatives, and health care providers; relatively few professionals with an interest in the diabetic foot and with the training to provide specialist treatment; nonexistent podiatry services; long distances for patients to travel to the clinic; delays among patients in seeking medical care, or the late referral of patients for specialist opinion; and lack of the awareness of the importance of a team approach to care, and the lack of training programs for health care professionals. Many of these can, however, potentially be tackled without exorbitant spending of financial resources. Cost-effective educational efforts should be targeted at both health care workers and patients. These include implementation of sustainable training programs for health care professionals with a special interest in foot

  5. Bolivia programme evaluation of a package to reach an underserved population: Community-based maternal and newborn care economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Diana; Pooley, Bertha; Dupuy, Julien Roger; Cardenas, Norma Amparo; Wall, Steve; Owen, Helen; Daviaud, Emmanuelle

    2017-10-01

    To address inequitable access to health services of indigenous communities in the Bolivian highlands, the Bolivian Ministry of Health, with the support of Save the Children-Saving Newborn Lives, conducted operational research to identify, implement and test a package of maternal and newborn interventions using locally recruited, volunteer Community Health Workers (vCHW) between 2008 and 2010. The additional annual economic and financial costs of the intervention were estimated from the perspective of the Bolivian Ministry of Health in two municipalities. The cost of intervention-stimulated increases in facility attendance was estimated with national surveillance data using a pre-post comparison, adjusted for secular trends in facility attendance. Three scale-up scenarios were modelled by varying the levels of coverage and the number (per mother and child pair) and frequency of home visits. Average cost per mother and average cost per home visit are presented in constant 2015 US$. Eighteen per cent of expectant mothers in the catchment area were visited at least once. The annualized additional financial cost of the community-based intervention across both municipalities was $43 449 of which 3% ($1324) was intervention design, 20% ($8474) set-up and 77% ($33 651) implementation. Drivers of additional costs were additional paid staff (68%), 81% of which was for management and support by local implementing partner and 19% of which was for vCHW supervision. The annual financial cost per vCHW was $595. Modelled scale-up scenarios highlight potential efficiency gains. Recognizing local imperatives to reduce inequalities by targeting underserved populations, the observed low coverage by vCHWs resulted in a high cost per mother and child pair ($296). This evaluation raises important questions about this model's ability to achieve its ultimate goals of reducing neonatal mortality and inequalities through behaviour change and increased care seeking and has served to

  6. Foot placement modulation diminishes for perturbations near foot contact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlutters, Mark; Van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; van der Kooij, Herman

    2018-01-01

    Whenever a perturbation occurs during walking we have to maintain our balance using the recovery strategies that are available to us. Foot placement adjustment is often considered an important recovery strategy. However, because this strategy takes time it is likely a poor option if the foot is

  7. Mortality associated with acute Charcot foot and neuropathic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baal, Juliette; Hubbard, Richard; Game, Fran; Jeffcoate, William

    2010-01-01

    To compare the mortality of patients with an acute Charcot foot with a matched population with uninfected neuropathic foot ulcers (NFUs). Data were extracted from a specialist departmental database, supplemented by hospital records. The findings were compared with the results of earlier populations

  8. Managing conflicts of interest in the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) clinical guidelines programme: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Tanya; Alderson, Phil; Stokes, Tim

    2015-01-01

    There is international concern that conflicts of interest (COI) may bias clinical guideline development and render it untrustworthy. Guideline COI policies exist with the aim of reducing this bias but it is not known how such policies are interpreted and used by guideline producing organisations. This study sought to determine how conflicts of interest (COIs) are disclosed and managed by a national clinical guideline developer (NICE: the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence). Qualitative study using semi-structured telephone interviews with 14 key informants: 8 senior staff of NICE's guideline development centres and 6 chairs of guideline development groups (GDGs). We conducted a thematic analysis. Participants regard the NICE COI policy as comprehensive leading to transparent and independent guidance. The application of the NICE COI policy is, however, not straightforward and clarity could be improved. Disclosure of COI relies on self reporting and guideline developers have to take "on trust" the information they receive, certain types of COI (non-financial) are difficult to categorise and manage and disclosed COI can impact on the ability to recruit clinical experts to GDGs. Participants considered it both disruptive and stressful to exclude members from GDG meetings when required by the COI policy. Nonetheless the impact of this disruption can be minimised with good group chairing skills. We consider that the successful implementation of a COI policy in clinical guideline development requires clear policies and procedures, appropriate training of GDG chairs and an evaluation of how the policy is used in practice.

  9. Collaborative action around implementation in Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care: towards a programme theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Wilkinson, Joyce; Burton, Christopher R; Harvey, Gill; McCormack, Brendan; Graham, Ian; Staniszewska, Sophie

    2013-10-01

    In theory, greater interaction between researchers and practitioners should result in increased potential for implementation. However, we know little about whether this is the case, or what mechanisms might operate to make it happen. This paper reports findings from a study that is identifying and tracking implementation mechanisms, processes, influences and impacts in real time, over time in the Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRCs). This is a longitudinal, realist evaluation case study. The development of the conceptual framework and initial hypotheses involved literature reviewing and stakeholder consultation. Primary data were collected through interviews, observations and documents within three CLAHRCs, and analysed thematically against the framework and hypotheses. The first round of data collection shows that the mechanisms of collaborative action, relationship building, engagement, motivation, knowledge exchange and learning are important to the processes and outcomes of CLAHRCs' activity, including their capacity for implementation. These mechanisms operated in different contexts such as competing agendas, availability of resources and the CLAHRCs' brand. Contexts and mechanisms result in different impact, including the CLAHRCs' approach to implementation, quality of collaboration, commitment and ownership, and degree of sharing and managing knowledge. Emerging features of a middle range theory of implementation within collaboration include alignment in organizational structures and cognitive processes, history of partnerships, responsiveness and resilience in rapidly changing contexts. CLARHCs' potential to mobilize knowledge may be further realized by how they develop insights into their function as collaborative entities.

  10. Patient safety improvement programmes for primary care. Review of a Delphi procedure and pilot studies by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstappen, Wim; Gaal, Sander; Esmail, Aneez; Wensing, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: To improve patient safety it is necessary to identify the causes of patient safety incidents, devise solutions and measure the (cost-) effectiveness of improvement efforts. Objective: This paper provides a broad overview with practical guidance on how to improve patient safety. Methods: We used modified online Delphi procedures to reach consensus on methods to improve patient safety and to identify important features of patient safety management in primary care. Two pilot studies were carried out to assess the value of prospective risk analysis (PRA), as a means of identifying the causes of a patient safety incident. Results: A range of different methods can be used to improve patient safety but they have to be contextually specific. Practice organization, culture, diagnostic errors and medication safety were found to be important domains for further improvement. Improvement strategies for patient safety could benefit from insights gained from research on implementation of evidence-based practice. Patient involvement and prospective risk analysis are two promising and innovative strategies for improving patient safety in primary care. Conclusion: A range of methods is available to improve patient safety, but there is no ‘magic bullet.’ Besides better use of the available methods, it is important to use new and potentially more effective strategies, such as prospective risk analysis. PMID:26339837

  11. Managing conflicts of interest in the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE clinical guidelines programme: qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Graham

    Full Text Available There is international concern that conflicts of interest (COI may bias clinical guideline development and render it untrustworthy. Guideline COI policies exist with the aim of reducing this bias but it is not known how such policies are interpreted and used by guideline producing organisations. This study sought to determine how conflicts of interest (COIs are disclosed and managed by a national clinical guideline developer (NICE: the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.Qualitative study using semi-structured telephone interviews with 14 key informants: 8 senior staff of NICE's guideline development centres and 6 chairs of guideline development groups (GDGs. We conducted a thematic analysis.Participants regard the NICE COI policy as comprehensive leading to transparent and independent guidance. The application of the NICE COI policy is, however, not straightforward and clarity could be improved. Disclosure of COI relies on self reporting and guideline developers have to take "on trust" the information they receive, certain types of COI (non-financial are difficult to categorise and manage and disclosed COI can impact on the ability to recruit clinical experts to GDGs. Participants considered it both disruptive and stressful to exclude members from GDG meetings when required by the COI policy. Nonetheless the impact of this disruption can be minimised with good group chairing skills.We consider that the successful implementation of a COI policy in clinical guideline development requires clear policies and procedures, appropriate training of GDG chairs and an evaluation of how the policy is used in practice.

  12. Qualitative evaluation of primary care providers experiences of a training programme to offer brief behaviour change counselling on risk factors for non-communicable diseases in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, Zelra; Mash, Robert; Everett-Murphy, Katherine

    2015-08-19

    The global epidemic of non-communicable disease (NCDs) has been linked with four modifiable risky lifestyle behaviours, namely smoking, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and alcohol abuse. Primary care providers (PCPs) can play an important role in changing patient's risky behaviours. It is recommended that PCPs provide individual brief behaviour change counselling (BBCC) as part of everyday primary care. This study is part of a larger project that re-designed the current training for PCPs in South Africa, to offer a standardized approach to BBCC based on the 5 As and a guiding style. This article reports on a qualitative sub-study, which explored whether the training intervention changed PCPs perception of their confidence in their ability to offer BBCC, whether they believed that the new approach could overcome the barriers to implementation in clinical practice and be sustained, and their recommendations on future training and integration of BBCC into curricula and clinical practice. This was a qualitative study that used verbal feedback from participants at the beginning and end of the training course, and twelve individual in-depth interviews with participants once they had returned to their clinical practice. Although PCP's confidence in their ability to counselling improved, and some thought that time constraints could be overcome, they still reported that understaffing, lack of support from within the facility and poor continuity of care were barriers to counselling. However, the current organisational culture was not congruent with the patient-centred guiding style of BBCC. Training should be incorporated into undergraduate curricula of PCPs for both nurses and doctors, to ensure that counselling skills are embedded from the start. Existing PCPs should be offered training as part of continued professional development programmes. This study showed that although training changed PCPs perception of their ability to offer BBCC, and increased their confidence

  13. Effect of a combined education and eHealth programme on the control of oral anticoagulation patients (PORTALS study): a parallel cohort design in Dutch primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talboom-Kamp, Esther P W A; Verdijk, Noortje A; Kasteleyn, Marise J; Harmans, Lara M; Talboom, Irvin J S H; Numans, Mattijs E; Chavannes, Niels H

    2017-09-27

    To analyse the effect on therapeutic control and self-management skills of the implementation of self-management programmes, including eHealth by e-learning versus group training. Primary Care Thrombosis Service Center. Of the 247 oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) patients, 63 started self-management by e-learning, 74 self-management by group training and 110 received usual care. Parallel cohort design with two randomised self-management groups (e-learning and group training) and a group receiving usual care. The effect of implementation of self-management on time in therapeutic range (TTR) was analysed with multilevel linear regression modelling. Usage of a supporting eHealth platform and the impact on self-efficacy (Generalised Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES)) and education level were analysed with linear regression analysis. After intervention, TTR was measured in three time periods of 6 months. (1) TTR, severe complications,(2) usage of an eHealth platform,(3) GSES, education level. Analysis showed no significant differences in TTR between the three time periods (p=0.520), the three groups (p=0.460) or the groups over time (p=0.263). Comparison of e-learning and group training showed no significant differences in TTR between the time periods (p=0.614), the groups (p=0.460) or the groups over time (p=0.263). No association was found between GSES and TTR (p=0.717) or education level and TTR (p=0.107). No significant difference was found between the self-management groups in usage of the platform (0-6 months p=0.571; 6-12 months p=0.866; 12-18 months p=0.260). The percentage of complications was low in all groups (3.2%; 1.4%; 0%). No differences were found between OAT patients trained by e-learning or by a group course regarding therapeutic control (TTR) and usage of a supporting eHealth platform. The TTR was similar in self-management and regular care patients. With adequate e-learning or group training, self-management seems safe and reliable for a selected

  14. Severe morbidity and mortality in untreated HIV-infected children in a paediatric care programme in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, 2004-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alioum Ahmadou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical evolution of HIV-infected children who have not yet initiated antiretroviral treatment (ART is poorly understood in Africa. We describe severe morbidity and mortality of untreated HIV-infected children. Methods All HIV-infected children enrolled from 2004-2009 in a prospective HIV programme in two health facilities in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, were eligible from their time of inclusion. Risks of severe morbidity (the first clinical event leading to death or hospitalisation and mortality were documented retrospectively and estimated using cumulative incidence functions. Associations with baseline characteristics were assessed by competing risk regression models between outcomes and antiretroviral initiation. Results 405 children were included at a median age of 4.5 years; at baseline, 66.9% were receiving cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, and 27.7% met the 2006 WHO criteria for immunodeficiency by age. The risk of developing a severe morbid event was 14% (95%CI: 10.7 - 17.8 at 18 months; this risk was lower in children previously exposed to any prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT intervention (adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio [sHR]: 0.16, 95% CI: 0.04 - 0.71 versus those without known exposure. Cumulative mortality reached 5.5% (95%CI: 3.5 - 8.1 at 18 months. Mortality was associated with immunodeficiency (sHR: 6.02, 95% CI: 1.28-28.42. Conclusions Having benefited from early access to care minimizes the severe morbidity risk for children who acquire HIV. Despite the receipt of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, the risk of severe morbidity and mortality remains high in untreated HIV-infected children. Such evidence adds arguments to promote earlier access to ART in HIV-infected children in Africa and improve care interventions in a context where treatment is still not available to all.

  15. What is the diabetic foot?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    increase in the complications related to diabetes as a result of this increasing ... A number of contributory factors work together to cause foot ... neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, foot deformities, external ... it is usually a combination of problems rather than a single risk ... This results in increased oxidative stress.

  16. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a contagious illness that mainly affects children under five. In this podcast, Dr. Eileen Schneider talks about the symptoms of hand, foot, and mouth disease, how it spreads, and ways to help protect yourself and your children from getting infected with the virus.

  17. Avoiding foot complications in diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preceded by a foot ulcer.1,2 Every 30 seconds a lower limb or part of a lower limb is ... of foot ulcers are peripheral neuropathy, deformity, peripheral vascular disease and ... Repetitive stresses cause hyperkeratosis, followed by subcutaneous ...

  18. Foot-and-mouth disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Charleston, Bryan; Jackson, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is an economically important, highly contagious, disease of cloven-hoofed animals characterized by the appearance of vesicles (blisters) on the feet and in and around the mouth. The causative agent, foot-and-mouth disease virus, was the first mammalian virus to be discovered...

  19. [Evaluation of the implementation of the FAPACAN programme to prevent cancer behavioral risk in primary care users in the North of Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López González, M Luisa; Fernández Carreira, Jose Manuel; López González, Santiago; del Olivo del Valle Gómez, M; García Casas, Juan Bautista; Cueto Espinar, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The evaluation of the process is an essential condition to correctly measure the impact of educational interventions on behaviour, its psychosocial determinants and the state of change, in the context of health promotion. The aim was to evaluate the quality of the implementation of the FAPACAN Programme, designed to prevent behavioural risk of cancer in Primary Care, and to improve its psychosocial determinants in the A.S.E. Model and the state of change according to Prochaska and DiClemente Theory. The quality of implementation was measured by means of a visit to the health centre, by filling in a checklist 'in situ', and a phone survey with the patient. Centralisation and association measures were found (Pearson and Spearman's coefficient). A multiple regression model was obtained with the score made by the patient (range of 0 to 8) and the covariables: gender, age, level of education, locality and family history of cancer. The quality scores obtained oscillate between 72% and 81% of optimum quality. Significant differences were found owing to the administrator (better with fewer years of exercise) and the patient (better with higher level of study). In general, the quality of implementation was more than sufficient, in spite of the poor provision by the health system.

  20. Implementation of a quality improvement initiative in Belgian diabetic foot clinics: feasibility and initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggen, Kris; Van Acker, Kristien; Beele, Hilde; Dumont, Isabelle; Félix, Patricia; Lauwers, Patrick; Lavens, Astrid; Matricali, Giovanni A; Randon, Caren; Weber, Eric; Van Casteren, Viviane; Nobels, Frank

    2014-07-01

    This article aims to describe the implementation and initial results of an audit-feedback quality improvement initiative in Belgian diabetic foot clinics. Using self-developed software and questionnaires, diabetic foot clinics collected data in 2005, 2008 and 2011, covering characteristics, history and ulcer severity, management and outcome of the first 52 patients presenting with a Wagner grade ≥ 2 diabetic foot ulcer or acute neuropathic osteoarthropathy that year. Quality improvement was encouraged by meetings and by anonymous benchmarking of diabetic foot clinics. The first audit-feedback cycle was a pilot study. Subsequent audits, with a modified methodology, had increasing rates of participation and data completeness. Over 85% of diabetic foot clinics participated and 3372 unique patients were sampled between 2005 and 2011 (3312 with a diabetic foot ulcer and 111 with acute neuropathic osteoarthropathy). Median age was 70 years, median diabetes duration was 14 years and 64% were men. Of all diabetic foot ulcers, 51% were plantar and 29% were both ischaemic and deeply infected. Ulcer healing rate at 6 months significantly increased from 49% to 54% between 2008 and 2011. Management of diabetic foot ulcers varied between diabetic foot clinics: 88% of plantar mid-foot ulcers were off-loaded (P10-P90: 64-100%), and 42% of ischaemic limbs were revascularized (P10-P90: 22-69%) in 2011. A unique, nationwide quality improvement initiative was established among diabetic foot clinics, covering ulcer healing, lower limb amputation and many other aspects of diabetic foot care. Data completeness increased, thanks in part to questionnaire revision. Benchmarking remains challenging, given the many possible indicators and limited sample size. The optimized questionnaire allows future quality of care monitoring in diabetic foot clinics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Effectiveness of a multifaceted podiatry intervention to prevent falls in community dwelling older people with disabling foot pain: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spink, Martin J; Menz, Hylton B; Fotoohabadi, Mohammad R; Wee, Elin; Landorf, Karl B; Hill, Keith D; Lord, Stephen R

    2011-06-16

    To determine the effectiveness of a multifaceted podiatry intervention in preventing falls in community dwelling older people with disabling foot pain. Parallel group randomised controlled trial. University health sciences clinic in Melbourne, Australia. 305 community dwelling men and women (mean age 74 (SD 6) years) with disabling foot pain and an increased risk of falling. 153 were allocated to a multifaceted podiatry intervention and 152 to routine podiatry care, with 12 months' follow-up. Multifaceted podiatry intervention consisting of foot orthoses, advice on footwear, subsidy for footwear ($A100 voucher; £65; €74), a home based programme of foot and ankle exercises, a falls prevention education booklet, and routine podiatry care for 12 months. The control group received routine podiatry care for 12 months. Proportion of fallers and multiple fallers, falling rate, and injuries resulting from falls during follow-up. Overall, 264 falls occurred during the study. 296 participants returned all 12 calendars: 147 (96%) in the intervention group and 149 (98%) in the control group. Adherence was good, with 52% of the participants completing 75% or more of the requested three exercise sessions weekly, and 55% of those issued orthoses reporting wearing them most of the time. Participants in the intervention group (n=153) experienced 36% fewer falls than participants in the control group (incidence rate ratio 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 0.91, P=0.01). The proportion of fallers and multiple fallers did not differ significantly between the groups (relative risk 0.85, 0.66 to 1.08, P=0.19 and 0.63, 0.38 to 1.04, P=0.07). One fracture occurred in the intervention group and seven in the control group (0.14, 0.02 to 1.15, P=0.07). Significant improvements in the intervention group compared with the control group were found for the domains of strength (ankle eversion), range of motion (ankle dorsiflexion and inversion/eversion), and balance (postural sway on the

  2. National and regional asthma programmes in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Olof Selroos; Maciej Kupczyk; Piotr Kuna; Piotr Łacwik; Jean Bousquet; David Brennan; Susanna Palkonen; Javier Contreras; Mark FitzGerald; Gunilla Hedlin; Sebastian L. Johnston; Renaud Louis; Leanne Metcalf; Samantha Walker; Antonio Moreno-Galdó

    2015-01-01

    This review presents seven national asthma programmes to support the European Asthma Research and Innovation Partnership in developing strategies to reduce asthma mortality and morbidity across Europe. From published data it appears that in order to influence asthma care, national/regional asthma programmes are more effective than conventional treatment guidelines. An asthma programme should start with the universal commitments of stakeholders at all levels and the programme has to be endorse...

  3. Risk factors for developing diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Estela Willrich Boell

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study is to identify the risk factors for developing diabetic foot. A cross-sectional study, with a convenience sample, developed with 70 individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM, registered in three basic health units in the municipality of Florianópolis/SC, Brazil, in the period from November 2010 to May 2011. Biometric data was collected regarding their sociodemographic, health and illness conditions. An assessment of the feet was also carried out. The average participant age was 66.17 years and time with diagnosed disease was under ten years (61.42%. The following risk factors were identified: advanced age; time of DM diagnosis; few years of schooling; overweight/obesity; inadequate diet; physical inactivity; inadequate metabolic control; lack of proper and specific foot care; and arterial hypertension. We conclude that the majority of the population presented one or more risk factors that favor the appearance of foot-related complications. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.20460.

  4. Increasing patient involvement in the diabetic foot pathway: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, E; Hacking, B; O'Carroll, R; Young, M; Jahr, J; Borthwick, C; Callander, A; Berrada, Z

    2016-11-01

    This pilot study aimed to explore whether the use of an intervention to increase shared decision-making (Decision Navigation) increased decision self-efficacy and foot-treatment adherence in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer. Fifty-six patients with a diabetic foot ulcer were randomized to receive Decision Navigation (N = 30) or usual care (N = 26). Primary outcomes included decision self-efficacy, adherence to foot treatment as reported by the participant and adherence to foot treatment as reported by the clinician. Secondary outcomes included foot ulcer healing rate, health-related quality of life, decision conflict and decision regret. Despite participants rating Decision Navigation as very helpful, mixed analyses of variance revealed no differences in decision self-efficacy or adherence between those receiving Decision Navigation and those receiving usual care. There were no differences between groups with regards to the secondary outcomes, with the exception of decision conflict which increased over time (12 weeks) for those receiving Decision Navigation. An intervention that facilitated patient involvement in treatment decisions did not have any impact on decisional confidence or adherence to foot treatment. This does not provide support for the suggestion that personalized care can improve health-related outcomes at this progressed stage of the patient's disease trajectory. We suggest that the diabetic foot population may benefit from interventions aimed at increasing motivation to engage with care pathways, centred on challenging personal controllability beliefs. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  5. Acceptability and Potential Effectiveness of a Foot Drop Stimulator in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Laura A.; Curatalo, Lindsey A.; Alter, Katharine E.; Damiano, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Ankle-foot orthoses are the standard of care for foot drop in cerebral palsy (CP), but may overly constrain ankle movement and limit function in those with mild CP. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) may be a less restrictive and more effective alternative, but has rarely been used in CP. The primary objective of this study was to…

  6. Skin grafting and tissue replacement for treating foot ulcers in people with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santema, Trientje B.; Poyck, Paul P. C.; Ubbink, Dirk T.

    2016-01-01

    Foot ulceration is a major problem in people with diabetes and is the leading cause of hospitalisation and limb amputations. Skin grafts and tissue replacements can be used to reconstruct skin defects for people with diabetic foot ulcers in addition to providing them with standard care. Skin

  7. Stepwise surgical approach to diabetic partial foot amputations with autogenous split thickness skin grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal L. Ramanujam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the surgical treatment of severe diabetic foot infections, substantial soft tissue loss often accompanies partial foot amputations. These sizeable soft tissue defects require extensive care with the goal of expedited closure to inhibit further infection and to provide resilient surfaces capable of withstanding long-term ambulation. Definitive wound closure management in the diabetic population is dependent on multiple factors and can have a major impact on the risk of future diabetic foot complications. In this article, the authors provide an overview of autogenous skin grafting, including anatomical considerations, clinical conditions, surgical approach, and adjunctive treatments, for diabetic partial foot amputations.

  8. Studying policy implementation using a macro, meso and micro frame analysis: the case of the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research & Care (CLAHRC) programme nationally and in North West London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Sarah E M; Mays, Nicholas

    2012-10-15

    The publication of Best research for best health in 2006 and the "ring-fencing" of health research funding in England marked the start of a period of change for health research governance and the structure of research funding in England. One response to bridging the 'second translational gap' between research knowledge and clinical practice was the establishment of nine Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRCs). The goal of this paper is to assess how national-level understanding of the aims and objectives of the CLAHRCs translated into local implementation and practice in North West London. This study uses a variation of Goffman's frame analysis to trace the development of the initial national CLAHRC policy to its implementation at three levels. Data collection and analysis were qualitative through interviews, document analysis and embedded research. Analysis at the macro (national policy), meso (national programme) and micro (North West London) levels shows a significant common understanding of the aims and objectives of the policy and programme. Local level implementation in North West London was also consistent with these. The macro-meso-micro frame analysis is a useful way of studying the transition of a policy from high-level idea to programme in action. It could be used to identify differences at a local (micro) level in the implementation of multi-site programmes that would help understand differences in programme effectiveness.

  9. Monitoring programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution's 1992 report on its programme of monitoring radioactive substances is presented. Site operators' returns are verified and the report provides independent data on the environmental impact of authorized disposal of radioactive wastes. Radiation doses which may have been received by members of the public, fall well below the International Commission for Radiological Protection's (ICRP) recommended annual doses. (UK)

  10. The effectiveness of a structured education pulmonary rehabilitation programme for improving the health status of people with moderate and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary care: the PRINCE cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Dympna; Murphy, Kathy; Devane, Declan; Cooney, Adeline; McCarthy, Bernard; Mee, Lorraine; Newell, John; O'Shea, Eamon; Scarrott, Carl; Gillespie, Paddy; Kirwan, Collette; Murphy, Andrew W

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a structured education pulmonary rehabilitation programme on the health status of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Two-arm, cluster randomised controlled trial. 32 general practices in the Republic of Ireland. 350 participants with a diagnosis of moderate or severe COPD. Experimental group received a structured education pulmonary rehabilitation programme, delivered by the practice nurse and physiotherapist. Control group received usual care. Health status as measured by the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ) at baseline and at 12-14 weeks postcompletion of the programme. Participants allocated to the intervention group had statistically significant higher mean change total CRQ scores (adjusted mean difference (MD) 1.11, 95% CI 0.35 to 1.87). However, the CI does not exclude a smaller difference than the one that was prespecified as clinically important. Participants allocated to the intervention group also had statistically significant higher mean CRQ Dyspnoea scores after intervention (adjusted MD 0.49, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.78) and CRQ Physical scores (adjusted MD 0.37, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.60). However, CIs for both the CRQ Dyspnoea and CRQ Physical subscales do not exclude smaller differences as prespecified as clinically important. No other statistically significant differences between groups were seen. A primary care based structured education pulmonary rehabilitation programme is feasible and may increase local accessibility to people with moderate and severe COPD. ISRCTN52403063.

  11. Depression and incident diabetic foot ulcers: a prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lisa H.; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Katon, Wayne J.; Reiber, Gayle E.; Ciechanowski, Paul; Heckbert, Susan R.; Lin, Elizabeth H.B.; Ludman, Evette J.; Oliver, Malia M.; Young, Bessie A.; Von Korff, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test whether depression is associated with an increased risk of incident diabetic foot ulcers. Methods The Pathways Epidemiologic Study is a population-based prospective cohort study of 4839 patients with diabetes in 2000–2007. The present analysis included 3474 adults with type 2 diabetes and no prior diabetic foot ulcers or amputations. Mean follow-up was 4.1 years. Major and minor depression assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) were the exposures of interest. The outcome of interest was incident diabetic foot ulcers. We computed the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% CI for incident diabetic foot ulcers, comparing patients with major and minor depression to those without depression and adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, medical comorbidity, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), diabetes duration, insulin use, number of diabetes complications, body mass index, smoking status, and foot self-care. Sensitivity analyses also adjusted for peripheral neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease as defined by diagnosis codes. Results Compared to patients without depression, patients with major depression by PHQ-9 had a two-fold increase in the risk of incident diabetic foot ulcers (adjusted HR 2.00, 95% CI: 1.24, 3.25). There was no statistically significant association between minor depression by PHQ-9 and incident diabetic foot ulcers (adjusted HR 1.37, 95% CI: 0.77, 2.44). Conclusion Major depression by PHQ-9 is associated with a two-fold higher risk of incident diabetic foot ulcers. Future studies of this association should include better measures of peripheral neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease, which are possible confounders and/or mediators. PMID:20670730

  12. Epidemiology and outcome in patients of diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.N.; Rehman, K.U.; Malik, K.I.; Iqbal, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of study was detailed analysis of the presentation of diabetic foot ulcers, characteristics and predictors of outcome (incidence of amputation in neuropathic, ischemic, neuro ischemic) in patients presenting with diabetic foot at our hospital. Methods: This prospective analytic study was conducted from January 2009-August 2010 at POF Hospital Wah Cantt. Diabetic patients who presented with foot ulcers were enrolled in this study. Demographics of patients along with ulcer size, type, site and Grade according to Wagner Classification were recorded. Wounds were managed with daily dressings, nursing care and de-sloughing of necrotic tissue along with appropriate antibiotic cover. Patients were followed over period until wound healed completely or a lower limb amputation performed, the outcome noted and patient was deemed to have completed study. Results: One hundred and fifteen patients with mean age 55.46 +- 8.23 years, both male and female were included in this study. Out of 115 patients 111 patients had Type-II diabetes while only 4 presented with Type-I. Mean Duration of diabetes was 14.61 +- 2.17 years. With respect to underlying causes 18.3% foot ulcers were ischemic, 22.6% were neuropathic and 59% were neuro-ischemic. Median ulcer size was 74% of ulcer classified as Wagner grade-II and III while 24% were of Grade-V. Lower limb amputation were performed in 25% of patients whereas limb salvage achieved in 75% of patients with wounds healed (median healing time 5 (3-10 weeks). Conclusion: Preservation of the limb function without endangering the patient must be a goal of treating diabetic foot. Once foot amputation is successful, rehabilitation with orthotic or prosthetic devices may allow years of a functional extremity along with preventive measures like cessation of smoking, daily foot hygiene and foot inspection. (author)

  13. Effects of kinesiotaping on foot posture in participants with pronated foot: a quasi-randomised, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Suarez, Alejandro; Gijon-Nogueron, Gabriel; Baron-Lopez, Francisco Javier; Labajos-Manzanares, Maria Teresa; Hush, Julia; Hancock, Mark Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    To investigate whether kinesiotaping improves excessive foot pronation compared with sham kinesiotaping. Quasi-randomised, double-blind study. One primary care centre. One hundred and thirty participants were screened for inclusion. Sixty-eight participants with pronated feet [Foot Posture Index (FPI)≥ 6] were enrolled, and the follow-up rate was 100%. Participants were allocated into one of two groups: an experimental kinesiotaping group (KT1) and a sham taping group (KT2). Measures were collected by a blinded assessor at baseline, and 1 minute, 10 minutes, 60 minutes and 24 hours after taping. The primary outcome was total FPI score, and the secondary outcome was rear-foot FPI score. There were no significant differences in total FPI score between kinesiotaping and sham taping at any time point. Similarly, there were no significant differences in rear-foot FPI score, apart from at 60-minute follow-up when the difference between groups was significant (P=0.04) but the effect size was very small (0.85 points on the rear-foot FPI score between -6 and +6). Kinesiotaping does not correct foot pronation compared with sham kinesiotaping in people with pronated feet. Copyright © 2013 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. All rights reserved.

  14. Refuah Shlema: a cross-cultural programme for promoting communication and health among Ethiopian immigrants in the primary health care setting in Israel: evidence and lessons learned from over a decade of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin-Zamir, Diane; Keret, Sandra; Yaakovson, Orit; Lev, Boaz; Kay, Calanit; Verber, Giora; Lieberman, Niki

    2011-03-01

    The Refuah Shlema programme was established to reduce health disparities, promote health literacy and health indicators of the Ethiopian immigrant community in Israel, and included: (i) integrating Ethiopian immigrant liaisons in primary care as inter-cultural mediators; (ii) in-service training of clinical staff to increase cultural awareness and sensitivity; and (iii) health education community activities. Qualitative and quantitative evidence showed improvements in: (i) clinic staff–patient relations; (ii) availability and accessibility of health services, and health system navigation without increasing service expenditure; (iii) perception of general well-being; and (iv) self-care practice with regards to chronic conditions. Evidence significantly contributed to sustaining the programme for over 13 years.

  15. Characterizing multisegment foot kinematics during gait in diabetic foot patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denti Paolo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions, this condition may result in multiple and chronic invalidating long term complications. Among these, the diabetic foot, is determined by the simultaneous presence of both peripheral neuropathy and vasculopathy that alter the biomechanics of the foot with the formation of callosity and ulcerations. To diagnose and treat the diabetic foot is crucial to understand the foot complex kinematics. Most of gait analysis protocols represent the entire foot as a rigid body connected to the shank. Nevertheless the existing multisegment models cannot completely decipher the impairments associated with the diabetic foot. Methods A four segment foot and ankle model for assessing the kinematics of the diabetic foot was developed. Ten normal subjects and 10 diabetics gait patterns were collected and major sources of variability were tested. Repeatability analysis was performed both on a normal and on a diabetic subject. Direct skin marker placement was chosen in correspondence of 13 anatomical landmarks and an optoelectronic system was used to collect the data. Results Joint rotation normative bands (mean plus/minus one standard deviation were generated using the data of the control group. Three representative strides per subject were selected. The repeatability analysis on normal and pathological subjects results have been compared with literature and found comparable. Normal and pathological gait have been compared and showed major statistically significant differences in the forefoot and midfoot dorsi-plantarflexion. Conclusion Even though various biomechanical models have been developed so far to study the properties and behaviour of the foot, the present study focuses on developing a methodology for the functional assessment of the foot-ankle complex and for the definition of a functional model of the diabetic neuropathic foot. It is, of course, important to evaluate

  16. The influence of valgus heel position on foot loading in a child's gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliška Martinásková

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Flat foot is a typical clinical sign in childhood, expressed as valgus positioning of the heel during vertical foot loading. This may lead to medial deviation of the foot axis and cause overloading of some foot areas. OBJECTIVE: To determine the influence of valgus position of the heel (both bilateral and unilateral on foot loading during gait. METHODS: An experimental group consisting of children with bilateral heel valgus deformity (16 children, age 5.3 ± 1.3 years and children with unilateral heel valgus deformity (14 children, age 5.6 ± 1.6 years. The control group comprised of 14 children (age 4.5 ± 1.2 years. For measuring foot loading during gait, the Footscan (RSScan International, Olen, Belgium pressure plate was used. Each subject went through 8 trials of gait measurement. From each trial, 8 foot areas were evaluated. Data processing with mean values for each subject was performed by non-parametric tests (Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests, Spearman correlation in the STATISTICA programme (StatSoft, Inc., Tulsa, USA. RESULTS: Pressure peak and pressure impulse in the first metatarsal was greater for the bilateral valgus group (p CONCLUSION: The results show that valgus positioning of the heel influences foot loading in children during gait. The findings of this study suggest the necessity of a complex solution to the problem of preventing further progression of pathological changes.

  17. Combined diabetic foot infections treatment, complicated by foot phlegmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavruyan O.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available the article shows the analysis of treatment results of 163 patients with diabetic foot infections, complicated by foot phlegmon. Patients were divided into 2 groups. The control group received traditional treatment and had an autopsy deep plantar space done and then, during the second phase, cytokine-rich autoplatelet concentrate had been applied. The research results confirmed a significant decrease in the duration of treatment and hospitalization of patients in the hospital.

  18. Attitude and knowledge about foot health: a spanish view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel López-López

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to explore attitudes towards patients' self-reported data about foot health-related beliefs from a behavioural and attitudinal perspective. Methods: a sample of 282 participants of a mean age of 39.46 ± 16.026 came to a health centre where self-reported demographic, clinical characteristics and beliefs relating to foot health data were registered, informants' completed all the stages of the research process. Results: the results of the analysis revealed an 8-factor factorial structure based on (1 podiatric behaviours, (2 the intention to carry out protective behaviour, (3 attitudinal beliefs, (4 normative beliefs, (5 needs, (6 apathy, (7 self-care, and (8 the general perception of foot health. They all explained 62.78% of the variance, and were considered as independent variables in a regression analysis to determine which provided the best explanations for the importance attributed to foot health. Conclusions: the participants in the study revealed a positive attitude in relation to foot health care and responsible behaviour.

  19. Risk factors, ulcer grade and management outcome of diabetic foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors, ulcer grade and management outcome of diabetic foot ulcers in a Tropical Tertiary Care Hospital. ... Data documented included age, gender, type of DM, duration of DM, risk factors of DFU, duration of DFU ... 85.2% had type 2 DM.

  20. Principles of management of vascular problems in the diabetic foot

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    atherosclerosis is the most important principle in the management ... Lynne Tudhope is President of the Diabetic Foot Working Group of South Africa and ... functional and physiological status belies ... contrast volume is always of paramount .... the adequacy of blood circulation to ... population costs the health care system of.

  1. [The benefits of foot reflexology in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonnet, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Massages, following the foot reflexology method, were given to patients in a nursing home suffering from Alzheimer's disease or related disorders. A methodical assessment, on a small sample of patients, showed a significant reduction in neuropsychiatric manifestations, opening up new perspectives for non-medication based therapy for the care of elderly dependent people.

  2. The Effect of Foot Exercises on Wound Healing in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With a Foot Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraydin, Şahizer; Avşar, Gülçin

    2017-12-19

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of foot exercises on wound healing in type 2 diabetic patients with a diabetic foot ulcer. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Sixty-five patients from an outpatient clinic with grade 1 or 2 ulcers (Wagner classification) who met study criteria agreed to participate; 60 patients completed the study and were included in the final analysis. Subjects were followed up between February 2014 and June 2015. Subjects were recruited by the researchers in the clinics where they received treatment. Subjects were randomly allocated to either the control or intervention group. Data were collected using investigator-developed forms: patient information form and the diabetic foot exercises log. Patients in the intervention group received standard wound care and performed daily foot exercises for 12 weeks; the control group received standard wound care but no exercises. The ulcers of the patients in both the intervention and control groups were examined and measured at the 4th, 8th, and 12th weeks. The groups were compared in terms of the ulcer size and depth. To analyze and compare the data, frequency distribution, mean (standard deviation), variance analysis, and the independent samples t test and the χ test were used. The mean ulcer areas were 12.63 (14.43), 6.91 (5.44), 4.30 (3.70), and 3.29 (3.80) cm (P diabetic foot ulcer sizes in the study intervention group in the 4th and 12th weeks compared to beginning baseline (P ≤ .05). However, only the 12th week was different from the beginning in the control group (P = .000). The mean depths of the ulcers were 0.56 (0.85), 0.42 (0.68), 0.36 (0.50), and 0.28 (0.38) cm in the study intervention group (P foot exercises should be included in the treatment plan when managing patients with diabetic foot ulcers.

  3. Priorities in offloading the diabetic foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanical factors play an important role in diabetic foot disease. Reducing high foot pressures (i.e. offloading) is one of the main goals in healing and preventing foot ulceration. Evidence-based guidelines show the strong association between the efficacy to offload the foot and clinical

  4. A survey of elephant husbandry and foot health in North American zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Karen D; Shepherdson, David J; Owens, Terrah M; Keele, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The foot health of elephants in human care is a longstanding concern. In 2001, the AZA Standards for Elephant Management and Care were published recommending husbandry to improve foot health. This article reports the results of a 2006 survey: basic statistics describing facility, husbandry, and foot health attributes are reported and relationships among variables are investigated. Median area available to elephants exceeded Standard recommendations (755 ft(2) per elephant indoor and 10,000 ft(2) outdoor). Concrete makes up 69% of indoor area and natural substrates account for 85% of outdzoor area. Elephants in AZA facilities received an average of 45.5 min/day of exercise, and facilities with a structured exercise plan provided significantly more exercise than did facilities without a structured exercise plan (z=-2.522, P=0.012). Enrichment is important to psychological health and may also stimulate activity beneficial to foot health; 95% of institutions had a structured enrichment program. Preventative foot care was nearly universal, and 100% of facilities performed routine nail and pad trimming. However, foot pathology has not been eradicated; 33% of institutions reported at least one pathology in the previous year. This study found a strong inverse relationship between foot pathology and exercise (chi(2)(3)=24.34, Pelephants seemed to experience lower rates of foot pathology and arthritis than Asian elephants; however, this was explained by differences in age.

  5. Welcome to Journal of Foot and Ankle Research: a new open access journal for foot health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borthwick Alan M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Journal of Foot and Ankle Research (JFAR is a new, open access, peer-reviewed online journal that encompasses all aspects of policy, organisation, delivery and clinical practice related to the assessment, diagnosis, prevention and management of foot and ankle disorders. JFAR will cover a wide range of clinical subject areas, including diabetology, paediatrics, sports medicine, gerontology and geriatrics, foot surgery, physical therapy, dermatology, wound management, radiology, biomechanics and bioengineering, orthotics and prosthetics, as well the broad areas of epidemiology, policy, organisation and delivery of services related to foot and ankle care. The journal encourages submission from all health professionals who manage lower limb conditions, including podiatrists, nurses, physical therapists and physiotherapists, orthopaedists, manual therapists, medical specialists and general medical practitioners, as well as health service researchers concerned with foot and ankle care. All manuscripts will undergo open peer review, and all accepted manuscripts will be freely available on-line using the open access platform of BioMed Central.

  6. Imaging the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.H.; Tong, D.T.F.; Crim, J.R.; Seeger, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of infection or neuropathy of the diabetic foot is the key to successful management. Angiopathy leads to ischemia which, in combination with peripheral neuropathy, predisposes to pedal skin ulceration, the precursor of osteomyelitis. Chronic hyperglycemia promotes production of glycosylated end products which accumulate on endothelial proteins, causing ischemia of the vasa nervorum. When combined with axonal degeneration of the sensory nerves, the result is hypertrophic neuroarthropathy. Should the sympathetic nerve fibers also be damaged, the resultant loss of vasoconstrictive impulses leads to hyperemia and atrophic neuroarthropathy. Plain radiography, although less sensitive than radionuclide, magnetic resonance (MR), and computed tomographic examinations, should be the initial procedure for imaging suspected osteomyelitis in the diabetic patient. If the radiographs are normal but the clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis is strong, a three-phase 99m Tc-MDP scan or MR imaging is recommended. An equivocal 99m Tc-MDP scan should be followed by MR imaging. To exclude osteomyelitis at a site of neuroarthropathy, a 111 In white blood cell scan is preferable. To obtain a specimen of bone for bacteriological studies, percutaneous core biopsy is the procedure of choice, with the entrance of the needle well beyond the edge of the subjacent ulcer. (orig.)

  7. Imaging the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.H. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tong, D.T.F. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crim, J.R. [Durham Radiology Associates, Durham, NC (United States); Seeger, L.L. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of infection or neuropathy of the diabetic foot is the key to successful management. Angiopathy leads to ischemia which, in combination with peripheral neuropathy, predisposes to pedal skin ulceration, the precursor of osteomyelitis. Chronic hyperglycemia promotes production of glycosylated end products which accumulate on endothelial proteins, causing ischemia of the vasa nervorum. When combined with axonal degeneration of the sensory nerves, the result is hypertrophic neuroarthropathy. Should the sympathetic nerve fibers also be damaged, the resultant loss of vasoconstrictive impulses leads to hyperemia and atrophic neuroarthropathy. Plain radiography, although less sensitive than radionuclide, magnetic resonance (MR), and computed tomographic examinations, should be the initial procedure for imaging suspected osteomyelitis in the diabetic patient. If the radiographs are normal but the clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis is strong, a three-phase {sup 99m}Tc-MDP scan or MR imaging is recommended. An equivocal {sup 99m}Tc-MDP scan should be followed by MR imaging. To exclude osteomyelitis at a site of neuroarthropathy, a {sup 111}In white blood cell scan is preferable. To obtain a specimen of bone for bacteriological studies, percutaneous core biopsy is the procedure of choice, with the entrance of the needle well beyond the edge of the subjacent ulcer. (orig.)

  8. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-08

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a contagious illness that mainly affects children under five. In this podcast, Dr. Eileen Schneider talks about the symptoms of hand, foot, and mouth disease, how it spreads, and ways to help protect yourself and your children from getting infected with the virus.  Created: 8/8/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 8/8/2013.

  9. Technology Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo [ed.

    2005-07-01

    The technology activities carried out by the Euratom-ENEA Association in the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement concern the Next Step (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - ITER), the Long-Term Programme (breeder blanket, materials, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility - IFMIF), Power Plant Conceptual Studies and Socio-Economic Studies. The Underlying Technology Programme was set up to complement the fusion activities as well to develop technologies with a wider range of interest. The Technology Programme mainly involves staff from the Frascati laboratories of the Fusion Technical and Scientific Unit and from the Brasimone laboratories of the Advanced Physics Technologies Unit. Other ENEA units also provide valuable contributions to the programme. ENEA is heavily engaged in component development/testing and in design and safety activities for the European Fusion Technology Programme. Although the work documented in the following covers a large range of topics that differ considerably because they concern the development of extremely complex systems, the high level of integration and coordination ensures the capability to cover the fusion system as a whole. In 2004 the most significant testing activities concerned the ITER primary beryllium-coated first wall. In the field of high-heat-flux components, an important achievement was the qualification of the process for depositing a copper liner on carbon fibre composite (CFC) hollow tiles. This new process, pre-brazed casting (PBC), allows the hot radial pressing (HRP) joining procedure to be used also for CFC-based armour monoblock divertor components. The PBC and HRP processes are candidates for the construction of the ITER divertor. In the materials field an important milestone was the commissioning of a new facility for chemical vapour infiltration/deposition, used for optimising silicon carbide composite (SiCf/SiC) components. Eight patents were deposited during 2004

  10. Technology Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    The technology activities carried out by the Euratom-ENEA Association in the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement concern the Next Step (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - ITER), the Long-Term Programme (breeder blanket, materials, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility - IFMIF), Power Plant Conceptual Studies and Socio-Economic Studies. The Underlying Technology Programme was set up to complement the fusion activities as well to develop technologies with a wider range of interest. The Technology Programme mainly involves staff from the Frascati laboratories of the Fusion Technical and Scientific Unit and from the Brasimone laboratories of the Advanced Physics Technologies Unit. Other ENEA units also provide valuable contributions to the programme. ENEA is heavily engaged in component development/testing and in design and safety activities for the European Fusion Technology Programme. Although the work documented in the following covers a large range of topics that differ considerably because they concern the development of extremely complex systems, the high level of integration and coordination ensures the capability to cover the fusion system as a whole. In 2004 the most significant testing activities concerned the ITER primary beryllium-coated first wall. In the field of high-heat-flux components, an important achievement was the qualification of the process for depositing a copper liner on carbon fibre composite (CFC) hollow tiles. This new process, pre-brazed casting (PBC), allows the hot radial pressing (HRP) joining procedure to be used also for CFC-based armour monoblock divertor components. The PBC and HRP processes are candidates for the construction of the ITER divertor. In the materials field an important milestone was the commissioning of a new facility for chemical vapour infiltration/deposition, used for optimising silicon carbide composite (SiCf/SiC) components. Eight patents were deposited during 2004

  11. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... learn more about taking care of your feet . Debridement Debridement is the process to remove dead skin and ... A visiting nurse may also help you. Other types of dressings are: Dressing that contains medicine Skin ...

  12. Assessing the efficacy of the healthy eating and lifestyle programme (HELP compared with enhanced standard care of the obese adolescent in the community: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie Deborah

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The childhood obesity epidemic is one of the foremost UK health priorities. Childhood obesity tracks into adult life and places individuals at considerable risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, liver disease and other morbidities. There is widespread need for paediatric lifestyle programmes as change may be easier to accomplish in childhood than later in life. Study Design/Method The study will evaluate the management of adolescent obesity by conducting a Medical Research Council complex intervention phase III efficacy randomised clinical trial of the Healthy Eating Lifestyle Programme within primary care. The study tests a community delivered multi-component intervention designed for adolescents developed from best practice as identified by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. The hospital based pilot reduced body mass index and improved health-related quality of life. Subjects will be individually randomised to receiving either the Healthy Eating Lifestyle Programme (12 fortnightly family sessions or enhanced standard care. Baseline and follow up assessments will be undertaken blind to allocation status. A health economic evaluation is also being conducted. 200 obese young people (13-17 years, body mass index > 98th centile for age and sex will be recruited from primary care within the greater London area. The primary hypothesis is that a motivational and solution-focused family-based weight management programme delivered over 6 months is more efficacious in reducing body mass index in obese adolescents identified in the community than enhanced standard care. The primary outcome will be body mass index at the end of the intervention, adjusted for baseline body mass index, age and sex. The secondary hypothesis is that the Healthy Eating Lifestyle Programme is more efficacious in improving quality of life and psychological function and reducing waist circumference and cardiovascular risk factors in

  13. The Happy Teen programme: a holistic outpatient clinic-based approach to prepare HIV-infected youth for the transition from paediatric to adult medical care services in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolekha, Rangsima; Boon-Yasidhi, Vitharon; Na-Nakorn, Yossawadee; Manaboriboon, Boonying; Vandepitte, Warunee Punpanich; Martin, Michael; Tarugsa, Jariya; Nuchanard, Wipada; Leowsrisook, Pimsiri; Lapphra, Ketwadee; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; Thaineua, Vorapathu; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2017-05-16

    We developed an 18-month Happy Teen 2 (HT2) programme comprised of a one-day workshop, two half-day sessions, and three individual sessions to prepare HIV-infected youth for the transition from paediatric to adult HIV care services. We describe the programme and evaluate the change in youth's knowledge scores. We implemented the HT2 programme among HIV-infected Thai youth aged 14-22 years who were aware of their HIV status and receiving care at two hospitals in Bangkok (Siriraj Hospital, Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health [QSNICH]). Staff interviewed youth using a standardized questionnaire to assess HIV and health-related knowledge at baseline and at 12 and 18 months while they participated in the programme. We examined factors associated with a composite knowledge score ≥95% at month 18 using logistic regression. During March 2014-July 2016, 192 of 245 (78%) eligible youth were interviewed at baseline. Of these, 161 (84%) returned for interviews at 12 and 18 months. Among the 161 youth, the median age was 17 years, 74 (46%) were female, and 99% were receiving antiretroviral treatment. The median composite score was 45% at baseline and increased to 82% at 12 months and 95% at 18 months ( P  95% was associated with education level >high school (aOR: 2.15, 95%CI, 1.03-4.48) and receipt care at QSNICH (aOR: 2.43, 95%CI, 1.18-4.98). Youth whose mother and father had died were less likely to have score ≥95% (aOR: 0.22, 95%CI, 0.07-0.67) than those with living parents. Knowledge useful for a successful transition from paediatric to adult HIV care increased among youth participating in the HT2 programme. Youth follow-up will continue to assess the impact of improved knowledge on outcomes following the transition to adult care services.

  14. Congenital club foot in a teaching hospital in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, O A; Giwa, S O; Kayode, M O; Shoga, M O; Balogun, R A

    2009-06-01

    Congenital club foot has been sparsely reported in literature in Nigeria, although it has been reported as the commonest congenital musculoskeletal abnormality. This study enumerates the point prevalence of this disease in a university teaching hospital in Lagos. Better understanding of the epidemiology in our community should improve awareness, and influence management. Between June 2005 and July 2006, 72 consecutive patients with congenital club feet were seen in the orthopaedic clinic of our Hospital. Demographic data, birth weight, family history, birth facility, maternal age and associated congenital anomalies were recorded and analysed using Statistical Programme for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15. A total of 72 patients were seen, 28 of whom had bilateral club feet resulting in a total of 100 feet. There were 38 males and 34 females. Only 29% presented in the first month of life and 28% in the second month. Maternal ages ranged between 19 and 38 years and no family history of congenital club foot was given,. Babies delivered outside the orthodox medical system (churches, traditional healers, home etc) constituted 28%. The commonest associated congenital anomalies were tibia hemimelia, hydrocephalus, inguinal hernia and umbilical hernia. A default rate of 28% was observed during treatment. Congenital club foot may not be uncommon in Nigeria. Late presentation and high default rate before correction of the deformity were observed. Establishment of special club foot clinics should reduce the default rate. Training of healthcare workers in maternity units as well as Public awareness should encourage early referral to specialists.

  15. [Therapeutic uses of ortho-podiatry in the diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Herranz, Marta; Bas Caro, Pedro; Carabantes Alarcón, David; Padín Galea, José Manuel

    2011-10-01

    The neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers are a major public health problem given by different situations: the chronic nature of the injury, a low response to treatment, relapse rates, etc. Therefore pose a serious personal, family health and social, with a significant expenditure of human and material resources. Treatment requires a multidisciplinary team which integrates a podiatrist as part of it. He will address especially the pre-ulcers, and have a singular care in diabetic foot by treatment with orthosis. Since your question can be seen changes in the feet of diabetic patients could be treated on an outpatient basis.

  16. What lessons can history teach us about the Charcot foot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lee J

    2008-01-01

    Regrettably, physicians today receive very little instruction in the history of medicine. Most health care providers have a very limited, contemporary knowledge of the condition that we know of as the Charcot foot. Yet, historical concepts of the pathogenesis and natural history of this condition provide us with important lessons that enhance our understanding, recognition, and management of this rare but debilitating neurogenic arthropathy. It is my belief that knowledge of the history of medicine provides us with a better understanding of present-day issues and clearer vision as we look to the future. This article describes some of the important lessons learned from the history of the Charcot foot.

  17. Foot orgasm syndrome: a case report in a woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldinger, Marcel D; de Lint, Govert J; van Gils, Ad P G; Masir, Farhad; Lakke, Egbert; van Coevorden, Ruben S; Schweitzer, Dave H

    2013-08-01

    Spontaneous orgasm triggered from inside the foot has so far not been reported in medical literature. The study aims to report orgasmic feelings in the left foot of a woman. A woman presented with complaints of undesired orgasmic sensations originating in her left foot. In-depth interview, physical examination, sensory testing, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-scan), electromyography (EMG), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and blockade of the left S1 dorsal root ganglion were performed. The main outcomes are description of this clinical syndrome, results of TENS application, and S1 dorsal root ganglion blockade. Subtle attenuation of sensory amplitudes of the left suralis, and the left medial and lateral plantar nerve tracts was found at EMG. MRI-scan disclosed no foot abnormalities. TENS at the left metatarso-phalangeal joint-III of the left foot elicited an instant orgasmic sensation that radiated from plantar toward the vagina. TENS applied to the left side of the vagina elicited an orgasm that radiated to the left foot. Diagnostic blockade of the left S1 dorsal root ganglion with 0.8 mL bupivacaine 0.25 mg attenuated the frequency and intensity of orgasmic sensation in the left foot with 50% and 80%, respectively. Additional therapeutic blockade of the same ganglion with 0.8 mL bupivacaine 0.50 mg combined with pulsed radiofrequency treatment resulted in a complete disappearance of the foot-induced orgasmic sensations. Foot orgasm syndrome (FOS) is descibed in a woman. Blockade of the left S1 dorsal root ganglion alleviated FOS. It is hypothesized that FOS, occurring 1.5 years after an intensive care emergency, was caused by partial nerve regeneration (axonotmesis), after which afferent (C-fiber) information from a small reinnervated skin area of the left foot and afferent somatic and autonomous (visceral) information from the vagina on at least S1 spinal level is misinterpreted by the brain as being solely information originating from

  18. Foot ulcers in the diabetic patient, prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Wu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie C Wu1, Vickie R Driver1, James S Wrobel2, David G Armstrong21Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research,William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, and National Center of Limb Salvage, Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research, Dr. William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Lower extremity complications in persons with diabetes have become an increasingly significant public health concern in both the developed and developing world. These complications, beginning with neuropathy and subsequent diabetic foot wounds frequently lead to infection and lower extremity amputation even in the absence of critical limb ischemia. In order to diminish the detrimental consequences associated with diabetic foot ulcers, a common-sense-based treatment approach must be implemented. Many of the etiological factors contributing to the formation of diabetic foot ulceration may be identified using simple, inexpensive equipment in a clinical setting. Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers can be accomplished in a primary care setting with a brief history and screening for loss of protective sensation via the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. Specialist clinics may quantify neuropathy, plantar foot pressure, and assess vascular status with Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial blood pressure indices. These measurements, in conjunction with other findings from the history and physical examination, may enable clinicians to stratify patients based on risk and help determine the type of intervention. Other effective clinical interventions may include patient education, optimizing glycemic control, smoking cessation, and diligent foot care. Recent technological advanced combined with better understanding of the wound healing process have resulted in a myriad of advanced

  19. The VIDA programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente; Iannone, Rosa Lisa

    and Innovation’ within the project ‘Curriculum Quality Analysis and Impact Review of European Education and Care’ (CARE). The programme at the centre of this case builds on theory drawn from research on child development, social disadvantage related to issues of social inequality, and research on organisational...... of innovation as “the development of new concepts, strategies and tools that support groups in achieving the objective of improved well-being”. Three research questions are explored: 1) How is the innovative approach to ECEC professional development conceptualised and translated into practice in the VIDA...... (mechanisms/aspects) affect the implementation of the innovative programme for practice change within ECEC? Methods used include a combination of qualitative data collected through interviews with ECEC educators, managers, consultants, a university college teachers, municipal directors and existing...

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2011-02-01

    Although simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant improves most complications of type 1 diabetes, suppression of the immune system increases the risk for infection. The authors report the case of a patient who, despite receiving a simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant, subsequently developed neuro-ischemic ulcers of his right foot requiring repeated amputations. He then developed an infected ulcer of his remaining right big toe, with significant implications for his mobility. This ulcer proved resistant to multiple courses of antibiotics and care in a specialist foot clinic but resolved completely following a course of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic foot ulcers is not yet fully established but should be considered in resistant cases with vascular insufficiency and a significant infective component.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2012-02-01

    Although simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant improves most complications of type 1 diabetes, suppression of the immune system increases the risk for infection. The authors report the case of a patient who, despite receiving a simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant, subsequently developed neuro-ischemic ulcers of his right foot requiring repeated amputations. He then developed an infected ulcer of his remaining right big toe, with significant implications for his mobility. This ulcer proved resistant to multiple courses of antibiotics and care in a specialist foot clinic but resolved completely following a course of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic foot ulcers is not yet fully established but should be considered in resistant cases with vascular insufficiency and a significant infective component.

  2. Comparing the Effect of Foot Reflexology Massage, Foot Bath and Their Combination on Quality of Sleep in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rahmani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many patients in coronary care unit (CCU suffer from decreased sleep quality caused by environmental and mental factors. This study compared the efficacy of foot reflexology massage, foot bath, and a combination of them on the quality of sleep of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was implemented on ACS patients in Iran. Random sampling was used to divide the patients into four groups of 35 subjects. The groups were foot reflexology massage, foot bath, a combination of the two and the control group. Sleep quality was measured using the Veran Snyder-Halpern questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13. Results: The mean age of the four groups was 61.22 (11.67 years. The mean sleep disturbance in intervention groups (foot reflexology massage and foot bath groups during the second and third nights was significantly less than before intervention. The results also showed a greater reduction in sleep disturbance in the combined group than in the other groups when compared to the control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the intervention of foot bath and massage are effective in reducing sleep disorders and there was a synergistic effect when used in combination. This complementary care method can be recommended to be implemented by CCU nurses.

  3. Comparing the Effect of Foot Reflexology Massage, Foot Bath and Their Combination on Quality of Sleep in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Ali; Naseri, Mahdi; Salaree, Mohammad Mahdi; Nehrir, Batool

    2016-12-01

    Introduction: Many patients in coronary care unit (CCU) suffer from decreased sleep quality caused by environmental and mental factors. This study compared the efficacy of foot reflexology massage, foot bath, and a combination of them on the quality of sleep of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods: This quasi-experimental study was implemented on ACS patients in Iran. Random sampling was used to divide the patients into four groups of 35 subjects. The groups were foot reflexology massage, foot bath, a combination of the two and the control group. Sleep quality was measured using the Veran Snyder-Halpern questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13. Results: The mean age of the four groups was 61.22 (11.67) years. The mean sleep disturbance in intervention groups (foot reflexology massage and foot bath groups) during the second and third nights was significantly less than before intervention. The results also showed a greater reduction in sleep disturbance in the combined group than in the other groups when compared to the control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the intervention of foot bath and massage are effective in reducing sleep disorders and there was a synergistic effect when used in combination. This complementary care method can be recommended to be implemented by CCU nurses.

  4. Educação terapêutica para diabéticos: os cuidados com os pés na realidade de pacientes e familiares Therapeutic education for diabetics: foot care in the reality of patients and family members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia de Loiola Cisneros

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Conhecer a realidade da prática dos cuidados com os pés ensinados nos programas educativos para diabéticos pode contribuir para um melhor resultado da educação terapêutica. Este estudo apresenta significados atribuídos por pacientes diabéticos e seus familiares aos cuidados primários que visam prevenir complicações nos pés. Foi realizada uma pesquisa qualitativa exploratória sobre amostra intencional de trinta diabéticos, neuropatas, com risco de lesão nos pés e familiares de onze deles, que participaram de um programa de prevenção em uma unidade de saúde pública do município de Porto Alegre (RS. Foi aplicada uma entrevista semidirigida com questões abertas sobre a experiência dos cuidados com os pés. O material transcrito foi submetido à análise qualitativa de conteúdo. Os pacientes precisam de ajuda para realizar os cuidados com os pés. Uma rede de solidariedade e interações é formada por trás dos pacientes, percebida como um apoio ou uma ameaça à liberdade. É a experiência própria ou alheia de uma complicação que evidencia a importância da prevenção. A educação terapêutica para prevenção de complicações nos pés de diabéticos deve levar em conta as relações de assistência formadas em torno do doente. É preciso romper o silêncio da evolução da doença para motivar o paciente à adoção das medidas preventivas.Knowing the reality of foot care practice taught in educational programs for diabetics can enhance the therapeutic education success. This study presents the perceptions of diabetics and their family members about primary cares to prevent complications on foot. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted in an intentional sample of 30 diabetic with neuropathic risk of foot injuries as well as 11 of their family members, participants of a preventive program offered in a public health center in the city of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. A semi-structured interview

  5. Dermatological and musculoskeletal assessment of diabetic foot: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsanjani Shirazi, Azam; Nasiri, Morteza; Yazdanpanah, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic Foot Syndrome (DFS) is the most costly and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), which early effective assessment can reduce the severity of complications including ulceration and amputations. This study aimed to review dermatological and musculoskeletal assessment of diabetic foot. In this review article, we searched for articles published between March 1, 1980 and July 28, 2015 in PubMed, Science Direct, Embase, Web of Science, and Scopus, for both English and non-English language articles with the following keywords: "Diabetic foot syndrome", "Ulceration", "Amputation", "Foot assessment", "Skin disorders" and "Musculoskeletal deformities". In dermatological dimension, most studies focused on elucidated changes in skin temperature, color, hardiness and turgor as well as common skin disorders such as Diabetic Dermopathy (DD), Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum (NLD) and Diabetic Bullae (DB), which are common in diabetic patients and have high potential for leading to limb-threatening problems such as ulceration and infection. In musculoskeletal dimension, most studies focused on range of motion and muscle strength, gait patterns and as well as foot deformities especially Charcot osteoarthropathy (COA), which is the most destructive musculoskeletal complication of diabetes. DFS as a common condition in DM patients lead to ulceration and lower limb amputation frequently unless a prompt and comprehensive assessment was taken. So that dermatological and musculoskeletal assessments are usually neglected in primary health care, these assessments should be done frequently to reduce the high risk of serious complications. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of using foot reflexology to improve quality of sleep amongst Taiwanese postpartum women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chia-Yen; Chen, Su-Chiu; Li, Chung-Yi; Gau, Meei-Ling; Huang, Chiu-Mieh

    2011-04-01

    to examine the effectiveness of using foot reflexology to improve sleep quality in postpartum women. randomised controlled trial, conducted at two postpartum centres in northern Taiwan. 65 postpartum women reporting poor quality of sleep were recruited from July 2007 to December 2007. participants were assigned randomly to either an intervention or a control group. Participants in both groups received the same care except for reflexology therapy. The intervention group received a single 30-minute foot reflexology session at the same time each evening for five consecutive days. Sessions were administered by a certified nurse reflexologist. MEASURES AND FINDINGS: the outcome measure was the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), and this was performed at baseline and post test. Mean PQSI scores for both groups declined over time between baseline and post test. Using a generalised estimation equation to control several confounding variables, the changes in mean PSQI were found to be significantly lower in the intervention group (β=-2.24, standard error=0.38, pfoot reflexology in the postnatal period significantly improved the quality of sleep. midwives should evaluate maternal sleep quality and design early intervention programmes to improve quality of sleep in order to increase maternal biopsychosocial well-being. Midwives interested in complementary therapies should be encouraged to obtain training in reflexology and to apply it in clinical settings if it is allowed. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identifying effective pathways in a successful continuous quality improvement programme: the GEDAPS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodicoat, Danielle H; Mundet, Xavier; Gray, Laura J; Cos, Xavier; Davies, Melanie J; Khunti, Kamlesh; Cano, Juan-Franciso

    2014-12-01

    Continuous quality improvement programmes often target several aspects of care, some of which may be more effective meaning that resources could be focussed on these. The objective was to identify the effective and ineffective aspects of a successful continuous quality improvement programme for individuals with type 2 diabetes in primary care. Data were from a series of cross-sectional studies (GEDAPS) in primary care, Catalonia, Spain, in 55 centres (2239 participants) in 1993, and 92 centres (5819 participants) in 2002. A structural equation modelling approach was used. The intervention was associated with improved microvascular outcomes through microalbuminuria and funduscopy screening, which had a direct effect on microvascular outcomes, and through attending 2-4 nurse visits and having ≥1 blood pressure measurement, which acted through reducing systolic blood pressure. The intervention was associated with improved macrovascular outcomes through blood pressure measurement and attending 2-4 nurse visits (through systolic blood pressure) and having ≥3 education topics, ≥1 HbA1c measurement and adequate medication (through HbA1c). Cholesterol measurement, weight measurement and foot examination did not contribute towards the effectiveness of the intervention. The pathways through which a continuous quality improvement programme appeared to act to reduce microvascular and macrovascular complications were driven by reductions in systolic blood pressure and HbA1c, which were attained through changes in nurse and education visits, measurement and medication. This suggests that these factors are potential areas on which future quality improvement programmes should focus. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Foot burns: epidemiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemington-Gorse, S; Pellard, S; Wilson-Jones, N; Potokar, T

    2007-12-01

    This is a retrospective study of the epidemiology and management of isolated foot burns presenting to the Welsh Centre for Burns from January 1998 to December 2002. A total of 289 were treated of which 233 were included in this study. Approximately 40% were in the paediatric age group and the gender distribution varied dramatically for adults and children. In the adult group the male:female ratio was 3.5:1, however in the paediatric group the male:female ratio was more equal (1.6:1). Scald burns (65%) formed the largest group in children and scald (35%) and chemical burns (32%) in adults. Foot burns have a complication rate of 18% and prolonged hospital stay. Complications include hypertrophic scarring, graft loss/delayed healing and wound infection. Although isolated foot burns represent a small body surface area, over half require treatment as in patients to allow for initial aggressive conservative management of elevation and regular wound cleansing to avoid complications. This study suggests a protocol for the initial acute management of foot burns. This protocol states immediate referral of all foot burns to a burn centre, admission of these burns for 24-48 h for elevation, regular wound cleansing with change of dressings and prophylactic antibiotics.

  9. The impact of the Perinatal Education Programme on cognitive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of cognitive knowledge by means of multiple-choice ... midwives use the Perinatal Education Programme in an outreach ... used the Afrikaans translation of the Programme, because .... improvements in patient care practices.

  10. Comparing the Effect of Foot Reflexology Massage, Foot Bath and Their Combination on Quality of Sleep in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Rahmani; Mahdi Naseri; Mohammad Mahdi Salaree; Batool Nehrir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Many patients in coronary care unit (CCU) suffer from decreased sleep quality caused by environmental and mental factors. This study compared the efficacy of foot reflexology massage, foot bath, and a combination of them on the quality of sleep of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods: This quasi-experimental study was implemented on ACS patients in Iran. Random sampling was used to divide the patients into four groups ...

  11. CT guided diagnostic foot injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saifuddin, A.; Abdus-Samee, M.; Mann, C.; Singh, D.; Angel, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To describe a CT technique for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic injections in the hind- and mid-foot. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a period of 50 months, 28 individuals were referred for diagnostic and therapeutic hind- and mid-foot injections before possible arthrodesis. A CT technique was developed that allowed entry into the various joints using a vertical approach. Numbers of joints injected were as follows: posterior subtalar, 21; talonavicular, 4; calcaneonavicular, calcaneocuboid, navicular-cuneiform and 5th metatarsocuboid joints, 1 each. RESULTS: All injections but one were technically successful. Significant relief of symptoms was noted by 16 participants, whereas for 9 there was no improvement and for 3 a partial response was achieved. CONCLUSION: CT is a simple and safe alternative to fluoroscopy for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic foot injections, and may be the technique of choice in cases of disordered anatomy

  12. ISOLDE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

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