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Sample records for follow-up skeletal surveys

  1. Follow-up skeletal surveys for nonaccidental trauma: can a more limited survey be performed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harlan, Susan R.; Nixon, G.W.; Prince, Jeffrey S.; Campbell, Kristine A.; Hansen, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated the value of the follow-up skeletal survey in identifying additional fractures, clarifying indeterminate findings, and improving dating of skeletal injuries in victims of physical abuse. To determine whether a more limited follow-up survey could yield the same radiologic data as a full follow-up survey. The study cohort comprised 101 children who had follow-up surveys that met our inclusion criteria. Consensus readings of both original and follow-up surveys were performed by two pediatric radiologists. These results were compared to determine additional findings from the follow-up surveys. Limited skeletal survey protocols were evaluated to determine whether they would detect the same fractures seen with a complete osseous survey. In the 101 children 244 fractures were identified on the initial osseous survey. Follow-up surveys demonstrated new information in 38 children (37.6%). A 15-view limited follow-up survey identified all additional information seen on the complete follow-up survey. Our data demonstrate that a 15-view limited follow-up skeletal survey could be performed without missing clinically significant new fractures and still allow proper identification of confirmed fractures or normal findings. A limited survey would decrease radiation dose in children. (orig.)

  2. Follow-up skeletal surveys for nonaccidental trauma: can a more limited survey be performed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan, Susan R. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Nixon, G.W.; Prince, Jeffrey S. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Campbell, Kristine A.; Hansen, Karen [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Studies have demonstrated the value of the follow-up skeletal survey in identifying additional fractures, clarifying indeterminate findings, and improving dating of skeletal injuries in victims of physical abuse. To determine whether a more limited follow-up survey could yield the same radiologic data as a full follow-up survey. The study cohort comprised 101 children who had follow-up surveys that met our inclusion criteria. Consensus readings of both original and follow-up surveys were performed by two pediatric radiologists. These results were compared to determine additional findings from the follow-up surveys. Limited skeletal survey protocols were evaluated to determine whether they would detect the same fractures seen with a complete osseous survey. In the 101 children 244 fractures were identified on the initial osseous survey. Follow-up surveys demonstrated new information in 38 children (37.6%). A 15-view limited follow-up survey identified all additional information seen on the complete follow-up survey. Our data demonstrate that a 15-view limited follow-up skeletal survey could be performed without missing clinically significant new fractures and still allow proper identification of confirmed fractures or normal findings. A limited survey would decrease radiation dose in children. (orig.)

  3. Utility of Follow-Up Skeletal Surveys in Suspected Child Physical Abuse Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Stephanie; Makoroff, Kathi; Care, Marguerite; Thomas, Amy; Shapiro, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the utility of a follow-up skeletal survey in suspected child physical abuse evaluations. Methods: In this prospective study, follow-up skeletal surveys were recommended for 74 children who, after an initial skeletal survey and evaluation by the Child Abuse Team, were suspected victims of physical abuse. The number and…

  4. Retrospective review to determine the utility of follow-up skeletal surveys in child abuse evaluations when the initial skeletal survey is normal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kachelmeyer Andrea

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The AAP recommends that a follow-up skeletal survey be obtained for all children Methods A retrospective review of radiology records from September 1, 1998 - January 31, 2007 was conducted. Suspected victims of child abuse who were Results Forty-seven children had a negative initial skeletal survey and were included for analysis. The mean age was 6.9 months (SD 5.7; the mean number of days between skeletal surveys was 18.7 (SD 10.1 Four children (8.5% had signs of healing bone trauma on a follow-up skeletal survey. Three of these children (75% had healing rib fractures and one child had a healing proximal humerus fracture. The findings on the follow-up skeletal survey yielded forensically important information in all 4 cases and strengthened the diagnosis of non-accidental trauma. Conclusion 8.5 percent of children with negative initial skeletal surveys had forensically important findings on follow-up skeletal survey that increased the certainty of the diagnosis of non-accidental trauma. A follow-up skeletal survey can be useful even when the initial skeletal survey is negative.

  5. Follow-up of Antihypertensive Therapy Improves Blood Pressure Control: Results of HYT (HYperTension survey) Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fici, F; Seravalle, G; Koylan, N; Nalbantgil, I; Cagla, N; Korkut, Y; Quarti-Trevano, F; Makel, W; Grassi, G

    2017-09-01

    Although improved during the past few years, blood pressure control remains sub optimal. The impact of follow-up assessment on blood pressure control was evaluated in a group of patients of the HYT (HYperTension survey), treated with a combination of different dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers (CCBs regimen) and inhibitors of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and with uncontrolled blood pressure. This was obtained assessing (a) the rate of blood pressure control at 3 and 6 months of follow-up in the whole group of patients, (b) the rate of blood pressure control and the average blood pressure values in subjects treated with different DHP-CCBs regimen. From the 4993 patients with uncontrolled blood pressure, (BP ≥ 140/90 or ≥140/85 in patients with diabetes), 3729 (mean age 61.2 ± 11.5 years), maintained CCBs regimen combined wih RAAS blockers and were evaluated at 3 and 6 months follow-up. At each visit BP (semiautomatic device, Omron-M6, 3 measurements), heart rate, adverse events and treatment persistence were collected. At 1st and 2nd follow-up the rate of controlled BP was 63.5 and 72.8% respectively (p blood pressure control; (b) there is no significant difference in the antihypertensive effect between different CCBs regimen; (c) lipophilic CCBs induce less ankle edema.

  6. Identifying Pertinent Variables for Nonresponse Follow-Up Surveys. Lessons Learned from 4 Cases in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Vandenplas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available All social surveys suffer from different types of errors, of which one of the most studied is non-response bias. Non-response bias is a systematic error that occurs because individuals differ in their accessibility and propensity to participate in a survey according to their own characteristics as well as those from the survey itself. The extent of the problem heavily depends on the correlation between response mechanisms and key survey variables. However, non-response bias is difficult to measure or to correct for due to the lack of relevant data about the whole target population or sample. In this paper, non-response follow-up surveys are considered as a possible source of information about non-respondents. Non-response follow-ups, however, suffer from two methodological issues: they themselves operate through a response mechanism that can cause potential non-response bias, and they pose a problem of comparability of measure, mostly because the survey design differs between main survey and non-response follow-up. In order to detect possible bias, the survey variables included in non-response surveys have to be related to the mechanism of participation, but not be sensitive to measurement effects due to the different designs. Based on accumulated experience of four similar non-response follow-ups, we studied the survey variables that fulfill these conditions. We differentiated socio-demographic variables that are measurement-invariant but have a lower correlation with non-response and variables that measure attitudes, such as trust, social participation, or integration in the public sphere, which are more sensitive to measurement effects but potentially more appropriate to account for the non-response mechanism. Our results show that education level, work status, and living alone, as well as political interest, satisfaction with democracy, and trust in institutions are pertinent variables to include in non-response follow-ups of general social

  7. Follow-Up Survey of the 1988-1989 Radiography Graduates of Middlesex Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Weymouth

    A graduate follow-up survey evaluated student outcomes for the radiography program at Middlesex Community College/Middlesex Memorial Hospital (Connecticut). The program prepares students for entry-level employment as radiographers. The questionnaire, based on input from program officials and respondents, was mailed to 14 1988 and 1989 graduates.…

  8. L-Band Wide Follow-up Survey: Interesting Candidates and IDL Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nathan; Grzeskowiak, S.; Murray, K.; Troischt, P.; ALFALFA Team

    2014-01-01

    ALFALFA-U is a collaborative undertaking of faculty and students at 19 institutions, performing research using the ALFALFA blind HI survey and the L-Band Wide (LBW) follow-up survey. The primary goal of the LBW survey is to conduct targeted L-band Wide observations of the most interesting ALFALFA sources. This included the following four categories: 1. dark galaxy candidates, 2. OH Megamaser candidates, 3. extreme gas-dominated dwarf galaxy candidates, and 4. statistical samples of low signal to noise sources associated with optical counterparts. An IDL (Interactive Data Language) routine was developed to reduce the LBW data, provide integrated fluxes of the signals and calculate RMS noise. There were 312 definite detections and 328 possible detections of 1256 possible sources. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-1211005 and AST-0725267.

  9. National survey for bariatric procedures in adolescents: Long time follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Roberto Luca; Toppino, Mauro; Favretti, Franco; Camoglio, Francesco Saverio; Zampieri, Nicola

    2017-10-01

    The role of bariatric surgery and its role in adolescent is still under discussion worldwide. The aim of this study is to report an Italian survey for bariatric procedures in adolescents and the outcome with a medium and long-term follow-up. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive data added into the Italian register of the society for bariatric surgery(period 2000-2010). We evaluated all patients treated in a 10-year period with a mean follow-up of 3 years. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were created. All patients were aged between 13 and 18 years. We evaluated and compared clinical data. After reviewing medical charts, 173 patients were considered for the study; 85 patients were treated with adjustable gastric band (AGB), 47 with intragastric balloon (IB), 26 with sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and other 15 patients with malabsorptive techniques (MT). Among clinical data, there was a statistical difference in terms of %excess weight loss (%EWL) between techniques only after 1 year post-procedure; at 5 years, considering the percentage of patients studied, sleeve gastrectomy had the best %EWL respect to other non malabsorptive techniques (padolescent; more than 80% of patients are followed until 5 years post-op but only few patients (less than 5%) until 10 years. Our results demonstrated that sleeve gastrectomy in adolescent is safe and had a better %EWL respect to other non-malabsorptive bariatric procedures. level III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Survey on patient doses in cardiology in Latin America. Criteria for high skin doses follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, Ariel; Duro, Ivanna; Lopez, Leonardo; Ramirez, Alfredo; Herrera, Carlos; Navarro, Joaquin; Rivarola, Carlos; Lopez, Jose A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: As part of the International Action Plan for Protection of Patients and supporting by the IAEA, a survey on patient doses in fluoroscopy guided procedures in cardiology in Latin America has been conducted since 2006. One of the objectives of the survey was to set criteria for the identification and evaluation of high skin doses in a certain number of patients to recommend a clinical follow up for potential radiation injuries (more than 3 Gy at the skin). The used methodology for the survey was initiated with two dedicated workshops held in Santiago de Chile (2005) and San Jose de Costa Rica (2007) involving relevant cardiologists from 15 different Latin American Countries. Some sessions were also attended by experts from the Regulatory and Health Authorities. Standardized forms to collect demographic and patient dosimetric data were agreed. Considering that most of the involved centres had still not dosimeters installed in the cardiology x-ray systems, it was agreed to collect data on fluoroscopy time and total number of cine frames per procedure. Relevant factors influencing radio sensitivity of the skin were also collected. Data from 10 countries representing a sample of 709 patients were received during the first year. Procedures included were diagnostic (DG) (coronary angiography and electrophysiology studies), therapeutic (TH) (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties, cardiac ablations and valvuloplasties) or including both DG and TH. A total of 26 patients (3.7%) were selected for potential high skin doses. Initial considered criteria for selection were more than 30 minutes of fluoroscopy, more than 3,000 cine frames per procedure or patients with more than 100 kg of weight. Maximum reported values were 72 minutes and 8,100 frames. In addition, 5 of these patients were diabetic, 6 have previous fluoroscopy procedures and 5 were over 95 kg. The percentage of selected cases for clinical follow up derived from potential skin injuries seem

  11. Vaccine financing and billing in practices serving adult patients: A follow-up survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Megan C; Hurley, Laura P; Beaty, Brenda L; Allison, Mandy A; Crane, Lori A; Brtnikova, Michaela; Snow, Megan; Bridges, Carolyn B; Kempe, Allison

    2018-02-14

    Financial concerns are often cited by physicians as a barrier to administering routinely recommended vaccines to adults. The purpose of this study was to assess perceived payments and profit from administering recommended adult vaccines and vaccine purchasing practices among general internal medicine (GIM) and family medicine (FM) practices in the United States. We conducted an interviewer-administered survey from January-June 2014 of practices stratified by specialty (FM or GIM), affiliation (standalone or ≥ 2 practice sites), and level of financial decision-making (independent or larger system level) in FM and GIM practices that responded to a previous survey on adult vaccine financing and provided contact information for follow-up. Practice personnel identified as knowledgeable about vaccine financing and billing responded to questions about payments relative to vaccine purchase price and payment for vaccine administration, perceived profit on vaccination, claim denial, and utilization of various purchasing strategies for private vaccine stocks. Survey items on payment and perceived profit were assessed for various public and private payer types. Descriptive statistics were calculated and responses compared by physician specialty, practice affiliation, and level of financial decision-making. Of 242 practices approached, 43% (n = 104) completed the survey. Reported payment levels and perceived profit varied by payer type. Only for preferred provider organizations did a plurality of respondents report profiting on adult vaccination services. Over half of respondents reported losing money vaccinating adult Medicaid beneficiaries. One-quarter to one-third of respondents reported not knowing about Medicare Part D payment levels for vaccine purchase and vaccine administration, respectively. Few respondents reported negotiating with manufacturers or insurance plans on vaccine purchase prices or payments for vaccination. Practices vaccinating adults may

  12. Design and methodology of a mixed methods follow-up study to the 2014 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Staveteig, Sarah; Aryeetey, Richmond; Anie-Ansah, Michael; Ahiadeke, Clement; Ortiz, Ladys

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The intended meaning behind responses to standard questions posed in large-scale health surveys are not always well understood. Systematic follow-up studies, particularly those which pose a few repeated questions followed by open-ended discussions, are well positioned to gauge stability and consistency of data and to shed light on the intended meaning behind survey responses. Such follow-up studies require extensive coordination and face challenges in protecting responden...

  13. Management and follow-up survey of Trichophyton tonsurans infection in a university judo club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Suganami, Morio; Shiraki, Yumi; Hiruma, Masataro; Ogawa, Hideoki

    2008-05-01

    The prevalence of Trichophyton tonsurans infection of the scalp in members of a university judo club (combat sport) was investigated over a 3.5-year period using a questionnaire survey and an assay based on fungal culture by the hairbrush method. In November 2002, 11 (35%) of 31 athletes were found to be positive for T. tonsurans infection by the hairbrush method and provided treatment with oral and topical antifungal agents according to a prescribed protocol. All the infected subjects became culture-negative following this treatment. We continued to conduct screening examinations every year in the month of April, when new university enrolment occurs. During three-and-a-half years of follow-up, there have been no outbreaks of the infection among the members of the university judo club. There were some positive culture results among the newly enrolled students, but these cases also became culture-negative with treatment. No re-infection has been noted after graduation among the club members who had been educated about and treated for the infection. Our findings indicate that the spread of T. tonsurans infection in sports clubs can be controlled by regular mass screening examination, therapy and measures at regular intervals to prevent the infection.

  14. Follow-up of Impaired Glucose Tolerance Basic Health Survey 2007 in Jakarta in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurentia Mihardja

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAKLatar Belakang:Toleransi Glukosa Terganggu (TGT atau Pre Diabetes merupakan keadaan yang belum termasuk kategori diabetes tetapi glukosa darah lebih tinggi dari normal. TGT merupakan faktor risiko terjadinya diabetes mellitus (DM, penyakit jantung koroner, stroke. Metode: Dilakukan penelitian follow up responden TGT Riskesdas 2007 pada tahun 2009 untuk mengetahui status hiperglikemianya apakah telah menjadi DM, tetap TGT atau Normal. Hasil:Didapatkan setelah 2 tahun 7,2% telah menjadi DM, 47,8% tetap TGT, 4,3% berubah menjadi gangguan glukosa puasa dan 40,7% menjadi normal toleransi glukosa. Kebiasaan perilaku, keadaan biologis seperti indeks massa tubuh, obesitas sentral, dislipidemia tidak berbeda signifikan antara tahun 2009 dibandingkan 2007. Dari analisis didapatkan pada kelompok TGT yang menjadi DM lingkar pinggang meningkat tapi tidak signifikan dan Homa IR (resistensi insulin lebih tinggi (p < 0,05 dibandingkan kelompok lainnya. Saran:Disarankan agar pembuat program melakukan intervensi pada kelompok TGT agar tidak menjadi DM dan mencegah timbulnya komplikasi penyakit degeneratif.Kata kunci: Toleransi Glukosa Terganggu, obesitas sentral, DKI JakartaABSTRACTBackground: Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT or pre diabetes is not categorized as diabetes yet but blood glucose level is more than normal. IGT is the risk factor for diabetes mellitus, coronary disease and stroke. Methods: In 2009, a cross-sectional study was conducted in DKI Jakarta to follow up 78 subjects identified as IGT in Basic Health Survey (Riskesdas 2007. It aimed to assess the hyperglycemia status of the IGT subjects, whether developing into diabetes mellitus or becoming normal glucose tolerance or just remained IGT. Results: We found over two years for IGT subjects, 7.2% progressed to diabetes mellitus, 47.8% remained impaired glucose tolerance, 4.3% changed to impaired fasting glucose and 40.7% reverted to normal glucose tolerance. Life style and biological factors

  15. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao; /Pennsylvania U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, D.L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Craig, Hogan, J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U.; Richmond, Michael W.; /Rochester Inst.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Smith, Mathew; /Portsmouth U.; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  16. Design and methodology of a mixed methods follow-up study to the 2014 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staveteig, Sarah; Aryeetey, Richmond; Anie-Ansah, Michael; Ahiadeke, Clement; Ortiz, Ladys

    2017-01-01

    The intended meaning behind responses to standard questions posed in large-scale health surveys are not always well understood. Systematic follow-up studies, particularly those which pose a few repeated questions followed by open-ended discussions, are well positioned to gauge stability and consistency of data and to shed light on the intended meaning behind survey responses. Such follow-up studies require extensive coordination and face challenges in protecting respondent confidentiality during the process of recontacting and reinterviewing participants. We describe practical field strategies for undertaking a mixed methods follow-up study during a large-scale health survey. The study was designed as a mixed methods follow-up study embedded within the 2014 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey (GDHS). The study was implemented in 13 clusters. Android tablets were used to import reference data from the parent survey and to administer the questionnaire, which asked a mixture of closed- and open-ended questions on reproductive intentions, decision-making, and family planning. Despite a number of obstacles related to recontacting respondents and concern about respondent fatigue, over 92 percent of the selected sub-sample were successfully recontacted and reinterviewed; all consented to audio recording. A confidential linkage between GDHS data, follow-up tablet data, and audio transcripts was successfully created for the purpose of analysis. We summarize the challenges in follow-up study design, including ethical considerations, sample size, auditing, filtering, successful use of tablets, and share lessons learned for future such follow-up surveys.

  17. Managing skin and soft-tissue infection and nosocomial pneumonia caused by MRSA: a 2014 follow-up survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dryden, M.; Andrasevic, A.T.; Bassetti, M.; Bouza, E.; Chastre, J.; Baguneid, M.; Esposito, S.; Giamarellou, H.; Gyssens, I.C.J.; Nathwani, D.; Unal, S.; Voss, A.; Wilcox, M.

    2015-01-01

    As a follow-up to our 2009 survey, in order to explore opinion and practice on the epidemiology and management of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Europe, we conducted a second survey to elicit current opinions on this topic, particularly around antibiotic choice, dose, duration

  18. Patient responses to research recruitment and follow-up surveys: findings from a diverse multicultural health care setting in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Khidir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care researchers working in the Arabian Gulf need information on how to optimize recruitment and retention of study participants in extremely culturally diverse settings. Implemented in Doha, Qatar in 2012 with 4 language groups, namely Arabic, English, Hindi, and Urdu, this research documents persons’ responses to recruitment, consent, follow-up, and reminder procedures during psychometric testing of the Multicultural Assessment Instrument (MAI, a novel self- or interviewer-administered survey. Methods Bilingual research assistants recruited adults in outpatient clinics by approaching persons in particular who appeared to be from a target language group. Participants completed the MAI, a second acculturation instrument used for content-validity assessment, and a demographics questionnaire. Participants were asked to take the MAI again in 2–3 weeks, in person or by post, to assess test-retest reliability. Recruitment data were analyzed by using nonparametric statistics. Results Of 1503 persons approached during recruitment, 400 enrolled (27 %—100 per language group. The enrollment rates in the language groups were: Arabic-32 %; English-33 %; Hindi-18 %; Urdu-30 %. The groups varied somewhat in their preferences regarding consent procedure, follow-up survey administration, contact mode for follow-up reminders, and disclosure of personal mailing address (for postal follow-up. Over all, telephone was the preferred medium for follow-up reminders. Of 64 persons who accepted a research assistant’s invitation for in-person follow-up, 40 participants completed the interview (follow-up rate, 63 %; among 126 persons in the postal group with a deliverable address, 29 participants mailed back a completed follow-up survey (response rate, 23 %. Conclusions Researchers in the Arabian Gulf face challenges to successfully identify, enroll, and retain eligible study participants. Although bilingual assistants

  19. [The incidence of Frey syndrome following parotidectomy: results of a survey and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, A; Rosenberger, D; Vorsprach, O; Dazert, S

    2011-02-01

    Frey's syndrome (FS) is defined as facial sweating due to gustatory stimuli following surgery or trauma of the parotid gland. Concomitant symptoms may occur in the area of the auriculotemporal nerve: swelling, facial flushing, and paresthesia. A misguided re-innervation of perspiratory glands by secretory parasympathetic fibres is likely responsible in the pathogenesis. The reported incidence in the literature varies considerably from 1.7% to 97.6%. The present study aims to clarify the incidence of FS. A questionnaire was sent to 221 consecutive patients who underwent parotidectomy between 07/2005 and 07/2008. No selection for type of parotidectomy or histological result was made. Patients were invited to undergo a follow-up examination including Minor's iodine starch test. A total of 135 of 221 (61%) questionnaires were available for evaluation. In all, 82 patients took part in the follow-up, with a follow-up period of 2.8 years (15-51 months). According to the questionnaire, 54% of patients claimed to be free of symptoms. Sweating following gustatory stimuli was reported by 23% of patients. Of the 82 Minor's tests performed, 62.2% were positive. All patients with subjective presence of FS had a positive Minor's test. In 27%, Minor's test was positive although patients did not suffer from facial sweating subjectively ("subclinical FS"). In all, 39% had no subjective complaints and Minor's test was also negative. Cases with a positive Minor's test showed no statistically significant relation to the patients' age, gender or to the histological diagnosis or type of parotidectomy. The clinical incidence of FS in our study is 23%, although a positive Minor's iodine starch test was observed in 62% of cases. Therefore, it seems justifiable to differentiate between a symptomatic or clinical FS and a merely asymptomatic or subclinical FS. No correlation was observed between epidemiological factors and the occurrence of FS. © Springer-Verlag 2010

  20. Sources of measurement variation in blood pressure in large-scale epidemiological surveys with follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulla Overgaard; Henriksen, Jens H; Jensen, Gorm

    2002-01-01

    The Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS) is a longitudinal epidemiological study of 19698 subjects followed up since 1976. Variation in blood pressure (BP) measurement in the first three CCHS surveys is evaluated by assessing two components, systematic variation and random variation [daytime...

  1. The SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts – II. New FRB discoveries and their follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhandari, S.; Keane, E.F.; Barr, E.D.; Jameson, A.; Petroff, E.; Johnston, S.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Caleb, M.; Eatough, R.P.; Flynn, C.; Green, J.A.; Jankowski, F.; Kramer, M.; Krishnan, V Venkatraman; Morello, V.; Possenti, A.; Stappers, B.; Tiburzi, C.; van Straten, W.; Andreoni, I.; Butterley, T.; Chandra, P.; Cooke, J.; Corongiu, A.; Coward, D.M.; Dhillon, V.S.; Dodson, R.; Hardy, L.K.; Howell, E.J.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Klotz, A.; Littlefair, S.P.; Marsh, T.R.; Mickaliger, M.; Muxlow, T.; Perrodin, D.; Pritchard, D.; Sawangwit, U.; Terai, T.; Tominaga, N.; Torne, P.; Totani, T.; Trois, A.; Turpin, D.; Niino, Y.; Wilson, R.W.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Basa, S.; Belhorma, B.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bourret, S.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Brânzas, H.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coelho, J.A.B.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Díaz, A.F.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Di Palma, I.; Domi, A.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; El Khayati, N.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ettahiri, A.; Fassi, F.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L.A.; Gay, P.; Giordano, V.; Glotin, H.; Grégoire, T.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A.J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C.W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefevre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martinez-Mora, J.A.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Organokov, M.; Pavalas, G.E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Saldaña, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D.F.E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schussler, F.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Versari, F.; Vivolo, D.; Vizzocca, A.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery of four Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) in the ongoing SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts at the Parkes Radio Telescope: FRBs 150610, 151206, 151230 and 160102. Our real-time discoveries have enabled us to conduct extensive, rapid multimessenger follow-up at 12 major

  2. The impact of coercion on treatment outcome: one-year follow-up survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mi Kyung; Kim, Seung Hyun; Rhee, Minkyu

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether coercive measures or perceived coercion experienced by mentally disabled patients in the hospitalization process could be justified under paternalism. To find out whether coercion can be justified by paternalism, a year of follow-up research was conducted to examine the impact of coercive measures and perceived coercion experienced during hospitalization on the patients' therapeutic benefit. A 6-month period and a 1-year period of follow-up research was conducted with 266 patients to assess whether the coercion they experienced during hospitalization (coercive measures and perceived coercion) had an effect on changing the patients' mental symptoms and insight. The results showed a decrease in both mental symptoms and insight over time. However, it was found that neither coercive measures nor perceived coercion had a significant effect on the change of mental symptoms and that, thus, coercion had little contribution to the declining of symptoms. Coercive measures had no effect on the change of insight but perceived coercion was shown to have a positive effect on a change in insight. Patient insight was shown to improve with increased perceived coercion. Paternalism provides a partial explanation to serve as a basis for justifying perceived coercion. Limitations and suggestions for further study are discussed.

  3. Long-Term Follow-Up of Nonoperatively and Operatively Treated Acute Primary Patellar Dislocation in Skeletally Immature Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Bengtsson Moström

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The present study reports a long-term follow-up of acute primary patellar dislocation in patients with open physes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate knee function and recurrence rates after surgical and nonsurgical treatment of patellar dislocation. Methods. A total of 51 patients, including 29 girls and 22 boys, who were 9–14 years of age at the time of injury, were retrospectively evaluated. The minimum follow-up time was 5 years. Thigh muscle torque, range of motion, the squat test, the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS, the Kujala score, and the recurrence rate were registered. Radiological predisposing factors at the time of injury were determined. Results. Quality of life and sports/recreation were the most affected subscales, according to KOOS, and a reduced Kujala score was also observed in all treatment groups. The surgically treated patients had a significantly lower recurrence rate. Those patients also exhibited reduced muscle performance, with a hamstring to quadriceps ratio (H/Q of 1.03. The recurrence rate was not correlated with knee function. Conclusions. Patellar dislocation in children influences subjective knee function in the long term. Surgery appears to reduce the recurrence rate, but subjective knee function was not restored.

  4. Using the 2-MASS photometric redshift survey to optimize LIGO follow-up observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolini, Elisa; Heyl, Jeremy S.

    2016-10-01

    The initial discovery of Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) on 2015 September 14 was the inspiral merger and ring-down of the black hole binary at a distance of about 500 Mpc or a redshift of about 0.1. The search for electromagnetic counterparts for the inspiral of binary black holes is impeded by coarse initial source localizations and a lack of a compelling model for the counterpart; therefore, rapid electromagnetic follow-up is required to understand the astrophysical context of these sources. Because astrophysical sources of gravitational radiation are likely to reside in galaxies, it would make sense to search first in regions where the LIGO-Virgo probability is large and where the density of galaxies is large as well. Under the assumption that the probability of a gravitational-wave event from a given region of space is proportional to the density of galaxies within the probed volume, one can calculate an improved localization of the position of the source simply by multiplying the LIGO-Virgo skymap by the density of galaxies in the range of redshifts. We propose using the 2-MASS photometric redshift galaxy catalogue for this purpose and demonstrate that using it can dramatically reduce the search region for electromagnetic counterparts.

  5. The healthy worker effect: Do health problems predict participation rates in, and the results of, a follow-up survey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Birkeland; Knardahl, Stein

    2016-02-01

    To determine the impact of the healthy worker effect (HWE) as a bias for the external and internal validity of the follow-up assessment in prospective survey research. Specifically, the study examined (1) whether the health status of respondents at the baseline measurement influenced response at the follow-up survey (external validity) and (2) whether HWE is a threat to internal validity by differential attrition, i.e., whether associations between work and health at baseline differ between stayers and dropouts. In a two-wave questionnaire survey with a 2-year time lag comprising 6283 persons, 4392 responded at both time points (response rate 70%). Mental distress and somatic symptoms served as indicators of health. Role conflict and role clarity were indicators of work factors. There were few differences in response rate at follow-up between persons with and without health complaints at the baseline measurement. As response rate increased incrementally with educational level, there seems to be a socio-educational bias, rather than a HWE bias on survey participation. Baseline relationships between work factors and health indicators were equal in magnitude among stayers and dropouts. The health status of participants at baseline seems to have little impact on the external and internal validity of the follow-up assessment in prospective survey research. Hence, the findings provide little support to the HWE as a potential bias in prospective studies within occupational health research. A limitation of the study is that the findings do not inform about the impact of the HWE on participation in the baseline assessment.

  6. Television-provoked epilepsy in children: a follow-up survey from Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemadifar, Masoud; Raoufi, Masoomeh; Maghzi, Amir-Hadi; Ebrahimi, Azadeh; Kaji-Esfahani, Mahboubeh; Mousavi, Seyed-Ali

    2008-11-01

    Television as an external stimulation can precipitate epileptic seizures. Today this kind of epilepsy is known as television epilepsy. As children spend much of their time watching television, it is important to study this type of epilepsy in this age group. This study was designed to describe the clinical and some demographic characteristics of television epilepsy in Iranian children. Patients who were diagnosed as having television epilepsy with an age less than 12 years were recruited from outpatient neurology clinics in Isfahan, Iran, from September 2002 through September 2006. We collected the case-related information including electroencephalograms, radiologic findings, and patients' history. Thirty patients with television epilepsy with the age less than 12 years were identified. Of whom 17 (56.7%) were females and 13 (43.3%) were males. The mean age at the onset of seizure was 9.9+/-2.1 years. Children had absence (3.3%), myoclonic (3.3%), and generalized tonic-clonic (93.3+/-) seizures in response to intermittent photic stimulations. Interictal epileptiform discharges in electroencephalograms were detected in 83.3%. In addition, neuroimaging findings were normal in 96.7% of the patients. In our study, 56.7% of the children had pure television epilepsy and 43.3% experienced other types of generalized seizure. During the follow-up period after initiation of variable drug treatments including valproic acid, carbamazepine, phenobarbital, clonazepam, ethosuximide, and lamotrigine all the patients had complete seizure remission. The clinical and demographic differences of our patients compared with other reports are probably due to genetic differences. In our study, it was demonstrated that carbamazepine could be used in children with television epilepsy because it had successfully terminated seizures in 43.3% of the patients.

  7. A Follow-Up Community Survey of Knowledge and Beliefs About Cancer and Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Shannon M; Hastrup, Janice L; Hyland, Andrew; Rivard, Cheryl

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess changes since the launch of the US Surgeon General's campaign in the public's beliefs about the role of genetics in the etiology of cancer, as well as changes in recording family health history. We conducted a survey of 480 Western New York adults, assessing: (1) experiences with cancer, (2) beliefs about cancer and genetics, and (3) practices of recording family health history. Most respondents were aware of the importance of family history. The sample also showed increased knowledge about cancer and genetics compared with a previous survey. However, only 7 % kept written records that included medical conditions, which was not different from a previous survey. Time constraints, apathy, and reluctance to find out negative health information were the most reported barriers. Results suggest a need for continued education of the public, with increased emphasis on written family health records.

  8. The European CRT Survey : 1 year (9-15 months) follow-up results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogale, Nigussie; Priori, Silvia; Cleland, John G. F.; Brugada, Josep; Linde, Cecilia; Auricchio, Angelo; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Limbourg, Tobias; Gitt, Anselm; Gras, Daniel; Stellbrink, Christoph; Gasparini, Maurizio; Metra, Marco; Derumeaux, Genevieve; Gadler, Fredrik; Buga, Laszlo; Dickstein, Kenneth

    Aims The European CRT Survey is a joint initiative of the Heart Failure Association (HFA) and the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) of the European Society of Cardiology evaluating the contemporary implantation practice of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in Europe. Methods and results

  9. Career Preparedness Survey Outcomes of Food Science Graduates--A Follow-Up Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlscheid, Jeffri; Clark, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-eight recent graduates (1998-2008) from the joint Washington State University (WSU) and University of Idaho (UI) BiState School of Food Science program and 27 of their employers participated in a survey assessing learning outcomes based on the 2001 Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) core competencies for undergraduate food science…

  10. Evaluation of Educational Quality Assessment (EQA) (Follow-up Survey for the 1976 Assessment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joyce S.

    Superintendents from 155 school districts in Pennsylvania were surveyed regarding their participation in Pennsylvania's 1976 Educational Quality Assessment (EQA). Ten state goals for quality public school education were assessed in grades 5, 8, and 11, as part of the EQA. Questionnaire responses were returned by superintendents from 128 school…

  11. Adherence to guidelines in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a follow-up national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Cottin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A new survey coordinated by the French expert centres for rare pulmonary diseases investigated French pulmonologists' diagnostic and therapeutic practice for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF and explored changes since a previous survey in 2011–2012. From May 16 to August 30, 2014, 524 pulmonologists were contacted. Those following at least one patient with IPF were invited to complete a questionnaire administered by telephone or e-mail. 166 (31.7% pulmonologists, 161 (97% of whom had participated to the first survey, completed the questionnaire. Of those, 46% and 52%, respectively, discussed the cases with radiologists and pathologists. Out of 144 pulmonologists practicing outside of expert centres, 80% indicated referring patients to those centres. The 2013 French practical guidelines for IPF were known by 92% of pulmonologists involved in IPF, 96% of whom considered them appropriate for practice. The multidisciplinary discussion form for IPF diagnosis was known by 74% and considered appropriate by 94%. Diagnosis and management resulted from multidisciplinary discussion in 50% of the cases. About 58% of patients were diagnosed with “mild to moderate IPF” as defined by forced vital capacity ≥50% of the predicted value and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide ≥35% of predicted. At the time of the survey, 31% of physicians were using pirfenidone to treat patients with “mild-to-moderately severe IPF” and 30% generally prescribed no treatment. Substantial improvement has occurred since the 2011–2012 survey with regard to knowledge of guidelines and proper management of IPF. Early diagnosis still needs to be improved through the network of expert centres.

  12. Relationship between bidet toilet use and haemorrhoids and urogenital infections: a 3-year follow-up web survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, K; Nakano, M; Omae, K

    2018-04-01

    Given the growing use of electric bidet toilets in Japan and other countries, we assessed the relationship between bidet toilet use and haemorrhoids or urogenital infections. Data were collected using a web-based longitudinal survey. In total, 10 305 subjects randomly selected from panels of a Japanese website research company for the baseline survey in 2013 were asked about their frequency of bidet toilet use and receipt of a doctor's diagnosis or subjective symptom of haemorrhoids and urogenital infections. One- and three-year follow-up surveys were performed in 2014 and 2016, respectively, and information on newly diagnosed/experienced outcomes occurring during the follow-up period were collected. Cumulative incidence of haemorrhoids and urogenital infections was not significantly increased by habitual use of a bidet toilet. In men, more habitual users reported subjective symptoms of irritated skin around the anus, which were newly experienced during follow-up than non-habitual users (adjusted risk ratio 1.36 (95% confidence interval 1.06-1.75)). Further studies are needed to confirm this relationship. Several of the outcomes were significantly more prevalent in habitual users, but these results were probably explained by reverse causation.

  13. The Cornella Health Interview Survey Follow-Up (CHIS.FU Study: design, methods, and response rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Gloria

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this report is to describe the main characteristics of the design, including response rates, of the Cornella Health Interview Survey Follow-up Study. Methods The original cohort consisted of 2,500 subjects (1,263 women and 1,237 men interviewed as part of the 1994 Cornella Health Interview Study. A record linkage to update the address and vital status of the cohort members was carried out using, first a deterministic method, and secondly a probabilistic one, based on each subject's first name and surnames. Subsequently, we attempted to locate the cohort members to conduct the phone follow-up interviews. A pilot study was carried out to test the overall feasibility and to modify some procedures before the field work began. Results After record linkage, 2,468 (98.7% subjects were successfully traced. Of these, 91 (3.6% were deceased, 259 (10.3% had moved to other towns, and 50 (2.0% had neither renewed their last municipal census documents nor declared having moved. After using different strategies to track and to retain cohort members, we traced 92% of the CHIS participants. From them, 1,605 subjects answered the follow-up questionnaire. Conclusion The computerized record linkage maximized the success of the follow-up that was carried out 7 years after the baseline interview. The pilot study was useful to increase the efficiency in tracing and interviewing the respondents.

  14. Follow-up: orthognathic surgery. Is there a future? A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zins, James E; Morrison, Colin M; Gonzalez, Andrea Moreira; Altus, Gene D; Bena, James

    2008-08-01

    The authors recently documented a significant decrease in orthognathic surgical cases performed by both plastic and oral surgeons in Ohio over a recent 5-year period. The main reason noted was related to third-party reimbursement. This is a potentially serious issue that may affect the quality of health care for patients with dentofacial deformities. Therefore, an expanded survey was conducted to determine whether this was indicative of a national trend. A three-page questionnaire was sent nationally to plastic surgeons and oral surgeons who were members of the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgery and the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, respectively. Surveys requested information regarding changes in the number of orthognathic operations over a 5-year period (1999-2003) and reasons for these changes. Of the 3273 surveys sent, 883 were returned, representing an overall response rate of 27 percent. Of the 883 returned, 771 (87.3 percent) were completed by oral surgeons and 112 (12.7 percent) were completed by plastic surgeons. The majority surveyed (70.0 percent) noted a decrease in the number of orthognathic procedures performed over a 5-year period, and 443 (77.3 percent) stated that the decrease was attributable to problems with insurance. Professional reimbursement per hour was calculated based on data collected from consecutive operations performed at the authors' institution. These data demonstrated that reimbursement per hour is significantly lower when orthognathic surgery procedures were compared with other standard plastic surgery operations. Orthognathic surgery may rapidly be becoming a cosmetic procedure. This has the potential of creating a two-tier system whereby only those who can afford it will undergo orthognathic correction.

  15. LIGO-VIRGO Triggered Follow-Up with NASA High Energy Photon Survey Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the proposed use of LIGO-VIRGO S6 triggers from comparatively loud events to search for both prompt and afterglow EM counterparts with RXTE, SWIFT and FERMI. Using a 2 or 3-fold coincident trigger from the two LIGO and one VIRGO detectors to provide sky position information, we can search the data from these missions within a limited time window and a constrained portion of their respective FOVs, allowing us to look at a level below the threshold normally used to publicly indicate an event. Since we propose to use these missions in their survey mode, no re-pointing of the missions is envisioned. The search for a coincidence between the data from LIGO-VIRGO and the EM survey missions can then be analyzed off-line; if a coincident EM signal is found it would have a significant effect in establishing the validity of the GW trigger. We discuss some relevant aspects of the NASA missions and give some preliminary estimates of thresholds and coincident background rates.

  16. Nutrition education in Japanese medical schools: a follow-up survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orimo, Hideo; Ueno, Takahiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Sone, Hirohito; Tanaka, Akira; Itakura, Hiroshige

    2013-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was used to determine the status of nutrition education in Japanese medical schools in 2009. A similar survey was conducted in 2004, at which time nutritional education was determined to be inadequate in Japanese medical schools. The current questionnaire was sent to the directors of Centers for Medical Education of 80 medical schools, who represented all medical schools in Japan. Sixty-seven medical schools (83.8%) responded, of which 25 schools (37.3%) offered dedicated nutrition courses and 36 schools (53.7%) did not offer dedicated nutrition courses but offered something related to nutrition in other courses; six schools (9.0%) did not offer any nutrition education. Overall, 61 schools (91.0%) offered at least some nutritional topics in their undergraduate education. Nevertheless, only 11 schools (16.4%) seem to dedicate more than 5 hours to substantial nutrition education as judged by their syllabi. Although the mean length of the course was 11 hours, substantial nutrition education accounted for only 4.2 hours. Of the 25 medical schools that offered dedicated nutrition courses, seven schools offered the nutrition course as a stand-alone course and 18 schools offered it as an integrated course. In conclusion, the status of nutrition education in Japan has improved slightly but is still inadequate.

  17. The OmegaWhite survey for short-period variable stars - III: follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, S. A.; Woudt, P. A.; Groot, P. J.; Ramsay, G.; Toma, R.; Motsoaledi, M.; Crause, L. A.; Gilbank, D. G.; O'Donoghue, D.; Potter, S. B.; Sickafoose, A. A.; van Gend, C.; Worters, H. L.

    2017-02-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of short-period variables discovered in the OmegaWhite survey, a wide-field high-cadence g-band synoptic survey targeting the Galactic Plane. We have used fast photometry on the SAAO 1.0- and 1.9-m telescopes to obtain light curves of 27 variables, and use these results to validate the period and amplitude estimates from the OmegaWhite processing pipeline. Furthermore, 57 sources (44 unique, 13 with new light curves) were selected for spectroscopic follow-up using either the SAAO 1.9-m telescope or the Southern African Large Telescope. We find that many of these variables have spectra which are consistent with being δ Scuti-type pulsating stars. At higher amplitudes, we detect four possible pulsating white dwarf/subdwarf sources and an eclipsing cataclysmic variable. Due to their rarity, these targets are ideal candidates for detailed follow-up studies. From spectroscopy, we confirm the symbiotic binary star nature of two variables identified as such in the SIMBAD database. We also report what could possibly be the first detection of the `Bump Cepheid' phenomena in a δ Scuti star, with OW J175848.21-271653.7 showing a pronounced 22 per cent amplitude dip lasting 3 min during each pulsational cycle peak. However, the precise nature of this target is still uncertain as it exhibits the spectral features of a B-type star.

  18. Improving response rates through incentive and follow-up: the effect on a survey of physicians' knowledge of genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambor, E S; Chase, G A; Faden, R R; Geller, G; Hofman, K J; Holtzman, N A

    1993-11-01

    This study assessed efforts to increase response rates to a mailed physician survey and examined whether, as a result, nonresponse bias was reduced. Randomly selected physicians and geneticists were mailed a questionnaire concerning genetics knowledge and attitudes. In the final but not the pilot survey, a $25 incentive and intensive follow-up were used to increase the response rate. The response rate from physicians in the final survey was 64.8% (n = 1140), compared with 19.6% in the pilot test (n = 69). Sample representatives in sociodemographic and practice characteristics was improved by follow-up. Respondents recruited with more difficulty did not differ on the principal outcome variable, genetics knowledge, except on one subscore. Pilot study and final survey respondents did not differ in knowledge. Although the effect of increased response rates on the principal outcome variable in this study was minimal, this may not be the case for other studies. Every effort should be made to attain as high a response rate as is practical and to establish that respondents are representative of the population being sampled.

  19. The assessment of elastic follow-up in high temperature piping systems - overall survey and theoretical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, J.T.; Nakamura, K.

    1987-01-01

    A review in some detail is presented, of simple and approximate methods for the assessment of elastic follow-up, to suggest possible modifications to the available methods to make them more appropriate for design purposes and to present a possible route for design based on simplified methods. An overall survey is given and the theoretical aspects of the various methods described in detail. In the second part of this paper these methods are compared to more exact solutions obtained by finite element analysis for a number of simple piping configurations subject to creep. (author)

  20. [Mortality follow-up of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS) : methods and first results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, I-K; Busch, M; Lange, M; Kamtsiuris, P; Doelle, R; Richter, A; Kuhnert, R; Ziese, T; Knopf, H; Scheidt-Nave, C

    2014-11-01

    Within the framework of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS), the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) conducted a nationwide mortality follow-up study. As there is no national mortality register in Germany, mortality and causes of death were investigated individually and under observance of state-specific data protection conditions. The German Health Interview and Examination Survey 1998 (GNHIES98) provided the database including 7,124 participants aged 18-79 years. A total of 6,979 participants of GNHIES98 (98 %) who consented to be re-contacted were invited between October 2008 and October 2011 to also participate in the first data collection wave of DEGS (DEGS1). In this context, the vital status and the causes of death for deceased participants were assessed. Age- and sex-specific probabilities of survival and death rates were calculated and grouped by main causes of death according to ICD-10 groups. A total of 671 individuals (285 women, 386 men) died between the two survey contacts. For all deceased persons the date of death and for 539 (80.3 %) the causes of death could be determined. With a median follow-up time of 12.0 years, 8,0742.5 person years were available for survival analysis. The crude overall death rate amounted to 8.3 per 1,000 persons-years (women: 7.2; men: 9.5). Among 539 persons with available information on causes of death, 209 (38.8 %) were attributable to cardiovascular diseases, 188 (34.9 %) to cancer, 135 (25.0 %) to other causes, and seven (1.3 %) could not be unambiguously assigned. A mortality follow-up was successfully integrated in the longitudinal component of DEGS as part of the national health monitoring at the RKI. Death rates and cause-specific mortality in relation to highly prevalent chronic diseases and risk factors provide essential information for assessing the potential of prevention and quality of care among adults in Germany. This requires a regular and complete conduction of

  1. Does a consumer training work? a follow-up survey of the PartecipaSalute training programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosconi Paola

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When properly trained through training programs on epidemiology, clinical research and healthcare policy, members of patients’/consumers’ organizations could be helpful for a patient-oriented healthcare system. Since 2006 the not for profit project PartecipaSalute has organized periodic editions of a training program for representatives of citizens’/patients’ organizations. After five editions of this training program, a survey of the long-term satisfaction and the impact on activities has been carried out. Methods A 17-questions follow-up questionnaire has been developed. The sample comprised 99 people who had taken part in at least one program edition. Results The overall response rate was 89% (89 responders/99 participants. About 98% of participants expressed general satisfaction with the training program and with the knowledge gained. Medical and informative topics were rated better than technical ones for their usefulness (96% versus 86%. The results of the survey showed a strong impact of the training course on single participants, while a weak outcome on the activities of the organizations was reported. Conclusions The training program was positively rated, and improvements in personal knowledge were reported. Less impact was reported on organizations’ activities. Participants showed a remarkable willingness to get more involved in healthcare decisions, and to boost their knowledge of health and research issues. The results show the importance of follow-up to understand the real value of training program and to better organize future programs.

  2. Patients' assessments of the continuity of primary care in Finland: a 15-year follow-up questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raivio, Risto; Holmberg-Marttila, Doris; Mattila, Kari J

    2014-10-01

    Continuity of care is an essential aspect of quality in general practice. This study is the first systematic follow-up of Finnish primary care patients' assessments with regard to personal continuity of care. To ascertain whether patient-reported longitudinal personal continuity of care is related to patient characteristics and their consultation experiences, and how this had changed over the study period. A 15-year follow-up questionnaire survey that took place at Tampere University Hospital catchment area, Finland. The survey was conducted among patients attending health centres in the Tampere University Hospital catchment area from 1998 until 2013. From a sample of 363 464 patients, a total of 157 549 responded. The responses of patients who had visited a doctor during the survey weeks (n = 97 468) were analysed. Continuity of care was assessed by asking the question: 'When visiting the health centre, do you usually see the same doctor?'; patients could answer 'yes' or 'no'. Approximately half of the responders had met the same doctor when visiting the healthcare centre. Personal continuity of care decreased by 15 percentage points (from 66% to 51%) during the study years. The sense of continuity was linked to several patients' experiences of the consultation. The most prominent factor contributing to the sense of continuity of care was having a doctor who was specifically appointed (odds ratio 7.28, 95% confidence interval = 6.65 to 7.96). Continuity of care was proven to enhance the experienced quality of primary care. Patients felt that continuity of care was best realised when they could consult a doctor who had been specifically appointed to them. Despite efforts of the authorities, over the past 15 years patient-reported continuity of care has declined in Finland. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  3. Attitude of Physicians towards the Follow-up of Renal Transplant Patients: A Questionnaire Survey in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souqiyyeh Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    combination was the most popular immunosuppressive regimen for renal transplant patients. Our survey suggests that the current practices concerning the work-up and follow-up of transplant patients in the dialysis centers in the KSA require refinement in terms of the need to enforce the use of a protocol to guide evaluation and therapy in each dialysis unit.

  4. Project USAP 2010: Use of Sedative Agents in Pediatric Dentistry-a 25-year Follow-up Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Houpt, Milton

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year follow-up survey was conducted among members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) to explore changes in the use of sedative agents. The survey was conducted in the winter of 2010 via an email LISTSERV of active members of the AAPD in the United States. The survey targeted demographics of participants and issues related to their use of sedation. A total of 1,642 responded, representing a response rate of 44 percent. The majority was board certified (58 percent) and indicated that nitrous oxide was used for over 50 percent of patients. Restraint (protective stabilization) was used by 72 percent of respondents but had declined compared to previous surveys. The dominant route of sedative administration was oral (93 percent). Benzodiazepines and nitrous oxide represented the most frequently used sedatives. Respondents and their patient pool characteristics are changing (e.g., there are proportionately more diplomates), benzodiazepines are the most frequently used sedative besides nitrous oxide (the use of which appears to be increasing), and protective stabilization among users is declining.

  5. The Einstein@Home Gamma-ray Pulsar Survey. II. Source Selection, Spectral Analysis, and Multiwavelength Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Clark, C. J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Guillemot, L.; Johnson, T. J.; Torne, P.; Champion, D. J.; Deneva, J.; Ray, P. S.; Salvetti, D.; Kramer, M.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bock, O.; Camilo, F.; Cognard, I.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Ferrara, E. C.; Kerr, M.; Machenschalk, B.; Ransom, S. M.; Sanpa-Arsa, S.; Wood, K.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the analysis of 13 gamma-ray pulsars discovered in the Einstein@Home blind search survey using Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Pass 8 data. The 13 new gamma-ray pulsars were discovered by searching 118 unassociated LAT sources from the third LAT source catalog (3FGL), selected using the Gaussian Mixture Model machine-learning algorithm on the basis of their gamma-ray emission properties being suggestive of pulsar magnetospheric emission. The new gamma-ray pulsars have pulse profiles and spectral properties similar to those of previously detected young gamma-ray pulsars. Follow-up radio observations have revealed faint radio pulsations from two of the newly discovered pulsars and enabled us to derive upper limits on the radio emission from the others, demonstrating that they are likely radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars. We also present results from modeling the gamma-ray pulse profiles and radio profiles, if available, using different geometric emission models of pulsars. The high discovery rate of this survey, despite the increasing difficulty of blind pulsar searches in gamma rays, suggests that new systematic surveys such as presented in this article should be continued when new LAT source catalogs become available.

  6. Bidet toilet use and incidence of hemorrhoids or urogenital infections: A one-year follow-up web survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Teppei; Asakura, Keiko; Nakano, Makiko; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2017-06-01

    Although bidet toilets are widely used in Japan, the relationship between habitual bidet toilet use and the incidence of hemorrhoids or urogenital infections has not been prospectively studied. We performed a web survey and followed bidet toilets users and non-users to assess the incidence of hemorrhoids or urogenital infections from 2013 to 2014. Study subjects were randomly selected from a research company's (Macromill, Inc.) web panel. The baseline survey inquired about toilet use and confounding parameters, and the follow-up survey examined outcome parameters. A total of 7637 subjects were analyzed using single or multiple logistic regression models. The prevalence odds ratios (ORs) between bidet toilet users and non-users for hemorrhoids, urological infections, and vulval pruritus were significantly > 1.0 but their incidence ORs were not significant. The adjusted incidence OR for bacterial vaginitis symptoms was significant (2.662, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.315-5.520]). These findings suggest that positive relations between habitual bidet toilet use and hemorrhoids and urogenital symptoms, except bacterial vaginitis, were due to reverse causation. The incidence of bacterial vaginitis might be caused by bidet toilet use, but the incidence rates were too small to make a definite conclusion, and further studies are needed.

  7. Socioeconomic Inequality in mortality using 12-year follow-up data from nationally representative surveys in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Young-Ho; Kim, Hye-Ryun

    2016-03-22

    Investigations into socioeconomic inequalities in mortality have rarely used long-term mortality follow-up data from nationally representative samples in Asian countries. A limited subset of indicators for socioeconomic position was employed in prior studies on socioeconomic inequalities in mortality. We examined socioeconomic inequalities in mortality using follow-up 12-year mortality data from nationally representative samples of South Koreans. A total of 10,137 individuals who took part in the 1998 and 2001 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were linked to mortality data from Statistics Korea. Of those individuals, 1,219 (12.1 %) had died as of December 2012. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the relative risks of mortality according to a wide range of socioeconomic position (SEP) indicators after taking into account primary sampling units, stratification, and sample weights. Our analysis showed strong evidence that individuals with disadvantaged SEP indicators had greater all-cause mortality risks than their counterparts. The magnitude of the association varied according to gender, age group, and specific SEP indicators. Cause-specific analyses using equivalized income quintiles showed that the magnitude of mortality inequalities tended to be greater for cardiovascular disease and external causes than for cancer. Inequalities in mortality exist in every aspect of SEP indicators, both genders, and age groups, and four broad causes of deaths. The South Korean economic development, previously described as effective in both economic growth and relatively equitable income distribution, should be scrutinized regarding its impact on socioeconomic mortality inequalities. Policy measures to reduce inequalities in mortality should be implemented in South Korea.

  8. Mammographic surveillance in the follow up of early primary breast cancer in England: A cross-sectional survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood-Haigh, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine current practice in the clinical setting at national and regional level of the use of mammographic surveillance in the follow up of patients surgically treated for early breast cancer. Method: A cross-sectional survey method was employed. Self-administered questionnaires were sent to a random selection of symptomatic breast imaging units representing all the cancer networks in England nationally, and all symptomatic breast imaging units in one cancer network regionally. Questions were designed to determine frequency and duration of mammographic surveillance for patients aged < 50 years and ≥50 years surgically treated by mastectomy or breast conserving surgery and the number of units with protocols based on the risk of local recurrence or development of a new primary breast cancer. Results: The protocols demonstrated a striking diversity in both the frequency and duration of mammographic surveillance; however the variation was less marked regionally. The duration of mammography for patient's aged ≥70 years surgically treated by mastectomy, demonstrated the greatest diversity (range: 0-15 years). Four protocols had regimes tailored to risk. Conclusion: The introduction of protocols based on risk of development of a local recurrence or new primary could prove cost effective by targeting mammographic surveillance to those who would benefit the most. The survey has demonstrated that a 'post-code lottery' exists for both the frequency and duration of mammographic surveillance in this patient group indicating an urgent need for evidence based national guidance.

  9. Long-term outcomes of epilepsy surgery in 85 pediatric patients followed up for over 10 years: a retrospective survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoyama, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Kazumi; Mihara, Tadahiro; Usui, Naotaka; Baba, Koichi; Inoue, Yushi; Tottori, Takayasu; Otsubo, Toshiaki; Kashida, Yumi; Iida, Koji; Hirano, Hirofumi; Hanaya, Ryosuke; Arita, Kazunori

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment outcomes and social engagement of patients who had undergone pediatric epilepsy surgery more than 10 years earlier. METHODS Between 1983 and 2005, 110 patients younger than 16 years underwent epilepsy surgery at the National Epilepsy Center, Shizuoka Institute of Epilepsy and Neurological Disorders. The authors sent a questionnaire to 103 patients who had undergone follow-up for more than 10 years after surgery; 85 patients (82.5%) responded. The survey contained 4 categories: seizure outcome, use of antiepileptic drugs, social participation, and general satisfaction with the surgical treatment (resection of the epileptic focus, including 4 hemispherectomies). The mean patient age at the time of surgery was 9.8 ± 4.2 (SD) years, and the mean duration of postoperative follow-up was 15.4 ± 5.0 years. Of the 85 patients, 79 (92.9%) presented with a lesional pathology, such as medial temporal sclerosis, developmental/neoplastic lesions, focal cortical dysplasia, and gliosis in a single lobe. RESULTS For 65 of the 85 responders (76.5%), the outcome was recorded as Engel Class I (including 15 [93.8%] of 16 patients with medial temporal sclerosis, 20 [80.0%] of 25 with developmental/neoplastic lesions, and 27 [73.0%] of 37 with focal cortical dysplasia). Of these, 29 (44.6%) were not taking antiepileptic drugs at the time of our survey, 29 (44.6%) held full-time jobs, and 33 of 59 patients (55.9%) eligible to drive had a driver's license. Among 73 patients who reported their degree of satisfaction, 58 (79.5%) were very satisfied with the treatment outcome. CONCLUSIONS The seizure outcome in patients who underwent resective surgery in childhood and underwent followup for more than 10 years was good. Of 85 respondents, 65 (76.5%) were classified in Engel Class I. The degree of social engagement was relatively high, and the satisfaction level with the treatment outcome was also high. From the perspective of

  10. Follow-up after colon cancer treatment in the Netherlands; a survey of patients, GPs, and colorectal surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, J.; Duineveld, L. A.; van der Heijden, R. P.; van Asselt, K. M.; Bemelman, W. A.; van Weert, H. C.

    2013-01-01

    Follow-up to detect recurrence is an important feature of care after colon cancer treatment. Currently, follow-up visits are surgeon-led with focus on recurrence. To date, there is increasing interest for general practitioners (GPs) providing this care, as GPs might provide more holistic care. The

  11. Return to sport activity after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in skeletally immature athletes with manual drilling original all inside reconstruction at 8 years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placella, Giacomo; Bartoli, Matteo; Peruzzi, Marco; Speziali, Andrea; Pace, Valerio; Cerulli, Giuliano

    2016-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are common injuries in adolescent athletes, especially in those who bear high stress on their knees due to shearing forces. The goal of the surgical procedures in skeletally immature patients is to restore joint stability avoiding the adverse effects on the growth process. The aim of this study was to verify the return of the skeletally immature professional athletes to sports in the long-term, following ACL reconstruction with the original all-inside technique and with manual drilling. This study included 24 athletes (14 boys, 10 girls; mean age: 13.15 years, range: 9-14 years) who had radiographic evidence of open physes, were less than 14 years of age at the time of surgery and those with a minimum follow-up of eight years. All patients completed a questionnaire, the IKDC subjective knee evaluation form, and Tegner Activity Scale. Biomechanical outcomes of the KT-1000 arthrometer, gait analysis, and stabilometric and isokinetic results were also evaluated. A plain radiograph of both lower limbs was taken to obtain a precise measurement of the limb length and mechanical axis angles. The patients returned to sport activities in a mean time of 6.43 months. No rerupture or resurgery due to growth abnormalities was observed. The mean difference in length between the operated and contralateral legs was 0.4 (range: -0.2 to 0.7) cm. The mean side-to-side difference measured with the KT-1000 arthrometer was 5.2 (range: 3.5 to 7) mm in the preoperative and 0.8 (range: 0 to 2.5) mm in the postoperative measurements. In conclusion, the original all-inside technique with manual drilling with a half tunnel and short graft seems to be a very effective technique for the surgical management of ACL injuries in pediatric/adolescent athletes. A good rate of return to sports at pre-injury levels or higher, high patient satisfaction and a decent motor and proprioceptive function is possible as shown by our analysis. Level IV, Therapeutic study

  12. The XXL Survey I. Scientific Motivations - Xmm-Newton Observing Plan - Follow-up Observations and Simulation Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, M.; Pacaud, F.; Adami, C.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Baran, N.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bremer, M. N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The quest for the cosmological parameters that describe our universe continues to motivate the scientific community to undertake very large survey initiatives across the electromagnetic spectrum. Over the past two decades, the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories have supported numerous studies of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the X-ray background. The present paper is the first in a series reporting results of the XXL-XMM survey; it comes at a time when the Planck mission results are being finalized. Aims. We present the XXL Survey, the largest XMM programme totaling some 6.9 Ms to date and involving an international consortium of roughly 100 members. The XXL Survey covers two extragalactic areas of 25 deg2 each at a point-source sensitivity of approx. 5 x 10(exp 15) erg/s/sq cm in the [0.5-2] keV band (completeness limit). The surveys main goals are to provide constraints on the dark energy equation of state from the space-time-distribution of clusters of galaxies and to serve as a pathfinder for future, wide-area X-ray missions. We review science objectives, including cluster studies, AGN evolution, and large-scale structure, that are being conducted with the support of approximately 30 follow-up programs. Methods. We describe the 542 XMM observations along with the associated multi- and numerical simulation programmes. We give a detailed account of the X-ray processing steps and describe innovative tools being developed for the cosmological analysis. Results. The paper provides a thorough evaluation of the X-ray data, including quality controls, photon statistics, exposure and background maps, and sky coverage. Source catalogue construction and multi-associations are briefly described. This material will be the basis for the calculation of the cluster and AGN selection functions, critical elements of the cosmological and science analyses. Conclusions. The XXL multi- data set will have a unique lasting legacy value for

  13. Persistence of Specific Phobia From Adolescence to Early Adulthood: Longitudinal Follow-Up of the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albor, Yesica C; Benjet, Corina; Méndez, Enrique; Medina-Mora, María Elena

    2017-03-01

    Specific phobia is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in the general population, begins at a younger age, and has high comorbidity. However, it receives less treatment than other disorders, perhaps because it is circumscribed to a specific object or situation that can be avoided or is difficult to differentiate from developmentally adaptive fear. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify its clinical significance, risk factors, and course. This study was designed to determine the persistence of specific phobia in participants during an 8-year period from adolescence to young adulthood and its predictors in a Mexican cohort. 1,071 respondents from a representative 2-wave panel sample participated in the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey in 2005 and in the follow-up survey in 2013. DSM-IV disorders were evaluated with the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Of adolescents with specific phobia at baseline, 17.46% persisted into adulthood. Persistence of specific phobia was predicted by an age of onset of disorder in adolescence (risk ratio [RR] = 2.83, 95% CI, 1.30-6.13), parental neglect (RR = 2.76, 95% CI, 1.35-5.65), a first-degree relative with specific phobia (RR = 2.69, 95% CI, 1.34-5.39) and economic adversities (RR = 2.06, 95% CI, 1.21-3.53). Noncomorbid specific phobia in adolescence predicted incidence of other anxiety and substance use disorders in early adulthood (RR = 1.98; 95% CI, 1.11-3.54 and RR = 1.35; 95% CI, 1.07-1.69, respectively). While many adolescents with specific phobia remit in adulthood, there are early adult consequences of adolescent phobia and identifiable risk factors for persistence that suggest a group of adolescents that might benefit from early intervention. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  14. Towards core outcome set (COS) development: a follow-up descriptive survey of outcomes in Cochrane reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuytack, Francesca; Smith, Valerie; Clarke, Mike; Williamson, Paula; Gargon, Elizabeth

    2015-05-19

    A core outcome set (COS) can address problems of outcome heterogeneity and outcome reporting bias in trials and systematic reviews, including Cochrane reviews, helping to reduce waste. One of the aims of the international Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials (COMET) Initiative is to link the development and use of COS with the outcomes specified and reported in Cochrane reviews, including the outcomes listed in the summary of findings (SoF) tables. As part of this work, an earlier exploratory survey of the outcomes of newly published 2007 and 2011 Cochrane reviews was performed. This survey examined the use of COS, the variety of specified outcomes, and outcome reporting in Cochrane reviews by Cochrane Review Group (CRG). To examine changes over time and to explore outcomes that were repeatedly specified over time in Cochrane reviews by CRG, we conducted a follow-up survey of outcomes in 2013 Cochrane reviews. A descriptive survey of outcomes in Cochrane reviews that were first published in 2013. Outcomes specified in the methods sections and reported in the results section of the Cochrane reviews were examined by CRG. We also explored the uptake of SoF tables, the number of outcomes included in these, and the quality of the evidence for the outcomes. Across the 50 CRGs, 375 Cochrane reviews that included at least one study specified a total of 3142 outcomes. Of these outcomes, 32 % (1008) were not reported in the results section of these reviews. For 23 % (233) of these non-reported outcomes, we did not find any reason in the text of the review for this non-report. Fifty-seven percent (216/375) of reviews included a SoF table. The proportion of specified outcomes that were reported in Cochrane reviews had increased in 2013 (68 %) compared to 2007 (61 %) and 2011 (65 %). Importantly, 2013 Cochrane reviews that did not report specified outcomes were twice as likely to provide an explanation for why the outcome was not reported. There has been an increased

  15. CONTRACT FOLLOW UP TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    SPL is organizing Training Sessions on the Contract Follow Up application. CFU is a Web based tool, developped and supported by the Administrative Information Services. It allows the creation of Divisional Requests and the follow up of their processing, from the Market Survey to the Invitation to Tender or Price Enquiry, approval by the Finance Committee, up to the actual signature of a Contract, acccording to the CERN Purchasing procedures. It includes a document management component. It also provides link with other AIS applications such as BHT and EDH. The course is primarily intended for DPOs, Contract Technical responsibles in the division and their assistants, but is beneficial to anybody involved in the follow up of such Purchasing Procedures. This course is free of charge, but application is necessary. The details of the course may be found at http://training.web.cern.ch/Training/ENSTEC/P2001/Bureautique/cfu4_f.htm General information of CFU may be found at http://ais.cern.ch/apps/cfu/ The dates of t...

  16. Knee complaints and consequences on work status; a 10-year follow-up survey among floor layers and graphic designers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytter, Søren; Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2007-09-18

    The purpose of the study was to examine if knee complaints among floor layers predict exclusion from the trade. In 1994/95 self-reported data were obtained from a cohort of floor layers and graphic designers with and without knee straining work activities, respectively. At follow-up in 2005 the questionnaire survey was repeated. The study population consisted of 81 floor layers and 173 graphic designers who were presently working in their trades at baseline (1995). All participants were men aged 36-70 years in 2005. We computed the risk of losing gainful employment in the trade according to occurrence of knee complaints at baseline, using Cox proportional hazard regression adjusted for a number of potential confounding variables. Moreover, the crude and adjusted odds risk ratio for knee complaints according to status of employment in the trade were computed, using graphic designers as reference. A positive but non-significant association between knee complaints lasting more than 30 days the past 12 months and exclusion from the trade was found among floor layers (Hazard Ratio = 1.4, 95% CI = 0.6-3.5).The frequency of self-reported knee complaints was lower among floor layers presently at work in the trade in year 2005 (26.3%) compared with baseline in 1995 (41.1%), while the opposite tendency was seen among graphic designers (20.7% vs. 10.7%). The study suggests that knee complaints are a risk factor for premature exclusion from a knee demanding trade. However, low power of the study precludes strong conclusions. The study also indicates a healthy worker effect among floor layers and a survivor effect among graphic designers.

  17. A 6-year Follow-up survey of health status in middle-aged women with Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjermestad, Krister W; Naess, Eva E; Bahr, David; Gravholt, Claus H

    2016-09-01

    Studies suggest younger women with Turner syndrome (TS) have good quality of life. Less is known about everyday functioning in adults with TS. In a 6-year follow-up study, multiple areas of functioning were compared between TS women and controls. Women with TS and controls were mailed a self-report survey 6 years after a baseline study. Fifty-seven women with TS (M age 40·6 ± 11·1 years) and 101 controls (M age 38·8 ± 10·6 years, ns) responded. Measures of background information, experienced life strain and presence/impact of health conditions were developed for this study. The QPS Nordic measured perceived workload challenges. The LiSat-9 measured life satisfaction. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale measured self-esteem. More TS women lived alone, fewer had biological children, and more had adoptive children. TS women reported fewer sex partners and less sexual confidence. Controls had higher education. There was no difference in employment status. More TS women received disability pensions. TS women reported their work as more physically challenging, less positively challenging and requiring less knowledge skills. TS women experienced more life strain in school, adolescence and late working life. Controls reported higher overall life satisfaction, with no difference between samples on specific domains. TS women reported lower self-esteem. For TS women only, physical health at baseline predicted length of education and mental health at baseline predicted self-esteem. Women with TS face more challenges than controls on several domains of functioning. Early physical and mental health may influence later educational achievement and self-esteem for women with TS. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts - II. New FRB discoveries and their follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, S.; Keane, E. F.; Barr, E. D.; Jameson, A.; Petroff, E.; Johnston, S.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Caleb, M.; Eatough, R. P.; Flynn, C.; Green, J. A.; Jankowski, F.; Kramer, M.; Krishnan, V. Venkatraman; Morello, V.; Possenti, A.; Stappers, B.; Tiburzi, C.; van Straten, W.; Andreoni, I.; Butterley, T.; Chandra, P.; Cooke, J.; Corongiu, A.; Coward, D. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Dodson, R.; Hardy, L. K.; Howell, E. J.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Klotz, A.; Littlefair, S. P.; Marsh, T. R.; Mickaliger, M.; Muxlow, T.; Perrodin, D.; Pritchard, T.; Sawangwit, U.; Terai, T.; Tominaga, N.; Torne, P.; Totani, T.; Trois, A.; Turpin, D.; Niino, Y.; Wilson, R. W.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Belhorma, B.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bourret, S.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brânzaş, H.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Moursli, R. Cherkaoui El; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Díaz, A. F.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Palma, I. Di; Domi, A.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Bojaddaini, I. El; Khayati, N. El; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ettahiri, A.; Fassi, F.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Gay, P.; Giordano, V.; Glotin, H.; Gregoire, T.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Organokov, M.; Pǎvǎlaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Saldaña, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schüssler, F.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Versari, F.; Vivolo, D.; Vizzocca, A.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2018-04-01

    We report the discovery of four Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) in the ongoing SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts at the Parkes Radio Telescope: FRBs 150610, 151206, 151230 and 160102. Our real-time discoveries have enabled us to conduct extensive, rapid multimessenger follow-up at 12 major facilities sensitive to radio, optical, X-ray, gamma-ray photons and neutrinos on time-scales ranging from an hour to a few months post-burst. No counterparts to the FRBs were found and we provide upper limits on afterglow luminosities. None of the FRBs were seen to repeat. Formal fits to all FRBs show hints of scattering while their intrinsic widths are unresolved in time. FRB 151206 is at low Galactic latitude, FRB 151230 shows a sharp spectral cut-off, and FRB 160102 has the highest dispersion measure (DM = 2596.1 ± 0.3 pc cm-3) detected to date. Three of the FRBs have high dispersion measures (DM > 1500 pc cm-3), favouring a scenario where the DM is dominated by contributions from the intergalactic medium. The slope of the Parkes FRB source counts distribution with fluences >2 Jy ms is α =-2.2^{+0.6}_{-1.2} and still consistent with a Euclidean distribution (α = -3/2). We also find that the all-sky rate is 1.7^{+1.5}_{-0.9}× 10^3FRBs/(4π sr)/day above {˜ }2{ }{Jy}{ }{ms} and there is currently no strong evidence for a latitude-dependent FRB sky rate.

  19. Predictors of physicians' stress related to information systems: a nine-year follow-up survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Hyppönen, Hannele; Kujala, Sari; Aalto, Anna-Mari; Vehko, Tuulikki; Vänskä, Jukka; Elovainio, Marko

    2018-04-13

    Among the important stress factors for physicians nowadays are poorly functioning, time consuming and inadequate information systems. The present study examined the predictors of physicians' stress related to information systems (SRIS) among Finnish physicians. The examined predictors were cognitive workload, staffing problems, time pressure, problems in teamwork and job satisfaction, adjusted for baseline levels of SRIS, age, gender and employment sector. The study has a follow-up design with two survey data collection waves, one in 2006 and one in 2015, based on a random sample of Finnish physicians was used. The present study used a sample that included 1109 physicians (61.9% women; mean age in 2015 was 54.5; range 34-72) who provided data on the SRIS in both waves. The effects of a) predictor variable levels in 2006 on SRIS in 2015 and b) the change in the predictor variables from 2006 to 2015 on SRIS in 2015 were analysed with linear regression analyses. Regression analyses showed that the higher level of cognitive workload in 2006 significantly predicted higher level of SRIS in 2015 (β = 0.08). The reciprocity of this association was tested with cross-lagged structural equation model analyses which showed that the direction of the association was from cognitive workload to SRIS, not from SRIS to cognitive workload. Moreover, increases in time pressure (β = 0.16) and problems in teamwork (β = 0.10) were associated with higher levels of SRIS in 2015, whereas job satisfaction increase was associated with lower SRIS (β = - 0.06). According to our results, physicians' cognitive workload may have long-lasting negative ramifications in regard to how stressful physicians experience their health information systems to be. Thus, organisations should pay attention to physicians workload if they wish physicians to master all the systems they need to use. It is also important to provide physicians with enough time and collegial support in their

  20. Comparison of radiographic and radionuclide skeletal surveys in battered children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickett, W.J.; Faleski, E.J.; Chacko, A.; Jarrett, R.V.

    1983-02-01

    A review of 13 cases of suspected child abuse in which radionuclide (RN) scans, radiographic skeletal surveys, and sufficient follow-up were available showed that the RN scans were insensitive, even though fractures were more than 48 hours old at the time of the scan. Frequently missed lesions included skull and extremity fractures. Furthermore, soft tissue and visceral abnormalities that were identified on radiographic examination went undetected on RN scan. We conclude that, although the RN scan may augment the radiographic examination, it should not be used alone to screen for the battered child.

  1. Comparison of radiographic and radionuclide skeletal surveys in battered children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, W.J.; Faleski, E.J.; Chacko, A.; Jarrett, R.V.

    1983-01-01

    A review of 13 cases of suspected child abuse in which radionuclide (RN) scans, radiographic skeletal surveys, and sufficient follow-up were available showed that the RN scans were insensitive, even though fractures were more than 48 hours old at the time of the scan. Frequently missed lesions included skull and extremity fractures. Furthermore, soft tissue and visceral abnormalities that were identified on radiographic examination went undetected on RN scan. We conclude that, although the RN scan may augment the radiographic examination, it should not be used alone to screen for the battered child

  2. Guidelines for Skeletal Surveys in Suspected Chils Abuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussmann, Bo; Poulsen, Mette Ramsdal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Child abuse imaging differs from general musculoskeletal imaging in that there is exceptional necessity for high quality images. The images are directly involved in legal processes and the child and the family faces major consequences if imaging is sub-optimal. The consequences...... of misdiagnosis are serious. Should head trauma or fractures be overlooked, or if the radiological diagnosis is uncertain, abused children may be sent home with violent parents or caregivers. Conversely, where no abuse has taken place, but the certainty of the diagnosis is questionable, the unnecessary...... focused mainly on follow-up skeletal surveys in children abused...

  3. Evaluating Imaging Follow-Up Strategies and Costs of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms Treated with Endovascular Techniques: A Survey of Academic Neurovascular Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Raghav; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Adeeb, Nimer; Chua, Michelle H; Moore, Justin M; Patel, Apar S; Thomas, Ajith J; Ogilvy, Christopher S

    2016-10-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) are being detected and treated with endovascular techniques at an increasing rate, with little evidence on the optimal imaging follow-up protocol. We performed a survey of academic neurovascular centers in the United States to assess imaging follow-up strategies and costs after endovascular treatment of UIAs. An online survey on 5-year follow-up strategies of UIAs treated with endovascular techniques was distributed to neurovascular directors of 101 academic neurovascular centers using the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons Joint Cerebrovascular Section database. An online healthcare marketplace, NewChoiceHealth, was used to calculate costs. Of 33 (32.7%) institutions that responded to the survey, 26 (25.7%) provided data suitable for analysis. Nine (34.6%), 10 (38.5%), 4 (15.4%), and 3 (11.5%) centers were located in the northeastern, southern, midwestern, and western regions of the United States. Total costs of 5-year follow-up imaging after primary coil embolization and stent-assisted coiling procedures were $3391-$32,882. Costs for aneurysms treated with flow diversion were $2788-$46,670. Eighteen (69.2%) institutions performed cerebral angiography at 6-month follow-up after coil embolization and stent-assisted coiling, and 19 (73.1%) institutions performed cerebral angiography 6 months after flow diversion. Of institutions, 20% affirmed that they maintained an identical imaging follow-up regimen after treatment of ruptured aneurysms. There is significant heterogeneity in imaging follow-up strategies and their associated costs. Stratification of patients by risk of recanalization and corresponding adjustment of follow-up imaging may be 1 strategy to limit unnecessary imaging and control costs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Adding Postal Follow-Up to a Web-Based Survey of Primary Care and Gastroenterology Clinic Physician Chiefs Improved Response Rates but not Response Quality or Representativeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, Melissa R; Powell, Adam A; Burgess, Diana J; Haggstrom, David A; Gravely, Amy A; Halek, Krysten; Bangerter, Ann; Shaukat, Aasma; Nelson, David B

    2015-09-01

    This study assessed whether postal follow-up to a web-based physician survey improves response rates, response quality, and representativeness. We recruited primary care and gastroenterology chiefs at 125 Veterans Affairs medical facilities to complete a 10-min web-based survey on colorectal cancer screening and diagnostic practices in 2010. We compared response rates, response errors, and representativeness in the primary care and gastroenterology samples before and after adding postal follow-up. Adding postal follow-up increased response rates by 20-25 percentage points; markedly greater increases than predicted from a third e-mail reminder. In the gastroenterology sample, the mean number of response errors made by web responders (0.25) was significantly smaller than the mean number made by postal responders (2.18), and web responders provided significantly longer responses to open-ended questions. There were no significant differences in these outcomes in the primary care sample. Adequate representativeness was achieved before postal follow-up in both samples, as indicated by the lack of significant differences between web responders and the recruitment population on facility characteristics. We conclude adding postal follow-up to this web-based physician leader survey improved response rates but not response quality or representativeness. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. Angle’s Class II division 1 associated to mandibular retrusion and skeletal open bite: a 5-year post-orthodontic/orthopedic treatment follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Gustavo Tirado

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obtaining long term stability allied to functional and aesthetic balance is the main goal of any orthodontic-orthopedic therapy. This case report describes the orthodontic therapy applied to a 7-year-9-month old child, who presented a Class II, division 1 malocclusion associated to skeletal open bite. Functional and skeletal corrections (sagittally and vertically) were obtained by means of mandible advancement achieved with a closed Balter’s bionator appliance followed by a fixed app...

  6. Emergency Contraceptive Pills: A 10-Year Follow-up Survey of Use and Experiences at College Health Centers in the Mid-Atlantic United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura McKeller; Sawyer, Robin G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a 10-year follow-up study using a telephone survey to investigate the availability of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) at college health centers in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. They also examined related issues, such as distribution procedure, existence of a written protocol, personnel involved,…

  7. Spectroscopic Follow-up of X-Ray Sources in the ChaMPlane Survey: Identification of a New Cataclysmic Variable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Servillat, M.; Grindlay, J.; van den Berg, M.; Hong, J.; Zhao, P.; Allen, B.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-object optical spectroscopy follow-up study of X-ray sources in a field along the Galactic plane (l = 327fdg42, b = 2fdg26) which is part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane survey (ChaMPlane). We obtained spectra for 46 stars, including 15 likely counterparts to X-ray sources,

  8. Follow-up study of dental and skeletal changes in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome with long-term treatment with the Silensor appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Gong, Xu; Yu, Zhe; Gao, Xuemei; Zhao, Ying

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the dental and skeletal changes associated with long-term use of the Silensor appliance (Erkodent, Cologne, Germany) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome. The sample included 42 patients with mild-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (mean apnea-hypopnea index, 27; range, 5-74) who had been treated with the Silensor appliance for an average of 4 years (range, 1-11 years). A questionnaire was used to assess of the side effects subjectively; the cephalometric analysis was conducted to identify the dental and skeletal changes of different treatment times objectively. The Silensor appliance was associated with few subjective side effects. Most subjective side effects decreased after long-term use of the Silensor appliance. Significant changes after long-term use of the Silensor appliance were observed in incisor angulation, overbite, overjet, mandibular plane angle, anterior lower facial height, and anterior facial height. Overbite and skeletal changes at treatment times between 1 year and 3 years were a decrease in overbite and increases in the mandibular plane angle, anterior lower facial height, and anterior facial height. Overjet and other dental changes at treatment times longer than 3 years were a decrease in overjet, retroclination of the maxillary incisors, and proclination of the mandibular incisors. The Silensor appliance was well tolerated and preferred by most subjects. Common but mild dental and skeletal changes resulted from using the appliance over a long period of time. The changes after 1 to 3 years of use were skeletal changes predominantly. Both dental and skeletal changes were observed simultaneously at treatment times longer than 3 years. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Two-year follow-up survey of patients with allergic contact dermatitis from an occupational cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Kim Katrine Bjerring; Carøe, T K; Thomsen, S F

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skin diseases are the most frequently recognized occupational diseases in Denmark. The prognosis for occupational contact dermatitis is often poor. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prognosis, assessed by eczema, job status and skin-related quality of life, among patients allergic...... patients with relevant rubber allergy (contact allergy to rubber chemicals or contact urticaria from latex) or epoxy allergy were identified. Follow-up consisted of a questionnaire covering current severity of eczema, employment, exposure and quality of life. RESULTS: The response rate was 75%. Clearance...... of eczema was reported by 11% of patients and 67% reported improvement. Overall 22% of patients with allergy to a nonubiquitous allergen had total clearance of eczema compared with 10% of cases allergic to ubiquitous allergens and 0% of those with contact urticaria (P = 0·116). Improvement was significantly...

  10. IBO Case Report: Management of Skeletal Class III Malocclusion with Combined Rapid Maxillary Expansion: Facemask Therapy and 5-Year Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Surana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the management of skeletal Class III malocclusion with maxillary deficiency in an adolescent girl, using combined rapid maxillary expansion-facemask approach, followed by comprehensive fixed appliance mechanotherapy. Excellent long-term stability is demonstrated up to 5 years post-treatment.

  11. Comparison of telephone with World Wide Web-based responses by parents and teens to a follow-up survey after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivara, Frederick P; Koepsell, Thomas D; Wang, Jin; Durbin, Dennis; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Vavilala, Monica; Dorsch, Andrea; Roper-Caldbeck, Maria; Houseknecht, Eileen; Temkin, Nancy

    2011-06-01

    To identify sociodemographic factors associated with completing a follow-up survey about health status on the web versus by telephone, and to examine differences in reported health-related quality of life by method of response. Survey about child health status of 896 parents of children aged 0-17 years treated in a hospital emergency department or admitted for a traumatic brain injury or arm injury, and 227 injured adolescents aged 14-17 years. The main outcomes were characteristics of those who completed a follow-up survey on the web versus by telephone and health-related quality of life by method of response. Email addresses were provided by 76.9 percent of parents and 56.5 percent of adolescents at baseline. The survey was completed on the web by 64.9 percent of parents and 40.2 percent of adolescents through email. Parents with email access who were Blacks, Hispanics, had lower incomes, and those who were not working were less likely to choose the web mode for completing the survey. Unlike adolescents, the amount of time for parents to complete the survey online was significantly shorter than completion by telephone. Differences by survey mode were small but statistically significant in some of the six functional outcome measures examined. Survey mode was associated with several sociodemographic characteristics. Sole use of web surveys could provide biased data. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. Do surgery journals insist on reporting by CONSORT and PRISMA? A follow-up survey of 'instructions to authors'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tanya A; Kulatilake, Priyantha; Brown, Lucy J; Wigley, James; Hameed, Waseem; Shantikumar, Saran

    2015-03-01

    Guidance has been published on how best to report randomised controlled trials (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials - CONSORT) and systematic reviews (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis - PRISMA). In 2011, we reported a low rate of enforcement by surgery journals for submitted manuscripts to conform to these guidelines. The aim of this follow-up study is to establish whether there has been any improvement. We studied the 134 surgery journals indexed in the Journal Citation Report. The 'Instructions to Authors' were scrutinised for inclusion of the following guidance: CONSORT, PRISMA, clinical trial registration and systematic review registration. Compared to 2011, there has been an improvement in the endorsement of reporting guidance in journals' 'Instructions to Authors' in 2014, as follows: trial registration (42% vs 33%), CONSORT (42% vs 30%) and PRISMA (19% vs 10%, all p CONSORT (p < 0.001) and PRISMA (p = 0.002). Journals with editorial offices in the UK were more likely to endorse guidance compared to those outside the UK (p < 0.05). Only one journal mentioned registration for systematic reviews. Surgery journals are presently more likely to require submitted manuscripts to follow published reporting guidance compared to three years ago. However, overall concordance rates are still low, and an improvement is required to help enhance the quality of reporting - and ultimately the conduct - of randomised control trials and systematic reviews in surgery.

  13. Angle’s Class II division 1 associated to mandibular retrusion and skeletal open bite: a 5-year post-orthodontic/orthopedic treatment follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Gustavo Tirado

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obtaining long term stability allied to functional and aesthetic balance is the main goal of any orthodontic-orthopedic therapy. This case report describes the orthodontic therapy applied to a 7-year-9-month old child, who presented a Class II, division 1 malocclusion associated to skeletal open bite. Functional and skeletal corrections (sagittally and vertically) were obtained by means of mandible advancement achieved with a closed Balter’s bionator appliance followed by a fixed appliance. This approach showed to be efficient in accomplishing both functional and aesthetic goals, that were kept stable five years after the treatment was finished. This case report was presented to the Board of Directors of the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO), as partial requirement to becoming a Diplomate of the BBO. PMID:29160350

  14. Childhood IQ and survival to 79: Follow-up of 94% of the Scottish Mental Survey 1947.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čukić, Iva; Brett, Caroline E; Calvin, Catherine M; Batty, G David; Deary, Ian J

    2017-07-01

    To extend previous literature that suggests higher IQ in youth is associated with living longer. Previous studies have been unable to assess reliably whether the effect differs across sexes and ages of death, and whether the effect is graded across different levels of IQ. We test IQ-survival associations in 94% of the near-entire population born in Scotland in 1936 who took an IQ test at age 11 (n = 70,805) and were traced in a 68-year follow-up. Higher IQ at age 11 years was associated with a lower risk of death (HR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.79, 0.81). The decline in risk across categories of IQ scores was graded across the full range with the effect slightly stronger in women (HR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.77, 0.80) than in men (HR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.81, 0.84). Higher IQ had a significantly stronger association with death before and including age 65 (HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.74, 0.77) than in those participants who died at an older age (HR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.78, 0.80). Higher childhood IQ is associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality in both men and women. This is the only near-entire population study to date that examines the association between childhood IQ and mortality across most of the human life course.

  15. The Italian national survey on radon indoors run by several different regional laboratories: Sampling strategy, realization and follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochicchio, F.; Risica, S.; Piermattei, S.

    1993-01-01

    The paper outlines the criteria and organization adopted by the Italian National Institutions in carrying out a representative national survey to evaluate the distribution of radon concentration and the exposure of the Italian population to natural radiation indoors. The main items of the survey - i.e. sampling design, choice of the sample size (5000 dwellings), organization, analysis of the actual sample structure, questionnaire to collect data about families and their dwellings, experimental set up and communication with the public - are discussed. Some results, concerning a first fraction of the total sample, are also presented. (author). 13 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Effect of counselling on health-care-seeking behaviours and rabies vaccination adherence after dog bites in Haiti, 2014–15: a retrospective follow-up survey

    OpenAIRE

    Dr Melissa Dominique Etheart, MD; Maxwell Kligerman, BA; Pierre Dilius Augustin; Jesse D Blanton, MPH; Benjamin Monroe, MPH; Ludder Fleurinord; Max Millien, DVM; Kelly Crowdis, DVM; Natael Fenelon, MD; Ryan MacLaren Wallace, DVM

    2017-01-01

    Background: Haiti has an integrated bite case management (IBCM) programme to counsel animal-bite victims on the risk of rabies and appropriate treatment, as well as the Haiti Animal Rabies Surveillance Program (HARSP) to examine the animals. We assessed the usefulness of the IBCM programme to promote best practices for rabies prophylaxis after exposure in a low-income rabies-endemic setting. Methods: We did a retrospective follow-up survey of randomly selected bite victims who were counsel...

  17. Magistrates' Survey. 1988 Follow-Up: Analysis of Results. Report to the Governor's Task Force on Domestic Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Sylvester; Relos, Ruth

    In 1988, over one-third of all North Carolina magistrates, from 87 of 100 counties, responded to a survey from the Governor's Task Force on Domestic Violence. Ninety-nine percent of respondents indicated that they had handled at least one case in which a woman had complained about physical violence or threats from her husband or boyfriend. The…

  18. [National Re-survey of Arterial Hypertension (RENAHTA). Mexican consolidation of the cardiovascular risk factors. national follow-up cohort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas Peralta, Martín; Lara Esqueda, Agustín; Pastelín Hernández, Gustavo; Velázquez Monroy, Oscar; Martínez Reding, Jesús; Méndez Ortiz, Arturo; Lorenzo Negrete, José-Antonio; Lomelí Estrada, Catalina; González Hermosillo, Antonio; Herrera Acosta, Jaime; Tapia Conyer, Roberto; Attie, Fause

    2005-01-01

    Based on a National Re-survey on Hypertension (HTA) and other cardiovascular risk factors performed in Mexico during 2003 and 2004 in the adult population with HTA, as identified in the 2000 National Survey of Health, this study was planed to determine: 1) morbidity and mortality rates; 2) the incidence and interrelation with other risk factors, such as overweight, obesity, dyslipidemia, nephropathy and diabetes; 3) the main risk factors associated to HTA involved in its complications, need for hospitalization and number of days; and, 4) the degree of therapeutical adhesion and the type of antihypertensive drugs used. The survey was of type III using the step by step method described by WHO. Sampling was weighed a priori taking into account a national prevalence average of HTA of 30.05% and its corresponding rate for each federal state. Permissible maximum error in the estimation = 0.28. Effect of design = 4.5; and, Rate of awaited answer (0.70). From the initial 14,567 interviewed patients, 1,165 (8%) subjects were considered non-hypertensive or false positives at the 2000 survey. From the 13,402 remaining patients, 335 died during the first 2 years of pursuit, which implies an annual mortality of approximately 1.15% in the hypertensive population. Thus, 13,067 survivors were subjected to the final analysis. The mean age at the re-survey was 45.6 +/- 12.6; 40.5% were men (n = 5,295). There was a statistically significant difference in height, but not in weight between both genders. The control HTA was raised 14.6% in the year 2000 and 19.2% in 2004. The prevalence of diabetes was duplicated from 16% to 30% (attention and prevention of this crucial risk factor and of screening the dynamic nonlinear interaction between the main cardiovascular risk factors in Mexico. New hypotheses are proposed for the metabolic syndrome.

  19. Sample selection may bias the outcome of an adolescent mental health survey: results from a five-year follow-up of 4171 adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekkonen, V; Kivimäki, P; Valtonen, H; Hintikka, J; Tolmunen, T; Lehto, S M; Laukkanen, E

    2015-02-01

    The representativeness of the data is one of the main issues in evaluating the significance of research findings. Dropping out is common in adolescent mental health research, and may distort the results. Nevertheless, very little is known about the types of systematic bias that may affect studies in a) the informed consent phase and b) later in follow-up phases. The authors addressed this gap in knowledge in a five-year follow-up study on a sample of adolescents aged 13-18 years. The data were collected using self-report questionnaires. The baseline sample consisted of 4171 adolescents, 1827 (43.8%) of whom gave consent to be contacted for a follow-up survey, but only 797 (19.1%) participated in the follow-up. Binary logistic regression models were used to explain the participation. Young age, female gender, a high number of hobbies, good performance at school in the native language and general subjects, family disintegration such as divorce, high parental employment, and symptoms of depression and anxiety were associated with both consent and participation. However, the effect of mental health aspects was smaller than the effect of age and gender. This study confirmed the possibility of systematic selection bias by adolescents' sociodemographic characteristics. The representativeness of the study sample might have been improved by more intense recruitment strategies. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. How General Practitioners and Their Patients Adhere to Osteoporosis Management: A Follow-Up Survey among Czech General Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Vytrisalova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: General practitioners (GPs are key participants in osteoporosis (OP management. The aim was to evaluate their adherence to lege artis management of the disease, potential barriers, and to discuss differences observed in comparison with the baseline survey carried out in 2007; the focus was on secondary prevention.Methods: On behalf of two professional associations, 2-round postal survey among randomly selected GPs (>1/4 of all Czech GPs was performed in 2014. The questionnaire covered areas concerning GP's role in the fight against OP, knowledge about OP, management of OP-related fractures, barriers to the management of OP, system- and patient-related in particular, and availability and use of information sources.Results: The overall questionnaire return rate was 37% (551 respondents; mean age of the respondents was 53 year (37% men. The GP's role in the treatment of OP was rated as essential in 28 and 37% of men and women, respectively (P = 0.012. The guideline for diagnosis and treatment of OP for GPs was considered accessible by 92% of respondents. As much as 60% of the respondents were adherent to the guideline, i.e., used it repeatedly. The knowledge of several risk factors was very good, however, recommended daily intake of calcium was stated correctly by only 41% of respondents, and daily intake of vitamin D by only 40%. Three quarters reported active steps after a fracture: referral to a specialist, life-style recommendations, prescription of calcium/vitamin D supplements. Half of the respondents focus on fall prevention. System-related barriers, such as lack of possibility to prescribe selected drugs (61% and financial limits set by health insurance company (44% were most frequently reported. Patient-related barriers were also common, patient's non-adherence (reported by 29% and patient's reluctance to go to a specialist (18%.Conclusion: GPs adhered to OP management more than in 2007. Knowledge of risk factors and

  1. Do We Still Have a Digital Divide in Mental Health? A Five-Year Survey Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, Dan; Satkunanathan, Safarina; Doughty, Lisa; Wykes, Til

    2016-11-22

    Nearly everyone in society uses the Internet in one form or another. The Internet is heralded as an efficient way of providing mental health treatments and services. However, some people are still excluded from using Internet-enabled technology through lack of resources, skills, and confidence. Five years ago, we showed that people with severe mental illness were at risk of digital exclusion, especially middle-aged patients with psychosis and/or people from black or minority ethnic groups with psychosis. An understanding of the breadth of potential digital exclusion is vital for the implementation of digital health services. The aim of this study is to understand the context of digital exclusion for people who experience mental illness. We conducted a survey involving people with a primary diagnosis of psychosis or depression in London, United Kingdom. A total of 241 participants were recruited: 121 with psychosis and 120 with depression. The majority of surveys were collected face-to-face (psychosis: n=109; depression: n=71). Participants answered questions regarding familiarity, access, use, motivation, and confidence with Internet-enabled technologies (ie, computers and mobile phones). Variables predicting digital exclusion were identified in regression analyses. The results were compared with the survey conducted in 2011. Digital exclusion has declined since 2011. Online survey collection introduced biases into the sample, masking those who were likely to be excluded. Only 18.3% (20/109) of people with psychosis in our sample were digitally excluded, compared with 30% (28/93) in 2011 (χ 2 1 =3.8, P=.04). People with psychosis had less confidence in using the Internet than people with depression (χ 2 1 =7.4, P=.004). Only 9.9% (24/241) of participants in the total sample were digitally excluded, but the majority of these people had psychosis (n=20). Those with psychosis who were digitally excluded were significantly older than their included peers (t 30 =3

  2. The rising burden of chronic conditions among urban poor: a three-year follow-up survey in Bengaluru, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Mrunalini J; Bhojani, Upendra; Devadasan, Narayanan; Beerenahally, Thriveni S

    2015-08-15

    Chronic conditions are on rise globally and in India. Prevailing intra-urban inequities in access to healthcare services compounds the problems faced by urban poor. This paper reports the trends in self-reported prevalence of chronic conditions and health-seeking pattern among residents of a poor urban neighborhood in south India. A cross sectional survey of 1099 households (5340 individuals) was conducted using a structured questionnaire. The prevalence and health-seeking pattern for chronic conditions in general and for hypertension and diabetes in particular were assessed and compared with a survey conducted in the same community three years ago. The predictors of prevalence and health-seeking pattern were analyzed through a multivariable logistic regression analysis. The overall self-reported prevalence of chronic conditions was 12%, with hypertension (7%) and diabetes (5.8%) being the common conditions. The self-reported prevalence of chronic conditions increased by 3.8 percentage point over a period of three years (OR: 1.5). Older people, women and people living below the poverty line had greater odds of having chronic conditions across the two studies compared. Majority of patients (89.3%) sought care from private health facilities indicating a decrease by 8.7 percentage points in use of government health facility compared to the earlier study (OR: 0.5). Patients seeking care from super specialty hospitals and those living below the poverty line were more likely to seek care from government health facilities. There is need to strengthen health services with a preferential focus on government services to assure affordable care for chronic conditions to urban poor.

  3. China Kadoorie Biobank of 0.5 million people: survey methods, baseline characteristics and long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengming; Chen, Junshi; Collins, Rory; Guo, Yu; Peto, Richard; Wu, Fan; Li, Liming

    2011-12-01

    Large blood-based prospective studies can provide reliable assessment of the complex interplay of lifestyle, environmental and genetic factors as determinants of chronic disease. The baseline survey of the China Kadoorie Biobank took place during 2004-08 in 10 geographically defined regions, with collection of questionnaire data, physical measurements and blood samples. Subsequently, a re-survey of 25,000 randomly selected participants was done (80% responded) using the same methods as in the baseline. All participants are being followed for cause-specific mortality and morbidity, and for any hospital admission through linkages with registries and health insurance (HI) databases. Overall, 512,891 adults aged 30-79 years were recruited, including 41% men, 56% from rural areas and mean age was 52 years. The prevalence of ever-regular smoking was 74% in men and 3% in women. The mean blood pressure was 132/79 mmHg in men and 130/77 mmHg in women. The mean body mass index (BMI) was 23.4 kg/m(2) in men and 23.8 kg/m(2) in women, with only 4% being obese (>30 kg/m(2)), and 3.2% being diabetic. Blood collection was successful in 99.98% and the mean delay from sample collection to processing was 10.6 h. For each of the main baseline variables, there is good reproducibility but large heterogeneity by age, sex and study area. By 1 January 2011, over 10,000 deaths had been recorded, with 91% of surviving participants already linked to HI databases. This established large biobank will be a rich and powerful resource for investigating genetic and non-genetic causes of many common chronic diseases in the Chinese population.

  4. Double-read of skeletal surveys in suspected non-accidental trauma: what we learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmazyn, Boaz; Wanner, Matthew R.; Marine, Megan B. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Miller, Elise M.; Jennings, S.G. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Lay, Sara E. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Methodist Hospital, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Massey, James M. [The Children' s Hospital at TriStar Centennial, Department of Imaging, Nashville, TN (United States); Ouyang, Fangqian [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Hibbard, Roberta A. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Child Protection Programs, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Missing a fracture in a child on skeletal surveys for suspected non-accidental trauma can have devastating results. Double-read has the potential to improve fracture detection. However the yield of double-read is unknown. To determine the advantage of double-read versus single-read of radiographic skeletal surveys for suspected non-accidental trauma. The study was performed in two phases. In the first phase (April 2013 to September 2013), double-read was performed for all skeletal surveys obtained during weekday working hours. Because we had no new double-read findings in studies initially read as negative, we conducted a second phase (January 2014 to March 2014). In the second phase we limited double-reads to skeletal surveys found positive on the first read. At the end of this period, we retrospectively performed double-read for all initially negative skeletal surveys. We excluded follow-up skeletal surveys. The difference in discrepancy (new fracture or false diagnosis of a fracture) ratio between negative and positive skeletal surveys was evaluated using the Fisher exact test, and change in discrepancy ratio between the first and second study phases was evaluated using the stratified Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test. Overall in the two phases, 178 skeletal surveys were performed in 178 children (67 girls) with mean age of 9 months (range 3 days to 3.7 years). Double-read found 16 discrepancies in 8/178 (4.5%) skeletal surveys. Seven of these studies showed additional fractures (n=15). In one study, an initial read of a skull fracture was read as a variant on the second read. There was a significant (P=0.01) difference between rate of disagreement in negative skeletal surveys (1/104, 1.0%) and positive skeletal surveys (7/74, 9.5%). No significant change in disagreement rate was demonstrated between the two phases of the study (P=0.59). Double-read of skeletal survey for suspected non-accidental trauma found false-negative fractures in a few cases and rarely found

  5. [Factors determining irregular attendance to follow-up visits among human immunodeficiency virus patients: results of the hospital survey of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Asuncion; Ten, Alicia; Marcos, Henar; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo; González-García, Juan; Moreno, Santiago; Barrios, Ana María; Arponen, Sari; Portillo, Álvaro; Serrano, Regino; García, Maria Teresa; Pérez, José Luis; Toledo, Javier; Royo, Maria Carmen; González, Gustavo; Izquierdo, Ana; Viloria, Luis Javier; López, Irene; Elizalde, Lázaro; Martínez, Eva; Castrillejo, Daniel; Aranguren, Rosa; Redondo, Caridad; Diez, Mercedes

    2015-05-01

    To describe the occurrence of non-regular attendance to follow-up visits among HIV patients and to analyze the determining factors. One-day survey carried out annually (2002-2012) in public hospitals. Epidemiological, clinical and behavioral data are collected in all HIV-infected inpatients and outpatients receiving HIV-related care on the day of the survey. "Non-regular attendance to a follow-up visit" was defined as sporadic attendance to the medical appointments, according to the judgment of the attending physician. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were performed, and factors associated to non-regular attendance to follow-up visits were estimated using logistic regression. A total of 7,304 subjects were included, of whom 13.7% did not attend medical appointments regularly. Factors directly associated with non-regular attendance were: age between 25-49 years; birth in Sub-Saharan Africa or Latin-America; low educational level; being homeless or in prison; living alone or in closed institutions; being unemployed or retired; being an intravenous drug user; not using a condom at last sexual encounter, and injecting drugs in the last 30 days. Conversely, HIV diagnosis within the last year and being men who have sex with men were factors inversely associated with non-regular attendance to follow-up visits. In spite of health care beings free of charge for everyone in Spain, social factors can act as barriers to regular attendance to medical appointments, which, in turn, can endanger treatment effectiveness in some population groups. This should be taken into account when planning HIV policies in Spain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of counselling on health-care-seeking behaviours and rabies vaccination adherence after dog bites in Haiti, 2014–15: a retrospective follow-up survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheart, Melissa Dominique; Kligerman, Maxwell; Augustin, Pierre Dilius; Blanton, Jesse D; Monroe, Benjamin; Fleurinord, Ludder; Millien, Max; Crowdis, Kelly; Fenelon, Natael; Wallace, Ryan MacLaren

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Haiti has an integrated bite case management (IBCM) programme to counsel animal-bite victims on the risk of rabies and appropriate treatment, as well as the Haiti Animal Rabies Surveillance Program (HARSP) to examine the animals. We assessed the usefulness of the IBCM programme to promote best practices for rabies prophylaxis after exposure in a low-income rabies-endemic setting. Methods We did a retrospective follow-up survey of randomly selected bite victims who were counselled by Haiti's IBCM programme between May 15, 2014, and Sept 15, 2015. We classified participants by HARSP decisions of confirmed, probable, suspected, or non-rabies exposures. We compared health-care outcomes in people who sought medical care before IBCM counselling with those in people who sought care after counselling. We used decision trees to estimate the probability of actions taken in the health-care system, and thereby human deaths. Findings During the study period, 1478 dog bites were reported to HARSP for assessment. 37 (3%) were confirmed exposures, 76 (5%) probable exposures, 189 (13%) suspected exposures, and 1176 (80%) non-rabies exposures. 115 of these cases were followed up in the survey. IBCM counselling was associated with a 1.2 times increase in frequency of bite victims seeking medical care and of 2.4 times increase in vaccination uptake. We estimated that there would be four human rabies deaths among the 1478 people assessed by IBCM during the survey period, and 11 in the absence of this programme, which would equate to a 65% decrease in rabies deaths. Among three people dead at the time of the follow-up survey, one was deemed to be due to rabies after a probable rabies exposure. Interpretation Adherence to medical providers' recommendations might be improved through counselling provided by IBCM programmes. PMID:28911750

  7. Follow-Up Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... second should occur after 1 year on the gluten-free diet. After that, a celiac should receive follow-up ... test result is straightforward—a celiac on the gluten-free diet should have a negative test. The numerical value ...

  8. Comparison of musculo-skeletal USG and radionuclide soft tissue scintigraphy in the evaluation, selection and follow-up of patients for radiosynoviorthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, S.; Basak, B.; Dey, N.R.; Sharma, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The main objective of this study was to compare and correlate the information obtained from high resolution ultrasound (USG) and soft tissue scintigraphy in the evaluation of painful joint disorders and follow-up of patients after Radiosynoviorthesis. Thirty-two patients suffering from painful joint disorders including Rheumatoid Arthritis were prospectively studied. High resolution ultrasonography of joints was performed with a 15 MHz transducer. Soft tissue scintigraphy of joints were performed in a single head gamma camera with leap collimator 15-20 minutes after injecting 20-25 mCi of Tc-99m MDP. Anterior, posterior, lateral and if needed oblique views were obtained. Delayed images of joints were also obtained. High resolution USG demonstrated effusion, synovial proliferation, thickening, Backer's cyst and bone erosion effectively, and was very useful in guiding aspiration. On the other hand soft tissue scintigraphy was found to be more sensitive in detecting active synovial inflammation and showed excellent correlation with clinical features. The earliest changes after therapy were reduction in the intensity of uptake in soft tissue scintigraphy and reduction of degree of effusion in USG. Delayed phase bone scans were helpful for assessment of extent and severity of disease and deformity. We conclude that soft tissue scintigraphy is a better indicator of the active synovial inflammation having better correlation with clinical features. Hence it is better suited for selecting patients for radiosynoviorthesis. Ultrasound however was found to be a better tool for detecting and treating associated effusion. The earliest changes of treatment response were changes in soft tissue uptake and reduction of effusion. (author)

  9. Infrastructure and Educational Needs of Newborn Screening Short-Term Follow-Up Programs within the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening & Genetics Collaborative: A Pilot Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecelia A. Bellcross

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Newborn screening (NBS follow-up protocols vary significantly by state, and there is a need to better understand the infrastructure and communication flow of NBS programs. In addition, assessment of the educational needs of families and providers with regard to the implications of NBS results is required to inform the development of appropriate informational resources and training opportunities. To begin to address these issues, we administered a web-based survey to state NBS coordinators within the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening & Genetics Collaborative (SERC. Fourteen coordinators responded to the survey, including at least one from each of the 10 SERC states/territories. Over one-third of respondents had never received formal training regarding the metabolic conditions identified on NBS. Most communicated results via telephone or fax, though two centers indicated use of a web-based platform. Only two programs were involved in directly reporting results to the family. Four programs reported a long-term follow-up protocol. Deficits were noted for primary care provider (PCP knowledge of metabolic disorders identified on NBS, and how to inform parents of abnormal results. Close to half indicated that the adequacy of the number of genetic counselors, dietitians, and medical/biochemical geneticists was minimal to insufficient. Respondents uniformly recognized the importance of providing additional educational and informational resources in multiple categories to NBS staff, PCPs, and families.

  10. Effect of counselling on health-care-seeking behaviours and rabies vaccination adherence after dog bites in Haiti, 2014-15: a retrospective follow-up survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheart, Melissa Dominique; Kligerman, Maxwell; Augustin, Pierre Dilius; Blanton, Jesse D; Monroe, Benjamin; Fleurinord, Ludder; Millien, Max; Crowdis, Kelly; Fenelon, Natael; Wallace, Ryan MacLaren

    2017-10-01

    Haiti has an integrated bite case management (IBCM) programme to counsel animal-bite victims on the risk of rabies and appropriate treatment, as well as the Haiti Animal Rabies Surveillance Program (HARSP) to examine the animals. We assessed the usefulness of the IBCM programme to promote best practices for rabies prophylaxis after exposure in a low-income rabies-endemic setting. We did a retrospective follow-up survey of randomly selected bite victims who were counselled by Haiti's IBCM programme between May 15, 2014, and Sept 15, 2015. We classified participants by HARSP decisions of confirmed, probable, suspected, or non-rabies exposures. We compared health-care outcomes in people who sought medical care before IBCM counselling with those in people who sought care after counselling. We used decision trees to estimate the probability of actions taken in the health-care system, and thereby human deaths. During the study period, 1478 dog bites were reported to HARSP for assessment. 37 (3%) were confirmed exposures, 76 (5%) probable exposures, 189 (13%) suspected exposures, and 1176 (80%) non-rabies exposures. 115 of these cases were followed up in the survey. IBCM counselling was associated with a 1·2 times increase in frequency of bite victims seeking medical care and of 2·4 times increase in vaccination uptake. We estimated that there would be four human rabies deaths among the 1478 people assessed by IBCM during the survey period, and 11 in the absence of this programme, which would equate to a 65% decrease in rabies deaths. Among three people dead at the time of the follow-up survey, one was deemed to be due to rabies after a probable rabies exposure. Adherence to medical providers' recommendations might be improved through counselling provided by IBCM programmes. None. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment interruption in HIV-positive patients followed up in Cameroon's antiretroviral treatment programme: individual and health care supply-related factors (ANRS-12288 EVOLCam survey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Christelle; Suzan-Monti, Marie; Sagaon-Teyssier, Luis; Mimi, Mohamed; Laurent, Christian; Maradan, Gwenaëlle; Mengue, Marie-Thérèse; Spire, Bruno; Kuaban, Christopher; Vidal, Laurent; Boyer, Sylvie

    2018-03-01

    Decreasing international financial resources for HIV and increasing numbers of antiretroviral treatment (ART)-treated patients may jeopardise treatment continuity in low-income settings. Using data from the EVOLCam ANRS-12288 survey, this study aimed to document the prevalence of unplanned treatment interruption for more than 2 consecutive days (TI>2d) and investigate the associated individual and health care supply-related factors within the Cameroonian ART programme. A cross-sectional mixed methods survey was carried out between April and December 2014 in 19 HIV services of the Centre and Littoral regions. A multilevel logistic model was estimated on 1885 ART-treated patients in these services to investigate factors of TI>2d in the past 4 weeks. Among the study population, 403 (21%) patients reported TI>2d. Patients followed up in hospitals reporting ART stock-outs were more likely to report TI>2d while those followed up in the Littoral region, in medium- or small-sized hospitals and in HIV services proposing financial support were at lower risk of TI>2d. The following individual factors were also associated with a lower risk of TI>2d: living in a couple, having children, satisfaction with attention provided by doctor, tuberculosis co-infection and not having consulted a traditional healer. Besides identifying individual factors of TI>2d, our study highlighted the role of health care supply-related factors in shaping TI in Cameroon's ART programme, especially the deleterious effect of ART stock-outs. Our results also suggest that the high proportion of patients reporting TI could jeopardise progress in the fight against HIV in the country, unless effective measures are quickly implemented like ensuring the continuity of ART supply. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. First on-line survey of an international multidisciplinary working group (MightyMedic) on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanutti, C; D'Alessandri, G; Petta, A; Harada-Shiba, M; Julius, U; Soran, H; Moriarty, P M; Romeo, S; Drogari, E; Jaeger, B R

    2015-05-01

    The MightyMedic (Multidisciplinary International Group for Hemapheresis TherapY and MEtabolic DIsturbances Contrast) Working Group has been founded in 2013. The leading idea was to establish an international network of interdisciplinary nature aimed at working to cross national borders research projects, clinical trials, educational initiatives (meetings, workshops, summer schools) in the field of metabolic diseases, namely hyperlipidemias, and diabetes, preventive cardiology, and atherosclerosis. Therapeutic apheresis, its indications and techniques, is a parallel field of investigation. The first on-line survey of the Group has been completed in the first half of 2014. The survey included # 24 Centers in Italy, Germany, Greece, UK, Sweden, Japan and USA. Relevant data have been collected on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias. 240 subjects with hyperlipidemia and treated with lipoprotein apheresis have been reported in the survey, but a large percentage of patients (35%) who could benefit from this therapeutic option are still treated by conventional drug approach. Genetic molecular diagnosis is performed in only 33% of patients while Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is included in cardiovascular disease risk assessment in 71% of participating Centers. New detailed investigations and prospective multicenter studies are needed to evaluate changes induced by the impact of updated indications and strategies, as well as new treatment options, targeting standardization of therapeutic and diagnostic approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Management of breast ductal carcinoma in situ in Catalonia, Spain: Results from the Grup Oncologic Calalà-Occità-Catalonia survey with 9-year follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, M J; Farrús, B; Moreno, F; Anglada, Ll; Arenas, M; Ballester, R; Casals, J; Cusidó, M; García, V; Gutiérrez, C; Mollà, M; Pedro, A; Reyes, V; Sanz, X

    2017-10-01

    Reliable data on DCIS incidence and management are not available in many countries. The present study describes the management of DCIS in Catalonia, Spain in the year 2005 and compares these findings to data obtained in France. Local recurrence and late toxicity rates from 2005 through the end of 2014 are reported. Observational survey of patients with pure DCIS (n = 270) diagnosed during 2005. A written questionnaire, the same as used in the French survey, was completed by 14 doctors at 12 cancer centres in Catalonia, Spain. Median patient age was 55 years (range, 29-89). Diagnosis was mammographic in 225 cases (83.3%). Treatment approaches included: mastectomy (10.4% of cases), breast-conserving surgery (BCS) alone (3.7%), and BCS plus radiotherapy (RT) (85.5%). Sentinel node biopsy and axillary dissection were performed in 27.4% and 5.6% of patients, respectively. Hormonotherapy was prescribed in 45.2% of cases. Tumour nuclear grade was as follows: low (16.7% of cases), intermediate (23%), and high (55.6%). Excision was complete (margins ≥1 mm) in 75% of patients treated with BCS alone vs. 95.7% for BCS+RT. The treatment approach varied widely: mastectomy rates ranged from 7.1% to 26.7% of centres, BCS+RT from 55.5% to 87.8%, and hormonotherapy from 3.3% to 83.3%. At a median follow-up of 102.6 months, 14 patients (5.6%) presented ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence. These findings on DCIS management in Catalonia are consistent with previous international reports. The inter-centre differences observed are similar to those reported in other international surveys during the same period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A 2-year follow-up survey of 523 cases with peripheral nerve injuries caused by the earthquake in Wenchuan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chun-qing; Zhang, Li-hai; Liu, Xian-fei; Tang, Pei-fu

    2015-01-01

    We performed a 2-year follow-up survey of 523 patients with peripheral nerve injuries caused by the earthquake in Wenchuan, Sichuan Province, China. Nerve injuries were classified into three types: type I injuries were nerve transection injuries, type II injuries were nerve compression injuries, and type III injuries displayed no direct neurological dysfunction due to trauma. In this study, 31 patients had type I injuries involving 41 nerves, 419 had type II injuries involving 823 nerves, and 73 had type III injuries involving 150 nerves. Twenty-two patients had open transection nerve injury. The restoration of peripheral nerve function after different treatments was evaluated. Surgical decompression favorably affected nerve recovery. Physiotherapy was effective for type I and type II nerve injuries, but not substantially for type III nerve injury. Pharmacotherapy had little effect on type II or type III nerve injuries. Targeted decompression surgery and physiotherapy contributed to the effective treatment of nerve transection and compression injuries. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center score for nerve injury severity declined with increasing duration of being trapped. In the first year after treatment, the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center score for grades 3 to 5 nerve injury increased by 28.2% to 81.8%. If scores were still poor (0 or 1) after a 1-year period of treatment, further treatment was not effective. PMID:25883624

  15. Quality of life of family caregivers 8 years after a relative's cancer diagnosis: follow-up of the National Quality of Life Survey for Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngmee; Shaffer, Kelly M; Carver, Charles S; Cannady, Rachel S

    2016-03-01

    The long-term impact of cancer caregiving on the family caregivers' quality of life (QOL) is currently not known. This study aimed (a) to characterize family caregivers of cancer survivors at 8 years post-diagnosis in terms of multidimensional aspects of QOL and (b) to identify demographic and early caregiving experience characteristics that may play significant roles in predicting the caregivers' longer-term QOL. A total of 1087 caregivers participated in the 8-year follow-up National Quality of Life Survey for Caregivers. Demographics and early caregiving experiences were measured 2 years post-diagnosis of their relative's cancer. Multidimensional aspects of QOL were assessed, including mental and physical health, psychological adjustment, and spirituality at both 2-year and 8-year post-diagnosis. Approximately 90% of family caregivers ceased the caregiver role by 8 years. One-fourth of them were due to bereavement. Caregivers' demographic and early caregiving characteristics were significantly associated with QOL. In addition, being bereaved by the 8-year mark predicted poorer mental health and greater psychological distress independent of contributions of demographic and early caregiving characteristics. Findings provided the first evidence that 8 years after the initial cancer diagnosis in the family, family members who became bereaved suffer from poorer mental health and greater psychological distress. Findings have theoretical implications for better understanding bereavement to cancer and practical implications for developing integrative programs to improve QOL among family members in the various phases of caregivership. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Excess mortality among people who report lifetime use of illegal drugs in the United States: A 20-year follow-up of a nationally representative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elizabeth Reisinger; Pratt, Laura A; Schoenborn, Charlotte A; Druss, Benjamin G

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mortality risks, over 20 years of follow-up in a nationally representative sample, associated with illegal drug use and to describe risk factors for mortality. We analyzed data from the 1991 National Health Interview Survey, which is a nationally representative household survey in the United States, linked to the National Death Index through 2011. This study included 20,498 adults, aged 18-44 years in 1991, with 1047 subsequent deaths. A composite variable of self-reported lifetime illegal drug use was created (hierarchical categories of heroin, cocaine, hallucinogens/inhalants, and marijuana use). Mortality risk was significantly elevated among individuals who reported lifetime use of heroin (HR=2.40, 95% CI: 1.65-3.48) and cocaine (HR=1.27, 95% CI: 1.04-1.55), but not for those who used hallucinogens/inhalants or marijuana, when adjusting for demographic characteristics. Baseline health risk factors (smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, and BMI) explained the greatest amount of this mortality risk. After adjusting for all baseline covariates, the association between heroin or cocaine use and mortality approached significance. In models adjusted for demographics, people who reported lifetime use of heroin or cocaine had an elevated mortality risk due to external causes (poisoning, suicide, homicide, and unintentional injury). People who had used heroin, cocaine, or hallucinogens/inhalants had an elevated mortality risk due to infectious diseases. Heroin and cocaine are associated with considerable excess mortality, particularly due to external causes and infectious diseases. This association can be explained mainly by health risk behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Eight-year incidence of psychiatric disorders and service use from adolescence to early adulthood: longitudinal follow-up of the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjet, Corina; Borges, Guilherme; Méndez, Enrique; Albor, Yesica; Casanova, Leticia; Orozco, Ricardo; Curiel, Teresa; Fleiz, Clara; Medina-Mora, María Elena

    2016-02-01

    Half of mental disorders have their first onset before adulthood when the presence of a disorder may be particularly disruptive to developmental milestones. Retrospective prevalence estimates have been shown to underestimate the burden of mental illness and scarce data are available on the incidence of disorders throughout the adolescent period, especially in developing countries. Thus, the objective was to determine the incidence of mental disorders in an 8-year period from adolescence to young adulthood, onset of service use and their predictors in a Mexican cohort. 1071 respondents from a representative two-wave panel sample participated in the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey in 2005 and in the follow-up survey in 2013. Disorders were evaluated with the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview. 37.9% experienced the onset of a psychiatric disorder and 28.4% sought services for the first time. Substance use disorders had the greatest incidence, followed by mood and behavior disorders, anxiety disorders and lastly eating disorders. Sex, age, school dropout, childhood adversities and prior mental disorders predicted the onset of new disorders. Being female, having more educated parents and most classes of disorder predicted first time service use. These findings contribute to a paradigm shift in conceptions of mental disorder similar to how we think of common physical afflictions as near universal experiences across the life course, but less frequent at any given moment. Adolescents are particularly vulnerable. Therefore, public health policy should focus on early universal promotion of positive mental health and structural determinants of mental health.

  18. Reporting of loss to follow-up information in randomised controlled trials with time-to-event outcomes: a literature survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bender Ralf

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the reporting of loss to follow-up (LTFU information in articles on randomised controlled trials (RCTs with time-to-event outcomes, and to assess whether discrepancies affect the validity of study results. Methods Literature survey of all issues of the BMJ, Lancet, JAMA, and New England Journal of Medicine published between 2003 and 2005. Eligible articles were reports of RCTs including at least one Kaplan-Meier plot. Articles were classified as "assessable" if sufficient information was available to assess LTFU. In these articles, LTFU information was derived from Kaplan-Meier plots, extracted from the text, and compared. Articles were then classified as "consistent" or "not consistent". Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the validity of study results. Results 319 eligible articles were identified. 187 (59% were classified as "assessable", as they included sufficient information for evaluation; 140 of 319 (44% presented consistent LTFU information between the Kaplan-Meier plot and text. 47 of 319 (15% were classified as "not consistent". These 47 articles were included in sensitivity analyses. When various imputation methods were used, the results of a chi2-test applied to the corresponding 2 × 2 table changed and hence were not robust in about half of the studies. Conclusions Less than half of the articles on RCTs using Kaplan-Meier plots provide assessable and consistent LTFU information, thus questioning the validity of the results and conclusions of many studies presenting survival analyses. Authors should improve the presentation of both Kaplan-Meier plots and LTFU information, and reviewers of study publications and journal editors should critically appraise the validity of the information provided.

  19. Low-dose biplanar skeletal survey versus digital skeletal survey in multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutry, Nathalie; Dutouquet, Bastien; Cotten, Anne; Leleu, Xavier; Vieillard, Marie-Helene; Duhamel, Alain

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the low-dose biplanar (LDB) skeletal survey (SS) for the assessment of focal bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) as compared with digital SS and to compare the two techniques in terms of image quality, patient comfort and radiation exposure. Fifty-six consecutive patients with newly diagnosed or first relapsed MM underwent LDB and digital SS on the same day. These were assessed by two radiologists for the detection of focal bone lesions. In the case of discordance, whole-body MR imaging was performed. Image quality, patient comfort and radiation dose were also assessed. Fifty-six patients (M:30, F:26, mean age, 62 years) with newly diagnosed (n = 21) or first relapse MM (n = 35) were enrolled. A total of 473 bone lesions in 46 patients (82 %) were detected. Out of that total, digital SS detected significantly more lesions than LDB SS (451 [95.35 %] versus 467 [98.73 %]), especially in osteopenic and obese patients. Overall patient satisfaction was greater with LDB SS (48.6 %) compared with digital SS (2.7 %). The radiation dose was significantly reduced (by a factor of 7.8) with the LDB X-ray device. Low-dose biplanar skeletal surveys cannot replace digital SS in all patients suffering from multiple myeloma. (orig.)

  20. Low-dose biplanar skeletal survey versus digital skeletal survey in multiple myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutry, Nathalie [University Hospital of Jeanne de Flandre and University of Lille 2, Departments of Pediatric and Musculoskeletal Imaging, Lille (France); University Hospital of Jeanne de Flandre and University of Lille 2, Department of Pediatric Imaging, Lille (France); Hopital Jeanne de Flandre, Service de Radiopediatrie, Lille (France); Dutouquet, Bastien; Cotten, Anne [University Hospital of Roger Salengro and University of Lille 2, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Lille (France); Leleu, Xavier [University Hospital of Claude Huriez and University of Lille 2, Clinical Hematology Department, Lille (France); Vieillard, Marie-Helene [University Hospital of Roger Salengro and University of Lille 2, Rheumatology Department, Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [University of Lille 2, Department of Medical Statistics, Lille (France)

    2013-08-15

    To evaluate the low-dose biplanar (LDB) skeletal survey (SS) for the assessment of focal bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) as compared with digital SS and to compare the two techniques in terms of image quality, patient comfort and radiation exposure. Fifty-six consecutive patients with newly diagnosed or first relapsed MM underwent LDB and digital SS on the same day. These were assessed by two radiologists for the detection of focal bone lesions. In the case of discordance, whole-body MR imaging was performed. Image quality, patient comfort and radiation dose were also assessed. Fifty-six patients (M:30, F:26, mean age, 62 years) with newly diagnosed (n = 21) or first relapse MM (n = 35) were enrolled. A total of 473 bone lesions in 46 patients (82 %) were detected. Out of that total, digital SS detected significantly more lesions than LDB SS (451 [95.35 %] versus 467 [98.73 %]), especially in osteopenic and obese patients. Overall patient satisfaction was greater with LDB SS (48.6 %) compared with digital SS (2.7 %). The radiation dose was significantly reduced (by a factor of 7.8) with the LDB X-ray device. Low-dose biplanar skeletal surveys cannot replace digital SS in all patients suffering from multiple myeloma. (orig.)

  1. Long-term biological and behavioural impact of an adolescent sexual health intervention in Tanzania: follow-up survey of the community-based MEMA kwa Vijana Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife M Doyle

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of specific behaviour-change interventions to reduce HIV infection in young people remains questionable. Since January 1999, an adolescent sexual and reproductive health (SRH intervention has been implemented in ten randomly chosen intervention communities in rural Tanzania, within a community randomised trial (see below; NCT00248469. The intervention consisted of teacher-led, peer-assisted in-school education, youth-friendly health services, community activities, and youth condom promotion and distribution. Process evaluation in 1999-2002 showed high intervention quality and coverage. A 2001/2 intervention impact evaluation showed no impact on the primary outcomes of HIV seroincidence and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 seroprevalence but found substantial improvements in SRH knowledge, reported attitudes, and some reported sexual behaviours. It was postulated that the impact on "upstream" knowledge, attitude, and reported behaviour outcomes seen at the 3-year follow-up would, in the longer term, lead to a reduction in HIV and HSV-2 infection rates and other biological outcomes. A further impact evaluation survey in 2007/8 ( approximately 9 years post-intervention tested this hypothesis.This is a cross-sectional survey (June 2007 through July 2008 of 13,814 young people aged 15-30 y who had attended trial schools during the first phase of the MEMA kwa Vijana intervention trial (1999-2002. Prevalences of the primary outcomes HIV and HSV-2 were 1.8% and 25.9% in males and 4.0% and 41.4% in females, respectively. The intervention did not significantly reduce risk of HIV (males adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 0.91, 95%CI 0.50-1.65; females aPR 1.07, 95%CI 0.68-1.67 or HSV-2 (males aPR 0.94, 95%CI 0.77-1.15; females aPR 0.96, 95%CI 0.87-1.06. The intervention was associated with a reduction in the proportion of males reporting more than four sexual partners in their lifetime (aPR 0.87, 95%CI 0.78-0.97 and an increase in reported

  2. Dynamic posterior stabilization for degenerative lumbar spine disease: a large consecutive case series with long-term follow-up by additional postal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner-Perth, R; Sellhast, N; Perler, G; Dietrich, D; Staub, L P; Röder, C

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic stabilization of the degenerated spine was invented to overcome the negative side effects of fusion surgery like adjacent segment degeneration. Amongst various different implants DSS(®) is a pedicle-based dynamic device for stabilizing the spine and preserving motion. Nearly no clinical data of the implant have been reported so far. The current analysis presents results from a single spine surgeon who has been using DSS(®) for the past 5 years and recorded all treatment and outcome data in the international Spine Tango registry. From the prospectively documented overall patient pool 436 cases treated with DSS(®) could be identified. The analysis was enhanced with a mailing of COMI patient questionnaires for generating longer-term follow-ups up to 4 years. 387 patients (189 male, 198 female; mean age 67.3 years) with degenerative lumbar spinal disease including degenerative spondylolisthesis (6.1 %) could be evaluated. The type of degeneration was mainly spinal stenosis (89.9 %). After a mean follow-up of 1.94 years, the COMI score and NRS back and leg pain improved significantly and to a clinically relevant extent. The postoperative trend analysis could not determine a relevant deterioration of these outcomes until 4 years postoperative. 10 patients were revised (2.6 %) and the implant was removed; in most cases, a fusion was performed. Another 5 cases (1.3 %) had an extension of the dynamic stabilization system to the adjacent level. 84.2 % of patients rated that the surgery had helped a lot or had helped. The results of this large consecutive series with a follow-up up to 4 years could demonstrate a good and stable clinical outcome after posterior dynamic stabilization with DSS(®). For degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine, this treatment seems to be a valid alternative to fusion surgery.

  3. The disease management program for type 2 diabetes in Germany enhances process quality of diabetes care - a follow-up survey of patient's experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Ingmar; Küver, Claudia; Gedrose, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Falk; Russ-Thiel, Barbara; Brose, Hans-Peter; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna

    2010-03-03

    In summer 2003 a disease management program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes was introduced on a nationwide basis in Germany. Patient participation and continuity of care within the DMP are important factors to achieve long-term improvements in clinical endpoints. Therefore it is of interest, if patients experience any positive or negative effects of the DMP on their treatment that would support or hamper further participation. The main objective of the study was to find out if the German Disease Management Program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes improves process and outcome quality of medical care for patients in the light of their subjective experiences over a period of one year. Cohort study with a baseline interview and a follow-up after 10.4 +/- 0.64 months. Data on process and outcome measures were collected by telephone interviews with 444 patients enrolled and 494 patients not enrolled in the German DMP for type 2 diabetes. Data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analyses. DMP enrolment was significantly associated with a higher process quality of care. At baseline enrolled patients more often reported that they had attended a diabetes education course (OR = 3.4), have > or = 4 contacts/year with the attending physician (OR = 3.3), have at least one annual foot examination (OR = 3.1) and one referral to an ophthalmologist (OR = 3.4) and possess a diabetes passport (OR = 2.4). Except for the annual referral to an ophthalmologist these parameters were also statistically significant at follow-up. In contrast, no differences between enrolled and not enrolled patients were found concerning outcome quality indicators, e.g. self-rated health, Glycated hemoglobin (GHb) and blood pressure. However, 16-36% of the DMP participants reported improvements of body weight and/or GHb and/or blood pressure values due to enrolment - unchanged within one year of follow-up. In the light of patient's experiences the DMP enhances the process quality of medical care for type 2

  4. Imaging Techniques Used in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Follow-up of Patients with Myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulligan, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Radiologists play a central role in the diagnosis, initial staging, follow-up, and restaging of patients with myeloma. This review article attempts to familiarize the reader with all the various types of myeloma, their imaging appearances and useful imaging strategies. The staging system for myeloma patients has been updated and now includes findings from advanced imaging modalities. Radiologists have a vast array of imaging modalities at their disposal to aid them in diagnosis, staging, and follow-up. Currently, conventional radiographic skeletal surveys, magnetic resonance imaging, and F-18 FDG PET/CT examinations are the most useful instruments

  5. Imaging Techniques Used in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Follow-up of Patients with Myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, M.E. [Univ. of Maryland, Medical School, Baltimore MD (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-11-01

    Radiologists play a central role in the diagnosis, initial staging, follow-up, and restaging of patients with myeloma. This review article attempts to familiarize the reader with all the various types of myeloma, their imaging appearances and useful imaging strategies. The staging system for myeloma patients has been updated and now includes findings from advanced imaging modalities. Radiologists have a vast array of imaging modalities at their disposal to aid them in diagnosis, staging, and follow-up. Currently, conventional radiographic skeletal surveys, magnetic resonance imaging, and F-18 FDG PET/CT examinations are the most useful instruments.

  6. Astronomy Degree Recipients Initial Employment: Results from the Follow-Up Survey of Degree Recipients, Classes of 2010, 2011 and 2012 Combined. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pold, Jack; Mulvey, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Each fall the Statistical Research Center (SRC) conducts its Survey of Enrollments and Degrees, which asks all degree-granting physics and astronomy departments in the US to provide information concerning the numbers of students they have enrolled and counts of recent degree recipients. In connection with this survey, SRC asks for the names and…

  7. Astronomy Degree Recipients: Initial Employment. Data from the Degree Recipient Follow-Up Survey for the Classes of 2007, 2008 and 2009. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Patrick; Shindel, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Each fall the Statistical Research Center conducts its Survey of Enrollments and Degrees, which asks all degree-granting physics and astronomy departments in the US to provide information concerning the numbers of students they have enrolled and counts of recent degree recipients. In connection with this survey, the authors ask for the names and…

  8. Physics Doctorates Initial Employment: Data from the Degree Recipient Follow-Up Survey for the Classes of 2011 and 2012. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Patrick; Pold, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Each fall the Statistical Research Center (SRC) conducts its Survey of Enrollments and Degrees, which asks all degree-granting physics and astronomy departments in the U.S. to provide information concerning the number of students they have enrolled and the counts of recent degree recipients. In connection with this survey, SRC asks for the names…

  9. Impacts of Social Network on Therapeutic Community Participation: A Follow-up Survey of Data Gathered after Ya'an Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhichao; Chen, Yao; Suo, Liming

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, natural disasters and the accompanying health risks have become more frequent, and rehabilitation work has become an important part of government performance. On one hand, social networks play an important role in participants' therapeutic community participation and physical & mental recovery. On the other hand, therapeutic communities with widespread participation can also contribute to community recovery after disaster. This paper described a field study in an earthquake-stricken area of Ya'an. A set of 3-stage follow-up data was obtained concerning with the villagers' participation in therapeutic community, social network status, demographic background, and other factors. The Hierarchical linear Model (HLM) method was used to investigate the determinants of social network on therapeutic community participation. First, social networks have significantly impacts on the annual changes of therapeutic community participation. Second, there were obvious differences in education between groups mobilized by the self-organization and local government. However, they all exerted the mobilization force through the acquaintance networks. Third, local cadre networks of villagers could negatively influence the activities of self-organized therapeutic community, while with positively influence in government-organized therapeutic activities. This paper suggests that relevant government departments need to focus more on the reconstruction and cultivation of villagers' social network and social capital in the process of post-disaster recovery. These findings contribute to better understandings of how social networks influence therapeutic community participation, and what role local government can play in post-disaster recovery and public health improvement after natural disasters.

  10. Impacts of Social Network on Therapeutic Community Participation: A Follow-up Survey of Data Gathered after Ya’an Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, Zhichao; CHEN, Yao; SUO, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background In recent years, natural disasters and the accompanying health risks have become more frequent, and rehabilitation work has become an important part of government performance. On one hand, social networks play an important role in participants’ therapeutic community participation and physical & mental recovery. On the other hand, therapeutic communities with widespread participation can also contribute to community recovery after disaster. Methods This paper described a field study in an earthquake-stricken area of Ya’an. A set of 3-stage follow-up data was obtained concerning with the villagers’ participation in therapeutic community, social network status, demographic background, and other factors. The Hierarchical linear Model (HLM) method was used to investigate the determinants of social network on therapeutic community participation. Results First, social networks have significantly impacts on the annual changes of therapeutic community participation. Second, there were obvious differences in education between groups mobilized by the self-organization and local government. However, they all exerted the mobilization force through the acquaintance networks. Third, local cadre networks of villagers could negatively influence the activities of self-organized therapeutic community, while with positively influence in government-organized therapeutic activities. Conclusion This paper suggests that relevant government departments need to focus more on the reconstruction and cultivation of villagers’ social network and social capital in the process of post-disaster recovery. These findings contribute to better understandings of how social networks influence therapeutic community participation, and what role local government can play in post-disaster recovery and public health improvement after natural disasters. PMID:26060778

  11. The fecal occult blood test as a tool for improved outpatient qualification for colonoscopy. A single-center experience and 10-year follow-up survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Budzyński, Jacek; Tojek, Krzysztof; Jarmocik, Paweł; Frasz, Jacek; Mrozowski, Marcin; Świtoński, Maciej; Jawień, Arkadiusz

    2017-03-01

    Colonoscopy is not widely and easily available in all countries, even for symptomatic patients. This is one of the causes of tumors not being diagnosed until an advanced stage. The aim of this study was to estimate the efficacy of the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in the diagnostic work-up of outpatients referred to a colorectal unit due to indistinct abdominal symptoms. Among 10418 consecutive symptomatic individuals referred to the outpatient clinic, an immunochemical FOBT (Hem-Check 1 ® ) was recommended for 9432 patients with indistinct symptoms as a tool for qualifying them for colonoscopy. All the subjects were treated according to their diagnosis and followed-up for the next 10 years. Colorectal cancer (CRC) was diagnosed in 535 individuals: 393/986 (39.9%) among patients with red-flag symptoms, and 142/951 (14.9%) of individuals with indistinct symptoms and a positive FOBT. In the latter group, less-advanced tumors, classed as such using Dukes' classification, were twice as common and more advanced CRC occurred twice as seldom than in the former. Cancer recurrence-free and overall survival periods after surgical treatment for CRC were significantly longer in patients with indistinct symptoms who qualified for diagnostic procedures on the basis of a positive FOBT. Patients with symptoms suggesting organic colon disease had a worse prognosis compared to individuals with non-specific symptoms. If bowel endoscopy is not widely and easily available, qualification for colonoscopy on the basis of alarm symptoms and a positive FOBT seems to be an effective strategy in early CRC diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiographic skeletal survey and radionuclide bone scan in Langerhans cell histiocytosis of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieuwenhuyse, J.P. van; Clapuyt, P.; Malghem, J.; Everarts, P.; Melin, J.; Pauwels, S.; Brichard, B.; Ninane, J.; Vermylen, C.; Cornu, G.

    1996-01-01

    Background. The lack of a consensus in the literature on the imaging strategy in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) bone lesions in childhood. Objective. To evaluate the relative value of radionuclide bone scan (RBS) and radiographic skeletal survey (RSS) in the detection of LCH bone lesions, both in the initial work-up of the disease and during the follow-up period. Materials and methods. Ten children with bone lesions evaluated by means of RSS and RBS in a retrospective study (1984-1993). Results. Fifty radiologically and/or scintigraphically abnormal foci were detected: 27 anomalies in the initial work-up (12 by both RSS and RBS, 8 by RSS only and 7 by RBS only) and 23 additional anomalies during follow-up (10 by both RSS and RBS, 10 by RSS only and 3 by RBS only). RSS+/RBS- lesions (n = 18) are more frequently encountered in the skull (P = 0.038), and more frequently lack radiologic signs of osteoblastic activity (P = 0.020), than RSS+/RBS+ lesions (n = 22). RSS-/RBS+ abnormalities (n = 10) were most frequently insignificant. Conclusion. In the initial work-up both RSS and RBS should be carried out, while in the follow-up only RSS should be performed. (orig.). With 2 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Treatment practice for IBD-associated anaemia remains out of tune with recommendations - A two year follow-up survey in five European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Jürgen; Bager, Palle; Befrits, Ragnar

    in correcting anaemia, and worse baseline Hb and iron status compared to a prior survey. The on-going lack in awareness of evidence-based recommendations on iron supplementation emphasises the need for new educational strategies to improve implementation of current and upcoming guidelines.......Background: In 2009, a survey on anaemia management in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) revealed that treatment practice is not in line with treatment recommendations. Despite a high prevalence of severe anaemia and absolute iron deficiency, most patients received oral instead...... of intravenous (i.v.) iron. Since additional data on effective correction of anaemia with i.v. iron emerged in the meantime (FERGIcor), a new survey was performed in 2011 to evaluate whether treatment practice changed. Methods: Gastroenterologists in France, Germany, Spain, UK and Switzerland completed...

  14. Reproducibility and Validity of Dietary Patterns Assessed by a Food Frequency Questionnaire Used in the 5-Year Follow-Up Survey of the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nanri, Akiko; Shimazu, Taichi; Ishihara, Junko; Takachi, Ribeka; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of dietary pattern is increasingly popular in nutritional epidemiology. However, few studies have examined the validity and reproducibility of dietary patterns. We assessed the reproducibility and validity of dietary patterns identified by a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) used in the 5-year follow-up survey of the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study (JPHC Study). Methods The participants were a subsample (244 men and 254 women) from the JPHC Study. Princ...

  15. Earth Day 1990: Lesson Plan and Home Survey--K-6. Energy, Solid Waste/Recycling, Toxics, and Water, with Follow-up Activities and Action Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sly, Carolie; Ruskey, Abby

    The purpose of this K-6 curriculum is to provide teachers and other educators with classroom lessons and home surveys that are a starting point for understanding four significant environmental issues--water, toxics, energy, and solid waste/recycling. While each of these environmental issues is complex and has far-reaching implications, the lessons…

  16. Physics Doctorates One Year after Degree: Data from the Follow-Up Survey of Degree Recipients from the Classes of 2011 and 2012. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Patrick; Pold, Jack; Tesfaye, Casey

    2014-01-01

    Each fall the American Institute of Physics (AIP) Statistical Research Center conducts its Survey of Enrollments and Degrees, which asks all degree-granting physics and astronomy departments in the U.S. to provide information concerning the number of students they have enrolled and the counts of recent degree recipients. In connection with this…

  17. Physics Bachelor's Initial Employment: Data from the Degree Recipient Follow-Up Survey for the Classes of 2011 and 2012. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Patrick; Pold, Jack

    2015-01-01

    New physics bachelor's entering the workforce receive some of the highest starting salaries of any undergraduate majors. Each fall, the Statistical Research Center conducts its "Survey of Enrollments and Degrees," which asks physics and astronomy departments to provide information concerning the numbers of students they have enrolled and…

  18. Patient-reported outcomes at hospital discharge from Heart Centres, a national cross-sectional survey with a registerbased follow-up: the DenHeart study protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Selina; Svanholm, Jette; Lauberg, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    , comorbidity, length of hospital stay, type of hospitalisation, visits to general practitioners and other agents in primary healthcare, dispensed prescription medication, vital status and cause of death. Labour market affiliation, sick leave, early retirement pension, educational degree and income......, mortality, labour market affiliation and healthcare utilisation in various diagnostic groups. A national survey aiming to include all cardiac diagnostic groups from a total Heart Centre population has been designed as the DenHeart survey. Methods and analysis: DenHeart is designed as a cross...... in national registers. The following instruments are used: SF-12, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, EQ-5D, Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ), HeartQoL and Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale. The following variables are collected from national registers: action diagnosis, procedures...

  19. Changes in medical students' exposure to and attitudes about drug company interactions from 2003 to 2012: a multi-institutional follow-up survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierles, Frederick S; Kessler, Kenneth H; Mintz, Matthew; Beck, Gary; Starr, Stephanie; Lynn, D Joanne; Chao, Jason; Cleary, Lynn M; Shore, William; Stengel, Terrie L; Brodkey, Amy C

    2015-08-01

    To ascertain whether changes occurred in medical student exposure to and attitudes about drug company interactions from 2003-2012, which factors influence exposure and attitudes, and whether exposure and attitudes influence future plans to interact with drug companies. In 2012, the authors surveyed 1,269 third-year students at eight U.S. medical schools. Items explored student exposure to, attitudes toward, and future plans regarding drug company interactions. The authors compared 2012 survey data with their 2003 survey data from third-year students at the same schools. The 2012 response rate was 68.2% (866/1,269). Compared with 2003, in 2012, students were significantly less frequently exposed to interactions (1.6/month versus 4.1/month, P students (65.0%) reported private outpatient offices were the main location of exposure to pharmaceutical representatives, despite spending only 18.4% of their clerkship-rotation time there. In 2012, 310/703 students (44.1%) were unaware their schools had rules restricting interactions, and 467/837 (55.8%) planned to interact with pharmaceutical representatives during residency. Students in 2012 had less exposure to drug company interactions and were more likely to have skeptical attitudes than students in 2003. These changes are consistent with national organizations' recommendations to limit and teach about these interactions. Continued efforts to study and influence students' and physician role models' exposures to and attitudes about drug companies are warranted.

  20. MALT-45: A 7 mm survey of the southern Galaxy - II. ATCA follow-up observations of 44 GHz class I methanol masers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Christopher H.; Walsh, Andrew J.; Breen, Shari L.; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Voronkov, Maxim A.; Hyland, Lucas J.

    2017-11-01

    We detail interferometric observations of 44 GHz class I methanol masers detected by MALT-45 (a 7 mm unbiased auto-correlated spectral-line Galactic-plane survey) using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect 238 maser spots across 77 maser sites. Using high-resolution positions, we compare the class I CH3OH masers to other star formation maser species, including CS (1-0), SiO v = 0 and the H53 α radio-recombination line. Comparison between the cross- and auto-correlated data has allowed us to also identify quasi-thermal emission in the 44 GHz class I methanol maser line. We find that the majority of class I methanol masers have small spatial and velocity ranges (<0.5 pc and <5 km s-1), and closely trace the systemic velocities of associated clouds. Using 870 μm dust continuum emission from the ATLASGAL survey, we determine clump masses associated with class I masers, and find that they are generally associated with clumps between 1000 and 3000 M⊙. For each class I methanol maser site, we use the presence of OH masers and radio recombination lines to identify relatively evolved regions of high-mass star formation; we find that maser sites without these associations have lower luminosities and preferentially appear towards dark infrared regions.

  1. Proximity to terror and post-traumatic stress: a follow-up survey of governmental employees after the 2011 Oslo bombing attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Marianne B; Nissen, Alexander; Heir, Trond

    2013-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among governmental employees after the 2011 Oslo bombing attack targeted towards the Norwegian Ministries, and to explore the importance of proximity to the bomb explosion as a predictor of PTSD. A cross-sectional study. Data were collected from a survey 10 months after the Oslo bombing on 22 July 2011. A total of 3520 employees were invited to the study. Net samples comprised 1927 employees in 14 of the 17 Norwegian Ministries. The employees reported where they were at the time of the explosion. PTSD was assessed with the Norwegian version of the PTSD checklist (PCL). A total of 207 of the 1881 (11%) ministerial employees who completed the survey were present at work when the bomb exploded. Of these, a quarter (24%, 95% CI 18.4 to 30.0) had symptom levels equivalent to PTSD, while the prevalence was approximately 4% among those not present at work. In the latter group the prevalence was similar irrespective of whether their location was in Oslo, other places in Norway or abroad. Leadership responsibility was associated with lower risk for PTSD. The risk of PTSD is mainly associated with being present at work at the time of a terror attack. For those not present at work, the risk of PTSD is low and independent of proximity to the terror scene. The findings may have implications for planning and priority of healthcare services after a work place terror attack.

  2. Uptake and predictors of early postnatal follow-up care amongst mother-baby pairs in South Africa: Results from three population-based surveys, 2010-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Anna; Cheyip, Mireille; Aynalem, Getahun; Dinh, Thu-Ha; Jackson, Debra; Ngandu, Nobubelo; Chirinda, Witness; Mogashoa, Mary; Kindra, Gupreet; Lombard, Carl; Goga, Ameena

    2017-12-01

    Achieving World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for postnatal care (PNC) within the first few weeks of life is vital to eliminating early mother-to-child transmission of HIV (MTCT) and improving infant health. Almost half of the annual global deaths among children under five occur during the first six weeks of life. This study aims to identify uptake of three PNC visits within the first six weeks of life as recommended by WHO among South African mother-infant pairs, and factors associated with uptake. We analyzed data from three facility-based, nationally representative surveys (2010, 2011/12 and 2012/13) primarily designed to determine the effectiveness of the South African program to prevent MTCT. This analysis describes the proportion of infants achieving the WHO recommendation of at least 3 PNC visits. Interviews from 27 699 HIV-negative and HIV-positive mothers of infants aged 4-8 weeks receiving their six week immunization were included in analysis. Data were analyzed using STATA 13.0 and weighted for sample ascertainment and South African live births. We fitted a multivariable logistic regression model to estimate factors associated with early PNC uptake. Over half (59.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 59.0-60.3) of mother-infant pairs received the recommended three PNC visits during the first 6 weeks; uptake was 63.1% (95% CI = 61.9-64.3) amongst HIV exposed infants and 58.1% (95% CI = 57.3-58.9) amongst HIV unexposed infants. Uptake of early PNC improved significantly with each survey, but varied significantly by province. Multivariable analysis of the pooled data, controlling for survey year, demonstrated that number of antenatal visits (4+ vs 12 weeks, aOR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.04-1.23), place of delivery (clinic vs hospital aOR = 1.5, 1.3-1.6), and infant HIV exposure (exposed vs unexposed aOR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.1-1.2) were the key factors associated with receiving recommended PNC visits. Approximately 40% of

  3. Long-term effects of mental disorders on marital outcomes in the National Comorbidity Survey ten-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojtabai, Ramin; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Hwang, Irving; Eaton, William W; Sampson, Nancy; Kessler, Ronald C

    2017-10-01

    Epidemiological research has consistently shown an association between mental disorders and marital dissolution. However, this research mostly examined the association of divorce as a risk factor for mental illness. This study prospectively examined the associations of mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders with future marital dissolution and new marriages in a representative population sample. The study used data from the National Comorbidity Survey panel study-a two-wave community epidemiological survey of 5001 participants interviewed in 1990-1992 and re-interviewed in 2001-2003. Mental disorders were ascertained with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, a fully structured instrument. Associations of baseline lifetime disorders and disorders with onset after the baseline with subsequent divorce and marriage/remarriage were examined using discrete-time survival analysis models. Mental disorders at baseline or with onset after baseline were associated with significantly greater odds of subsequent divorce among respondents who either were married at baseline or got married after baseline. Mental disorders with onset after baseline were associated with smaller odds of marriage or remarriage. Projections assuming causal effects of mental illness on marital outcomes suggest that preventing the effects of common mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders would be associated with 6.7 million fewer divorces and 3.5 million more marriages in the US population over an 11-year period. Individuals with common mental disorders are at greater risk of marital dissolution and are less likely to enter new marriages. These factors contribute to the diminished social engagement and social support for individuals with these disorders. Interventions aimed at improving marital and family relationships could potentially ameliorate the effect of mental disorders on these vital social ties.

  4. Treatment approach, delivery, and follow-up evaluation for cardiac rhythm disease management patients receiving radiation therapy: retrospective physician surveys including chart reviews at numerous centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossman, Michael S; Wilkinson, Jeffrey D; Mallick, Avishek

    2014-01-01

    In a 2-part study, we first examined the results of 71 surveyed physicians who provided responses on how they address the management of patients who maintained either a pacemaker or a defibrillator during radiation treatment. Second, a case review study is presented involving 112 medical records reviewed at 18 institutions to determine whether there was a change in the radiation prescription for the treatment of the target cancer, the method of radiation delivery, or the method of radiation image acquisition. Statistics are provided to illustrate the level of administrative policy; the level of communication between radiation oncologists and heart specialists; American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging and classification; National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines; tumor site; patient׳s sex; patient׳s age; device type; manufacturer; live monitoring; and the reported decisions for planning, delivery, and imaging. This survey revealed that 37% of patient treatments were considered for some sort of change in this regard, whereas 59% of patients were treated without regard to these alternatives when available. Only 3% of all patients were identified with an observable change in the functionality of the device or patient status in comparison with 96% of patients with normal behavior and operating devices. Documented changes in the patient׳s medical record included 1 device exhibiting failure at 0.3-Gy dose, 1 device exhibiting increased sensor rate during dose delivery, 1 patient having an irregular heartbeat leading to device reprogramming, and 1 patient complained of twinging in the chest wall that resulted in a respiratory arrest. Although policies and procedures should directly involve the qualified medical physicist for technical supervision, their sufficient involvement was typically not requested by most respondents. No treatment options were denied to any patient based on AJCC staging, classification, or NCCN practice standards. Copyright

  5. Treatment approach, delivery, and follow-up evaluation for cardiac rhythm disease management patients receiving radiation therapy: Retrospective physician surveys including chart reviews at numerous centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gossman, Michael S., E-mail: MGossman@TSRCC.com [Regulation Directive Medical Physics, Russell, KY (United States); Wilkinson, Jeffrey D. [Medtronic, Inc., Mounds View, MN (United States); Mallick, Avishek [Department of Mathematics, Marshall University, Huntington, WV (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In a 2-part study, we first examined the results of 71 surveyed physicians who provided responses on how they address the management of patients who maintained either a pacemaker or a defibrillator during radiation treatment. Second, a case review study is presented involving 112 medical records reviewed at 18 institutions to determine whether there was a change in the radiation prescription for the treatment of the target cancer, the method of radiation delivery, or the method of radiation image acquisition. Statistics are provided to illustrate the level of administrative policy; the level of communication between radiation oncologists and heart specialists; American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging and classification; National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines; tumor site; patient's sex; patient's age; device type; manufacturer; live monitoring; and the reported decisions for planning, delivery, and imaging. This survey revealed that 37% of patient treatments were considered for some sort of change in this regard, whereas 59% of patients were treated without regard to these alternatives when available. Only 3% of all patients were identified with an observable change in the functionality of the device or patient status in comparison with 96% of patients with normal behavior and operating devices. Documented changes in the patient's medical record included 1 device exhibiting failure at 0.3-Gy dose, 1 device exhibiting increased sensor rate during dose delivery, 1 patient having an irregular heartbeat leading to device reprogramming, and 1 patient complained of twinging in the chest wall that resulted in a respiratory arrest. Although policies and procedures should directly involve the qualified medical physicist for technical supervision, their sufficient involvement was typically not requested by most respondents. No treatment options were denied to any patient based on AJCC staging, classification, or NCCN practice standards.

  6. Register-based follow-up of social benefits and other transfer payments: accuracy and degree of completeness in a Danish interdepartmental administrative database compared with a population-based survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjøllund, Niels Henrik Ingvar; Andersen, Johan Hvid; Larsen, F. B.

    2007-01-01

    database includes information on all public transfer payments administered by Danish ministries, municipalities, and Statistics Denmark for all Danish citizens on a weekly basis since 1991. The DREAM database was compared with self-reported information on sources of income in a population survey from 2001......BACKGROUND: Social consequences of disease may be subject to register based follow-up. A Danish database, DREAM, allows weekly follow-up of any public transfer payment. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of the register for use in public health research. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The DREAM...... with about 5000 participants. RESULTS: According to DREAM, 80.2% of respondents had received some kind of transfer income since 1991. For the week they filled in the questionnaire, 9.0% had a record of labour-market-related benefit (unemployment benefit, social assistance, wage subsidy), 6.4% a health...

  7. Time trends in leisure time physical activity and physical fitness in elderly people: 20 year follow-up of the Spanish population national health survey (1987-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrasco-Garrido Pilar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To estimate trends in leisure time physical activity and physical fitness between 1987-2006 in older Spanish people. Methods We analyzed data collected from the Spanish National Health Surveys conducted in 1987 (n = 29,647, 1993 (n = 20,707, 1995-1997 (n = 12,800, 2001 (n = 21,058, 2003 (n = 21,650, and 2006 (n = 29,478. The number of subjects aged ≥ 65 years included in the current study was 29,263 (1987: n = 4,958-16.7%; 1993: n = 3,751-17.8%; 1995-97: n = 2,229-17.4%; 2001: n = 4,356-20.7%; 2003: 6,134-28.3%; 2006: 7,835-26.5%. Main variables included leisure-time physical activity and physical fitness. We analyzed socio-demographic characteristics, self-rated health status, lifestyle habit and co-morbid conditions using multivariate logistic regression models. Results Women exhibited lower prevalence of leisure time physical activity and physical fitness compared to men (P Conclusions We found an increase in leisure time physical activity in the older Spanish population. Older age, married status, co-morbid conditions, obesity, and worse self-perceived health status were associated with lower activity. Identification of these factors can help to identify individuals at risk for physical inactivity.

  8. Perceived relative harm of electronic cigarettes over time and impact on subsequent use. A survey with 1-year and 2-year follow-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brose, Leonie S; Brown, Jamie; Hitchman, Sara C; McNeill, Ann

    2015-12-01

    Media presentations of e-cigarettes may affect perception of the devices which may influence use. To assess in a cohort of past-year smokers (1) if perceived harm of e-cigarettes relative to cigarettes changed over time, (2) predictors of perceived relative harm, (3) if perceived relative harm predicted subsequent e-cigarette use among never-users. Longitudinal web-based survey of a general population sample of British smokers and ex-smokers, waves in 2012 (n=4553), 2013 and 2014 (44%, 31% response rate, respectively). Changes over time were assessed using Friedman and McNemar tests, n=1204. Perceived relative harm at wave 3 was regressed onto perceived relative harm at waves 1 and 2, while adjusting for socio-demographics and change in smoking and e-cigarette status, n=1204. Wave 2 e-cigarette use among 1588 wave 1 never-users was regressed onto wave 1 socio-demographics, smoking status and perceived relative harm. Perceived relative harm changed (χ(2)=20.67, ptime. Clear information on the relative harm of cigarettes and e-cigarettes is needed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Tim A.; Greenstreet, S.; Gomez, E.; Christensen, E.; Larson, S.

    2016-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network size of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and additionally for the discovery of new objects. We are using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1&2) and several hundred targets are now being followed per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO follow-up portal which will allow professionals, amateurs and Citizen Scientists to plan, schedule and analyze NEO imaging and spectroscopy observations and data using the LCOGT Network and to act as a co-ordination hub for the NEO follow-up efforts.

  10. Appraisal of elastic follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Elastic computations are widely used in structural analysis, and their results are used when material behaviour is non elastic. The current practice is the partition of the computed stress between primary and secondary stress. The basic characteristic of primary stress is that it is not self limiting. On the contrary the basic characteristic of a secondary stress is that it is self limiting, and failure from one application of the stress is not to be expected. It must be emphasized that self limitation is not sufficient and that it is also necessary that strains are small enough to avoid any material disorder. Unfortunately, elastic computations do not give real strain distribution and computed strain in highly stressed areas can be magnified under conditions of plastic temperature is high enough, an undesirable amount of creep occurs in areas of reduced strength and failure can happen. In creep range, to avoid elastic follow up, the most important part of elastically computed stress is considered as primary. This practice is over conservative, and the aim of this paper is to provide indications to choise what fraction of a self limiting stress can be considered as secondary. (orig./GL)

  11. The Kepler follow-up observation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier...[], T.N.; Batalha, N.M.; Borucki, W. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched on March 6, 2009 to perform a photometric survey of more than 100,000 dwarf stars to search for terrestrial-size planets with the transit technique. Follow-up observations of planetary candidates identified by detection of transit-like events are needed both...... for identification of astrophysical phenomena that mimic planetary transits and for characterization of the true planets and planetary systems found by Kepler. We have developed techniques and protocols for detection of false planetary transits and are currently conducting observations on 177 Kepler targets...

  12. The yield of high-detail radiographic skeletal surveys in suspected infant abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Ignasi [Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Pediatric Radiology Department, Barcelona (Spain); Perez-Rossello, Jeannette M.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Radiology Department, Boston, MA (United States); Wilson, Celeste R. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Division of General Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-07-06

    Skeletal surveys are routinely performed in cases of suspected child abuse, but there are limited data regarding the yield of high-detail skeletal surveys in infants. To determine the diagnostic yield of high-detail radiographic skeletal surveys in suspected infant abuse. We reviewed the high-detail American College of Radiology standardized skeletal surveys performed for suspected abuse in 567 infants (median: 4.4 months, SD 3.47; range: 4 days-12 months) at a large urban children's hospital between 2005 and 2013. Skeletal survey images, radiology reports and medical records were reviewed. A skeletal survey was considered positive when it showed at least one unsuspected fracture. In 313 of 567 infants (55%), 1,029 definite fractures were found. Twenty-one percent (119/567) of the patients had a positive skeletal survey with a total of 789 (77%) unsuspected fractures. Long-bone fractures were the most common injuries, present in 145 children (26%). The skull was the site of fracture in 138 infants (24%); rib cage in 77 (14%), clavicle in 24 (4.2%) and uncommon fractures (including spine, scapula, hands and feet and pelvis) were noted in 26 infants (4.6%). Of the 425 infants with neuroimaging, 154 (36%) had intracranial injury. No significant correlation between positive skeletal survey and associated intracranial injury was found. Scapular fractures and complex skull fractures showed a statistically significant correlation with intracranial injury (P = 0.029, P = 0.007, respectively). Previously unsuspected fractures are noted on skeletal surveys in 20% of cases of suspected infant abuse. These data may be helpful in the design and optimization of global skeletal imaging in this vulnerable population. (orig.)

  13. The yield of high-detail radiographic skeletal surveys in suspected infant abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Ignasi; Perez-Rossello, Jeannette M.; Kleinman, Paul K.; Wilson, Celeste R.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal surveys are routinely performed in cases of suspected child abuse, but there are limited data regarding the yield of high-detail skeletal surveys in infants. To determine the diagnostic yield of high-detail radiographic skeletal surveys in suspected infant abuse. We reviewed the high-detail American College of Radiology standardized skeletal surveys performed for suspected abuse in 567 infants (median: 4.4 months, SD 3.47; range: 4 days-12 months) at a large urban children's hospital between 2005 and 2013. Skeletal survey images, radiology reports and medical records were reviewed. A skeletal survey was considered positive when it showed at least one unsuspected fracture. In 313 of 567 infants (55%), 1,029 definite fractures were found. Twenty-one percent (119/567) of the patients had a positive skeletal survey with a total of 789 (77%) unsuspected fractures. Long-bone fractures were the most common injuries, present in 145 children (26%). The skull was the site of fracture in 138 infants (24%); rib cage in 77 (14%), clavicle in 24 (4.2%) and uncommon fractures (including spine, scapula, hands and feet and pelvis) were noted in 26 infants (4.6%). Of the 425 infants with neuroimaging, 154 (36%) had intracranial injury. No significant correlation between positive skeletal survey and associated intracranial injury was found. Scapular fractures and complex skull fractures showed a statistically significant correlation with intracranial injury (P = 0.029, P = 0.007, respectively). Previously unsuspected fractures are noted on skeletal surveys in 20% of cases of suspected infant abuse. These data may be helpful in the design and optimization of global skeletal imaging in this vulnerable population. (orig.)

  14. [A self-improvement and participatory career development education program involving internships and volunteer training experience for pharmacy students: results verified in a follow-up survey three years after participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurio, Wasako; Konishi, Motomi; Okuno, Tomofumi; Nakao, Teruyuki; Kimura, Tomoki; Tsuji, Takumi; Yamamuro, Akiko; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nishikawa, Tomoe; Yanada, Kazuo; Yasuhara, Tomohisa; Kohno, Takeyuki; Ogita, Kiyokazu; Sone, Tomomichi

    2014-01-01

    The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Setsunan University, offers the Self-improvement and Participatory Career Development Education Program: Internship and Volunteer Training Experience for Pharmacy Students to third-year students. We previously reported that the training experience was effective in cultivating important attributes among students, such as a willingness to learn the aims of pharmacists, an awareness of their own role as healthcare workers, and a desire to reflect on their future careers and lives. A follow-up survey of the participants was carried out three years after the training experience. The questionnaire verified that the training experience affected attendance at subsequent lectures and course determination after graduation. We confirmed the relationship between the participants' degree of satisfaction with the training experience and increased motivation for attending subsequent lectures. Through the training experience, participants discovered future targets and subjects of study. In addition, they became more interested in subsequent classroom lessons and their future. The greater the participants' degree of satisfaction with their training experience, the more interest they took in practical training and future courses. The present study clarified that the training experience was effective in cultivating important attributes such as a willingness to learn and an interest in future courses. Moreover, the training positively affected the course determination after graduation.

  15. Antisocial Behavioral Syndromes in Adulthood and Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment over Three-Year Follow-Up: Results from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B; Dawson, Deborah A; Grant, Bridget F

    2010-07-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is associated with poorer treatment outcomes, but more help seeking, for alcohol use disorders (AUDs); however, associations of ASPD with AUD treatment in the general population have not been studied prospectively. To examine prediction of treatment over 3-year follow-up among adults with AUDs by baseline ASPD and syndromal adult antisocial behavior without conduct disorder before age 15 (AABS). Face-to-face interviews with 34,653 respondents to the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, of whom 3875 had prevalent AUDs between Waves 1 and 2 and ASPD, AABS, or no antisocial syndrome at Wave 1. In unadjusted analyses, baseline ASPD predicted AUD treatment but AABS did not. After adjustment for additional need, predisposing, and enabling factors, antisocial syndromes did not predict treatment. Baseline predictors of treatment included more past-year AUD symptoms, and past-year nicotine dependence and AUD treatment. That baseline antisocial syndrome did not predict AUD treatment may reflect strong associations of antisociality with previously identified predictors of help seeking.

  16. Follow-up interviews after eclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersgaard, Alice Beathe; Herbst, Andreas; Johansen, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    hundred and twenty-three women (59%) were followed up with a structured telephone interview, 6-24 months (median 11) after their eclamptic fit. Results: At the time of follow-up, 63 women (51%) had at least one persistent symptom; 2 patients had severe neurological sequels (hemiparesis and dysarthria), 11...

  17. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Pope, Jenny; Bond, Alan; Retief, Francois

    2014-01-01

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently

  18. Follow-up in Childhood Functional Constipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modin, Line; Walsted, Anne-Mette; Rittig, Charlotte Siggaard

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Guidelines recommend close follow-up during treatment of childhood functional constipation. Only sparse evidence exists on how follow-up is best implemented. Our aim was to evaluate if follow-up by phone or self-management through web-based information improved treatment outcomes....... METHODS: In this randomized, controlled trial, conducted in secondary care, 235 children, aged 2-16 years, who fulfilled the Rome III criteria of childhood constipation, were assigned to one of three follow-up regimens: (I) control group (no scheduled contact), (II) phone group (2 scheduled phone contacts......: Improved self-management behavior caused by access to self-motivated web-based information induced faster short-term recovery during treatment of functional constipation. Patient empowerment rather than health care promoted follow-up might be a step towards more effective treatment for childhood...

  19. Does somatic illness explain the association between common mental disorder and elevated mortality? Findings from extended follow-up of study members in the UK Health and Lifestyle Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, G David; Hamer, Mark; Der, Geoff

    2012-07-01

    Common mental disorder (psychological distress) is associated with an increased risk of disease-specific mortality. Given that physical illness is related to both exposure and outcome, it may explain this relation through confounding or mediation. The authors used a 20-year follow-up of the UK Health and Lifestyle Survey (6127 men and women) in which common mental disorder was ascertained at baseline using the 30 item General Health Questionnaire and physical illness using a range of enquiries. Study members were an average of 45.2 years (SD 17.0) at study induction. In age-adjusted analyses, a 1 SD increase in common mental disorder score was associated with an elevated risk of mortality outcomes coronary heart disease (CHD) in men (HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.27), CHD in women (1.33, 1.16 to 1.51); plus, in men and women combined, stroke (1.13, 0.96 to 1.30), respiratory disease (1.31, 1.15 to 1.48), lung cancer (1.11, 0.92 to 1.33), 'other' cancer (1.14, 1.03 to 1.26) and all causes (1.18, 1.12 to 1.23). Controlling for prior physical illness effectively eliminated the common mental disorder-mortality relation in all analyses with the exception of CHD in women. That physical illness largely explains the link between common mental disorder and mortality in the present cohort is compatible with either a confounding or mediation explanation.

  20. Risk Factors for Obesity at Age 3 in Alaskan Children, Including the Role of Beverage Consumption: Results from Alaska PRAMS 2005-2006 and Its Three-Year Follow-Up Survey, CUBS, 2008-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcicki, Janet M.; Young, Margaret B.; Perham-Hester, Katherine A.; de Schweinitz, Peter; Gessner, Bradford D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prenatal and early life risk factors are associated with childhood obesity. Alaska Native children have one of the highest prevalences of childhood obesity of all US racial/ethnic groups. Methods Using the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) and the follow-up survey at 3 years of age (CUBS), we evaluated health, behavioral, lifestyle and nutritional variables in relation to obesity (95th percentile for body mass index (BMI)) at 3 years of age. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was conducted using Stata 12.0 to evaluate independent risk factors for obesity in non-Native and Alaska Native children. Results We found an obesity prevalence of 24.9% in all Alaskan and 42.2% in Alaska Native 3 year olds. Among Alaska Native children, obesity prevalence was highest in the Northern/Southwest part of the state (51.6%, 95%CI (42.6-60.5)). Independent predictive factors for obesity at age 3 years in Alaska non-Native children were low income (obesity (OR 2.01, 95%CI 1.01-4.01) and longer duration of breastfeeding was protective (OR 0.95, 95%CI 0.91-0.995). Among Alaska Native children, predictive factors were witnessing domestic violence/abuse as a 3 year-old (OR 2.28, 95%CI 1.17-7.60). Among obese Alaska Native children, there was an increased daily consumption of energy dense beverages in the Northern/Southwest region of the state, which may explain higher rates of obesity in this part of the state. Conclusions The high prevalence of obesity in Alaska Native children may be explained by differences in lifestyle patterns and food consumption in certain parts of the state, specifically the Northern/Southwest region, which have higher consumption of energy dense beverages. PMID:25793411

  1. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; hide

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  2. Preoperative Short Form Health Survey Score Is Predictive of Return to Play and Minimal Clinically Important Difference at a Minimum 2-Year Follow-up After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Chang, Brenda; Voleti, Pramod B; Berkanish, Patricia; Cohn, Matthew R; Altchek, David W; Allen, Answorth A; Williams, Riley J

    2017-10-01

    There is increased interest in understanding the preoperative determinants of postoperative outcomes. Return to play (RTP) and the patient-reported minimal clinically important difference (MCID) are useful measures of postoperative outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). To define the MCID after ACLR and to investigate the role of preoperative outcome scores for predicting the MCID and RTP after ACLR. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. There were 294 active athletes enrolled as part of an institutional ACL registry with a minimum 2-year follow-up who were eligible for inclusion. A questionnaire was administered to elicit factors associated with RTP. Patient demographic and clinical data as well as patient-reported outcome measures were captured as part of the registry. Outcome measures included the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation form, Lysholm scale, and 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS). Preoperative outcome score thresholds predictive of RTP were determined using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) with area under the curve (AUC) analysis. The MCID was calculated using a distribution-based method. Multivariable logistic models were fitted to identify predictors for achieving the MCID and RTP. At a mean (±SD) follow-up of 3.7 ± 0.7 years, 231 patients were included from a total 294 eligible patients. The mean age and body mass index were 26.7 ± 12.5 years and 23.7 ± 3.2 kg/m 2 , respectively. Of the 231 patients, 201 (87.0%) returned to play at a mean time of 10.1 months. Two-year postoperative scores on all measures were significantly increased from preoperative scores (IKDC: 50.1 ± 15.6 to 87.4 ± 10.7; Lysholm: 61.2 ± 18.1 to 89.5 ± 10.4; SF-12 PCS: 41.5 ± 9.0 to 54.7 ± 4.6; SF-12 MCS: 53.6 ± 8.1 to 55.7 ± 5.7; P Preoperative score thresholds predictive of RTP were the following: IKDC, 60

  3. Audit Follow-up Tracking System (AFTS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Audit Follow-up Tracking System (AFTS) is used to track, monitor, and report on audits and open recommendations of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM)...

  4. Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms as Predictors of All-Cause Mortality among People with Insulin-Naïve Type 2 Diabetes: 17-Year Follow-Up of the Second Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey (HUNT2, Norway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein M Iversen

    Full Text Available To examine whether elevated anxiety and/or depressive symptoms are related to all-cause mortality in people with Type 2 diabetes, not using insulin.948 participants in the community-wide Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey conducted during 1995-97 completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale with subscales of anxiety (HADS-A and depression (HADS-D. Elevated symptoms were defined as HADS-A or HADS-D ≥8. Participants with type 2 diabetes, not using insulin, were followed until November 21, 2012 or death. Cox regression analyses were used to estimate associations between baseline elevated anxiety symptoms, elevated depressive symptoms and mortality, adjusting for sociodemographic factors, HbA1c, cardiovascular disease and microvascular complications.At baseline, 8% (n = 77/948 reported elevated anxiety symptoms, 9% (n = 87/948 elevated depressive symptoms and 10% (n = 93/948 reported both. After a mean follow-up of 12 years (SD 5.1, range 0-17, 541 participants (57% had died. Participants with elevated anxiety symptoms only had a decreased mortality risk (unadjusted HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.46-0.96. Adjustment for HbA1c attenuated this relation (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.50-1.07. Those with elevated depression symptoms alone had an increased mortality risk (fully adjusted model HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.05-1.84. Having both elevated anxiety and depressive symptoms was not associated with increased mortality risk (adjusted HR 1.30, 95% CI 0.96-1.74.Elevated depressive symptoms were associated with excess mortality risk in people with Type 2 diabetes not using insulin. No significant association with mortality was found among people with elevated anxiety symptoms. Having both elevated anxiety and depressive symptoms was not associated with mortality. The hypothesis that elevated levels of anxiety symptoms leads to behavior that counteracts the adverse health effects of Type 2 diabetes needs further investigation.

  5. Risk factors for obesity at age 3 in Alaskan children, including the role of beverage consumption: results from Alaska PRAMS 2005-2006 and its three-year follow-up survey, CUBS, 2008-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M Wojcicki

    Full Text Available Prenatal and early life risk factors are associated with childhood obesity. Alaska Native children have one of the highest prevalences of childhood obesity of all US racial/ethnic groups.Using the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS and the follow-up survey at 3 years of age (CUBS, we evaluated health, behavioral, lifestyle and nutritional variables in relation to obesity (95th percentile for body mass index (BMI at 3 years of age. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was conducted using Stata 12.0 to evaluate independent risk factors for obesity in non-Native and Alaska Native children.We found an obesity prevalence of 24.9% in all Alaskan and 42.2% in Alaska Native 3 year olds. Among Alaska Native children, obesity prevalence was highest in the Northern/Southwest part of the state (51.6%, 95%CI (42.6-60.5. Independent predictive factors for obesity at age 3 years in Alaska non-Native children were low income (<$10,000 in the year before the child was born (OR 3.94, 95%CI 1.22--17.03 and maternal pre-pregnancy obesity (OR 2.01, 95%CI 1.01-4.01 and longer duration of breastfeeding was protective (OR 0.95, 95%CI 0.91-0.995. Among Alaska Native children, predictive factors were witnessing domestic violence/abuse as a 3 year-old (OR 2.28, 95%CI 1.17-7.60. Among obese Alaska Native children, there was an increased daily consumption of energy dense beverages in the Northern/Southwest region of the state, which may explain higher rates of obesity in this part of the state.The high prevalence of obesity in Alaska Native children may be explained by differences in lifestyle patterns and food consumption in certain parts of the state, specifically the Northern/Southwest region, which have higher consumption of energy dense beverages.

  6. Follow-up after rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovdenak Jakobsen, Ida; Juul, Therese; Bernstein, Inge

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main treatment for non-metastatic rectal cancer (RC) is surgical resection. Late adverse effects that are highly prevalent and negatively impact patients' symptom burden and quality of life are: bowel-, urological and sexual dysfunctions; psychological distress; fear of recurrence....... As a consequence, the randomized controlled trial Follow-up after Rectal Cancer (FURCA) has been launched, testing the effect of a new patient-led, follow-up program. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology used in the FURCA study and to report results from the development of the patient-led, follow......, or a control group following the current follow-up program with routine medicals. The primary outcomes are symptom burden and quality of life, measured by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Colorectal (FACT-C) questionnaire. Other outcome and demographic data are collected as patient...

  7. Radiological follow-up of inverted papilloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, P.; Vivarrat-Perrin, L.; Champsaur, P.; Juhan, V.; Chagnaud, C.; Vidal, V.; Gaubert, J.Y.; Bartoli, J.M.; Moulin, G. [Department of Radiology, Groupe Hospitalier de la Timone, Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Marseille, F-13385 Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Dessi, P.; Zanaret, M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Groupe Hospitalier de la Timone, Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Marseille, F-13385 Marseille Cedex 5 (France)

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe cross-sectional imaging features of recurrent papilloma of the nasal fossa and paranasal sinuses and to evaluate the role of MR and CT in the postoperative follow-up of this lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging and CT of ten patients who presented recurrence of inverted papilloma were reviewed and correlated to initial imaging, endoscopy, and surgical reports. Imaging patterns of recurrent inverted papilloma are identical to those of initial tumors and recurrence location is closely related to the site of the former lesion. Magnetic resonance is more efficient than CT for the diagnosis and evaluation of extensions. Magnetic resonance supplies the deficiencies of endoscopy in case of extensions to the frontal sinus or the lateral recess of the antrum, especially if mucosal hyperplasia or sinusitis is associated. Magnetic resonance imaging is the first imaging modality to perform in the follow-up after removal of inverted papilloma. (orig.)

  8. [Follow-up after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsø, Dag; Aasheim, Erlend T; Søvik, Torgeir T; Jakobsen, Gunn Signe; Johnson, Line Kristin; Sandbu, Rune; Aas, Alf Tore; Kristinsson, Jon; Hjelmesæth, Jøran

    2011-10-04

    The number of bariatric surgical procedures in Norway is increasing. Patients who undergo bariatric surgery may experience surgical, medical and nutritional complications. Follow-up of these patients is therefore important. The article is based on non-systematic literature searches in PubMed and on the clinical experience of the authors. Bariatric surgery induces significant and sustained weight loss and improves obesity-related disorders. Gastric bypass is the most commonly performed bariatric procedure in Norway. This procedure is associated with a 30-day mortality of below 0.5 %, while severe complications occur in approximately 5 % of patients. Late complications include internal herniation, intestinal ulcers and gallbladder disease. After surgery all patients are given iron, vitamin D/calcium and vitamin B12 supplements to prevent vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Gastrointestinal symptoms and postprandial hypoglycaemia after surgery can be improved by dietary modifications, and the need for anti-diabetic and blood pressure lowering medications is reduced. Dose adjustment of other medications may also be necessary. Pregnancy is not recommended during the first year after bariatric surgery. Many patients need plastic surgery after the operation. Complications after bariatric surgery may manifest in the long term. Regular follow-up is required. General practitioners should be responsible for follow-up in the long term, and should be familiar with common and serious complications as well as normal symptomatology after bariatric surgery.

  9. Perfusion volume correlates, percentage of involution, and clinical efficacy at diverse follow-up survey times after MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery in uterine fibroids: first report in a Mexican mestizo population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco-Choque, Ana Luz; Fernandez-de Lara, Yeni; Vivas-Bonilla, Ingrid; Romero-Trejo, Cecilia [Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Mexico City (Mexico); Villa, Antonio R. [UNAM, Division de Investigacion, Facultad de Medicina, Mexico City (Mexico); Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto [Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Mexico City (Mexico); Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Coordination of Research and Innovation, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery in a Mexican mestizo population. This retrospective study included 159 women (mean age 37 ± 6.4 years, range 22-53 years) from 2008 to 2010. Two hundred sixty-eight symptomatic uterine fibroids were treated using MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. Parameters included initial perfused volume, final perfused volume, non-perfused volume (NPV), and treated volume ratio (TVR). Follow-up up to 15 months assessed treatment efficacy and symptomatic relief. Non-parametric statistics and the Kaplan-Meier method were performed. T{sub 2}-weighted hypointense fibroids showed a frequency of 93.6 %; isointense and hyperintense fibroids had frequencies of 5.60 and 1.1 %. There was a negative correlation between NPV and age (r = -0.083, p = 0.307) and treatment time (r = -0.253, p = 0.001). Median TVR was 96.0 % in small fibroids and 76.5 % in large fibroids. Involution of 50 % and 80 % was achieved at months 6-7 and month 11, respectively. Relief of symptoms was significant (p < 0.05). Our data show that higher TVR attained immediately post-treatment of MRgFUS favours higher involution percentages at follow-up; however, careful patient selection and use of pretreatment imaging are important components for predicting success using MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. (orig.)

  10. Follow-up of colorectal cancer patients: quality of life and attitudes towards follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiggelbout, A. M.; de Haes, J. C.; Vree, R.; van de Velde, C. J.; Bruijninckx, C. M.; van Groningen, K.; Kievit, J.

    1997-01-01

    The aims of our study were to assess the effect of follow-up on the quality of life of colorectal cancer patients and to assess the attitudes of patients towards follow-up as a function of patient characteristics. Patients who had been treated with curative intent were selected from four types of

  11. Loss of Follow-up in Orthopaedic Trauma: Who Is Getting Lost to Follow-up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Boris A; Buttacavoli, Frank A; Shroff, Jeffrey B; Stirton, Jacob B

    2015-11-01

    Noncompliance with postoperative follow-up visits remains a common problem in orthopaedic trauma. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for loss of follow-up after orthopaedic trauma. Retrospective review. Urban level 1 academic trauma center. A total of 307 (226 men/81 women) patients undergoing surgical treatment of their orthopaedic injuries were included in this study. The average age was 40.4 ± 17 years. All patients were treated surgically for their orthopaedic injuries and were instructed to follow-up in the orthopaedic trauma clinic after hospital discharge. Noncompliance with follow-up appointment at 6 months after injury. Over a 6-month postoperative period, a total of 215 patients were noncompliant with at least one of their follow-up appointments between hospital discharge and the 6-month follow-up. A logistic regression showed male gender, uninsured or government insurance, and smoker to be statistically significant risk factors for noncompliance with the 6-month follow-up (P trauma. Our study suggests different risk factors for noncompliance, including male gender, smoker, lack of commercial health insurance, and illicit drug abuse. Health care providers may consider establishing protocols for facilitating follow-up appointments to patients who are at risk for noncompliance.

  12. Who are we missing? Too few skeletal surveys for children with humeral and femoral fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelmerdine, S.C.; Das, R.; Ingram, M.D.; Negus, S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine the potential shortfall in skeletal survey referral for children presenting with an acute non-supracondylar humeral or femoral fracture. Materials and methods: Plain radiograph reports were reviewed retrospectively using the radiology information system database over a 5 year study period (May 2008–2013) in children under 18 months of age who presented with an acute fracture. Subsequent skeletal survey referral was used as a surrogate marker for further investigation of child abuse. Application of robust meta-analysis derived probability data regarding likelihood of child abuse as a cause of non-supracondylar humeral or femoral fracture was applied. An estimation of the expected number of cases of abuse, with shortfall in skeletal survey referrals, was then calculated. Results: There were 288 fractures in 281 children. Three children presented with multiple fractures and were considered separately in the present data. The mean patient age was 10.5 months. Nine (3%) non-supracondylar humeral fractures were identified of which four cases may have been due to non-accidental injury (NAI). One (11%) of these patients was referred for a skeletal survey indicating a potential shortfall of three referrals. Twenty-five (9%) femoral fractures were identified of which 13 cases may have been due to NAI, with six (24%) referrals for skeletal surveys generated. This indicates a potential shortfall of seven referrals. Conclusion: The present study serves as a current analysis of practice within a tertiary paediatric referral centre. There appeared to be local under-investigation of NAI. Improved child protection education and awareness programmes have now been introduced. - Highlights: • Long bone fractures in non-ambulatory children carry high probability for child abuse. • Suspicion for child abuse should trigger a referral for a skeletal survey. • We examine the potential shortfall in skeletal survey referrals in such patients. • Only 11% and 24% of

  13. Follow-Up Multicenter Alpha Counting Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, J. D.; Clark, B. M.; Wong, R.; Slayman, C.; Gordon, M. S.; He, Y.; Marckmann, J.; McNally, B. D.; Wu, T.

    2014-08-01

    A follow-up alpha emissivity study was conducted to examine the wide variability observed in previous work that was hypothesized to be due to differences in the pulse height discrimination threshold among participant's equipment. Two samples, one mixed energy and one monoenergetic, were prepared and sequentially circulated to all participants for counting. Analysis of the data demonstrates that only a small portion of the variability is explained by this mechanism. The role of the sample to entrance window gap for some counters was analyzed post hoc using the same data set and may be responsible for a large amount of the variability. The results of this large-scale study demonstrate the continuing uncertainty for these measurements and the importance of interpreting their results appropriately when estimating soft error rates.

  14. Spectroscopic follow up of Kepler planet candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latham..[], D. W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using......Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from...... spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars...

  15. Spectroscopic follow up of Kepler planet candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latham..[], D. W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from...... spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars...... and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using...

  16. [Allogeneic parathyroid: 2-year follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermosillo-Sandoval, José Manuel; Leonher-Ruezga, Karla Lisseth; Jiménez-Gómez, José Alfredo; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; González-Ojeda, Alejandro; Ramírez-González, Luis Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is one of the most frequent complications of neck surgery. The treatment is currently medical; however this involves several complications secondary to high doses of calcium and vitamin D, thus making parathyroid allotransplantation a good management option. Patients with hypoparathyroidism were selected in the April-December period of 2011 in the general surgical clinic. They were between 16 and 65 years, and ingested high doses of calcium. The donors were patients with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism, and the transplants were performed in relation to blood group and human leucocyte antigen. Five parathyroid allografts were performed. All the patients had iatrogenic hypoparathyroidism, all women with a mean age of 49.8 years. The graft was implanted under local anaesthesia in the non-dominant forearm. Four of the patients are so far considered functional due to the increase in paratohormone, and demonstrating its function by scintigraphy with sestamibi. One of the patients showed no increase in paratohormone or imaging studies that demonstrate its functionality. After a two year follow up the graft remains functional but with with oral calcium intake at a lower dose than before transplantation. None of the patients had immunosuppression side effects. In this study, allogeneic unrelated living parathyroid transplant with an immunosuppressive regimen of six months has proven to be a safe alternative treatment to improve quality of life by decreasing the excessive calcium intake and improving physical activity with adequate graft survival at 24 months follow up. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Complications Following the Mini/One Anastomosis Gastric Bypass (MGB/OAGB): a Multi-institutional Survey on 2678 Patients with a Mid-term (5 Years) Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musella, Mario; Susa, Antonio; Manno, Emilio; De Luca, Maurizio; Greco, Francesco; Raffaelli, Marco; Cristiano, Stefano; Milone, Marco; Bianco, Paolo; Vilardi, Antonio; Damiano, Ivana; Segato, Gianni; Pedretti, Laura; Giustacchini, Piero; Fico, Domenico; Veroux, Gastone; Piazza, Luigi

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, several articles have reported considerable results with the Mini/One Anastomosis Gastric Bypass (MGB/OAGB) in terms of both weight loss and resolution of comorbidities. Despite those positive reports, some controversies still limit the widespread acceptance of this procedure. Therefore, a multicenter retrospective study, with the aim to investigate complications following this procedure, has been designed. To report the complications rate following the MGB/OAGB and their management, and to assess the role of this approach in determining eventual complications related especially to the loop reconstruction, in the early and late postoperative periods, the clinical records of 2678 patients who underwent MGB/OAGB between 2006 and 2015 have been studied. Intraoperative and early complications rates were 0.5 and 3.1%, respectively. Follow-up at 5 years was 62.6%. Late complications rate was 10.1%. A statistical correlation was found for perioperative bleeding both with operative time (p < 0.001) or a learning curve of less than 50 cases (p < 0.001). A statistical correlation was found for postoperative duodenal-gastro-esophageal reflux (DGER) with a preexisting gastro-esophageal-reflux disease (GERD) or with a gastric pouch shorter than 9 cm, (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001), respectively. An excessive weight loss correlated with a biliopancreatic limb longer than 250 cm (p < 0.001). Our results confirm MGB/OAGB to be a reliable bariatric procedure. According to other large and long-term published series, MGB/OAGB seems to compare very favorably, in terms of complication rate, with two mainstream procedures as standard Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG).

  18. Pharmacological treatment and perceived health status during 1-year follow up in patients diagnosed with coronary artery disease, but ineligible for revascularization. Results from the Euro Heart Survey on Coronary Revascularization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenzen, M.; Scholte op Reimer, W.; Norekval, T.M.; De Geest, S.; Fridlund, B.; Heikkila, J.; Jaarsma, Trijntje (Tiny); Martensson, J.; Moons, P.; Smith, K; Stewart, S.; Stromberg, A; Thompson, D.R.; Wijns, W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been recognized that a clinically significant portion of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) continue to experience anginal and other related symptoms that are refractory to the combination of medical therapy and revascularization. The Euro Heart Survey on

  19. Morbidity follow-up feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.

    1988-02-01

    The report reviews the available sources of data within Canada for undertaking morbidity follow-up studies to both supplement and complement studies using Canadian mortality data. Such studies would permit earlier detection and more sensitive measures of differences in risk for exposures to radiation and allow timely measures to be taken to minimize any occupational and environmental health risk to radiation workers. The technical feasibility of using these sources was reviewed using the criteria of adequate personal identifying information, automation of data records, file size and the accuracy of the morbidity diagnosis information. At the present time certain of the provincial cancer registry files meet these criteria best. A work plan was prepared suggesting a morbidity pilot study to clarify the role of occupational factors in the incidence of cancer among radiation workers using the Alberta Cancer Registry file and the National Dose Registry (NDR) file of radiation workers. For the longer term a full cohort study using the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System (NCIRS) and the NDR workers as the study population would provide information on all radiation workers on a national basis. A work plan was prepared and some initial format conversion of historical data was undertaken to begin developing the NCIRS into a data base suitable for long-term health studies

  20. Trauma and postoperative follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voth, E.

    1997-01-01

    Indications for the use of nuclear medicine techniques, mostly bone scintigraphy, occur in case of diagnostic problems, especially if there are discrepancies between the clinical symptoms and X-ray findings. This may happen in case of stress fractures, fractures in bones difficult to judge by X-ray imaging, and in the differentation of recent versus old fracture. A further indication for bone scanning is to assess the extent of skeletal lesions in polytrauma and in the battered child syndrome. In postoperative patients bone scanning is most frequently performed in order to assess loosening or infection of endoprosthesis. Due to bone remodelling uptake of Tc-diphosphonates varies between cemented and cementfree implants. This fact should be taken into consideration when interpreting bone scans in areas with endoprostheses. In both trauma and postoperative patients, indications for nuclear medicine imaging exist if healing is complicated. Bone scanning can be used to assess pseudoartrosis or non-union, infection, viability of grafts and bone fragments and reflex sympathetic dystrophy. In suspicious infection with positive bone scan, white blood cell or microcollid scintigraphy can be used for further differentiation. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this

  2. Intraosseous vascular access defect: fracture mimic in the skeletal survey for child abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, Mary P.; Kao, Simon C. [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Two infants were transferred to the emergency department for injuries suggestive of child abuse. Skeletal surveys showed cortical bone defects in the proximal tibiae that were initially interpreted as healing fractures. Further investigation, however, revealed that intraosseous (IO) vascular access needles had been placed at these sites in both infants. In the appropriate clinical setting, a cortical lesion in the proximal tibia corresponding to the site of IO needle insertion should not be mistaken for a radiographic sign of child abuse. (orig.)

  3. Intraosseous vascular access defect: fracture mimic in the skeletal survey for child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, Mary P.; Kao, Simon C.

    2002-01-01

    Two infants were transferred to the emergency department for injuries suggestive of child abuse. Skeletal surveys showed cortical bone defects in the proximal tibiae that were initially interpreted as healing fractures. Further investigation, however, revealed that intraosseous (IO) vascular access needles had been placed at these sites in both infants. In the appropriate clinical setting, a cortical lesion in the proximal tibia corresponding to the site of IO needle insertion should not be mistaken for a radiographic sign of child abuse. (orig.)

  4. The relationship between physical activity level and selected cardiovascular risk factors and mortality of males ≥ 50 years in Poland – The results of follow-up of participants of National Multicenter Health Survey WOBASZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Śmigielski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The role of leisure-time physical activity in reducing all-cause and cardiovascular mortality is well explored. The knowledge on occupational and commuting physical activity continues to be ambiguous and misleading. The aim of the study is to assess the influence of different kinds of physical activity on cardiovascular mortality risk in men. Material and Methods: Data analysis on physical activity level and other selected cardiovascular risk factors acquired from 3577 men in the age between 50–80 years who participated in the National Multicenter Health Survey WOBASZ (Wieloośrodkowe Ogólnopolskie Badanie Stanu Zdrowia, Poland (2003–2005 was linked with male mortality in 2004–2009. Data about causes of deaths were obtained from the Central Statistical Office and the Population Electronic Register. Results: Among males aged 50–59 years, the strongest risk factor was living in large settlements and provincial capitals as a place of residence and the most protective factor was occupational physical activity. In the age group 60–69 years and 70–80 years, the strongest protective effect was observed for leisure-time physical activity. In men aged between 70–80 years (unlike in the 50–59 years age group, the protective effect of large settlements and provincial capitals as a place of residence was noted. Conclusions: Occupational physical activity significantly reduced cardiovascular mortality in men aged 50–69 years, while for leisure-time activity the positive effect was observed in age group 60–69 years and 70–80 years. On the other hand, for the inhabitants of large settlements and provincial capitals, significantly higher risk of cardiovascular mortality in the age group 50–69 years and lower risk in the age group ≥ 70 years was noted, both in comparison with smaller places of residence.

  5. Patient's needs and preferences in routine follow-up after treatment for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, GH; Bonnema, J; Zwaan, RE; de Velde, CJH; Kievit, J; Stiggelbout, AM

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the needs of women who participated in a routine follow-up programme after treatment for primary breast cancer. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a postal questionnaire among women without any sign of relapse during the routine follow-up period. The

  6. Laparoscopic Hill repair: 25-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeseul; Aye, Ralph W; Watkins, Jeffrey R; Farivar, Alex S; Louie, Brian E

    2018-03-30

    The open Hill repair for gastroesophageal reflux disease and hiatal hernia is remarkably durable, with a median 10-year reoperation rate of only 3% and satisfaction of 93%. No long-term data exist for the laparoscopic Hill repair (LHR). Patients who underwent primary LHR at Swedish Medical Center for reflux and/or hiatal hernia at least 5 years earlier (1992-2010) were identified from an IRB-approved database. There were 727 patients who met inclusion criteria, including 648 undergoing repair for reflux and 79 for paraesophageal hernia. Two questionnaires were administered via mail to evaluate long-term quality of life using validated GERD-HRQL, Swallowing score, and global satisfaction score. Outcomes were defined by GERD-HRQL score, Swallowing score, resumption of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, need for reoperation, and global satisfaction with overall results. Two hundred forty-two patients completed and returned the survey (226 lost to follow-up, 90 deceased, 3 denied undergoing LHR, 166 non-responders), of which 52% were male. The average age at the time of surgery was 49.5 years. Median follow-up was 18.5 years (range 6.2-24.7). The average GERD-HRQL score (7.1) and the average Swallowing score (39.9) both indicated excellent symptomatic outcomes. 30% of patients are using daily PPIs. 24 patients (9.9%) required reoperation for failure during the follow-up period, 21 in the reflux group and 3 in the paraesophageal hernia group. Overall, 85% reported good to excellent results, and 76% would recommend the operation. LHR shows excellent long-term durability and quality of life similar to the open Hill repair, with 85% good to excellent results at a median follow-up of 19 years and a reoperation rate under 10%. It is surmised that Hill suture fixation of the gastroesophageal junction to the preaortic fascia may confer unique structural integrity compared to other repairs.

  7. SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Candidate RV Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil; Ma, Bo; Li, Rui; SIthajan, Sirinrat

    2014-02-01

    Planetary systems, discovered by the radial velocity (RV) surveys, reveal strong correlations between the planet frequency and stellar properties, such as metallicity and mass, and a greater diversity in planets than found in the solar system. However, due to the sample sizes of extant surveys (~100 to a few hundreds of stars) and their heterogeneity, many key questions remained to be addressed: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate- mass stars and binaries? Is the ``planet desert'' within 0.6 AU in the planet orbital distribution of intermediate-mass stars real? The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars. The latest data pipeline effort at UF has been able to remove long term systematic errors suffered in the earlier data pipeline. 18 high confident giant planet candidates have been identified among newly processed data. We propose to follow up these giant planet candidates with the KPNO EXPERT instrument to confirm the detection and also characterize their orbits. The confirmed planets will be used to measure occurrence rates, distributions and multiplicity of giants planets around F,G,K stars with a broad range of mass (~0.6-2.5 M_⊙) and metallicity ([Fe/H]~-1.5-0.5). The well defined MARVELS survey cadence allows robust determinations of completeness limits for rigorously testing giant planet formation theories and constraining models.

  8. Long-term follow-up in distal renal tubular acidosis with sensorineural deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R

    2000-11-01

    A 20-year-old man presented with failure to thrive and bilateral genu valgum. On the basis of growth failure, skeletal deformity, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with alkaline urine and hypokalemia, nephrocalcinosis, and hearing loss, a diagnosis of distal renal tubular acidosis (DRTA) with sensorineural deafness was made. The genu valgum was treated by corrective osteotomy. Skeletal deformity was corrected and impaired growth improved after sustained therapy of metabolic acidosis with alkali supplementation. During an 8-year follow-up period the patient's glomerular filtration rate remained stable, the nephrocalcinosis did not progress, and his height increased 10 cm. Although nephrolithiasis led to atrophy of the right kidney, at last follow-up, when the patient was 44 years old, his creatinine clearance was 50 ml/min per 1.73 m2 body surface.

  9. Meeting increased demand for total knee replacement and follow-up: determining optimal follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meding, J B; Ritter, M A; Davis, K E; Farris, A

    2013-11-01

    The strain on clinic and surgeon resources resulting from a rise in demand for total knee replacement (TKR) requires reconsideration of when and how often patients need to be seen for follow-up. Surgeons will otherwise require increased paramedical staff or need to limit the number of TKRs they undertake. We reviewed the outcome data of 16 414 primary TKRs undertaken at our centre to determine the time to re-operation for any reason and for specific failure mechanisms. Peak risk years for failure were determined by comparing the conditional probability of failure, the number of failures divided by the total number of TKRs cases, for each year. The median times to failure for the most common failure mechanisms were 4.9 years (interquartile range (IQR) 1.7 to 10.7) for femoral and tibial loosening, 1.9 years (IQR 0.8 to 3.9) for infection, 3.1 years (IQR 1.6 to 5.5) for tibial collapse and 5.6 years (IQR 3.4 to 9.3) for instability. The median time to failure for all revisions was 3.3 years (IQR 1.2 to 8.5), with an overall revision rate of 1.7% (n = 282). Results from our patient population suggest that patients be seen for follow-up at six months, one year, three years, eight years, 12 years, and every five years thereafter. Patients with higher pain in the early post-operative period or high body mass index (≥ 41 kg/m(2)) should be monitored more closely.

  10. Workload and Stress in New Zealand Universities. A Follow Up to the 1994 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Anna

    This follow-up study surveyed members of the Association of University Staff of New Zealand concerning their workload and stress levels and compared findings to a similar survey conducted in 1994. Survey responses (n=1155) were analyzed in terms of employment status, work hours, salary, responsibilities, changes and their impact, stresses and…

  11. [Health management system in outpatient follow-up of kidney transplantation patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Xie, Jinliang; Yao, Hui; Liu, Ling; Tan, Jianwen; Geng, Chunmi

    2014-07-01

    To develop a health management system for outpatient follow-up of kidney transplant patients. Access 2010 database software was used to establish the health management system for kidney transplantation patients in Windows XP operating system. Database management and post-operation follow-up of the kidney transplantation patients were realized through 6 function modules including data input, data query, data printing, questionnaire survey, data export, and follow-up management. The system worked stably and reliably, and the data input was easy and fast. The query, the counting and printing were convenient. Health management system for patients after kidney transplantation not only reduces the work pressure of the follow-up staff, but also improves the efficiency of outpatient follow-up.

  12. Physicians' experience with follow-up care of childhood cancer survivors - challenges and needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Gisela; Gianinazzi, Micol Eva; Vetsch, Janine; Mader, Luzius; Lupatsch, Judith E; von der Weid, Nicolas X; Rueegg, Corina Silvia

    2017-07-19

    Regular follow-up care is essential for childhood cancer survivors, but we know little about physicians' experience with it. We aimed to describe: (1) involvement of Swiss physicians in follow-up care; (2) content of follow-up care provided; (3) problems encountered; and (4) additional resources needed. Within this cross-sectional survey we sent adapted questionnaires via professional associations to a sample of medical oncologists (MOs), paediatric oncologists (POs), general practitioners (GPs) and paediatricians (P) in Switzerland. Only oncologists involved in follow-up care were asked to report problems. GPs and Ps not involved in follow-up could indicate why. All physicians were asked about the content of follow-up care provided and additional resources needed. A total of 183 physicians responded (27 MO, 13 PO, 122 GP, 21 P). Involved in follow-up were 81% of MOs, 85% of POs, 39% of GPs and 81% of Ps. Follow-up content differed between oncologists (MO and PO) and generalists (GP and P), with generalists examining or informing less in regard to the former cancer. POs reported more problems than MOs: many POs reported problems with transition of survivors to adult care (91%), and because of financial resources (73%) and time restraints (73%). MOs reported most problems during transition (23%). Not being aware of a survivor was the most common reason for GPs and Ps not participating in follow-up (74%). All groups reported a need for standardised protocols (85-91%) and specialised training (55-73%). GPs (94%) and Ps (100%) additionally desired more support from oncologists. To improve quality and efficiency of follow-up care a national follow-up care model including standardised protocols and guidelines needs to be developed.

  13. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Tsai, Chao-Wei; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sayers, Jack; Bridge, Carrie [Division of Physics, Math and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benford, Dominic [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Blain, Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, LE1 7RH Leicester (United Kingdom); Petty, Sara; Lake, Sean [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bussmann, Shane [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Comerford, Julia M.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78731 (United States); Lonsdale, Carol [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Rho, Jeonghee [SETI Institute, 189 BERNARDO Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Stanford, S. Adam, E-mail: jingwen.wu@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare ({approx}1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 {mu}m. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 {mu}m, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  14. Submillimeter Follow-Up of WISE-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; hide

    2012-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approx.1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 microns, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 microns. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 microns, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60 C120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) Stellar Luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  15. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Sayers, Jack; Bridge, Carrie; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Petty, Sara; Lake, Sean; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Evans, Neal J. II; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam

    2012-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (∼1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 μm, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 μm. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 μm, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10 13 L ☉ . These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  16. WFIRST Microlensing Exoplanet Characterization with HST Follow up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Aparna; David Bennett, Jay Anderson, J.P. Beaulieu.

    2018-01-01

    More than 50 planets are discovered with the different ground based telescopes available for microlensing. But the analysis of ground based data fails to provide a complete solution. To fulfill that gap, space based telescopes, like Hubble space telescope and Spitzer are used. My research work focuses on extracting the planet mass, host star mass, their separation and their distance in physical units from HST Follow-up observations. I will present the challenges faced in developing this method.This is the primary method to be used for NASA's top priority project (according to 2010 decadal survey) Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Exoplanet microlensing space observatory, to be launched in 2025. The unique ability of microlensing is that with WFIRST it can detect sub-earth- mass planets beyond the reach of Kepler at separation 1 AU to infinity. This will provide us the necessary statistics to study the formation and evolution of planetary systems. This will also provide us with necessary initial conditions to model the formation of planets and the habitable zones around M dwarf stars.

  17. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  18. Factors associated with intentions to adhere to colorectal cancer screening follow-up exams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishibashi Teruo

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To increase adherence rate to recommendations for follow-up after abnormal colorectal cancer (CRC screening results, factors that inhibit and facilitate follow-up must be identified. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors associated with intention to adhere to CRC screening follow-up exams. Methods During a 4-week period in October 2003, this survey was conducted with 426 subjects participating in a community-based CRC screening program in Nagano, Japan. Study measures included intention to adhere to recommendation for clinical follow-up in the event of an abnormal fecal occult blood test (FOBT result, perceived susceptibility and severity of CRC, perceived benefits and barriers related to undergoing follow-up examination, social support, knowledge of CRC risk factors, health status, previous CRC screening, personality and social demographic characteristics. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses on intention to adhere to recommendations for follow-up were performed. Results Among the 288 individuals analyzed, approximately 74.7% indicated that they would definitely adhere to recommendations for follow-up. After controlling for age, gender, marital status, education, economic status, trait anxiety, bowel symptoms, family history of CRC, and previous screening FOBT, analyses revealed that lower levels of perceived barriers, higher levers of perceived benefits and knowledge of CRC risk factors were significantly associated with high intention respectively. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that future interventions should focus on reducing modifiable barriers by clarifying misperceptions about follow-up, promoting the acceptance of complete diagnostic evaluations, addressing psychological distress, and making follow-up testing more convenient and accessible. Moreover, educating the public regarding the risk factors of CRC and increasing understanding of the benefits of follow-up is

  19. Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) in colorectal cancer follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer follow-up aims to detect recurrent disease as soon as possible, since earlier detection of recurrent disease is associated with greater chances for cure. A part of follow-up is the measurement of Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) in the blood of the patient. This tumor marker is

  20. National screening program vs. standardized neurodevelopmental follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maschke, Cornelia; Ellenrieder, Birte; Hecher, Kurt; Bartmann, Peter

    Background: Long-term follow-up is urgently needed to decide on the consequences of new therapies. Objective: This study assesses the use of a national child development screening program for a follow-up examination of a defined patient group. Patients and methods: Neurodevelopmental outcome of 139

  1. Forgotten antibiotics: a follow-up inventory study in Europe, the USA, Canada and Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulcini, C.; Mohrs, S.; Beovic, B.; Gyssens, I.C.; Theuretzbacher, U.; Cars, O.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to update a 2011 survey, conducted on behalf of the ESCMID Study Group for Antibiotic Policies (ESGAP), studying the availability of old but clinically useful antibiotics in North America, Europe and Australia. This follow-up survey was performed in 2015 in 40

  2. B-School Follow Up: Class of 2013. GMAC® Data-to-Go Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graduate Management Admission Council, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This brief summarizes the findings of an annual poll of new business school alumni conducted each September by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC). The September 2013 follow-up study gathered data from students who responded to the Global Management Education Graduate Survey--the GMAC exit survey of graduating management students in…

  3. Nationwide radiation dose survey of computed tomography for fetal skeletal dysplasias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Osamu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sawai, Hideaki [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nishinomiya-shi, Hyogo (Japan); Murotsuki, Jun [Miyagi Children' s Hospital, Department of Maternal and Fetal Medicine, Sendai-shi, Miyagi (Japan); Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Advanced Fetal and Developmental Medicine, Sendai-shi, Miyagi (Japan); Nishimura, Gen [Tokyo Metropolitan Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Imaging, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Horiuchi, Tetsuya [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Osaka University, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Course of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, computed tomography (CT) has been used to diagnose fetal skeletal dysplasia. However, no surveys have been conducted to determine the radiation exposure dose and the diagnostic reference level (DRL). To collect CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) data from domestic hospitals implementing fetal skeletal 3-D CT and to establish DRLs for Japan. Scan data of 125 cases of 20 protocols from 16 hospitals were analyzed. The minimum, first-quartile, median, third-quartile and maximum values of CTDIvol and DLP were determined. The time-dependent change in radiation dose setting in hospitals with three or more cases with scans was also examined. The minimum, first-quartile, median, third-quartile and maximum CTDIvol values were 2.1, 3.7, 7.7, 11.3 and 23.1 mGy, respectively, and these values for DLP were 69.0, 122.3, 276.8, 382.6 and 1025.6 mGy.cm, respectively. Six of the 12 institutions reduced the dose setting during the implementation period. The DRLs of CTDIvol and DLP for fetal CT were 11.3 mGy and 382.6 mGy.cm, respectively. Institutions implementing fetal CT should use these established DRLs as the standard and make an effort to reduce radiation exposure by voluntarily decreasing the dose. (orig.)

  4. Nationwide radiation dose survey of computed tomography for fetal skeletal dysplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Osamu; Sawai, Hideaki; Murotsuki, Jun; Nishimura, Gen; Horiuchi, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    Recently, computed tomography (CT) has been used to diagnose fetal skeletal dysplasia. However, no surveys have been conducted to determine the radiation exposure dose and the diagnostic reference level (DRL). To collect CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) data from domestic hospitals implementing fetal skeletal 3-D CT and to establish DRLs for Japan. Scan data of 125 cases of 20 protocols from 16 hospitals were analyzed. The minimum, first-quartile, median, third-quartile and maximum values of CTDIvol and DLP were determined. The time-dependent change in radiation dose setting in hospitals with three or more cases with scans was also examined. The minimum, first-quartile, median, third-quartile and maximum CTDIvol values were 2.1, 3.7, 7.7, 11.3 and 23.1 mGy, respectively, and these values for DLP were 69.0, 122.3, 276.8, 382.6 and 1025.6 mGy·cm, respectively. Six of the 12 institutions reduced the dose setting during the implementation period. The DRLs of CTDIvol and DLP for fetal CT were 11.3 mGy and 382.6 mGy·cm, respectively. Institutions implementing fetal CT should use these established DRLs as the standard and make an effort to reduce radiation exposure by voluntarily decreasing the dose.

  5. Automated telecommunication to obtain longitudinal follow-up in a multicenter cross-sectional COPD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jeffrey I; Moyle, Sarah; Criner, Gerard J; Wilson, Carla; Tanner, Ron; Bowler, Russell P; Crapo, James D; Zeldin, Robert K; Make, Barry J; Regan, Elizabeth A; For The Copdgene Investigators

    2012-08-01

    It can be challenging to maintain longitudinal follow-up of subjects in clinical studies. COPDGene is a multicenter, observational study designed to identify genetic factors associated with COPD and to characterize COPD-related phenotypes. To obtain follow-up data on patient's vital status and outcomes, the COPDGene Longitudinal Follow-up (LFU) Program was developed to supplement its parent study. We used a telecommunication system that employed automated telephone contact or web-based questions to obtain longitudinal follow-up data in our subjects. A branching questionnaire asked about exacerbations, new therapies, smoking status, development of co-morbid conditions, and general health status. Study coordinators contacted subjects who did not respond to one of the automated methods. We enrolled 10,383 subjects in the COPDGene study. As of August 29, 2011, 7,959 subjects completed 19,955 surveys. On the first survey, 68.8% of subjects who completed their survey did so by electronic means, while 31.3% required coordinator phone follow-up. On each subsequent survey the number of subjects who completed their survey by electronic means increased, while the number of subjects who required coordinator follow-up decreased. Despite many of the patients in the cohort being chronically ill and elderly, there was broad acceptance of the system with over half the cohort using electronic response methods. The COPDGene LFU Study demonstrated that telecommunications was an effective way to obtain longitudinal follow-up of subjects in a large multicenter study. Web-based and automated phone contacts are accepted by research subjects and could serve as a model for LFU in future studies.

  6. Treatment, follow-up and microbiota in acute diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniels, L.

    2015-01-01

    Er bestaat veel controverse rondom diverticulitis. Er is tegenstrijdigheid omtrent de beste behandeling van de verschillende stadia. Voor acute ongecompliceerde diverticulitis is het onzeker of antibiotica nodig zijn. De waarde van routine follow-up colonoscopie wordt betwijfeld. Er bestaat

  7. Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Analysis reported in Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization by Medicare Patients, 2007-2010, published in Volume 4, Issue 2 of Medicare and...

  8. Management of follow-up of neuroendocrine neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Ulrich-Frank; Maasberg, Sebastian; Jann, Henning; Pschowski, René; Krüger, Sandrine; Prasad, Vikas; Denecke, Timm; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Pascher, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasias (NEN) comprise heterogeneous epithelial neoplasms with a large variety of clinical presentations, treatment options and outcomes. Since potentially all NEN bear malignant potential it is important for long-term clinical management and improvement of outcome to decide on successful and oncologically and economically meaningful follow-up strategies. Evidence-based outcome data validating specific follow-up strategies are, however, not available to date and thus outcome data, known prognostic factors and clinical experience guide the decisions on follow-up regimens. The review summarizes general recommendations as well as specific considerations based on tumor entities, clinicopathological tumor characteristics and clinical experience. Follow-up shall serve the patient to improve outcome, benefit from more effective therapies and suffer less from unnecessary and/or toxic therapeutic interventions and finally preserve or gain a good quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pediatric Celiac Disease: Follow-Up in the Spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valitutti, Francesco; Trovato, Chiara Maria; Montuori, Monica; Cucchiara, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    The follow-up of celiac disease (CD) is challenging due to the scarcity of published data and the lack of standardized evidence-based protocols. The worldwide frequency and methods of CD follow-up appear to be heavily influenced by expert opinions of the individual physicians who assess children with CD. The aim of this review was to summarize the available studies on CD follow-up in children. We conducted a literature search with the use of PubMed, Medline, and Embase (from 1900 to 15 December 2016) for terms relevant to this review, including CD, follow-up, dietary adherence or dietary compliance, nutrition, comorbidities, complications, and quality of life. The aims of follow-up are as follows: to ensure strict adherence to a gluten-free diet, to ensure nutritional adequacy, to improve quality of life, and to prevent disease complications. For the correct evaluation of children with CD at follow-up, a clinical and biochemical evaluation is necessary on a regular basis. It is advisable to assess compliance, nutrition, comorbidities, or possible complications once a year at the referral center. Laboratory tests might be useful for a thorough evaluation of any patient with CD to rule out a micronutrient deficiency (full blood count, ferritin, folic acid, vitamin B-6, and vitamin B-12) and possible cardiovascular risk factors (glucose, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides). Biochemical evaluation is essential when there are clinical problems and should be customized on the basis of the specific clinical suspicion. Associated autoimmune thyroiditis should also be screened for yearly by measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid autoantibody concentrations, regardless of symptoms, because hypothyroidism is often subtle and methods for early treatment are available and desirable. Although evidence-based recommendations for follow-up of pediatric patients with CD have not yet been established, we advise a yearly follow-up visit as the safest approach. © 2017 American

  10. Use of mobile phones to improve follow-up rates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dear editor: I read with interest your article titled, “Assessing the feasibility of mobile phones for follow-up of acutely unwell children presenting to village clinics in rural northern. Malawi,” by Hardy et al.1 It is indeed enlightening to know that concrete efforts are being made to ensure follow-up for acutely unwell kids below the ...

  11. Skeletal survey quality in non-accidental injury – A single site evaluation of the effects of imaging checklists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weldon, J.; Price, R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Evidence suggests ongoing practice variability in the quality of skeletal survey examinations for non-accidental injury. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects on examination quality following the implementation of imaging checklists. Method: A retrospective evaluation of skeletal survey examinations was carried out on studies performed between January 2007 and November 2014 at a large District General Hospital Trust. Longitudinal assessment was undertaken over three periods, before and following the introduction of two versions of imaging checklists, following modifications. Examinations were assessed and scored using three measures for completeness and quality employing a modified established scoring system against a professional body national standards document. Results: A total of 121 examinations met the inclusion criteria, all quality assessment measures showed improvements between each period. Examination completeness increased from median of 13 projections, to 20 throughout the three periods. Mann Whitney u Tests showed significant differences between each period. The mean combined anatomy score reduced from 3.11 to 1.10 throughout the three periods. Independent t Tests and Mann Whitney u Tests showed a significant decrease throughout the study period. Total percentage examination quality increased from median 44–83% throughout the three periods. Independent t Tests also showed significant differences between each period. Conclusion: The use of imaging checklists to improve quality and to support the optimal acquisition of the non-accidental injury skeletal survey shows encouraging results. However, further work is needed to optimise content and the use of checklists in practice. - Highlights: • Skeletal survey examinations for non-accidental practices have been shown to vary in content and in quality. • Checklists have demonstrated improvements in compliance to guidelines across health disciplines and in various settings.

  12. Recent results of the follow-up of radium-224-treated ankylosing spondylitis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wick, R.R.; Goessner, W.

    1989-01-01

    In this study 1473 ankylosing spondylitis patients were followed after treatment with 10-12 weekly injections of radium 224 of about 1MBq each injections( skeletal dose 0.56-0.67 Gy for a 70 kg man). 495 in the exposure group and 602 in the controls have died. By June 1988 (mean follow-up time 17 years), 3 cases of skeletal malignancies were observed in the exposure group versus one in the controls. Haematopoietic tissue disease among living and dead included bone marrow failure (10 in the exposed, seven in controls), and leukemias (7 versus 4). In the exposure group 3 of the leukemias were chronic myeloid and one acute lymphoblastic, and in the controls no chronic myeloid cases were found but 3 cases of lymphoblastic leukemia. Incidence of myeloproliferative disease is discussed compared with patients treated with other doses and dose rates. (author)

  13. Internet of things and bariatric surgery follow-up: Comparative study of standard and IoT follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Lecube, Albert; Fort, José Manuel; Boleko, Maria Angeles; Hidalgo, Marta; Armengol, Manel

    2013-09-01

    Follow-up of obese patient is difficult. There is no literature related to patient follow-up that incorporates the concept of Internet of Things (IoT), use of WiFi, Internet, or portable devices for this purpose. This prospective observational study commenced in June 2011. Patients were prospectively offered to participate in the IoT study group, in which they received a WiFi scale (Withing®, Paris) that provides instant WiFi data to the patient and surgeon. Other patients were admitted to the standard follow-up group at the outpatient clinic. A total of 33 patients were included in our study (ten in the IoT group). Twelve patients did not have WiFi at home, ten lacked of computer knowledge, and seven preferred standard for follow-up. All patients underwent different surgical procedures. There were no complications. Excess weight loss (EWL) was similar in both groups. More than 90% of patients were satisfied. In the IoT group, patients considered it valuable in saving time, and considered seeing their evolution graphics extremely motivating. IoT technology can monitor medical parameters remotely and collect data. A WiFi scale can facilitate preoperative and follow-up. Standard follow-up in a classical outpatient clinic setting with the surgeon was preferred globally.

  14. Examining Adherence With Recommendations for Follow-Up in the Prevention Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Nikki A; Berkowitz, Zahava; Rodriguez, Juan; Miller, Jacqueline W; Sabatino, Susan A; Pollack, Lori A

    2015-05-01

    To explore the impact of health professionals' recommendations for medical follow-up among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors. Cross-sectional survey. Mailed surveys and telephone interviews with CRC survivors in California. 593 adults diagnosed with a primary CRC six to seven years before the time of the study. Participants were identified through California Cancer Registry records and invited to take part in a survey delivered via mail or through telephone interview. The survey assessed cancer history, current preventive health practices, health status, demographics, and other cancer-related experiences. More than 70% of CRC survivors received recommendations for routine checkups, surveillance colonoscopy, or other cancer screenings after completing CRC treatment, and 18%-22% received no such recommendations. Recommendations were sometimes given in writing. Receiving a recommendation for a specific type of follow-up was associated with greater adherence to corresponding guidelines for routine checkups, colonoscopy, mammography, and Papanicolaou testing. Receiving written (versus unwritten) recommendations led to greater adherence only for colonoscopy. Most CRC survivors reported receiving recommendations for long-term medical follow-up and largely adhered to guidelines for follow-up. Receiving a health professional's recommendation for follow-up was consistently associated with patient adherence, and limited evidence showed that recommendations in written form led to greater adherence than unwritten recommendations. Given the increasingly important role of the oncology nurse in survivorship care, nurses can be instrumental in ensuring appropriate surveillance and follow-up care among CRC survivors. Conveying recommendations in written form, as is done in survivorship care plans, may be particularly effective.

  15. Follow-Up Study of Dietetic Technician Graduates 1980-1982. Volume 12, No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, Henriette D.; Lucas, John A.

    A follow-up study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to evaluate and obtain externally required information about the dietetic technician program. Surveys were mailed to all 47 of the students who graduated from the program between 1980 and 1982 to obtain information on their employment status, job title, length of service,…

  16. Exploring "Successful" Outcomes of Entrepreneurship Education: A Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Laura; Kapasi, Isla; Whittam, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    During 2005-2006 entrepreneurship students in several UK universities completed a survey about their background and career intentions. This paper reports, eight years on, on a follow-up study with ten of these participants, with the aim of exploring the students' intentions and subsequent actions since graduating. Using a qualitative methodology,…

  17. Follow up of Graves' Opthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M.S.R.; Paul, A. K.; Rahman, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy may first appear or worsen during or after treatment for hyperthyroidism. We followed up 158 Graves' hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine of which 49 had Grave's' ophthalmopathy during presentation in Nuclear Medicine Centre, Khulna during the period from 1995 to 2000. The aim of our study is to see the effect of radioiodine in Graves' ophthalmopathy. All the patients received radioiodine at fixed dose regime ranged from 7 mCi to 12 mCi. The duration of follow up was at least 12 months Graves' ophthalmopathy patients, 4 (4/49 i.e., 8.2%) showed exaggeration of ophthalmopathy and the rest (45/49 i.e., 91.8%) remained unchanged. None of ophthalmopathy developed among any of Graves' hyperthyroid or disappeared after radioiodine treatment during follow up period. From the study we concluded that eye changes in Graves' hyperthyroidism remain unchanged or exaggerated after radioiodine therapy and needs ophthalmologist care.(author)

  18. Course of disease and follow-up in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebner, F.; Hackl, H.; Hoermann, M.; Schneider, G.

    1986-01-01

    Besides individual care, regular follow-up studies in breast cancer patients have different aims, relative to different tumor stages at presentation. In early stages emphasis has to be laid on detection of loco-regional recurrences, which will not reduce overall survival if diagnosed and treated early. In addition, treatment effects and changes in the activity of disease are evaluated. Radiographic studies for detection of distant metastases are justified if followed by proper treatment. Early diagnosis of cancer of the opposite breast and of such cancers that are associated with breast cancer (colon, ovaries, endometrium) is imperative. The aim of a regular follow-up in more advanced tumor stages is to monitor the extent of disease and to prevent complications (e.g. fractures, spinal cord compression). In familial breast cancer first degree relatives should be included in the follow-up plan. The patient's psychosocial needs, even if not verbalized, should not be neglected. (Author)

  19. [Post-ART follow-up for women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboin, S

    2008-08-01

    The follow-up of women after ART is for the most part related, over the short and long term, to the follow-up of the child born through ART. What is important to know is the possible repercussions of treatment on women's health over the short and long term. To date, no study has proven that menopause comes on earlier after ART treatments. Similarly, none of the international studies has demonstrated a significant increase in breast, ovary, uterus, or colon cancer related to ovulation-inducing treatment. However, for reasons of safety, vigilance is required. Large-scale follow-up of this nature essentially involves crossing registries (cancers, ART), but must respect the desires of women not to be indefinitely reminded of their past infertility. In addition, a study is reported on pursuing the parental project in a cohort of 1200 women who delivered at least one child conceived through MAP more than 3 years before.

  20. 77 FR 59984 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Placement Verification and Follow-Up of Job Corps...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Collection for Placement Verification and Follow-Up of Job Corps Participants; Extension Without Revisions... Placement Verification and Follow-up of Job Corps Participants, using post-center surveys of Job Corps... to Lawrence Lyford, Office of Job Corps, Room N-4507, Employment and Training Administration, U.S...

  1. Acromegalic patients lost to follow-up: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuki, Leandro; Marques, Nelma Verônica; Nuez, Maria José Braga La; Leal, Vera Lucia Gomes; Chinen, Renata N; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 50 % of all acromegalic patients will require lifelong medical treatment to normalize mortality rates and reduce morbidity. Thus, adherence to therapy is essential to achieve treatment goals. To date, no study has evaluated the frequency and reasons for loss to follow-up in the acromegalic population. The current study aimed at evaluating the frequency of acromegalic patient loss to follow-up in three reference centers and the reasons responsible for their low compliance with treatment. All of the files for the acromegalic patients in the three centers were reviewed. Those patients, who had not followed up with the hospital for more than a year, were contacted via phone and/or mail and invited to participate. Patients who agreed to participate were interviewed, and blood samples were collected. A total of 239 files were reviewed; from these 42 patients (17.6 %) were identified who were lost to follow-up. It was possible to contact 27 of these patients, 10 of whom did not attend the appointments for more than one time and 17 of whom agreed to participate in the study. Fifteen of these 17 patients had active disease (88.2 %), and all of the patients restarted treatment in the original centers. The main reason for loss to follow-up was an absence of symptoms. High-quality follow-up is important in acromegaly to successfully achieve the aims of the treatment. An active search for patients may allow the resumption of treatment in a significant proportion of these cases, contributing to reduced morbidity and mortality in this patient population.

  2. Exercise-Induced Ventricular Fibrillation: Seven Years Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökmen Gemici

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a 7-year follow-up of a 55-year-old male who experienced ventricular fibrillation during the recovery period of exercise testing and refused implantation of an ICD. Normal left ventricular systolic function was found on echocardiographic examination, and coronary angiography revealed only a side branch disease with a vessel diameter of less than 2 millimeters. The patient was discharged on metoprolol and ASA in addition to his previous treatment with lisinopril and simvastatin. Outpatient cardiac evaluation by repeated 24-hour ECG monitorizations (Holter revealed normal findings. On follow up visits every six months for the past seven years, the patient was found to be asymptomatic.

  3. MAGIC electromagnetic follow-up of gravitational wave alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lotto, Barbara; Ansoldi, Stefano; Antonelli, Angelo; Berti, Alessio; Carosi, Alessandro; Longo, Francesco; Stamerra, Antonio

    The year 2015 witnessed the first direct observations of a transient gravitational-wave (GW) signal from binary black hole mergers by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) Collaboration with the Virgo Collaboration. The MAGIC two 17m diameter Cherenkov telescopes system joined since 2014 the vast collaboration of electromagnetic facilities for follow-up of gravitational wave alerts. During the 2015 LIGO-Virgo science run we set up the procedure for GW alerts follow-up and took data following the last GW alert. MAGIC results on the data analysis and prospects for the forthcoming run are presented.

  4. Esophageal atresia: long-term interdisciplinary follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia B. Giúdici

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: We provide protocolized interdisciplinary follow-up to babies born with Esophageal Atresia (EA. There are few reports in Argentina about follow-up of EA patients.Objective: To describe outcomes in follow-up of EA patients at 1, 3 and 6 years old and to compare outcomes at age 1 with those at age 6.Methods: Prospective, longitudinal, analytic study of the cohort of babies born with EA, admitted to the follow-up program from 11/01/03 to 10/31/14. Follow-up includes: growth (weight > 10th centile, WHO, neurology-psychomotor development, audiology, vision, genetic, mental health, surgical reintervention, phonostomatology, language, pulmonology, re-hospitalization for clinical causes, lost to follow-up. Outcomes were described at age 1, 3 and 6. We included all EA patients who had reached age 1 at the start of this study.Results: 27 babies were admitted; 30% had long-gap EA; 18% presented VACTERL association; 23 children met inclusion criteria. Genetics  was assessed in 18 newborns (78%; a chromosomal map was performed in 11 babies; 3 had an abnormal karyotype. Mental health: 5/14 of the assessed children showed problems. Phonostomatology: 11 newborns checked (6 required treatment, 4 recovered at age 1. Pulmonologist evaluated 18 babies (7 with recurrent wheezing, 6 with moderate tracheomalacia. Gastroenterology and endoscopy: 80% presented gastroesophageal reflux (GER grade 3-4, and 50% showed a pathologic pHmetry. Lost to follow-up: age 1, 2 (8%; age 3, 3 (17%; age 6, 3 (23%. Normal outcomes observed are the following. Age 1 – growth: 81%; neurologic-psychomotor developmental index (NPDI: 76%; audiology: 95%; vision: 85%; language: 62%; re-hospitalization for clinical causes: 38%; surgical reinterventions: 47%. Age 3 – growth: 78%; NPDI: 50%; audiology: 93%; vision: 93%; language: 43%; re-hospitalization: 35%; surgical reinterventions: 14%. Age 6 – growth: 50%; NPDI: 30%; audiology: 90%; vision: 40%; language: 50%; re

  5. Danish offshore wind. Key environmental issues - a follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    This follow-up to the Danish environmental monitoring programme on large-scale offshore wind power builds on the result of the former programme of 2006 and focuses on updated knowledge on harbour porpoises, water birds and fish communities, and on the cumulative effects of wind farms. The scientific quality of the projects in this follow-up has been assessed by experts from the International Advisory Panel of Experts on Marine Ecology (IAPEME), who have commented on the results in an independent evaluation which is reproduced in this publication. (LN)

  6. Group anxiety management: effectiveness, perceived helpfulness and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadbury, S; Childs-Clark, A; Sandhu, S

    1990-05-01

    An evaluation was conducted on out-patient cognitive-behavioural anxiety management groups. Twenty-nine clients assessed before and after the group and at three-month follow-up showed significant improvement on self-report measures. A further follow-up on 21 clients, conducted by an independent assessor at an average of 11 months, showed greater improvement with time. Clients also rated how helpful they had found non-specific therapeutic factors, and specific anxiety management techniques. 'Universality' was the most helpful non-specific factor, and 'the explanation of anxiety' was the most helpful technique.

  7. Association between subjective memory complaints and health care utilisation: a three-year follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Siersma, Volkert; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subjective memory complaints (SMC) are common among elderly patients and little is know about the association between SMC and health care utilisation. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate health care utilisation during a three-year follow-up among elderly patients consulting...... their general practitioner and reporting subjective memory complaints (SMC). METHODS: This study was conducted as a prospective cohort survey in general practice with three-year follow-up. Selected health care utilisation or costs relative to SMC adjusted for potential confounders were analyzed in a two...

  8. Patients' views on follow up of colorectal cancer: implications for risk communication and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagrigoriadis, S; Heyman, B

    2003-07-01

    Medical views about the clinical value and potential detrimental effect on quality of life of postoperative follow up are divided. There is no literature on the views of British patients with colorectal cancer towards the follow up process. To investigate patients' views and experiences of follow up of colorectal cancer, and to assess their attitudes towards suggested changes to follow up policy. A total of 156 asymptomatic and disease-free patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the follow up clinic. Recurrence-free status was confirmed through retrieval of computerised clinic letters. A postal survey using a 39 item piloted questionnaire was undertaken. Data analysis generated descriptive statistics and logistic regression models. A response rate of 61% (95) was obtained. Among these respondents, 63% (60) had undergone initial surgery within three years of the time of the survey, and 86% (82) patients expected a further follow up appointment. Majorities of the sample, ranging from 71% (67) to 96% (91), expressed satisfaction with respect to clinic delays, staff conduct and knowledge about their case, consultation time, and being able to discuss personal problems freely. However some patients reported difficulty in discussing sexual problems at the clinic. Appointment imminence caused anxiety, sleep problems, and decreased appetite in 35% (35), 27% (26), and 8 % (8) of patients respectively. However, 78% (74) patients felt reassured and optimistic for the future after receiving results. Such optimism is not necessarily justified in terms of estimated mortality risks. A majority (78%, 66) stated that they would value finding out about the presence of recurrence even if there would be no survival benefit. Nearly half of the sample (48%, 43) felt that they would disagree with the cessation of follow up in any circumstances. Only 47% (42) and 27% (24) indicated that they would accept follow up by a specialist nurse or their general practitioner

  9. Treatment of Class II Division 2 Malocclusion Using the Forsus Fatigue Resistance Device and 5-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Atik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report presents the treatment of a 14-year-and-8-month-old boy with Class II division 2 mandibular retrusion, severe deep bite, and concave profile. The Forsus fatigue resistance device (FRD was effective in correcting both skeletal and dental parameters. At 5-year posttreatment follow-up, the teeth were well aligned and the occlusion was stable. FRD application with appropriate treatment time can result with prominent changes in the facial profile and dentition, and the outcomes can be maintained at the long-term follow-up periods.

  10. Challenges of loss to follow-up in tuberculosis research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Thomas N; Rose, Michala V; Kimaro, Godfather

    2012-01-01

    In studies evaluating methods for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB), follow-up to verify the presence or absence of active TB is crucial and high dropout rates may significantly affect the validity of the results. In a study assessing the diagnostic performance of the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test...

  11. the optimum radiographic follow-up of a giant vertebrobasiler ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BEYINCERRSEM

    Key Words: Endovascular coil embolization, long term follow up, vertebro basilar junction aneurysm. ... angiography, a giant vertebrobasilar junction saccular .... Seruga T, Klein GE .Endovascular treatment of intracranial artery aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation. Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2004;116 Suppl 2:13-8. 2.

  12. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  13. [Follow-up and treatment outcome of early anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, U; Neudörfl, A; Krill, A; Warnke, A; Remschmidt, H; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B

    1997-03-01

    In a two-center follow-up study on the early-onset form of anorexia nervosa, we reexamined 43 (74%) of 58 former patients who had developed anorexia nervosa at the age of 13 years or younger. In addition to make a standardized assessment of the eating disorder at follow-up we assessed psychiatric comorbidity with a structured interview based on the criteria of DSM-III-R and ICD-10. After an average follow-up period of 6.8 years, 8 (18%) of our former patients had an eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) and 4 (9%) still suffered from anorexia nervosa. 5 (11%) of the subjects had developed bulimia nervosa. In 3 cases (7%) we found both syndromes. 12 (28%) of our former patients had an additional psychiatric disorder. The results of our study indicate that the quality of outcome in patients with an early-onset form of anorexia nervosa does not differ from that in individuals with a later manifestation of the eating disorder. Factors of prognostic relevance were the existence of an eating disorder during the first year of life and the duration of the follow-up period.

  14. Immediate Follow-Up in Orientation Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas T.; Hurst, James C.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether differing time intervals between the conclusion of the Summer Orienation Program at Colorado State University and the follow-up assessment of the program yield different results. Such differentiation was not found. (Author/RP)

  15. A formula for continued improvement: Audit follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maday, J.H. Jr.

    1989-10-01

    In his book Management Audits, Allan J. Sayle states, ''QA standards stipulate that corrective action, required as a result of performing an audit, be followed up and closed out. There would, indeed, be little point in performing audits, requiring corrective action, or having a QA system at all if the auditee knows that the auditor will never verify that the corrective action has been efficaciously implemented.'' The QA auditor has an obligation to include follow-up in the overall audit planning. All too often the auditor will go to great lengths to plan and perform an audit only to have a recurring finding in the next audit. The proposed corrective action was only promissory and was not designed to stop the problem from recurring or to identify its root cause. Auditors do a disservice to the overall QA program and particularly to the customer when they fail to follow up and verify that an audit corrective action has been effectively implemented. In this paper, the techniques used by the quality assurance auditors at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) will be presented. Although PNL is a research and development laboratory, the techniques outlined in this paper could be applied to any industry conducting quality assurance audits. Most important, they provide a formula for continued improvement by assuring that audit follow-up is timely, meaningful, and permanent

  16. The Danish Cerebral Palsy follow-up Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle Mätzke; Nordbye-Nielsen, Kirsten; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    -15 years and children with symptoms of CP aged 0-5 years. MAIN VARIABLES: In the follow-up program, the children are offered examinations throughout their childhood by orthopedic surgeons, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and pediatricians. Examinations of gross and fine motor function, manual...

  17. Eight to ten years follow-up after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen Rathenborg, Lisbet; Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T

    1990-01-01

    Follow-up information was obtained on 185 patients who consecutively underwent carotid endarterectomy eight to ten years previously. Doppler ultrasound examination was performed in 59 patients who were still alive and living within 100 miles of the hospital. Using lifetable analysis, the annual r...

  18. Women's experiences of a follow up childbearing journey with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse the lived experiences of the follow up journey of a pregnant woman by listening to the voices of women as they reflect on their journey. A qualitative, descriptive and contextual design was used to examine into each woman's experience of her world from pregnancy to ...

  19. Advances in diagnosis and follow-up in kidney cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rioja, Jorge; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Laguna, M. Pilar

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the most recent data on preoperative diagnostic methods in kidney cancer and in follow-up and monitoring after ablation therapy. RECENT FINDINGS: Although the role of the percutaneous biopsy in the diagnostics of renal masses has been limited, new data suggest a high

  20. MRI of penile fracture: diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uder, Michael; Gohl, Dietrich; Takahashi, Masahide; Kramann, Bernhard; Schneider, Guenther [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Derouet, Harry [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Defreyne, Luc [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University Hospital of Gent (Belgium)

    2002-01-01

    A rupture of corpus cavernosum (CC) is a rare injury of the erect penis. The present study describes the role of MRI for diagnosis and follow-up of this injury. Four patients with clinically suspected acute penile fractures underwent MRI. Imaging findings were confirmed at surgery. In three patients, follow-up MRI was also available at 1, 6 and 16 weeks after surgical repair. In all patients pre-contrast T1-weighted images (T1WI) clearly disclosed ruptures of CC, which depicted as discontinuity of low signal intensity of the tunica albuginea (TA). Concomitant subcutaneous haematoma were well visualised both on T1-weighted (T1WI) and T2-weighted images, whereas haematoma in CC were optimally demonstrated on contrast-enhanced T1WI. On follow-up MRI all fractures presented similar healing process. Shortly after the repair, the tunical suture showed an increase in signal intensity on pre-contrast T1WI and was strongly enhanced with the administration of contrast material. Then the tear site gradually recovered low signal intensity on all spin-echo sequences by 4 months after surgery. These serial findings may suggest the formation of vascularised granulation tissue during cicatrisation. Magnetic resonance imaging is of great value for the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with penile fracture. (orig.)

  1. Long-Term Follow Up of Superficial Bladder Tumors | Shelbaia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The treatment of superficial TCC may be done by relatively minor endoscopic procedures, but the disease itself is a serious condition that merits close long-term follow-up. Key words: bladder tumors, transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), ND: YAG lasers, transurethral resection (TURT) Suivi à long terme des ...

  2. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... include audit findings from multiple years, it shall include the fiscal year in which the finding... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... (CONTINUED) AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 41.315 Audit...

  3. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... schedule may include audit findings from multiple years, it shall include the fiscal year in which the... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees § 3052...

  4. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... schedule may include audit findings from multiple years, it shall include the fiscal year in which the... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditees...

  5. Developmental screening: predictors of follow-up adherence in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: The importance of early identification for infants and young children with developmental delays is well estab- lished. Poor follow-up on referrals, however, undermines the effectiveness of early intervention programmes. Objectives: To identify factors, including text message reminders, that influence ...

  6. Solitary Functioning Kidney in Children - A Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Kolvek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aims to assess the cumulative incidence of elevated albuminuria, hypertension and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR to identify possible renal injury in children with SFK. Methods: Forty-two children with SFK (23 boys; 27 congenital were included in a prospective follow-up study. Blood pressure, albuminuria and eGFR were assessed repeatedly and the cumulative incidence rate of various forms of renal injury, overall and by type of etiology, were evaluated. Finally, renal injury-free survival was analyzed. Results: Mean follow-up was until age 11.3 years (SD 6.3 years. During follow-up, 16 (38.1% patients met the criteria for renal injury, defined as hypertension (10; 23.8%, severely increased albuminuria (3; 7.1% and a significantly impaired eGFR (2 (5; 11.9% and/or use of antihypertensive or antiproteinuric medication (11; 26.2%. Children with CAKUT in SFK had a significantly higher incidence of renal injury. The median time to develop renal injury was 12.8 years. Conclusion: A substantial proportion of children with SFK develop renal injury during childhood, especially those with CAKUT in the SFK. Therefore, close follow-up of albuminuria, blood pressure and eGFR are warranted to identify chronic kidney disease in its early stages.

  7. Immunological follow-up of hydatid cyst cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulut Vedat

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is caused by Echinococcus granulosus. In this study, we aimed to investigate the benefit of monitoring cases with hydatid cyst by means of immune components in patients in a long-term follow-up after surgery. Eighty-four preoperative and postoperative serum samples from 14 cases undergoing surgery for hydatid disease were evaluated in terms of immune parameters, such as total and specific IgE, IgG, IgM, IgA and complement. Total and specific IgE were determined by ELISA. Specific IgG levels were measured by indirect hemaglutination.Total IgG, IgM, IgA and complement (C3 and C4 were detected by nephelometry. Imaging studies were also carried out during the follow-up. In none of the patients hydatid cysts were detected during the follow-up. Total IgE levels in the sera of the patients decreased to normal six months after surgery. Although specific IgE against echinococcal antigens decreased one year after operation, levels were still significantly high. There were no changes in the levels of anti-Echinococcus IgG and total IgG in follow-up period. Additionally, other parameters, such as IgA, IgM, C3 and C4, were not affected.

  8. A Follow-Up Study of the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, P. A.; Reich, C. M.

    Followed up through interviews and questionnaires were 278 former students, average age 28 years, of two residential schools and one day school for the deaf in Ontario. Data was collected on the degree of hearing loss, use of a hearing aid, educational and occupational history, social integration, methods of communication, and attitudes toward…

  9. A Follow-Up Study of Former Student Health Advocates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streng, Nancy J.

    2007-01-01

    Student health advocates (SHAs) are high school students who, under the supervision of the school nurse, provide health education and health promotion activities to other students via a peer education model. This 3-year follow-up study explored how the SHA experience influences career choice and attitudes of the participants. It also examined what…

  10. Student Perceptions of Educator Effectiveness: A Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Julie E.

    2009-01-01

    The current study investigates graduate student perceptions of educator effectiveness. This study is the follow-up to a pilot and instrument validation study conducted by the researcher. The findings of the previous study indicated student biases in areas such as gender, age, teaching style, learning style, grade awarded, and educator personality…

  11. Nimh Treatment Study of ADHD Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of changes in medication use between 14 and 24 months follow-up on effectiveness (symptom ratings and growth (height and weight measures were analyzed, comparing 4 groups of patients, in the Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD (MTA reported by the MTA Cooperative Group.

  12. Applicability of structured telephone monitoring to follow up heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Studies from developed countries have shown that home monitoring and follow up of heart failure (HF) patients by use of phone calls is cost-effective as it reduces re-admission and improves patients' clinical status. This intervention has however not been tested in resource poor countries including Tanzania, ...

  13. Long-term follow-up of obstetric studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teune, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on long-term child follow-up after obstetric studies. Obstetric randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are performed to evaluate the effectiveness of perinatal interventions. However, most often only short-term outcomes are reported, while long-term outcomes are just as

  14. MFP-REA Follow-Up 2002-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    ontwikkeld en volgt. Verwacbt kan worden dat dergellike 4/26 MVFIP-REA follow-up 2002-2005 systemnen binnen tien jaar op de markt verschijnen, waarmee de...prof. dr. P. Werkhoven 1 ex. TNO Defensie en Veiligheid, Directie Directeur Markt , G.D. Klein Baltink 1 ex. TNO Defensie en Veiligheid, vestiging Den

  15. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms: initial and follow-up screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, A.S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms may rupture, causing subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). SAH is a devastating subtype of stroke, resulting in death or severe disability in half the patients. This thesis has a focus on initial and follow-up screening for unruptured intracranial aneurysms, and consists

  16. Analytical framework and tool kit for SEA follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Mans; Wiklund, Hans; Finnveden, Goeran; Jonsson, Daniel K.; Lundberg, Kristina; Tyskeng, Sara; Wallgren, Oskar

    2009-01-01

    Most Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) research and applications have so far neglected the ex post stages of the process, also called SEA follow-up. Tool kits and methodological frameworks for engaging effectively with SEA follow-up have been conspicuously missing. In particular, little has so far been learned from the much more mature evaluation literature although many aspects are similar. This paper provides an analytical framework and tool kit for SEA follow-up. It is based on insights and tools developed within programme evaluation and environmental systems analysis. It is also grounded in empirical studies into real planning and programming practices at the regional level, but should have relevance for SEA processes at all levels. The purpose of the framework is to promote a learning-oriented and integrated use of SEA follow-up in strategic decision making. It helps to identify appropriate tools and their use in the process, and to systematise the use of available data and knowledge across the planning organization and process. It distinguishes three stages in follow-up: scoping, analysis and learning, identifies the key functions and demonstrates the informational linkages to the strategic decision-making process. The associated tool kit includes specific analytical and deliberative tools. Many of these are applicable also ex ante, but are then used in a predictive mode rather than on the basis of real data. The analytical element of the framework is organized on the basis of programme theory and 'DPSIR' tools. The paper discusses three issues in the application of the framework: understanding the integration of organizations and knowledge; understanding planners' questions and analytical requirements; and understanding interests, incentives and reluctance to evaluate

  17. DESGW: Optical Follow-up of BBH LIGO-Virgo Events with DECam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Robert E. [Indiana U.; Soares-Santos, M. [Brandeis U.; Annis, j. [Fermilab; Herner, K. [Fermilab

    2017-12-14

    The DESGW program is a collaboration between members of the Dark Energy Survey, the wider astronomical community, and the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration to search for optical counterparts of gravitational wave events, such as those expected from binary neutron star mergers or neutron star-black hole mergers. While binary black hole (BBH) events are not expected to produce an electromagnetic (EM) signature, emission is certainly not impossible. The DESGW program has performed follow-up observations of four BBH events detected by LIGO in order to search for any possible EM counterpart. Failure to nd such counterparts is still relevant in that it produces limits on optical emission from such events. This is a review of follow-up results from O1 BBH events and a discussion of the status of ongoing uniform re-analysis of all BBH events that DESGW has followed up to date.

  18. Loss to follow up did not bias associations between early life factors and adult depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Kriegbaum, Margit; Christensen, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examines the consequences of nonresponse in a follow-up survey for the associations of early life factors with adult depression. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A cohort of 11,532 Danish men born in 1953 had nearly complete follow up for outcomes retrieved from the Danish...... characteristics and four measures of depression were described by odd ratios (OR), estimated by logistic regression. For the register-based measures the effect of nonresponse was described by a relative OR(OR(responders)/OR(entire cohort)=ROR). RESULTS: Nonresponse at 50 years of age was related to having...... a single mother at birth, low educational attainment at age 18, and low cognitive function at ages 12 and 18. Hospitalizations for depression and having claimed a prescription for an antidepressive drug were also most frequent among men who did not respond in the follow up. However, the effect...

  19. Self-Determination Theory and Outpatient Follow-Up After Psychiatric Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Rebecca K; Bowersox, Nicholas W; Ganoczy, Dara; Valenstein, Marcia; Pfeiffer, Paul N

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether the constructs of self-determination theory-autonomy, competence, and relatedness-are associated with adherence to outpatient follow-up appointments after psychiatric hospitalization. 242 individuals discharged from inpatient psychiatric treatment within the Veterans Health Administration completed surveys assessing self-determination theory constructs as well as measures of depression and barriers to treatment. Medical records were used to count the number of mental health visits and no-shows in the 14 weeks following discharge. Logistic regression models assessed the association between survey items assessing theory constructs and attendance at mental healthcare visits. In multivariate models, none of the self-determination theory factors predicted outpatient follow-up attendance. The constructs of self-determination theory as measured by a single self-report survey may not reliably predict adherence to post-hospital care. Need factors such as depression may be more strongly predictive of treatment adherence.

  20. B-cell Lymphoma in retrieved femoral heads: a long term follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Kemenade Folkert J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A relatively high incidence of pathological conditions in retrieved femoral heads, including a group of patients having low grade B-cell lymphoma, has been described before. At short term follow up none of these patients with low-grade B-cell lymphoma showed evidence of systemic disease. However, the long term follow up of these patients is not known. Methods From November 1994 up to and including December 2005 we screened all femoral heads removed at the time of primary total hip replacement histopathologically and included them in the bone banking protocol according to the guidelines of the American Associations of Tissue Banks (AATB and the European Association of Musculo-Skeletal Transplantation (EAMST. We determined the percentage of B-cell lymphoma in all femoral heads and in the group that fulfilled all criteria of the bone banking protocol and report on the long-term follow-up. Results Of 852 femoral heads fourteen (1.6% were highly suspicious for low-grade B-cell lymphoma. Of these 852 femoral heads, 504 were eligible for bone transplantation according to the guidelines of the AATB and the EAMST. Six femoral heads of this group of 504 were highly suspicious for low-grade B-cell lymphoma (1.2%. At long term follow up two (0.2% of all patients developed systemic malignant disease and one of them needed medical treatment for her condition. Conclusion In routine histopathological screening we found variable numbers of low-grade B-cell lymphoma throughout the years, even in a group of femoral heads that were eligible for bone transplantation. Allogenic transmission of malignancy has not yet been reported on, but surviving viruses are proven to be transmissible. Therefore, we recommend the routine histopathological evaluation of all femoral heads removed at primary total hip arthroplasty as a tool for quality control, whether the femoral head is used for bone banking or not.

  1. Trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome: a 20 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianetti, T M; Dall'Asta, L; Torroni, A; Gasparini, G; Pelo, S

    2014-07-01

    Trismus-Pseudocamptodactyly Syndrome (TPS) is a rare autosomal syndrome characterised by the inability to open the mouth fully, pseudocamptodactyly, short stature and foot deformities. The maxillofacial feature entails hyperplasia of the coronoid processes which mechanically interfere with the zygomatic processes during mouth opening. A 22-year- old girl affected by a severe form of TPS was followed from the age of three years. Bone reossification was observed after two coronoidotomies of both hyperplasic coronoid processes. After the decision to perform a coronoidectomy, the four-year follow-up showed a favourable outcome. Meanwhile the patient developed an anterior open bite which was treated with a fourth orthognathic surgery. The follow-up underscores how the correction of malformation leads to the generation of EMG activity of the masticatory muscles after many years of passiveness.

  2. [Normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism: recommendations for management and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo; Jódar Gimeno, Esteban; Reyes García, Rebeca; Gómez Sáez, José Manuel; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    To provide practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (PubMed), using the terms normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism and primary hyperparathyroidism, for articles in English published before 22 November 2012. Literature was reviewed by 2 members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology, and after development of recommendations, the manuscript was reviewed by all other members of the Group, and their suggestions were incorporated. The document provides practical recommendations for evaluation and follow-up of patients with normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism. There is however little evidence available about different aspects of this disease, mainly progression rate and clinical impact. More data are therefore needed before definite recommendations may be made. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  4. MASTER Prompt and Follow-Up GRB Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Tyurina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We presented the results of last years GRB observations obtained on the MASTER robotic telescope, which is the only telescope of its kind in Russia. These results include 5 prompt observations of GRB in 2008 and 2009, follow-up observations of 15 other GRBs in 2008-2009, the first observations in different polarization angles of optical emission from the gamma-ray bursts GRB091020, and observations in different polarization angles for GRB091127 and GRB090820.

  5. Radiographic follow-up study of Little Leaguer's shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Yoshiji; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Kashiwaguchi, Shinji; Iwase, Takenobu; Suzue, Naoto; Iwame, Toshiyuki; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Little Leaguer's shoulder is a syndrome involving the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. Conservative treatment usually resolves the symptoms. However, there are no reports of a radiographic follow-up study of this disease. The purpose of this study was to show the radiographic healing process of Little Leaguer's shoulder. A total of 19 male baseball players diagnosed as having Little Leaguer's shoulder were retrospectively evaluated. The mean age at first presentation was 12.7 years. External rotation anteroposterior radiographs of the shoulder were taken. All patients were treated with rest from throwing, and no throwing was recommended until remodeling was confirmed. Follow-up radiographs were taken at 1-month intervals to assess healing. All patients were observed until healing was confirmed radiographically, after which they returned to baseball. The mean follow-up period was 8.5 months. In addition to radiography, patients were asked whether they had any symptoms and whether they had been able to return to baseball. At the first examination, radiographs showed a wider epiphyseal plate of the throwing side compared with the asymptomatic contralateral shoulder. Healing was observed in all cases. Healing occurred first along the medial side and was then extended laterally. The mean time required for healing was 4.7 months. All patients were able to return to playing baseball at their pre-injury level of play and were asymptomatic when examined at the final follow-up. The healing process of Little Leaguer's shoulder advanced from medial to lateral, and healing was achieved about 5 months after initial examination.

  6. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida,Renato Rodrigues de; Almeida,Marcio Rodrigues de; Oltramari-Navarro,Paula Vanessa Pedron; Conti,Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Navarro,Ricardo de Lima; Souza,Karen Regina Siqueira de

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been re...

  7. Follow-up of permanent hearing impairment in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Volpe, A; De Lucia, A; Pastore, V; Bracci Laudiero, L; Buonissimo, I; Ricci, G

    2016-02-01

    Programmes for early childhood childhood hearing impairment identification allows to quickly start the appropriate hearing aid fitting and rehabilitation process; nevertheless, a large number of patients do not join the treatment program. The goal of this article is to present the results of a strategic review of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats connected with the audiologic/prosthetic/language follow-up process of children with bilateral permanent hearing impairment. Involving small children, the follow-up includes the involvement of specialised professionals of a multidisciplinary team and a complex and prolonged multi-faced management. Within the framework of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for Early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", the purpose of this analysis was to propose recommendations that can harmonise criteria for outcome evaluation and provide guidance on the most appropriate assessment methods to be used in the follow-up course of children with permanent hearing impairment. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  8. Cherubism - A case report with long term follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi V Chavali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cherubism is a rare non-neoplastic disease of the bone characterized by bilateral painless enlargement of the jaws giving a cherubic appearance to the patient. It is an autosomal dominant disorder but may occur sporadically. In this paper, we have tried to explain about the clinical, radiological and histopathologic features of cherubism by presenting a case study. A case study of a 7 year old male patient, who first presented with mandibular bilateral swellings to our department in 1998, has been presented. In-depth clinical, radiological and histopathologic examination was done. An extensive long-term follow-up till 11 years was maintained. When presented for the first time, radiological investigation showed characteristic multilocular lytic lesions of the mandible bilaterally. Histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen showed proliferating fibrous connective tissue interspersed by multinucleated giant cells. It was diagnosed as a case nonfamilial cherubism. Follow-up after 5 years showed involvement of the maxilla as well, which was then corrected by surgical methods. Upon follow up 11 years after the first presentation, it was seen that the lesion was regressing by itself and there was improvement in facial contour. The natural course of Cherubism through its progression, stabilization and involution of the disease after puberty, has been highlighted in this case. More, in-depth studies to understand the nature and the pathogenesis of this condition better are required.

  9. Baseline and follow-up laboratory monitoring of cardiovascular medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjia, Jennifer; Fischer, Shira H; Raebel, Marsha A; Peterson, Daniel; Zhao, Yanfang; Gagne, Shawn J; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Field, Terry S

    2011-09-01

    Laboratory monitoring of medications is typically used to establish safety prior to drug initiation and to detect drug-related injury following initiation. It is unclear whether black box warnings (BBWs) as well as evidence- and consensus-based clinical guidelines increase the likelihood of appropriate monitoring. To determine the proportion of patients newly initiated on selected cardiovascular medications with baseline assessment and follow-up laboratory monitoring and compare the prevalence of laboratory testing for drugs with and without BBWs and guidelines. This cross-sectional study included patients aged 18 years or older from a large multispecialty group practice who were prescribed a cardiovascular medication (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, amiodarone, digoxin, lipid-lowering agents, diuretics, and potassium supplements) between January 1 and July 31, 2008. The primary outcome measure was laboratory test ordering for baseline assessment and follow-up monitoring of newly initiated cardiovascular medications. The number of new users of each study drug ranged from 49 to 1757 during the study period. Baseline laboratory test ordering across study drugs ranged from 37.4% to 94.8%, and follow-up laboratory test ordering ranged from 20.0% to 77.2%. Laboratory tests for drugs with baseline laboratory assessment recommendations in BBWs were more commonly ordered than for drugs without BBWs (86.4% vs 78.0%, p BBW recommendations may improve monitoring.

  10. Recommendations for Follow-up Care for Gynecologic Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elit, Laurie; Reade, Clare J

    2015-12-01

    Gynecologic cancer survivors are expected to increase in number over the coming years. This is attributable in part to an increased incidence of gynecologic malignancies as the population ages. Earlier detection and improved treatments will lead to improved survival. Women who have completed their cancer treatment and are disease-free enter a phase of follow-up care. This care can be provided by gynecologic oncologists, general gynecologists, or primary care practitioners, depending on local practices and geographic area. The key components of follow-up include complete history and physical examination. There should be judicious use of appropriate testing to detect disease recurrence, assessment, and management of therapy-related symptoms and provision of psychosocial support. Well-woman care and ongoing screening for other malignancies remain an important component of care that should not be overlooked. This review provides recommendations regarding follow-up care for women with gynecologic malignancies. There is very little high-quality evidence available to guide such care.

  11. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauth, Elke A.M.; Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of ≥70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS

  12. Follow-Up Photometry of Kelt Transiting Planet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Denise C.; Joner, Michael D.; Hintz, Eric G.; Martin, Trevor; Spencer, Alex; Kelt Follow-Up Network (FUN) Team

    2017-10-01

    We have three telescopes at BYU that we use to follow-up possible transiting planet canidates for the KELT team. These telescopes were used to collect data on Kelt-16b and Kelt-9b, which is the hottest known exoplanet. More recently we used the newest of these telescopes, a robotic 8-inch telescope on the roof of our building, to confirm the most recent Kelt planet that will be published soon. This research has been ideal for the teaching and training of undergraduate students in the art of photometric observing and data reduction. In this presentation I will highlight how we are using our membership in the Kelt team to further the educational objective of our undergraduate astronomy program, while contributing meaningful science to the ever growing field of exoplanet discovery. I will also highlight a few of the more interesting Kelt planets and the minimum telescope requirements for detecting these planets. I will then discuss the sensitivities required to follow-up future TESS candidates, which may be of interest to others interested in joining the TESS follow-up teams.

  13. Development of Guidelines for Skeletal Survey in Young Children With Intracranial Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Christine Weirich; Scribano, Philip V; Localio, Russell; Wood, Joanne N

    2016-04-01

    As evidenced by the variation and disparities in evaluation, there is uncertainty in determining which young children with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) should undergo evaluation with skeletal survey (SS) for additional injuries concerning for abuse. We aimed to develop guidelines for performing initial SS in children <24 months old presenting with ICH by combining available evidence from the literature with expert opinion. Using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method, a multispecialty panel of 12 experts used the literature and their own clinical expertise to rate the appropriateness of performing SS for 216 scenarios characterizing children <24 months old with ICH. After a moderated discussion of initial ratings, the scenarios were revised. Panelists re-rated SS appropriateness for 74 revised scenarios. For the 63 scenarios in which SS was deemed appropriate, the panel rated the necessity of SS. Panelists concluded that SS is appropriate for 85% (63), uncertain for 15% (11), and inappropriate for 0% of scenarios. Panelists determined that SS is necessary in all scenarios deemed appropriate. SS was deemed necessary for infants <6 months old and for children <24 months old with subdural hemorrhage that is not tiny and under a skull fracture. For children 6 to 23 months old with epidural hemorrhage, necessity of SS depended on the child's age, history of trauma, signs/symptoms, and ICH characteristics. The resulting clinical guidelines call for near-universal evaluation in children <24 months old presenting with ICH. Detailed, validated guidelines that are successfully implemented may decrease variation and disparities in care. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessels, Jan-Albert, E-mail: janalbert.wessels@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: A.Morrison-Saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Environmental Assessment, School of Environmental Science, Murdoch University, Australia. (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  15. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessels, Jan-Albert; Retief, Francois; Morrison-Saunders, Angus

    2015-01-01

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  16. Disparities in Barriers to Follow-up Care between African American and White Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Nynikka R. A.; Weaver, Kathryn E.; Hauser, Sally P.; Lawrence, Julia A.; Talton, Jennifer; Case, L. Douglas; Geiger, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite recommendations for breast cancer survivorship care, African American women are less likely to receive appropriate follow-up care, which is concerning due to their higher mortality rates. This study describes differences in barriers to follow-up care between African American and White breast cancer survivors. Methods We conducted a mailed survey of women treated for non-metastatic breast cancer in 2009–2011, 6–24 months post-treatment (N=203). Survivors were asked about 14 potential barriers to follow-up care. We used logistic regression to explore associations between barriers and race, adjusting for covariates. Results Our participants included 31 African American and 160 White survivors. At least one barrier to follow-up care was reported by 62%. Compared to White survivors, African Americans were more likely to identify barriers related to out-of-pocket costs (28% vs. 51.6%, p=0.01), other healthcare costs (21.3% vs. 45.2%, p=0.01), anxiety/worry (29.4% vs. 51.6%, p=0.02), and transportation (4.4% vs. 16.1%, p=0.03). After adjustment for covariates, African Americans were three times as likely to report at least one barrier to care (OR=3.3, 95%CI=1.1–10.1). Conclusions Barriers to care are common among breast cancer survivors, especially African American women. Financial barriers to care may prevent minority and underserved survivors from accessing follow-up care. Enhancing insurance coverage or addressing out-of-pocket costs may help address financial barriers to follow-up care among breast cancer survivors. Psychosocial care aimed at reducing fear of recurrence may also be important to improve access among African American breast cancer survivors. PMID:25821145

  17. Overview of BioBank Japan follow-up data in 32 diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Makoto; Nagai, Akiko; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Yamagata, Zentaro; Kubo, Michiaki; Muto, Kaori; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Mushiroda, Taisei; Murakami, Yoshinori; Yuji, Koichiro; Furukawa, Yoichi; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ohnishi, Yozo; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuda, Koichi

    2017-03-01

    We established a patient-oriented biobank, BioBank Japan, with information on approximately 200,000 patients, suffering from any of 47 common diseases. This follow-up survey focused on 32 diseases, potentially associated with poor vital prognosis, and collected patient survival information, including cause of death. We performed a survival analysis for all subjects to get an overview of BioBank Japan follow-up data. A total of 141,612 participants were included. The survival data were last updated in 2014. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed after categorizing subjects according to sex, age group, and disease status. Relative survival rates were estimated using a survival-rate table of the Japanese general population. Of 141,612 subjects (56.48% male) with 1,087,434 person-years and a 97.0% follow-up rate, 35,482 patients died during follow-up. Mean age at enrollment was 64.24 years for male subjects and 63.98 years for female subjects. The 5-year and 10-year relative survival rates for all subjects were 0.944 and 0.911, respectively, with a median follow-up duration of 8.40 years. Patients with pancreatic cancer had the least favorable prognosis (10-year relative survival: 0.184) and patients with dyslipidemia had the most favorable prognosis (1.013). The most common cause of death was malignant neoplasms. A number of subjects died from diseases other than their registered disease(s). This is the first report to perform follow-up survival analysis across various common diseases. Further studies should use detailed clinical and genomic information to identify predictors of mortality in patients with common diseases, contributing to the implementation of personalized medicine. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing nonresponse bias at follow-up in a large prospective cohort of relatively young and mobile military service members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooper Tomoko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonresponse bias in a longitudinal study could affect the magnitude and direction of measures of association. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, military, and health-related predictors of response to the first follow-up questionnaire in a large military cohort and assessed the extent to which nonresponse biased measures of association. Methods Data are from the baseline and first follow-up survey of the Millennium Cohort Study. Seventy-six thousand, seven hundred and seventy-five eligible individuals completed the baseline survey and were presumed alive at the time of follow-up; of these, 54,960 (71.6% completed the first follow-up survey. Logistic regression models were used to calculate inverse probability weights using propensity scores. Results Characteristics associated with a greater probability of response included female gender, older age, higher education level, officer rank, active-duty status, and a self-reported history of military exposures. Ever smokers, those with a history of chronic alcohol consumption or a major depressive disorder, and those separated from the military at follow-up had a lower probability of response. Nonresponse to the follow-up questionnaire did not result in appreciable bias; bias was greatest in subgroups with small numbers. Conclusions These findings suggest that prospective analyses from this cohort are not substantially biased by non-response at the first follow-up assessment.

  19. Sleep During Menopausal Transition: A 6-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampio, Laura; Polo-Kantola, Päivi; Himanen, Sari-Leena; Kurki, Samu; Huupponen, Eero; Engblom, Janne; Heinonen, Olli J; Polo, Olli; Saaresranta, Tarja

    2017-07-01

    Menopausal transition is associated with increased dissatisfaction with sleep, but the effects on sleep architecture are conflicting. This prospective 6-year follow-up study was designed to evaluate the changes in sleep stages and sleep continuity that occur in women during menopausal transition. Sixty women (mean age 46.0 years, SD 0.9) participated. All women were premenopausal at baseline, and at the 6-year follow-up, women were in different stages of menopausal transition. Polysomnography was used to study sleep architecture at baseline and follow-up. The effects of aging and menopause (assessed as change in serum follicle-stimulating hormone [S-FSH]) on sleep architecture were evaluated using linear regression models. After controlling for body mass index, vasomotor, and depressive symptoms, aging of 6 years resulted in shorter total sleep time (B -37.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] -71.5 to (-3.3)), lower sleep efficiency (B -6.5, 95%CI -12.7 to (-0.2)), as well as in increased transitions from slow-wave sleep (SWS) to wakefulness (B 1.0, 95%CI 0.1 to 1.9), wake after sleep onset (B 37.7, 95%CI 12.5 to 63.0), awakenings per hour (B 1.8, 95%CI 0.8 to 2.8), and arousal index (B 2.3, 95%CI 0.1 to 4.4). Higher S-FSH concentration in menopausal transition was associated with increased SWS (B 0.09, 95%CI 0.01 to 0.16) after controlling for confounding factors. A significant deterioration in sleep continuity occurs when women age from 46 to 52 years, but change from premenopausal to menopausal state restores some SWS. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Long-Term Follow-Up of Lateral Canthal Resuspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Sathyadeepak; Gupta, Adit; Rootman, Daniel Benson; Goldberg, Robert Alan

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term results of lateral canthal resuspension over time. A cohort study of adults (n = 25, 45 eyelids) undergoing lateral canthal resuspension. Marginal reflex distance 2 (MRD2), inferior scleral show, lateral canthal height, lateral canthal angle, horizontal palpebral aperture, and lateral scleral triangle area were measured preoperatively and at postoperative week 1, month 3, and the final follow-up visit. Minimum follow-up time was 6 months (mean, 15.1 months). At the final follow-up visit, MRD2 decreased by 0.41 ± 0.14 mm, inferior scleral show decreased by 0.27 ± 0.05 mm, and lateral canthal height increased by 0.81 ± 0.15 mm. The overall function of time was found to be significant for change in MRD2 (P < 0.01). In multiple comparisons, all time point values were significantly different from one another (Bonferroni corrected, P < 0.05), except for 3 months and the final position, which were not. Similarly, the overall effect of time on lateral canthus position was also significant (P < 0.01). All time points were significantly different from one another (Bonferroni corrected, P < 0.05). The overall effect of time on inferior scleral show was also significant (P < 0.01). Differences were significant from preoperative to final postoperative position, although the other time points were not significant (Bonferroni corrected, P < 0.05). No complications were noted. Minimally invasive lateral canthal resuspension provides durable, albeit modest, improvements in MRD2, inferior scleral show, and lateral canthal height without significantly changing lateral canthal angle, horizontal palpebral aperture, or lateral scleral triangle area. Copyright 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  1. Cervicomedullary astrocytomas of childhood: clinical and imaging follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young Poussaint, T.; Yousuf, N.; Barnes, P.D. [Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Anthony, D.C. [Department of Pathology, Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, D. [Department of Research Computing and Biostatistics, Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Scott, R.M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Tarbell, N.J. [Head, Radiation Oncology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Background. Cervicomedullary astrocytomas are a unique subset of brainstem tumors in children because they have a good prognosis when compared to the pontine subset of brainstem gliomas. Objective. To review the clinical and imaging findings in a series of children with cervicomedullary astrocytomas as to diagnosis and management. Materials and methods. A retrospective review of eleven children (six females, five males, age range: 10 days-18 years; mean = 7 years) with cervicomedullary tumors was done including the clinical presentation, imaging studies (MR: eleven, CT and MR: four), surgical findings, pathological results, and follow-up clinical and imaging findings (range: 0.2-11 years; mean = 5.2 years). Results. Symptoms and signs were delayed and protracted, often occurring over months to years (mean = 2.3 years, range 0.5-7 years). The tumors expanded the dorsal medulla and involved the upper cervical spinal cord (mean maximum tumor diameter = 4.4 cm). Only three patients had hydrocephalus. In three of four cases the tumor was not seen on CT. On MR, the majority of the tumors were T1 hypointense and T2 hyperintense. Treatment consisted of surgery only in six patients, surgery and radiation therapy in four, and surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation in one. There was recurrent local disease in four patients and on follow-up metastatic disease in the brain in one. On follow-up the majority of the patients are alive and stable (mean = 5.2 years, range 0.2-11 years). There has been one death. The majority of tumors were pilocytic astrocytomas. Conclusion. Cervicomedullary tumors are a unique subset of brainstem gliomas in childhood that present with a long duration of symptoms and a greater long-term survival than pontine gliomas. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 21 refs.

  2. Latex allergy in children: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diéguez Pastor, M C; Antón Girones, M; Blanco, R; Pulido, Z; Muriel, A; de la Hoz Caballer, B

    2006-01-01

    Natural rubber latex allergy is an important health problem. Multiple contacts with latex in childhood are a risk factor. Many aspects of this disease are still unknown, one of which is the clinical outcome of these children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and epidemiological features of latex allergy and compliance with latex avoidance instructions in allergic children. Seventeen consecutive patients with a history of latex allergy, fruit allergy or chronic urticaria were selected. The patients underwent a skin prick test and determination of specific-IgE to latex at the start and at end of the study (median follow-up: 3 years). At diagnosis, patients with a positive result to one of the tests and a clinical history of latex allergy were considered allergic; patients with a positive test but without a clinical history suggestive of allergy were considered sensitized. These children were given latex avoidance instructions. Eleven children (64.7 %) were classified as allergic and 6 (35.3 %) as sensitized. Five patients had undergone latex-free surgery after diagnosis without incident. During follow-up, 11 patients (8 allergic and 3 sensitized) had contact with latex. Contact occurred in the home in 10 children, and all were symptomatic. Specific-IgE levels to latex at the end of the study were significantly higher in patients who had contact with latex during the follow-up period than in those without latex contact. Strict compliance with latex avoidance instructions is essential both inside and outside the hospital. Greater emphasis should be placed on reducing latex exposure in the home and school environments, as such contact could maintain positive IgE-antibody levels.

  3. Urological outcome after myelomeningocele: 20 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Biering-Sorensen, Fin; Cortes, Dina

    2011-01-01

    at follow-up; seven (14%) had normal total renal function but unilateral deteriorated kidney, and eight individuals (15%) had deteriorated kidney function. Adult individuals with bilateral kidney deterioration had a significant higher frequency of diagnosed detrusor overactivity at childhood urodynamics (63...... intermittent catheterization. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, 15% of patients had impairment of kidney function and 48% were urinary continent. Considering the present age distribution of the present study population, this figure appears to be comparable to the data in the literature. Urodynamic findings in childhood...

  4. Primary cemented total hip arthroplasty: 10 years follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nath Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary cemented total hip arthroplasty is a procedure for non-traumatic and traumatic affections of the hip. Long term follow-up is required to assess the longevity of the implant and establish the procedure. Indo-Asian literature on long term result of total hip arthroplasty is sparse. We present a 10-year follow-up of our patients of primary cemented total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods: We operated 31 hips in 30 patients with primary cemented total hip arthroplasty. We followed the cases for a minimum period of 10 years with a mean follow-up period of 12.7 years. The mean age of the patients was 60.7 years (range 37-82 yrs male to female ratio was 2:1. The clinical diagnoses included - avascular necrosis of femoral head (n=15, sero positive rheumatoid arthritis (n=5, seronegative spondylo-arthropathy (n=4, neglected femoral neck fractures (n=3, healed tubercular arthritis (n=2 and post traumatic osteoarthritis of hip (n=2. The prostheses used were cemented Charnley′s total hip (n=12 and cemented modular prosthesis (n=19. The results were assessed according to Harris hip score and radiographs taken at yearly intervals. Results: The mean follow-up is 12.7 yrs (range 11-16 yrs Results in all operated patients showed marked improvement in Harris hip score from preoperative mean 29.2 to 79.9 at 10 years or more followup. However, the non-inflammatory group showed more sustained long term improvement as compared to the inflammatory group, as revealed by the Harris hip score. Mean blood loss was 450ml (±3.7 ml, mean transfusion rate was 1.2 units (±.3. The complications were hypotension (n=7, shortening> 1.5 cm (n=9, superficial infection (n=2 and malposition of prosthesis (n=1. Conclusion: The needs of Indian Asian patients, vary from what is discussed in literature. The pain tolerance is greater than western population and financial constraints are high. Thus revision surgery among Indian-Asian patients is less compared

  5. Follow-up study of memory deficits after ECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellenberger, W; Miller, M J; Small, I F; Milstein, V; Stout, J R

    1982-06-01

    Twenty-four patients received ECT induced by either alternating sine wave or brief pulsed-square wave stimulus and were evaluated at follow-up for clinical functioning and subjective memory loss. The hypothesis of less memory loss in the group receiving a weaker stimulus (pulsed-square wave) was not supported. The two treatment groups and a group of controls showed no significant differences on the memory test. On measures of clinical functioning the sine wave group scored better on every measure than the square wave group, although not significantly better.

  6. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now - for science, for exploration and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation (NG) were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. KLENOT Project Goals are confirmatory observations of newly discovered fainter NEO candidates, early follow-up of newly discovered NEOs, long-arc follow-up astrometry of NEOs

  7. Follow-up of young road accident victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Marjorie L; Barton, Joanne; Di Gallo, Alain

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this study was to follow-up a group of children and young people previously examined for psychological sequelae following road traffic accidents. The group was assessed 18-month postaccident to assess the severity of continuing symptoms and examine any emergence of delayed onset of posttraumatic stress reactions. Participants (N = 31) completed the Revised Impact of Event Scale and the Child Posttraumatic Stress Reaction Index. Parents completed the Child Behavior Check-List and participated in a semistructured interview. Symptoms of PTSD were noted in a quarter of participants as was delayed onset of symptoms. The role of avoidance in symptom reporting and continuing disorder is discussed.

  8. Automated medical follow-up and delayed industrial risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.E.

    In response to increasing demand for human data to identify social, environmental, and occupational influences upon health, Statistics Canada has been organizing existing files of vital and health records to facilitate such studies on a national scale. In particular, the development of a Canadian Mortality Data Base file, the initiation of the National Cancer Incidence system, and the development of new computer techniques have helped reduce the cost and increase the scale and efficiency of automated medical follow-up to produce statistics of sickness or death attributable to environmental factors. Specific occupational studies now in progress serve to illustrate the methods, practical difficulties, potential size, and products from such investigations

  9. West Foster Creek 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    A follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the West Foster Creek (Smith acquisition) wildlife mitigation site in May 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance and maintain the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The West Foster Creek 2007 follow-up HEP survey generated 2,981.96 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for a 34% increase (+751.34 HUs) above baseline HU credit (the 1999 baseline HEP survey generated 2,230.62 habitat units or 1.13 HUs per acre). The 2007 follow-up HEP analysis yielded 1,380.26 sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) habitat units, 879.40 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) HUs, and 722.29 western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) habitat units. Mule deer and sharp-tailed grouse habitat units increased by 346.42 HUs and 470.62 HUs respectively over baseline (1999) survey results due largely to cessation of livestock grazing and subsequent passive restoration. In contrast, the western meadowlark generated slightly fewer habitat units in 2007 (-67.31) than in 1999, because of increased shrub cover, which lowers habitat suitability for that species.

  10. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Rodrigues de Almeida

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program, and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment.

  11. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Renato Rodrigues de; Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues de; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Souza, Karen Regina Siqueira de

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment.

  12. Follow up study of Alzheimer's type dementia with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Nobuhide

    1987-01-01

    In 54 patients who were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's type dementia based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, III, cranial computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained before and after their follow-up study ranging from 6 to 24 months (mean 15.4 +- 4.7 months). Cerebrospinal percentage and CT density in various regions of interest were examined. Six patients died during the study. Comparison of the group of the deceased (Group I) with the group of survivors (Group II) revealed: (1) there was no difference in average age and the degree of mental disorder at first presentation; (2) Group I had decreased activities of daily living; and (3) CT density was significantly decreased in the bilateral lateral and frontal lobes in Group I. As for Group II, decreased CT numbers were noticeable during the follow-up period in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and caudate nucleus in the group evaluated as aggravated, as compared with the group evaluated as unchanged. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. CT follow-up after radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rush, S.C.; Newall, J.

    1988-01-01

    Between 1973 and 1985, 105 patients received radiation therapy as all or part of their treatment for pituitary tumor at the New York University Medical Center. Of these, 48 patients underwent computed tomography (CT) at a minimum of 2 years following treatment, with detailed reports available for analysis of tumor regression. There were 28 men with a median age of 46 years (range, 18-71 years) and 20 women with a median age of 53 years (range, 28-80 years). Tumors were classified as secretory in 23 patients, nonsecretory in 21, and undetermined in four. Sixteen patients were treated with radiation therapy alone, 23 patients with surgery and radiation therapy, and the other with bromocriptine and radiation therapy, with or without surgery. With a median follow-up of 5 years (range, 2-14 years), 16 patients developed an empty sella, 25 patients had residual sellar mass, and seven patients had persistent extrasellar components or no change in their intrasellar mass. Among patients who did not have hypopituitarism at the inception of radiation therapy, five of 13 with empty sellas and 12 of 22 with residual mass subsequently required therapy. The authors conclude that residual mass is commonly found in long-term follow-up after radiation therapy, that isolated imaging studies revealing such findings after treatment in no way herald a diagnosis of recurrence, and that hypopituitarism following pituitary radiation therapy does not correlate with the ablation or persistence of tissue within the sella

  14. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    de ALMEIDA, Renato Rodrigues; de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; OLTRAMARI-NAVARRO, Paula Vanessa Pedron; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; NAVARRO, Ricardo de Lima; de SOUZA, Karen Regina Siqueira

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment. PMID:23032213

  15. ESUR guidelines: ovarian cancer staging and follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forstner, Rosemarie [Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Radiology, Landeskliniken Salzburg, Salzburg (Austria); Sala, Evis [University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kinkel, Karen [Geneva University Hospital, Clinique des Grangettes, Geneva (Switzerland); Spencer, John A. [St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    To design clear guidelines for the staging and follow-up of patients with ovarian cancer, and to provide the radiologist with a framework for use in multidisciplinary conferences. Guidelines for ovarian cancer staging and follow-up were defined by the female imaging subcommittee of the ESUR (European Society of Urogenital Radiology) based on the expert consensus of imaging protocols of 12 leading institutions and a critical review of the literature. Computed tomography (CT) with coverage of the base of the lungs to the inguinal region is regarded as the imaging technique of choice for preoperative staging. Critical diagnostic criteria are presented and the basis for a structured report for preoperative staging is outlined. Following primary treatment for ovarian cancer, clinical assessment and CA-125 are routinely used to monitor patients. For suspected recurrence, CT remains the imaging modality of choice, with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT emerging as the optimal imaging technique for suspected recurrence, particularly in patients with negative CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT is the imaging modality of choice for preoperative staging and detection of recurrence in patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  16. Gastric and Duodenal Stents: Follow-Up and Complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto Pabon, Isabel Teresa; Paul Diaz, Laura; Ruiz de Adana, Juan Carlos; Lopez Herrero, Julio

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of self-expanding metallic stents in treating inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses during follow-up and to evaluate the complications encountered.Methods: A total of 31 patients suffering from gastroduodenal obstruction (29 malignant, 2 benign) were treated with a self-expanding metallic stent (Wallstent). In 24 cases insertion was by the peroral route, in seven cases via gastrostomy.Results: All the strictures were successfully negotiated under fluoroscopic guidance without having to resort to endoscopy. A total of 27 patients (87%) were able to resume a regular diet, a soft diet, or a liquid diet orally. Complications included one case of stent malpositioning, one case of leakage of ascitic fluid through the gastrostomy orifice, one case of perforation and fistula to the biliary tree, and two cases of hematemesis. In two patients (6%) additional stents were implanted to improve patency. In all patients follow-up was maintained until death. Recurrence of symptoms immediately before death occurred in seven cases (23%). Mean survival time of patients was 13.3 weeks (SE ± 4.6).Conclusions: The deployment of gastroduodenal stents resulted in good palliation of inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses. Certain technical aspects, e.g., adaptation of stents to bowel morphology, is critical to proper stent function and avoidance of complications

  17. Vaginismus Treatment: Clinical Trials Follow Up 241 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacik, Peter T; Geletta, Simon

    2017-06-01

    Vaginismus is mostly unknown among clinicians and women. Vaginismus causes women to have fear, anxiety, and pain with penetration attempts. To present a large cohort of patients based on prior published studies approved by an institutional review board and the Food and Drug Administration using a comprehensive multimodal vaginismus treatment program to treat the physical and psychologic manifestations of women with vaginismus and to record successes, failures, and untoward effects of this treatment approach. Assessment of vaginismus included a comprehensive pretreatment questionnaire, the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), and consultation. All patients signed a detailed informed consent. Treatment consisted of a multimodal approach including intravaginal injections of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) and bupivacaine, progressive dilation under conscious sedation, indwelling dilator, follow-up and support with office visits, phone calls, e-mails, dilation logs, and FSFI reports. Logs noting dilation progression, pain and anxiety scores, time to achieve intercourse, setbacks, and untoward effects. Post-treatment FSFI scores were compared with preprocedure scores. One hundred seventy-one patients (71%) reported having pain-free intercourse at a mean of 5.1 weeks (median = 2.5). Six patients (2.5%) were unable to achieve intercourse within a 1-year period after treatment and 64 patients (26.6%) were lost to follow-up. The change in the overall FSFI score measured at baseline, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year was statistically significant at the 0.05 level. Three patients developed mild temporary stress incontinence, two patients developed a short period of temporary blurred vision, and one patient developed temporary excessive vaginal dryness. All adverse events resolved by approximately 4 months. One patient required retreatment followed by successful coitus. A multimodal program that treated the physical and psychologic aspects of vaginismus enabled women to achieve

  18. Mammographic follow-up after conservation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yajia; Xiao Qin; Zheng Xiaojing; Wu Jiong; Chen Jiayi; Gu Rongfeng; Feng Xiaoyuan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To recognize the mammographic changes after conservation therapy for breast carcinoma. Methods: A total of 139 follow-up mammographic examinations in 85 cases were studied during the period between 1999 and 2004. Mammography was performed at intervals of 6 months for the first 2 years, then annually. Attention was paid to mammographic change patterns of conservation therapy for breast carcinoma, including breast edema, skin thickening, architectural disturbance, asymmetric density, architectural distortion retraction, and calcifications. SPSS version 11.0 for windows was used to perform all statistical tests. Kruskal-Wallis H test was used for calculating the overall statistical differences between difference periods. Categorical data were expressed as percentages and analyzed by using the X 2 test. The age of the patients ranged from 25 to 63 years (mediate, 44 years old). The time of follow-up observation ranged from 1 week to 72 months. Results: Two cases were normal on mammograms. High proportion of abnormal mammography was seen in the period of 12 month (40.3%, 56/139) and 24 month (21.6%, 30/139), respectively. Various findings appeared in various periods and the difference was statistically significant(X 2 =30.998, v=6, P=0.001). Mild edema appeared in the first 3 years. Moderately severe or marked breast edema may be present between 6 months to 12 months, then slowly resolved. The appearance and disappearance of skin thickening were similar to the process of breast edema. The changes of architectural disturbance did not correlate with time (X 2 =8.634, P>0.05), but on sequential mammograms for same patient, the extent of architectural disturbance relieved over time (17/19). Asymmetric density was found in only 5 patients, and disappeared in later period of follow-up in 3. Architectural distortion retraction got more and more obvious with time, and kept stable after certain period of time. Calcifications were shown in 2 patients, including 1

  19. Hyperphosphatasia with massive osteoectasia: a 45-year follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, E.F. [Division of Surgical Pathology, Department of Pathology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sack, G.H. [Department of Internal Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Hyperphosphatasia is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by a generalized skeletal disease and increased alkaline phosphatase. Increased bone remodeling secondary to increased osteoclastic activity appears to be the underlying feature of these disorders. These disorders include juvenile Paget's disease, expansile skeletal hyperphosphatasia, hyperostosis generalisata with striations, and Camurati-Engelmann's disease, type II. The genetic mutations for a number of these disorders have been identified. We present a patient with congenital hyperphosphatasia whose clinical and radiographic features were somewhat different from these other well-defined syndromes. The patient was followed for 45 years until his death of at age 49. The patient had massive osteoectasia with dense striations involving the entire shaft of his long bones. His spine, pelvis, short tubular bones, and calvarium were also involved. He suffered hearing loss and optic atrophy, but he kept his teeth throughout his life. He was tall with a marfanoid habitus, and he had hypogonadism and hypothyroidism. There was no evidence of mental retardation, and other laboratory studies where within normal limits. This case, as well as other manifestations of hyperphosphatasia, attests to the complexity of the bone remodeling system. (orig.)

  20. Current role of bone scan with phosphonates in the follow-up of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffioli, Lorenzo; Florimonte, Luigia; Pagani, Luca; Butti, Ivana [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Ospedale ' ' A. Manzoni' ' , Via dell' Eremo 9/11, 23900, Lecco (Italy); Roca, Isabel [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Universitari Vall Hebron, 08035, Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-06-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that bone scintigraphy has high sensitivity and efficacy in the early detection of bone metastases from several tumours, including breast cancer. Bone scintigraphy is the most definitive tool for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic spread of breast cancer. However, in the past decade there has been a wide debate on its impact on survival time, morbidity and quality of life. Worldwide economic restrictions and these studies have led to the adoption of an almost minimalist policy for breast cancer follow-up using evidence-based guidelines. The recommended breast cancer surveillance testing includes only a few procedures (history, physical and breast self-examination, patient education on symptoms, pelvic examination). The routine use of additional tests, such as blood cell count, tumour markers, liver ultrasonography, bone scan and chest X-rays, is not recommended. Accordingly, scintigraphy should be reserved for a limited number of patients. On the other hand, early diagnosis of bone involvement may reduce the risk of skeletal related events, thus leading to a significant improvement in quality of life. Furthermore, new drugs (e.g. bisphosphonates) can now delay the onset of bone metastasis and reduce the number of patients who experience skeletal complications. In conclusion, the evidence of the clinical usefulness of bone scintigraphy (to allow early planning of new treatments in advanced disease) has to be re-evaluated, possibly by large randomised prospective trials. (orig.)

  1. Epidemiological follow-up study of Japanese Thorotrast cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T.; Maruyama, T.; Kato, Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1979-01-01

    The authors conducted a follow-up study on 243 Thorotrast-administered war-wounded ex-servicemen in 1975, after a lapse of 30 to 38 years from Thorotrast injections, and found 18 cases of malignant hepatic tumor, 15 cases of other malignant tumors, 2 cases of blood diseases, and 9 cases of liver cirrhosis in 224 cases who had been given Thorotrast intravascularly. The incidence of hepatic and other malignant tumors, blood diseases, and liver cirrhosis was significantly higher than in the controls. The total number of deaths in the Thorotrast-administered cases was also significantly higher than in the controls. In the remaining 19 cases who had been given Thorotrast by a route other than intravascularly, no fatal case related to Thorotrast administration was discovered. In the living cases, however, one sarcoma was observed to have developed at the site of the Thorotrast injection

  2. Hydrotherapy after total knee arthroplasty. A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaquinto, S; Ciotola, E; Dall'Armi, V; Margutti, F

    2010-01-01

    The study evaluated the subjective functional outcome following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in participants who underwent hydrotherapy (HT) six months after discharge from a rehabilitation unit. A total of 70 subjects, 12 of which were lost at follow-up, were randomly assigned to either a conventional gym treatment (N=30) or HT (N=28). A prospective design was performed. Participants were interviewed with Western-Ontario McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) at admission, at discharge and six months later. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were applied for statistical analysis. Both groups improved. The WOMAC subscales, namely pain, stiffness and function, were all positively affected. Statistical analysis indicates that scores on all subscales were significantly lower for the HT group. The benefits gained by the time of discharge were still found after six months. HT is recommended after TKA in a geriatric population. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Vertebral sarcoidosis: long-term follow-up with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefere, M. [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Larbi, A.; Malghem, J.; Vande Berg, B.; Dallaudiere, B. [University Hospitals St Luc, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    Vertebral involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and its clinical and imaging features are non-specific. Indeed, because the lesions are hard to differentiate from metastatic disease based on imaging alone, a histological confirmation is advised. Fatty replacement is a well-known finding indicating stabilization and healing in both benign and malignant conditions. It can be used as an indicator of a favorable disease course and response to treatment. We report the case of a 43-year-old woman with multifocal vertebral sarcoidosis lesions and long-term follow-up showing progressive and gradual fatty involution on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during 4 years of steroid treatment with a final favorable outcome. (orig.)

  4. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of imaging in glaucoma diagnosis and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vizzeri Gianmarco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the review is to provide an update on the role of imaging devices in the diagnosis and follow-up of glaucoma with an emphasis on techniques for detecting glaucomatous progression and the newer spectral domain optical coherence tomography instruments. Imaging instruments provide objective quantitative measures of the optic disc and the retinal nerve fiber layer and are increasingly utilized in clinical practice. This review will summarize the recent enhancements in confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, scanning laser polarimetry, and optical coherence tomography with an emphasis on how to utilize these techniques to manage glaucoma patients and highlight the strengths and limitations of each technology. In addition, this review will briefly describe the sophisticated data analysis strategies that are now available to detect glaucomatous change overtime.

  6. Patients’ Vulnerability in Follow-up After Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thora Grothe; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    and reorganizing follow-up after cancer treatment. OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to identify the perspectives of fast-track colorectal cancer surgery patients on challenges experienced in the transition from being a hospitalized patient with cancer to being a cancer survivor. METHODS:: The current article...... represents phase 1 in an ongoing action research project. Data were analyzed by using the “interpretive description” method. RESULTS:: Twelve patients (6 male and 6 female patients; mean age, 72.4 years) participated in the study. The analyses show that the patients physically experienced readiness to leave......BACKGROUND:: In the transition between being a hospitalized patient with cancer and resuming “normal” life, many patients experience physical, mental, and social challenges. Scientifically, as well as politically, it is therefore recommended to undertake research with a focus on rethinking...

  7. GWASeq: targeted re-sequencing follow up to GWAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Matthew P; Li, Wai Lok Sibon; Edlund, Christopher K; Morrison, John; Fortini, Barbara K; Win, Aung Ko; Conti, David V; Thomas, Duncan C; Duggan, David; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A; Casey, Graham; Marjoram, Paul

    2016-03-03

    For the last decade the conceptual framework of the Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) has dominated the investigation of human disease and other complex traits. While GWAS have been successful in identifying a large number of variants associated with various phenotypes, the overall amount of heritability explained by these variants remains small. This raises the question of how best to follow up on a GWAS, localize causal variants accounting for GWAS hits, and as a consequence explain more of the so-called "missing" heritability. Advances in high throughput sequencing technologies now allow for the efficient and cost-effective collection of vast amounts of fine-scale genomic data to complement GWAS. We investigate these issues using a colon cancer dataset. After QC, our data consisted of 1993 cases, 899 controls. Using marginal tests of associations, we identify 10 variants distributed among six targeted regions that are significantly associated with colorectal cancer, with eight of the variants being novel to this study. Additionally, we perform so-called 'SNP-set' tests of association and identify two sets of variants that implicate both common and rare variants in the etiology of colorectal cancer. Here we present a large-scale targeted re-sequencing resource focusing on genomic regions implicated in colorectal cancer susceptibility previously identified in several GWAS, which aims to 1) provide fine-scale targeted sequencing data for fine-mapping and 2) provide data resources to address methodological questions regarding the design of sequencing-based follow-up studies to GWAS. Additionally, we show that this strategy successfully identifies novel variants associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility and can implicate both common and rare variants.

  8. [Follow-up of patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, Santiago

    2013-10-01

    Multiple data were presented on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Digestive Disease Week (DDW). Of particular interest to gastroenterologists were those on novel treatments and information on safety. Other data, such as those relating to disease "follow-up", were possibly of lesser interest. However, the information reported this year was, in my opinion, highly important, because it could lead to significant changes in clinical practice. Thus, results presented strongly suggest that patients with asymptomatic IBD, specifically Crohn's disease (CD), often develop complications during their clinical course. Moreover, this is especially true in patients with CD and biological signs of inflammation, despite being asymptomatic. In addition, it seems clear that the absence of symptoms does not imply an absence of inflammation. These observations indicate a dual practical message: patients should be followed-up and objectively evaluated. Multiple data were presented on how to objectively evaluate disease activity in IBD. The prognostic value and objectivity of endoscopy has been reaffirmed, specifically with new data on the only validated index, the UCEIS, in ulcerative colitis. Together with endoscopy, the role of less invasive techniques such as imaging tests (magnetic resonance enterography, computed tomography enterography and even echography, with and without contrast agent) and fecal markers has been reaffirmed in several conditions and these techniques have a certain predictive value. Finally, many studies were reported that confirm the therapeutic activity of levels of anti-TNF and its antibodies in certain conditions and with some limitations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Bariatric versus diabetes surgery after five years of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Almulaifi, Abdullah; Chong, Keong; Yao, Wei-Cheng; Tsou, Ju Juin; Ser, Kong-Han; Lee, Yi-Chih; Chen, Shu-Chun; Chen, Jung-Chien

    2016-04-01

    Bariatric surgery (BS) is totally different from diabetes surgery (DS) in the patient characters, goals of surgery, and management although similar in surgical procedure. Comparison of BS and DS with long-term data is lacking. A retrospective review of patients who received BS and patients who received DS at Min-Sheng General Hospital from 2007 to 2013 was designed. All inpatient and outpatient follow-up data were analyzed. Patients undergoing BS for the treatment of morbid obesity were compared with patients undergoing metabolic surgery for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients who received revision surgeries were excluded. The main outcome measures were: (1) operation risk; (2) weight loss; and (3) diabetes remission. Between 2007 and 2013, 2073 patients who received BS and 741 patients who received DS were recruited from both centers. DS patients were older (41.1 ± 10.9 years vs. 33.1 ± 9.3 years, p surgeries were gastric bypass procedure, whereas this procedure made up only 47.1% of BS surgeries). Although the major complication rates were similar (2.0% vs. 2.4%), the DS program had a significant higher mortality rate than the BS program (0.54% vs. 0.1%; p successful results (weight loss > 30%) and 80% of the DS patients had complete remission of their diabetes [hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) < 6.0%]. Both the DS and the BS group had good results in up to 85% of the patients at the 5-year follow-up time point. The clinical profiles were very different between the BS and the DS programs. Both programs achieved the desired outcomes equally well, however, the DS program had a higher risk than the BS program. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  10. Long-term follow-up of stentless prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Fabrizio; Dato, Guglielmo Mario Actis; Zingarelli, Edoardo; Ferrero, Emanuele; Prot, Sara; Ceresa, Fabrizio; Patanè, Francesco; Casabona, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Stentless prostheses have an interesting hemodynamic performance when compared to stented prostheses and are recommended in cases of small aortic annulus. From January 1996 to January 2004, 138 patients suffering from aortic disease, underwent aortic valve replacement. • Group A: 93 patients underwent stentless aortic valve implantation [stentless Biocor (Biocor Industria e Pesguisa Ltda, Belo Horizonte, Brazil) and stentless Sorin (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy)]. • Group B: 45 patients underwent stented aortic valve implantation (stented Biocor). Patients were assessed by clinical evaluation and echocardiography after a mean follow up of 124.5 ± 58.2 months. There was a significant difference in terms of time of extracorporeal circulation and aortic cross clamp. The actuarial survival at 4, 8, 12, and 15 years is 77%, 50%, 21%, and 18%, respectively. Freedom from reoperation at 4, 8, 12, and 14 years was 92%, 83%, 73%, and 63%, respectively. Freedom from all events, death, and reoperation at 4, 8, 12, and 14 years was 70%, 39%, 13%, and 8%, respectively. There is no statistical difference among the two groups in terms of actuarial survival, freedom from reoperation, and freedom from re-hospitalization for prosthesis-related causes. There was a significantly higher incidence of pacemaker implantation in Group A and the causes are not known. The rate of freedom from reoperation is high in both groups for the patients who remained alive. There was no statistical difference about prosthesis dysfunction between the two groups. The higher incidence of death in Group A cannot be explained by causes related to the prosthesis because there is no difference in terms of causes of death. Rates of reoperation did not differ between the two groups. The results obtained with stentless prostheses are encouraging even in long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in follow-up assessment of sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J; Van der Kallen, Bas F; van den Hout, Wilbert B; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently performed during follow-up in patients with known lumbar-disk herniation and persistent symptoms of sciatica. The association between findings on MRI and clinical outcome is controversial. We studied 283 patients in a randomized trial comparing surgery and prolonged conservative care for sciatica and lumbar-disk herniation. Patients underwent MRI at baseline and after 1 year. We used a 4-point scale to assess disk herniation on MRI, ranging from 1 for "definitely present" to 4 for "definitely absent." A favorable clinical outcome was defined as complete or nearly complete disappearance of symptoms at 1 year. We compared proportions of patients with a favorable outcome among those with a definite absence of disk herniation and those with a definite, probable, or possible presence of disk herniation at 1 year. The area under the receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve was used to assess the prognostic accuracy of the 4-point scores regarding a favorable or unfavorable outcome, with 1 indicating perfect discriminatory value and 0.5 or less indicating no discriminatory value. At 1 year, 84% of the patients reported having a favorable outcome. Disk herniation was visible in 35% with a favorable outcome and in 33% with an unfavorable outcome (P=0.70). A favorable outcome was reported in 85% of patients with disk herniation and 83% without disk herniation (P=0.70). MRI assessment of disk herniation did not distinguish between patients with a favorable outcome and those with an unfavorable outcome (area under ROC curve, 0.48). MRI performed at 1-year follow-up in patients who had been treated for sciatica and lumbar-disk herniation did not distinguish between those with a favorable outcome and those with an unfavorable outcome. (Funded by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development and the Hoelen Foundation; Controlled Clinical Trials number, ISRCTN26872154.).

  12. Association between subjective memory complaints and nursing home placement: a four-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Siersma, Volkert; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In order to evaluate whether elderly persons with subjective memory complaints may be regarded as a group of potentially vulnerable patients who need close follow-up, we investigated the risk of nursing home placement during a 4-year follow-up period. METHODS: Prospective cohort survey...... nursing home placements were observed. Subjective memory complaints were associated with an adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) of 2.59 for nursing home placement. Other statistical significant covariates were MMSE .../depression (HR = 4.74). The effect of subjective memory complaints is seen to moderate when subjects are older. CONCLUSION: The data of this study indicated that in an elderly primary care population the presence of subjective memory complaints was a significant independent predictor for nursing home placement...

  13. The 2002 results of the second series of follow-up studies on Japanese Thorotrast patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, F. [Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Mori, T. [Yokohama City Univ. School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Hirota, Y. [National Higashi-Nagoya Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Kyosawa, K. [Shinshu Univ. Medical School (Japan); Hayashi, S. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Kido, C. [Kido Hospital, Toyohashi (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    The second series (Aichi series) of Japanese follow-up studies on thorotrast patients started in 1979 based on the results of a nation-wide X-ray survey on the upper abdomen of ex-serviceman who were war-wounded during the Manchurian campaign to world war II (1931-1945). The survey planned by the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japanese Government was performed between 1975 and 1978 i.e. about 33-47 years after the injection of thorotrast into blood vessels. It aimed to detect the deposited thorotrast in the liver and spleen of war-wounded ex-servicemen. The thorotrast group in the second series consisted of 156 war-wounded ex-servicemen treated by intravascular route with thorotrast. Control patients were selected matching the 5-year-age-classes of thorotrast patients among ex-servicemen who were wounded by almost the same kind of wounds in these wars. The first survey in this second series of our follow-up studies was performed on January 1, 1979. The second and third survey performed in 1995 and 1998, respectively. This fourth 2002 survey was performed 23 years after the first 1979 survey. It revealed that only 8 (5.1%) of 156 thorotrast patients were alive and remaining 148 (94.9%) had died. Of the 915 controls, 264 (28.9%) were still alive and 651 (71.1%) had died. In spite of this second follow-up study began 25 years after the starting of the first follow-up study, the life span of thorotrast patients in the 2002 survey, 23 years after the beginning of this study, revealed significantly shorter period than that of controls [{chi} {sup 2} test (P <0, 001)]. The main causes of death of thorotrast patients in the 2002 survey were; liver malignancies (73 cases; 46.8%), liver cirrhosis (7 cases; 4.5%), cancer of the extrahepatic bile duct (5 cases; 3.2%), hematopoietic malignancies (6 cases; 3.8%), hemangiosarcoma of the spleen (3 cases; 1.9%) and lung cancer (7 cases; 4.5%). Among the controls, there were 20 cases (2.2%) of hepatic malignancies, 11 cases (1

  14. Diagnosis, surgical treatment and follow-up of thyroid cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacini, F.; Pinchera, A.; Vorontsova, T.; Demidchik, E.P.; Delange, F.; Reiners, C.; Schlumberger, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the activities and the results of the research carried out by the Centers participating to the JSP4 project, within the framework of the EU program on the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster. The project was aimed to develop and to control the application of basic principles for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of thyroid carcinoma, with special attention to the peculiar requirement of children and adolescents. To this purpose, training in Western European Centers was offered to a number of scientists from Belarus, Ukraine and Russia. Several official meetings were organized to share views and to discuss the progress of the project. A basic protocol for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of thyroid carcinoma has been developed and approved by all participating Centers. Hopefully, it will be applied to the new cases and to those already under monitoring. A large part of the protocol is dedicated to the post-surgical treatment with thyroid hormones for the suppression of TSH and with calcitriol for the management of surgical hypoparathyroidism. A detailed protocol to asses iodine deficiency and, eventually, to introduce a program of iodine supplementation has been proposed. The collection of control cases of childhood thyroid carcinoma in non-radiation exposed European countries has been initiated in Italy, France and Germany. This data will be used as control for the post-Chernobyl childhood thyroid carcinomas. Here is reported a preliminary comparison of the clinical and epidemiological features of almost all (n=368) radiation-exposed Belarus children who developed thyroid carcinoma (age at diagnosis < 16 years), with respect to 90 children of the same age group, who, in the past 20 years, have received treatment for thyroid carcinoma in two centers in Italy (Pisa and Rome). Finally, by molecular biology, genetic mutations of the RET proto-oncogene have been found in several samples of thyroid carcinomas provided by the Belarus

  15. Patient Compliance in the Setting of BI-RADS Category 3: What Factors Impact Compliance With Short-Term Follow-Up Recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Marisa H; Cheng, Lucy; Fitzpatrick, Kimberly A; Krupinski, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    The study aims to define how imaging findings, patient demographics, patient-provider interactions, and health care practices may affect a woman's decision to follow-up in the setting of a BI-RADS Category 3. A total of 398 women from the University of Arizona Breast Imaging Center with a BI-RADS Category 3 assessment for mammography and/or ultrasound findings were evaluated between February 2012 and June 2014. Demographic information was analyzed for all patients, regardless of follow-up. Women who returned for follow-up within the recommended time period were given one survey at the time of their follow-up appointment, and women who returned for follow-up, but later than recommended, were given a separate survey to complete. Age, palpability of a lesion, and menopause status were related to follow-up. Self-rated general health was the only factor found to be associated with the decision to follow-up on time. The majority of patients who followed up on time reported that mailed reminder cards were the primary practice that prompted follow-up. Of patients who followed up later than recommended, the major reason was "no time." The findings suggest that additional counseling regarding the benefits of short-interval imaging follow-up might be advantageous for patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Patient satisfaction with radioiodine treatment and telephone follow-up for the management of thyrotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashari WA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Waiel A Bashari, Rebecca L Coates, Shahbaz Nazir, Naomi E Riddel, Oluwaseyi O Lawanson, Ahmed M Mohamed, Samson O Oyibo Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Peterborough City Hospital, Peterborough, UK Background and objective: Patient satisfaction is of paramount importance when delivering a patient-centered service. Our hospital has been a center for the use of radioiodine to treat thyrotoxicosis for several years, but we began carrying out patient satisfaction surveys and implementing changes after 2008. The aim of the project reported here was to assess patient satisfaction with our radioiodine treatment and telephone follow-up service, and to compare results with our previous surveys.Patients and methods: Anonymous patient satisfaction questionnaires were sent to all patients who received radioiodine treatment for thyrotoxicosis between January 2012 and December 2013. Patients were asked to answer four questions concerning informed consenting, treatment, and telephone follow-up using a four-point Likert scale, and post back the questionnaires. A suggestion box was included for comments and suggestions for improvement.Results: A total of 56 questionnaires were posted out (to 44 females and 12 males and 34 questionnaires were returned (60.8% response rate. Between 94% and 100% of the responders, depending on the question asked, were satisfied with the service they received. Patients also put useful comments and suggestions in the suggestion box provided.Conclusion: Patients with thyrotoxicosis were satisfied with our radioiodine treatment and telephone follow-up service. This survey has revealed areas for service improvement, and highlights the importance of patient satisfaction when assessing a patient-centered service. Keywords: service improvement, patient-centered service, patient satisfaction survey, informed consenting

  17. Long term follow up in hemodialysis patients with parathyroidectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, A.; Petraglia, A.; Caorsi, H.; Mazzuchi, N.; Olaizola, I.; Acuna, G.; Fajardo, L.; Ambrosoni, P.; Morelli, R.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed in 41 patients, in chronic hemodialysis with severe hyperparathyroidism (HPT), who underwent surgery during time period from 1985 to 1997. 22 females, 19 males, aged 50 and 14 years, with PTHI 1345 and 604 pg/ml were followed up 32 and 22 months. Three surgical methods we evaluated: group I) total para thyroidectomy(PTX) with Implants(n=24); group II) subtotal PTX(n=14) and group III) total PTX(n=3). It considered recurrence of HPT when PTH levels were higher than upper range of normal, after 6 months post surgery. persistence was defined when there was no standardization of PTH levels. In group I, 9 patients had normal parathyroid function, 7 had persistent hypoparathyroidism and had hyperparathyroidism (7 recurrences). Group II patients had parathyroid over function in 5 cases (4 persistence s), 5 were normal and 4 hypoparathyroidism. All patients of the third group had hypoparathyroidism. Long term normalization of parathyroid gland activity was achieved in one third of troduccion patients (34,1%) whereas 34,1% permanent hypoparathyroidism and 31,8% hyperparathyroidism. It found no differences in recurrence and histological subtype of parathyroid gland in the different groups. In conclusion, similar long term clinical results were obtained with the different groups. The surgical ideal treatment is controversial. We think that in the long run, the evolution of parathyroid status is mostly influenced by the persistence of uremic state rather than the type of surgery performed [es

  18. Spectroscopic follow-up of the Hercules-Aquila Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simion, Iulia T.; Belokurov, Vasily; Koposov, Sergey E.; Sheffield, Allyson; Johnston, Kathryn V.

    2018-05-01

    We designed a follow-up program to find the spectroscopic properties of the Hercules-Aquila Cloud (HAC) and test scenarios for its formation. We measured the radial velocities (RVs) of 45 RR Lyrae in the southern portion of the HAC using the facilities at the MDM observatory, producing the first large sample of velocities in the HAC. We found a double-peaked distribution in RVs, skewed slightly to negative velocities. We compared both the morphology of HAC projected on to the plane of the sky and the distribution of velocities in this structure outlined by RR Lyrae and other tracer populations at different distances to N-body simulations. We found that the behaviour is characteristic of an old, well-mixed accretion event with small apo-galactic radius. We cannot yet rule out other formation mechanisms for the HAC. However, if our interpretation is correct, HAC represents just a small portion of a much larger debris structure spread throughout the inner Galaxy whose distinct kinematic structure should be apparent in RV studies along many lines of sight.

  19. Bradykinesia in Huntington's disease. A prospective, follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Ruiz, Pedro J; Hernández, Jaime; Cantarero, Susana; Bartolomé, Manuel; Sánchez Bernardos, Vicenta; García de Yébenez, Justo

    2002-04-01

    Bradykinesia is a frequent finding in Huntington's disease (HD), but some aspects are presently unknown; including the natural evolution of bradykinesia over time and the correlation between bradykinesia and functional capacity. We studied the motor performance of 20 genetically confirmed patients with HD (age: 40+/-10.8 years; age at onset 33.6+/-11 years; total functional capacity (TFC): 9.57+/-3; UHDRS total motor scale: 31.4+/-13, triplet length (CAG)n: 46.7+/-4 triplets). These patients were studied in baseline conditions and after 18.7+/-6 months of follow-up. In addition, HD patients were compared with 20 age-matched normal controls. Motor study included the four CAPIT timed tests commonly used for Parkinson's disease: pronation-supination (PS), finger dexterity (FD), movement between two points (MTP) and walking test (WT). HD patients were significantly slower than controls in all motor tasks. A significant deterioration occurred over time in three of the four motor tasks (especially FD and WT). A significant correlation between timed tests and TFC score was found (for MTP, r: -0.845; p < 0,0001). In addition a significant correlation between timed tests and the UHDRDS total motor scale was also found (for MTP, r: 0.864; p < 0.0001). In conclusion, simple timed motor tests can detect a deterioration of motor activity over time in HD. Timed tests might be useful to follow the natural evolution of HD and to assess the efficacy of new therapies.

  20. [Diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of cesarean scar pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Xuan, H-T; Lousquy, R; Barranger, E

    2014-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy is a rare entity. This situation may induce uterine rupture and/or a massive life-threatening hemorrhage. The standard treatment is laparotomy surgery, but in situ injections to replace invasive surgery. The objective of this study was to focus on the diagnosis, optimal management and long-term follow-up of the patients. Data from 6 patients with diagnosis of cesarean scar pregnancy between 2007 and 2013 at Lariboisière hospital were retrospectively collected. Endovaginal ultrasound succeeded to diagnose all cases. Four patients were treated with in situ injection of methotrexate performing a vaginal way (n=2) or laparoscopy (n=2) and two others using systemic injection. One patient was complicated by hemorrhagic shock requiring iterative embolizations. Three patients achieved a new pregnancy, with one recurrent scar pregnancy complicated by massive hemorrhage. Diagnosis and treatment of cesarean scar pregnancies must be done precociously because of high hemorrhage risks. Endovaginal ultrasound is the gold standard exam. Treatment is non-consensual, but methotrexate in situ injection is effective and safer. Monitoring the decrease of HCG levels and ultrasonography supervision of gestational sac size and its vascularization must be performed. Due to the risk of recurrence, any subsequent pregnancy shows a high risk of complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Thyroid carcinoma: A follow-up study of 11 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritzl, F.; Siebers, G.; Neumann, C.; Ritzl, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    During a follow-up of 11 years of thyroid carcinoma 136 patients were repeatedly examined. 43% papillary, 43% follicular, 11% anaplastic and 2% medullary carcinomas was found. The incidence of these types of carcinoma differed considerably; the frequency peak of papillary carcinomas was reached in 45-year-old humans, that of the follicular carcinomas in people aged 60, that of the anaplastic carcinomas in 70-year-old humans. 84% of the patients was female. Classification in pTNM-system: 8% in pT1, 27% in pT2, 12% in pT3 and 49% in pT4. Local and distant metastases were found at a low rate equally in pT1, pT2 and pT3; 26% of patients in pT4 had local metastases and 18% had distant ones in addition. There were 6 patients with metastases of a differentiated adenocarcinoma accumulating no 131-iodine and with no thyroglobulin in serum. 29% of patients had after thyroidectomy an unilateral paresis of the nervus recurrens and 4% a bilateral one. 26% of patients had a permanent hypoparathyroidism after thyroidectomy. (orig.)

  2. Thyroid carcinoma: A follow-up study of 11 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritzl, F.; Siebers, G.; Neumann, C.; Ritzl, E.K.

    1987-09-01

    During a follow-up of 11 years of thyroid carcinoma 136 patients were repeatedly examined. 43% papillary, 43% follicular, 11% anaplastic and 2% medullary carcinomas was found. The incidence of these types of carcinoma differed considerably; the frequency peak of papillary carcinomas was reached in 45-year-old humans, that of the follicular carcinomas in people aged 60, that of the anaplastic carcinomas in 70-year-old humans. 84% of the patients was female. Classification in pTNM-system: 8% in pT1, 27% in pT2, 12% in pT3 and 49% in pT4. Local and distant metastases were found at a low rate equally in pT1, pT2 and pT3; 26% of patients in pT4 had local metastases and 18% had distant ones in addition. There were 6 patients with metastases of a differentiated adenocarcinoma accumulating no 131-iodine and with no thyroglobulin in serum. 29% of patients had after thyroidectomy an unilateral paresis of the nervus recurrens and 4% a bilateral one. 26% of patients had a permanent hypoparathyroidism after thyroidectomy.

  3. Treatment and follow-up of obesity in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerr, S L; Nelson, R A; Essex-Sorlie, D

    1988-01-01

    An intervention program was conducted for 12 postmenarche, 12-15-year-old obese girls. Weight Winners, a multicomponent and multidisciplinary after-school intervention program, was developed in which behavior modification, aerobic exercise, and modeling appropriate behaviors for weight control were emphasized. Evaluation made before and immediately after the intervention and at a nine-month follow-up suggested that the after-school treatment program was successful in: 1) reducing the rate of gain and decreasing body weight by 11% while maintaining lean tissue and resting energy expenditure (REE), and 2) improving eating and exercise behaviors. Significant changes in eating behaviors (p less than 0.05) were: more low-calorie, nutritionally dense foods were consumed; the frequency and amount eaten decreased; and the speed of eating slowed. Implementing a fee contingent on attendance and on record keeping appeared to reduce attrition. Subjects cited the Weight Winners program, aerobic exercise, changes in eating behaviors, group and family support, and encouragement and praise from the group leaders as important contributions to their success in weight control. Barriers to change were reported by participants as boredom, hunger, lack of family and peer support, and having food in sight. An increase in lean tissue was associated with both improved self-esteem (p less than 0.05) and improved self-control (p less than 0.05). Subjects who had been obese the longest were the most responsive to hunger cues (p less than 0.05).

  4. Patients’ follow-up using biomechanical analysis of rehabilitation exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bonnechère

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the evolution of game controllers video games are becoming more and more popular in physical rehabilitation. The integration of serious games in rehabilitation has been tested for various pathologies. Parallel to this clinical research, a lot of studies have been done in order to validate the use of these game controllers for simple biomechanical evaluation. Currently, it is thus possible to record the motions performed by the patients during serious gaming exercises for later analysis. Therefore, data collected during the exercises could be used for monitoring the evolution of the patients during long term rehabilitation. Before using the parameters extracted from the games to assess patients’ evolution two important aspects must be verified: the reproducibility of measurement and a possible effect of learning of the task to be performed. Ten healthy adults played 9 sessions of specific games developed for rehabilitation over a 3-weeks period. Nineteen healthy children played 2 sessions to study the influence of age. Different parameters were extracted from the games: time, range of motion, reaching area. Results of this study indicates that it is possible to follow the evolution of the patients during the rehabilitation process. The majority of the learning effect occurred during the very first session. Therefore, in order to allow proper regular monitoring, the results of this first session should not be included in the follow-up of the patient.

  5. Diagnosis, treatment and follow up of neonatal arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnetoğlu, Fatih Köksal; Babaoğlu, Kadir; Türker, Gülcan; Altun, Gürkan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the aetiology, spectrum, course and outcomes of neonates with arrhythmias observed in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit from 2007 to 2012. Neonates with rhythm problems were included. The results of electrocardiography (ECG), Holter ECG, echocardiography and biochemical analysis were evaluated. The long-term results of follow up were reviewed. Forty-five patients were male (68%) and 21 (32%) were female. Fifty-five patients (83.3%) were term, 11 (16.6%) were preterm, and 34% were diagnosed in the prenatal period. Twenty cases (30.3%) had congenital heart disease. Twenty-three patients (34.8%) were diagnosed during the foetal period. The most common arrhythmias were supraventricular ectopic beats and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) at 39.3 and 22.7%, respectively. SVT recurred in five patients after the neonatal period. Supraventricular ectopic beats and SVT were the most common arrhythmias during the neonatal period. Although the prognosis of arrhythmias in the neonatal period is relatively good, regular monitoring is required.

  6. Spectroscopic Follow-Up of the Hercules Aquila Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simion, Iulia T.; Belokurov, Vasily; Koposov, Sergey E.; Sheffield, Allyson; Johnston, Kathryn V.

    2018-02-01

    We designed a follow-up program to find the spectroscopic properties of the Hercules-Aquila Cloud (HAC) and test scenarios for its formation. We measured the radial velocities (RVs) of 45 RR Lyrae in the southern portion of the HAC using the facilities at the MDM observatory, producing the first large sample of velocities in the HAC. We found a double-peaked distribution in RVs, skewed slightly to negative velocities. We compared both the morphology of HAC projected onto the plane of the sky and the distribution of velocities in this structure outlined by RR Lyrae and other tracer populations at different distances to N-body simulations. We found that the behaviour is characteristic of an old, well-mixed accretion event with small apo-galactic radius. We cannot yet rule out other formation mechanisms for the HAC. However, if our interpretation is correct, HAC represents just a small portion of a much larger debris structure spread throughout the inner Galaxy whose distinct kinematic structure should be apparent in RV studies along many lines of sight.

  7. Incontinentia pigmenti: case report and 5-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Sarı

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Incontinentia Pigmenti (Bloch-Sulzberger Syndrome is a disease of organ involvement with ectodermic and mesodermic origin, showing dominant transition based on the X-chromosome. It affects the skin, eyes, teeth, and central nervous system. Case Report: The patient diagnosed with Incontinentia Pigmenti was referred from the Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Mustafa Kemal University to the Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mustafa Kemal University to consult whether there was anomaly in tooth germs and crests in the mouth. The patient was followed in our clinic for 5 years (examinations at 42 days, 6 months and 5 years. In the extraoral examinations, second-grade hyperkeratotic erythematous papules and plaques on the arms and legs, and linearly-arranged hyperpigmented and hypopigmented macular lesions at various grades were seen. In the intraoral examinations, no anomalies were observed in the crests and the palate during the toothless period. However, during the dentition period, wedge-shaped teeth and oligodontia were observed. In the 5-year follow-up period, no deficiency was observed in the patient's body and mental development compared with the peers. Conclusion: Early diagnosis of Incontinentia Pigmenti can be made through observation of the dental anomalies. There is no specific treatment of this disease. As it affects multiple systems of the human body, it requires monitoring and treatment with interdisciplinary approaches.

  8. Bilateral sacrospinous fixation without hysterectomy: 18-month follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şentürk, Mehmet Baki; Güraslan, Hakan; Çakmak, Yusuf; Ekin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of bilateral sacrospinous fixation (SSF), which was performed with surgical mesh interposition and bilateral vaginal repair. Material and Methods Twenty-two patients underwent SSF between 2010 and 2012, and the results were evaluated retrospectively. The results at preoperative and postoperative 6th, 12th, and 18th months of the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12) were compared using Friedman and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests. Values of p<0.05 and <0.01 were considered statistically significant. Results According to the POP-Q, significant healing was observed on all vaginal vault points (p=0.001), and no prolapse was observed until the 18-month follow-up stage. There were also prominent patients who felt satisfactory with respect to their sexual life according to PISQ-12 (p=0.001). Conclusion This technique appears to provide an adequate clinical resolution, and it may be the primary surgical option for women with pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:26097393

  9. Follow-up measles campaign in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    The Dominican Republic conducted a national follow-up measles vaccination campaign 6 weeks after sustaining heavy damage from Hurricane Georges, on November 6-12, targeting 830,517 children aged 9 months to 5 years in 29 provinces and the capital city. This campaign was the first mass vaccination effort in the country, following the beginning of the decentralized delivery of health services. Priority was given to vaccinating against diphtheria, whooping cough, and tetanus, especially in refugee camps. More than 500,000 vaccines were given to different age groups, with almost 100,000 of those immunized under 5 years old. Children aged 9 months to 5 years were targeted for immunization regardless of their vaccination status. At the same time, children aged 2 months through 2 years were immunized against poliomyelitis. Vaccination activities were continued until the entire target population was reached and no important side effects have thus far been reported. The government of Mexico donated 300,000 doses of measles vaccine, while other vaccines for the campaign were acquired through the PAHO Revolving Fund for Vaccine Procurement. The decentralized implementation of this campaign allowed the population to actively participate and the resulting high vaccination coverage rates.

  10. Measles vaccine: a 27-year follow-up.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramsay, M E

    1994-04-01

    In 1964, the Medical Research Council undertook a trial of measles vaccine in over 36,000 United Kingdom children; 9577 of whom received live vaccine, 10,625 received inactivated followed by live vaccines, and 16,328 acted as unvaccinated controls. Participants in this study have been followed to determine the long term protection from measles vaccine and follow-up data were available on 4194, 4638 and 274 respectively. During the 5-year period 1986-90, the protective efficacy of live measles vaccine has remained high at 87%, but the 95% confidence interval was wide (-43 to 99%) due to the small numbers of cases. Between 1976 and 1990, however, the overall efficacy of the live vaccine was 92% (95% confidence interval 86 to 95%) and there was no evidence of a decline in efficacy (P = 0.13) over the 15-year period. This study suggests that the protection from live measles vaccine persists for up to 27 years after vaccination, and that no change in the current United Kingdom measles immunization policy should be made on the grounds of waning immunity.

  11. Primary testicular plasmocytoma: A five year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Ghirelli Filho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The testicular plasmocytoma represents only 5% of the non-germinative cell testicular tumors, and accounts for only 2% of all plasma cell neoplasms. Approximately, 50 cases of testicular plasmocytoma have been reported in medical literature; however, only 9 of these are isolated tumors without previous history or progression to multiple myeloma. A 47-year-old patient, presenting progressive and painless growth of the right testicle in the last four years, underwent surgical treatment in another hospital two years ago, to correct a hydrocele in the same testicle with no improvement at all. Sonography showed a tumor with the following measurements for the right testicle: 84 × 59 × 80 mm. The tumor marker values were all normal. An abdominal computed tomography found no evidence of retroperitoneal lymph nodes invasion. The patient underwent a right radical orchiectomy. Pathologic analysis revealed a malignant neoplasia described as a plasmocytoma (solitary myeloma that produces immunoglobulin′s kappa light chain. After five years of follow-up, there were no signs of metastasis or local recurrence in the exams. Case report and review of literature have been presented here.

  12. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Follow-Up of Borderline Ovarian Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikan, Michal; Dundr, Pavel; Cibula, David

    2012-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent a heterogeneous group of noninvasive tumors of uncertain malignant potential with characteristic histology. They occur in younger women, are present at an early stage, and have a favorable prognosis, but symptomatic recurrence and death may be found as long as 20 years after therapy in some patients. The molecular changes in borderline ovarian tumors indicate linkage of this disease to type I ovarian tumors (low-grade ovarian carcinomas). The pathological stage of disease and subclassification of extraovarian disease into invasive and noninvasive implants, together with the presence of postoperative macroscopic residual disease, appear to be the major predictor of recurrence and survival. However, it should be emphasized that the most important negative prognostic factor for recurrence is just the use of conservative surgery, but without any impact on patient survival because most recurrent diseases are of the borderline type—easily curable and with an excellent prognosis. Borderline tumors are difficult masses to correctly preoperatively diagnose using imaging methods because their macroscopic features may overlap with invasive and benign ovarian tumors. Over the past several decades, surgical therapy has shifted from a radical approach to more conservative treatment; however, oncologic safety must always be balanced. Follow-up is essential using routine ultrasound imaging, with special attention paid to the remaining ovary in conservatively treated patients. Current literature on this topic leads to a number of controversies that will be discussed thoroughly in this article, with the aim to provide recommendations for the clinical management of these patients. PMID:23024155

  13. Report on Follow-up Visit to Ecuador, Part 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Combs, Gerald F

    1961-01-01

    ...), National Institutes of Health, who visited Ecuador from January 15th to the 21st, 1961. Dr. Gerald F. Combs, PhD, visited Ecuador to discuss the nutritional survey conducted by ICNND in the summer of 1959...

  14. [Leber congenital amaurosis: diagnosis, follow-up and differential diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshaber, M C; Niemeyer, G

    1998-05-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) had been diagnosed on/in 42 children between 1968 and 1996 at the Deptm. of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich. We reexamined critically this rare diagnosis in retrospect and with new examinations where possible. Clinical and electroretinographic (ERG) results, often obtained in general anesthesia, were re-evaluated and when possible repeated in new examinations. Thirty-three of the total 42 patients presented with an extinguished, 35 with markedly reduced, and 6 with minimal ERGs. A profound visual loss (from no light perception to 20/200), nystagmus and strabismus were the principal symptoms. The heterogeneity of retinal findings ranged from normal to salt and pepper or bone spicules pigmentation and pronounced chorioretinal atrophy. Vascular attenuation and rarification were frequent. Patients with nonocular findings such as mental retardation (n = 12), renal (n = 3) and skeletal (n = 4) abnormalities revealed no differing ERG- or retinal findings. The oculodigital sign (eye-poking) was found in 25%, and parental consanguinity was evident in 10% of the cases. In 16 patients that were reexamined, the progression of the disease was characterized by an increase in retinal pigmentary changes, attenuation of retinal vessel, and further diminuation of the visual acuity (n = 6). Upon review, the diagnosis had to be revised in 8 patients as juvenile retinitis pigmentosa and in one as infantile Refsum syndrome. Bilateral visual impairement in infants should be assessed clinically and electroretinographically within the first year. Neuropediatric and metabolic examinations meaningfully complement the diagnostic procedures.

  15. Can the theory of planned behavior help explain attendance to follow-up care of childhood cancer survivors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenziger, Julia; Roser, Katharina; Mader, Luzius; Christen, Salome; Kuehni, Claudia E; Gumy-Pause, Fabienne; Tinner, Eva Maria; Michel, Gisela

    2018-02-22

    Childhood cancer survivors are at high risk for late effects. Regular attendance to long-term follow-up care is recommended and helps monitoring survivors' health. Using the theory of planned behavior, we aimed to (1) investigate the predictors of the intention to attend follow-up care, and (2) examine the associations between perceived control and behavioral intention with actual follow-up care attendance in Swiss childhood cancer survivors. We conducted a questionnaire survey in Swiss childhood cancer survivors (diagnosed with cancer aged theory of planned behavior-related predictors (attitude, subjective norm, perceived control), intention to attend follow-up care, and actual attendance. We applied structural equation modeling to investigate predictors of intention, and logistic regression models to study the association between intention and actual attendance. Of 299 responders (166 [55.5%] females), 145 (48.5%) reported attending follow-up care. We found that subjective norm, ie, survivors' perceived social pressure and support (coef = 0.90, P < 0.001), predicted the intention to attend follow-up; attitude and perceived control did not. Perceived control (OR = 1.58, 95%CI:1.04-2.41) and intention to attend follow-up (OR = 6.43, 95%CI:4.21-9.81) were positively associated with attendance. To increase attendance, an effort should be made to sensitize partners, friends, parents, and health care professionals on their important role in supporting survivors regarding follow-up care. Additionally, interventions promoting personal control over the follow-up attendance might further increase regular attendance. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Changes in occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity: a follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahelma Eero

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity is known to have health benefits across population groups. However, less is known about changes over time in socioeconomic differences in leisure-time physical activity and the reasons for the changes. We hypothesised that class differences in leisure-time physical activity would widen over time due to declining physical activity among the lower occupational classes. We examined whether occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity change over time in a cohort of Finnish middle-aged women and men. We also examined whether a set of selected covariates could account for the observed changes. Methods The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study cohort mail surveys; the respondents were 40-60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki at baseline in 2000-2002 (n = 8960, response rate 67%. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to the baseline respondents in 2007 (n = 7332, response rate 83%. The outcome measure was leisure-time physical activity, including commuting, converted to metabolic equivalent tasks (MET. Socioeconomic position was measured by occupational class (professionals, semi-professionals, routine non-manual employees and manual workers. The covariates included baseline age, marital status, limiting long-lasting illness, common mental disorders, job strain, physical and mental health functioning, smoking, body mass index, and employment status at follow-up. Firstly the analyses focused on changes over time in age adjusted prevalence of leisure-time physical activity. Secondly, logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for covariates of changes in occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity. Results At baseline there were no occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity. Over the follow-up leisure-time physical activity increased among those in the higher classes and decreased among manual workers, suggesting the emergence of

  17. The LCO Follow-up and Characterization Network and AgentNEO Citizen Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Tim; Greenstreet, Sarah; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric J.; Larson, Stephen M.

    2017-10-01

    The LCO NEO Follow-up Network is using the telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory (LCO) and a web-based target selection, scheduling and data reduction system to confirm NEO candidates and characterize radar-targeted known NEOs. Starting in July 2014, the LCO NEO Follow-up Network has observed over 4,500 targets and reported more than 25,000 astrometric and photometric measurements to the Minor Planet Center.The LCO NEO Follow-up Network's main aims are to perform confirming follow-up of the large number of NEO candidates and to perform characterization measurements of radar targets to obtain light curves and rotation rates. The NEO candidates come from the NEO surveys such as Catalina, PanSTARRS, ATLAS, NEOWISE and others. In particular, we are targeting objects in the Southern Hemisphere, where the LCO NEO Follow-up Network is the largest resource for NEO observations.The first phase of the LCO Network comprises nine 1-meter and seven 0.4-meter telescopes at site at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Additional 0.4-meter telescopes will be deployed in 2017 and 2x1-meter telescopes for a site at Ali Observatory, Tibet are planned for 2018-2019.We have developed web-based software called NEOexchange which automatically downloads and aggregates NEO candidates from the Minor Planet Center's NEO Confirmation Page, the Arecibo and Goldstone radar target lists and the NASA lists. NEOexchange allows the planning and scheduling of observations on the LCO Telescope Network and the tracking of the resulting blocks and generated data. We have extended the NEOexchange software to include automated scheduling and moving object detection, with the results presented to the user via the website.We will present results from the LCO NEO Follow-up Network and from the development of the

  18. Attitudes among healthcare professionals towards ICT and home follow-up in chronic heart failure care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gund, Anna; Lindecrantz, Kaj; Schaufelberger, Maria; Patel, Harshida; Sjöqvist, Bengt Arne

    2012-11-28

    eHealth applications for out-of-hospital monitoring and treatment follow-up have been advocated for many years as a promising tool to improve treatment compliance, promote individualized care and obtain a person-centred care. Despite these benefits and a large number of promising projects, a major breakthrough in everyday care is generally still lacking. Inappropriate organization for eHealth technology, reluctance from users in the introduction of new working methods, and resistance to information and communication technology (ICT) in general could be reasons for this. Another reason may be attitudes towards the potential in out-of-hospital eHealth applications. It is therefore of interest to study the general opinions among healthcare professionals to ICT in healthcare, as well as the attitudes towards using ICT as a tool for patient monitoring and follow-up at home. One specific area of interest is in-home follow-up of elderly patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The aim of this paper is to investigate the attitudes towards ICT, as well as distance monitoring and follow-up, among healthcare professionals working with this patient group. This paper covers an attitude survey study based on responses from 139 healthcare professionals working with CHF care in Swedish hospital departments, i.e. cardiology and medicine departments. Comparisons between physicians and nurses, and in some cases between genders, on attitudes towards ICT tools and follow-up at home were performed. Out of the 425 forms sent out, 139 were collected, and 17 out of 21 counties and regions were covered in the replies. Among the respondents, 66% were nurses, 30% physicians and 4% others. As for gender, 90% of nurses were female and 60% of physicians were male. Internet was used daily by 67% of the respondents. Attitudes towards healthcare ICT were found positive as 74% were positive concerning healthcare ICT today, 96% were positive regarding the future of healthcare ICT, and 54% had high

  19. Teaching patient-centered communication skills: a telephone follow-up curriculum for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George W. Saba

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: To encourage medical students’ use of patient-centered skills in core clerkships, we implemented and evaluated a Telephone Follow-up Curriculum focusing on three communication behaviors: tailoring education to patients’ level of understanding, promoting adherence by anticipating obstacles, and ensuring comprehension by having patients repeat the plans. Methods: The intervention group consisted of two different cohorts of third-year medical students in longitudinal clerkships (n=41; traditional clerkship students comprised the comparison group (n =185. Intervention students telephoned one to four patients 1 week after seeing them in outpatient clinics or inpatient care to follow up on recommendations. We used surveys, focus groups, and clinical performance examinations to assess student perception, knowledge and skills, and behavior change. Results: Students found that the curriculum had a positive impact on patient care, although some found the number of calls excessive. Students and faculty reported improvement in students’ understanding of patients’ health behaviors, knowledge of patient education, and attitudes toward telephone follow-up. Few students changed patient education behaviors or called additional patients. Intervention students scored higher in some communication skills on objective assessments. Conclusion: A patient-centered communication curriculum can improve student knowledge and skills. While some intervention students perceived that they made too many calls, our data suggest that more calls, an increased sense of patient ownership, and role modeling by clerkship faculty may ensure incorporation and application of skills.

  20. Teaching patient-centered communication skills: a telephone follow-up curriculum for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, George W; Chou, Calvin L; Satterfield, Jason; Teherani, Arianne; Hauer, Karen; Poncelet, Ann; Chen, Huiju Carrie

    2014-01-01

    To encourage medical students' use of patient-centered skills in core clerkships, we implemented and evaluated a Telephone Follow-up Curriculum focusing on three communication behaviors: tailoring education to patients' level of understanding, promoting adherence by anticipating obstacles, and ensuring comprehension by having patients repeat the plans. The intervention group consisted of two different cohorts of third-year medical students in longitudinal clerkships (n=41); traditional clerkship students comprised the comparison group (n = 185). Intervention students telephoned one to four patients 1 week after seeing them in outpatient clinics or inpatient care to follow up on recommendations. We used surveys, focus groups, and clinical performance examinations to assess student perception, knowledge and skills, and behavior change. Students found that the curriculum had a positive impact on patient care, although some found the number of calls excessive. Students and faculty reported improvement in students' understanding of patients' health behaviors, knowledge of patient education, and attitudes toward telephone follow-up. Few students changed patient education behaviors or called additional patients. Intervention students scored higher in some communication skills on objective assessments. A patient-centered communication curriculum can improve student knowledge and skills. While some intervention students perceived that they made too many calls, our data suggest that more calls, an increased sense of patient ownership, and role modeling by clerkship faculty may ensure incorporation and application of skills.

  1. Hand-arm vibration syndrome among travertine workers: a follow up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovenzi, M; Franzinelli, A; Scattoni, L; Vannuccini, L

    1994-06-01

    In a six year follow up study of the handarm vibration syndrome, 62 stoneworkers operating hand held vibrating tools in 10 travertine quarries and mills were first investigated in 1985 and then in 1991. The frequency weighted acceleration of vibration from the rock drills and stone hammers used by the travertine workers exceeded 20 m/s2, indicating a hazardous work activity according to the proposal of the EC directive for physical agents. A clinical examination and a cold provocation test were repeated with the same procedures as those adopted at the time of the first survey. The stoneworkers were divided into groups according to current work state: active stoneworkers who continued to use powered tools during the follow up (n = 21, median exposure time 22 years), and ex-stoneworkers with retirement vibration free intervals of three years (n = 22, median exposure time 27.5 years) and of six years (n = 19, median exposure time 20 years). In the group of active stoneworkers, a 38% onset a new cases of vibration-induced white finger (VWF) was found during the follow up (p stone workers after a few extra years of vibrating tool usage argues for an urgent implementation of preventive measures in the stone industry.

  2. Community cholesterol screening: medical follow-up in subjects identified with high plasma cholesterol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C D; Menashe, V D; Anderson, P H; Malinow, M R; Illingworth, D R

    1990-09-01

    Population screening or plasma cholesterol is an effective method of detecting hypercholesterolemia; however, follow-up and treatment are essential components of such a program. After a city-wide screening in 1987 of more than 19,872 persons, using a mailed survey with a response rate of 48%, we evaluated subsequent actions of 3,078 individuals with high plasma cholesterol levels. Slightly more than half the population was aware of high blood cholesterol levels prior to the time of screening and apparently used the program for follow-up. Overall, after the screening, 65% consulted a physician within 5 months of screening and blood cholesterol levels were remeasured in 80% of the sample. Procrastination and expense were cited as the primary reasons for failing to consult a physician. If screening is to be effectively utilized as a means of reducing the prevalence of high plasma cholesterol levels, diligent follow-up must be made of all individuals identified to be at increased risk on the basis of their initial values.

  3. Electrochemical sensors in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Marques

    2015-12-01

    electrodes (SPCEs were used as the transducers. These SPCEs (working volume: ~40 μL are widely employed in the construction of electrochemical (biosensors because of several reasons: simplicity and low cost, versatility of design, small dimensions and possibility of incorporation in portable systems, as well as adequate electroanalytical characteristics. These SPCEs were modified with gold nanoparticles (nAu through the electrochemical deposition of ionic gold from a solution. The developed sensors were applied to the analysis of the selected biomarkers in spiked human serum samples.Besides these immunosensors, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP sensor was developed for the analysis of HER2-ECD. In this case a gold electrode was used as the transducer. The MIP was formed by surface imprinting and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and voltammetry were used for detection purposes.Results: For the immunoassays the following parameters were optimized: capture and detection antibody concentration, surface blocking, reaction mixtures and incubation times. The best limits of detection obtained were below the established cut-off values (25 U/mL and 15 ng/mL for CA15-3 and HER2-ECD, respectively. For the MIP sensor the most adequate polymer was chosen and the electropolymerization, template removal, and incubation conditions were optimized. The lowest HER2-ECD concentration that was analyzed was 50 µg/mL.Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that the developed sensors could be promising tools in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up. However, further studies should be conducted using patients' samples and the results of these assays should be validated with the established analysis procedures for these cancer biomarkers.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Marques R, Pacheco J, Rama EC, Viswanathan S, Nouws H, Delerue-Matos C. Electrochemical sensors in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:34012.[This

  4. Clinical 3-year follow-up of uterine fibroid embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeleff, B.A.; Satzl, S.; Eiers, M.; Fechtner, K.; Hakim, A.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Richter, G.M.; Rimbach, S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term success of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in patients with symptomatic fibroids using spherical particles (Embosphere). Materials and Methods: 34 consecutive patients treated with UAE were initially enrolled in the study which had the following study goals (1) 1-year follow-up MRI evaluation of the fibroid behavior and (2) clinical long-term success due to standardized assessment of the main fibroid-related symptoms (hypermenorrhoea, dysmenorrhoea and dysuria) of the patients' individual overall health status and their therapy satisfaction at 1-year, 2- year and 3-year intervals after UAE. Results: Technical success was achieved in all procedures. Four patients had to be excluded from the long-term evaluation schedule: one because of a hysterectomy due to bleeding after 6 weeks, 3 patients were not available for the designated minimum follow-up interval. The preinterventional severe hypermenorrhoea (n = 27) with a score of 4.4 ± 0.7 (5 = extreme menstrual bleeding) decreased after one year to 2.1 ± 0.5 (p = 0.0001), after two years to 1.7 ± 0.5 (p = 0.0042) and after three years to 1.3 ± 0.6 (p = 0.0001). The preinterventional dysmenorrhoea (n = 15) with a score of 3.1 ± 1.5 (3 = distinctly increased dysmenorrhoea) decreased after one year to 1.1 ± 0.3 (p = 0.0001), after two years to 1.2 ± 0.2 and after three years to 1.2 ± 0.4 (p = 0.148). The pretreatment dysuria (n = 12) with a preinterventional score of 3.1 ± 1.5 (3 = distinctly increased dysuria) decreased after one year to 1.1 ± 0.3 (p 0.0069) and remained after two years at 1.1 ± 0.2 and after three years at 1.2 ± 0.4 (p = 0.905). The initial overall health status was 54.7 ± 20.1 (maximal value 100). After one year it rose to 90.5 ± 15.4 (p = 0.0001), was 91.8 ± 5.6 after two years and was 91.3 ± 8.5 (p = 0.8578) after three years. The satisfaction with the therapy was 2.9 ± 0.2 after one year, 2.6 ± 0.3 after two

  5. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, J.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France)]|[Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France); Visy, J.M. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Belin, C. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Gaston, A. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Goldlust, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Dumas, M. [Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France)

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8-48 months. Lesions were classified according to changes in four features: cyst content and capsule signal, gadolinium enhancement and oedema signal. We were able to recognise each of the pathological phases; five MRI stages were identified. Stage 1 showed oedema and/or nodular gadolinium enhancement in the tissue invasion phase; stage 2 was cerebrospinal fluid-like signal within a cyst in the vesicular phase; stage 3 showed a thick capsule with an impure liquid content signal and surrounding oedema, in the cystic phase; stage 4 showed the disappearance of the cyst fluid content signal in the degenerative phase; stage 5 showed a calcified lesion in the residual phase. Stage 1 lesions disappeared after therapy; the other progressed from one stage to another. Stage 4 indicated the end of viability of the parasite and determined the point after which treatment was useless. On T2-weighted images changes in the cyst content differed according to the history of the lesion; nodular low intensity followed the natural degeneration of the parasite and a mixed fluid signal with punctate low signal seemed to represent the specific result of therapy. MRI staging can help in the evaluation of indications for treatment and facilitate clinical therapeutic trials. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Clinical features and follow-up of congenital syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Eleonor G; Vaccari, Alessandra; Fiori, Renato M

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate clinical features and outcomes of children treated for congenital syphilis (CS). Infants born alive in the public sector of São Lucas Hospital, Porto Alegre, Brazil, 1997 to 2004, whose mothers had syphilis and neonates with CS born in other facilities and admitted during this period were included. Follow-up was performed from birth up to 5 years. Among 24,920 live births, 379 (1.5%) met the criteria for CS. A further 19 infants born in other hospitals were included, for a total of 398 with CS. We compared infants with CS with 120 infants whose mothers received adequate treatment of syphilis before delivery (total sample, 518 infants). Congenital syphilis was associated with delivery before 34 weeks, low birth weight, and small for gestational age. During the study period, 37 stillbirths with CS were detected. Result from the serum venereal disease research laboratory test was negative at birth in 17.5% of the neonates with CS, and in 4 infants, it became positive after the second day. Thirty percent of the infants with CS were reevaluated between 8 and 60 months, and most had a good outcome when managed according to standard guidelines. Sixteen infants (13.3%) had sequelae. Of these, 8 were symptomatic in the neonatal period, and 13 (81%) of 16 had laboratory/x-ray findings. All asymptomatic and 78% of symptomatic infants had nonreactive fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test after 12 months of age. Congenital syphilis remains an impacting disease that causes fetal and neonatal deaths, prematurity, low birth weight, and severe and irreversible sequelae in some children. This study confirms the value of standard guidelines for its management.

  7. PNH revisited: Clinical profile, laboratory diagnosis and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is characterized by intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, nocturnal hemoglobinuria and thrombophila. This acquired disease caused by a deficiency of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored proteins on the hematopoietic cells is uncommon in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Data of patients diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year were collected. Clinical data (age, gender, various presenting symptoms, treatment information and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results of relevant diagnostic tests were documented i.e., urine analysis, Ham′s test, sucrose lysis test and sephacryl gel card test (GCT for CD55 and CD59. Results: A total of 5 patients were diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year. Presenting symptoms were hemolytic anemia (n=4 and bone marrow failure (n=1. A GCT detected CD59 deficiency in all erythrocytes in 4 patients and CD55 deficiency in 2 patients. A weak positive PNH test for CD59 was seen in 1 patient and a weak positive PNH test for CD55 was seen in 3 patients. All patients were negative by sucrose lysis test. Ham′s test was positive in two cases. Patients were treated with prednisolone and/or androgen and 1 patient with aplastic anemia was also given antithymocyte globulin. A total of 4 patients responded with a partial recovery of hematopoiesis and 1 patient showed no recovery. None of the patients received a bone marrow transplant. Conclusion: The study highlights the diagnostic methods and treatment protocols undertaken to evaluate the PNH clone in a developing country where advanced methods like flowcytometry immunophenotyping (FCMI and bone marrow transplants are not routinely available.

  8. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, J.L.; Visy, J.M.; Belin, C.; Gaston, A.; Goldlust, D.; Dumas, M.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8-48 months. Lesions were classified according to changes in four features: cyst content and capsule signal, gadolinium enhancement and oedema signal. We were able to recognise each of the pathological phases; five MRI stages were identified. Stage 1 showed oedema and/or nodular gadolinium enhancement in the tissue invasion phase; stage 2 was cerebrospinal fluid-like signal within a cyst in the vesicular phase; stage 3 showed a thick capsule with an impure liquid content signal and surrounding oedema, in the cystic phase; stage 4 showed the disappearance of the cyst fluid content signal in the degenerative phase; stage 5 showed a calcified lesion in the residual phase. Stage 1 lesions disappeared after therapy; the other progressed from one stage to another. Stage 4 indicated the end of viability of the parasite and determined the point after which treatment was useless. On T2-weighted images changes in the cyst content differed according to the history of the lesion; nodular low intensity followed the natural degeneration of the parasite and a mixed fluid signal with punctate low signal seemed to represent the specific result of therapy. MRI staging can help in the evaluation of indications for treatment and facilitate clinical therapeutic trials. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  9. Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty: One-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Ljubiša

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sutureless transplantation of endothelium on a thin stromal carrier was introduced under the name of Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK in 2004. It has become the treatment of choice of corneal oedema due to endothelial dysfunction. Objective. To investigate posterior lamellar graft attachment, central corneal thickness (CCT, astigmatism, and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA during one-year follow-up. Methods. Surgery was performed on one eye of 11 patients with pseudophakic bullous keratopathy and Fuchs’ dystrophy. The graft thick 150-200 μm and 8.0 mm in diameter was detached manually. The carrier of the recipient cornea was created by DSEK. The graft was folded in half, introduced into the anterior orbital chamber through a 5.0 mm cut on the limbus and attached by air bubble along the internal side of the recipient cornea. CCT and astigmatism were evaluated by corneal topography, and graft attachment by biomicroscopy. Results. One year after surgery, all grafts remained attached. Primary graft failure occurred in three eyes, probably due to the crushing effect of the forceps. BCVA was 20/30 (2 eyes, and 20/40 (6 eyes, CCT 643-728 μm, and astigmatism 1.1 D to 2.9 D. The peak values were reached three months after surgery, and did not change much afterwards. Conclusion. This is the first report on the long-term results of DSEK in our literature. The results are similar to those obtained by more experienced DSEK surgeons, and suggest that this procedure is safe and successful.

  10. Sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence: medium-term follow-up from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Vicki; Abraham, Earl; Lubowski, David Z

    2017-06-01

    Most studies on sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) are either single-centre with small numbers of patients or multi-centre studies. We present the medium-term follow-up results from a single centre for 127 patients undergoing SNS. Consecutive patients treated with SNS for faecal incontinence had preoperative baseline St Mark's continence scores, faecal incontinence quality of life (FIQL) measures and anorectal physiology studies. Follow-up was a postal questionnaire concerning continence, FIQL, patient-perceived change in bowel control (-5 to +5 where 0 is no change), overall satisfaction (0-10 visual analogue scale) and use of medications. A total of 166 patients underwent temporary nerve stimulation testing, of which 112 progressed to a permanent implantable pulse generator (IPG). Fifteen received an IPG without the testing phase, hence 127 patients in total. Fourteen had the IPG removed, four were deceased, leaving 109 for assessment; 91 (83%) responded to the survey. Mean follow-up was 2.7 years (range: 2 months-8.5 years). Mean baseline St Mark's continence score was 14.4, and mean follow-up score was 10.3 (P < 0.01). FIQL improved in all domains (P < 0.001). Patient-reported improved bowel control mean score was +3.2 (95% CI: 2.9, 3.55). Median satisfaction score was 8.0 (range: 0-10). Complications included 17 lead dislodgements, seven superficial infections, five infections requiring surgery and five repositioning of a rotated IPG. Thirty-two patients used loperamide and 34 used fibre supplements. In this observational study, limited by the absence of a placebo control group, SNS significantly improved continence and quality of life, and patient satisfaction was high. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  11. Planck early results. IX. XMM-Newton follow-up for validation of Planck cluster candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.; Polenta, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present the XMM-Newton follow-up for confirmation of Planck cluster candidates. Twenty-five candidates have been observed to date using snapshot (∼10 ks) exposures, ten as part of a pilot programme to sample a low range of signal-to-noise ratios (4 ... programme has helped to optimise the Planck candidate selection process. It has also provided a preview of the X-ray properties of these newly-discovered clusters, allowing comparison with their SZ properties, and to the X-ray and SZ properties of known clusters observed in the Planck survey. Our results...

  12. Report on Follow-Up Visit to Ecuador, Part 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pearson, W. N

    1961-01-01

    ...), National Institutes of Health, who visited Ecuador from January 15th to the 21st, 1961. W. N. Pearson, PhD, visited Ecuador from January 15th to the 21st, 1961, to discuss the nutritional survey conducted by ICNND in the summer of 1959...

  13. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B.; Kilsmark, Jannie

    2010-01-01

    to the recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions were conducted separately for each of the 4 perspectives. In addition, the organizational analysis included a nationwide questionnaire survey among all relevant hospital departments, and the operating costs were calculated. RESULTS...

  14. Trauma and postoperative follow-up; Traumata und postoperative Folgezustaende

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voth, E. [Univ. Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1997-10-01

    Indications for the use of nuclear medicine techniques, mostly bone scintigraphy, occur in case of diagnostic problems, especially if there are discrepancies between the clinical symptoms and X-ray findings. This may happen in case of stress fractures, fractures in bones difficult to judge by X-ray imaging, and in the differentation of recent versus old fracture. A further indication for bone scanning is to assess the extent of skeletal lesions in polytrauma and in the battered child syndrome. In postoperative patients bone scanning is most frequently performed in order to assess loosening or infection of endoprosthesis. Due to bone remodelling uptake of Tc-diphosphonates varies between cemented and cementfree implants. This fact should be taken into consideration when interpreting bone scans in areas with endoprostheses. In both trauma and postoperative patients, indications for nuclear medicine imaging exist if healing is complicated. Bone scanning can be used to assess pseudoartrosis or non-union, infection, viability of grafts and bone fragments and reflex sympathetic dystrophy. In suspicious infection with positive bone scan, white blood cell or microcollid scintigraphy can be used for further differentiation. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Indikationen zum Einsatz nuklearmedizinischer Verfahren, in der Regel der Skelettszintigraphie, ergeben sich bei diagnostischen Problemen, speziell bei Diskrepanzen zwischen der klinischen Symptomatik und dem roentgenologischen Befund. In der Traumatologie kann dies Stressfrakturen, Frakturen in roentgenologisch schwer beurteilbaren Skelettabschnitten, das Ausmass der knoechernen Verletzungen bei Polytraumata oder Kindermisshandlungen sowie die Differenzierung alte versus frische Fraktur betreffen. In der postoperativen Verlaufs- bzw. Therapiekontrolle ist die haeufigste Indikation zur Skelettszintigraphie die Frage nach Lockerung einer Endoprothese. Wegen des aus pathophysiologischen Gruenden unterschiedlichen Anreicherungsmusters

  15. Nurse-led follow-up at home vs. conventional medical outpatient clinic follow-up in patients with incurable upper gastrointestinal cancer: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitdehaag, Madeleen J; van Putten, Paul G; van Eijck, Casper H J; Verschuur, Els M L; van der Gaast, Ate; Pek, Chulja J; van der Rijt, Carin C D; de Man, Rob A; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Laheij, Robert J F; Siersema, Peter D; Spaander, Manon C W; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2014-03-01

    Upper gastrointestinal cancer is associated with a poor prognosis. The multidimensional problems of incurable patients require close monitoring and frequent support, which cannot sufficiently be provided during conventional one to two month follow-up visits to the outpatient clinic. To compare nurse-led follow-up at home with conventional medical follow-up in the outpatient clinic for patients with incurable primary or recurrent esophageal, pancreatic, or hepatobiliary cancer. Patients were randomized to nurse-led follow-up at home or conventional medical follow-up in the outpatient clinic. Outcome parameters were quality of life (QoL), patient satisfaction, and health care consumption, measured by different questionnaires at one and a half and four months after randomization. As well, cost analyses were done for both follow-up strategies in the first four months. In total, 138 patients were randomized, of which 66 (48%) were evaluable. At baseline, both groups were similar with respect to clinical and sociodemographic characteristics and health-related QoL. Patients in the nurse-led follow-up group were significantly more satisfied with the visits, whereas QoL and health care consumption within the first four months were comparable between the two groups. Nurse-led follow-up was less expensive than conventional medical follow-up. However, the total costs for the first four months of follow-up in this study were higher in the nurse-led follow-up group because of a higher frequency of visits. The results suggest that conventional medical follow-up is interchangeable with nurse-led follow-up. A cost utility study is necessary to determine the preferred frequency and duration of the home visits. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparing the effects of education using telephone follow-up and smartphone-based social networking follow-up on self-management behaviors among patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Sharifian, Sanaz; Nasr Isfahani, Mehdi; Haghani, Hamid

    2018-03-05

    Little is known about the benefits of social networks in the management of patients. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of self-management (SM) education using telephone follow-up and mobile phone-based social networking on SM behaviors among patients with hypertension. This randomized clinical trial was conducted with 100 patients. They were randomly allocated to four groups: (i) control, (ii) SM training without follow-up, (iii) telephone follow-up and (iv) smartphone-based social networking follow-up. The hypertension SM behavior questionnaire was used for data collection before and six weeks after the study. Those patients who underwent SM education training (with and without follow-up) had statistically significant differences from those in the control group in terms of SM behaviors (p networking follow-up influenced SM behaviors among patients with hypertension.

  17. Medical Harm: Patient Perceptions and Follow-up Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Heather G; Cooper, Michol A; Mayer-Blackwell, Brandan; Jiam, Nicole; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Wick, Elizabeth C; Berenholtz, Sean M; Makary, Martin A

    2017-12-01

    Much research has been conducted to describe medical mistakes resulting in patient harm using databases that capture these events for medical organizations. The objective of this study was to describe patients' perceptions regarding disclosure and their actions after harm. We analyzed a patient harm survey database composed of responses from a voluntary online survey administered to patients by ProPublica, an independent nonprofit news organization, during a 1-year period (May 2012 to May 2013). We collected data on patient demographics and characteristics related to the acknowledgment of patient harms, the reporting of patient harm to an oversight agency, whether the patient or the family obtained the harm-associated medical records, as well as the presence of a malpractice claim. There were 236 respondents reporting a patient harm (mean age, 49.1 y). In 11.4% (27/236) of harms, an apology by the medical organization or the clinician was made. In 42.8% (101/236) of harms, a complaint was filed with an oversight agency. In 66.5% (157/236) of harms, the patient or the family member obtained a copy of the pertinent medical records. A malpractice claim was reported in 19.9% (47/236) of events. In this sample of self-reported patient harms, we found a perception of inadequate apology. Nearly half of patient harm events are reported to an oversight agency, and roughly one-fifth result in a malpractice claim.

  18. Idiopathic scoliosis: evaluation of loss of correction in postoperative follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Faria Garcia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the postoperative loss of scoliosis correction using third-generation instrumental, comparing the immediately postoperative period, and the last visit of the patients operated on from 2002 to 2010. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study, conducted by analysis of medical records, in which 45 patients undergoing scoliosis correction were included. Variables were evaluated preoperatively, immediately postoperatively and in the last follow-up visit after surgery. Statistical analysis of data was performed in PASW program, with a significance level of 95%. RESULTS: Among the 45 patients studied, 88.9% were female and 82.8% were in the skeletally immature group. The mean pre-operative Cobb was 57°, the postoperative was 6.5° and at the last visit, it was 7.04°. There was no statistic difference between postoperative Cobb angle and that at the last examination (p = 0.176. CONCLUSION: There was no significant loss of scoliosis correction loss between the immediate postoperative and the final radiographic evaluation.

  19. Smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma: current diagnostic criteria, new predictors of outcome, and follow-up recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladé, Joan; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Rosiñol, Laura; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Kyle, Robert A

    2010-02-01

    To provide an overview on smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma (SMM) including current diagnostic criteria, predictors of progression, pattern of progression, and outcome. A comprehensive review of the literature on risk factors for progression, treatment attempts to delay progression and outcome in patients with SMM. The risk factors for progression of SMM include: plasma cell mass including M-protein size and percentage of bone marrow clonal plasma cells (BMPC), abnormal free light chain ratio, proportion of phenotypically abnormal BMPC, immunoparesis, evolution pattern (evolving v nonevolving), and pattern of magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. Most patients with SMM progress with anemia and/or skeletal involvement. Immediate therapy with cytotoxic agents, such as melphalan/prednisone has not resulted in improved outcome. Patients should not be treated until progressive disease with end-organ damage occurs. Increasing anemia is the most reliable indicator of progression. These recently recognized predictors of outcome may be helpful for better disease monitoring and for investigation of new treatment approaches. Thus, recommendations for follow-up every to 3 to 6 months depending on the risk of progression are suggested, and clinical trials with new noncytotoxic biologically derived agents to delay progression, particularly in high-risk patients, are ongoing.

  20. Prostate cancer as a chronic disease: cost-effectiveness and proper follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttilla, A.; Bortolami, A.; Evangelista, L.

    2015-01-01

    In western countries, prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common non-dermatological malignant disease in men. Bone metastases more often develop in patients with advanced PCa; the associated complications present a substantial disease and economic burden. Although the introduction of new therapeutic strategies have provided some advantages in terms of overall survival and quality of life in patients with metastatic PCa, the skeletal related events and side effects due to the therapies are associated with an important impact on the health care costs. In particular, the number of hospital admission, clinical consultation and the introduction of new expensive diagnostic modalities have changed the management of metastatic patients. However, the National and International guidelines suggest to follow patients with metastatic PCa by using clinical assessment, biochemical evaluation and, when necessary, diagnostic imaging. The aims of the present review were: 1) to summarize the information regarding the clinical and economic burden of metastasis; 2) to evaluate the quality of life; and 3) to suggest a proper follow-up in advanced PCa patients.

  1. Parents report on stimulant-treated children in the Netherlands : Initiation of treatment and follow-up care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Adrianne; Kalverdijk, Luuk J.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G.; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Tobi, Hilde

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe current practices around initiation and follow-up care of stimulant treatment among stimulant-treated children in a nationwide survey among parents. Methods: A total of 115 pharmacies detected current stimulant users <16 years old in their pharmacy

  2. Barriers to follow-up for pediatric cataract surgery in Maharashtra, India: How regular follow-up is important for good outcome. The Miraj Pediatric Cataract Study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikshit Gogate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular follow up and amblyopia treatment are essential for good outcomes after pediatric cataract surgery. Aim: To study the regularity of follow-up after cataract surgery in children and to gauge the causes of poor compliance to follow up. Subjects: 262 children (393 cataracts who underwent cataract surgery in 2004-8. Materials and Methods: The children were identified and examined in their homes and a "barriers to follow-up" questionnaire completed. Demographic data collected, visual acuity estimated, and ocular examination performed. Statistical Analysis: SPSS version 19. Results: Of the 262 children, only 53 (20.6% had been regularly following up with any hospital, 209 (79.4% had not. A total of 150 (57.3% were boys and the average age was 13.23 years (Std Dev 5 yrs. Poor follow up was associated with the older age group ( P 1 line with regular follow-up. Conclusion: Regular follow-up is important and improves vision; eye care practitioners need to take special efforts to ensure better follow-up.

  3. Musculoskeletal disorders among construction workers: a one-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boschman Julitta S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs are an important cause of functional impairments and disability among construction workers. An improved understanding of MSDs in different construction occupations is likely to be of value for selecting preventive measures. This study aimed to survey the prevalence of symptoms of MSDs, the work-relatedness of the symptoms and the problems experienced during work among two construction occupations: bricklayers and supervisors. Methods We randomly selected 750 bricklayers and 750 supervisors resident in the Netherlands in December 2009. This sample was surveyed by means of a baseline questionnaire and a follow-up questionnaire one year later. The participants were asked about complaints of the musculoskeletal system during the last six months, the perceived work-relatedness of the symptoms, the problems that occurred during work and the occupational tasks that were perceived as causes or aggravating factors of the MSD. Results Baseline response rate was 37%, follow-up response was 80%. The prevalence of MSDs among 267 bricklayers and 232 supervisors was 67% and 57%, respectively. Complaints of the back, knee and shoulder/upper arm were the most prevalent among both occupations. Irrespective of the body region, most of the bricklayers and supervisors reported that their complaints were work-related. Complaints of the back and elbow were the most often reported among the bricklayers during work, whereas lower arm/wrist and upper leg complaints were the most often reported among the supervisors. In both occupations, a majority of the participants perceived several occupational physical tasks and activities as causes or aggravating factors for their MSD. Recurrent complaints at follow-up were reported by both bricklayers (47% of the complaints and supervisors (31% of the complaints. Participants in both occupations report that mainly back and knee complaints result in additional problems

  4. Optical follow-up of gravitational wave triggers with DECam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herner, K.; Annis, J.; Berger, E.; Brout, D.; Butler, R.; Chen, H.; Cowperthwaite, P.; Diehl, H.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Farr, B.; Finley, D.; Frieman, J.; Holz, D.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Marriner, J.; Nielsen, E.; Palmese, A.; Sako, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Yanny, B.

    2017-10-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) events have several possible progenitors, including black hole mergers, cosmic string cusps, supernovae, neutron star mergers, and black hole{neutron star mergers. A subset of GW events are expected to produce electromagnetic (EM) emission that, once detected, will provide complementary information about their astrophysical context. To that end, the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration has partnered with other teams to send GW candidate alerts so that searches for their EM counterparts can be pursued. One such partner is the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and Dark Energy Camera (DECam) Gravitational Waves Program (DES- GW). Situated on the 4m Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, DECam is an ideal instrument for optical followup observations of GW triggers in the southern sky. The DES-GW program performs subtraction of new search images with respect to preexisting overlapping images to select candidate sources. Due to the short decay timescale of the expected EM counterparts and the need to quickly eliminate survey areas with no counterpart candidates, it is critical to complete the initial analysis of each night's images within 24 hours. The computational challenges in achieving this goal include maintaining robust I/O pipelines during the processing, being able to quickly acquire template images of new sky regions outside of the typical DES observing regions, and being able to rapidly provision additional batch computing resources with little advance notice. We will discuss the search area determination, imaging pipeline, general data transfer strategy, and methods to quickly increase the available amount of batch computing. We will present results from the rst season of observations from September 2015 to January 2016 and conclude by presenting improvements planned for the second observing season.

  5. Optical follow-up of gravitational wave triggers with DECam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herner, K.; Annis, J.; Berger, E.; Brout, D.; Butler, R.; Chen, H.; Cowperthwaite, P.; Diehl, H.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Farr, B.; Finley, D.; Frieman, J.; Holz, D.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Marriner, J.; Nielsen, E.; Palmese, A.; Sako, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Yanny, B.

    2017-10-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) events have several possible progenitors, including black hole mergers, cosmic string cusps, supernovae, neutron star mergers, and black hole–neutron star mergers. A subset of GW events are expected to produce electromagnetic (EM) emission that, once detected, will provide complementary information about their astrophysical context. To that end, the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration has partnered with other teams to send GW candidate alerts so that searches for their EM counterparts can be pursued. One such partner is the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and Dark Energy Camera (DECam) Gravitational Waves Program (DES-GW). Situated on the 4m Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, DECam is an ideal instrument for optical followup observations of GW triggers in the southern sky. The DES-GW program performs subtraction of new search images with respect to preexisting overlapping images to select candidate sources. Due to the short decay timescale of the expected EM counterparts and the need to quickly eliminate survey areas with no counterpart candidates, it is critical to complete the initial analysis of each night’s images within 24 hours. The computational challenges in achieving this goal include maintaining robust I/O pipelines during the processing, being able to quickly acquire template images of new sky regions outside of the typical DES observing regions, and being able to rapidly provision additional batch computing resources with little advance notice. We will discuss the search area determination, imaging pipeline, general data transfer strategy, and methods to quickly increase the available amount of batch computing. We will present results from the first season of observations from September 2015 to January 2016 and conclude by presenting improvements planned for the second observing season.

  6. Klenot near-Earth-object follow-up program --- next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticha, J.; Tichy, M.; Kocer, M.; Honkova, M.

    2014-07-01

    computations were identified. Then we have searched for ways to eliminate them and this effort still continues. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. More than 3000 minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to March 2014. The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have a large potential to contribute to recent NEO efforts. We also plan to discuss an international dimension of NEO astrometric follow-up, crucial for reasonable results. A meaningful connection and collaboration with the next generation ground-based and space surveys will be important. The cooperation with and through the Minor Planet Center, the worldwide clearinghouse for small solar system bodies astrometric observations and orbits, is an essential feature of NEO efforts. We also plan to cooperate and directly take part with the ESA's SSA-NEO Programme as a part of European network of cooperating sensors.

  7. Social support, self-efficacy for decision-making, and follow-up care use in long-term cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Laura P; Alfano, Catherine M; Kent, Erin E; Weaver, Kathryn E; Bellizzi, Keith; Arora, Neeraj; Aziz, Noreen; Keel, Gretchen; Rowland, Julia H

    2014-07-01

    Cancer survivors play an important role in coordinating their follow-up care and making treatment-related decisions. Little is known about how modifiable factors such as social support are associated with active participation in follow-up care. This study tests associations between social support, cancer-related follow-up care use, and self-efficacy for participation in decision-making related to follow-up care (SEDM). We also identified sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with social support among long-term survivors. The FOllow-up Care Use among Survivors study is a cross-sectional, population-based survey of breast, prostate, colon, and gynecologic cancer survivors (n=1522) 4-14 years post-diagnosis. Multivariable regression models were used to test associations between perceived social support (tangible and emotional/informational support modeled separately), follow-up care use (past 2 years), and SEDM, as well as to identify factors associated with perceived support. Neither support type was associated with follow-up care use (all p>0.05), although marital status was uniquely, positively associated with follow-up care use (psocial support may facilitate survivor efficacy for participation in decision-making during cancer follow-up care, other factors, including marital satisfaction, appear to influence follow-up care use. Marital status and social support may be important factors to consider in survivorship care planning. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. THE DETECTION OF A SN IIn IN OPTICAL FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF ICECUBE NEUTRINO EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; for the PTF Collaboration; for the Swift Collaboration; for the Pan-STARRS1 Science Consortium; and others

    2015-09-20

    The IceCube neutrino observatory pursues a follow-up program selecting interesting neutrino events in real-time and issuing alerts for electromagnetic follow-up observations. In 2012 March, the most significant neutrino alert during the first three years of operation was issued by IceCube. In the follow-up observations performed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) PTF12csy was found 0.°2 away from the neutrino alert direction, with an error radius of 0.°54. It has a redshift of z = 0.0684, corresponding to a luminosity distance of about 300 Mpc and the Pan-STARRS1 survey shows that its explosion time was at least 158 days (in host galaxy rest frame) before the neutrino alert, so that a causal connection is unlikely. The a posteriori significance of the chance detection of both the neutrinos and the SN at any epoch is 2.2σ within IceCube's 2011/12 data acquisition season. Also, a complementary neutrino analysis reveals no long-term signal over the course of one year. Therefore, we consider the SN detection coincidental and the neutrinos uncorrelated to the SN. However, the SN is unusual and interesting by itself: it is luminous and energetic, bearing strong resemblance to the SN IIn 2010jl, and shows signs of interaction of the SN ejecta with a dense circumstellar medium. High-energy neutrino emission is expected in models of diffusive shock acceleration, but at a low, non-detectable level for this specific SN. In this paper, we describe the SN PTF12csy and present both the neutrino and electromagnetic data, as well as their analysis.

  9. Long-Term Follow-Up of Children after Venom Immunotherapy: Low Adherence to Anaphylaxis Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Claudia; Miehe, Ulrich; Treudler, Regina; Kiess, Wieland; Prenzel, Freerk

    2017-01-01

    Data on the long-term outcome of children after specific venom immunotherapy (VIT) are limited. Therefore, we assessed sting recurrence and anaphylaxis relapse rates as well as adherence to anaphylaxis guidelines with regard to the availability of emergency equipment and education status. For this long-term survey, data of 311 children with a history of anaphylactic reactions to hymenoptera stings were collected by chart review. We included patients who were treated with a 3-year VIT between 1993 and 2009 and had completed a questionnaire. Forty of the 311 patients were included. Mean VIT duration was 3.1 years. Of the 40 patients included, 29 children (72.5%) received VIT with vespid venom, 9 with bee venom, and 2 patients with both venoms. During a mean follow-up period of 13 years, 20/40 patients (50%) suffered re-stings. Six of the 20 (30%) patients developed again anaphylactic symptoms (grade 1 n = 5, grade 3 n = 1); 2 were allergic to vespid and 4 to bee venom. Of the entire cohort, only 5/40 (12.5%) had appropriate emergency kits according to the guidelines of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Among the patients who had emergency kits available, one third (5/15) felt uncertain about the correct application of the medication. Less than two thirds of our population (25/40) affirmed that they have been educated in emergency management. The vast majority (95%; 38/40) of our patients did not have allergy follow-ups after VIT completion. Anaphylactic relapses are not uncommon, and there are considerable deficits in the emergency management of patients. Hence, comprehensive standardized anaphylaxis education programs as well as regular follow-ups of the allergy status are crucial. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Is training in psychosocial interventions worthwhile? Report of a psychosocial intervention trainee follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Charlie; Saul, Carol; Robinson, Jeannie; King, Jenny; Dudley, Mike

    2003-09-01

    A follow-up study of psychosocial intervention (PSI) trainees from the Sheffield and Maudsley training centres was undertaken in three stages. In Stage 1, 141 students, at two PSI training centres, were sent a simple postal questionnaire to elicit career trajectory following PSI training. A response rate of 82% was achieved. The sub-group, who had been trained and who still engaged in clinical practice were identified and followed-up in more detail (n=96). The effect of PSI training in a range of domains was investigated. The impact of training may not be to equip students with formal technical skills in CBT and family work. What is more likely is that trainees acquired proficiency in: working effectively using a case management model; conveying 'therapeutic optimism'; enabling users to meet their own goals and helping them to develop better coping strategies; using 'stress vulnerability' and formal outcome measures as means of structuring this approach. The secondary aim of the study was to identify and prioritise the barriers that impede the effective implementation of PSI skills in routine service settings. For the second phase of the survey the response rate was again 82%. This group's service managers were identified and surveyed for the same information and 59% responded. The aim was to gather information about implementation issues from both the clinical and service perspectives. The results of the survey indicate that PSI training has a positive impact on the development of services for people with serious mental health problems although there are serious organisational hurdles for managers, trainees and organisations to overcome if PSI skills are to be properly implemented. Key factors that impact upon faithful implementation are related to resource issues (caseload size), organisational factors (the existence of an implementation plan and training strategy), and the extent to which the trainee's team is supportive.

  11. HEMATURIA IN ASYMPTOMATIC ADULTS: ITS PREVALENCE AND ITS FOLLOW UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH SHAHIDI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hematuria is a clue to the diagnosis of renal and extra renal diseases. In this survey we evaluated the prevalance of hematuria in asymptomatic adults. Methods. Non - probability convenience sampling method was applied to choose 1000 subjects among the medical staff and patients" relatives in Noor and AI-Zahra Hospitals affiliated with Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS. On the basis of inclusion criteria, urine samples of subjects were tested with dipstick and some were crossed out based on exclusion criteria. Remaining samples were centrifuged and urine sediments were examined with light microscope. Hematuric samples were divided in to glomerular and non-glomerular groups. Data analysis was performed with SPSS software package and results were statistically compared with X2 method. Results. The relative prevalance of hematuria in this study was 2.6 percent. Glomerular and non-glomerular hematuria accounted for 1 percent and 1.6 percent of cases, respectively. The origin of hematuria in younger age groups was glomerular in most cases (66.6 percent and non-glomerular in older age groups (90 percent. There was significant difference between the prevalance of non-glomerular disease (1 percent and those with non-glomerular origin (P < 0.001. In subjects with non glomerular hematuria who underwent urological workup, 62.5 percent were diagnosed with a specific disease. Given their normal hematologic and serological test resultes, kidney biopsy was not indicated for subjects with glomerular hematuria. All of these subjects had isolated hematuria. The pre valance of hematuria evaluated with dipstick was significantly different from the results obtained from microscopic examination of urine specimens (P < 0.001. Discussion. Most cases of hematuria were non-glomerular origin in patients older than 50 years and glomerular in younger age groups. The diagnosed diseases did not affect, the subjects prognosis and this way of patient

  12. Prospects for Ground-Based Detection and Follow-up of TESS-Discovered Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varakian, Matthew; Deming, Drake

    2018-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will monitor over 200,000 main sequence dwarf stars for exoplanetary transits, with the goal of discovering small planets orbiting stars that are bright enough for follow-up observations. We here evaluate the prospects for ground-based transit detection and follow-up of the TESS-discovered planets. We focus particularly on the TESS planets that only transit once during each 27.4 day TESS observing window per region, and we calculate to what extent ground-based recovery of additional transits will be possible. Using simulated exoplanet systems from Sullivan et al. and assuming the use of a 60-cm telescope at a high quality observing site, we project the S/N ratios for transits of such planets. We use Phoenix stellar models for stars with surface temperatures from 2500K to 12000K, and we account for limb darkening, red atmospheric noise, and missed transits due to the day-night cycle and poor weather.

  13. Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Progression and De Novo Spondylolisthesis in Elderly Chinese Men and Women: A Year-4 Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wáng, Yì Xiáng J; Deng, Min; Griffith, James F; Kwok, Anthony W L; Leung, Jason Cs; Ahuja, Anil T; Kwok, Timothy; Leung, Ping Chung

    2016-07-01

    Longitudinal follow-up study. This current study aimed to further assess progression, incidence, and risk factors of lumbar spondylolisthesis in these subjects at 4-year follow-up. A survey for osteoporotic fractures in Hong Kong during 2001 to 2003 represented the first large scale prospective population-based study on bone health in elderly (≥65 years) Chinese men and women. A follow-up study was performed at year-4. The lateral lumbar radiographs of 1519 male and 1546 female subjects at year-4 follow-up were analyzed using the Meyerding classification, and compared with the baseline findings. Spondylolisthesis progressed in 13.0%, and de novo spondylolisthesis appeared in 12.4% in men. Spondylolisthesis progressed in 16.5%, and de novo spondylolisthesis appeared in 12.7% in women. In women, higher weight, body mass index, spine and hip bone mineral density (BMD), lower physical activity and lower grip strength were significant factors associated with spondylolisthesis progression, whereas only higher spine BMD was a marginally significant factor associated with spondylolisthesis progression for men. A weak association was noted between spondylolisthesis and lower back pain incidence in women, but not in men. Lumbar spondylolisthesis progression in elderly Chinese at 4-year follow-up was characterized by this study. 3.

  14. Primary care follow-up of radical prostatectomy patients: A regional New Zealand experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Yassaie

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Our study identified that follow-up by GPs after RP is insufficient. Accordingly, there is a requirement for formal educational programs if primary care is to take a greater role in follow-up of these patients.

  15. EROSITA: AGN SCIENCE, BACKGROUND DETERMINATION, AND OPTICAL FOLLOW-UP SPECTROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Boller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available More than 20 years after the highly impacting ROSAT all-sky survey in the soft X-ray spectral range, we are close to the next major X-ray all/sky surveys with eROSITA. eROSITA will be the primary instrument on-board the Russian “Spectrum–Roentgen–Gamma” (SRG satellite which will be launched from Baikonur in 2014 and placed in an L2 orbit. It will perform the first imaging all-sky survey in the medium energy X-ray range up to 10 keV with an unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The eROSITA all sky X-ray survey will take place in a very different context than the ROSAT survey. There is now a wealth of complete, ongoing and planned surveys of the sky in broad range of wavelengths from the gamma, X-ray to the radio. A significant amount of science can be accomplished through the multi-frequency study of the eROSITA AGN and cluster sample, including optical confirmation and photometric redshift estimation of the eROSITA extended sources and AGNs. Optical spectroscopy has been, and will for the foreseeable future be, one of the main tools of astrophysics allowing studies of a large variety of astronomical objects over many fields of research. The fully capitalize on the eROSITA potential, a dedicated spectroscopic follow-up program is needed. 4MOST is the ideal instrument to secure the scientific success of the eROSITA X-ray survey and to overcome the small sample sizes together with selection biases that plagued past samples. The aim is to have the instrument commissioned in 2017, well matched to the data releases of eROSITA and Gaia. The design and implementation of the 4MOST facility simulator aimed to optimize the science output for eROSITA is described in necessary details.

  16. Radiological diagnosis of skeletal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederlund, V.

    1996-01-01

    The clinical management of patients with skeletal metastases puts new demands on imaging. The radiological imaging in screening for skeletal metastases entails detection, metastatic site description and radiologically guided biopsy for morphological typing and diagnosis. Regarding sensitivity and the ease in performing surveys of the whole skeleton, radionuclide bone scintigraphy still is the first choice in routine follow-up of asymptomatic patients with metastatic disease of the skeleton. A negative scan has to be re-evaluated with other findings, with emphasis on the possibility of a false-negative result. Screening for metastases in patients with local symptoms or pain is best accomplished by a combination of radiography and MRI. Water-weighted sequences are superior in sensitivity and in detection of metastases. Standard spin-echo sequences on the other hand are superior in metastatic site description and in detection of intraspinal metastases. MRI is helpful in differentiating between malignant disease, infection, benign vertebral collapse, insufficiency fracture after radiation therapy, degenerative vertebral disease and benign skeletal lesions. About 30% of patients with known cancer have benign causes of radiographic abnormalities. Most of these are related to degenerative diseases and are often easily diagnosed. However, due to overlap in MRI characteristics, bone biopsy sometimes is essential for differentiating between malignant and nonmalignant lesions. Performing bone biopsy and aspiration cytology by radiologist and cytologist in co-operation has proven highly accurate in diagnosing bone lesions. The procedure involves low risk to the patient and provides a morphological diagnosis. Once a suspected metastatic lesion is detected, irrespective of modality, the morphological diagnosis determines the appropriate work-up imaging with respect to the therapy alternatives. (orig./VHE)

  17. Adherence to follow-up CT scans in patients with small pulmonary nodules, a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sofie Lock; Gerner Hansen, Niels-Christian

    2010-01-01

    was referred to another hospital and we have insufficient data on the follow-up. Another patient – also from 2008 -never came to the suggested first follow-up. Fifty eight patients have completed the first follow-up, while 10 are waiting for the first scheduled control CT. In twelve of the 19 patients (63...

  18. The impact of phone calls on follow-up rates in an online depression prevention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F. Muñoz

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Adding phone call contacts to email reminders and monetary incentives did increase follow-up rates. However, the rate of response to follow-up was low and the number of phone calls required to achieve one completed follow-up raises concerns about the utility of adding phone calls. We also discuss difficulties with using financial incentives and their implications.

  19. 20 CFR 664.450 - What are follow-up services for youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are follow-up services for youth? 664... YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth Program Design, Elements, and Parameters § 664.450 What are follow-up services for youth? (a) Follow-up services for youth may include: (1...

  20. Doping prevalence among preadolescent athletes: a 4-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laure, P; Binsinger, C

    2007-10-01

    To describe the prevalence of doping and its progression in a cohort of preadolescent athletes during a 4-year follow-up. Prospective cohort study. Self-questionnaire survey. All of the pupils entering the first year of secondary school (sixth grade) in the Vosges Département (east France) and followed for 4 years. Drug use (prohibited substances, tobacco, alcohol, cannabis), intention to use, reported health hazards, perceived drug effectiveness, self-esteem, trait anxiety. At the beginning of the study, 1.2% (95% CI 0.8 to 1.6) stated that they had taken doping agents at least once in the preceding 6 months, and this had risen to 3.0% (95% CI 2.3-3.7) 4 years later (pself-esteem and trait anxiety. The results show that doping does exist in preadolescent athletes who train every day. This fact should to be taken into account in preventive actions.

  1. Discovery, Follow-up, and Implications of the Optical/Infrared Counterpart to GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drout, Maria

    2018-01-01

    On August 17th, 2017, the field of multi-messenger, gravitational-wave, astronomy was born. On this date, Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo observed gravitational waves from the coalescence of a neutron star binary with a false alarm probability of 1 per 10000 years and electromagnetic counterparts were subsequently identified across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. In this talk, I will give a broad review of the optical and infrared emission associated with the binary neutron star merger, GW170817. I will describe the process of the discovery and localization of the optical counterpart, and review the extensive follow-up observations obtained over the following three weeks. Finally, I will place these results in context. I will discuss the implications of these observations on our understanding of the ejecta from neutron star mergers, the origin of r-process elements, and the prospects for the identification of similar transients in upcoming surveys.

  2. Barriers to Receiving Follow-Up Eye Care and Detection of Non-Glaucomatous Ocular Pathology in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cindy X; Hu, Wanda D; Tran, Judie; Siam, Linda; Berardi, Giuliana G; Sembhi, Harjeet; Hark, Lisa A; Katz, L Jay; Waisbourd, Michael

    2016-04-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate adherence rates and identify barriers to receiving follow-up eye care in participants diagnosed with significant non-glaucomatous eye pathology in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project. This community-based project aimed to improve detection, management, treatment, and follow-up eye care of individuals at high risk for glaucoma in community-based settings. Participants throughout Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA were enrolled. After a comprehensive eye examination, follow-up recommendations were given to each participant. A telephone survey was administered to individuals diagnosed with non-glaucomatous ocular pathology 3 months after initial eye examination to assess rates of follow-up and to evaluate potential barriers to follow-up. Of the 1649 participants enrolled in this project, 249 (15 %) were diagnosed with significant non-glaucomatous ocular pathology requiring follow-up care. There were 143 (57 %) who responded to the telephone survey. Respondents had a median age of 72 years, and were predominately female (69 %) and African-American (64 %). Of the respondents, 36 (25 %) attended a follow-up appointment. Participants who did not remember the results of their examinations, did not remember their recommendations, and had not seen an eye doctor within the past year were less likely to make a follow-up appointment (P = 0.04, 0.001 and 0.005, respectively). The Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Program was able to detect a significant amount of non-glaucomatous ocular pathology requiring follow-up care. Actual follow-up rates were sub-optimal. Further research is needed to determine interventions to overcome barriers and increase adherence with follow-up recommendations.

  3. Influence of rugby injuries on players' subsequent health and lifestyle: beginning a long term follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A J; Garraway, W M; Hepburn, W; Laidlaw, R

    2001-02-01

    To describe the current rugby playing status of a cohort of 1,169 men who had previously participated in an epidemiological survey of rugby injuries during the 1993-1994 season, and assess the consequences of rugby injuries sustained. In May 1998, 911 (78%) men completed a questionnaire reporting their current involvement in rugby and the influence that the 324 (71%) injuries they had sustained four years earlier had since had on their health and wellbeing. The most common reasons given by the 390 (43%) ex-players for ceasing to play rugby were family (10%), employment (25%), and an injury sustained while playing rugby (26%), 80% of which were dislocations, strains, and sprains, mainly to the knee (35%), back (14%), and shoulder (9%). A significantly (chi2 test 21.7, df = 1, pnegative effects to employment, family life, and health up to mid-1998 from injuries that occurred during the 1993-1994 season, although the impact on their lifestyle had been substantial in some cases. With the recent increase in the incidence of dislocation, strain, and sprain injuries in rugby football, the findings of this follow up could have a great impact on the game in the future. Although this survey has shown that, so far, only a small proportion of players suffer significant effects of rugby injuries, four years is not long enough to assess the long term effects. This cohort of rugby players need to be followed up for at least a further 20 years to determine whether there is a higher incidence of subsequent degenerative joint disease or other long term sequelae to injuries sustained while playing rugby.

  4. Hong Kong Chinese school children with elevated urine melamine levels: A prospective follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Winnie CW

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2008, the outbreak of kidney stones in children fed by melamine-tainted milk products in Mainland China has caused major public concern of food safety. We identified Hong Kong school children with elevated urine melamine level from a community-based school survey in 2007-08 and reviewed their clinical status in 2009. Methods In 2007-08, 2119 school children participated in a primary and secondary school survey in Hong Kong using a cluster sampling method. Urine aliquots from 502 subjects were assayed for melamine level. High urine melamine level was defined as urine melamine/creatinine ratio >7.1 μg/mmol. Subjects with high urine melamine level were invited for clinical evaluation in 2009 including urinalysis and ultrasound imaging of the urinary system. Results The age range of this subcohort was 6 - 20 years with 67% girls (335 female and 167 male subjects. The spot urine melamine/creatinine ratio of the 502 urine aliquots ranged from undetectable to 1467 μg/mmol (median 0.8 μg/mmol. Of these, 213 subjects had undetectable level (42%. We invited 47 (9% subjects with high urine melamine level for re-evaluation and one subject declined. The median duration of follow-up was 23.5 months (interquartile range: 19.8 - 30.6 months. None of the 46 subjects (28% boys, mean age 13.9 ± 2.9 years had any abnormality detected on ultrasound study of the urinary system. All subjects had stable renal function with a median urine albumin-creatinine ratio of 0.70 mg/mmol (interquartile range: 0.00 - 2.55 mg/mmol. Conclusions Hong Kong Chinese school children with high urine melamine levels appeared to have benign clinical course in the short term although a long term follow-up study is advisable in those with persistently high urine melamine level.

  5. Hong Kong Chinese school children with elevated urine melamine levels: a prospective follow up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Alice P S; Choi, Kai-Chow; Ho, Chung Shun; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun Kwok; Liu, Eric K H; Chu, Winnie C W; Chow, Viola C Y; Lau, Joseph T F; Chan, Juliana C N

    2011-05-20

    In 2008, the outbreak of kidney stones in children fed by melamine-tainted milk products in Mainland China has caused major public concern of food safety. We identified Hong Kong school children with elevated urine melamine level from a community-based school survey in 2007-08 and reviewed their clinical status in 2009. In 2007-08, 2119 school children participated in a primary and secondary school survey in Hong Kong using a cluster sampling method. Urine aliquots from 502 subjects were assayed for melamine level. High urine melamine level was defined as urine melamine/creatinine ratio >7.1 μg/mmol. Subjects with high urine melamine level were invited for clinical evaluation in 2009 including urinalysis and ultrasound imaging of the urinary system. The age range of this subcohort was 6 - 20 years with 67% girls (335 female and 167 male subjects). The spot urine melamine/creatinine ratio of the 502 urine aliquots ranged from undetectable to 1467 μg/mmol (median 0.8 μg/mmol). Of these, 213 subjects had undetectable level (42%). We invited 47 (9%) subjects with high urine melamine level for re-evaluation and one subject declined. The median duration of follow-up was 23.5 months (interquartile range: 19.8 - 30.6 months). None of the 46 subjects (28% boys, mean age 13.9 ± 2.9 years) had any abnormality detected on ultrasound study of the urinary system. All subjects had stable renal function with a median urine albumin-creatinine ratio of 0.70 mg/mmol (interquartile range: 0.00 - 2.55 mg/mmol). Hong Kong Chinese school children with high urine melamine levels appeared to have benign clinical course in the short term although a long term follow-up study is advisable in those with persistently high urine melamine level.

  6. Young adult cancer survivors' follow-up care expectations of oncologists and primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugh-Yeun, Kiara; Kumar, Divjot; Moghaddamjou, Ali; Ruan, Jenny Y; Cheung, Winson Y

    2017-06-01

    Young adult cancer survivors face unique challenges associated with their illness. While both oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) may be involved in the follow-up care of these cancer survivors, we hypothesized that there is a lack of clarity regarding each physician's roles and responsibilities. A self-administered survey was mailed to young adult cancer survivors in British Columbia, Canada, who were aged 20 to 39 years at the time of diagnosis and alive at 2 to 5 years following the diagnosis to capture their expectations of oncologists and PCPs in various important domains of cancer survivorship care. Multivariate logistic regression models that adjusted for confounders were constructed to examine for predictors of the different expectations. Of 722 young cancer survivors surveyed, 426 (59%) responded. Among them, the majority were White women with breast cancer. Oncologists were expected to follow the patient's most recent cancer and treatment-related side effects while PCPs were expected to manage ongoing and future cancer surveillance as well as general preventative care. Neither physician was perceived to be responsible for addressing the return to daily activities, reintegration to interpersonal relationships, or sexual function. Older survivors were significantly less likely to expect oncologists (p = 0.03) and PCPs (p = 0.01) to discuss family planning when compared to their younger counterparts. Those who were White were significantly more likely to expect PCPs to discuss comorbidities (p = 0.009) and preventative care (p = 0.001). Young adult cancer survivors have different expectations of oncologists and PCPs with respect to their follow-up care. Physicians need to better clarify their roles in order to further improve the survivorship phase of cancer care for young adults. Young adult cancer survivors have different expectations of their oncologists and PCPs. Clarification of the roles of each physician group during follow-up can

  7. Results from the LCOGT Near-Earth Object Follow-up Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric; Larson, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter and two 2-meter telescopes to five locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with plans to extend to twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. The versitility and design of this network allows for rapid response to target of opportunity events as well as the long-term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The network's global coverage and the apertures of telescopes available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). This is complimented by the two 2-meter telescopes at Haleakala (Hawaii) and Siding Spring Observatory. The telescope network has been fully operational since May 2014, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to sites in the Canary Islands and Tibet are planned for 2016.The LCOGT near-Earth object group is using the network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS), PanSTARRS (PS1) and NEOWISE, with several hundred targets being followed per year. Follow-up astrometry and photometry of radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists are improving orbits, producing light curves and rotation periods, and better characterizing these NEOs. Recent results include the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. In addition, we are in the process of building a NEO portal that will allow

  8. Communication Practices of Mammography Facilities and Timely Follow-up of a Screening Mammogram with a BI-RADS 0 Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Marilyn M; Barlow, William E; Conant, Emily F; Sprague, Brian L; Tosteson, Anna N A; Haas, Jennifer S; Onega, Tracy; Beaber, Elisabeth F; Goodrich, Martha; McCarthy, Anne Marie; Herschorn, Sally D; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Harrington, Tory O; Geller, Berta

    2018-02-09

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of communication practices with timely follow-up of screening mammograms read as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data Systems (BI-RADS) 0 in the Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) consortium. A radiology facility survey was conducted in 2015 with responses linked to screening mammograms obtained in 2011-2014. We considered timely follow-up to be within 15 days of the screening mammogram. Generalized estimating equation models were used to evaluate the association between modes of communication with patients and providers and timely follow-up, adjusting for PROSPR site, patient age, and race and ethnicity. The analysis included 34,680 mammography examinations with a BI-RADS 0 assessment among 28 facilities. Across facilities, 85.6% of examinations had a follow-up within 15 days. Patients in a facility where routine practice was to contact the patient by phone if follow-up imaging was recommended were more likely to have timely follow-up (odds ratio [OR] 4.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.76-7.76), whereas standard use of mail was associated with reduced timely follow-up (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.30-0.75). Facilities that had standard use of electronic medical records to report the need for follow-up imaging to a provider had less timely follow-up (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.35-0.90). Facilities that routinely contacted patients by mail if they missed a follow-up imaging visit were more likely to have timely follow-up (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.02-2.69). Our findings support the value of telephone communication to patients in relation to timely follow-up. Future research is needed to evaluate the role of communication in completing the breast cancer screening episode. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Patients highly value routine follow-up of skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Themstrup, Lotte; Jemec, Gregor E; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    : This study included an open sample of patients attending routine follow-up at the outpatient Departments of Plastic Surgery and Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital. A total of 218 follow-up patients diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM), non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) or actinic keratosis (AK......INTRODUCTION: Skin cancer follow-up is a substantial burden to outpatient clinics. Few studies have investigated patients' views on skin cancer follow-up and cutaneous melanoma. The objective was to investigate patients' perceived benefits and the impact of follow-up. MATERIAL AND METHODS...

  10. A follow-up study of the association between mobile phone use and symptoms of ill health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Min; Lim, Hee Jin; Jang, Hoon; Kim, Kyunghee; Choi, Jae Wook; Shin, Chol; Lee, Seung Ku; Kwon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Nam

    2016-01-01

    The duration and frequency of mobile phone calls, and their relationship with various health effects, have been investigated in our previous cross-sectional study. This 2-year period follow-up study aimed to assess the changes in these variables of same subjects. The study population comprised 532 non-patient adult subjects sampled from the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study. The subjects underwent a medical examination at a hospital in 2012/2013 and revisited the same hospital in 2014/2015 to have the same examination for the characteristics of mobile phone use performed. In addition, to evaluate the effects on health, the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6), Psychosocial Well-being Index-Short Form, Beck Depression Inventory, Korean-Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, Perceived Stress Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and 12-item Short Form Health Survey were analyzed. For all these tests, the higher the score, the greater the effect on health. Variances between scores in all the indices in the baseline and follow-up surveys were calculated, and correlations of each index were analyzed. The average duration per call and HIT-6 score of the subjects decreased significantly compared with those recorded two years ago. The results showed a slight but significant correlation between call duration changes and HIT-6 score changes for female subjects, but not for males. HIT-6 scores in the follow-up survey significantly decreased compared to those in the baseline survey, but long-time call users (subjects whose call duration was ≥5 minutes in both the baseline and follow-up surveys) had no statistically significant reduction in HIT-6 scores. This study suggests that increased call duration is a greater risk factor for increases in headache than any other type of adverse health effect, and that this effect can be chronic.

  11. A follow-up study of the association between mobile phone use and symptoms of ill health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Min Cho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The duration and frequency of mobile phone calls, and their relationship with various health effects, have been investigated in our previous cross-sectional study. This 2-year period follow-up study aimed to assess the changes in these variables of same subjects. The study population comprised 532 non-patient adult subjects sampled from the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study. The subjects underwent a medical examination at a hospital in 2012/2013 and revisited the same hospital in 2014/2015 to have the same examination for the characteristics of mobile phone use performed. In addition, to evaluate the effects on health, the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6, Psychosocial Well-being Index-Short Form, Beck Depression Inventory, Korean-Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, Perceived Stress Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and 12-item Short Form Health Survey were analyzed. For all these tests, the higher the score, the greater the effect on health. Variances between scores in all the indices in the baseline and follow-up surveys were calculated, and correlations of each index were analyzed. The average duration per call and HIT-6 score of the subjects decreased significantly compared with those recorded two years ago. The results showed a slight but significant correlation between call duration changes and HIT-6 score changes for female subjects, but not for males. HIT-6 scores in the follow-up survey significantly decreased compared to those in the baseline survey, but long-time call users (subjects whose call duration was ≥5 minutes in both the baseline and follow-up surveys had no statistically significant reduction in HIT-6 scores. This study suggests that increased call duration is a greater risk factor for increases in headache than any other type of adverse health effect, and that this effect can be chronic.

  12. A survey to assess audit mechanisms practised by skeletal reporting radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, H.C.; Manning, D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the role of plain film reporting radiographers and the methods they employ to evaluate the quality of their performance. Method: The survey was conducted in 2003. Questionnaires were sent, via the universities, to radiographers who had registered on a post-graduate musculoskeletal image interpretation course at a University in England since their introduction (9 years earlier). Results: The response rate was 37% (n = 112). Sixty-four percent of the trained reporting radiographers surveyed are creating independent reports on musculoskeletal images and an additional 15% contribute to a double reporting system. Twenty-one percent of the reporting radiographers in this study are not undertaking audit of their practice. Of the 79% who are participating in audit programmes the variety of methods being used are widespread. In order to protect against litigation, 19% of reporting radiographers have a portfolio of evidence supporting their competency; 71% have a specific job description for their advanced role; 73% of reporting radiographers are members of a trade union; and 82% of reporting radiographers work to a departmental protocol. Conclusion: The majority of reporting radiographers are participating in some form of audit. However, it is imperative that the sizeable minority who are not should initiate this process promptly. It is important that national standards are set so that these audit processes become embedded into practice for the protection of both the patient and radiographer. The inconsistency shown with regard to audit processes and protection against litigation suggests that further clarification is required from the professional bodies

  13. Health Centre Staff Are Satisfied with Librarian-Mediated Search Services, Especially When Librarians Follow Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peace Ossom Williamson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: McKeown, S., Konrad, S.-L., McTavish, J., & Boyce, E. (2017. Evaluation of hospital staff’s perceived quality of librarian-mediated literature searching services. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 105(2, 120-131. http://dx.doi.org/10.5195/jmla.2017.201 Abstract Objective – To determine the effects of the professional designation and communication method on clinical, educational, and research activities and related users’ reported satisfaction with and perceived quality of a librarian-mediated literature searching service. Design – Online survey. Setting – A large teaching hospital in Ontario, Canada. Subjects – 237 health sciences centre staff who were requesting librarian-mediated literature searching over a one-year period. Methods – From February 1, 2014 to January 31, 2015, one-third of the health centre staff members requesting searching services, representing a systematic sample of the user group, were invited to participate in the survey. The survey centred on questioning participants on a critical incident, which, according to the critical incident technique, is an actual event upon which recollections are made, rather than hypothetical situations. In the case of this study, the critical incident was the service they received upon requesting literature searching by a librarian who was blinded concerning the originator of the request. With a 71% response rate, the researchers received 137 responses to the survey by health sciences staff. Participants were asked how many literature searches they had requested in the previous year, the reason they requested the service, how they submitted the request, and whether the librarian followed up for further clarification of their need. They also reported on the relevance of the results and their method of delivery, along with their perceptions of the overall quality of the service. Main Results – The results came from 137 completed surveys, for a 71% response

  14. [Differences in subjective health, mental health, and health behavior among 11- to 17-year-olds at secondary schools in Germany : Results of the German health interview and examination survey for children and adolescents: first follow-up (KiGGS Wave 1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldhauer, Julia; Kuntz, Benjamin; Lampert, Thomas

    2018-02-22

    Social inequalities in health can already be found among children and adolescents to the disadvantage of socially deprived population groups. This paper aims to detect, whether differences in subjective health, mental health and health behavior among young people are due to the secondary school type attended and whether these associations exist independently of the family's socioeconomic position (SEP). The data basis was the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS Wave 1, 2009-2012). Data of 11- to 17-year-old girls and boys (n = 4665) who attend different types of secondary schools in Germany were analyzed. The dependent variables were self-rated health, findings of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) for the detection of psychological abnormalities, as well as self-reported information regarding leisure sport, tobacco, and alcohol consumption. Prevalence and odds ratios (ORs) based on logistic regressions are shown. For the majority of the examined indicators, it can be shown that adolescents in lower secondary schools are more likely to report worse self-rated health and mental problems and engage in unhealthy behavior than peers in grammar schools ("Gymnasium"). The differences decrease after controlling for family's SEP but mostly remain statistically significant. Adolescents who don't attend grammar schools are most strongly disadvantaged in terms of inattention/hyperactivity for both gender (OR: 2.29 [1.70-3.08]), smoking among girls (2.91 [1.85-4.57]) and physical inactivity (no leisure sport) among boys (OR: 2.71 [1.85-3.95]). Unequal health opportunities should be viewed in relation to people's living conditions. For adolescents, school constitutes an important setting for learning, experience, and health. The results indicate divergent needs of school-based health promotion and prevention regarding differences among gender and type of school.

  15. Cost implications of human and automated follow-up in ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Eta S; Burkhardt, Jeffrey H; Panjamapirom, Anantachai; Ray, Midge N

    2014-11-01

    To compare the costs of human and automated follow-up processes in ambulatory care. Analysis of costs of nurse-initiated and interactive voice response (IVR) system follow-up interventions. Using national cost data and data on follow-up processes and outcomes from a previous study, we examined the costs to the healthcare system and providers of developing a follow-up process using nurse-initiated telephone calls compared with calls made by an IVR. Whether using nurse-initiated telephone calls or IVR calls, costs over the first 2 years of follow-up for a practice assumed to have 4800 acute care patient visits per year are approximately the same. After 2 years, IVR follow-up is approximately $9000 per year less expensive than nurse follow-up. In addition, overall cost savings are greater with IVR. Follow-up of ambulatory care patients is a way to assess risks of future problems and associated costs and to improve quality of care. An automated follow-up process using IVR is more efficient than one based on nurse-initiated follow-up calls.

  16. Cupping for chronic nonspecific neck pain: a 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    Several trials have shown that cupping might be an effective treatment for chronic nonspecific neck pain, but little is known about the long-term effectiveness. This study aimed to investigate long-term effects of a short series of cupping; therefore additional follow-up measurements were conducted 2 years after completion of 3 studies. Participants from 3 randomized waitlist controlled trials on cupping for chronic nonspecific neck pain were followed 2 years after treatment. Outcome measures included neck pain intensity (100 mm Visual Analog Scale; VAS), functional disability (Neck Disability Index, NDI), and health-related quality of life (Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire; SF-36). 133 of 150 patients had received cupping treatment and were contacted; 82 of them (61.7%) returned the follow-up questionnaires. No effect was found for neck pain intensity, but for physical function (∆ NDI: -3.15; 95% CI: -5.89; -0.41; p = 0.025) and quality of life (∆ physical component summary: 2.97; 95% CI: 0.97; 4.97; p = 0.004; ∆ bodily pain: 14.53; 95 % CI: 9.67; 19.39; p cupping effect was 8.9 ± 8.7 months with 16 patients reporting that neck pain had not yet reached the level before cupping. The majority of the patients did not continue cupping therapy, mostly due to lack of providers, costs or loss of interest. A series of cupping treatments did not influence neck pain intensity on the longer term, however significant increases were found for physical function and quality of life in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. Due to the considerable drop-out rate conclusions are limited. There is evidence suggesting that cupping treatment might have sustainable effects in some patients. Further randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up are urgently needed for conclusive judgment of long-term effectiveness. © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  17. A 10-year follow-up study of psychosocial factors affecting couples after infertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmann, T; Korge, K; Scherg, H; Strowitzki, T; Verres, R

    2012-11-01

    Little is known about the long-term course taken in life by couples who had undergone medically assisted reproduction (MAR). The aim of this study was to find out in a large sample whether, in comparison with parents, involuntarily childless couples have a different subjective perception of overall and specific quality of life over a period of >10 years. Between 1994 and 1997, 564 couples participated in the initial Heidelberg Fertility Consultation Service study of psychosocial aspects of infertility. In March 2008, a follow-up questionnaire was sent to all of these couples. Both partners were asked about the current status of their desire for a child and their satisfaction with life, their self-esteem, partnership, sexuality and career, as well as their current attitude towards the MAR they had undergone and experience of the process. The final sample consisted of 148 couples and 60 women (response rate: 41% of the women and 31% of the men contacted). Fifty-nine percent of the women had at least one genetically related child, 11% had a foster or adopted child and 30% remained childless. Comparisons of psychological variables between parents and childless couples were done for the 148 couples only. Post-MAR parents indicated significantly higher self-esteem than childless couples (P < 0.01) and were more inclined to go through the infertility treatment again than childless couples (P < 0.001 for women, P < 0.05 for men). Positive aspects of infertility were seen more often by childless couples than by parents (P < 0.001). Childless women reported more occupational satisfaction than mothers (P < 0.01), while no such difference was identified in the male partners. Concerning overall life satisfaction, satisfaction with friendships and the partnership, and sexual satisfaction there were no statistically significant differences between childless women/men and mothers/fathers. Overall, our 10-year follow-up survey indicated good psychological adjustment both in

  18. XMM FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF THREE SWIFT BAT-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, M. L.; Reynolds, C. S.; Koss, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Winter, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton observations of three active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken as part of a hunt to find very heavily obscured Compton-thick AGNs. For obscuring columns greater than 10 25 cm -2 , AGNs are only visible at energies below 10 keV via reflected/scattered radiation, characterized by a flat power law. We therefore selected three objects (ESO 417-G006, IRAS 05218-1212, and MCG -01-05-047) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray survey catalog with Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) 0.5-10 keV spectra with flat power-law indices as candidate Compton-thick sources for follow-up observations with the more sensitive instruments on XMM-Newton. The XMM spectra, however, rule out reflection-dominated models based on the weakness of the observed Fe Kα lines. Instead, the spectra are well fit by a model of a power-law continuum obscured by a Compton-thin absorber plus a soft excess. This result is consistent with previous follow-up observations of two other flat-spectrum BAT-detected AGNs. Thus, out of the six AGNs in the 22 month BAT catalog with apparently flat Swift XRT spectra, all five that have had follow-up observations are not likely Compton thick. We also present new optical spectra of two of these objects, IRAS 05218-1212 and MCG -01-05-047. Interestingly, though both the AGNs have similar X-ray spectra, their optical spectra are completely different, adding evidence against the simplest form of the geometric unified model of AGNs. IRAS 05218-1212 appears in the optical as a Seyfert 1, despite the ∼8.5 x 10 22 cm -2 line-of-sight absorbing column indicated by its X-ray spectrum. MCG -01-05-047's optical spectrum shows no sign of AGN activity; it appears as a normal galaxy.

  19. Frequency of unplanned interventions in patients attending for a presumed routine glaucoma follow-up appointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calafati, Jennifer; Pradhan, Zia S; Birt, Catherine M

    2016-12-01

    To determine the frequency of patient visits in which an unplanned treatment modification was required in chronic patients attending a glaucoma clinic for routine follow-up and to identify the treatment interventions most commonly employed. Prospective, cross-sectional study. A total of 630 previously stable patients attending a glaucoma clinic for routine follow-up. This was a single-centre survey of all eligible patients returning to an academic glaucoma clinic. Data regarding whether patients' visit remained routine or required intervention, which clinical parameter had changed, and any alterations in treatment regimens were studied. The percentage of patients found to require a change in management was 20.79% (131 of 630 patients); 16.9% were found to have a cause for change because of glaucoma, and the remaining 4% required intervention because of a nonglaucomatous condition. The most common parameter that changed treatment was intraocular pressure (43.87%), followed by visual fields (21.29%). The frequency of abnormal parameters varied within each subtype of glaucoma. The frequency of treatment changes among those with primary open-angle glaucoma was 22.58% compared with 16.5% of glaucoma suspects, 14% of ocular hypertensives, 32% of pseudoexfoliative glaucoma, and 50% of normal tension glaucoma patients. The most common intervention (32.84%) was a change in antiglaucoma medications. The next most frequent interventions were laser procedures (21.90%) and surgery (16.06%). This study suggests that a significant minority of patients attending a glaucoma clinic for a routine appointment require treatment modification. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Patient Satisfaction With an Early Smartphone-Based Cosmetic Surgery Postoperative Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozza, Edoardo Dalla; D'Souza, Gehaan F; DeLeonibus, Anthony; Fabiani, Brianna; Gharb, Bahar Bassiri; Zins, James E

    2017-12-13

    While prevalent in everyday life, smartphones are also finding increasing use as a medical care adjunct. The use of smartphone technology as a postoperative cosmetic surgery adjunct for care has received little attention in the literature. The purpose of this effort was to assess the potential efficacy of a smartphone-based cosmetic surgery early postoperative follow-up program. Specifically, could smartphone photography provided by the patient to the plastic surgeon in the first few days after surgery allay patient's concerns, improve the postoperative experience and, possibly, detect early complications? From August 2015 to March 2016 a smartphone-based postoperative protocol was established for patients undergoing cosmetic procedures. At the time of discharge, the plastic surgeon sent a text to the patient with instructions for the patient to forward a postoperative photograph of the operated area within 48 to 72 hours. The plastic surgeon then made a return call/text that same day to review the patient's progress. A postoperative questionnaire evaluated the patients' postoperative experience and satisfaction with the program. A total of 57 patients were included in the study. Fifty-two patients responded to the survey. A total of 50 (96.2%) patients reported that the process improved the quality of their postoperative experience. The protocol allowed to detect early complications in 3 cases. The physician was able to address and treat the complications the following day prior to the scheduled clinic follow up. The smartphone can be effectively utilized by the surgeon to both enhance the patient's postoperative experience and alert the surgeon to early postoperative problems. 4. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Recurrence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the affecting factors: A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li Ya; Song, Zhi Qiang; Xue, Yan; Li, Xiao; Li, Yan Qing; Qian, Jia Ming

    2017-01-01

    Recurrence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection weakens the protective effect and long-term prognosis of eradication. With the widespread therapies, decreasing prevalence of H. pylori infection and improvement in living conditions, the recurrence of H. pylori infection may present with new features. We conducted this prospective, large-scale, multicenter follow-up study to determine the recurrence rate of H. pylori infection and its affecting factors. A total of 827 patients receiving successful H. pylori eradication in our previous randomized controlled trial were enrolled. 13 C-urea breath test (UBT) was repeated one year after the eradication therapy to determine its recurrence. Moreover, a questionnaire survey was performed to explore the potential factors affecting the recurrence. A total of 743 patients completed 13 C-UBT (follow-up rate 89.8%), and the result was positive in 13 patients one year after eradication therapy, with an annual recurrence rate of 1.75% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.81-2.69%). Six hundred and ninety-two patients (13 with recurrence and 679 without recurrence) returned their questionnaires, with a response rate of >80%. Multivariate analysis revealed that peptic ulcer (odds ratio [OR] 3.385, 95% CI 1.016-11.274), close contact with individuals having H. pylori infection (OR 4.231, 95% CI 1.201-14.911), and hospitalization (OR 9.302, 95% CI 2.441-35.440) were independent risk factors of H. pylori infection recurrence. The recurrence of H. pylori infection one year after eradication therapy is low in urban population of China. Peptic ulcer, contact history with individuals having H. pylori infection and hospitalization are risk factors. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Nurse-led telephone follow-up after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szöts, Kirsten; Konradsen, Hanne; Solgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    follow-up consultations and individual interviews with 10 patients formed the data material. Content analysis was used for the analysis. RESULTS: The content of the telephone follow-ups included dialogues relating to all key subjects for nursing status except 'culture/spirituality'. The structured......AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To generate information on how telephone follow-up consultations, structured by nursing status according to the VIPS-model, functioned after total knee arthroplasty. The objectives were to unfold the content of the telephone follow-ups according to the structure for nursing...... of health problems. A clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of telephone follow-up, and information on how the telephone follow-ups functioned is relevant for implementation into clinical practice. DESIGN: A qualitative design was used. METHOD: One hundred and four case reports from telephone...

  3. Deep Rapid Optical Follow-Up of Gravitational Wave Sources with the Dark Energy Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowperthwaite, Philip

    2018-01-01

    The detection of an electromagnetic counterpart associated with a gravitational wave detection by the Advanced LIGO and VIRGO interferometers is one of the great observational challenges of our time. The large localization regions and potentially faint counterparts require the use of wide-field, large aperture telescopes. As a result, the Dark Energy Camera, a 3.3 sq deg CCD imager on the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO in Chile is the most powerful instrument for this task in the Southern Hemisphere. I will report on the results from our joint program between the community and members of the dark energy survey to conduct rapid and efficient follow-up of gravitational wave sources. This includes systematic searches for optical counterparts, as well as developing an understanding of contaminating sources on timescales not normally probed by traditional untargeted supernova surveys. I will additionally comment on the immense science gains to be made by a joint detection and discuss future prospects from the standpoint of both next generation wide-field telescopes and next generation gravitational wave detectors.

  4. Long-term follow-up of unilateral transfemoral amputees from the Vietnam war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Paul J

    2003-04-01

    Despite their frequency, few reports exist concerning the initial and long-term consequences of battle-incurred unilateral transfemoral amputations. A retrospective cohort design was used to measure the long-term health of transfemoral battle amputees treated at a single hospital during the Vietnam War. Data collection consisted of medical record abstraction and a follow-up questionnaire that included the SF-36 Health Survey. Forty-six patients responded to the survey an average of 28 years after injury. Compared with the controls, patient responses to the SF-36 were significantly (p < 0.01) less in all categories except Mental Health and Vitality. Forty-three (93.5%) are or have been married. Forty-one (89.1%) are or have been employed an average of 20.1 years. Forty patients (87%) wore a prosthesis an average of 13.5 h/day. Although the patients do relatively well with employment and marriage stability, the low SF-36 scores suggest a significant disability.

  5. A Decade of GRB Follow-Up by BOOTES in Spain (2003–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Jelínek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article covers ten years of GRB follow-ups by the Spanish BOOTES stations: 71 follow-ups providing 23 detections. Follow-ups by BOOTES-1B from 2005 to 2008 were given in a previous article and are here reviewed and updated, and additional detection data points are included as the former article merely stated their existence. The all-sky cameras CASSANDRA have not yet detected any GRB optical afterglows, but limits are reported where available.

  6. Anxiety and depression after prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment: 5-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Korfage, I J; Essink-Bot, M-L; Janssens, A C J W; Schr?der, F H; de Koning, H J

    2006-01-01

    To document anxiety and depression from pretreatment till 5-year follow-up in 299 men with localized prostate cancer. To assess, if baseline scores were predictive for anxiety and depression at 1-year follow-up. Respondents completed four assessments (pretreatment, at 6 and 12 months, and at 5-year follow-up) on anxiety, depression and mental health. Respondents were subdivided according to therapy (prostatectomy or radiotherapy) and high vs low-anxiety. Pretreatment 28% of all patients were ...

  7. Follow-up of Indigenous-specific health assessments - a socioecological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailie, Jodie; Schierhout, Gill H; Kelaher, Margaret A; Laycock, Alison F; Percival, Nikki A; O'Donoghue, Lynette R; McNeair, Tracy L; Chakraborty, Amal; Beacham, Barbara D; Bailie, Ross S

    2014-06-16

    To describe patterns of uptake of Indigenous-specific health assessments and associated follow-up items, and examine the barriers and enablers to delivery and billing of follow-up over the first 3 years of implementation of the Indigenous Chronic Disease Package (ICDP). We used a socioecological approach to analyse data derived from the Sentinel Sites Evaluation of the ICDP - with data from 24 sites across Australia. Administrative data (1 May 2009 to 30 May 2012) and program data (1 March 2010 to 30 May 2012) were provided by the Department of Health. Data on barriers and enablers to follow-up of health assessments were obtained from community focus groups, in-depth interviews and discussions with key informants (1 November 2010 to 30 December 2012). Monthly number of Medicare Benefits Schedule items claimed for Indigenous-specific health services and follow-up; qualitative data on enablers and barriers categorised according to patient, patient-health service relationship, health service or organisation, community and policy environment levels or influence. There was an increase in the uptake of health assessments, but relatively limited delivery of follow-up care and billing for Indigenous-specific follow-up items. Follow-up was constrained by factors that operated at various levels: patient, interpersonal, health service, community and policy. Constraints included practitioners' lack of awareness of item numbers, staffing, poor state of clinical information systems, billing against non-Indigenous-specific items or more general follow-up items, emphasis on health assessments with less attention to requirements for follow-up, limited capacity to arrange and facilitate follow-up, and communication and transport challenges for patients. Work is required across various levels of the system to address barriers to follow-up care. Enhancing follow-up care is vital to achieving health benefits from the large financial and human resource investment in health assessments.

  8. Patients highly value routine follow-up of skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themstrup, Lotte; Jemec, Gregor E; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-10-01

    Skin cancer follow-up is a substantial burden to outpatient clinics. Few studies have investigated patients' views on skin cancer follow-up and cutaneous melanoma. The objective was to investigate patients' perceived benefits and the impact of follow-up. This study included an open sample of patients attending routine follow-up at the outpatient Departments of Plastic Surgery and Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital. A total of 218 follow-up patients diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM), non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) or actinic keratosis (AK) completed a structured interview. A total of 97% patients found follow-up useful. Continuity and consistency were important. One third of patients felt some degree of pre follow-up anxiety. The number of anxious MM patients was significantly greater than that of NMSC patients. No significant difference was found between the number of anxious MM and AK patients. Female gender, cohabitation and age younger than 50 years were associated with increased levels of anxiety. No relation was found between the number of anxious patients or the level of anxiety and the duration of the follow-up period. The majority of patients who attended found that the follow-up had been useful. Certain demographic characteristics were associated with higher levels of anxiety and may be addressed by supportive efforts targeting these groups.

  9. Fear, opposition, ambivalence, and omission: Results from a follow-up study on unmet need for family planning in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staveteig, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Despite a relatively strong family planning program and regionally modest levels of fertility, Ghana recorded one of the highest levels of unmet need for family planning on the African continent in 2008. Unmet need for family planning is a composite measure based on apparent contradictions between women's reproductive preferences and practices. Women who want to space or limit births but are not using contraception are considered to have an unmet need for family planning. The study sought to understand the reasons behind high levels of unmet need for family planning in Ghana. A mixed methods follow-up study was embedded within the stratified, two-stage cluster sample of the 2014 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey (GDHS). Women in 13 survey clusters who were identified as having unmet need, along with a reference group of current family planning users, were approached to be reinterviewed within an average of three weeks from their GDHS interview. Follow-up respondents were asked a combination of closed- and open-ended questions about fertility preferences and contraceptive use. Closed-ended responses were compared against the original survey; transcripts were thematically coded and analyzed using qualitative analysis software. Among fecund women identified by the 2014 GDHS as having unmet need, follow-up interviews revealed substantial underreporting of method use, particularly traditional methods. Complete postpartum abstinence was sometimes the intended method of family planning but was overlooked during questions about method use. Other respondents classified as having unmet need had ambivalent fertility preferences. In several cases, respondents expressed revised fertility preferences upon follow-up that would have made them ineligible for inclusion in the unmet need category. The reference group of family planning users also expressed unstable fertility preferences. Aversion to modern method use was generally more substantial than reported in the GDHS

  10. Fear, opposition, ambivalence, and omission: Results from a follow-up study on unmet need for family planning in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Staveteig

    Full Text Available Despite a relatively strong family planning program and regionally modest levels of fertility, Ghana recorded one of the highest levels of unmet need for family planning on the African continent in 2008. Unmet need for family planning is a composite measure based on apparent contradictions between women's reproductive preferences and practices. Women who want to space or limit births but are not using contraception are considered to have an unmet need for family planning. The study sought to understand the reasons behind high levels of unmet need for family planning in Ghana.A mixed methods follow-up study was embedded within the stratified, two-stage cluster sample of the 2014 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey (GDHS. Women in 13 survey clusters who were identified as having unmet need, along with a reference group of current family planning users, were approached to be reinterviewed within an average of three weeks from their GDHS interview. Follow-up respondents were asked a combination of closed- and open-ended questions about fertility preferences and contraceptive use. Closed-ended responses were compared against the original survey; transcripts were thematically coded and analyzed using qualitative analysis software.Among fecund women identified by the 2014 GDHS as having unmet need, follow-up interviews revealed substantial underreporting of method use, particularly traditional methods. Complete postpartum abstinence was sometimes the intended method of family planning but was overlooked during questions about method use. Other respondents classified as having unmet need had ambivalent fertility preferences. In several cases, respondents expressed revised fertility preferences upon follow-up that would have made them ineligible for inclusion in the unmet need category. The reference group of family planning users also expressed unstable fertility preferences. Aversion to modern method use was generally more substantial than reported in

  11. Establishment of an inferior vena cava filter database and interventional radiology led follow-up - retrieval rates and patients lost to follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinken, Sven; Humphries, Charlotte; Ferguson, John

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the rates of inferior vena cava (IVC) filter retrieval and the number of patient's lost to follow-up, before and after the establishment of an IVC filter database and interventional radiology (inserting physician) led follow-up. On the 1st of June 2012, an electronic interventional radiology database was established at our Institution. In addition, the interventional radiology team took responsibility for follow-up of IVC filters. Data were prospectively collected from the database for all patients who had an IVC filter inserted between the 1st June 2012 and the 31st May 2014. Data on patients who had an IVC filter inserted between the 1st of June 2009 to the 31st of May 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, insertion indications, filter types, retrieval status, documented retrieval decisions, time in situ, trackable events and complications were obtained in the pre-database (n = 136) and post-database (n = 118) cohorts. Attempted IVC filter retrieval rates were improved from 52.9% to 72.9% (P = 0.001) following the establishment of the database. The number of patients with no documented decision (lost to follow-up) regarding their IVC filter reduced from 31 of 136 (23%) to 0 of 118 patients (P = database group (113 as compared to 137 days, P = 0.129). Following the establishment of an IVC filter database and interventional radiology led follow-up, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the attempted retrieval rates of IVC filters and the number of patient's lost to follow-up. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  12. The Surgical Management of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee in the Skeletally Immature: A Survey of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) Membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellin, Joseph L; Gans, Itai; Carey, James L; Shea, Kevin G; Ganley, Theodore J

    While the characteristics of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee that require surgery to heal have been described, several surgical techniques/procedures exist with no consensus established regarding timing of treatment and specific surgical intervention. In this study, we aim to determine current trends in surgical treatment for OCD lesions in the skeletally immature who have failed 6 months of nonoperative management by surveying a large cohort of orthopaedic surgeons. An electronic survey designed using REDCap to capture surgeon treatment preferences for OCD lesions was distributed to members of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA). The survey inquired about treating physicians' training and demographics. It then offered a series of clinical vignettes alongside imaging describing patients with varying degrees of severity of OCD following nonoperative treatment. Surgeons were prompted to select from a variety of multiple-choice-based options for further patient management. Standard descriptive statistics were used to summarize and compare the responses. Of the 129 POSNA members completing the pediatric survey, 97.7% were attending level orthopaedic surgeons, the majority identifying with an academic institution and treating mostly skeletally immature patients. In the skeletally immature population, the majority would treat intact, stable OCD lesions with drilling in a retroarticular or transarticular manner. Preferred treatment for unstable, salvageable lesions was screw fixation using bioabsorble materials or metal with variable pitch with no bone graft. The majority of respondents would treat unstable, unsalvageable OCD lesions with chondroplasty and osteochondral transplant/transfer or microfracture/drilling. The POSNA membership appears to agree on principle in terms of treatment modalities for various stages of OCD lesions in the skeletally immature, whereas individual techniques of achieving these principles may vary. Members

  13. Profile and pattern of follow-ups of psychiatry outpatients at Christian Medical College, Ludhiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Singla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: As psychiatric illness requires long-term treatment, some patients are lost to follow-up. Aims: The present study aimed to find the follow-up pattern of psychiatric patients attending psychiatry outpatient department (OPD and to determine the correlation of follow-up with socio-demographic profile and diagnosis, if any. Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective data analysis study carried out at the OPD of Psychiatry, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana. Subjects and Methods: New cases attending the OPD from April 2010 to March 2011 were included in this study. The data were scrutinized 1 year after the initial assessment. Socio-demographic data, diagnosis and follow-up information were obtained from the files. The collected data were statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square and P value. Results: 53.1% of the patients dropped out after first visit, 29.4% patients had 1-3 follow-up, 14.9% had 4-10 follow-ups and only 2.6% had more than 10 follow-ups. Correlation between follow-up and various socio-demographic variables such as age, gender, place of living or distance from hospital, occupation, religion and marital status was not statistically significant. It was, however, seen that cognitive disorders, conversion disorder, mental retardation, and patients in which diagnosis was deferred, had more dropout rate after first visit. Conclusions: In our study 53.1% of the patients did not attend follow-up at all and only 2.6% had more than 10 follow ups. Correlation between follow-up and various socio-demographic variables was not statistically significant. Patients in which diagnosis was deferred had more drop out rate than patients who had a diagnosis and the difference was statistically significant.

  14. Structured nursing follow-up: does it help in diabetes care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Michal; Nakar, Sasson; Lustman, Alex; Lahad, Amnon; Vinker, Shlomo

    2014-01-01

    In 1995 Clalit Health Services introduced a structured follow-up schedule, by primary care nurses, of diabetic patients. This was supplementary care, given in addition to the family physician's follow-up care. This article aims to describe the performance of diabetes follow-up and diabetes control in patients with additional structured nursing follow-up care, compared to those patients followed only by their family physician. We randomly selected 2,024 type 2 diabetic subjects aged 40-76 years. For each calendar year, from 2005-2007, patients who were "under physician follow-up only" were compared to those who received additional structured nursing follow-up care. Complete diabetes follow-up parameters including: HbA1c, LDL cholesterol, microalbumin, blood pressure measurements and fundus examination. The average age of study participants was 60.7 years, 52% were females and 38% were from low socioeconomic status (SES). In 2005, 39.5% of the diabetic patients received structured nursing follow-up, and the comparable figures for 2006 and 2007 were 42.1% 49.6%, respectively. The intervention subjects tended to be older, from lower SES, suffered from more chronic diseases and visited their family physician more frequently than the control patients. Patients in the study group were more likely to perform a complete diabetes follow-up plan: 52.8% vs. 21.5% (2005; p nursing follow-up care were more likely to perform complete diabetes follow-up protocol. Our results reinforce the importance of teamwork in diabetic care. Further study is required to identify strategies for channeling the use of the limited resources to the patients who stand to benefit the most.

  15. The Capodimonte Deep Field - Presentation of the survey and first follow-up studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alcala, JM; Pannella, M; Puddu, E; Radovich, M; Silvotti, R; Arnaboldi, M; Capaccioli, M; Covone, G; Dall'Ora, M; De Lucia, G; Grado, A; Longo, G; Mercurio, A; Musella, [No Value; Napolitano, N; Pavlov, M; Rifatto, A; Ripepi, [No Value; Scaramella, R

    2004-01-01

    We present the Capodimonte Deep Field (OACDF), a deep field covering an area of 0.5 deg(2) in the B, V, R optical bands plus six medium-band filters in the wavelength range 773-913 nm. The field reaches the following limiting magnitudes: B-AB similar to 25.3, V-AB similar to 24.8 and R-AB similar to

  16. Survey of Amanita phalloides poisoning: clinical findings and follow-up evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křenová, M.; Pelclová, D.; Navrátil, Tomáš

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 12 (2007), s. 955-961 ISSN 0960-3271 R&D Projects: GA MPO 1H-PK/42 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : death cap * hepatotoxicity * nephrotoxicity * texicological information centre Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.335, year: 2007

  17. Antecedents of teenage pregnancy from a 14-year follow-up study using data linkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Fiona J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many western nations continue to have high rates of teenage pregnancies and births, which can result in adverse outcomes for both mother and child. This study identified possible antecedents of teenage pregnancy using linked data from administrative sources to create a 14-year follow-up from a cross-sectional survey. Methods Data were drawn from two sources - the 1993 Western Australian Child Health Survey (WACHS, a population-based representative sample of 2,736 children aged 4 to 16 years (1,374 girls; and administrative data relating to all their subsequent births and hospital admissions. We used weighted population estimates to examine differences between rates for teenage pregnancy, motherhood and abortion. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to model risk for teenage pregnancy. Results There were 155 girls aged less than 20 years at the time of their first recorded pregnancy. Teenage pregnancy was significantly associated with: family type; highest school year completed by primary carer; combined carer income; whether the primary carer was a smoker; and whether the girl herself displayed aggressive and delinquent behaviours. An age-interaction analysis on the association with aggressive and delinquent behaviours found that while girls with aggressive and delinquent behaviours who were older at the time of the survey were at highest risk of teenage pregnancy, there was elevated risk for future teenage pregnancy across all ages. Conclusions Our findings suggest that interventions to reduce teenage pregnancy rates could be introduced during primary school years, including those that are focused on the prevention and management of aggressive and delinquent behaviour.

  18. Antecedents of teenage pregnancy from a 14-year follow-up study using data linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudie, Jennifer; Mitrou, Francis; Lawrence, David; Stanley, Fiona J; Silburn, Sven R; Zubrick, Stephen R

    2010-02-11

    Many western nations continue to have high rates of teenage pregnancies and births, which can result in adverse outcomes for both mother and child. This study identified possible antecedents of teenage pregnancy using linked data from administrative sources to create a 14-year follow-up from a cross-sectional survey. Data were drawn from two sources - the 1993 Western Australian Child Health Survey (WACHS), a population-based representative sample of 2,736 children aged 4 to 16 years (1,374 girls); and administrative data relating to all their subsequent births and hospital admissions. We used weighted population estimates to examine differences between rates for teenage pregnancy, motherhood and abortion. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to model risk for teenage pregnancy. There were 155 girls aged less than 20 years at the time of their first recorded pregnancy. Teenage pregnancy was significantly associated with: family type; highest school year completed by primary carer; combined carer income; whether the primary carer was a smoker; and whether the girl herself displayed aggressive and delinquent behaviours. An age-interaction analysis on the association with aggressive and delinquent behaviours found that while girls with aggressive and delinquent behaviours who were older at the time of the survey were at highest risk of teenage pregnancy, there was elevated risk for future teenage pregnancy across all ages. Our findings suggest that interventions to reduce teenage pregnancy rates could be introduced during primary school years, including those that are focused on the prevention and management of aggressive and delinquent behaviour.

  19. Spatially localized phosphorous metabolism of skeletal muscle in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients: 24-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijmans, M T; Doorenweerd, N; Baligand, C; Verschuuren, J J G M; Ronen, I; Niks, E H; Webb, A G; Kan, H E

    2017-01-01

    To assess the changes in phosphodiester (PDE)-levels, detected by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), over 24-months to determine the potential of PDE as marker for muscle tissue changes in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients. Spatially resolved phosphorous datasets were acquired in the right lower leg of 18 DMD patients (range: 5-15.4 years) and 12 age-matched healthy controls (range: 5-14 years) at three time-points (baseline, 12-months, and 24-months) using a 7T MR-System (Philips Achieva). 3-point Dixon images were acquired at 3T (Philips Ingenia) to determine muscle fat fraction. Analyses were done for six muscles that represent different stages of muscle wasting. Differences between groups and time-points were assessed with non-parametric tests with correction for multiple comparisons. Coefficient of variance (CV) were determined for PDE in four healthy adult volunteers in high and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) datasets. PDE-levels were significantly higher (two-fold) in DMD patients compared to controls in all analyzed muscles at almost every time point and did not change over the study period. Fat fraction was significantly elevated in all muscles at all time points compared to healthy controls, and increased significantly over time, except in the tibialis posterior muscle. The mean within subject CV for PDE-levels was 4.3% in datasets with high SNR (>10:1) and 5.7% in datasets with low SNR. The stable two-fold increase in PDE-levels found in DMD patients in muscles with different levels of muscle wasting over 2-year time, including DMD patients as young as 5.5 years-old, suggests that PDE-levels may increase very rapidly early in the disease process and remain elevated thereafter. The low CV values in high and low SNR datasets show that PDE-levels can be accurately and reproducibly quantified in all conditions. Our data confirms the great potential of PDE as a marker for muscle tissue changes in DMD patients.

  20. Patient preference regarding assessment of clinical follow-up after percutaneous coronary intervention: the PAPAYA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Marlies M.; von Birgelen, Clemens; Lam, Ming Kai; Löwik, Marije M.; van Houwelingen, K. Gert; Stoel, Martin G.; Louwerenburg, J. (Hans) W.; de Man, Frits H.A.F.; Hartmann, Marc; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria; van Til, Janine Astrid; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To keep patients in long-term clinical follow-up programmes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), knowledge of the patient-preferred mode for follow-up assessment is crucial. We systematically assessed patient preference, and explored potential relationships with age and

  1. Psychologic impact of follow-up after low-risk gestational trophoblastic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lok, Christine A. R.; Donker, Mariëlle; Calff, Mart M.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Ansink, Anca C.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the psychological consequences of hCG measurements during follow-up in patients with low-risk gestational trophoblastic disease. The length of follow-up of patients with molar pregnancy and spontaneous normalization of the hCG level is currently discussed, in consideration of the low

  2. Radiation exposure during follow-up of adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, Andreas; Engelfriet, Peter; Mulder, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Adult patients with congenital heart disease under follow-up often need to undergo diagnostic procedures which expose them to radiation. To evaluate radiation doses in adult patients with congenital heart disease during follow-up. Data on diagnostic procedures were used from the European Heart

  3. Loss to follow-up in an international, multicentre observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, A; Kirk, O; Aldins, P

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to assess loss to follow-up (LTFU) in EuroSIDA, an international multicentre observational cohort study. METHODS: LTFU was defined as no follow-up visit, CD4 cell count measurement or viral load measurement after 1 January 2006. Poisson regression was used...

  4. Variation in Follow-Up Visit Practices Across Clinicians and Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Yuan Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Specialty care access is increasingly constrained due to increasing demand for specialty care. Although much attention has been placed on the initial referral decision, much less is known about follow-up visit patterns. We examined the patterns of follow-up visits for new patients to a university-based cardiology practice and identified independent predictors of follow-up visits. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study of new patient visits using electronic medical record data. The primary outcome was a follow-up visit. Results: Substantial variation in practice patterns by provider persisted after accounting for patient and disease factors. Most follow-up care was concentrated in a small population of patients. Conclusion: Specialty care follow-up visits may represent a significant opportunity for standardization and quality improvement, and further studies are warranted to understand follow-up visits in specialty care. Implications: Better understanding of between-provider differences could identify ways to reduce unnecessary follow-up visits. Level of Evidence: Single-institution study.

  5. A Research on Students' Needs for Follow-Up Curriculum of College English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jie; Liu, Hengying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Increased universities and colleges offer the undergraduates with more follow-up courses with the further reform in college English education in China. An investigation on self-evaluation, difficulty, and willingness of undergraduates in learning English further was made in order to design more appropriate and adaptable follow-up courses. This…

  6. Breast cancer follow-up: from the perspective of health professionals and patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwast, A.B.G.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Siesling, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Increased breast cancer incidence and better survival have raised the number of patients requiring follow-up care. Despite guidelines, there is controversy about appropriate breast cancer follow-up. Therefore, semi-structured interviews were conducted in two hospitals with 23 patients and 18 health

  7. Anxiety and depression after prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment: 5-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, I. J.; Essink-Bot, M.-L.; Janssens, A. C. J. W.; Schröder, F. H.; de Koning, H. J.

    2006-01-01

    To document anxiety and depression from pretreatment till 5-year follow-up in 299 men with localized prostate cancer. To assess, if baseline scores were predictive for anxiety and depression at 1-year follow-up. Respondents completed four assessments (pretreatment, at 6 and 12 months, and at 5-year

  8. Colorectal cancer incidence in path_MLH1 carriers subjected to different follow-up protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seppälä, Toni; Pylvänäinen, Kirsi; Evans, Dafydd Gareth

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in carriers of pathogenic MLH1 variants (path_MLH1) despite follow-up with colonoscopy including polypectomy.......We have previously reported a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in carriers of pathogenic MLH1 variants (path_MLH1) despite follow-up with colonoscopy including polypectomy....

  9. Effective follow-up consultations : the importance of patient-centered communication and shared decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Paul L. P.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.

    2013-01-01

    Paediatricians spend a considerable proportion of their time performing follow-up visits for children with chronic conditions, but they rarely receive specific training on how best to perform such consultations. The traditional method of running a follow-up consultation is based on the doctor's

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome--prognosis and diagnostic safety. A 5-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, J H; Munck, Lars K; Andersen, J R

    1985-01-01

    with irritable bowel syndrome as the final and only abdominal diagnosis in the period 1977-79 were followed up in 1984. Seventeen patients died during the follow-up period; two of these were considered diagnostic failures (chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer). Of the remaining 95 patients, 93 were...

  11. Strategies for follow-up care of non-compliant HIV-positive pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NM Jama, N Tshotsho. Abstract. In an effort to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV, this study was designed to explore and describe the strategies used by nurses as a follow-up with newly-diagnosed ... The strategies for following up non-compliant women are recommended as guidelines to promote compliance.

  12. Extended heart failure clinic follow-up in low-risk patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Videbaek, Lars

    2013-01-01

    by NT-proBNP, might benefit from an extended HFC follow-up.Methods and resultsIn a multi-centre setting, we randomly assigned 921 clinically stable systolic heart failure (HF) outpatients on optimal medical therapy to undergo either an extended follow-up in the HFC (n = 461) or referral back...

  13. Infantile Amnesia across the Years: A 2-Year Follow-Up of Children's Earliest Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carole; Warren, Kelly L.; Short, Megan M.

    2011-01-01

    Although infantile amnesia has been investigated for many years in adults, only recently has it been investigated in children. This study was a 2-year follow-up and extension of an earlier study. Children (4-13 years old) were asked initially and 2 years later for their earliest 3 memories. At follow-up, their age at the time of these memories…

  14. Laparoscopy or clinical follow-up to detect occult diaphragm injuries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean follow-up time was 24 months (median: 24; interquartile range: 1–40). There was no morbidity or mortality in Group B. Conclusions: Clinical and radiological follow-up are feasible and appear to be safe, in the short term, in patients who harbour occult diaphragm injuries after left TA stab wounds. Until studies ...

  15. Anxiety and depression after prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment: 5-Year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.J. Korfage (Ida); M.L.E. Essink-Bot (Marie-Louise); A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); F.H. Schröder (Fritz); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractTo document anxiety and depression from pretreatmenttill 5-year follow-up in 299 men with localized prostate cancer. To assess, if baseline scores were predictive for anxiety and depression at 1-year follow-up. Respondents completed four assessments (pretreatment, at 6 and 12 months, and

  16. Hearing screening follow-up return rate in a very low birth weight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These may involve parental education and counselling, as well as involvement of nursing staff and medical professionals in implementation of EHDI programmes. It may be possible to improve followup by aligning follow-up screening with the day of neonatal follow-up clinics in provincial hospitals where such services are ...

  17. Follow-up of treated coeliac patients: Sugar absorption test and intestinal biopsies compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uil, J. J.; van Elburg, R. M.; van Overbeek, F. M.; Meyer, J. W.; Mulder, C. J.; Heymans, H. S.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the sugar absorption test (SAT) during follow-up of patients with coeliac disease on a gluten-free diet (GFD) correlates with improvement of the villous architecture of the small intestine. Methods: The SAT was performed in coeliacs at diagnosis and during follow-up

  18. Initial non-participation and loss to follow-up in a Danish youth cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winding, Trine N; Andersen, Niels Johan; Labriola, Merete

    2014-01-01

    Initial non-participation and loss to follow-up in the Danish youth cohort Vestliv could introduce selection bias of the measured risk estimates......Initial non-participation and loss to follow-up in the Danish youth cohort Vestliv could introduce selection bias of the measured risk estimates...

  19. Nurse-Led Follow-Up at Home vs. Conventional Medical Outpatient Clinic Follow-Up in Patients With Incurable Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer: A Randomized Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Uitdehaag (Madeleen); P.G. van Putten (Paul); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); E.M.L. Verschuur (Els); A. van der Gaast (Ate); C.J. Pek (Chulja); C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin); R.A. de Man (Robert); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); C. Laheij (Claudia); P.D. Siersema (Peter); M.C.W. Spaander (Manon); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractContext: Upper gastrointestinal cancer is associated with a poor prognosis. The multidimensional problems of incurable patients require close monitoring and frequent support, which cannot sufficiently be provided during conventional one to two month follow-up visits to the outpatient

  20. The positive effect of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion is preserved at long-term follow-up: a RCT with 11-13 year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Videbaek, Tina S; Hansen, Ebbe S

    2008-01-01

    patients originally randomised to posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion with or without pedicle screw instrumentation. Follow-up included Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), SF-36 and a question regarding willingness to undergo the procedure again knowing the result as global...

  1. A three-year national follow-up study on the development of community-level cancer rehabilitation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maria; Adamsen, Lis; Piil, Karin

    2017-01-01

    statistics and content analysis. RESULTS: A total of 93 municipalities responded (95% response rate) and the services offered primarily comprised group physical activity, dietary advice, smoking cessation and individual counselling on physical activity. The number of patients enrolled was below the estimated......AIMS: Scandinavian cancer care policies emphasise community-level rehabilitation services, but little is known about changes in service provision over time. This follow-up study explores development in these services in Danish municipalities, focusing on availability, utilisation and organisation...... of services, including existing opportunities and challenges. METHODS: A national survey among all 98 Danish municipalities was conducted in 2013 (baseline) and repeated in 2016 (follow-up). The electronic questionnaire comprised closed- and open-ended questions. Data were analysed using descriptive...

  2. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra I

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ishveen Chopra,1 Avijeet Chopra2 1Department of Pharmacy Administration, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Background: Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an understanding of the goals of follow-up care, and unique psychosocial aspects of care for these patients. The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies focusing on follow-up care in BCSs from the patient's and physician's perspective or from patterns of care and to integrate primary empirical evidence on the different aspects of follow-up care from these studies. Methods: A comprehensive literature review and evaluation was conducted for all relevant publications in English from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2013 using electronic databases. Studies were included in the final review if they focused on BCS’s preferences and perceptions, physician's perceptions, patterns of care, and effectiveness of follow-up care. Results: A total of 47 studies assessing the different aspects of follow-up care were included in the review, with a majority of studies (n=13 evaluating the pattern of follow-up care in BCSs, followed by studies focusing on BCS's perceptions (n=9 and preferences (n=9. Most of the studies reported variations in recommended frequency, duration, and intensity of follow-up care as well as frequency of mammogram screening. In addition, variations were noted in patient preferences for type of health care provider (specialist versus non-specialist. Further, BCSs perceived a lack of psychosocial support and information for management of side effects. Conclusion: The studies reviewed, conducted in a range of settings, reflect variations in

  3. Recurrence after surgery due to cervical cancer - An evaluation of the follow-up program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Katrine; Petersen, Lone Kjeld; Blaakær, Jan

    Objective During the last 20 years the follow-up program after surgical treatment for cervical cancer has remained unchanged. Surprisingly, little is communicated in relation to the follow-up program even though it has a huge impact on the life of the women and their relatives for five years...... consequences, but there is a need for a foundation prior to an adjustment of the follow-up program. Methods Design: retrospective study of a cohort of women attending follow-up program after surgery due to cervical cancer. Material: From the patient register at the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics......, Aarhus University Hospital we identified 567 patients from 1996 to 2011 matching the diagnosis cervical cancer combined with a surgical procedure. From the Danish Pathology Data Bank the following information is collected: - Stage of disease - Histology - Surgical procedure - Number of follow-up visit...

  4. Effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up for discharged patients treated with chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nurse-led telephone follow-up is effective in meeting information and psycho-social needs. We explored the potential effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up for patients treated with chemotherapy in China. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was employed in the research. 300 cases of cancer inpatients in a cancer hospital in Beijing during July-October 2012 were selected by convenience sampling. To compare the satisfaction and response regarding to chemotherapy adverse side effects, patients who discharged on Monday and Friday were provided with telephone follow-up. Patients who discharged on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday received routine care. Results: Via telephone follow-up, patient satisfaction relating to nursing care increased. Moreover, their response to chemotherapy adverse side effects showed a significant difference. Conclusion: Telephone follow-up by specialist nurses may be a feasible option. It was well received by patients, with no physical or psychological disadvantage.

  5. Exploration of Postoperative Follow-up Strategies for Early Staged NSCLC Patients on the Basis of Follow-up Result of 416 Stage I NSCLC Patients after Lobectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang DAI

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Currently, there is no consensus on the follow-up strategy (follow-up time interval and content of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in the world, and the relevant clinical evidence is also very limited. In this study, we aimed to summarize the recurrence/metastasis sites and timings of stage I NSCLC patients based on their follow-up data, aiming to provide a basis of follow-up time interval and content for this group of patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the 416 stage I NSCLC patients that underwent continuous anatomic lobectomy between Jan. 2000 to Oct. 2013 in our prospective lung cancer database. According to the recurrence/metastasis sites and timings, the long term follow-up time interval and content were explored. Results The 5-yr disease free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS in the whole group were 82.4% and 85.4%, respectively. There were 76 cases (18.3% had recurrence/metastasis during follow-up, among which the most frequent site was pulmonary metastasis (21 cases, 5.0%, followed by brain metastasis (20 cases, 4.8%, bone metastasis (12 cases, 2.9%, and mediastinal lymph node metastasis (12 cases, 2.9%. Among the factors that could influence recurrence/metastasis, patients with pT2a suffered from a higher recurrence/metastasis rate compared to patients with pT1 (P=0.006, with 5-yr DFS being 73.8% and 87.3%, respectively (P=0.002, and the 5-yr OS being 77.7% and 90.3%, respectively (P=0.011. Conclusion The commonest recurrence/metastasis sites of stage I NSCLC after anatomic lobectomy are lung, brain and mediastinal lymph nodes, the risk of recurrence/metastasis within 2 years were equal to that between 3 years and 5 years. The follow-up frequencies and content within 2 years could be adjusted according to T stages.

  6. [Exploration of Postoperative Follow-up Strategies for Early Staged NSCLC Patients on the Basis of Follow-up Result of 416 Stage I NSCLC Patients after Lobectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Liang; Yan, Wanpu; Kang, Xiaozheng; Fu, Hao; Yang, Yongbo; Zhou, Haitao; Liang, Zhen; Xiong, Hongchao; Lin, Yao; Chen, Keneng

    2018-03-20

    Currently, there is no consensus on the follow-up strategy (follow-up time interval and content) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the world, and the relevant clinical evidence is also very limited. In this study, we aimed to summarize the recurrence/metastasis sites and timings of stage I NSCLC patients based on their follow-up data, aiming to provide a basis of follow-up time interval and content for this group of patients. We retrospectively analyzed the 416 stage I NSCLC patients that underwent continuous anatomic lobectomy between Jan. 2000 to Oct. 2013 in our prospective lung cancer database. According to the recurrence/metastasis sites and timings, the long term follow-up time interval and content were explored. The 5-yr disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in the whole group were 82.4% and 85.4%, respectively. There were 76 cases (18.3%) had recurrence/metastasis during follow-up, among which the most frequent site was pulmonary metastasis (21 cases, 5.0%), followed by brain metastasis (20 cases, 4.8%), bone metastasis (12 cases, 2.9%), and mediastinal lymph node metastasis (12 cases, 2.9%). Among the factors that could influence recurrence/metastasis, patients with pT2a suffered from a higher recurrence/metastasis rate compared to patients with pT1 (P=0.006), with 5-yr DFS being 73.8% and 87.3%, respectively (P=0.002), and the 5-yr OS being 77.7% and 90.3%, respectively (P=0.011). The commonest recurrence/metastasis sites of stage I NSCLC after anatomic lobectomy are lung, brain and mediastinal lymph nodes, the risk of recurrence/metastasis within 2 years were equal to that between 3 years and 5 years. The follow-up frequencies and content within 2 years could be adjusted according to T stages.

  7. High blood pressure and the incidence of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus: Findings in A 11.5 year follow-up study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P. Stolk (Ronald); I.P. van Splunder (I.); J.S.A.G. Schouten (Jan S.A.G.); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractTo examine the contribution of cardiovascular risk factors to the development of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, a prospective follow-up study was performed of a cohort, initially examined in a population survey on cardiovascular risk factors. The survey was conducted from 1975

  8. Cost Analysis of Following Up Incomplete Low-Risk Fetal Anatomy Ultrasounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Karen; Shainker, Scott A; Modest, Anna M; Spiel, Melissa H; Resetkova, Nina; Shah, Neel; Hacker, Michele R

    2017-03-01

    To examine the clinical utility and cost of follow-up ultrasounds performed as a result of suboptimal views at the time of initial second-trimester ultrasound in a cohort of low-risk pregnant women. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women at low risk for fetal structural anomalies who had second-trimester ultrasounds at 16 to less than 24 weeks of gestation from 2011 to 2013. We determined the probability of women having follow-up ultrasounds as a result of suboptimal views at the time of the initial second-trimester ultrasound, and calculated the probability of detecting an anomaly on follow-up ultrasound. These probabilities were used to estimate the national cost of our current ultrasound practice, and the cost to identify one fetal anomaly on follow-up ultrasound. During the study period, 1,752 women met inclusion criteria. Four fetuses (0.23% [95% CI 0.06-0.58]) were found to have anomalies at the initial ultrasound. Because of suboptimal views, 205 women (11.7%) returned for a follow-up ultrasound, and one (0.49% [95% CI 0.01-2.7]) anomaly was detected. Two women (0.11%) still had suboptimal views and returned for an additional follow-up ultrasound, with no anomalies detected. When the incidence of incomplete ultrasounds was applied to a similar low-risk national cohort, the annual cost of these follow-up scans was estimated at $85,457,160. In our cohort, the cost to detect an anomaly on follow-up ultrasound was approximately $55,000. The clinical yield of performing follow-up ultrasounds because of suboptimal views on low-risk second-trimester ultrasounds is low. Since so few fetal abnormalities were identified on follow-up scans, this added cost and patient burden may not be warranted. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nut consumption and incidence of metabolic syndrome after 6-year follow-up: the SUN (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra Follow-up) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Montero, Alejandro; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Beunza, Juan J; Barrio-Lopez, Maria Teresa; de la Fuente-Arrillaga, Carmen; Moreno-Galarraga, Laura; Martínez-González, Miguel Angel

    2013-11-01

    To assess the long-term relationship between tree nut consumption and the risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS). Nut consumption was collected using a validated 136-item FFQ. The MetS was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation and American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute harmonizing definition. The association between nut consumption and MetS was assessed with logistic regression models adjusting for potential confounders. We compared the incidence of MetS between extreme categories of nut intake (> or = 2 servings/week v. never/almost never) after 6 years of follow-up. The SUN Project (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra Follow-up) is a prospective cohort study, formed of Spanish university graduates. Information is gathered by mailed questionnaires collected biennially. Nut consumption and MetS information was collected by self-reported data. Participants (n 9887) initially free of MetS or diabetes and followed up for a minimum of 6 years were included. We observed 567 new cases of MetS during follow-up. Participants who consumed nuts > or = 2 servings/week presented a 32% lower risk of developing MetS than those who never/almost never consumed (adjusted OR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.50, 0.92). The inverse association was stronger among participants who were health professionals. Nut consumption was significantly associated with lower risk of developing MetS after a 6-year follow-up period in a cohort of Spanish graduates.

  10. Near-Earth Asteroid Follow-up Observations from the Astronomical Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Tyler R.

    2017-10-01

    The Astronomical Research Institute (ARI) operates eight telescopes ranging in size from 0.41m to 1.3m. These telescopes are dedicated to the astrometric recovery and arc-extension of Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs). Four telescopes are located outside Westfield, Illinois, USA (0.61, 0.76, 0.81, 1.3m) while the other four telescopes are at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (0.41, 0.61, 0.61, 1.0m).The increase in NEA discovery from PanSTARRS and Catalina Sky Survey continues to escalate the nightly demand for newly discovered NEA follow-up. ARI has developed a new protocol which allows the discovery rate to increase fivefold without the need for additional telescopes.ARI’s new secondary priority is to provide spectra and spectrophotometry observations of the brightest newly discovered NEAs. Proposed methods and procedures will be discussed so that other NEA researchers may have access to the results without a peer-reviewed delay.

  11. Thromboembolic prophylaxis in plastic surgery a 12-year follow up in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, F J; Thornton, D J A; Mather, D P; Srinivasan, J; Hart, N B

    2006-01-01

    Potentially fatal thromboembolic events prevail post-operatively despite the widespread availability of proven methods of prophylaxis. In 1992 Dujon et al published an article which reviewed thromboembolic prophylaxis methods of Consultant Plastic Surgeons in the UK and Ireland. Our follow up study surveyed all current Consultant B.A.P.S members using a modified postal questionnaire to assess practice nationwide. Our conclusions were drawn from comparisons made between the two populations some twelve years apart. Our results show a dramatic change from the previous findings. Since 1992 86% of respondents have developed a set prophylaxis protocol (compared to 19%). The use of low molecular weight heparin has drastically increased by 24% to 76%, the use of flow-tron boots (or similar) has increased by 22% to 68%, the use of TED stockings has increased by 12% to 83%, the use of multi-modality prophylaxis has increased by 27% to 79% Our results demonstrate a definite shift towards multi-modal thromboembolic prophylaxis, possibly due to increased awareness of available technologies and subsequent reduction in costs.

  12. Information needs and sources of information for patients during cancer follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea-Budgell, M A; Kostaras, X; Myhill, K P; Hagen, N A

    2014-08-01

    Now more than ever, cancer patients want health information. Little has been published to characterize the information needs and preferred sources of that information for patients who have completed cancer treatment. We used a nationally validated instrument to prospectively survey patients attending a cancer clinic for a post-treatment follow-up visit. All patients who came to the designated clinics between December 2011 and June 2012 were approached (N = 648), and information was collected only from those who agreed to proceed. The 411 patients who completed the instrument included individuals with a wide range of primary malignancies. Their doctor or health professional was overwhelmingly the most trusted source of cancer information, followed by the Internet, family, and friends. The least trusted sources of information included radio, newspaper, and television. Patients most preferred to receive personalized written information from their health care provider. Cancer survivors are keenly interested in receiving information about cancer, despite having undergone or finished active therapy. The data indicate that, for patients, their health care provider is the most trusted source of cancer information. Cancer providers should ask patients about the information they want and should direct them to trusted sources.

  13. Patient dose during radiological examination in the follow-up of bariatric surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro, L.; Cazzani, C.; Tomarchio, O.; Morone, G.; Catona, A.; Fantinato, D.

    2007-01-01

    A patient dose survey was carried out measuring the kerma-area product (KAP) values during radiological evaluation in the follow-up of bariatric surgery. The procedures were performed by three radiologists to adjust laparoscopic gastric bands and to detect postoperative complications after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedures to treat morbid obesity. Total fluoroscopy time, exposure factors and the overall contribution of fluoroscopy to the accumulated KAP value were recorded. The median KAP values were used to estimate organ doses and effective dose to a standard patient; the radiation risk associated with the procedures was also evaluated. The doses were smaller for one of the three radiologists, owing to a more appropriate beam collimation and a reduction of the screening time. The KAP values ranged from 1.6 to 7.1 Gy cm 2 for the laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding management, and from 3.0 and 8.3 Gy cm 2 for the radiological examinations after gastric bypass. As a whole, the effective doses associated to these procedures were between 0.5 and 2.7 mSv. The organs receiving the highest doses were not only breast, stomach, pancreas and liver, but also lungs, owing to of their high radiosensitivity, significantly contributed to the effective dose. (authors)

  14. Chandra and NuSTAR Follow-up Observations of Swift-BAT-selected AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, S.; Tremblay, L.; Ajello, M.; Marcotulli, L.; Paggi, A.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Segreto, A.

    2017-10-01

    Based on current models of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB), heavily obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are expected to make up ˜10% of the peak emission of the CXB and ˜20% of the total population of AGNs, yet few of these sources have been recorded and characterized in current surveys. Here we present the Chandra follow-up observation of 14 AGNs detected by Swift-BAT. For five sources in the sample, NuSTAR observations in the 3-80 keV band are also available. The X-ray spectral fitting over the 0.3-150 keV energy range allows us to determine the main X-ray spectral parameters, such as the photon index and the intrinsic absorption, of these objects and to make hypotheses on the physical structures responsible for the observed spectra. We find that 13 of the 14 objects are absorbed AGNs, and one is a candidate Compton-thick AGN, having intrinsic absorption {N}{{H}}> {10}24 cm-2. Finally, we verified that the use of NuSTAR observations is strategic to strongly constrain the properties of obscured AGNs, since the best-fit values we obtained for parameters such as the power-law photon index Γ and the intrinsic absorption {N}{{H}} changed sometimes significantly fitting the spectra with and without the use of NuSTAR data.

  15. [Four year follow-up of a screening program for prostate cancer in workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso-Barbero, Luis; Díaz-Garrido, Ramón; Piñaga-Solé, Montserrat; Fernández-Fernández, Miguel; Belanger-Quintana, Diego; Gómez-Gallego, Félix

    2013-01-01

    To analyze our four-year follow-up experience (2008-2011) with a prostate cancer screening program offered to employees of a banking company. Data were obtained from the health examinations carried out by the bank's in-house occupational health service (with centers in Barcelona, Madrid and Valencia). PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood levels were measured and cases with high levels (>4 ng/ml) were followed through diagnosis and treatment, including a telephone survey of confirmed cases. Personal and occupational characteristics of the participants were analyzed as well. 750 workers (99% with administrative and/or commercial jobs) met the inclusion criteria for the screening program. Of these, 110 had elevated PSA levels on at least one occasion. The diagnosis of prostate cancer was confirmed in 21 cases. There were no associations between a diagnosis of cancer and the remaining analyzed variables. Urology and pathology records were retrieved for 76% of the contacted cases. The most frequent histological type was adenocarcinoma (98%), the most common Gleason grade at diagnosis was 6-7% (88%), and the majority of cases were treated surgically (90%).With respect to adverse effects, 48% of cases described erectile dysfunction and 33% reported urinary incontinence. In our program the observed prevalence of prostate cancer was above that expected (respectively, 21 confirmed cases vs. 12 expected). The identified cases unanimously expressed their support for the screening program. Copyright belongs to the Societat Catalana de Seguretat i Medicina del Treball.

  16. Two-Year Follow-Up of a Sexual Health Promotion Program for Spanish Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espada, Jose P; Escribano, Silvia; Morales, Alexandra; Orgilés, Mireia

    2017-12-01

    The aim is to evaluate the effects of the Competencias para adolescentes con una sexualidad saludable (COMPAS) program and compare them with an evidence-based program ( ¡Cuídate!) and a control group (CG). Eighteen public high schools were randomly assigned to one of the three experimental conditions. Initially, 1,563 Spanish adolescents between 14 and 16 years of age participated, and 24 months after their implementation, 635 of them completed a survey. Self-report measures collected data on sexual behavior, knowledge, attitudes, intention, sexual risk perception, and perceived norm. Compared to the CG, COMPAS increased the level of knowledge about sexually transmitted infections and improved the attitudes toward people living with human immunodeficiency virus at the 2-year follow-up. Neither intervention had a long-term impact on behavioral variables. Results suggest that COMPAS has a comparable impact to the other intervention on the variables predicting consistent condom use. Reinforcing the messages and skills that have the greatest impact on condom use and adding booster sessions following program completion as strategies to maintain long-term effects are necessary.

  17. New methods for estimating follow-up rates in cohort studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Xue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The follow-up rate, a standard index of the completeness of follow-up, is important for assessing the validity of a cohort study. A common method for estimating the follow-up rate, the “Percentage Method”, defined as the fraction of all enrollees who developed the event of interest or had complete follow-up, can severely underestimate the degree of follow-up. Alternatively, the median follow-up time does not indicate the completeness of follow-up, and the reverse Kaplan-Meier based method and Clark’s Completeness Index (CCI also have limitations. Methods We propose a new definition for the follow-up rate, the Person-Time Follow-up Rate (PTFR, which is the observed person-time divided by total person-time assuming no dropouts. The PTFR cannot be calculated directly since the event times for dropouts are not observed. Therefore, two estimation methods are proposed: a formal person-time method (FPT in which the expected total follow-up time is calculated using the event rate estimated from the observed data, and a simplified person-time method (SPT that avoids estimation of the event rate by assigning full follow-up time to all events. Simulations were conducted to measure the accuracy of each method, and each method was applied to a prostate cancer recurrence study dataset. Results Simulation results showed that the FPT has the highest accuracy overall. In most situations, the computationally simpler SPT and CCI methods are only slightly biased. When applied to a retrospective cohort study of cancer recurrence, the FPT, CCI and SPT showed substantially greater 5-year follow-up than the Percentage Method (92%, 92% and 93% vs 68%. Conclusions The Person-time methods correct a systematic error in the standard Percentage Method for calculating follow-up rates. The easy to use SPT and CCI methods can be used in tandem to obtain an accurate and tight interval for PTFR. However, the FPT is recommended when event rates and

  18. Impact of age on care pathways of people living with HIV followed up in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacomet, Christine; Berland, Pauline; Guiguet, Marguerite; Simon, Anne; Rey, David; Arvieux, Cédric; Pugliese, Pascal; Gerbaud, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    The aging population of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (PLWH) is exposed to a widening spectrum of non-AIDS-defining diseases. Thus, our objective was to compare the health care offered to PLWH according to age. We conducted a multicenter cross-sectional study on PLWH who consulted at one of 59 French HIV reference centers from 15th to 19th October 2012. Using our survey questionnaires, PLWH self-reported the medical care they received, whether or not tied to HIV infection monitoring, during the previous year. A total of 650 PLWH participated in the survey (median age 48 years, Interquartile range (IQR) 40-54), of which 95 were aged 60 years or over (14.5%). Compared to younger PLWH, 60-and-over PLWH were more often under complementary health insurance cover and less socially deprived based on the French EPICES (Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centers) score. The elderly PLWH presented more comorbidities and less coinfections with hepatitis viruses. During health care, therapeutic education was less often offered to older PLWH (14% vs. 26%, p = .01), but this difference was mainly explained by sociodemographic factors and clinical status. Over the previous 6 months, 74% of PLWH who were followed up in hospital had also consulted another doctor, with a mean of 3.75 consultations (±4.18) without difference between age groups. After adjustment for sociodemographic factors and comorbidities, PLWH over 60 years were more likely to have consulted medical specialists as outpatients in the last 6 months (odds ratio [OR] = 2.63 [1.11-6.20]). Whatever their age, 13% of PLWH had been refused care on disclosure of their HIV status, and 27% of PLWH still did not disclose their HIV status to some caregivers. Coordinated health care throughout patients' lives is crucial, as health-care pathways evolve toward outpatient care as the patients get older.

  19. A long-term follow-up of a physician leadership program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassiotto, Magali; Maldonado, Yvonne; Hopkins, Joseph

    2018-03-19

    Purpose Physician leadership programs serve to develop individual capabilities and to affect organizational outcomes. Evaluations of such programs often focus solely on short-term increases in individual capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to assess long-term individual and organizational outcomes of the Stanford Leadership Development Program. Design/methodology/approach There are three data sources for this mixed-methods study: a follow-up survey in 2013-2014 of program participants ( n=131) and matched (control) non-participants ( n=82) from the 2006 to 2011 program years; promotion and retention data; and qualitative in-person interview data. The authors analyzed survey data across leadership knowledge, skills, and attitudes as well as leadership titles held, following program participation using Pearson's χ 2 test of independence. Using logistic regression, the authors analyzed promotion and retention among participants and non-participants. Finally, the authors applied both a grounded theory approach and qualitative content analysis to analyze interview data. Findings Program participants rated higher than non-participants across 25 of 30 items measuring leadership knowledge, skills, and attitudes, and were more likely to hold regional/national leadership titles and to have gained in leadership since program participation. Asian program participants were significantly more likely than Asian non-participants to have been promoted, and women participants were less likely to have left the institution than non-participants. Finally, qualitative interviews revealed the long-term impact of leadership learning and networking, as well as the enduring, sustained impact on the organization of projects undertaken during the program. Originality/value This study is unique in its long-term and comprehensive mixed-methods nature of evaluation to assess individual and organizational impact of a physician leadership program.

  20. Language barriers, location of care, and delays in follow-up of abnormal mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Leah S; Ma, Lin; Hofmann, Michael; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2012-02-01

    Breast cancer is frequently diagnosed after an abnormal mammography result. Language barriers can complicate communication of those results. We evaluated the association of non-English language with delay in follow-up. Retrospective cohort study of women at 3 mammography facilities participating in the San Francisco Mammography Registry with an abnormal mammogram result from 1997 to 2008. We measured median time from report of abnormal result to first follow-up test. Of 13,014 women with 16,109 abnormal mammograms, 4027 (31%) had a non-English patient language. Clinical facilities differed in proportion of non-English speakers and in time to first follow-up test: facility A (38%; 25 d), facility B (18%; 14 d), and facility C (51%; 41 d). Most mammography examinations (67%) had breast imaging and reporting data system 0 (incomplete) assessment, requiring radiographic follow-up. At 30 days of follow-up, 67% of all English speakers with incomplete assessments had a follow-up examination compared with 50% of all non-English speakers (Planguage; compared with English speakers and adjusting for education, non-English speakers had twice the odds ratio of >30-day delay in follow-up (odds ratio=2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-3.9). There are considerable differences among facilities in delays in diagnostic follow-up of abnormal mammography results. More attention must be paid to understanding mammography facility factors, such as wait time to schedule diagnostic mammography and radiology workload, to improve rates of timely follow-up, particularly for those facilities disproportionately serving vulnerable non-English speaking patients.

  1. Language Barriers, Location of Care and Delays in Follow-up of Abnormal Mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, LS; Ma, L; Hofmann, M; Kerlikowske, K

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is frequently diagnosed after an abnormal mammography result. Language barriers can complicate communication of those results. Objectives We evaluated the association of non-English language with delay in follow-up. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of women at three mammography facilities participating in the San Francisco Mammography Registry (SFMR) with an abnormal mammogram result from 1997-2008. We measured median time from report of abnormal result to first follow-up test. Results Of 13,014 women with 16,109 abnormal mammograms, 4,027 (31%) had a non-English patient language. Clinical facilities differed in proportion of non-English-speakers and in time to first follow-up test: facility A (38%; 25 days), facility B (18%; 14 days), facility C (51%; 41 days). Most (67%) mammography examinations had BIRADS 0 (incomplete) assessment, requiring radiographic follow-up. At 30 days of follow-up 67% of all English speakers with incomplete assessments had a follow-up exam compared with 50% of all non-English speakers (p30 day delay in follow-up (OR 2.3; 95 CI 1.4-3.9). Conclusions There are considerable differences among facilities in delays in diagnostic follow-up of abnormal mammography results. More attention must be paid to understanding mammography facility factors, such as wait time to schedule diagnostic mammography and radiology workload, in order to improve rates of timely follow-up, particularly for those facilities disproportionately serving vulnerable non-English speaking patients. PMID:21993060

  2. Determining cancer survivors' preferences to inform new models of follow-up care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Peter; Norwood, Patricia F; Pietrucin-Materek, Marta; Porteous, Terry; Hannaford, Philip C; Ryan, Mandy

    2016-12-06

    Specialist-led cancer follow-up is becoming increasingly expensive and is failing to meet many survivors' needs. Alternative models informed by survivors' preferences are urgently needed. It is unknown if follow-up preferences differ by cancer type. We conducted the first study to assess British cancer survivors' follow-up preferences, and the first anywhere to compare the preferences of survivors from different cancers. A discrete choice experiment questionnaire was mailed to 1201 adults in Northeast Scotland surviving melanoma, breast, prostate or colorectal cancer. Preferences and trade-offs for attributes of cancer follow-up were explored, overall and by cancer site. 668 (56.6%) recipients (132 melanoma, 213 breast, 158 prostate, 165 colorectal) responded. Cancer survivors had a strong preference to see a consultant during a face-to-face appointment when receiving cancer follow-up. However, cancer survivors appeared willing to accept follow-up from specialist nurses, registrars or GPs provided that they are compensated by increased continuity of care, dietary advice and one-to-one counselling. Longer appointments were also valued. Telephone and web-based follow-up and group counselling, were not considered desirable. Survivors of colorectal cancer and melanoma would see any alternative provider for greater continuity, whereas breast cancer survivors wished to see a registrar or specialist nurse, and prostate cancer survivors, a general practitioner. Cancer survivors may accept non-consultant follow-up if compensated with changes elsewhere. Care continuity was sufficient compensation for most cancers. Given practicalities, costs and the potential to develop continuous care, specialist nurse-led cancer follow-up may be attractive.

  3. Preoperative characteristics and compliance with follow-up after trabeculectomy surgery in rural southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Jin, Ling; Li, Li; Zeng, Siming; Dan, Aihua; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Xiuqin; Li, Guirong; Congdon, Nathan

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate preoperative characteristics and follow-up in rural China after trabeculectomy, the primary treatment for glaucoma there. Patients undergoing trabeculectomy at 14 rural hospitals in Guangdong and Guangxi Provinces and their doctors completed questionnaires concerning clinical and sociodemographic information, transportation, and knowledge and attitudes about glaucoma. Follow-up after surgery was assessed as cumulative score (1 week: 10 points, 2 weeks: 7 points, 1 month: 5 points). Among 212 eligible patients, mean preoperative presenting acuity in the operative eye was 6/120, with 61.3% (n=130) blind (≤6/60). Follow-up rates were 60.8% (129/212), 75.9% (161/212) and 26.9% (57/212) at 1 week, 2 weeks and 1 month, respectively. Patient predictors of poor follow-up included elementary education or less (OR=0.37, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.70, p=0.002), believing follow-up was not important (OR=0.62, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.94, p=0.02), lack of an accompanying person (OR=0.14, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.29, pemployment, travel distance/time/costs, patient preoperative clinical factors and physician factors were unassociated with follow-up. Follow-up after 2 weeks was inadequate to provide optimal clinical care, and surgery is being applied too late to avoid blindness in the majority of patients. Earlier surgery, support for return visits and better explanations of the importance of follow-up are needed. Directing all patients to return for possible scleral flap suture removal may be a valid strategy to improve follow-up. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. 10-year follow-up after implantation of the Bryan Cervical Disc Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejaegher, Joost; Walraevens, Joris; van Loon, Johannes; Van Calenbergh, Frank; Demaerel, Philippe; Goffin, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Cervical arthroplasty is being used as an alternative for cervical fusion, but long-term follow-up results have rarely been reported. In this paper, we present 10-year follow-up results after implantation of the Bryan Cervical Disc Prosthesis in a single center. 89 patients underwent implantation of a single-level Bryan Cervical Disc Prosthesis to treat radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. Clinical (Neurological Success, Neck Disability Index (NDI), Neck- and Arm-Pain, and SF-36) and radiological follow-up was prospectively organized up to 10 years after surgery. Adverse events and second surgeries were recorded and evaluated. Ten-year follow-up data were available for 72 (81%) patients. Maintenance or improvement of the neurological state was seen in 89% of patients after 10-year follow-up. SF-36 PCS scores improved significantly at all follow-up points. SF-36 MCS improvement was significant at 4 and 6 year, but not at 8- and 10-year follow-up. Significant improvement for NDI, and Neck- and Arm-Pain scores was found for the subgroup of patients in whom these data were available. Mean angular motion of the prosthesis at 10-year follow-up was 8.6°. Mobility of the device, defined as >2° of angular motion, was reached in 81% of patients. During the study period, 21 patients (24%) developed new or recurrent radiculopathy or myelopathy, the majority of these being treated conservatively. Seven patients (8%) required 8 additional spine surgeries to treat persistent or recurrent symptoms. Of these, 2 patients (2%) were reoperated at the index level and at 5 (6%) an adjacent level. In this study, favorable long-term clinical outcome after implantation of the Bryan Cervical Disc Prosthesis was seen, with the majority of prostheses remaining mobile after 10-year follow-up. However, still 6% of patients required adjacent level surgery.

  5. Occupational disease disclosed by preventive follow-up of former uranium ore miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacina, V.; Vich, Z.; Elterlein, E.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of preventive follow-up examinations of former employees of the concern Czechoslovak Uranium Mines is to determine possible health damage of chronically exposed workers in an area that can become manifest even following a long time after leaving the high-risk working environment. In a group of 1,139 persons that had undergone preventive follow-up examinations in the years 1977 to 1980 there were 63 cases of newly detected affections that were reported as occupational diseases, and other serious affections. The system of preventive follow-up examinations represents a significant contribution to the improvement of health care of the workers. (author)

  6. Conservative treatment and follow-up of type III dens invaginatus using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhanli, Kadir T; Celik, Davut; Altintas, Subutay H; Taşdemir, Tamer; S Sezgin, Omer

    2014-12-01

    Dens invaginatus is a well-recognized phenomenon, and its endodontic treatment poses a challenge, especially for peri-invagination lesions with vital pulp. Here we describe the outcome of conservative treatment and follow-up in a case of type III dens invaginatus. Cone-beam computed tomography was used for diagnosis and follow-up. Pulp vitality was preserved with endodontic treatment of only an invaginated canal. At the 24-month follow-up examination, the tooth was asymptomatic and repair of the lesion was evident radiographically. This case was managed successfully with endodontic treatment of the invagination. (J Oral Sci 56, 307-310, 2014).

  7. Long-term adherence to follow-up after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barken, Sidsel S; Lynge, Elsebeth; Andersen, Erik S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure adherence to annual follow-up among women treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. DESIGN: Prospective, population-based, register study. SETTING: Denmark, 1996-2007. POPULATION: All women treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with conization. METHODS: Treated...... was poor in Denmark. Our findings suggest that because of this poor adherence, recommendations for long-term annual follow-up after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia may not be highly effective. Shorter follow-up schedules using highly sensitive tests appear attractive....

  8. Prevalence and prognosis of coronary stent gap detected by multi-detector CT: a follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xinghua; Yang, Li; Ju, Haiyue; Zhang, Fan; Wu, Jian; He, Bin; Chen, Yundai

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the features of stent gap (SG) and the long-term impact of SG on in-stent restenosis (ISR) in patent stents. A total of 347 consecutive patients with 781 stents who underwent MDCT were assessed for SG and ISR. Clinical and stent features were compared between the SG and non-SG groups. In the follow-up study, among 82 patients with 175 patent stents [26 assessed by conventional coronary angiography (CCA) including 6 contacted in a telephone survey, 46 assessed by computed tomography angiography (CTA) and 10 by both], the incidence of ISR was compared between stents with and without SG. Three patients and 13 stents were excluded. SG was observed in 12.5% of patients and 8.6% of stents. ISR detected by CTA was noted in 21.2% of SG, and SG accounted for 23.7% of ISR. Stent number, length, location, overlapping pattern, tortuosity and in-out angle were predisposing factors for SG. During a mean follow-up period of 15 months after detection of SG, the incidence of ISR was significantly higher in the SG group than in the non-SG group (43.8/14.9% by CCA, 33.3/10.1% by CTA and CCA). Patent stents with SG detected by CTA had a higher incidence of late restenosis, indicating that long-term follow-up or further intervention is necessary. (orig.)

  9. Mortality over an extended follow-up period in coal workers exposed to respirable dust and quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.G.; MacCalman, L.; Hutchison, P.A.

    2009-10-15

    In the 1950s the Pneumoconiosis Field Research (PFR) programme was set up to study the health of British coalworkers. Studies included regular health surveys, an intensive characterisation of workers' individual exposures, and entry to a cohort followed up to the present for cause-specific mortality. This study reports on analyses of cause-specific mortality in a cohort of almost 18,000 men from 10 collieries. External analyses used standardised mortality ratios, comparing observed mortality with reference rates from the regions in which the pits were situated. Causes investigated include lung and stomach cancers, nonmalignant respiratory diseases, and cardiovascular endpoints. Internal analyses used Cox regression models with time-dependent exposures adjusting for the confounding effects of age, smoking, cohort entry date and regional differences in population mortality rates. Several causes showed evidence of a healthy worker effect early in the follow-up, with a deficit in the SMR diminishing over time. For most of the causes there was a significant excess in the latter part of follow-up. Internal analyses found evidence of an association between increased risks of lung cancer and increased quartz exposure, particularly at a lag of 15 years. Risks of mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease, and specifically chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pneumoconiosis, showed increases with increased exposure to respirable dust. 60 refs.

  10. A decade after the Tokyo sarin attack: a review of neurological follow-up of the victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Azik; Eisenkraft, Arik; Finkelstein, Arseny; Schein, Ophir; Rotman, Eran; Dushnitsky, Tsvika

    2007-06-01

    On March 20, 1995, sarin gas was used in Tokyo by members of the Japanese "Uhm-Shinrikiu" cult, killing 12 and injuring >5,500 innocent people. Most of the casualties were mildly injured. This article reviews the neurological follow-up data for some of the victims over the past decade. We reviewed the published literature regarding neurological follow-up of the victims, dividing the data according to the time elapsed after the attack. The digit span test, finger-tapping test, and computerized posturography were the only performance tests that showed statistically significant differences between the victims and the control groups in some of the surveys. The main sequela 7 years after the attack was post-traumatic stress disorder. The results emphasize the need for a national preparedness program for such mass casualty events, led by national health systems. This should include long-term, neurological, follow-up monitoring with performance tests and a post-traumatic stress disorder screening test.

  11. The relationship between facial skeletal class and expert-rated interpersonal skill: an epidemiological survey on young Italian adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tremolizzo Lucio

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The facial region plays a major role in determining physical attractiveness, so we assessed the hypothesis that the capability of successfully managing interpersonal relationships in young adults might be related to the facial skeletal class. Methods 1,014 young subjects applying to the Military Academy of Pozzuoli, Italy, were enrolled and the cephalometric evaluation was performed by calculating the angular relationships between skeletal points localized by the lateral cephalogram of the face, sorting the subjects in three groups corresponding to each major facial skeletal class. Concurrently, the subjects were evaluated by a team of psychiatrists administering the MMPI-2 test followed by a brief colloquium with each candidate, in order to identify those subjects characterized by low skills for managing interpersonal relationships. Results According to the psychiatric evaluation about 20% of the subjects were considered potentially unable to manage successfully interpersonal relationships (NS. Males displayed an about two-fold increased risk of being NS. No differences were shown in the distribution of the NS male subjects among the three different facial skeletal classes. On the other hand, NS females displayed a different distribution among the three facial skeletal classes, with a trend of about two-fold and four-fold, respectively, for those subjects belonging to classes II and III, respect to those belonging to class I. Conclusion Females may be more sensitive to physical factors determining beauty, such as the facial morphology certainly is. This finding appears to be interesting especially when thinking about possible orthodontic interventions, although further study is certainly needed to confirm these results.

  12. Long-term follow-up after surgical treatment of talar fractures: Twenty cases with an average follow-up of 7.5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Xavier; Harisboure, Alain; Hemery, Xavier; Dehoux, Emile

    2011-01-01

    Displaced talar neck and body fractures are rare and serious injuries with important outcomes. The aim of our study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of these fractures after operative treatment in our centre between 1993 and 2005. Displaced talar fractures have a high rate of long-term complications. This was a retrospective study concerning 20 patients with an average follow-up of 7.5 years. The final follow-up examination included determination of the AHS score (ankle-hindfoot scale) from the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS), range of motion evaluation and radiological analysis. Mean age at the time of trauma was 38.8 years. This study comprised ten talar neck fractures and ten talar body fractures. We always used a single surgical approach and obtained anatomical reduction in 30% of the whole series of both groups. Four early complications were noted in four patients (20%). We noted no skin complications and the rate of consolidation was 100%. Four patients (20%) developed avascular necrosis of the talus, and at final follow-up seven patients (35%) had undergone secondary surgery. Radiographic analysis showed an osteoarthritis rate of 94% and a malunion rate of 59%. The mean AOFAS score was 66.9/100 and range of motion was systematically decreased. Contrary to undisplaced talar fractures, displaced talar fractures are a therapeutic challenge with many early or late complications. The outcome often revealed stiffness and osteoarthritis.

  13. Two-year follow-up study of elderly residents in S. Paulo, Brazil: methodology and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, L R; Toniolo, J; Cendoroglo, M S; Garcia, J T; Najas, M S; Perracini, M; Paola, C R; Santos, F C; Bilton, T; Ebel, S J; Macedo, M B; Almada, C M; Nasri, F; Miranda, R D; Gonçalves, M; Santos, A L; Fraietta, R; Vivacqua, I; Alves, M L; Tudisco, E S

    1998-10-01

    Previous cross-sectional studies have shown a high prevalence of chronic disease and disability among the elderly. Given Brazil's rapid aging process and the obvious consequences of the growing number of old people with chronic diseases and associated disabilities for the provision of health services, a need was felt for a study that would overcome the limitations of cross-sectional data and shed some light on the main factors determining whether a person will live longer and free of disabling diseases, the so-called successful aging. The methodology of the first follow-up study of elderly residents in Brazil is presented. The profile of the initial cohort is compared with previous cross-sectional data and an in-depth analysis of nonresponse is carried out in order to assess the validity of future longitudinal analysis. The EPIDOSO ('Epidemiologia do Idoso') Study conducted a two-year follow-up of 1,667 elderly people (65+), living in S. Paulo. The study consisted of two waves, each consisting of household, clinical, and biochemical surveys. In general, the initial cohort showed a similar profile to previous cross-sectional samples in S. Paulo. There was a majority of women, mostly widows, living in multigenerational households, and a high prevalence of chronic illnesses, psychiatric disturbances, and physical disabilities. Despite all the difficulties inherent in follow-up studies, there was a fairly low rate of nonresponse to the household survey after two years, which did not actually affect the representation of the cohort at the final household assessment, making unbiased longitudinal analysis possible. Concerning the clinical and blood sampling surveys, the respondents tended to be younger and less disabled than the nonrespondents, limiting the use of the clinical and laboratory data to longitudinal analysis aimed at a healthier cohort. It is worth mentioning that gender, education, family support, and socioeconomic status were not important determinants of

  14. Long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery in a national cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thereaux, J; Lesuffleur, T; Païta, M; Czernichow, S; Basdevant, A; Msika, S; Millat, B; Fagot-Campagna, A

    2017-09-01

    Lifelong medical follow-up is mandatory after bariatric surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the 5-year follow-up after bariatric surgery in a nationwide cohort of patients. All adult obese patients who had undergone primary bariatric surgery in 2009 in France were included. Data were extracted from the French national health insurance database. Medical follow-up (medical visits, micronutrient supplementation and blood tests) during the first 5 years after bariatric surgery was assessed, and compared with national and international guidelines. Some 16 620 patients were included in the study. The percentage of patients with at least one reimbursement for micronutrient supplements decreased between the first and fifth years for iron (from 27.7 to 24.5 per cent; P bariatric surgery is poor, especially for young men with poor early follow-up. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Postoperative follow-up studies in congenital dilatation of the common bile duct using hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirobe, Seiichi; Ishida, Haruo; Hayashi, Akira; Kamagata, Shoichiro; Fuchimoto, Yasufumi; Mizuno, Dai; Yano, Tsunehiro; Ishii, Katsumi.

    1995-01-01

    Follow-up studies in congenital dilatation of the common bile duct were done in 20 cases ranging 3 to 20 years after operation. Operative cholangiography had shown dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts in 15 patients (75%), of these, 7 patients had cystic dilatation. Five cases of these 7 patients showed prolonged stasis of the nuclide in the cystic dilated intrahepatic bile ducts by 99m Tc-PMT hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the follow-up studies even at 10 years after operation. But none of 20 cases had complication such as intrahepatic lithiasis, cholangitis, and liver dysfunction. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy could provide moderate anatomic and excellent functional information which were useful for these follow-up studies and careful follow-up should be done in the case of cystic dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. (author)

  16. Osteogenesis imperfecta in childhood: impairment and disability--a follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbert, R. H.; Beemer, F. A.; van der Graaf, Y.; Helders, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate differences over time (mean follow-up, 14 months) on impairment parameters (range of joint motion and muscle strength), functional limitation parameters (functional ability), and disability parameters (caregiver assistance in achieving functional skills) in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI),

  17. The importance of complete follow-up for results after femoro-infrapopliteal vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L P; Nielsen, O M; Schroeder, T V

    1996-01-01

    to follow-up according to the vascular registry database and the fact that these patients turned out to have a significantly increased rate of graft thrombosis, limb amputation and death, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Life-table statistics may inadvertently become unreliable if a large proportion of patients...... postoperatively and 100% follow-up was obtained. After completion of the trial we calculated the patency and survival rates using life-table methods and compared the results based on the vascular registry with those achieved in the clinical trial. RESULTS: Comparing the results from the two databases revealed...... is lost to follow-up, since failure to examine the patient for any reason may be related to the patients health. In addition to the number of patients at risk, it is suggested, that life-table plots should be supplemented with information on the number of patients lost to follow-up....

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome--prognosis and diagnostic safety. A 5-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, J H; Munck, Lars K; Andersen, J R

    1985-01-01

    The irritable bowel syndrome is the commonest diagnosis in gastroenterological clinics, although diagnostic criteria and investigatory programs vary. To elucidate the diagnostic safety and prognosis of the syndrome, a retrospective study was conducted. One hundred and twelve consecutive patients...... with irritable bowel syndrome as the final and only abdominal diagnosis in the period 1977-79 were followed up in 1984. Seventeen patients died during the follow-up period; two of these were considered diagnostic failures (chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer). Of the remaining 95 patients, 93 were...... available for the follow-up study. Three diagnostic failures were found (gallbladder stones, kidney stone, thyrotoxicosis). The diagnostic failure rate was accordingly 4.5% (5/110). Half of the patients had unchanged or aggravated symptoms at the follow-up study, independent of treatment. The only predictor...

  19. Postoperative follow-up studies in congenital dilatation of the common bile duct using hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirobe, Seiichi; Ishida, Haruo; Hayashi, Akira; Kamagata, Shoichiro; Fuchimoto, Yasufumi; Mizuno, Dai; Yano, Tsunehiro [Tokyo Metropolitan Kiyose Children`s Hospital (Japan); Ishii, Katsumi

    1995-03-01

    Follow-up studies in congenital dilatation of the common bile duct were done in 20 cases ranging 3 to 20 years after operation. Operative cholangiography had shown dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts in 15 patients (75%), of these, 7 patients had cystic dilatation. Five cases of these 7 patients showed prolonged stasis of the nuclide in the cystic dilated intrahepatic bile ducts by {sup 99m}Tc-PMT hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the follow-up studies even at 10 years after operation. But none of 20 cases had complication such as intrahepatic lithiasis, cholangitis, and liver dysfunction. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy could provide moderate anatomic and excellent functional information which were useful for these follow-up studies and careful follow-up should be done in the case of cystic dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. (author).

  20. ESRD QIP - Clinical Depression Screening and Follow-up - Payment Year 2018

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset includes facility details, measure score, and the state and national average measure scores for the clinical depression screening and follow up...

  1. ESRD QIP - Pain Assessment and Follow-up - Payment Year 2018

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset includes facility details, measure score, and the state and national average measure scores for the pain assessment and follow up reporting measure...

  2. Health status and follow-up of the liquidators in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okeanov, A.E.; Antipova, S.I.; Polyakov, S.M.; Sobolev, A.V.; Bazulko, N.V.; Cardis, E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents information on the organization of the follow-up of Chernobyl liquidators in Belarus. The characteristics of the liquidators cohort and results of preliminary analyses of their health status, including cancer incidence and general morbidity, are presented

  3. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up: evidence-based ignorance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B; Kilsmark, Jannie

    2010-01-01

    To explore the extent of evidence-based data and cost-utility of follow-up after primary treatment of endometrial and ovarian cancer, addressing perspectives of technology, organization, economics, and patients....

  4. A 10-year follow-up of tailored behavioural treatment and exercise-based physiotherapy for persistent musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilson, Christina; Demmelmaier, Ingrid; Bergman, Stefan; Lindberg, Per; Denison, Eva; Åsenlöf, Pernilla

    2017-02-01

    To study the long-term outcomes of two interventions targeting patients with sub-acute and persistent pain in a primary care physiotherapy setting. A 10-year follow-up of a two-armed randomised controlled trial, initially including 97 participants. Tailored behavioural medicine treatment, applied in a physiotherapy context (experimental condition), and exercise-based physiotherapy (control condition). Pain-related disability was the primary outcome. The maximum pain intensity, pain control, fear of movement, sickness-related absence (register data) and perceived benefit and confidence in coping with future pain problems were the secondary outcomes. Forty-three (44%) participants responded to the follow-up survey, 20 in the tailored behavioural medicine treatment group and 23 in the exercise-based physiotherapy group. The groups did not differ in terms of the change in the scores for the primary outcome ( p=0.17) of pain-related disability between the experimental group (median: 2.5, Q1-Q3: -2.5-14.25), and the control group (median: 0, Q1-Q3: -5-6). Further, there were also no significant differences found for the secondary outcomes except for sickness-related absence, where the exercise-based physiotherapy group had more days of sickness-related absence three months before treatment ( p= 0.02), and at the 10-year follow-up ( p=0.03). The beneficial effects favouring tailored behavioural medicine treatment that observed post-treatment and at the two-year follow-up were not maintained 10 years after treatment.

  5. A cost-utility analysis of nursing intervention via telephone follow-up for injured road users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brulin Christine

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traffic injuries can cause physical, psychological, and economical impairment, and affected individuals may also experience shortcomings in their post-accident care and treatment. In an earlier randomised controlled study of nursing intervention via telephone follow-up, self-ratings of health-related quality of life were generally higher in the intervention group than in the control group. Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of nursing intervention via telephone follow-up by examining costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs. Methods A randomised controlled study was conducted between April 2003 and April 2005. Car occupants, cyclists, and pedestrians aged between 18 and 70 years and attending the Emergency Department of Umeå University Hospital in Sweden after an injury event in the traffic environment were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 288 or control group (n = 280. The intervention group received routine care supplemented by nursing via telephone follow-up during half a year, while the control group received routine care only. Data were collected from a mail survey using the non-disease-specific health-related quality of life instrument EQ5D, and a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed including the costs of the intervention and the QALYs gained. Results Overall, the intervention group gained 2.60 QALYs (260 individuals with an average gain of 0.01 QALYs. The car occupants gained 1.54 QALYs (76 individuals, average of 0.02. Thus, the cost per QALY gained was 16 000 Swedish Crown (SEK overall and 8 500 SEK for car occupants. Conclusion Nursing intervention by telephone follow-up after an injury event, is a cost effective method giving improved QALY to a very low cost, especially for those with minor injuries. Trial registration This trial registration number is: ISRCTN11746866.

  6. A cost-utility analysis of nursing intervention via telephone follow-up for injured road users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzén, Carin; Björnstig, Ulf; Brulin, Christine; Lindholm, Lars

    2009-06-11

    Traffic injuries can cause physical, psychological, and economical impairment, and affected individuals may also experience shortcomings in their post-accident care and treatment. In an earlier randomised controlled study of nursing intervention via telephone follow-up, self-ratings of health-related quality of life were generally higher in the intervention group than in the control group. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of nursing intervention via telephone follow-up by examining costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). A randomised controlled study was conducted between April 2003 and April 2005. Car occupants, cyclists, and pedestrians aged between 18 and 70 years and attending the Emergency Department of Umeå University Hospital in Sweden after an injury event in the traffic environment were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 288) or control group (n = 280). The intervention group received routine care supplemented by nursing via telephone follow-up during half a year, while the control group received routine care only. Data were collected from a mail survey using the non-disease-specific health-related quality of life instrument EQ5D, and a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed including the costs of the intervention and the QALYs gained. Overall, the intervention group gained 2.60 QALYs (260 individuals with an average gain of 0.01 QALYs). The car occupants gained 1.54 QALYs (76 individuals, average of 0.02). Thus, the cost per QALY gained was 16 000 Swedish Crown (SEK) overall and 8 500 SEK for car occupants. Nursing intervention by telephone follow-up after an injury event, is a cost effective method giving improved QALY to a very low cost, especially for those with minor injuries. This trial registration number is: ISRCTN11746866.

  7. Impact of an Intervention to Improve Contraceptive Use Through Follow-Up Phone Calls to Female Adolescent Clinic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Douglas; Raine, Tina; Thrush, Greg; Yuen, Cora; Sokoloff, Abby; Potter, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT Adolescent females often have questions or concerns about their contraceptive methods, and they may discontinue use if these questions are not answered. Little evidence exists on whether follow-up phone calls to address young women’s concerns can help sustain contraceptive use. METHODS Between 2005 and 2007, a total of 805 females aged 14–18 attending a reproductive health clinic in San Francisco were randomly assigned to receive either regular clinic services or regular clinic services plus nine follow-up phone calls over 12 months. The young women were surveyed at baseline and roughly six, 12 and 18 months later to measure condom and contraceptive use, rates of pregnancy and STDs, and other outcomes and mediators. Multiple linear and logistic regression repeated measures analyses were used to assess the program’s effects. RESULTS Clinic counselors completed only 2.7 calls per patient, and made 7.8 attempts for every completed call. Although contraceptive use increased from baseline to follow-up at six months in both groups, levels of condom and contraceptive use, and rates of pregnancy and STDs, did not differ between the intervention and control groups at any of the follow-up assessments. Moreover, the intervention did not improve clinic utilization or satisfaction or have consistent positive effects on participants’ attitudes. CONCLUSIONS Reaching young women by phone after a clinic visit for contraception is challenging and does not appear to provide significant benefits beyond those provided by basic clinic services. More intensive interventions may be needed to markedly change adolescent sexual and contraceptive behavior. PMID:21126301

  8. Profile of children and adolescents with chronic renal failure followed up at nephrology units

    OpenAIRE

    Maciel, Ayla Costa; Miranda, Juliana de Oliveira Freitas

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Characterize the profile of children and adolescents with chronic renal failure followed up at nephrology units in the town of Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil. Methods: This is a quantitative, retrospective and descriptive, research which investigated socio-demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables in the medical records of 35 children and adolescents followed up at nephrology units by June 2010. Results: The main etiology was chronic glomerulonephritis (34,2%); 88,6% of pat...

  9. Laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with monoclonal gammopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo García-Morato, M; Padilla-Merlano, B; Nozal, P; Espiño, M; Juárez, C; Villar, L M; López-Trascasa, M

    2016-04-01

    We present guidelines from the Immunochemistry group of the Spanish Society for Immunology that are designed to provide a practical tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies. We review the clinical and analytical features of various monoclonal gammopathies, international consensus guidelines and techniques used to detect and follow-up monoclonal components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  10. Occurrence of gastric cancer and carcinoids in atrophic gastritis during prospective long-term follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Edith; Esposito, Gianluca; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Purchiaroni, Flaminia; Corleto, Vito D; Di Giulio, Emilio; Annibale, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    Atrophic gastritis (AG) is a risk condition for gastric cancer and type I gastric carcinoids. Recent studies assessing the overall risk of gastric cancer and carcinoids in AG at long-term follow up are lacking. This study aimed to investigate in a prospective cohort of AG patients the occurrence of gastric cancer and carcinoids at long-term follow up. A total of 200 AG patients from a prospective cohort (67% female, median age 55 years) with a follow up of 7.5 (range: 4-23.4) years were included. Inclusion criteria were presence of AG and at least one follow-up gastroscopy with biopsies at ≥4 years after AG diagnosis. Follow-up gastroscopies at 4-year intervals were performed. Overall, 22 gastric neoplastic lesions were detected (crude incidence 11%). Gastric cancer was diagnosed in four patients at a median follow up of 7.2 years (crude incidence 2%). Eleven type I gastric carcinoids were detected at a median follow up of 5.1 years (crude incidence of 5.5%). In seven patients, six low-grade and one high-grade dysplasia were found. The annual incidence rate person-year were 0.25% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.067-0.63%), 0.43% (95% CI: 0.17-0.89%), and 0.68% (95% CI: 0.34-1.21%) for gastric cancer, dysplasia, and type I-gastric carcinoids, respectively. The incidence rates of gastric cancer and carcinoids were not different (p = 0.07). This study shows an annual incidence rate of 1.36% person-year for gastric neoplastic lesions in AG patients at long-term follow up. AG patients are similarly exposed to gastric cancer and type I gastric carcinoids.

  11. Routine follow-up visits after first-trimester induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Daniel; Ellertson, Charlotte; Grimes, David A; Walker, Dilys

    2004-04-01

    Routine follow-up visits after abortion are intended to confirm that the abortion is complete and to diagnose and treat complications. Many clinicians also take advantage of the follow-up visit to provide general reproductive health care: discussing contraceptive plans and providing family planning services; diagnosing sexually transmitted infections; performing a Pap test or discussing abnormal Pap results. We reviewed the evidence related to the routine postabortion follow-up visit. Other than mifepristone medical abortion performed at 50 days of gestation or later and methotrexate medical abortion, we found little evidence that mandatory follow-up visits typically detect conditions that women themselves could not be taught to recognize. In addition, the natural history of the most severe complications after abortion-infection and unrecognized ectopic pregnancy-have time courses inconsistent with the usual timing of the follow-up visit. Costs associated with this visit can be great. These include travel expenses, lost wages, child-care expenses, privacy and emotional burdens for women, and scheduling disruptions and the related opportunity costs caused by "no-shows" for the provider. Follow-up appointments should be scheduled for those women likely to benefit from a physical examination. For the remainder of women, simple instructions and advice about detecting complications, possibly coupled with telephone follow-up, might suffice. Although arguably valuable in their own right, counseling, family planning services, or sexually transmitted infection diagnosis and treatment should not be so inflexibly bundled with postabortion care. Protocols that require in-person follow-up after abortion may not make the best use of a women's time or abilities, or of the medical system.

  12. Annual Trends in Follow-Up Visits for Pediatric Concussion in Emergency Departments and Physicians' Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Liraz; Scolnik, Michal; Macpherson, Alison; Rothman, Linda; Guttmann, Astrid; Grool, Anne M; Rodriguez Duque, Daniel; Zemek, Roger L

    2018-01-01

    To assess whether children and youth with concussion receive follow-up visits in accordance with the recommended guidelines. We conducted a retrospective, population-based study using linked health administrative data from all concussion-related visits to emergency department and physician offices by children aged 5 through 18 years (range, 5.00-18.99) in Ontario between 2003 and 2013. We analyzed the percentage of children and youth seen for follow-up. The Mann-Kendall test for trends was used to assess a monotonic increasing trend over time in concussion follow-up visits. A total of 126 654 children and youth were evaluated for an index concussion visit. The number of children and youth assessed for concussion follow-up (N = 45 155) has increased significantly over time (P < .001). In 2003, 781 of 7126 patients (11.0%; 95% CI, 10.3-11.7) with an index visit for concussion had a follow-up assessment. By 2013, 6526 of 21 681 (30.1%; 95% CI, 29.5-30.7) patients received follow-up care. The proportion of children and youth receiving follow-up after an acute concussion has significantly increased between 2003 and 2013. Nevertheless, more than two-thirds of all patients do not seek medical follow-up or clearance as recommended by current concussion guidelines, suggesting that ongoing efforts to improve and monitor compliance with recommended guidelines by patients and physicians are important. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Outpatient follow-up after mild traumatic brain injury: Results of the UPFRONT-study

    OpenAIRE

    de Koning, M.E.; Scheenen, M.E.; van der Horn, H.J.; Hageman, G.; Roks, G.; Yilmaz, T.; Spikman, J.M.; van der Naalt, J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate outpatient follow-up after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) by various medical specialists, for both hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients, and to study guideline adherence regarding hospital admission. Methods: Patients (n = 1151) with mTBI recruited from the emergency department received questionnaires 2 weeks (n = 879), 3 months (n = 780) and 6 months (n = 668) after injury comprising outpatient follow-up by various health care providers, and outcome define...

  14. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Oei, Edwin H. G.; Koster, Ingrid M.; Hensen, Jan-Hein J.; Boks, Simone S.; Wagemakers, Harry P. A.; Koes, Bart W.; Vroegindeweij, Dammis; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Hunink, M. G. Myriam

    2009-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. Methods: We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40 years) in general practice who underwent initial knee MRI within 5 weeks of trauma. We performed ordinal logistic regression analysis to analyse prognostic factors for meniscal change on follow-up ...

  15. U.S. Navy Womens Experience with Cervical Cancer Screening and Follow-up Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-15

    have a greater risk for acquiring cervical cancer . 14- 18 These risks include: higher rates of smoking, hormonal contraceptive use, unprotected sexual...Experience with Cervical Cancer Screening & Follow-up Care 5b. GRANT NUMBER HU0001-14-1-TS01 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S...military healthcare facility. Design: Potential participants were women requiring colposcopic follow-up for abnormal cervical cancer screening. Exclusion

  16. Gynaecological aspects of the treatment and follow-up of transsexual men and women

    OpenAIRE

    Weyers, S.; De Sutter, P.; Hoebeke, S.; Monstrey, G.; ’T Sjoen, G.; Verstraelen, H.; Gerris, J.

    2010-01-01

    The role of the gynaecologist in the treatment of female-to-male transsexual patients is largely confined to hysterectomy and vaginectomy. We showed that laparoscopic hysterectomy is feasible and safe in this group. When surgery is not performed completely, follow-up of the remaining organs is necessary. The major part of this thesis deals with the necessity and acceptability of gynaecological follow-up in male-to-female (MTF) transsexual patients. These patients function well on a physical, ...

  17. Techniques for Minimizing Radiation Exposure During Evaluation, Surgical Treatment, and Follow-up of Urinary Lithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Javier L; Baldwin, D Duane

    2015-07-01

    Patients receive significant radiation exposure during the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of urinary stone disease. This radiation exposure may result in patient harm and is believed to contribute to the risk for malignancy. This review will present current information to allow surgeons to optimize their diagnostic, treatment, and follow-up regimens to allow optimal care of stone disease patients at the lowest radiation dose possible.

  18. Electronic Detection of Delayed Test Result Follow-Up in Patients with Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ashley N D; Murphy, Daniel R; Al-Mutairi, Aymer; Sittig, Dean F; Wei, Li; Russo, Elise; Singh, Hardeep

    2017-07-01

    Delays in following up abnormal test results are a common problem in outpatient settings. Surveillance systems that use trigger tools to identify delayed follow-up can help reduce missed opportunities in care. To develop and test an electronic health record (EHR)-based trigger algorithm to identify instances of delayed follow-up of abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) results in patients being treated for hypothyroidism. We developed an algorithm using structured EHR data to identify patients with hypothyroidism who had delayed follow-up (>60 days) after an abnormal TSH. We then retrospectively applied the algorithm to a large EHR data warehouse within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), on patient records from two large VA networks for the period from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2011. Identified records were reviewed to confirm the presence of delays in follow-up. During the study period, 645,555 patients were seen in the outpatient setting within the two networks. Of 293,554 patients with at least one TSH test result, the trigger identified 1250 patients on treatment for hypothyroidism with elevated TSH. Of these patients, 271 were flagged as potentially having delayed follow-up of their test result. Chart reviews confirmed delays in 163 of the 271 flagged patients (PPV = 60.1%). An automated trigger algorithm applied to records in a large EHR data warehouse identified patients with hypothyroidism with potential delays in thyroid function test results follow-up. Future prospective application of the TSH trigger algorithm can be used by clinical teams as a surveillance and quality improvement technique to monitor and improve follow-up.

  19. Impact of a Health Information Technology Intervention on the Follow-up Management of Pulmonary Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacson, Ronilda; Desai, Sonali; Landman, Adam; Proctor, Randall; Sumption, Siobhan; Khorasani, Ramin

    2018-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the USA. The most common abnormalities suspicious for lung cancer on CT scan include pulmonary nodules. Recommendations to improve care for patients with pulmonary nodules require follow-up management. However, transitions in care, especially for patients undergoing transitions to ambulatory care sites from the emergency department (ED) and inpatient settings, can exacerbate failures in follow-up testing and compromise patient safety. We evaluate the impact of a discharge module that includes follow-up recommendations for further management of pulmonary nodules on the study outcome and follow-up management of patients with pulmonary nodules within 1 year after discharge. After IRB approval, we collected data on all patients undergoing chest or abdominal CT exams over a 12-month baseline and 12-month intervention period at an academic medical center. The inpatient discharge module was implemented in November 2011; the ED module was implemented in May 2012. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to account for care setting, imaging modality, recommendations, and patient demographics. Implementation of a discharge module resulted in improved follow-up of patients with pulmonary nodules within 1 year after discharge (OR = 1.64, p = 0.01); the ED implementation resulted in better follow-up compared to the inpatient module (OR = 2.24, p < 0.01). Twenty-seven percent of patients with pulmonary nodules received follow-up management, which, although significantly improved from the 18% baseline, remains low. An electronic discharge module is associated with improved follow-up management of patients with pulmonary nodules, and may be combined with interventions to further improve management of these patients.

  20. NIBLES - an HI census of stellar mass selected SDSS galaxies. II. Arecibo follow-up HI observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Z.; Schneider, S.; van Driel, W.; Lehnert, M. D.; Minchin, R.

    2016-11-01

    We obtained Arecibo Hi line follow-up observations of 154 of the 2600 galaxies in the Nançay Interstellar Baryons Legacy Extragalactic Survey (NIBLES) sample. These observations are on average four times more sensitive than the original observations at the Nançay Radio Telescope. The main goal of this survey is to characterize the underlying Hi properties of the NIBLES galaxies which were undetected or marginally detected at Nançay. Of the Nançay non-detections, 85% were either clearly or marginally detected at Arecibo, while 89% of the Nançay marginal detections were clearly detected. Based on the statistics of the detections relative to g-I color and r-band luminosity (Lr) distribution among our Arecibo observations, we anticipate 60% of our 867 Nançay non-detections and marginal detections could be detected at the sensitivity of our Arecibo observations. Follow-up observations of our low luminosity (Lr ALFALFA surveys respectively. Reduced spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A60

  1. Determinants of Attrition to Follow-Up in a Multicentre Cohort Study in Children-Results from the IDEFICS Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hense, Sabrina; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Michels, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    were investigated. Data was available for 16,225 children from the IDEFICS baseline survey (2007/2008). Attrition was defined as nonparticipation in the first follow-up examination (2009/2010). Determinants of attrition were analysed by logistic regression. The statistical significance level was set...... at 훼 = 0 . 0 1 to account for the large sample size. The strongest associations were seen for baseline item non-response, especially when information on migration background (odds ratio (OR) = 1.55; 99% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 2.31), single parenthood (OR = 1.37; 99% CI: 1.12, 1.67), or well...... in childhood obesity research....

  2. A postgraduation follow-up of social work students trained in "SBIRT": Rates of usage and perceptions of effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senreich, Evan; Ogden, Lydia P; Greenberg, Joy Pastan

    2017-01-01

    Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is an evidence-based modality that can help social workers work with substance-using clients as part of an integrated health care approach. This study reports the findings of a post-graduation one-year follow-up survey of 193 master's and bachelor's social work students trained in SBIRT in practice courses at a Northeast urban college. Forty-three percent of the trainees who were practicing social work after graduation were using SBIRT. A content analysis of participants' comments found that the vast majority found SBIRT to be a valuable practice modality, with barriers to utilization of SBIRT identified.

  3. Creating the Action Model for High Risk Infant Follow Up Program in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Jodiery, Behzad; Mirnia, Kayvan; Akrami, Forouzan; Hosseini, Mohammad Bagher; Heidarabadi, Seifollah; HabibeLahi, Abbas

    2013-11-01

    Intervention in early childhood development as one of the social determinants of health, is important for reducing social gap and inequity. In spite of increasingly developing intensive neonatal care wards and decreasing neonatal mortality rate, there is no follow up program in Iran. This study was carreid out to design high risk infants follow up care program with the practical aim of creating an model action for whole country, in 2012. This qualitative study has been done by the Neonatal Department of the Deputy of Public Health in cooperation with Pediatrics Health Research Center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. After study of international documents, consensus agreement about adapted program for Iran has been accomplished by focus group discussion and attended Delphi agreement technique. After compiling primary draft included evidence based guidelines and executive plan, 14 sessions including expert panels were hold to finalize the program. After finalizing the program, high risk infants follow up care service package has been designed in 3 chapters: Evidence based clinical guidelines; eighteen main clinical guidelines and thirteen subsidiaries clinical guidelines, executive plan; 6 general, 6 following up and 5 backup processes. Education program including general and especial courses for care givers and follow up team, and family education processes. We designed and finalized high risk infants follow up care service package. It seems to open a way to extend it to whole country.

  4. Assessing factors for loss to follow-up of HIV infected patients in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Pernille Bejer; Engell-Sørensen, Thomas; Jespersen, Sanne

    2017-01-01

    and 12.6 % HIV-1/2) living within the DSS, 292 patients had been lost to follow-up and were, therefore, eligible for active follow-up. Vital status was ascertained in 65.9 % of eligible patients and 42.7 % were alive, while 23.2 % had died. Information on reasons for LTFU existed for 103 patients. Major......Purpose: The objective of this study was to ascertain vital status of patients considered lost to follow-up at an HIV clinic in Guinea-Bissau, and describe reasons for loss to follow-up (LTFU). Methods: This study was a cross-sectional sample of a prospective cohort, carried out between May 15......, 2013, and January 31, 2014. Patients lost to follow-up, who lived within the area of the Bandim Health Project, a demographic surveillance site (DSS), were eligible for inclusion. Active follow-up was attempted by telephone and tracing by a field assistant. Semi-structured interviews were done face...

  5. Radiofrequency Ablation of Renal Tumors: Four-Year Follow-Up Results in 47 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Dong; Yoon, Seong Guk; Sung, Gyung Tak [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the intermediate results of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of small renal masses (SRMs). Percutaneous or laparoscopic RFA was performed on 48 renal tumors in 47 patients. The follow-up studies included a physical examination, chest radiography, creatinine level, and contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. To confirm the pathologic criteria of complete ablation, 35 patients underwent a follow-up biopsy. Recurrence was defined as contrast enhancement on imaging studies after 3 months, lesion growth at subsequent imaging, or viable cancer cells on follow-up biopsy. Technical success was achieved in 43 (89.6%) of 48 renal tumors. The mean tumor size was 2.3 cm and the mean follow-up period was 49.6 months. Repeated RFA was necessary in 5 tumors due to incomplete ablation. The overall complication rate was 35.8%, of which 96.2% were mild complications. Serum creatinine levels at 12 months after RFA did not differ from those before RFA (1.28 vs. 1.36 mg/dL). Four patients were found to have recurrence at various follow-up intervals, and distant metastasis was not found in any cases. RFA appears to be a useful treatment for selected patients with SRMs. Our 4-year follow-up results disclose an excellent therapeutic outcome with RFA, while achieving effective local tumor control.

  6. Comfort monitoring? Environmental assessment follow-up under community-industry negotiated environmental agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, Bram; Birk, Jasmine

    2011-01-01

    Negotiated environmental agreements are becoming common practice in the mining industry. In principle, negotiated environmental agreements are said to respond to many of the shortcomings of environmental impact assessment by providing for improved follow-up of project impacts through, among other things, data provision, engaging stakeholders in the monitoring and management of project impacts, and building capacity at the local level to deal with project-induced environmental change. In practice, however, little is known about the efficacy of follow-up under negotiated environmental agreements between proponents and communities and the demonstrated value added to project impact management. This paper examines follow-up practice under negotiated environmental agreements with a view to understanding whether and how community-based monitoring under privatized agreements actually contributes to improved follow-up and impact management. Based on lessons emerging from recent experiences with environmental agreements in Canada's uranium industry, we show that follow-up under negotiated agreements may be described as 'comfort monitoring'. While such monitoring does improve community-industry relations and enhance corporate image, it does little to support effects-based management. If follow-up under negotiated agreements is to be credible over the long term, there is a need to ensure that monitoring results are useful for, and integrated with, regulatory-based monitoring and project impact management practices.

  7. Long-term follow-up of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy for bone metastases: Results from a randomised multicentre trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sande, Tonje Anette; Ruenes, Randi; Lund, Jo Asmund; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Hornslien, Kjersti; Bremnes, Roy; Kaasa, Stein

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the need for re-irradiation, rates of pathological fractures, and spinal cord compressions in patients randomised to single-fraction radiotherapy (8 Gy x 1) or multiple-fraction therapy (3 Gy x 10) and with a long-term follow-up. The underlying hypothesis was that single-fraction and multiple-fraction regimens are equally effective. Material and methods: The present study reports on the Norwegian sub sample of an international large prospective-randomised multicentre study. One hundred and eighty patients with painful skeletal metastases in four Norwegian hospitals were randomised to receive single-fraction (8 Gy x 1) or multiple-fraction (3 Gy x 10) radiotherapy. Results: Patients in the single-fraction arm received significantly more re-irradiations as compared to the multiple-fraction arm (27% versus 9%, p = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the rate of pathological fractures (5% versus 5%, p = 1.00) or spinal cord compressions (1% versus 4%, p = 0.37) between the two treatment groups. Conclusion: The present study indicates no difference between radiotherapy with 8 Gy x 1 and 3 Gy x 10 for the majority of patients with painful bone metastases, also in a long-term perspective. Importantly, the patients in this study were followed up until death, and the trial showed no disadvantage for 8 Gy x 1 compared to 3 Gy x 10. Despite the fact that single-fraction treatment will imply an approximately 2.5-fold greater need for re-irradiation, single-fraction treatment is considered more convenient for the patients and more cost-effective for the radiotherapy departments.

  8. [Satisfaction of principal caregivers of patients followed-up by palliative care teams].

    Science.gov (Un