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Sample records for flux transfer events

  1. On the topology of flux transfer events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl

    1990-01-01

    A topological analysis is made of a simple model magnetic field of a perturbation at the magnetopause that shares magnetic properties with flux transfer events. The aim is to clarify a number of topological aspects that arise in the case of fully three-dimensional magnetic fields. It is shown that a localized perturbation at the magnetopause can in principle open a closed magnetosphere by establishing magnetic connections across the magnetopause by the formation of a ropelike magnetic field structure. For this purpose a global topological model of a closed magnetosphere is considered as the unperturbed state. The topological substructure of the model flux rope is discussed in detail.

  2. A study of flux transfer events at different planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.

    1995-01-01

    Flux transfer events (FTEs) are disturbances in and near the magnetopause current layer that cause a characteristic signature in the component of the magnetic field parallel to the average boundary normal. These disturbances have been observed at Mercury, Earth and Jupiter but not at Saturn, Uranus or Neptune. At Earth, FTEs last about 1 minute and repeat about every 8 but at Mercury, a much smaller magnetosphere, the events last seconds and are tens of seconds apart. These features have been interpreted in terms of magnetospheric flux ropes connected to the interplanetary magnetic field, arising as the result of reconnection. An analogous phenomenon occurs at Venus where magnetic flux ropes arise at the ionosphere, a boundary between a very strongly magnetized one. However, here the flux ropes do not appear to be due to reconnection.

  3. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  4. MMS Observations of the Evolution of Ion-Scale Flux Transfer Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Paterson, W.; Petrinec, S.; Zhou, M.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Bromund, K. R.; Chutter, M.; Fischer, D.; Gershman, D. J.; Giles, B. L.; Le, G.; Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Slavin, J. A.; Torbert, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Flux transfer events are key processes in the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. Previously, the observed flux transfer events have had scale sizes of 10,000 km radius in the cross-section and connect about 2 MWb magnetic flux from solar wind to the terrestrial magnetosphere. Recently, from the high-temporal resolution MMS magnetic field data, many ion-scale FTEs have been found. These FTEs contains only about 2 kWb magnetic flux and are believed to be in an early stage of FTE evolution. With the help of the well-calibrated MMS data, we are also able to determine the velocity profile and forces within the FTE events. We find that some ion-scale FTEs are expanding as we expect, but there are also contracting FTEs. We examine the differences between the two classes of FTEs and their differences with the larger previously studied class of FTE.

  5. Bursts of Pc 1-2 related to flux transfer events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoldy, R.L.; Cahill, L.J. Jr.; Engebretson, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Instances of sporadic reconnection of geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field lines have been measured by space-craft passing through the dayside magnetopause region (Russell and Elphic 1979; Rijnbeek et al. 1984). The ionospheric signature of the reconnection events (flux transfer events) is a topic of current interest in that if one is evident then ground magnetic field data can be used to monitor the rate of dayside reconnection and conditions under which it occurs in a manner not possible with rapidly moving spacecraft. The proposed ground magnetic signature of a flux transfer event (FTE) is a large amplitude one-cycle Pc 5 (150-600 second period) pulse produced by a large vortex of ionospheric Hall current generated by the field-aligned current in the helical flux tube that has reconnected (Lee 1986). The intent of this article is to provide further data on the possible ground magnetic signatures of FTE (Lanzerotti el al. 1986) as measured by the induction antennas that the University of New Hampshire and the University of Minnesota have operated at high latitudes in the Antarctic and Greenland. With a high-frequency cut-off of 5 hertz, the induction magnetometers can measure Pc 1-2 waves (0.1-5.0 hertz) which cannot be seen by fluxgate instruments. Indeed, Pc 1-2 waves are frequently observed on the ground coincident with the Pc 5 FTE signature which provides some interesting new perspectives on these events

  6. On flares, substorms and the theory of impulsive flux transfer events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratenahl, A.; Baum, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    Solar flares and magnetospheric substorms are discussed in the context of a general theory of impulsive flux transfer events (IFTE). IFTE theory, derived from laboratory observations in the Double Inverse Pinch Device (DIPD), provides a quantitative extension of 'neutral sheet' theories to include nonsteady field line reconnection. Current flow along the reconnection line increases with magnetic flux storage. When flux build-up exceeds the level corresponding to a critical limit on the current, instabilities induce a sudden transition in the mode of conduction. The resulting IFTE, indifferent to the specific modes and instabilities involved, is the more energetic, the lower the initial resistivity. It is the more violent, the greater the resulting resistivity increase and the faster its growth. Violent events can develop very large voltage transients along the reconnection line. Persistent build-up promoting conditions produce relaxation oscillations in the quantity of flux and energy stored (build-up-IFTE cycles). It is difficult to avoid the conclusion: flares and substorms are examples of IFTE. (Auth.)

  7. Force Balance at the Magnetopause Determined with MMS: Application to Flux Transfer Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Petrinec, S. M.; Paterson, W. R.; Zhou, M.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Bromund, K. R.; Chutter, M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS) consists of four identical spacecraft forming a closely separated (less than or equal to 10 km) and nearly regular tetrahedron. This configuration enables the decoupling of spatial and temporal variations and allows the calculation of the spatial gradients of plasma and electromagnetic field quantities. We make full use of the well cross-calibrated MMS magnetometers and fast plasma instruments measurements to calculate both the magnetic and plasma forces in flux transfer events (FTEs) and evaluate the relative contributions of different forces to the magnetopause momentum variation. This analysis demonstrates that some but not all FTEs, consistent with previous studies, are indeed force-free structures in which the magnetic pressure force balances the magnetic curvature force. Furthermore, we contrast these events with FTE events that have non-force-free signatures.

  8. The Substructure of a Flux Transfer Event Observed by the MMS Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Gershman, D.; Avanov, L.; Paterson, W. R.; Dorelli, J. C.; Ergun, R. E.; Russel, C. T.; hide

    2016-01-01

    On 15 August 2015, MMS (Magnetospheric Multiscale mission), skimming the dusk magnetopause, detected an isolated region of an increased magnetic strength and bipolar Bn, indicating a flux transfer event (FTE). The four spacecraft in a tetrahedron allowed for investigations of the shape and motion of the FTE. In particular, high-resolution particle data facilitated our exploration of FTE substructures and their magnetic connectivity inside and surrounding the FTE. Combined field and plasma observations suggest that the core fields are open, magnetically connected to the northern magnetosphere from which high-energy particles leak; ion "D" distributions characterize the axis of flux ropes that carry old-opened field lines; counter streaming electrons superposed by parallel-heated components populate the periphery surrounding the FTE; and the interface between the core and draped regions contains a separatrix of newlyopened magnetic field lines that emanate from the X line above the FTE.

  9. A survey of flux transfer events observed in the dayside magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, M. D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Lee, S. H.; Gonzalez, W.; Koga, D.

    2017-12-01

    Flux transfer events (FTE) have been interpreted to be results from transient magnetic reconnection and can be observed in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetopause, as well in other planets. FTE acts as a flux tube connecting the magnetosheath to the magnetosphere allowing the transference of particles, energy and momentum in both sides magnetopause. Their main signatures in satellite data are bipolar variation in the magnetic field component normal to the magnetopause, centered in an enhanced magnetic field strength. Other signatures such as pressure imbalance, bulk flow jets, and particle anisotropy distribution can be observed inside the those structures. We surveyed FTEs observed by MMS on the vicinity of the magnetopause (from x = 0 to 13Re and y = -12 to 12Re). Taking advantage of the MMS tetrahedron configuration we will employed timing analysis to determine the FTEs direction of motion and scale lengths. We will present information about occurrence related with IMF clock angle and other parameters, amplitude of the perturbations induced by the FTEs in the environment magnetic field and plasma; characteristic time and structure scale size. Using data from ACE, Wind and Artemis we can evaluate which is the best solar wind monitor for each FTE observed and then employ the appropriated lag time corresponding to FTE location and magnetic field orientation. The objective is to investigate the mechanisms of generation of FTEs comparing characteristics of the events observed on the dayside region and on the magnetopause flanks determining the motion and speed of FTEs.

  10. Calculating the Motion and Direction of Flux Transfer Events with Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    For many years now, the interactions of the solar wind plasma with the Earth's magnetosphere has been one of the most important problems for Space Physics. It is very important that we understand these processes because the high-energy particles and also the solar wind energy that cross the magneto sphere could be responsible for serious damage to our technological systems. The solar wind is inherently a dynamic medium, and the particles interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere can be steady or unsteady. Unsteady interaction include transient processes like bursty magnetic reconnection. Flux Transfer Events (FTEs) are magnetopause signatures that usually occur during transient times of reconnection. They exhibit bipolar signatures in the normal component of the magnetic field. We use multi-point timing analysis to determine the orientation and motion of ux transfer events (FTEs) detected by the four Cluster spacecraft on the high-latitude dayside and flank magnetopause during 2002 and 2003. During these years, the distances between the Cluster spacecraft were greater than 1000 km, providing the tetrahedral configuration needed to select events and determine velocities. Each velocity and location will be examined in detail and compared to the velocities and locations determined by the predictions of the component and antiparallel reconnection models for event formation, orientation, motion, and acceleration for a wide range of spacecraft locations and solar wind conditions.

  11. Two-dimensional electric field measurements in the ionospheric footprint of a flux transfer event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. McWilliams

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Line-of-sight Doppler velocities from the SuperDARN CUTLASS HF radar pair have been combined to produce the first two-dimensional vector measurements of the convection pattern throughout the ionospheric footprint of a flux transfer event (a pulsed ionospheric flow, or PIF. Very stable and moderate interplanetary magnetic field conditions, along with a preceding prolonged period of northward interplanetary magnetic field, allow a detailed study of the spatial and the temporal evolution of the ionospheric response to magnetic reconnection. The flux tube footprint is tracked for half an hour across six hours of local time in the auroral zone, from magnetic local noon to dusk. The motion of the footprint of the newly reconnected flux tube is compared with the ionospheric convection velocity. Two primary intervals in the PIF's evolution have been determined. For the first half of its lifetime in the radar field of view the phase speed of the PIF is highly variable and the mean speed is nearly twice the ionospheric convection speed. For the final half of its lifetime the phase velocity becomes much less variable and slows down to the ionospheric convection velocity. The evolution of the flux tube in the magnetosphere has been studied using magnetic field, magnetopause and magnetosheath models. The data are consistent with an interval of azimuthally propagating magnetopause reconnection, in a manner consonant with a peeling of magnetic flux from the magnetopause, followed by an interval of anti-sunward convection of reconnected flux tubes.Key words: Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere · ionosphere interactions; plasma convection; solar wind · magnetosphere interactions

  12. Two-dimensional electric field measurements in the ionospheric footprint of a flux transfer event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. McWilliams

    Full Text Available Line-of-sight Doppler velocities from the SuperDARN CUTLASS HF radar pair have been combined to produce the first two-dimensional vector measurements of the convection pattern throughout the ionospheric footprint of a flux transfer event (a pulsed ionospheric flow, or PIF. Very stable and moderate interplanetary magnetic field conditions, along with a preceding prolonged period of northward interplanetary magnetic field, allow a detailed study of the spatial and the temporal evolution of the ionospheric response to magnetic reconnection. The flux tube footprint is tracked for half an hour across six hours of local time in the auroral zone, from magnetic local noon to dusk. The motion of the footprint of the newly reconnected flux tube is compared with the ionospheric convection velocity. Two primary intervals in the PIF's evolution have been determined. For the first half of its lifetime in the radar field of view the phase speed of the PIF is highly variable and the mean speed is nearly twice the ionospheric convection speed. For the final half of its lifetime the phase velocity becomes much less variable and slows down to the ionospheric convection velocity. The evolution of the flux tube in the magnetosphere has been studied using magnetic field, magnetopause and magnetosheath models. The data are consistent with an interval of azimuthally propagating magnetopause reconnection, in a manner consonant with a peeling of magnetic flux from the magnetopause, followed by an interval of anti-sunward convection of reconnected flux tubes.

    Key words: Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere · ionosphere interactions; plasma convection; solar wind · magnetosphere interactions

  13. Motion of flux transfer events: a test of the Cooling model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Fear

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The simple model of reconnected field line motion developed by Cooling et al. (2001 has been used in several recent case studies to explain the motion of flux transfer events across the magnetopause. We examine 213 FTEs observed by all four Cluster spacecraft under a variety of IMF conditions between November 2002 and June 2003, when the spacecraft tetrahedron separation was ~5000 km. Observed velocities were calculated from multi-spacecraft timing analysis, and compared with the velocities predicted by the Cooling model in order to check the validity of the model. After excluding three categories of FTEs (events with poorly defined velocities, a significant velocity component out of the magnetopause surface, or a scale size of less than 5000 km, we were left with a sample of 118 events. 78% of these events were consistent in both direction of motion and speed with one of the two model de Hoffmann-Teller (dHT velocities calculated from the Cooling model (to within 30° and a factor of two in the speed. We also examined the plasma signatures of several magnetosheath FTEs; the electron signatures confirm the hemisphere of connection indicated by the model in most cases. This indicates that although the model is a simple one, it is a useful tool for identifying the source regions of FTEs.

  14. Reconnection at the earth's magnetopause - Magnetic field observations and flux transfer events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical models of plasma acceleration by magnetic-field-line reconnection at the earth magnetopause and the high-resolution three-dimensional plasma measurements obtained with the ISEE satellites are compared and illustrated with diagrams, graphs, drawings, and histograms. The history of reconnection theory and the results of early satellite observations are summarized; the thickness of the magnetopause current layer is discussed; problems in analyzing the polarization of current-layer rotation are considered; and the flux-transfer events responsible for periods of patchy reconnection are characterized in detail. The need for further observations and refinements of the theory to explain the initiation of reconnection and identify the mechanism determining whether it is patchy or steady-state is indicated.

  15. On the quasi-periodic nature of magnetopause flux transfer events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, M.; Wild, M.N.

    1993-01-01

    The authors look at the interpretation of magnetopause flux transfer events (FTE), which claims to show that these events are quasi periodic with a mean period of about 8 minutes. FTE are characteristic signatures in the magnetic field observed by satellites in or near the magnetopause. They are mainly observed when the interplanetary magnetic field is southward, as is supported by a wide range of experimental evidence. There are several theoretical models which try to explain these events. The most successful to date is based upon a suggestion made by Saunders and Biernat, et al. This model has the advantage of accounting for some of the ground based observations of these events. It has been suggested that FTE represent bursts of enhanced magnetic reconnection, and may be the dominant mechanism of this solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. The authors also look at the variability of the IMF B z component as a potential source of the periodic FTE. Data from the ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft taken during 1977 to 1979 were statistically surveyed for this report. The spacecraft crossed the magnetopause more than 172 times, and could observe FTE for typically 1 hr per pass. Data for the IMF came from the IMP8 spacecraft. Little data was available for the period of interest, but for the subsequent phase of the solar cycle there was considerable coverage. The data analysis shows a highly skewed recurrence period, with a mode of 3 min., and a lower and upper decile of 1.5 and 18.5 min. No significant peak is observed at 8 minutes. The shape of the distribution does not lend itself to any natural period of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. There may be a correlation with the B z component of the IMF, but the correlation suffers most from the variability of the IMF dataset

  16. A survey of flux transfer events recorded by the UKS spacecraft magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southwood, D.J.; Saunders, M.A.; Dunlop, M.W.; Mier-Jedrzejowicz, W.A.C.; Rijnbeek, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    The UKS spacecraft operated from August 1984 through to January 1985. During that time, it made multiple crossings of the magnetopause in local time sectors extending from mid-afternoon to just behind the dawn meridian. We have surveyed the magnetometer records from these magnetopause encounters and have compiled a catalogue of flux transfer events. Using the catalogue, we find the FTE occurrence determined from the UKS data set is substantially less than that detected using data from the early ISEE 1/2 spacecraft orbits. The UKS data set shows a correlation between FTE occurrence and southward external magnetic field, but there are several instances of passes in which no FTEs are detected but for which the external field was unambiguously southward. The passes with the largest number of events are those for which the field outside the magnetopause has a large Bsub(M) component. We conclude that the lower latitude of the UKS encounters is responsible for the discrepancy with the ISEE occurrence. The most likely source region appears to be near the subsolar region. (author)

  17. Global modeling of flux transfer events: generation mechanism and spacecraft signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, J.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental mode of energy and momentum transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. It is known to occur in different forms depending on solar wind and magnetospheric conditions. In particular, steady reconnection can be distinguished from pulse-like reconnection events which are also known as Flux Transfer Events (FTEs). The formation mechanism of FTEs and their contolling factors remain controversial. We use global MHD simulations of Earth's magnetosphere to show that for southward IMF conditions: a) steady reconnection preferentially occurs without FTEs when the stagnation flow line nearly coincides with the X-line location, which requires small dipole tilt and nearly due southward IMF, b) FTEs occur when the flow/field symmetry is broken, which requires either a large dipole tilt and/or a substantial east-west component of the IMF, c) the predicted spacecraft signature and the repetition frequency of FTEs in the simulations agrees very well with typical observations, lending credibility to the the model, d) the fundamental process that leads to FTE formation is multiple X-line formation caused by the flow and field patterns in the magnetosheath and requires no intrinsic plasma property variations like variable resistivity, e) if the dipole tilt breaks the symmetry FTEs occur only in the winter hemisphere whereas the reconnection signatures in the summer hemisphere are steady with no bipolar FTE-like signatures, f) if the IMF east-west field component breaks the symmetry FTEs occur in both hemispheres, and g) FTE formation depends on sufficient resolution and low diffusion in the model -- coarse resolution and/or high diffusivity lead to flow-through reconnection signatures that appear unphysical given the frequent observation of FTEs.

  18. Unraveling the Nature of Steady Magnetopause Reconnection Versus Flux Transfer Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, J.

    2002-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental mode of energy and momentum transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. It is known to occur in different forms depending on solar wind and magnetospheric conditions. In particular, steady reconnection can be distinguished from pulse-like reconnection events which are also known as Flux Transfer Events (FTEs). The formation mechanism of FTEs and their contolling factors remain controversial. We use global MHD simulations of Earth's magnetosphere to show that for southward IMF conditions: a) steady reconnection preferentially occurs without FTEs when the stagnation flow line nearly coincides with the X-line location, which requires small dipole tilt and nearly due southward IMF, b) FTEs occur when the flow/field symmetry is broken, which requires either a large dipole tilt and/or a substantial east-west component of the IMF, c) the predicted spacecraft signature and the repetition frequency of FTEs in the simulations agrees very well with typical observations, lending credibility to the the model, d) the fundamental process that leads to FTE formation is multiple X-line formation caused by the flow and field patterns in the magnetosheath and requires no intrinsic plasma property variations like variable resistivity, e) if the dipole tilt breaks the symmetry FTEs occur only in the winter hemisphere whereas the reconnection signatures in the summer hemisphere are steady with no bipolar FTE-like signatures, f) if the IMF east-west field component breaks the symmetry FTEs occur in both hemispheres, and g) FTE formation depends on sufficient resolution and low diffusion in the model -- coarse resolution and/or high diffusivity lead to flow-through reconnection signatures that appear unphysical given the frequent observation of FTEs.

  19. The ionospheric response to flux transfer events: the first few minutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Rodger

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available We utilise high-time resolution measurements from the PACE HF radar at Halley, Antarctica to explore the evolution of the ionospheric response during the first few minutes after enhanced reconnection occurs at the magnetopause. We show that the plasma velocity increases associated with flux transfer events (FTEs occur first ~100–200 km equatorward of the region to which magnetosheath (cusp precipitation maps to the ionosphere. We suggest that these velocity variations start near the ionospheric footprint of the boundary between open and closed magnetic field lines. We show that these velocity variations have rise times ~100 s and fall times of ~10 s. When these velocity transients reach the latitude of the cusp precipitation, sometimes the equatorward boundary of the precipitation begins to move equatorward, the expected and previously reported ionospheric signature of enhanced reconnection. A hypothesis is proposed to explain the velocity variations. It involves the rapid outflow of magnetospheric electrons into the magnetosheath along the most recently reconnected field lines. Several predictions are made arising from the proposed explanation which could be tested with ground-based and space-based observations.

  20. Cluster observations of bounday layer structure and a flux transfer event near the cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Fear

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available On the 25th January 2002 between 10:00 and 12:00 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft passed through the northern high-latitude cusp, the dayside magnetosphere and into the magnetosheath in a linear formation. In the magnetosphere the PEACE electron spectrometers on the four spacecraft all observed a series of transient bursts of magnetosheath-like plasma, but without bipolar magnetic signatures in the magnetopause normal component as might be expected if the plasma had been injected by transient reconnection (flux transfer events – FTEs. Reordering the data using the magnetopause transition parameter reveals that these plasma observations, the related variations in the magnetic field and the balance of magnetic and thermal gas pressures are consistent with transient entries into a stable high-latitude boundary layer structure. However, once some of the spacecraft entered the magnetosheath, FTE signatures were observed outside the magnetopause at the same time as some of the boundary layer entries occurred at the other spacecraft inside. Thus, (a the lack of a bipolar BN signature is inconsistent with the traditional picture of a magnetospheric FTE, and (b the cause of the observed entry of the spacecraft into the boundary layer (pressure pulse or passing magnetosheath FTE can only be determined by spacecraft observations in the magnetosheath. Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and bondary layers; Solar wind- magnetosphere interactions; Magnetosheath

  1. Cluster observations of bounday layer structure and a flux transfer event near the cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Fear

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available On the 25th January 2002 between 10:00 and 12:00 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft passed through the northern high-latitude cusp, the dayside magnetosphere and into the magnetosheath in a linear formation. In the magnetosphere the PEACE electron spectrometers on the four spacecraft all observed a series of transient bursts of magnetosheath-like plasma, but without bipolar magnetic signatures in the magnetopause normal component as might be expected if the plasma had been injected by transient reconnection (flux transfer events – FTEs. Reordering the data using the magnetopause transition parameter reveals that these plasma observations, the related variations in the magnetic field and the balance of magnetic and thermal gas pressures are consistent with transient entries into a stable high-latitude boundary layer structure. However, once some of the spacecraft entered the magnetosheath, FTE signatures were observed outside the magnetopause at the same time as some of the boundary layer entries occurred at the other spacecraft inside. Thus, (a the lack of a bipolar BN signature is inconsistent with the traditional picture of a magnetospheric FTE, and (b the cause of the observed entry of the spacecraft into the boundary layer (pressure pulse or passing magnetosheath FTE can only be determined by spacecraft observations in the magnetosheath.

    Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and bondary layers; Solar wind- magnetosphere interactions; Magnetosheath

  2. Topology and signatures of a model for flux transfer events based on vortex-induced reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z.X.; Zhu, Z.W.; Li, F.; Pu, Z.Y.

    1992-01-01

    A model of the disturbed magnetic field and disturbed velocity of flux transfer events (FTEs) is deduced on the basis of the vortex-induced reconnection theory. The topology and signatures of FTEs are calculated and discussed. The authors propose that the observed forms of FTE signatures depend on the motional direction of the FTE tube, the positions of the spacecraft relative to the passing FTE tube, and which part of the FTE tube (the magnetosphere part, the magnetopause part, or the magnetosheath part) the spacecraft is passing through. It is found that when a FTE tube moves from south to north along a straight line in the northern hemisphere, positive FTEs appear for most passages; however, reverse FTEs are also observed occasionally while the signatures of B Z (B L ) appear as a single peak, and the irregular FTEs always correspond to oblique line motions of the FTE tube. The velocity signatures are similar to those of the magnetic field, but in the northern hemisphere their directions are all just opposite to the magnetic field. The calculated results for the magnetic field are compared with 61 observed FTEs. The observed signatures (B N and B L ) of 52 FTEs are consistent with the calculations. The results indicate that a majority of observed FTEs correspond to passages of spacecraft through the edges of FTE tubes

  3. Flux transfer events at the dayside magnetopause: Transient reconnection or magnetosheath dynamic pressure pulses?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, M.

    1991-01-01

    The suggestion is discussed that characteristic particle and field signatures at the dayside magnetopause, termed flux transfer events, are, in at least some cases, due to transient solar wind and/or magnetosheath dynamic pressure increases, rather than time-dependent magnetic reconnection. It is found that most individual cases of FTEs observed by a single spacecraft can, at least qualitatively, be explained by the pressure pulse model, provided a few rather unsatisfactory features of the predictions are explained in terms of measurement uncertainties. The most notable exceptions to this are some two-regime observations made by two satellites simultaneously, one on either side of the magnetopause. However, this configuration has not been frequently achieved for sufficient time, such observations are rare, and the relevant tests are still not conclusive. The strongest evidence that FTEs are produced by magnetic reconnection is the dependence of their occurence on the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) or of the magnetosheath field. The pressure pulse model provides an explanation for this dependence in the case of magnetosheath FTEs, but does not apply to magnetosphere FTEs. The only surveys of magnetosphere FTEs have not employed the simultaneous IMF, but have shown that their occurence is strongly dependent on the north-south component of the magnetosheath field, as observed earlier/later on the same magnetopause crossing. This paper employs statistics on the variability of the IMF orientation to investigate the effects of IMF changes between the times of the magnetosheath and FTE observations. It is shown that the previously published results are consistent with magnetospheric FTEs being entirely absent when the magentosheath field is northward

  4. Coordinated Cluster/Double Star observations of dayside flux transfer events on 6 April 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Pu, ZuYin; Zhou, XuZhi; Zhang, XianGuo; Dunlop, Malcolm; Fu, SuiYan; Xie, Lun; Zong, QiuGang; Xiao, ChiJie; Wang, XiaoGang; Liu, ZhenXing

    2008-10-01

    With the Double Star Program TC1 in the equatorial orbit and Cluster tetrahedron in the high latitude polar orbit, a conjunct observation of FTEs on the dayside magnetopause (MP) on April 6, 2004 is presented in this study. The FTEs observed by TC1 at low latitudes are characterized to be generated in the subsolar region and the obtained flux tube axes orientate along the predicted low latitude component magnetic reconnection X-line, indicating that these FTEs were more likely to be generated through multiple X-line reconnection or single X-line bursty reconnection. During the same period, Cluster also encountered a series of magnetosheath FTEs with their axes pointing roughly along the interplanetary magnetic field. At last, the global FTE configuration is obtained from observations in different locations, which is in good agreement with the "elbow shape" model.

  5. High-time resolution measurements of upstream magnetic field and plasma conditions during flux transfer events at the Earth's dayside magnetopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, J.D.; Cattell, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary analysis of six flux transfer events which were observed simultaneously by IRM and CCE. IRM was able to measure magnetic fields and pressures far from the earth, while CCE made observations at the earth's magnetopause. The objective is to better understand the coupling of energy and momentum into the earth's magnetosphere, by in this case trying to better understand the processes active in flux transfer events. For three of the events the observations were made on common field lines, and IRM observed fluctuations in B z large enough to cause a south to north swing in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Pressure pulses were observed during two of these events. For the other three events there was no such consistent behavior of IMF direction or pressure pulses

  6. A search for upstream pressure pulses associated with flux transfer events: An AMPTE/ISEE case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphic, R. C.; Baumjohann, W.; Cattell, C. A.; Luehr, H.; Smith, M. F.

    1994-01-01

    On September 19, 1984, the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracers Explorers (AMPTE) United Kingdom Satellite (UKS) and Ion Release Module (IRM) and International Sun Earth Explorers (ISEE) 1 and 2 spacecraft passed outbound through the dayside magnetopause at about the same time. The AMPTE spacecraft pair crossed first and were in the near-subsolar magnetosheath for more than an hour. Meanwhile the ISEE pair, about 5 R(sub E) to the south, observed flux transfer event (FTE) signatures. We use the AMPTE UKS and IRM plasma and field observations of magnetosheath conditions directly upstream of the subsolar magnetopause to check whether pressure pulses are responsible for the FTE signatures seen at ISEE. Pulses in both the ion thermal pressure and the dynamic pressure are observed in the magnetosheath early on when IRM and UKS are close to the magnetopause, but not later. These large pulses appear to be related to reconnection going on at the magnetopause nearby. AMPTE magnetosheath data far from the magnetopause do not show a pressure pulse correlation with FTEs at ISEE. Moreover, the magnetic pressure and tension effects seen in the ISEE FTEs are much larger than any pressure effects seen in the magnetosheath. A superposed epoch analysis based on small-amplitude peaks in the AMPTE magnetosheath total static pressure (nkT + B(exp 2)/2 mu(sub 0)) hint at some boundary effects, less than 5 nT peak-to-peak variations in the ISEE 1 and 2 B(sub N) signature starting about 1 min after the pressure peak epoch. However, these variations are much smaller than the standard deviations of the B(sub N) field component. Thus the evidence from this case study suggests that upstream magnetosheath pressure pulses do not give rise to FTEs, but may produce very small amplitude signatures in the magnetic field at the magnetopause.

  7. A flux transfer event observed at the magnetopause by the Equator-S spacecraft and in the ionosphere by the CUTLASS HF radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Neudegg

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations of a flux transfer event (FTE have been made simultaneously by the Equator-S spacecraft near the dayside magnetopause whilst corresponding transient plasma flows were seen in the near-conjugate polar ionosphere by the CUTLASS Finland HF radar. Prior to the occurrence of the FTE, the magnetometer on the WIND spacecraft ~226 RE upstream of the Earth in the solar wind detected a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF which is estimated to have reached the subsolar magnetopause ~77 min later. Shortly afterwards the Equator-S magnetometer observed a typical bipolar FTE signature in the magnetic field component normal to the magnetopause, just inside the magnetosphere. Almost simultaneously the CUTLASS Finland radar observed a strong transient flow in the F region plasma between 78° and 83° magnetic latitude, near the ionospheric region predicted to map along geomagnetic field lines to the spacecraft. The flow signature (and the data set as a whole is found to be fully consistent with the view that the FTE was formed by a burst of magnetopause reconnection.Key words. Interplanetary physics (ionosphere-magnetosphere interaction · Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  8. Transfer matrix method for four-flux radiative transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovick, Brian; Flom, Zachary; Zipp, Lucas; Krishnamurthy, Srini

    2017-07-20

    We develop a transfer matrix method for four-flux radiative transfer, which is ideally suited for studying transport through multiple scattering layers. The model predicts the specular and diffuse reflection and transmission of multilayer composite films, including interface reflections, for diffuse or collimated incidence. For spherical particles in the diffusion approximation, we derive closed-form expressions for the matrix coefficients and show remarkable agreement with numerical Monte Carlo simulations for a range of absorption values and film thicknesses, and for an example multilayer slab.

  9. Proton transfer events in GFP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Donato, M.; van Wilderen, L.J.G.W.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Cohen Stuart, T.A.; Kennis, J.T.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; van Grondelle, R.; Groot, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton

  10. Proton transfer events in GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Stuart, Thomas Cohen; Kennis, John T M; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2011-09-28

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton transfer through a 'proton-wire', formed by the chromophore (the proton donor), water molecule W22, Ser205 and Glu222 (the acceptor), on a picosecond time scale. To obtain a more refined view of this process, we have used a combined approach of time resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy and visible pump-dump-probe spectroscopy to resolve with atomic resolution how and how fast protons move through this wire. Our results indicate that absorption of light by GFP induces in 3 ps (10 ps in D(2)O) a shift of the equilibrium positions of all protons in the H-bonded network, leading to a partial protonation of Glu222 and to a so-called low barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) for the chromophore's proton, giving rise to dual emission at 475 and 508 nm. This state is followed by a repositioning of the protons on the wire in 10 ps (80 ps in D(2)O), ultimately forming the fully deprotonated chromophore and protonated Glu222.

  11. Near bed suspended sediment flux by single turbulent events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirshahi, Seyed Mohammad; Kwoll, Eva; Winter, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The role of small scale single turbulent events in the vertical mixing of near bed suspended sediments was explored in a shallow shelf sea environment. High frequency velocity and suspended sediment concentration (SSC; calibrated from the backscatter intensity) were collected using an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV). Using quadrant analysis, the despiked velocity time series was divided into turbulent events and small background fluctuations. Reynolds stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) calculated from all velocity samples, were compared to the same turbulent statistics calculated only from velocity samples classified as turbulent events (Reevents and TKEevents). The comparison showed that Reevents and TKEevents was increased 3 and 1.6 times, respectively, when small background fluctuations were removed and that the correlation with SSC for TKE could be improved through removal of the latter. The correlation between instantaneous vertical turbulent flux (w ‧) and SSC fluctuations (SSC ‧) exhibits a tidal pattern with the maximum correlation at peak ebb and flood currents, when strong turbulent events appear. Individual turbulent events were characterized by type, strength, duration and length. Cumulative vertical turbulent sediment fluxes and average SSC associated with individual turbulent events were calculated. Over the tidal cycle, ejections and sweeps were the most dominant events, transporting 50% and 36% of the cumulative vertical turbulent event sediment flux, respectively. Although the contribution of outward interactions to the vertical turbulent event sediment flux was low (11%), single outward interaction events were capable of inducing similar SSC ‧ as sweep events. The results suggest that on time scales of tens of minutes to hours, TKE may be appropriate to quantify turbulence in sediment transport studies, but that event characteristics, particular the upward turbulent flux need to be accounted for when considering sediment transport

  12. Experimental study on effect of flux composition on element transfer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BRIJPAL SINGH

    2018-03-10

    Mar 10, 2018 ... 3 Division of Manufacturing Processes and Automation Engineering, Netaji Subhas Institute of ... Submerged arc welding; basicity index; element transfer; slag metal reactions; oxidizing power of ... flux composition, wire and base plate composition. ..... increase in BI of the flux with increasing NiO additive. If.

  13. Heat transfer for ultrahigh flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadkins, R.P.; Lake, J.A.; Oh, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    The use of a uniquely designed nuclear reactor to supply neutrons for materials research is the focus of recent reactor design efforts. The biological, materials, and fundamental physics aspects of research require neutron fluxes much higher than present research and testing facilities can produce. The most advanced research using neutrons as probing detectors is being done in the High Flux Reactor at the Institut Laue Langeuin, France. The design of a reactor that can produce neutron fluxes of 1.0 x 10 16 n/cm 2 .s requires a relatively high power (300 MW range) and a small core volume (approximately 30 liters). This combination of power and volume leads to a high power density which places increased demands on thermal hydraulic margins

  14. Ultrahigh Flux Thin Film Boiling Heat Transfer Through Nanoporous Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyang; Chen, Renkun

    2018-05-09

    Phase change heat transfer is fundamentally important for thermal energy conversion and management, such as in electronics with power density over 1 kW/cm 2 . The critical heat flux (CHF) of phase change heat transfer, either evaporation or boiling, is limited by vapor flux from the liquid-vapor interface, known as the upper limit of heat flux. This limit could in theory be greater than 1 kW/cm 2 on a planar surface, but its experimental realization has remained elusive. Here, we utilized nanoporous membranes to realize a new "thin film boiling" regime that resulted in an unprecedentedly high CHF of over 1.2 kW/cm 2 on a planar surface, which is within a factor of 4 of the theoretical limit, and can be increased to a higher value if mechanical strength of the membranes can be improved (demonstrated with 1.85 kW/cm 2 CHF in this work). The liquid supply is achieved through a simple nanoporous membrane that supports the liquid film where its thickness automatically decreases as heat flux increases. The thin film configuration reduces the conductive thermal resistance, leads to high frequency bubble departure, and provides separate liquid-vapor pathways, therefore significantly enhances the heat transfer. Our work provides a new nanostructuring approach to achieve ultrahigh heat flux in phase change heat transfer and will benefit both theoretical understanding and application in thermal management of high power devices of boiling heat transfer.

  15. Estimation of bulk transfer coefficient for latent heat flux (Ce)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    The bulk transfer coefficient for latent heat flux (Ce) has been estimated over the Arabian Sea from the moisture budget during the pre-monsoon season of 1988. The computations have been made over two regions (A: 0-8 degrees N: 60-68 degrees E: B: 0...

  16. Heat Flux Sensors for Infrared Thermography in Convective Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  17. Heat Flux Sensors for Infrared Thermography in Convective Heat Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Maria Carlomagno

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors’ research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described.

  18. Flux-transfer losses in helically wound superconducting power cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clem, John R; Malozemoff, A P

    2013-01-01

    Minimization of ac losses is essential for economic operation of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) ac power cables. A favorable configuration for the phase conductor of such cables has two counter-wound layers of HTS tape-shaped wires lying next to each other and helically wound around a flexible cylindrical former. However, if magnetic materials such as magnetic substrates of the tapes lie between the two layers, or if the winding pitch angles are not opposite and essentially equal in magnitude to each other, current distributes unequally between the two layers. Then, if at some point in the ac cycle the current of either of the two layers exceeds its critical current, a large ac loss arises from the transfer of flux between the two layers. A detailed review of the formalism, and its application to the case of paramagnetic substrates including the calculation of this flux-transfer loss, is presented. (paper)

  19. Measurements of Critical Heat Flux using Mass Transfer System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seung Hyun; Chung Bum Jin [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In a severe accident, the reactor vessel is heated by the decay heat from core melts and the outer surface of reactor vessel is cooled by the natural convection of water pool. When the heat flux increases, boiling will start. Further increase of the heat flux may result in the CHF, which is generated by the bubble combinations. The CHF means that the reactor vessel was separated with coolant and wall temperature is raised rapidly. It may damage the reactor vessel. Also the CHF indicates the maximum cooling capability of the system. Therefore, the CHF has been used as a criterion for the regulatory and licensing. Mechanism of hydrogen vapor bubbles generated and combined can be simulated water bubbles mechanism. And also the both heat and mass transfer mechanism of CHF can be identified in the same methods. Therefore, the CHF phenomena can be simulated enough by mass transfer.

  20. Partnering Events | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  1. Family Events and the Timing of Intergenerational Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Thomas; Schneider, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates how family events in adult children's lives influence the timing of their parents' financial transfers. We draw on retrospective data collected by the German Socio-Economic Panel Study and use event history models to study the effects of marriage, divorce and childbirth on the receipt of large gifts from parents. We find…

  2. Multiple Flux Rope Events at the High-Latitude Magnetopause: Cluster/Rapid Observation on January 26, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zong-Ying; Pu, Zu-Yin; Xiao, Chi-Jie; Xong, Qui-Gang; Fu, Sui-Yan; Xie, Lun; Shi, Quan-Qi; Cao, Jin-Bin; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Shen, Cao; Shi, Jian-Kui; Lu, Li; Wang, Nai-Quan; Chen, Tao; Fritz, T.; Glasmeier, K.-H.; Daly, P.; Reme, H.

    2004-04-01

    From 11:10 to 11:40UT on January 26, 2001 the four Cluster II spacecraft were located in the duskside high latitude regions of the magnetosheath and magnetosheath boundary layer (MSBL). During this time Interval the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) had a negative Bz component. A detailed study on the multiple flux ropes (MFRs) observed in this period is conducted in this paper. It is found that: (1) The multiple flux ropes in the high latitude MSBL appeared quasi-periodically with a repeated time period of about 78s, which is much shorter than the averaged occurring period (about 8-11min) of the flux transfer events (FTEs) at the dayside magnetopause (MP). (2) All the flux ropes observed in this event had a strong core magnetic field. The axial orientation of the most flux ropes is found to lie in the direction of the minimum magnetic field variance; a few flux ropes had their axes lying in the direction of the middle magnetic field variance; while for the remainders their principle axes could not be determined by the method of Principal Axis Analysis (PAA). The reason that causes this complexity relys on the different trajectories of the spacecraft passing through the flux ropes. (3) Each flux rope had a good corresponding HT frame of reference in which it was in a quasi-steady state. All flux ropes moved along the surface of the MP in a similar direction indicating that these flux ropes all came from the dawnside low latitude. Their radial scale is 1-2RE, comparable to the normal diameter of FTEs observed atthe dayside MP. (4) The energetic ions originated from the magnetosphere flowed out to the magnetosheath on the whole, while the solar wind plasma flowed into the magnetosphere along the axis of the flux ropes. The flux ropes offered channels for the transport of the solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere and the escaping of the magnetospheric plasma into the interplanetary space. (5) Each event was accompanied by an enhanced reversal of the dusk

  3. Particle acceleration in relativistic magnetic flux-merging events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Sironi, Lorenzo; Komissarov, Serguei S.; Porth, Oliver

    2017-12-01

    Using analytical and numerical methods (fluid and particle-in-cell simulations) we study a number of model problems involving merger of magnetic flux tubes in relativistic magnetically dominated plasma. Mergers of current-carrying flux tubes (exemplified by the two-dimensional `ABC' structures) and zero-total-current magnetic flux tubes are considered. In all cases regimes of spontaneous and driven evolution are investigated. We identify two stages of particle acceleration during flux mergers: (i) fast explosive prompt X-point collapse and (ii) ensuing island merger. The fastest acceleration occurs during the initial catastrophic X-point collapse, with the reconnection electric field of the order of the magnetic field. During the X-point collapse, particles are accelerated by charge-starved electric fields, which can reach (and even exceed) values of the local magnetic field. The explosive stage of reconnection produces non-thermal power-law tails with slopes that depend on the average magnetization . For plasma magnetization 2$ the spectrum power-law index is 2$ ; in this case the maximal energy depends linearly on the size of the reconnecting islands. For higher magnetization, 2$ , the spectra are hard, , yet the maximal energy \\text{max}$ can still exceed the average magnetic energy per particle, , by orders of magnitude (if is not too close to unity). The X-point collapse stage is followed by magnetic island merger that dissipates a large fraction of the initial magnetic energy in a regime of forced magnetic reconnection, further accelerating the particles, but proceeds at a slower reconnection rate.

  4. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology – The Primary Events

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 12. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology – The Primary Events in Photosynthesis. V Krishnan. General Article Volume 2 Issue 12 December 1997 pp 77-86. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Forecast of solar proton flux profiles for well-connected events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Eun-Young; Moon, Yong-Jae; Park, Jinhye

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a forecast model of solar proton flux profiles (> 10 MeV channel) for well-connected events. Among 136 solar proton events (SPEs) from 1986 to 2006, we select 49 well-connected ones that are all associated with single X-ray flares stronger than M1 class and start to increase within 4 h after their X-ray peak times. These events show rapid increments in proton flux. By comparing several empirical functions, we select a modified Weibull curve function to approximate a SPE flux profile. The parameters (peak flux, rise time, and decay time) of this function are determined by the relationship between X-ray flare parameters (peak flux, impulsive time, and emission measure) and SPE parameters. For 49 well-connected SPEs, the linear correlation coefficient between the predicted and the observed proton peak fluxes is 0.65 with the RMS error of 0.55 log10(pfu). In addition, we determine another forecast model based on flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) parameters using 22 SPEs. The used CME parameters are linear speed and angular width. As a result, we find that the linear correlation coefficient between the predicted and the observed proton peak fluxes is 0.83 with the RMS error of 0.35 log10(pfu). From the relationship between error of model and CME acceleration, we find that CME acceleration is an important factor for predicting proton flux profiles.

  6. Heat transfer in flow past a continuously moving porous flat plate with heat flux

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, T.V.R.; Sarma, Y.V.B.

    The analysis of the heat transfer in flow past a continuously moving semi-infinite plate in the presence of suction/ injection with heat flux has been presented. Similarity solutions have been derived and the resulting equations are integrated...

  7. Heat transfer and critical heat flux in a spiral flow in an asymmetrical heated tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boscary, J.; Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance

    1997-03-01

    The design of plasma facing components is crucial for plasma performance in next fusion reactors. These elements will be submitted to very high heat flux. They will be actively water-cooled by swirl tubes in the subcooled boiling regime. High heat flux experiments were conducted in order to analyse the heat transfer and to evaluate the critical heat flux. Water-cooled mock-ups were one-side heated by an electron beam gun for different thermal-hydraulic conditions. The critical heat flux was detected by an original method based on the isotherm modification on the heated surface. The wall heat transfer law including forced convection and subcooled boiling regimes was established. Numerical calculations of the material heat transfer conduction allowed the non-homogeneous distribution of the wall temperature and of the wall heat flux to be evaluated. The critical heat flux value was defined as the wall maximum heat flux. A critical heat flux model based on the liquid sublayer dryout under a vapor blanket was established. A good agreement with test results was found. (author)

  8. Heat transfer and critical heat flux in a asymmetrically heated tube helicoidal flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boscary, J.

    1995-10-01

    The design of plasma facing components is crucial for plasma performance in next fusion reactors. These elements will be submitted to very high heat flux. They will be actively water-cooled by swirl tubes in the subcooled boiling regime. High heat flux experiments were conducted in order to analyse the heat transfer and to evaluate the critical heat flux. Water-cooled mock-ups were one-side heated by an electron beam gun for different thermal-hydraulic conditions. The critical heat flux was detected by an original method based on the isotherm modification on the heated surface. The wall heat transfer law including forced convection and subcooled boiling regimes was established. Numerical calculations of the material heat transfer conduction allowed the non-homogeneous distribution of the wall temperature and of the wall heat flux to be evaluated. The critical heat flux value was defined as the wall maximum heat flux. A critical heat flux model based on the liquid sublayer dryout under a vapor blanket was established. A good agreement with test results was found. (author). 198 refs., 126 figs., 21 tabs

  9. A simple heat transfer model for a heat flux plate under transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, L.; Dale, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Heat flux plates are used for measuring rates of heat transfer through surfaces under steady state and transient conditions. Their usual construction is to have a resistive layer bounded by thermopiles and an exterior layer for protection. If properly designed and constructed a linear relationship between the thermopile generated voltage and heat flux results and calibration under steady state conditions is straight forward. Under transient conditions however the voltage output from a heat flux plate cannot instantaneously follow the heat flux because of the thermal capacitance of the plate and the resulting time lag. In order to properly interpret the output of a heat flux plate used under transient conditions a simple heat transfer model was constructed and tested. (author)

  10. Linearized Flux Evolution (LiFE): A technique for rapidly adapting fluxes from full-physics radiative transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Crisp, David

    2018-05-01

    Solar and thermal radiation are critical aspects of planetary climate, with gradients in radiative energy fluxes driving heating and cooling. Climate models require that radiative transfer tools be versatile, computationally efficient, and accurate. Here, we describe a technique that uses an accurate full-physics radiative transfer model to generate a set of atmospheric radiative quantities which can be used to linearly adapt radiative flux profiles to changes in the atmospheric and surface state-the Linearized Flux Evolution (LiFE) approach. These radiative quantities describe how each model layer in a plane-parallel atmosphere reflects and transmits light, as well as how the layer generates diffuse radiation by thermal emission and by scattering light from the direct solar beam. By computing derivatives of these layer radiative properties with respect to dynamic elements of the atmospheric state, we can then efficiently adapt the flux profiles computed by the full-physics model to new atmospheric states. We validate the LiFE approach, and then apply this approach to Mars, Earth, and Venus, demonstrating the information contained in the layer radiative properties and their derivatives, as well as how the LiFE approach can be used to determine the thermal structure of radiative and radiative-convective equilibrium states in one-dimensional atmospheric models.

  11. Developing a forecast model of solar proton flux profiles for well-connected events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, E. Y.; Moon, Y. J.; Park, J.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a forecast model of solar proton flux profile (> 10 MeV channel) for well-connected events. Among 136 solar proton events (SPEs) from 1986 to 2006, we select 49 well-connected ones that are all associated with single X-ray flares stronger than M1 class and start to increase within four hours after their X-ray peak times. These events show rapid increments in proton flux. By comparing several empirical functions, we select a modified Weibull curve function to approximate a SPE flux profile, which is similar to the particle injection rate. The parameters (peak value, rise time and decay time) of this function are determined by the relationship between X-ray flare parameters (peak flux, impulsive time, and emission measure) and SPE parameters. For 49 well-connected SPEs, the linear correlation between the predicted proton peak flux and the observed proton peak fluxes is 0.65 with the RMS error of 0.55 pfu in the log10. In addition, we have developed another forecast model based on flare and CME parameters using 22 SPEs. The used CME parameters are linear speed and angular width. As a result, we find that the linear correlation between the predicted proton peak flux and the observed proton peak fluxes is 0.83 with the RMS error of 0.35 pfu in the log10. From the relationship between the model error and CME acceleration, we find that CME acceleration is also an important factor for predicting proton flux profiles.

  12. Method to eliminate flux linkage DC component in load transformer for static transfer switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; Mao, Chengxiong; Lu, Jiming; Wang, Dan; Tian, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Many industrial and commercial sensitive loads are subject to the voltage sags and interruptions. The static transfer switch (STS) based on the thyristors is applied to improve the power quality and reliability. However, the transfer will result in severe inrush current in the load transformer, because of the DC component in the magnetic flux generated in the transfer process. The inrush current which is always 2 ~ 30 p.u. can cause the disoperation of relay protective devices and bring potential damage to the transformer. The way to eliminate the DC component is to transfer the related phases when the residual flux linkage of the load transformer and the prospective flux linkage of the alternate source are equal. This paper analyzes how the flux linkage of each winding in the load transformer changes in the transfer process. Based on the residual flux linkage when the preferred source is completely disconnected, the method to calculate the proper time point to close each phase of the alternate source is developed. Simulation and laboratory experiments results are presented to show the effectiveness of the transfer method.

  13. Multiple flux rope events at the magnetopause observations by TC-1 on 18 March 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Xiao

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available From 23:10 to 23:50 UT on 18 March 2004, the Double Star TC-1 spacecraft detected eight flux ropes at the outbound crossing of the southern dawnside magnetopause. A notable guide field existed inside all ropes. In the mean time the Cluster spacecraft were staying in the magnetosheath and found that the events occurred under the condition of southward IMF Bz and dominant negative IMF By. There are six ropes that appeared quasi-periodically, with a repeated period being approximately 1-4 min. The last flux rope lasts for a longer time interval with a larger peak in the BN variations; it can thus be referred to as a typical FTE. The 18 March 2004 event is quite similar to the multiple flux rope event observed by Cluster on 26 January 2001 at the northern duskside high-latitude magnetopause. A detailed comparison of these two events is made in the paper. Preliminary studies imply that both of these multiple flux ropes events seem to be produced by component reconnection at the dayside low-latitude magnetopause.

  14. External event Probabilistic Risk Assessment for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, G.F.; Johnson, D.H.; Buttemer, D.; Perla, H.F.; Chien, S.H.

    1989-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a high performance isotope production and research reactor which has been in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1965. In late 1986 the reactor was shut down as a result of discovery of unexpected neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel. In January of 1988 a level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) (excluding external events) was published as part of the response to the many reviews that followed the shutdown and for use by ORNL to prioritize action items intended to upgrade the safety of the reactor. A conservative estimate of the core damage frequency initiated by internal events for HFIR was 3.11 x 10 -4 . In June 1989 a draft external events initiated PRA was published. The dominant contributions from external events came from seismic, wind, and fires. The overall external event contribution to core damage frequency is about 50% of the internal event initiated contribution and is dominated by seismic events

  15. Mass transfer effects on vertical oscillating plate with heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthucumaraswamy R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical solution of unsteady viscous incompressible flow past an infinite vertical oscillating plate with uniform heat flux and mass diffusion is presented here, taking into account of the homogeneous chemical reaction of first-order. The temperature from the plate to the fluid at an uniform rate and the mass is diffused uniformly. The dimensionless governing equations has been obtained by the Laplace transform method, when the plate is oscillating harmonically in its own plane. The effects of velocity and concentration are studied for different parameters like phase angle chemical reaction parameter, thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number Schmidt number and time are studied. The so­lutions are valid only for small values of time t. It is observed that the velocity increases with decreasing phase angle ωt or chemical reaction parameter.

  16. Event-driven sediment flux in Hueneme and Mugu submarine canyons, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J. P.; Swarzenski, P.W.; Noble, M.; Li, A.-C.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical sediment fluxes and their dominant controlling processes in Hueneme and Mugu submarine canyons off south-central California were assessed using data from sediment traps and current meters on two moorings that were deployed for 6 months during the winter of 2007. The maxima of total particulate flux, which reached as high as 300+ g/m2/day in Hueneme Canyon, were recorded during winter storm events when high waves and river floods often coincided. During these winter storms, wave-induced resuspension of shelf sediment was a major source for the elevated sediment fluxes. Canyon rim morphology, rather than physical proximity to an adjacent river mouth, appeared to control the magnitude of sediment fluxes in these two submarine canyon systems. Episodic turbidity currents and internal bores enhanced sediment fluxes, particularly in the lower sediment traps positioned 30 m above the canyon floor. Lower excess 210Pb activities measured in the sediment samples collected during periods of peak total particulate flux further substantiate that reworked shelf-, rather than newly introduced river-borne, sediments supply most of the material entering these canyons during storms.

  17. Energetic electron precipitation characteristics observed from Antarctica during a flux dropout event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clilverd, Mark A.; Cobbett, Neil; Rodger, Craig J.; Brundell, James B.; Denton, Michael H.; Hartley, David P.; Rodriguez, Juan V.; Danskin, Donald; Raita, Tero; Spanswick, Emma L.

    2013-11-01

    from two autonomous VLF radio receiver systems installed in a remote region of the Antarctic in 2012 is used to take advantage of the juxtaposition of the L = 4.6 contour, and the Hawaii-Halley, Antarctica, great circle path as it passes over thick Antarctic ice shelf. The ice sheet conductivity leads to high sensitivity to changing D region conditions, and the quasi constant L shell highlights outer radiation belt processes. The ground-based instruments observed several energetic electron precipitation events over a moderately active 24 h period, during which the outer radiation belt electron flux declined at most energies and subsequently recovered. Combining the ground-based data with low and geosynchronous orbiting satellite observations on 27 February 2012, different driving mechanisms were observed for three precipitation events with clear signatures in phase space density and electron anisotropy. Comparison between flux measurements made by Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) in low Earth orbit and by the Antarctic instrumentation provides evidence of different cases of weak and strong diffusion into the bounce loss cone, helping to understand the physical mechanisms controlling the precipitation of energetic electrons into the atmosphere. Strong diffusion events occurred as the bounce loss cone. Two events had a factor of about 3 to 10 times more >30 keV flux than was reported by POES, more consistent with strong diffusion conditions.

  18. A Methodology to Determine Self-Similarity, Illustrated by Example: Transient Heat Transfer with Constant Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Charles; Newman, John

    2005-01-01

    This simple example demonstrates the physical significance of similarity solutions and the utility of dimensional and asymptotic analysis of partial differential equations. A procedure to determine the existence of similarity solutions is proposed and subsequently applied to transient constant-flux heat transfer. Short-time expressions follow from…

  19. Mercury fluxes over an Australian alpine grassland and observation of nocturnal atmospheric mercury depletion events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Howard

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic gradient measurements of the air–surface exchange of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM were undertaken over a 40 ha alpine grassland in Australia's Snowy Mountains region across a 3-week period during the late austral summer. Bi-directional GEM fluxes were observed throughout the study, with overall mean value of 0.2 ± 14.5 ng m−2 h−1 and mean nocturnal fluxes of −1.5 ± 7.8 ng m−2 h−1 compared to diurnal fluxes of 1.8 ± 18.6 ng m−2 h−1. Deposition velocities ranged from −2.2 to 2.9 cm s−1, whilst ambient GEM concentrations throughout the study were 0.59 ± 0.10 ng m−3. Cumulative GEM fluxes correlated well with 24 h running mean soil temperatures, and one precipitation event was shown to have a positive impact on diurnal emission fluxes. The underlying vegetation had largely senesced and showed little stomatal control on fluxes. Nocturnal atmospheric mercury depletion events (NAMDEs were observed concomitant with O3 depletion and dew formation under shallow, stable nocturnal boundary layers. A mass balance box model was able to reproduce ambient GEM concentration patterns during NAMDE and non-NAMDE nights without invoking chemical oxidation of GEM throughout the column, indicating a significant role of surface processes controlling deposition in these events. Surface deposition was enhanced under NAMDE nights, though uptake to dew likely represents less than one-fifth of this enhanced deposition. Instead, enhancement of the surface GEM gradient as a result of oxidation at the surface in the presence of dew is hypothesised to be responsible for a large portion of GEM depletion during these particular events. GEM emission pulses following nights with significant deposition provide evidence for the prompt recycling of 17 % of deposited mercury, with the remaining portion retained in surface sinks. The long-term impacts of any sinks are however likely to be minimal, as

  20. Substorm topology in the ionosphere and magnetosphere during a flux rope event in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Amm

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available On 13 August 2002, at ~23:00 UT, about 10 min after a substorm intensification, Cluster observes a flux rope in the central magnetotail, followed by a localised fast flow event about oneminute later. Associated with the flux rope event, a traveling compression region (TCR is seen by those Cluster spacecraft which reside in the lobe. In the conjugate ionospheric region in Northern Scandinavia, the MIRACLE network observes the ionospheric equivalent currents, and the electron densities and electric fields are measured by the EISCAT radar along a meridional scanning profile. Further, the auroral evolution is observed with the Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC on the IMAGE satellite. We compare in detail the substorm evolution as observed in the ionosphere and in the magnetosphere, and examine whether topological correspondences to the flux rope event exist in the ionospheric signatures. The large-scale mapping of both the location and the direction of the flux rope to the ionosphere shows an excellent correspondence to a lens-shaped region of an auroral emission minimum. This region is bracketed by an auroral region equatorward of it which was preexisting to the substorm intensification, and a substorm-related auroral region poleward of it. It is characterised by reduced ionospheric conductances with respect to its environment, and downward field-aligned current (FAC observed both in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere. As determined from the ionospheric data, this downward FAC area is moving eastward with a speed of ~2 km s-1, in good agreement with the mapped plasma bulk velocity measured at the Cluster satellite closest to that area. Further southwestward to this leading downward FAC area, a trailing upward FAC area is observed that moves eastward with the same speed. The direction of the ionospheric electric field permits a current closure between these two FAC areas through the ionosphere. We speculate that these FAC areas may correspond to

  1. Study of the transfer efficiency of alloyed elements in fluxes during submerged arc welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, R.; Cruz, A.; Perdomo, L.; Castellanos, G.; Garcia, L. L.; Formoso, A.; Cores, A.

    2003-01-01

    It is assessed the transfer of chromium, manganese and carbon of different agglomerate fluxes constituted by 18.75% of alloyed load and 81.25% of matrix during the SAW process (submerge Arc Welding). A vitreous basic matrix corresponding to the system SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -(CaO+MgO) was obtained from minerals by fusion in the electric arc furnace. The current proportions of the alloyed load components (FeCr, FeMn and graphite) were carried out using a McLean Anderson experiment design. The corresponding fluxes to each experimental point were obtained by granulation with liquid glass;afterwards, their transfer coefficient for a given regimen of welding was determined. The transfer coefficients were calculated by means of a formula based on the laws of mass conservation and of distribution. (Author) 17 refs

  2. Characteristics of ion distribution functions in dipolarizing flux bundles: Event studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runov, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Artemyev, A.; Birn, J.; Pritchett, P. L.; Zhou, X.-Z.

    2017-06-01

    Taking advantage of multipoint observations from a repeating configuration of the five Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) probes separated by 1 to 2 Earth radii (RE) along X, Y, and Z in the geocentric solar magnetospheric system (GSM), we study ion distribution functions collected by the probes during three dipolarizing flux bundle (DFB) events observed at geocentric distances 9 energy and twice the thermal energy, although the distribution in the ambient plasma sheet was isotropic. The anisotropic ion distribution in DFBs injected toward the inner magnetosphere may provide the free energy for waves and instabilities, which are important elements of particle energization.

  3. On which timescales do gas transfer velocities control North Atlantic CO2 flux variability?

    OpenAIRE

    Couldrey, Matthew; Oliver, Kevin; Yool, Andrew; Halloran, Paul; Achterberg, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The North Atlantic is an important basin for the global ocean's uptake of anthropogenic and natural carbon dioxide (CO2), but the mechanisms controlling this carbon flux are not fully understood. The air-sea flux of CO2, F, is the product of a gas transfer velocity, k, the air-sea CO2 concentration gradient, ΔpCO2, and the temperature and salinity-dependent solubility coefficient, α. k is difficult to constrain, representing the dominant uncertainty in F on short (instantaneous to interannual...

  4. Evaluation of empirical heat transfer models using TFG heat flux sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Cuyper, T.; Broekaert, S.; Chana, K.; De Paepe, M.; Verhelst, S.

    2017-01-01

    Thermodynamic engine cycle models are used to support the development of the internal combustion engine (ICE) in a cost and time effective manner. The sub model which describes the in-cylinder heat transfer from the working gases to the combustion chamber walls plays an important role in the accuracy of these simulation tools. The heat transfer affects the power output, engine efficiency and emissions of the engine. The most common heat transfer models in engine research are the models of Annand and Woschni. These models provide an instantaneous spatial averaged heat flux. In this research, prototype thin film gauge (TFG) heat flux sensors are used to capture the transient in-cylinder heat flux behavior within a production spark ignition (SI) engine as they are small, robust and able to capture the highly transient temperature swings. An inlet valve and two different zones of the cylinder head are instrumented with multiple TFG sensors. The heat flux traces are used to calculate the convection coefficient which includes all information of the convective heat transfer phenomena inside the combustion chamber. The implementation of TFG sensors inside the combustion chamber and the signal processing technique are discussed. The heat transfer measurements are used to analyze the spatial variation in heat flux under motored and fired operation. Spatial variation in peak heat flux was observed even under motored operation. Under fired operation the observed spatial variation is mainly driven by the flame propagation. Next, the paper evaluates the models of Annand and Woschni. These models fail to predict the total heat loss even with calibration of the models coefficients using a reference motored operating condition. The effect of engine speed and inlet pressure is analyzed under motored operation after calibration of the models. The models are able to predict the trend in peak heat flux value for a varying engine speed and inlet pressure. Next, the accuracy of the

  5. The importance of wind-flux feedbacks during the November CINDY-DYNAMO MJO event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley Dellaripa, Emily; Maloney, Eric; van den Heever, Susan

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution, large-domain cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations probing the importance of wind-flux feedbacks to Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) convection are performed for the November 2011 CINDY-DYNAMO MJO event. The work is motivated by observational analysis from RAMA buoys in the Indian Ocean and TRMM precipitation retrievals that show a positive correlation between MJO precipitation and wind-induced surface fluxes, especially latent heat fluxes, during and beyond the CINDY-DYNAMO time period. Simulations are done using Colorado State University's Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The domain setup is oceanic and spans 1000 km x 1000 km with 1.5 km horizontal resolution and 65 stretched vertical levels centered on the location of Gan Island - one of the major CINDY-DYNAMO observation points. The model is initialized with ECMWF reanalysis and Aqua MODIS sea surface temperatures. Nudging from ECMWF reanalysis is applied at the domain periphery to encourage realistic evolution of MJO convection. The control experiment is run for the entire month of November so both suppressed and active, as well as, transitional phases of the MJO are modeled. In the control experiment, wind-induced surface fluxes are activated through the surface bulk aerodynamic formula and allowed to evolve organically. Sensitivity experiments are done by restarting the control run one week into the simulation and controlling the wind-induced flux feedbacks. In one sensitivity experiment, wind-induced surface flux feedbacks are completely denied, while in another experiment the winds are kept constant at the control simulations mean surface wind speed. The evolution of convection, especially on the mesoscale, is compared between the control and sensitivity simulations.

  6. Heat transfer and critical heat flux in a spiral flow in an asymmetrical heated tube; Transfert thermique et flux critique dans un ecoulement helicoidal en tube chauffe asymetriquement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscary, J [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Sciences de la Matiere; [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d` Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1997-03-01

    The design of plasma facing components is crucial for plasma performance in next fusion reactors. These elements will be submitted to very high heat flux. They will be actively water-cooled by swirl tubes in the subcooled boiling regime. High heat flux experiments were conducted in order to analyse the heat transfer and to evaluate the critical heat flux. Water-cooled mock-ups were one-side heated by an electron beam gun for different thermal-hydraulic conditions. The critical heat flux was detected by an original method based on the isotherm modification on the heated surface. The wall heat transfer law including forced convection and subcooled boiling regimes was established. Numerical calculations of the material heat transfer conduction allowed the non-homogeneous distribution of the wall temperature and of the wall heat flux to be evaluated. The critical heat flux value was defined as the wall maximum heat flux. A critical heat flux model based on the liquid sublayer dryout under a vapor blanket was established. A good agreement with test results was found. (author) 197 refs.

  7. Heat transfer and critical heat flux in a asymmetrically heated tube helicoidal flow; Transfert thermique et flux critique dans un ecoulement helicoidal en tube chauffe asymetriquement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscary, J

    1995-10-01

    The design of plasma facing components is crucial for plasma performance in next fusion reactors. These elements will be submitted to very high heat flux. They will be actively water-cooled by swirl tubes in the subcooled boiling regime. High heat flux experiments were conducted in order to analyse the heat transfer and to evaluate the critical heat flux. Water-cooled mock-ups were one-side heated by an electron beam gun for different thermal-hydraulic conditions. The critical heat flux was detected by an original method based on the isotherm modification on the heated surface. The wall heat transfer law including forced convection and subcooled boiling regimes was established. Numerical calculations of the material heat transfer conduction allowed the non-homogeneous distribution of the wall temperature and of the wall heat flux to be evaluated. The critical heat flux value was defined as the wall maximum heat flux. A critical heat flux model based on the liquid sublayer dryout under a vapor blanket was established. A good agreement with test results was found. (author). 198 refs., 126 figs., 21 tabs.

  8. Heat transfer augmentation in a tube using nanofluids under constant heat flux boundary condition: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vinay; Gupta, Munish

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reviews heat transfer augmentation of nanofluids in a tube with constant heat flux. • Recent advances in hybrid nanofluids are reviewed. • Identifies and compares significant results. • Scope of future research in this area is discussed. - Abstract: In the last few decades, research on nanofluids has increased rapidly. Traditional heat transfer fluids with order of nanometer sized particles (1–100 nm) suspended in them are termed as nanofluids. Nanofluids have been proved as better heat transfer fluids despite of various contradictions in results by different research groups. The aim of this article is to review and summarize the recent experimental and theoretical studies on convective heat transfer in heat exchangers using constant heat flux boundary condition. The use of different types of nanoparticles with different base fluids by different research groups has been presented and compared. Further an overview of experimental results about heat transfer abilities of hybrid nanofluids from available literature sources is also presented. Finally, the challenges and future directions in which research can be further progress are discussed.

  9. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort

  10. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

  11. Evaluation of upward heat flux in ex-vessel molten core heat transfer using MELCOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.Y.; Park, J.H.; Kim, S.D.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to share experiences of MELCOR application to resolve the molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) issue in the Korea Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). In the evaluation of concrete erosion, the heat transfer modeling from the molten corium internal to the corium pool surface is very important and uncertain. MELCOR employs Kutateladze or Greene's bubble-enhanced heat transfer model for the internal heat transfer. The phenomenological uncertainty is so large that the model provides several model parameters in addition to the phenomenological model for user flexibility. However, the model parameters do not work on Kutateladze correlation at the top of the molten layer. From our experience, a code modification is suggested to match the upward heat flux with the experimental results. In this analysis, minor modification was carried out to calculate heat flux from the top molten layer to corium surface, and efforts were made to find out the best value of the model parameter based on upward heat flux of MACE test M1B. Discussion also includes its application to KNGR. (author)

  12. Reconstructing Heat Fluxes Over Lake Erie During the Lake Effect Snow Event of November 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, L.; Fujisaki-Manome, A.; Gronewold, A.; Anderson, E. J.; Spence, C.; Chen, J.; Shao, C.; Posselt, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Lofgren, B. M.; Schwab, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    The extreme North American winter storm of November 2014 triggered a record lake effect snowfall (LES) event in southwest New York. This study examined the evaporation from Lake Erie during the record lake effect snowfall event, November 17th-20th, 2014, by reconstructing heat fluxes and evaporation rates over Lake Erie using the unstructured grid, Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). Nine different model runs were conducted using combinations of three different flux algorithms: the Met Flux Algorithm (COARE), a method routinely used at NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (SOLAR), and the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE); and three different meteorological forcings: the Climate Forecast System version 2 Operational Analysis (CFSv2), Interpolated observations (Interp), and the High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR). A few non-FVCOM model outputs were also included in the evaporation analysis from an atmospheric reanalysis (CFSv2) and the large lake thermodynamic model (LLTM). Model-simulated water temperature and meteorological forcing data (wind direction and air temperature) were validated with buoy data at three locations in Lake Erie. The simulated sensible and latent heat fluxes were validated with the eddy covariance measurements at two offshore sites; Long Point Lighthouse in north central Lake Erie and Toledo water crib intake in western Lake Erie. The evaluation showed a significant increase in heat fluxes over three days, with the peak on the 18th of November. Snow water equivalent data from the National Snow Analyses at the National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center showed a spike in water content on the 20th of November, two days after the peak heat fluxes. The ensemble runs presented a variation in spatial pattern of evaporation, lake-wide average evaporation, and resulting cooling of the lake. Overall, the evaporation tended to be larger in deep water than shallow water near the shore. The lake-wide average evaporations

  13. Study on minimum heat-flux point during boiling heat transfer on horizontal plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Shigefumi

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of boiling heat transfer are usually shown by the boiling curve of N-shape having the maximum and minimum points. As for the limiting heat flux point, that is, the maximum point, there have been many reports so far, as it is related to the physical burn of heat flux-controlling type heating surfaces. But though the minimum heat flux point is related to the quench point as the problems in steel heat treatment, the core safety of LWRs, the operational stability of superconducting magnets, the start-up characteristics of low temperature machinery, the condition of vapor explosion occurrence and so on, the systematic information has been limited. In this study, the effects of transient property and the heat conductivity of heating surfaces on the minimum heat flux condition in the pool boiling on horizontal planes were experimentally examined by using liquid nitrogen. The experimental apparatuses for steady boiling, for unsteady boiling with a copper heating surface, and for unsteady boiling with a heating surface other than copper were employed. The boiling curves obtained with these apparatuses and the minimum heat flux point condition are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  14. Analysis of heat transfer under high heat flux nucleate boiling conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.; Dinh, N. [3145 Burlington Laboratories, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Analysis was performed for a heater infrared thermometric imaging temperature data obtained from high heat flux pool boiling and liquid film boiling experiments BETA. With the OpenFOAM solver, heat flux distribution towards the coolant was obtained by solving transient heat conduction of heater substrate given the heater surface temperature data as boundary condition. The so-obtained heat flux data was used to validate them against the state-of-art wall boiling model developed by D. R. Shaver (2015) with the assumption of micro-layer hydrodynamics. Good agreement was found between the model prediction and data for conditions away from the critical heat flux (CHF). However, the data indicate a different heat transfer pattern under CHF, which is not captured by the current model. Experimental data strengthen the notion of burnout caused by the irreversible hot spot due to failure of rewetting. The observation forms a basis for a detailed modeling of micro-layer hydrodynamics under high heat flux.

  15. Analysis of heat transfer under high heat flux nucleate boiling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Dinh, N.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis was performed for a heater infrared thermometric imaging temperature data obtained from high heat flux pool boiling and liquid film boiling experiments BETA. With the OpenFOAM solver, heat flux distribution towards the coolant was obtained by solving transient heat conduction of heater substrate given the heater surface temperature data as boundary condition. The so-obtained heat flux data was used to validate them against the state-of-art wall boiling model developed by D. R. Shaver (2015) with the assumption of micro-layer hydrodynamics. Good agreement was found between the model prediction and data for conditions away from the critical heat flux (CHF). However, the data indicate a different heat transfer pattern under CHF, which is not captured by the current model. Experimental data strengthen the notion of burnout caused by the irreversible hot spot due to failure of rewetting. The observation forms a basis for a detailed modeling of micro-layer hydrodynamics under high heat flux.

  16. Thin film heat flux sensors for accurate transient and unidirectional heat transfer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azerou, B; Garnier, B; Lahmar, J

    2012-01-01

    Heat flux measurement is needed in many heat transfer studies. For the best unbiased heat flux sensors (HFS), the heat flux is obtained using temperature measurements at different locations and also an inverse heat conduction method (function specification...) in order to calculate the heat flux. Systematic errors can come from the uncertainty in the wire thermocouples locations and from errors in the knowledge of distances between two consecutive wire thermocouples. The main idea in this work is to use thin film thermoresistances deposited on a flexible thin polymer substrate instead of wire thermocouples welded on metallic sample. The interest of using thin film thermoresistances instead of wire thermocouples is a lower disturbance due to the smaller thickness of the thin film sensors (typically less than 1μm) and a much better knowledge of the distances between the different thin film thermoresistances which are precisely defined in the mask used for the metallic thin film pattern fabrication. In this paper, we present the fabrication of the new heat flux sensor with thin film thermoresistances, the study of the effect of the self heating (due to Joule effect in thermoresistances) and the performances of this new HFS with the comparison with classical HFS using wire thermocouples. For this study, a symmetric experimental setup is used with metallic samples equipped with an etched foil heater and both classical and new HFS. For several heating conditions, it appears that a better accuracy is always obtained with the new HFS using thin film thermoresistances.

  17. Greenhouse gas fluxes in a drained peatland forest during spring frost-thaw event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Pihlatie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluxes of greenhouse gases (GHG carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O were measured during a two month campaign at a drained peatland forest in Finland by the eddy covariance (EC technique (CO2 and N2O, and automatic and manual chambers (CO2, CH4 and N2O. In addition, GHG concentrations and soil parameters (mineral nitrogen, temperature, moisture content in the peat profile were measured. The aim of the measurement campaign was to quantify the GHG fluxes during freezing and thawing of the top-soil, a time period with potentially high GHG fluxes, and to compare different flux measurement methods. The forest was a net CO2 sink during the two months and the fluxes of CO2 dominated the GHG exchange. The peat soil was a small sink of atmospheric CH4 and a small source of N2O. Both CH4 oxidation and N2O production took place in the top-soil whereas CH4 was produced in the deeper layers of the peat, which were unfrozen throughout the measurement period. During the frost-thaw events of the litter layer distinct peaks in CO2 and N2O emissions were observed. The CO2 peak followed tightly the increase in soil temperature, whereas the N2O peak occurred with a delay after the thawing of the litter layer. CH4 fluxes did not respond to the thawing of the peat soil. The CO2 and N2O emission peaks were not captured by the manual chambers and hence we conclude that high time-resolution measurements with automatic chambers or EC are necessary to quantify fluxes during peak emission periods. Sub-canopy EC measurements and chamber-based fluxes of CO2 and N2O were comparable, although the fluxes of N2O measured by EC were close to the detection limit of the system. We conclude

  18. Carbon Dioxide Transfer Through Sea Ice: Modelling Flux in Brine Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, L.; Mitchelson-Jacob, G.; Hardman-Mountford, N.

    2010-12-01

    For many years sea ice was thought to act as a barrier to the flux of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere. However, laboratory-based and in-situ observations suggest that while sea ice may in some circumstances reduce or prevent transfer (e.g. in regions of thick, superimposed multi-year ice), it may also be highly permeable (e.g. thin, first year ice) with some studies observing significant fluxes of CO2. Sea ice covered regions have been observed to act both as a sink and a source of atmospheric CO2 with the permeability of sea ice and direction of flux related to sea ice temperature and the presence of brine channels in the ice, as well as seasonal processes such as whether the ice is freezing or thawing. Brine channels concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) as well as salinity and as these dense waters descend through both the sea ice and the surface ocean waters, they create a sink for CO2. Calcium carbonate (ikaite) precipitation in the sea ice is thought to enhance this process. Micro-organisms present within the sea ice will also contribute to the CO2 flux dynamics. Recent evidence of decreasing sea ice extent and the associated change from a multi-year ice to first-year ice dominated system suggest the potential for increased CO2 flux through regions of thinner, more porous sea ice. A full understanding of the processes and feedbacks controlling the flux in these regions is needed to determine their possible contribution to global CO2 levels in a future warming climate scenario. Despite the significance of these regions, the air-sea CO2 flux in sea ice covered regions is not currently included in global climate models. Incorporating this carbon flux system into Earth System models requires the development of a well-parameterised sea ice-air flux model. In our work we use the Los Alamos sea ice model, CICE, with a modification to incorporate the movement of CO2 through brine channels including the addition of DIC processes and ice algae production to

  19. On which timescales do gas transfer velocities control North Atlantic CO2 flux variability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couldrey, Matthew P.; Oliver, Kevin I. C.; Yool, Andrew; Halloran, Paul R.; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2016-05-01

    The North Atlantic is an important basin for the global ocean's uptake of anthropogenic and natural carbon dioxide (CO2), but the mechanisms controlling this carbon flux are not fully understood. The air-sea flux of CO2, F, is the product of a gas transfer velocity, k, the air-sea CO2 concentration gradient, ΔpCO2, and the temperature- and salinity-dependent solubility coefficient, α. k is difficult to constrain, representing the dominant uncertainty in F on short (instantaneous to interannual) timescales. Previous work shows that in the North Atlantic, ΔpCO2 and k both contribute significantly to interannual F variability but that k is unimportant for multidecadal variability. On some timescale between interannual and multidecadal, gas transfer velocity variability and its associated uncertainty become negligible. Here we quantify this critical timescale for the first time. Using an ocean model, we determine the importance of k, ΔpCO2, and α on a range of timescales. On interannual and shorter timescales, both ΔpCO2 and k are important controls on F. In contrast, pentadal to multidecadal North Atlantic flux variability is driven almost entirely by ΔpCO2; k contributes less than 25%. Finally, we explore how accurately one can estimate North Atlantic F without a knowledge of nonseasonal k variability, finding it possible for interannual and longer timescales. These findings suggest that continued efforts to better constrain gas transfer velocities are necessary to quantify interannual variability in the North Atlantic carbon sink. However, uncertainty in k variability is unlikely to limit the accuracy of estimates of longer-term flux variability.

  20. Impact of melting heat transfer and nonlinear radiative heat flux mechanisms for the generalized Burgers fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqar Azeem Khan

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the analysis of melting heat and mass transfer characteristics in the stagnation point flow of an incompressible generalized Burgers fluid over a stretching sheet in the presence of non-linear radiative heat flux. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. The governing equations in dimensional form are reduced to a system of dimensionless expressions by implementation of suitable similarity transformations. The resulting dimensionless problem governing the generalized Burgers is solved analytically by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM. The effects of different flow parameters like the ratio parameter, magnetic parameter, Prandtl number, melting parameter, radiation parameter, temperature ratio parameter and Schmidt number on the velocity, heat and mass transfer characteristics are computed and presented graphically. Moreover, useful discussions in detail are carried out with the help of plotted graphs and tables. Keywords: Generalized Burgers fluid, Non-linear radiative flow, Magnetic field, Melting heat transfer

  1. Extreme fluxes in solar energetic particle events: Methodological and physical limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miroshnichenko, L.I.; Nymmik, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, all available data on the largest solar proton events (SPEs), or extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) events, for the period from 1561 up to now are analyzed. Under consideration are the observational, methodological and physical problems of energy-spectrum presentation for SEP fluxes (fluences) near the Earth's orbit. Special attention is paid to the study of the distribution function for extreme fluences of SEPs by their sizes. The authors present advances in at least three aspects: 1) a form of the distribution function that was previously obtained from the data for three cycles of solar activity has been completely confirmed by the data for 41 solar cycles; 2) early estimates of extremely large fluences in the past have been critically revised, and their values were found to be overestimated; and 3) extremely large SEP fluxes are shown to obey a probabilistic distribution, so the concept of an “upper limit flux” does not carry any strict physical sense although it serves as an important empirical restriction. SEP fluxes may only be characterized by the relative probabilities of their appearance, and there is a sharp break in the spectrum in the range of large fluences (or low probabilities). It is emphasized that modern observational data and methods of investigation do not allow, for the present, the precise resolution of the problem of the spectrum break or the estimation of the maximum potentialities of solar accelerator(s). This limitation considerably restricts the extrapolation of the obtained results to the past and future for application to the epochs with different levels of solar activity. - Highlights: • All available data on the largest solar proton events (SPEs) are analyzed. • Distribution function obtained for 3 last cycles is confirmed for 41 solar cycles. • Estimates of extremely large fluences in the past are found to be overestimated. • Extremely large SEP fluxes are shown to obey a probabilistic distribution.

  2. Monte Carlo next-event point flux estimation for RCP01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, R.L.; Gast, R.C.; Tyburski, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    Two next event point estimators have been developed and programmed into the RCP01 Monte Carlo program for solving neutron transport problems in three-dimensional geometry with detailed energy description. These estimators use a simplified but accurate flux-at-a-point tallying technique. Anisotropic scattering in the lab system at the collision site is accounted for by determining the exit energy that corresponds to the angle between the location of the collision and the point detector. Elastic, inelastic, and thermal kernel scattering events are included in this formulation. An averaging technique is used in both estimators to eliminate the well-known problem of infinite variance due to collisions close to the point detector. In a novel approach to improve the estimator's efficiency, a Russian roulette scheme based on anticipated flux fall off is employed where averaging is not appropriate. A second estimator successfully uses a simple rejection technique in conjunction with detailed tracking where averaging isn't needed. Test results show good agreement with known numeric solutions. Efficiencies are examined as a function of input parameter selection and problem difficulty

  3. A Jet Source of Event Horizon Telescope Correlated Flux in M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsly, Brian

    2017-12-01

    Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) observations at 230 GHz are combined with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations at 86 GHz and high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope optical observations in order to constrain the broadband spectrum of the emission from the base of the jet in M87. The recent VLBI observations of Hada et al. provide much stricter limits on the 86 GHz luminosity and component acceleration in the jet base than were available to previous modelers. They reveal an almost hollow jet on sub-mas scales. Thus, tubular models of the jet base emanating from the innermost accretion disk are considered within the region responsible for the EHT correlated flux. There is substantial synchrotron self-absorbed opacity at 86 GHz. A parametric analysis indicates that the jet dimensions and power depend strongly on the 86 GHz flux density and the black hole spin, but depend weakly on other parameters, such as jet speed, 230 GHz flux density, and optical flux. The entire power budget of the M87 jet, ≲ {10}44 {erg} {{{s}}}-1, can be accommodated by the tubular jet. No invisible, powerful spine is required. Even though this analysis never employs the resolution of the EHT, the spectral shape implies a dimension transverse to the jet direction of 12-21 μ {as} (˜ 24{--}27 μ {as}) for 0.99> a/M> 0.95 (a/M˜ 0.7), where M is the mass and a is the angular momentum per unit mass of the central black hole.

  4. ANL ITER high-heat-flux blanket-module heat transfer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasza, K.E.

    1992-02-01

    An Argonne National Laboratory facility for conducting tests on multilayered slab models of fusion blanket designs is being developed; some of its features are described. This facility will allow testing under prototypic high heat fluxes, high temperatures, thermal gradients, and variable mechanical loadings in a helium gas environment. Steady and transient heat flux tests are possible. Electrical heating by a two-sided, thin stainless steel (SS) plate electrical resistance heater and SS water-cooled cold panels placed symmetrically on both sides of the heater allow achievement of global one-dimensional heat transfer across blanket specimen layers sandwiched between the hot and cold plates. The heat transfer characteristics at interfaces, as well as macroscale and microscale thermomechanical interactions between layers, can be studied in support of the ITER engineering design effort. The engineering design of the test apparatus has shown that it is important to use multidimensional thermomechanical analysis of sandwich-type composites to adequately analyze heat transfer. This fact will also be true for the engineering design of ITER

  5. Heat transfer augmentation for high heat flux removal in rib-roughened narrow channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.S.; Hino, Ryutaro; Haga, Katsuhiro; Sudo, Yukio; Monde, Masanori.

    1997-03-01

    Heat transfer augmentation in narrow rectangular channels in a target system is a very important method to remove high heat flux up to 12 MW/m 2 generated at target plates of a high-intensity proton accelerator of 1.5 GeV and 1 mA with a proton beam power of 1.5 MW. In this report, heat transfer coefficients and friction factors in narrow rectangular channels with one-sided rib-roughened surface were evaluated for fully developed flows in the range of the Reynolds number from 6,000 to 1,00,000; the rib pitch-to-height ratios (p/k) were 10,20 and 30; the rib height-to-equivalent diameter ratios (k/De) were 0.025, 0.03 and 0.1 by means of previous existing experimental correlations. The rib-roughened surface augmented heat transfer coefficients approximately 4 times higher than the smooth surface at Re=10,000, p/k=10 and k/De=0.1; friction factors increase around 22 times higher. In this case, higher heat flux up to 12 MW/m 2 could be removed from the rib-roughened surface without flow boiling which induces flow instability; but pressure drop reaches about 1.8 MPa. Correlations obtained by air-flow experiments have showed lower heat transfer performance with the water-flow conditions. The experimental apparatus was proposed for further investigation on heat transfer augmentation in very narrow channels under water-flow conditions. This report presents the evaluation results and an outline of the test apparatus. (author)

  6. Surface wettability effects on critical heat flux of boiling heat transfer using nanoparticle coatings

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Chin-Chi

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nano-silica particle coatings were used to vary the wettability of the copper surface from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic by modifying surface topography and chemistry. Experimental results show that critical heat flux (CHF) values are higher in the hydrophilic region. Conversely, CHF values are lower in the hydrophobic region. The experimental CHF data of the modified surface do not fit the classical models. Therefore, this study proposes a simple model to build the nexus between the surface wettability and the growth of bubbles on the heating surface. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ion transfer through solvent polymeric membranes driven by an exponential current flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, A; Torralba, E; González, J; Serna, C; Ortuño, J A

    2011-03-21

    General analytical equations which govern ion transfer through liquid membranes with one and two polarized interfaces driven by an exponential current flux are derived. Expressions for the transient and stationary E-t, dt/dE-E and dI/dE-E curves are obtained, and the evolution from transient to steady behaviour has been analyzed in depth. We have also shown mathematically that the voltammetric and stationary chronopotentiometric I(N)-E curves are identical (with E being the applied potential for voltammetric techniques and the measured potential for chronopotentiometric techniques), and hence, their derivatives provide identical information.

  8. Disjunct eddy covariance measurements of volatile organic compound fluxes using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taipale, R.

    2011-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources, vegetation being the dominant source on a global scale. Some of these reactive compounds are deemed major contributors or inhibitors to aerosol particle formation and growth, thus making VOC measurements essential for current climate change research. This thesis discusses ecosystem scale VOC fluxes measured above a boreal Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland. The flux measurements were performed using the micrometeorological disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), which is an online technique for measuring VOC concentrations. The measurement, calibration, and calculation procedures developed in this work proved to be well suited to long-term VOC concentration and flux measurements with PTR-MS. A new averaging approach based on running averaged covariance functions improved the determination of the lag time between wind and concentration measurements, which is a common challenge in DEC when measuring fluxes near the detection limit. The ecosystem scale emissions of methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone were substantial. These three oxygenated VOCs made up about half of the total emissions, with the rest comprised of monoterpenes. Contrary to the traditional assumption that monoterpene emissions from Scots pine originate mainly as evaporation from specialized storage pools, the DEC measurements indicated a significant contribution from de novo biosynthesis to the ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions. This thesis offers practical guidelines for long-term DEC measurements with PTR-MS. In particular, the new averaging approach to the lag time determination seems useful in the automation of DEC flux calculations. Seasonal variation in the monoterpene biosynthesis and the detailed structure of a revised hybrid algorithm, describing both de novo and pool emissions, should be determined in

  9. Responses of CO2 Fluxes to Arctic Browning Events in a Range of High Latitude, Shrub-Dominated Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, G. K.; Treharne, R.; Emberson, L.; Tømmervik, H. A.; Bjerke, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Climatic and biotic extreme events can result in considerable damage to arctic vegetation, often at landscape and larger scale. These acute events therefore contribute to the browning observed in some arctic regions. It is of considerable concern, therefore, that such extreme events are increasing in frequency as part of climate change. However, despite the increasing importance of browning events, and the considerable impact they can have on ecosystems, to date there is little understanding of their impacts on ecosystem carbon fluxes. To address this, the impacts of a number of different, commonly occurring, extreme events and their subsequent browning (vegetation damage) on key ecosystem CO2 fluxes were assessed during the growing season at a range of event damaged sites of shrub dominated vegetation. Sites were located from the boreal to High Arctic (64˚N-79˚N) and had been previously been damaged by events of frost-drought, extreme winter warming, ground icing and caterpillar (Epirrita autumnata) outbreaks. Plot-level CO2 fluxes of Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (Reco) were assessed using vegetation chambers. At a sub-set of sites, NDVI (greenness) in flux plots was also assessed by hand-held proximal sensor, allowing the relationship between NDVI of damage plots to CO2 flux to be calculated. Despite the contrasting sites and drivers, damage had consistent, major impacts on all fluxes. All sites showed reductions in GPP and NEE with increasing damage, despite efflux from Reco also declining with damage. When scaled to site-level, reductions of up to 81% of NEE, 51% of GPP and 37% of Reco were observed. In the plot-level NDVI-flux relationship, NDVI was shown to explain up to 91% of variation in GPP, and therefore supports the use of NDVI for estimating changes in ecosystem CO2 flux at larger scales in regions where browning has been driven by extreme events. This work is the first attempt to quantify the

  10. Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    . FLUX betegner en flyden eller strømmen, dvs. dynamik. Forstår man livet som proces og udvikling i stedet for som ting og mekanik, får man et andet billede af det gode liv end det, som den velkendte vestlige mekanicisme lægger op til. Dynamisk forstået indebærer det gode liv den bedst mulige...... kanalisering af den flux eller energi, der strømmer igennem os og giver sig til kende i vore daglige aktiviteter. Skal vores tanker, handlinger, arbejde, samvær og politiske liv organiseres efter stramme og faste regelsæt, uden slinger i valsen? Eller skal de tværtimod forløbe ganske uhindret af regler og bånd...

  11. Flux balance modeling to predict bacterial survival during pulsed-activity events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Nicholas A.; Lau, Rebecca; Swenson, Tami L.; Klitgord, Niels; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Baran, Richard; Northen, Trent R.

    2018-04-01

    Desert biological soil crusts (BSCs) are cyanobacteria-dominated surface soil microbial communities common to plant interspaces in arid environments. The capability to significantly dampen their metabolism allows them to exist for extended periods in a desiccated dormant state that is highly robust to environmental stresses. However, within minutes of wetting, metabolic functions reboot, maximizing activity during infrequent permissive periods. Microcoleus vaginatus, a primary producer within the crust ecosystem and an early colonizer, initiates crust formation by binding particles in the upper layer of soil via exopolysaccharides, making microbial dominated biological soil crusts highly dependent on the viability of this organism. Previous studies have suggested that biopolymers play a central role in the survival of this organism by powering resuscitation, rapidly forming compatible solutes, and fueling metabolic activity in dark, hydrated conditions. To elucidate the mechanism of this phenomenon and provide a basis for future modeling of BSCs, we developed a manually curated, genome-scale metabolic model of Microcoleus vaginatus (iNJ1153). To validate this model, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) were used to characterize the rate of biopolymer accumulation and depletion in in hydrated Microcoleus vaginatus under light and dark conditions. Constraint-based flux balance analysis showed agreement between model predictions and experimental reaction fluxes. A significant amount of consumed carbon and light energy is invested into storage molecules glycogen and polyphosphate, while β-polyhydroxybutyrate may function as a secondary resource. Pseudo-steady-state modeling suggests that glycogen, the primary carbon source with the fastest depletion rate, will be exhausted if M. vaginatus experiences dark wetting events 4 times longer than light wetting events.

  12. The Role of the Velocity Gradient in Laminar Convective Heat Transfer through a Tube with a Uniform Wall Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Bi; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xiao-Xia

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of convective heat transfer. For this purpose, the reason why thermal diffusivity should be placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux, and the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer are analysed. The background to these analyses is that, when the energy…

  13. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology - The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transfers, occurs in a cascade in many biological processes, including photosynthesis. ... the model reactions of photosynthetic ... biological relevance. GENERAL I ARTICLE of electrons, respectively. This has entirely changed the earlier framework of interpreting reactions in chemistry and biology. This shift in emphasis ...

  14. The FluxCompensator: Making Radiative Transfer Models of Hydrodynamical Simulations Directly Comparable to Real Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P., E-mail: koepferl@usm.lmu.de [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-11-01

    When modeling astronomical objects throughout the universe, it is important to correctly treat the limitations of the data, for instance finite resolution and sensitivity. In order to simulate these effects, and to make radiative transfer models directly comparable to real observations, we have developed an open-source Python package called the FluxCompensator that enables the post-processing of the output of 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, such as Hyperion. With the FluxCompensator, realistic synthetic observations can be generated by modeling the effects of convolution with arbitrary point-spread functions, transmission curves, finite pixel resolution, noise, and reddening. Pipelines can be applied to compute synthetic observations that simulate observatories, such as the Spitzer Space Telescope or the Herschel Space Observatory . Additionally, this tool can read in existing observations (e.g., FITS format) and use the same settings for the synthetic observations. In this paper, we describe the package as well as present examples of such synthetic observations.

  15. The FluxCompensator: Making Radiative Transfer Models of Hydrodynamical Simulations Directly Comparable to Real Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P.

    2017-11-01

    When modeling astronomical objects throughout the universe, it is important to correctly treat the limitations of the data, for instance finite resolution and sensitivity. In order to simulate these effects, and to make radiative transfer models directly comparable to real observations, we have developed an open-source Python package called the FluxCompensator that enables the post-processing of the output of 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, such as Hyperion. With the FluxCompensator, realistic synthetic observations can be generated by modeling the effects of convolution with arbitrary point-spread functions, transmission curves, finite pixel resolution, noise, and reddening. Pipelines can be applied to compute synthetic observations that simulate observatories, such as the Spitzer Space Telescope or the Herschel Space Observatory. Additionally, this tool can read in existing observations (e.g., FITS format) and use the same settings for the synthetic observations. In this paper, we describe the package as well as present examples of such synthetic observations.

  16. Correlations of Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical Heat Flux for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Yang; F. B. Cheung; J. L. Rempe; K. Y. Suh; S. B. Kim

    2005-01-01

    Four types of steady-state boiling experiments were conducted to investigate the efficacy of two distinctly different heat transfer enhancement methods for external reactor vessel cooling under severe accident conditions. One method involved the use of a thin vessel coating and the other involved the use of an enhanced insulation structure. By comparing the results obtained in the four types of experiments, the separate and integral effect of vessel coating and insulation structure were determined. Correlation equations were obtained for the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the critical heat flux. It was found that both enhancement methods were quite effective. Depending on the angular location, the local critical heat flux could be enhanced by 1.4 to 2.5 times using vessel coating alone whereas it could be enhanced by 1.8 to 3.0 times using an enhanced insulation structure alone. When both vessel coating and insulation structure were used simultaneously, the integral effect on the enhancement was found much less than the product of the two separate effects, indicating possible competing mechanisms (i.e., interference) between the two enhancement methods

  17. Convective boundary layer flow and heat transfer in a nanofluid in the presence of second order slip, constant heat flux and zero nanoparticles flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, M.M., E-mail: mansurdu@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, PO Box 36, PC 123 Al-Khod, Muscat (Oman); Al-Rashdi, Maryam H. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, PO Box 36, PC 123 Al-Khod, Muscat (Oman); Pop, I. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca 400084 (Romania)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Convective boundary layer flow and heat transfer in a nanofluid is investigated. • Second order slip increases the rate of shear stress and decreases the rate of heat transfer in a nanofluid. • In nanofluid flow zero normal flux of the nanoparticles at the surface is realistic to apply. • Multiple solutions are identified for certain values of the parameter space. • The upper branch solution is found to be stable, hence physically realizable. - Abstract: In this work, the effects of the second order slip, constant heat flux, and zero normal flux of the nanoparticles due to thermophoresis on the convective boundary layer flow and heat transfer characteristics in a nanofluid using Buongiorno's model over a permeable shrinking sheet is studied theoretically. The nonlinear coupled similarity equations are solved using the function bvp4c using Matlab. Similarity solutions of the flow, heat transfer and nanoparticles volume fraction are presented graphically for several values of the model parameters. The results show that the application of second order slip at the interface is found to be increased the rate of shear stress and decreased the rate of heat transfer in a nanofluid, so need to be taken into account in nanofluid modeling. The results further indicate that multiple solutions exist for certain values of the parameter space. The stability analysis provides guarantee that the lower branch solution is unstable, while the upper branch solution is stable and physically realizable.

  18. The role of the velocity gradient in laminar convective heat transfer through a tube with a uniform wall heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liangbi; Zhang Qiang; Li Xiaoxia

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of convective heat transfer. For this purpose, the reason why thermal diffusivity should be placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux, and the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer are analysed. The background to these analyses is that, when the energy conservation equation of convective heat transfer is used to explain convective heat transfer there are two points that are difficult for teachers to explain and for undergraduates to understand: thermal diffusivity is placed before the Laplacian operator of temperature; on the wall surface (the fluid side) the velocity is zero, a diffusion equation of temperature is gained from energy conservation equation, however, temperature cannot be transported. Consequently, the real physical meaning of thermal diffusivity is not clearly reflected in the energy conservation equation, and whether heat transfer occurs through a diffusion process or a convection process on the wall surface is not clear. Through a simple convective heat transfer case: laminar convective heat transfer in a tube with a uniform wall heat flux on the tube wall, this paper explains these points more clearly. The results declare that it is easier for teachers to explain and for undergraduates to understand these points when a description of heat transfer in terms of the heat flux is used. In this description, thermal diffusivity is placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux; the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer appears, on the wall surface, the fact whether heat transfer occurs through a diffusion process or a convection process can be explained and understood easily. The results are not only essential for teachers to improve the efficiency of university-level physics education regarding heat transfer, but they also enrich the theories for understanding heat transfer

  19. Gradient flux measurements of sea–air DMS transfer during the Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Smith

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Direct measurements of marine dimethylsulfide (DMS fluxes are sparse, particularly in the Southern Ocean. The Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP voyage in February–March 2012 examined the distribution and flux of DMS in a biologically active frontal system in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Three distinct phytoplankton blooms were studied with oceanic DMS concentrations as high as 25 nmol L−1. Measurements of DMS fluxes were made using two independent methods: the eddy covariance (EC technique using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization–mass spectrometry (API-CIMS and the gradient flux (GF technique from an autonomous catamaran platform. Catamaran flux measurements are relatively unaffected by airflow distortion and are made close to the water surface, where gas gradients are largest. Flux measurements were complemented by near-surface hydrographic measurements to elucidate physical factors influencing DMS emission. Individual DMS fluxes derived by EC showed significant scatter and, at times, consistent departures from the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment gas transfer algorithm (COAREG. A direct comparison between the two flux methods was carried out to separate instrumental effects from environmental effects and showed good agreement with a regression slope of 0.96 (r2 = 0.89. A period of abnormal downward atmospheric heat flux enhanced near-surface ocean stratification and reduced turbulent exchange, during which GF and EC transfer velocities showed good agreement but modelled COAREG values were significantly higher. The transfer velocity derived from near-surface ocean turbulence measurements on a spar buoy compared well with the COAREG model in general but showed less variation. This first direct comparison between EC and GF fluxes of DMS provides confidence in compilation of flux estimates from both techniques, as well as in the stable periods when the observations are not well predicted by the COAREG

  20. Gradient flux measurements of sea-air DMS transfer during the Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP) experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Murray J.; Walker, Carolyn F.; Bell, Thomas G.; Harvey, Mike J.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Law, Cliff S.

    2018-04-01

    Direct measurements of marine dimethylsulfide (DMS) fluxes are sparse, particularly in the Southern Ocean. The Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP) voyage in February-March 2012 examined the distribution and flux of DMS in a biologically active frontal system in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Three distinct phytoplankton blooms were studied with oceanic DMS concentrations as high as 25 nmol L-1. Measurements of DMS fluxes were made using two independent methods: the eddy covariance (EC) technique using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (API-CIMS) and the gradient flux (GF) technique from an autonomous catamaran platform. Catamaran flux measurements are relatively unaffected by airflow distortion and are made close to the water surface, where gas gradients are largest. Flux measurements were complemented by near-surface hydrographic measurements to elucidate physical factors influencing DMS emission. Individual DMS fluxes derived by EC showed significant scatter and, at times, consistent departures from the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment gas transfer algorithm (COAREG). A direct comparison between the two flux methods was carried out to separate instrumental effects from environmental effects and showed good agreement with a regression slope of 0.96 (r2 = 0.89). A period of abnormal downward atmospheric heat flux enhanced near-surface ocean stratification and reduced turbulent exchange, during which GF and EC transfer velocities showed good agreement but modelled COAREG values were significantly higher. The transfer velocity derived from near-surface ocean turbulence measurements on a spar buoy compared well with the COAREG model in general but showed less variation. This first direct comparison between EC and GF fluxes of DMS provides confidence in compilation of flux estimates from both techniques, as well as in the stable periods when the observations are not well predicted by the COAREG model.

  1. Radiation phenomena and particle fluxes in the X-event in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckel, H J; Bartlett, D V; Falter, H; Lingertat, J; Reichle, R [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    The radiation build-up and the particle fluxes in the phase, immediately preceding the X-event, has been studied bolometrically and using spectroscopy. The results show that the H-mode phase in high performance discharges tends to collapse irreversibly. The (calculated) target temperature just before the X-event amounts to about 1400 C. Any deterioration of confinement at this temperature leads to run-away conditions of the target temperature and a final fall-back into L-mode. Possible causes of the confinement deterioration are: MHD activities can cause a fast plasma loss and, hence, a power flash, dumped on the divertor target, leading to a temperature jump of up to 1000 C; enhanced recycling, due to thermal release of trapped deuterium from the graphite target plates causes an effective plasma edge cooling; loose graphite on the target tiles with virtually no thermal coupling to the target bulk can be sublimated and ejected into the main plasma with even small power levels. An active cooling, keeping the bulk target at ambient temperature could make the discharge more resilient against even medium MHD instabilities, as e.g. giant ELMs. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  2. 31P magnetization transfer measurements of Pi→ATP flux in exercising human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, Alison; Savage, David B; Williams, Guy B; Porter, David; Carpenter, T Adrian; Brindle, Kevin M; Kemp, Graham J

    2016-03-15

    Fundamental criticisms have been made over the use of (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) magnetization transfer estimates of inorganic phosphate (Pi)→ATP flux (VPi-ATP) in human resting skeletal muscle for assessing mitochondrial function. Although the discrepancy in the magnitude of VPi-ATP is now acknowledged, little is known about its metabolic determinants. Here we use a novel protocol to measure VPi-ATP in human exercising muscle for the first time. Steady-state VPi-ATP was measured at rest and over a range of exercise intensities and compared with suprabasal oxidative ATP synthesis rates estimated from the initial rates of postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis (VATP). We define a surplus Pi→ATP flux as the difference between VPi-ATP and VATP. The coupled reactions catalyzed by the glycolytic enzymes GAPDH and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) have been shown to catalyze measurable exchange between ATP and Pi in some systems and have been suggested to be responsible for this surplus flux. Surplus VPi-ATP did not change between rest and exercise, even though the concentrations of Pi and ADP, which are substrates for GAPDH and PGK, respectively, increased as expected. However, involvement of these enzymes is suggested by correlations between absolute and surplus Pi→ATP flux, both at rest and during exercise, and the intensity of the phosphomonoester peak in the (31)P NMR spectrum. This peak includes contributions from sugar phosphates in the glycolytic pathway, and changes in its intensity may indicate changes in downstream glycolytic intermediates, including 3-phosphoglycerate, which has been shown to influence the exchange between ATP and Pi catalyzed by GAPDH and PGK. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Air bubble migration is a random event post embryo transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confino, E; Zhang, J; Risquez, F

    2007-06-01

    Air bubble location following embryo transfer (ET) is the presumable placement spot of embryos. The purpose of this study was to document endometrial air bubble position and migration following embryo transfer. Multicenter prospective case study. Eighty-eight embryo transfers were performed under abdominal ultrasound guidance in two countries by two authors. A single or double air bubble was loaded with the embryos using a soft, coaxial, end opened catheters. The embryos were slowly injected 10-20 mm from the fundus. Air bubble position was recorded immediately, 30 minutes later and when the patient stood up. Bubble marker location analysis revealed a random distribution without visible gravity effect when the patients stood up. The bubble markers demonstrated splitting, moving in all directions and dispersion. Air bubbles move and split frequently post ET with the patient in the horizontal position, suggestive of active uterine contractions. Bubble migration analysis supports a rather random movement of the bubbles and possibly the embryos. Standing up changed somewhat bubble configuration and distribution in the uterine cavity. Gravity related bubble motion was uncommon, suggesting that horizontal rest post ET may not be necessary. This report challenges the common belief that a very accurate ultrasound guided embryo placement is mandatory. The very random bubble movement observed in this two-center study suggests that a large "window" of embryo placement maybe present.

  4. Flow boiling heat transfer of R134a and R404A in a microfin tube at low mass fluxes and low heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Klaus; Müller-Steinhagen, Hans

    2009-05-01

    An experimental investigation of flow boiling heat transfer in a commercially available microfin tube with 9.52 mm outer diameter has been carried out. The microfin tube is made of copper with a total fin number of 55 and a helix angle of 15°. The fin height is 0.24 mm and the inner tube diameter at fin root is 8.95 mm. The test tube is 1 m long and is electrically heated. The experiments have been performed at saturation temperatures between 0 and -20°C. The mass flux was varied between 25 and 150 kg/m2s, the heat flux from 15,000 W/m2 down to 1,000 W/m2. All measurements have been performed at constant inlet vapour quality ranging from 0.1 to 0.7. The measured heat transfer coefficients range from 1,300 to 15,700 W/m2K for R134a and from 912 to 11,451 W/m2K for R404A. The mean heat transfer coefficient of R134a is in average 1.5 times higher than for R404A. The mean heat transfer coefficient has been compared with the correlations by Koyama et al. and by Kandlikar. The deviations are within ±30% and ±15%, respectively. The influence of the mass flux on the heat transfer is most significant between 25 and 62.5 kg/m2s, where the flow pattern changes from stratified wavy flow to almost annular flow. This flow pattern transition is shifted to lower mass fluxes for the microfin tube compared to the smooth tube.

  5. Heat transfer in boundary layer stagnation-point flow towards a shrinking sheet with non-uniform heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya Krishnendu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of non-uniform heat flux on heat transfer in boundary layer stagnation-point flow over a shrinking sheet is studied. The variable boundary heat fluxes are considered of two types: direct power-law variation with the distance along the sheet and inverse power-law variation with the distance. The governing partial differential equations (PDEs) are transformed into non linear self-similar ordinary differential equations (ODEs) by similarity transformations, and then those are solved using very efficient shooting method. The direct variation and inverse variation of heat flux along the sheet have completely different effects on the temperature distribution. Moreover, the heat transfer characteristics in the presence of non-uniform heat flux for several values of physical parameters are also found to be interesting

  6. Experimental investigation of pool boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux on a downward facing surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocmanac, M.; Luxat, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    A separate effects experimental study of heat transfer and Critical Heat Flux (CHF) on a downward facing plate in subcooled water pool boiling is described. Two geometries of downwards facing surfaces are studied. The first is termed the 'confined' study in which bubble motion is restricted to the heated surface. The second is termed the 'unconfined' study where individual bubbles are free to move along the heated surface and vent in any direction. The method used in the confined study is novel and involves the placement of a lip surrounding the heated surface. The CHF as a function of angle of inclination of the surface is presented and is in good agreement with other experimental data from somewhat different test geometries. (author)

  7. Boiling Heat Transfer Coefficients of Nanofluids Containing Carbon Nanotubes up to Critical Heat Fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ki Jung; Lee, Yohan; Jung, Dong Soo; Shim, Sang Eun

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) and critical heat flux (CHF) for a smooth and square flat heater in a pool of pure water with and without carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dispersed at 60 .deg. C were measured. Tested aqueous nanofluids were prepared using CNTs with volume concentrations of 0.0001%, 0.001%, and 0.01%. The CNTs were dispersed by chemically treating them with an acid in the absence of any polymers. The results showed that the pool boiling HTCs of the nanofluids are higher than those of pure water in the entire nucleate boiling regime. The acid-treated CNTs led to the deposition of a small amount of CNTs on the surface, and the CNTs themselves acted as heat-transfer-enhancing particles, owing to their very high thermal conductivity. There was a significant increase in the CHF- up to 150%-when compared to that of pure water containing CNTs with a volume concentration of 0.001%. This is attributed to the change in surface characteristics due to the deposition of a very thin layer of CNTs on the surface. This layer delays nucleate boiling and causes a reduction in the size of the large vapor canopy around the CHF. This results in a significant increase in the CHF

  8. MMS observations of magnetic reconnection signatures of dissipating ion inertial-scale flux ropes associated with dipolarization events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Lu, S.; Le, G.; Cassak, P.; Eastwood, J. P.; Ozturk, D. S.; Zou, S.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Russell, C. T.; Gershman, D. J.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C.; Moore, T. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    The formation of flux ropes is thought to be an integral part of the process that may have important consequences for the onset and subsequent rate of reconnection in the tail. Earthward flows, i.e. bursty bulk flows (BBFs), generate dipolarization fronts (DFs) as they interact with the closed magnetic flux in their path. Global hybrid simulations and THEMIS observations have shown that earthward-moving flux ropes can undergo magnetic reconnection with the near-Earth dipole field in the downtail region between the Near Earth Neutral Line and the near-Earth dipole field to create DFs-like signatures. In this study, we analyzed sequential "chains" of earthward-moving, ion-scale flux ropes embedded within DFs observed during MMS first tail season. MMS high-resolution plasma measurements indicate that these earthward flux ropes embedded in DFs have a mean bulk flow velocity and diameter of 250 km/s and 1000 km ( 2‒3 ion inertial length λi), respectively. Magnetic reconnection signatures preceding the flux rope/DF encounter were also observed. As the southward-pointing magnetic field in the leading edge of the flux rope reconnects with the northward-pointing geomagnetic field, the characteristic quadrupolar Hall magnetic field in the ion diffusion region and electron outflow jets in the north-south direction are observed. Our results strongly suggest that the earthward moving flux ropes brake and gradually dissipate due to magnetic reconnection with the near Earth magnetic field. We have also examined the occurrence rate of these dissipating flux ropes/DF events as a function of downtail distances.

  9. A Novel Approach to Estimating Nitrous Oxide Emissions during Wetting Events from Single-Timepoint Flux Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian W; Needelman, Brian A; Cavigelli, Michel A; Yarwood, Stephanie A; Maul, Jude E; Bagley, Gwendolyn A; Mirsky, Steven B

    2017-03-01

    Precipitation and irrigation induce pulses of NO emissions in agricultural soils, but the magnitude, duration, and timing of these pulses remain uncertain. This uncertainty makes it difficult to accurately extrapolate emissions from unmeasured time periods between chamber sampling events. Therefore, we developed a modeling protocol to predict NO emissions from data collected daily for 7 d after wetting events. Within a cover crop-based corn ( L.) production system in Beltsville, MD, we conducted the 7-d time series during four time periods representing a range of corn growth stages in 2013 and 2014. Treatments included mixtures and monocultures of grass and legume cover crops that were fertilized with pelletized poultry litter or urea-ammonium nitrate solution (9-276 kg N ha). Most fluxes did not exhibit the expected exponential decay over time (82%); therefore, cumulative emissions were calculated using trapezoidal integration over 7 d after the wetting event. Cumulative 7-d emissions were well correlated with single point gas fluxes on the second day after a wetting event using a generalized linear mixed model (ln[emissions] = 0.809∙ln[flux] + 2.47). Soil chemical covariates before or after a wetting event were weakly associated with cumulative emissions. The ratio of dissolved organic C to total inorganic N was negatively correlated with cumulative emissions ( = 0.23-0.29), whereas nitrate was positively correlated with cumulative emissions ( = 0.23-0.33). Our model is an innovative approach that is calibrated using site-specific time series data, which may then be used to estimate short-term NO emissions after wetting events using only a single flux measurement. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Experimental result of BWR post-CHF tests. Critical heat flux and post-CHF heat transfer coefficient. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Anoda, Yoshinari

    2002-02-01

    Authors performed post-CHF experiments under wider pressure ranges of 2 MPa - 18 MPa, wider mass flux ranges of 33 kg/m 2 s - 1651 kg/m 2 s and wider superheat of heaters up to 500 K in comparison to experimental ranges at previous post-CHF experiments. Data on boiling transition, critical heat flux and post-CHF heat transfer coefficient were obtained. Used test section was 4x4-rod bundle with heaters, which diameter and length were the same as those of BWR nuclear fuels. As the result of the experiments, it was found that the boiling transition occurred just below several grid spacers, and that the fronts of the boiling transition region proceeded lower with increase of heated power. Heat transfer was due to nucleate boiling above grid spacers, while it was due to film boiling below grid spacers. Consequently, critical heat flux is affected on the distance from the grid spacers. Critical heat flux above the grid spacers was about 15% higher than that below the grid spacers, by comparing them under the same local condition. Heat transfer by steam turbulent flow was dominant to post-CHF heat transfer, when superheat of heaters was sufficiently high. Then, post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was predicted with heat transfer correlations for single-phase flow. On the other hand, when superhead of heaters was not sufficiently high, post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was higher than the prediction with heat transfer correlations for single-phase flow. Mass flux effect on post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was described by standardization of post-CHF heat transfer coefficient with the prediction for single-phase flow. However, pressure effect, superheat effect and effect of position were not described. Authors clarified that those effects could be described with functions of heater temperature and position. Post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was lowest just blow the grid spacers, and it increased with the lower positions. It increased by about 30% in one span of the grid

  11. Experimental result of BWR post-CHF tests. Critical heat flux and post-CHF heat transfer coefficient. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Anoda, Yoshinari [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Iwaki, Chikako [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    Authors performed post-CHF experiments under wider pressure ranges of 2 MPa - 18 MPa, wider mass flux ranges of 33 kg/m{sup 2}s - 1651 kg/m{sup 2}s and wider superheat of heaters up to 500 K in comparison to experimental ranges at previous post-CHF experiments. Data on boiling transition, critical heat flux and post-CHF heat transfer coefficient were obtained. Used test section was 4x4-rod bundle with heaters, which diameter and length were the same as those of BWR nuclear fuels. As the result of the experiments, it was found that the boiling transition occurred just below several grid spacers, and that the fronts of the boiling transition region proceeded lower with increase of heated power. Heat transfer was due to nucleate boiling above grid spacers, while it was due to film boiling below grid spacers. Consequently, critical heat flux is affected on the distance from the grid spacers. Critical heat flux above the grid spacers was about 15% higher than that below the grid spacers, by comparing them under the same local condition. Heat transfer by steam turbulent flow was dominant to post-CHF heat transfer, when superheat of heaters was sufficiently high. Then, post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was predicted with heat transfer correlations for single-phase flow. On the other hand, when superhead of heaters was not sufficiently high, post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was higher than the prediction with heat transfer correlations for single-phase flow. Mass flux effect on post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was described by standardization of post-CHF heat transfer coefficient with the prediction for single-phase flow. However, pressure effect, superheat effect and effect of position were not described. Authors clarified that those effects could be described with functions of heater temperature and position. Post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was lowest just blow the grid spacers, and it increased with the lower positions. It increased by about 30% in one span of

  12. Condensation heat transfer and pressure drop of R-410A in a 7.0 mm O.D. microfin tube at low mass fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nae-Hyun

    2016-12-01

    R-410A condensation heat transfer and pressure drop data are provided for a 7.0 mm O.D. microfin tube at low mass fluxes (50-250 kg/m2 s). The heat transfer coefficient of the microfin tube shows a minimum behavior with the mass flux. At a low mass flux, where flow pattern is stratified, condensation induced by surface tension by microfins overwhelms condensation induced by shear, and the heat transfer coefficient decreases as mass flux increases. At a high mass flux, where flow pattern is annular, condensation induced by shear governs the heat transfer, and the heat transfer coefficient increases as mass flux increases. The pressure drop of the microfin tube is larger than that of the smooth tube at the annular flow regime. On the contrary, the pressure drop of the smooth tube is larger than that of the microfin tube at the stratified flow regime.

  13. Transectional heat transfer in thermoregulating bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) - a 2D heat flux model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boye, Jess; Musyl, Michael; Brill, Richard; Malte, Hans

    2009-11-01

    We developed a 2D heat flux model to elucidate routes and rates of heat transfer within bigeye tuna Thunnus obesus Lowe 1839 in both steady-state and time-dependent settings. In modeling the former situation, we adjusted the efficiencies of heat conservation in the red and the white muscle so as to make the output of the model agree as closely as possible with observed cross-sectional isotherms. In modeling the latter situation, we applied the heat exchanger efficiencies from the steady-state model to predict the distribution of temperature and heat fluxes in bigeye tuna during their extensive daily vertical excursions. The simulations yielded a close match to the data recorded in free-swimming fish and strongly point to the importance of the heat-producing and heat-conserving properties of the white muscle. The best correspondence between model output and observed data was obtained when the countercurrent heat exchangers in the blood flow pathways to the red and white muscle retained 99% and 96% (respectively) of the heat produced in these tissues. Our model confirms that the ability of bigeye tuna to maintain elevated muscle temperatures during their extensive daily vertical movements depends on their ability to rapidly modulate heating and cooling rates. This study shows that the differential cooling and heating rates could be fully accounted for by a mechanism where blood flow to the swimming muscles is either exclusively through the heat exchangers or completely shunted around them, depending on the ambient temperature relative to the body temperature. Our results therefore strongly suggest that such a mechanism is involved in the extensive physiological thermoregulatory abilities of endothermic bigeye tuna.

  14. Extraction of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes from experimental event rate data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Maltoni, M.; Rojo, J.

    2007-01-01

    The precise knowledge of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes is a key ingredient in the interpretation of the results from any atmospheric neutrino experiment. In the standard atmospheric neutrino data analysis, these fluxes are theoretical inputs obtained from sophisticated numerical calculations. In

  15. Control of particles flux in a tokamak with an events structure; Controle des flux de particules dans un Tokamak au moyen d`une structure a events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsitrone, E

    1995-12-01

    Two key problems in the development of a controlled fusion reactor are: -the control of the ashes resulting from the fusion reaction (helium) and of the impurities coming from the wall erosion, which affect the central plasma performances by diluting the fuel and dissipating a part of the produced energy by radiation. - the removal of the heat carried to the walls by charged particles, which is highly concentrated (peak values of several tens of MW per m{sup 2}). Two types of systems are generally used for the plasma-wall interface: throat limiter and axisymmetric divertor. Neither is an ideal candidate to control simultaneously the heat and particle fluxes. This thesis investigates an alternative configuration, the vented limiter, tested for the first time on the Tore Supra tokamak. The vented limiter principle lies on the recycling neutrals collection by slots, in such a way that local thermal overload is avoided. It is shown experimentally that the surface temperature of the prototype installed in Tore Supra remains uniform. As far as the particle collection is concerned, even though the pressure in the vented limiter is lower than the pressure in the throat limiter by a factor 3 for deuterium and 4 helium, it is sufficient to control the plasma density. Moreover, as with a throat limiter, the pressure exhibits a quadratic evolution with the plasma density. To interpret these results, a model describing the plasma recycling on the limiter and the pumping by the slots has been developed. The model has been validated by a comparison with the experimental data. It was then used to propose an optimized version of the prototype with reshaped slots. This should improve the pumping efficiency by a factor 2, in deuterium as well as in helium, but without removing the discrepancy between both pumping efficiencies. (Abstract Truncated)

  16. Heat Flux of a Transferred Arc Driven by a Transverse Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Matsumoto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical consideration of a magnetically driven arc was performed to elucidate the variation of heat flux with an imposed DC magnetic field. Experiments were conducted to confirm the validity of the theoretical model. The heat flux decreased concomitantly with increased imposed magnetic flux density. Theoretical predictions agreed with experimental results.

  17. A Study of the Heat Transfer Behavior of Mold Fluxes with Different Amounts of Al2O3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejun Zhou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The element Al in molten aluminum containing steel reacts with the liquid mold flux and thus be transferred into the mold flux during the continuous casting process. Additionally, the increase in alumina in a mold flux changes its performance significantly. Thus, in this paper, the heat transfer properties of mold fluxes with the Al2O3 content ranging from 7 to 40 wt. % were studied with the Infrared Emitter Technique (IET. Results found that heat flux at the final steady state decreased from 423 kW·m−2 to 372 kW·m−2 with the increase in Al2O3 content from 7% to 30%, but it increased to 383 kW·m−2 when the Al2O3 content was further increased to 40%. Both crystalline layer thickness and crystalline fraction first increased, then decreased with the further addition of A2O3 content. Moreover, it indicated that the heat transfer process inside the mold was dominated by both a crystallization of mold flux and the resulting interfacial thermal resistance. Further, the Rint increased from 9.2 × 10−4 m2·kW−1 to 11.0 × 10−4 m2·kW−1 and then to 16.0 × 10−4 m2·kW−1 when the addition of Al2O3 content increased from 7% to 20% and then to 30%, respectively; however, it decreased to 13.6 × 10−4 m2·kW−1 when the Al2O3 content reached 40%.

  18. Optimized Data Transfers Based on the OpenCL Event Management Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Takizawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In standard OpenCL programming, hosts are supposed to control their compute devices. Since compute devices are dedicated to kernel computation, only hosts can execute several kinds of data transfers such as internode communication and file access. These data transfers require one host to simultaneously play two or more roles due to the need for collaboration between the host and devices. The codes for such data transfers are likely to be system-specific, resulting in low portability. This paper proposes an OpenCL extension that incorporates such data transfers into the OpenCL event management mechanism. Unlike the current OpenCL standard, the main thread running on the host is not blocked to serialize dependent operations. Hence, an application can easily use the opportunities to overlap parallel activities of hosts and compute devices. In addition, the implementation details of data transfers are hidden behind the extension, and application programmers can use the optimized data transfers without any tricky programming techniques. The evaluation results show that the proposed extension can use the optimized data transfer implementation and thereby increase the sustained data transfer performance by about 18% for a real application accessing a big data file.

  19. Radiative heat transfer with hydromagnetic flow and viscous dissipation over a stretching surface in the presence of variable heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Hitesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The boundary layer steady flow and heat transfer of a viscous incompressible fluid due to a stretching plate with viscous dissipation effect in the presence of a transverse magnetic field is studied. The equations of motion and heat transfer are reduced to non-linear ordinary differential equations and the exact solutions are obtained using properties of confluent hypergeometric function. It is assumed that the prescribed heat flux at the stretching porous wall varies as the square of the distance from origin. The effects of the various parameters entering into the problem on the velocity field and temperature distribution are discussed.

  20. Measurements and Modeling of Turbulent Fluxes during Persistent Cold Air Pool Events in Salt Lake Valley, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, C. E.; Sun, X.; Holmes, H.

    2017-12-01

    Land surface processes are important in meteorology and climate research since they control the partitioning of surface energy and water exchange at the earth's surface. The surface layer is coupled to the planetary boundary layer (PBL) by surface fluxes, which serve as sinks or sources of energy, moisture, momentum, and atmospheric pollutants. Quantifying the surface heat and momentum fluxes at the land-atmosphere interface, especially for different surface land cover types, is important because they can further influence the atmospheric dynamics, vertical mixing, and transport processes that impact local, regional, and global climate. A cold air pool (CAP) forms when a topographic depression (i.e., valley) fills with cold air, where the air in the stagnant layer is colder than the air aloft. Insufficient surface heating, which is not able to sufficiently erode the temperature inversion that forms during the nighttime stable boundary layer, can lead to the formation of persistent CAPs during wintertime. These persistent CAPs can last for days, or even weeks, and are associated with increased air pollution concentrations. Thus, realistic simulations of the land-atmosphere exchange are meaningful to achieve improved predictions of the accumulation, transport, and dispersion of air pollution concentrations. The focus of this presentation is on observations and modeling results using turbulence data collected in Salt Lake Valley, Utah during the 2010-2011 wintertime Persistent Cold Air Pool Study (PCAPS). Turbulent fluxes and the surface energy balance over seven land use types are quantified. The urban site has an energy balance ratio (EBR) larger than one (1.276). Negative Bowen ratio (-0.070) is found at the cropland site. In addition to turbulence observations, half-hourly WRF simulated net radiation, latent heat, sensible heat, ground heat fluxes during one persistent CAP event are evaluated using the PCAPS observations. The results show that sensible and latent

  1. Analysis of powerful heliospheric non-geoeffective event of the 28 April, 2015 in muon flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astapov, I. I.; Barbashina, N. S.; Veselovsky, I. S.; Osetrova, N. V.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Shutenko, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    The coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on April 28, 2015 is analyzed. The passage of the ejection did not cause geoeffective disturbances in the near-Earth space. At the same time, the CME had a significant impact on the flux of cosmic rays registered on the Earth's surface by the muon hodoscope URAGAN.

  2. Association between anomalies of moisture flux and extreme runoff events in the south-eastern Alps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller, Miloslav; Kašpar, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2011), s. 915-920 ISSN 1561-8633 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : moisture flux * extreme precipitation * seasonality of heavy rains Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.983, year: 2011 http://www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/11/915/2011/

  3. A new computational method for the detection of horizontal gene transfer events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, the increase in the amounts of available genomic data has made it easier to appreciate the extent by which organisms increase their genetic diversity through horizontally transferred genetic material. Such transfers have the potential to give rise to extremely dynamic genomes where a significant proportion of their coding DNA has been contributed by external sources. Because of the impact of these horizontal transfers on the ecological and pathogenic character of the recipient organisms, methods are continuously sought that are able to computationally determine which of the genes of a given genome are products of transfer events. In this paper, we introduce and discuss a novel computational method for identifying horizontal transfers that relies on a gene's nucleotide composition and obviates the need for knowledge of codon boundaries. In addition to being applicable to individual genes, the method can be easily extended to the case of clusters of horizontally transferred genes. With the help of an extensive and carefully designed set of experiments on 123 archaeal and bacterial genomes, we demonstrate that the new method exhibits significant improvement in sensitivity when compared to previously published approaches. In fact, it achieves an average relative improvement across genomes of between 11 and 41% compared to the Codon Adaptation Index method in distinguishing native from foreign genes. Our method's horizontal gene transfer predictions for 123 microbial genomes are available online at http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/HGT/.

  4. Impact of Land Cover Change Induced by a Fire Event on the Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Sánchez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Forest fires affect the natural cycle of the vegetation, and the structure and functioning of ecosystems. As a consequence of defoliation and vegetation mortality, surface energy flux patterns can suffer variations. Remote sensing techniques together with surface energy balance modeling offer the opportunity to explore these changes. In this paper we focus on a Mediterranean forest ecosystem. A fire event occurred in 2001 in Almodóvar del Pinar (Spain affecting a pine and shrub area. A two-source energy balance approach was applied to a set of Landsat 5-TM and Landsat 7-EMT+ images to estimate the surface fluxes in the area. Three post-fire periods were analyzed, six, seven, nine, and 11 years after the fire event. Results showed the regeneration of the shrub area in 6–7 years, in contrast to the pine area, where an important decrease in evapotranspiration, around 1 mm·day−1, remained. Differences in evapotranspiration were mitigated nine and 11 years after the fire in the pine area, whereas significant deviations in the rest of the terms of the energy balance equation were still observed. The combined effect of changes in the vegetation structure and surface variables, such as land surface temperature, albedo, or vegetation coverage, is responsible for these variations in the surface energy flux patterns.

  5. Effects of radiation and thermal diffusivity on heat transfer over a stretching surface with variable heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddeek, M.A.; Abdelmeguid, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of radiation and thermal diffusivity on heat transfer over a stretching surface with variable heat flux has been studied. The thermal diffusivity is assumed to vary as a linear function of temperature. The governing partial differential equations have been transformed to ordinary differential equations. The exact analytical solution for the velocity and the numerical solution for the temperature field are given. Numerical solutions are obtained for different values of variable thermal diffusivity, radiation, temperature parameter and Prandtl number

  6. The Solid Waste Transfer Pit an FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] station for fuel and reflector transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milewski, A.J.; Thomson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the design aspects of a proposed FFTF facility called the Solid Waste Transfer Pit (SWTP). This new facility will be used as a transfer station for reflectors and/or low decay heat fuel assemblies when movement from the Fuel Storage Facility for sodium removal and subsequent reprocessing is to be accomplished. The SWTP utilizes a shielded cell cover with an integral manually-operated gate valve for top loading of a transfer vessel. The cost-effective design discussed herein provides a practical approach using state-of-the-art concepts while assuring safe and reliable operation

  7. Eddy covariance flux measurements of biogenic VOCs during ECHO 2003 using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Spirig

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the AFO 2000 project ECHO, two PTR-MS instruments were operated in combination with sonic anemometers to determine biogenic VOC fluxes from a mixed deciduous forest site in North-Western Germany. The measurement site was characterised by a forest of inhomogeneous composition, complex canopy structure, limited extension in certain wind directions and frequent calm wind conditions during night time. The eddy covariance (EC technique was applied since it represents the most direct flux measurement approach on the canopy scale and is, therefore, least susceptible to these non-ideal conditions. A specific flux calculation method was used to account for the sequential multi-component PTR-MS measurements and allowing an individual delay time adjustment as well as a rigorous quality control based on cospectral analysis. The validated flux results are consistent with light and temperature dependent emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from this forest, with average daytime emissions of 0.94 and 0.3µg m-2s-1, respectively. Emissions of methanol reached on average 0.087µg m-2s-1 during daytime, but fluxes were too small to be detected during night time. Upward fluxes of the isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK and methacrolein (MACR were also found, being two orders of magnitude lower than those of isoprene. Calculations with an analytical footprint model indicate that the observed isoprene fluxes correlate with the fraction of oaks within the footprints of the flux measurement.

  8. Wintertime Air-Sea Gas Transfer Rates and Air Injection Fluxes at Station Papa in the NE Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, C.; Steiner, N.; Vagle, S.

    2008-12-01

    In recent studies of air-sea fluxes of N2 and O2 in hurricanes, McNeil and D'Asaro (2007) used a simplified model formulation of air-sea gas flux to estimate simultaneous values of gas transfer rate, KT, and air injection flux, VT. The model assumes air-sea gas fluxes at high to extreme wind speeds can be explained by a combination of two processes: 1) air injection, by complete dissolution of small bubbles drawn down into the ocean boundary layer by turbulent currents, and 2) near-surface equilibration processes, such as occurs within whitecaps. This analysis technique relies on air-sea gas flux estimates for two gases, N2 and O2, to solve for the two model parameters, KT and VT. We present preliminary results of similar analysis of time series data collected during winter storms at Station Papa in the NE Pacific during 2003/2004. The data show a clear increase in KT and VT with increasing NCEP derived wind speeds and acoustically measured bubble penetration depth.

  9. Disruptive Technologies in Workmanship: pH-neutral Flux, CDM ESD Events, HDI PCBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Jeannette F.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes what it calls "disruptive technologies", i.e., "Low-end disruption" occurs when the rate at which products improve exceeds the rate at which customers can adopt the new performance. Therefore, at some point the performance of the product overshoots the needs of certain customer segments. At this point, a disruptive technology may enter the market and provide a product which has lower performance than the incumbent but which exceeds the requirements of certain segments, thereby gaining a foothold in the market. This concept is viewed in impacting incumbent technologies Rosin Flux, with a pH-neutral water soluble Flux; electrostatic discharge models being disrupted by the charge device model (CDM) concept; and High Density Interconnect Printed Circuit Boards (HDI PCB).

  10. Response of ecosystem carbon fluxes to drought events in a poplar plantation in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie Zhou; Zhiqiang Zhang; Ge Sun; Xianrui Fang; Tonggang Zha; Steve McNulty; Jiquan Chen; Ying Jin; Asko Noormets

    2013-01-01

    Poplar plantations are widely used for timber production and ecological restoration in northern China,a region that experiences frequent droughts and water scarcity. An open-path eddy-covariance (EC)system was used to continuously measure the carbon,water,and energy fluxes in a poplar plantation during the growing season (i.e., April–October)over the period 2006–2008...

  11. Global simulation of flux transfer events: Generation mechanism and spacecraft signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, J.

    We use global MHD simulations of Earth's magnetosphere to show that for southward IMF conditions: a) steady reconnection preferentially occurs without FTEs when the stagnation flow line nearly coincides with the X-line location, which requires small dipole tilt and nearly due southward IMF, b) FTEs occur when the flow/field symmetry is broken, which requires either a large dipole tilt and/or a substantial east-west component of the IMF, c) the predicted spacecraft signature and the repetition frequency of FTEs in the simulations agrees very well with typical observations, lending credibility to the the model, d) the fundamental process that leads to FTE formation is multiple X-line formation caused by the flow and field patterns in the magnetosheath and requires no intrinsic plasma property variations like variable resistivity, e) if the dipole tilt breaks the symmetry FTEs occur only in the winter hemisphere whereas the reconnection signatures in the summer hemisphere are steady with no bipolar FTE-like signatures, f) if the IMF east-west field component breaks the symmetry FTEs occur in both hemispheres but are least likely observed near the subsolar point, and g) FTE formation depends on sufficient resolution and low diffusion in the model. Too coarse resolution and/or too high diffusivity lead to flow-through reconnection signatures that appear unphysical given the frequent observation of FTEs.

  12. Heat transfer in pool boiling liquid neon, deuterium and hydrogen, and critical heat flux in forced convection of liquid neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astruc, J.M.

    1967-12-01

    In the first part, free-convection and nucleate pool boiling heat transfer (up to burn-out heat flux) between a platinum wire of 0.15 mm in diameter in neon, deuterium and hydrogen has been studied at atmospheric pressure. These measurements were continued in liquid neon up to 23 bars (Pc ≅ 26.8 b). Film boiling heat transfer coefficients have been measured in pool boiling liquid neon at atmospheric pressure with three heating wires (diameters 0.2, 0.5, 2 mm). All the results have been compared with existing correlations. The second part is devoted to measurements of the critical heat flux limiting heat transfer with small temperature differences between the wall and the liquid neon flowing inside a tube (diameters 3 x 3.5 mm) heated by joule effect on 30 cm of length. Influences of flow stability, nature of electrical current, pressure, mass flow rate and subcooling are shown. In conclusion, the similarity of the heat transfer characteristics in pool boiling as well as in forced convection of liquid neon and hydrogen is emphasized. (author) [fr

  13. Response of CO2 and H2O fluxes in a mountainous tropical rainforest in equatorial Indonesia to El Niño events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olchev, A.; Ibrom, Andreas; Panferov, O.

    2015-01-01

    The possible impact of El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events on the main components of CO2 and H2O fluxes in a pristine mountainous tropical rainforest growing in Central Sulawesi in Indonesia is described. The fluxes were continuously measured using the eddy covariance method for the period...

  14. Effects of transient and non-uniform distribution of heat flux on intensity of heat transfer and burnout conditions in the channels of nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitaly Osmachkin [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' 1, Kurchatov sq, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The influence of power transient, changes of flow rate, inlet temperatures or pressure in cores of nuclear reactors on heat transfer and burnout conditions in channels depend on rate of such violations. Non-uniform distribution of the heat flux is also important factor for heat transfer and development of crisis phenomenon. Such effects may be significant for NPPs safety. But they have not yet generally accepted interpretation. Steady state approach is often recommended for use in calculations. In the paper a review of experimental observed so-called non-equilibrium effects is presented. The effects of space and time factors are displaying due delay in reformation turbulence intensity, velocity, temperatures or void fraction profiles, water film flow on the surface of heated channels. For estimation of such effect different methods are used. Modern computer codes based on two or three fluids approaches are considered as most effective. But simple and clear correlations may light up the mechanics of effects on heat transfer and improve general understanding of scale and significance of the transient events. In the paper the simplified methods for assessment the influence of lags in the development of distributions of parameters of flow, the relaxation of temporal or space violations are considered. They are compared with more sophisticated approaches. Velocities of disturbance fronts moving along the channels are discussed also. (author)

  15. High-latitude electromagnetic and particle energy flux during an event with sustained strongly northward IMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korth

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of a prolonged interval of strongly northward orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field on 16 July 2000, 16:00-19:00 UT to characterize the energy exchange between the magnetosphere and ionosphere for conditions associated with minimum solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. With reconnection occurring tailward of the cusp under northward IMF conditions, the reconnection dynamo should be separated from the viscous dynamo, presumably driven by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability. Thus, these conditions are also ideal for evaluating the contribution of a viscous interaction to the coupling process. We derive the two-dimensional distribution of the Poynting vector radial component in the northern sunlit polar ionosphere from magnetic field observations by the constellation of Iridium satellites together with drift meter and magnetometer observations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP F13 and F15 satellites. The electromagnetic energy flux is then compared with the particle energy flux obtained from auroral images taken by the far-ultraviolet (FUV instrument on the Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE spacecraft. The electromagnetic energy input to the ionosphere of 51 GW calculated from the Iridium/DMSP observations is eight times larger than the 6 GW due to particle precipitation all poleward of 78° MLAT. This result indicates that the energy transport is significant, particularly as it is concentrated in a small region near the magnetic pole, even under conditions traditionally considered to be quiet and is dominated by the electromagnetic flux. We estimate the contributions of the high and mid-latitude dynamos to both the Birkeland currents and electric potentials finding that high-latitude reconnection accounts for 0.8 MA and 45kV while we attribute <0.2MA and ~5kV to an interaction at lower latitudes having the sense of a viscous interaction. Given that these

  16. Numerical investigation of fluid flow and heat transfer under high heat flux using rectangular micro-channels

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.

    2012-02-01

    A 3D-conjugate numerical investigation was conducted to predict heat transfer characteristics in a rectangular cross-sectional micro-channel employing simultaneously developing single-phase flows. The numerical code was validated by comparison with previous experimental and numerical results for the same micro-channel dimensions and classical correlations based on conventional sized channels. High heat fluxes up to 130W/cm 2 were applied to investigate micro-channel thermal characteristics. The entire computational domain was discretized using a 120×160×100 grid for the micro-channel with an aspect ratio of (α=4.56) and examined for Reynolds numbers in the laminar range (Re 500-2000) using FLUENT. De-ionized water served as the cooling fluid while the micro-channel substrate used was made of copper. Validation results were found to be in good agreement with previous experimental and numerical data [1] with an average deviation of less than 4.2%. As the applied heat flux increased, an increase in heat transfer coefficient values was observed. Also, the Reynolds number required for transition from single-phase fluid to two-phase was found to increase. A correlation is proposed for the results of average Nusselt numbers for the heat transfer characteristics in micro-channels with simultaneously developing, single-phase flows. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Using a thermalhydraulics system code to estimate heat transfer coefficients for a critical heat flux experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statham, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    RELAP5/SCDAPSIM MOD 3.4 is used to predict wall temperature before and after critical heat flux (CHF) is reached in a vertical, uniformly heated tube using light water as the working fluid. The heated test section is modeled as a 1 m long Inconel 600 tube having an OD of 6.35 mm and ID of 4.57 mm with a 0.5 m long unheated development length at the inlet. Simulations are performed at pressures of 0.5 to 2.0 MPa with mass fluxes from 500 to 2000 kg m -2 s -1 and inlet qualities ranging from -0.2 to 0. Loss of flow simulations are performed with flow reduction rates of 10, 20, 50, and 100 kg m -2 s -2 . Inlet mass flux at CHF was nominally independent of rate in the model; this may or may not be realistic. (author)

  18. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Turbulent Gas Flow in Microtube with Constant Heat Flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Chungpyo; Matsushita, Shinichi; Ueno, Ichiro; Asako, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Local friction factors for turbulent gas flows in circular microtubes with constant wall heat flux were obtained numerically. The numerical methodology is based on arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian method to solve two-dimensional compressible momentum and energy equations. The Lam-Bremhorst's Low-Reynolds number turbulence model was employed to calculate eddy viscosity coefficient and turbulence energy. The simulations were performed for a wide flow range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers with different constant wall heat fluxes. The stagnation pressure was chosen in such a way that the outlet Mach number ranged from 0.07 to 1.0. Both Darcy friction factor and Fanning friction factor were locally obtained. The result shows that the obtained both friction factors were evaluated as a function of Reynolds number on the Moody chart. The values of Darcy friction factor differ from Blasius correlation due to the compressibility effects but the values of Fanning friction factor almost coincide with Blasius correlation. The wall heat flux varied from 100 to 10000 W/m 2 . The wall and bulk temperatures with positive heat flux are compared with those of incompressible flow. The result shows that the Nusselt number of turbulent gas flow is different from that of incompressible flow.

  19. Flow regime transition and heat transfer model at low mass flux condition in a post-dryout region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Yong

    1996-02-01

    The post-dryout flow regime transition criterion from inverted annular flow (IAF) to agitated inverted annular flow (AIAF) is suggested based on the hyperbolicity breaking concept. The hyperbolicity breaking represents a bifurcation point where a sudden flow transition occurs. The hyperbolicity breaking concept is applied to describe the flow regime transition from IAF to AIAF by the growth of disturbance on liquid core surface. The resultant correlation has the similar form to Takenaka's empirical one. To validate the proposed model, it is applied to predict Takenake's experimental results using R-113 refrigerant with four different tube diameters of 3, 5, 7 and 10 mm. The proposed model gives accurate predictions for the tube diameters of 7 and 10 mm. As the tube diameter decreases, the differences between the predictions and the experimental results slightly increase. The flow regime transition from AIAF to dispersed flow (DF) is described by the drift flux model. It is shown that the transition criterion can be well predicted if the droplet sizes in dispersed flow are evaluated appropriately. Existing mechanistic post-dryout models result in fairly good predictions when the mass flux is high or when the film dryout occurs. However, the predictions by these models become poor at low mass flux at which the flow regime before dryout is believed to be churn-turbulent. This is because the constitutive relations and/or the imposed assumptions used in the models become erroneous at low mass flux. The droplet size predicted by the correlation used in the model becomes unrealistically large. In addition, the single phase vapor heat transfer correlation becomes invalid at low mass flux condition. To develop a mechanistic post-dryout model which is available at low mass flux condition, the entrainment mechanisms and the entrained droplet sizes with relation to the flow regimes are investigated. Through the analysis of many experimental post-dryout data, it is shown that

  20. Surface wettability effects on critical heat flux of boiling heat transfer using nanoparticle coatings

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Chin-Chi; Chen, Ping-Hei

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nano-silica particle coatings were used to vary the wettability of the copper surface from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic by modifying surface topography

  1. Experimental study on heat transfer augmentation for high heat flux removal in rib-roughened narrow channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.S.; Monde, Masanori; Hino, Ryutaro; Haga, Katsuhiro; Sudo, Yukio.

    1997-07-01

    Frictional pressure drop and heat transfer performance in a very narrow rectangular channel having one-sided constant heat flux and repeated-ribs for turbulent flow have been investigated experimentally, and their experimental correlations were obtained using the least square method. The rib pitch-to-height ratios(p/k) were 10 and 20 while holding the rib height constant at 0.2mm, the Reynolds number(Re) from 2,414 to 98,458 under different channel heights of 1.2mm, 2.97mm, and 3.24mm, the rib height-to-channel equivalent diameter(k/De) of 0.03, 0.04, and 0.09 respectively. The results show that the rib-roughened surface augments heat transfer 2-3 times higher than that of the smooth surface with the expense of 2.8-4 times higher frictional pressure drop under Re=5000-10 5 , p/k=10, and H=1.2mm. Experimental results obtained by channel height, H=1.2mm shows a little bit higher heat transfer and friction factor performance than the higher channel height, H=3.24mm. The effect of fin and consequently higher turbulence intensity are responsible for producing higher heat transfer rates. The obtained correlations could be used to design the cooling passages between the target plates to remove high heat flux up to 12MW/m 2 generated at target plates in a high-intensity proton accelerator system. (author). 54 refs

  2. Experimental study on heat transfer augmentation for high heat flux removal in rib-roughened narrow channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M.S.; Monde, Masanori [Saga Univ. (Japan); Hino, Ryutaro; Haga, Katsuhiro; Sudo, Yukio

    1997-07-01

    Frictional pressure drop and heat transfer performance in a very narrow rectangular channel having one-sided constant heat flux and repeated-ribs for turbulent flow have been investigated experimentally, and their experimental correlations were obtained using the least square method. The rib pitch-to-height ratios(p/k) were 10 and 20 while holding the rib height constant at 0.2mm, the Reynolds number(Re) from 2,414 to 98,458 under different channel heights of 1.2mm, 2.97mm, and 3.24mm, the rib height-to-channel equivalent diameter(k/De) of 0.03, 0.04, and 0.09 respectively. The results show that the rib-roughened surface augments heat transfer 2-3 times higher than that of the smooth surface with the expense of 2.8-4 times higher frictional pressure drop under Re=5000-10{sup 5}, p/k=10, and H=1.2mm. Experimental results obtained by channel height, H=1.2mm shows a little bit higher heat transfer and friction factor performance than the higher channel height, H=3.24mm. The effect of fin and consequently higher turbulence intensity are responsible for producing higher heat transfer rates. The obtained correlations could be used to design the cooling passages between the target plates to remove high heat flux up to 12MW/m{sup 2} generated at target plates in a high-intensity proton accelerator system. (author). 54 refs.

  3. Some specific features of subcooled boiling heat transfer and crisis at extremely high heat flux densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotovsky, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    Forced convection boiling is the process used widely in a lot of industry branches including NPP. Heat transfer intensity under forced convection boiling is considered in different way in dependence on conditions. One of main problems for the process considered is an influence of interaction between forced flow and boiling on heat transfer character. For saturated water case a transition from ''pure'' forced convection to nucleate boiling can be realized in smooth form. (author)

  4. Analysis and modeling of flow blockage-induced steam explosion events in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Lestor, C.W.; Gat, U.; Lepard, B.L.; Cook, D.H.; Freels, J.; Chang, S.J.; Luttrell, C.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Kirkpatrick, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides a perspective overview of the analysis and modeling work done to evaluate the threat from steam explosion loads in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor during flow blockage events. The overall workscope included modeling and analysis of core melt initiation, melt propagation, bounding and best-estimate steam explosion energetics, vessel failure from fracture, bolts failure from exceedance of elastic limits, and finally, missile evolution and transport. Aluminum ignition was neglected. Evaluations indicated that a thermally driven steam explosion with more than 65 MJ of energy insertion in the core region over several miliseconds would be needed to cause a sufficiently energetic missile with a capacity to cause early confinement failure. This amounts to about 65% of the HFIR core mass melting and participating in a steam explosion. Conservative melt propagation analyses have indicated that at most only 24% of the HFIR core mass could melt during flow blockage events under full-power conditions. Therefore, it is judged that the HFIR vessel and top head structure will be able to withstand loads generated from thermally driven steam explosions initiated by any credible flow blockage event. A substantial margin to safety was demonstrated

  5. Widespread extreme drought events in Iberia and their relationship with North Atlantic moisture flux deficit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Montero, Irene; Russo, Ana; Gouveia, Célia; Ramos, Alexandre M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.

    2015-04-01

    Droughts represent one of the most frequent climatic extreme events on the Iberian Peninsula, often with widespread negative ecological and environmental impacts, resulting in major socio-economic damages such as large decreases in hydroelectricity and agricultural productions or increasing forest fire risk. Unlike other weather driven extreme events, droughts duration could be from few months to several years. Here we employ a recently developed climatic drought index, the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI; Vicente-Serrano et al. 2010a), based on the simultaneous use of precipitation and temperature fields. This index holds the advantage of combining a multi-scalar character with the capacity to include the effects of temperature variability on drought assessment (Vicente-Serrano et al., 2010a). In this study the SPEI was computed using the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) TS3.21 High Resolution Gridded Data (0.5°) for the period 1901-2012. At this resolution the study region of Iberian Peninsula corresponds to a square of 30x30 grid pixels. The CRU Potential Evapotranspiration (PET) was used, through the Penmann-Monteith equation and the log-logistic probability distribution. This formulation allows a very good fit to the series of differences between precipitation and PET (Vicente-Serrano et al., 2010b), using monthly averages of daily maximum and minimum temperature data and also monthly precipitation records. The parameters were estimated by means of the L-moment method. The application of multi-scalar indices to the high-resolution datasets allows identifying whether the Iberian Peninsula is in hydric stress and also whether drought is installed. Based on the gridded SPEI datasets, spanning from 1901 to 2012, obtained for timescales 6, 12, 18 and 24 months, an objective method is applied for ranking the most extensive extreme drought events that occurred on the Iberian Peninsula. This objective method is based on the evaluation of the

  6. Installation for the study of heat transfer with high flux density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robin, M.; Schwab, B.

    1957-01-01

    As a result of their very low vapor pressure, metals with a low fusion point (sodium, sodium-potassium alloys, etc.) can be used at high temperature, as heating fluids, in installations whose internal pressure is close to atmospheric pressure. Owing to the very high convection coefficients which can be reached with these fluids and to the large temperature differences utilizable, it is possible to produce through the exchange surfaces considerable heat flux densities, of the order of those which exist through the canning of fuel elements in nuclear reactors. The installation described allowed a flux density of more than 200 W/cm 2 to be obtained, the heating fluid being a Na-K alloy (containing 56 per cent by weight of potassium) brought to a temperature around 550 deg. C. (author) [fr

  7. Control of particles flux in a tokamak with an events structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsitrone, E.

    1995-01-01

    Two key problems in the development of a controlled fusion reactor are: -the control of the ashes resulting from the fusion reaction (helium) and of the impurities coming from the wall erosion, which affect the central plasma performances by diluting the fuel and dissipating a part of the produced energy by radiation. - the removal of the heat carried to the walls by charged particles, which is highly concentrated (peak values of several tens of MW per m 2 ). Two types of systems are generally used for the plasma-wall interface: throat limiter and axisymmetric divertor. Neither is an ideal candidate to control simultaneously the heat and particle fluxes. This thesis investigates an alternative configuration, the vented limiter, tested for the first time on the Tore Supra tokamak. The vented limiter principle lies on the recycling neutrals collection by slots, in such a way that local thermal overload is avoided. It is shown experimentally that the surface temperature of the prototype installed in Tore Supra remains uniform. As far as the particle collection is concerned, even though the pressure in the vented limiter is lower than the pressure in the throat limiter by a factor 3 for deuterium and 4 helium, it is sufficient to control the plasma density. Moreover, as with a throat limiter, the pressure exhibits a quadratic evolution with the plasma density. To interpret these results, a model describing the plasma recycling on the limiter and the pumping by the slots has been developed. The model has been validated by a comparison with the experimental data. It was then used to propose an optimized version of the prototype with reshaped slots. This should improve the pumping efficiency by a factor 2, in deuterium as well as in helium, but without removing the discrepancy between both pumping efficiencies. As a consequence, even if the thermal behaviour of the vented limiter is satisfactory, its suitability for a future strongly depends on whether it is possible or

  8. Is reduced benthic flux related to the Diporeia decline? Analysis of spring blooms and whiting events in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, James M.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Crabtree, Darran L.; Walsh, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Benthic monitoring by USGS off the southern shore of Lake Ontario from October 1993 to October 1995 provides a detailed view of the early stages of the decline of the native amphipod Diporeia. A loss of the 1994 and 1995 year classes of Diporeia preceded the disappearance of the native amphipod at sites near Oswego and Rochester at depths from 55 to 130 m. In succeeding years, Diporeia populations continued to decline in Lake Ontario and were nearly extirpated by 2008. Explanations for Diporeia 's decline in the Great Lakes include several hypotheses often linked to the introduction and expansion of exotic zebra and quagga mussels (Dreissena sp.). We compare the timeline of the Diporeia decline in Lake Ontario with trends in two sources of organic matter to the sediments — spring diatom blooms and late summer whiting events. The 1994–95 decline of Diporeia coincided with localized dreissenid effects on phytoplankton in the nearshore and a year (April 1994 to May 1995) of decreased flux of organic carbon recorded by sediment traps moored offshore of Oswego. Later declines of profundal (> 90 m) Diporeia populations in 2003 were poorly associated with trends in spring algal blooms and late summer whiting events. Lake Ontario/Diporeia/Dreissena/remote sensing.

  9. Analysis and modeling of flow-blockage-induced steam explosion events in the high-flux isotope reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Nestor, C.W.; Gat, U.; Lepard, B.L.; Cook, D.H.; Freels, J.; Chang, S.J.; Luttrell, C.; Gwaltney, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    This article provides a perspective overview of the analysis and modeling work done to evaluate the threat from steam explosion loads in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) during flow blockage events. The overall work scope included modeling and analysis of core-melt initiation, melt propagation, bounding and best-estimate steam explosion energetics, vessel failure from fracture, bolts failure from exceedance of elastic limits, and, finally, missile evolution and transport. Aluminum ignition was neglected. Evaluations indicated that a thermally driven steam explosion with more than 65 MJ of energy insertion in the core region over several milliseconds would be needed to cause a sufficiently energetic missile with a capacity to cause early confinement failure. This amounts to about 65% of the HFIR core mass melting and participating in a steam explosion. Conservative melt propagation analyses have indicated that at most only 24% of the HFIR core mass could melt during flow blockage events under full-power conditions. 19 refs., 11 figs

  10. Enhanced transfer of terrestrially derived carbon to the atmosphere in a flooding event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Thomas S.; Garcia-Tigreros, Fenix; Yvon-Lewis, Shari A.; Shields, Michael; Mills, Heath J.; Butman, David; Osburn, Christopher; Raymond, Peter A.; Shank, G. Christopher; DiMarco, Steven F.; Walker, Nan; Kiel Reese, Brandi; Mullins-Perry, Ruth; Quigg, Antonietta; Aiken, George R.; Grossman, Ethan L.

    2013-01-01

    Rising CO2 concentration in the atmosphere, global climate change, and the sustainability of the Earth's biosphere are great societal concerns for the 21st century. Global climate change has, in part, resulted in a higher frequency of flooding events, which allow for greater exchange between soil/plant litter and aquatic carbon pools. Here we demonstrate that the summer 2011 flood in the Mississippi River basin, caused by extreme precipitation events, resulted in a “flushing” of terrestrially derived dissolved organic carbon (TDOC) to the northern Gulf of Mexico. Data from the lower Atchafalaya and Mississippi rivers showed that the DOC flux to the northern Gulf of Mexico during this flood was significantly higher than in previous years. We also show that consumption of radiocarbon-modern TDOC by bacteria in floodwaters in the lower Atchafalaya River and along the adjacent shelf contributed to northern Gulf shelf waters changing from a net sink to a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere in June and August 2011. This work shows that enhanced flooding, which may or may not be caused by climate change, can result in rapid losses of stored carbon in soils to the atmosphere via processes in aquatic ecosystems.

  11. Global observations of electromagnetic and particle energy flux for an event during northern winter with southward interplanetary magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korth

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The response of the polar ionosphere–thermosphere (I-T system to electromagnetic (EM energy input is fundamentally different to that from particle precipitation. To understand the I-T response to polar energy input one must know the intensities and spatial distributions of both EM and precipitation energy deposition. Moreover, since individual events typically display behavior different from statistical models, it is important to observe the global system state for specific events. We present an analysis of an event in Northern Hemisphere winter for sustained southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF, 10 January 2002, 10:00–12:00 UT, for which excellent observations are available from the constellation of Iridium satellites, the SuperDARN radar network, and the Far-Ultraviolet (FUV instrument on the IMAGE satellite. Using data from these assets we determine the EM and particle precipitation energy fluxes to the Northern Hemisphere poleward of 60° MLAT and examine their spatial distributions and intensities. The accuracy of the global estimates are assessed quantitatively using comparisons with in-situ observations by DMSP along two orbit planes. While the location of EM power input evaluated from Iridium and SuperDARN data is in good agreement with DMSP, the magnitude estimated from DMSP observations is approximately four times larger. Corrected for this underestimate, the total EM power input to the Northern Hemisphere is 188 GW. Comparison of IMAGE FUV-derived distributions of the particle energy flux with DMSP plasma data indicates that the IMAGE FUV results similarly locate the precipitation accurately while underestimating the precipitation input somewhat. The total particle input is estimated to be 20 GW, nearly a factor of ten lower than the EM input. We therefore expect the thermosphere response to be determined primarily by the EM input even under winter conditions, and accurate assessment of the EM energy input is therefore key

  12. Methane fluxes during the cold season: distribution and mass transfer in the snow cover of bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagin, A. V.; Shnyrev, N. A.

    2015-08-01

    Fluxes and profile distribution of methane in the snow cover and different landscape elements of an oligotrophic West-Siberian bog (Mukhrino Research Station, Khanty-Mansiisk autonomous district) have been studied during a cold season. Simple models have been proposed for the description of methane distribution in the inert snow layer, which combine the transport of the gas and a source of constant intensity on the soil surface. The formation rates of stationary methane profiles in the snow cover have been estimated (characteristic time of 24 h). Theoretical equations have been derived for the calculation of small emission fluxes from bogs to the atmosphere on the basis of the stationary profile distribution parameters, the snow porosity, and the effective methane diffusion coefficient in the snow layer. The calculated values of methane emission significantly (by 2-3 to several tens of times) have exceeded the values measured under field conditions by the closed chamber method (0.008-0.25 mg C/(m2 h)), which indicates the possibility of underestimating the contribution of the cold period to the annual emission cycle of bog methane.

  13. MHD boundary layer slip flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid along a stretching cylinder with prescribed heat flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasim, Muhammad; Khan, Zafar Hayat; Khan, Waqar Ahmad; Ali Shah, Inayat

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of ferrofluid along a stretching cylinder. The velocity slip and prescribed surface heat flux boundary conditions are employed on the cylinder surface. Water as conventional base fluid containing nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) is used. Comparison between magnetic (Fe3O4) and non-magnetic (Al2O3) nanoparticles is also made. The governing non-linear partial differential equations are reduced to non-linear ordinary differential equations and then solved numerically using shooting method. Present results are compared with the available data in the limiting cases. The present results are found to be in an excellent agreement. It is observed that with an increase in the magnetic field strength, the percent difference in the heat transfer rate of magnetic nanoparticles with Al2O3 decreases. Surface shear stress and the heat transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases, i.e curvature helps to enhance the heat transfer.

  14. In-pile critical heat flux and post-dryout heat transfer measurements – A historical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, D.C., E-mail: degroeneveld@gmail.com

    2017-06-15

    In the 1960s’ and 1970s’ Canada was a world leader in performing in-reactor heat transfer experiments on fuel bundles instrumented with miniature sheath thermocouples. Several Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and Post-CHF experiments were performed in Chalk River’s NRU and NRX reactors on water-cooled 3-, 18-, 19-, 21-, and 36-element fuel bundles. Most experiments were obtained at steady-state conditions, where the power was raised gradually from single-phase conditions up to the CHF and beyond. Occasionally, post-dryout temperatures up to 600 °C were maintained for several hours. In some tests, the fuel behaviour during loss-of-flow and blowdown transients was investigated – during these transients sheath temperatures could exceed 2000 °C. Because of the increasingly more stringent licensing requirements for in-pile heat transfer tests on instrumented fuel bundles, no in-pile CHF and post-dryout tests on fuel bundles have been performed anywhere in the world for the past 40 years. This paper provides details of these unique in-pile experiments and describes some of their heat transfer results.

  15. Influence of vapor-mass flux on simultaneous heat and moisture transfer in unsaturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.G.; Boo, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper evaluates the validity of neglecting vapor transport by moisture content gradients (VMG) and liquid transport by temperature gradients (LTG) in coupled heat and moisture transfer in moist porous media. A review of previous work reveals discrepancies between model predictions and experimental data. The results presented here show that these discrepancies result from neglecting VMG. The governing equations which describe the coupled heat and moisture transfer are solved numerically for an infinite slab of an unsaturated porous medium, and existing experimental and empirical data for a moist sandy silt soil are used. Predicted moisture content distributions during dry-out and drying rates are found to be significantly affected by VMG. Accurate results can be obtained when VMG is neglected in the energy equation provided that it is retained in the mass conservation equation

  16. Plasma and energetic electron flux variations in the Mercury 1 C event: Evidence for a magnetospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christon, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    Near the outbound magnetopause crossing during the first encounter of Mariner 10 with the planet Mercury on March 29, 1974, large intensity, ∼ 6 s quasi-periodic variations in the intensity-time profile of the charged particle experiment's electron counting rate appeared as a series of peaks and valleys. The peaks have previously been interpreted as quasi-periodic burst sequences of mildly relativistic electrons, caused in one case by episodic ∼ 6-s magnetotail substorm reconnection events and in another case by multiple encounters with a substorm energized electron population drifting around Mercury with an ∼ 6 s drift period. In this paper, the authors offer a new and fundamentally different interpretation of the Mariner 10 energetic electron, plasma electron, and magnetic field data near the outbound magnetopause at Mercury 1. They show that magnetosheath-like boundary layer plasma was observed up to ∼ 360 km planetward of the dawn magnetopause crossing as sensed by the magnetometer. They show that observations of substorm enhanced > 35 keV electron flux (that previously interpreted as > 175 keV electrons) associated with the hot tenuous plasma sheet population were interleaved with ∼ 6 s period observations of a cold dense boundary layer plasma associated with a much lower > 35 keV electron flux. They argue that the ∼ 6 s temporal signature is due to variation of the thickness and/or position of the boundary layer plasma population. This explanation of the ∼ 6-s variations, based upon the analysis of the coincident responses of the magnetic field experiment and two independent charged particle instruments (at their highest temporal resolutions), finds a direct analogue in observations of Earth's magnetospheric boundary layer, although the time scales are significantly shorter at Mercury

  17. Experiments of Pool Boiling Performance (Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical Heat Flux) on Designed Micro-Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seol Ha; Kang, Jun Young; Lee, Gi Chol; Kiyofumia, Moriyama; Kim, Moo Hwan; Park, Hyun Sun

    2015-01-01

    In general, the evaluation of the boiling performance mainly focuses on two physical parameters: boiling heat transfer (BHT) and critical heat flux (CHF). In the nuclear power plants, both BHT and CHF contribute the nuclear system efficiency and safety, respectively. In this study, BHT and CHF of the pool boiling on well-organized fabricated structured (micro scaled) surface has been evaluated. As a results, BHT change on microstructured surface shows strongly dependent on Pin-fin effect analysis. In terms of CHF, critical size of micro structure for CHF enhancement has been observed and analyzed based on the capillary wicking effect. In this study, BHT and CHF of the pool boiling on well-organized fabricated structured (micro scaled) surface has been evaluated. As a results, BHT change on microstructured surface shows strongly dependent on the roughness ratio. The extended heat transfer area contributes the boiling heat transfer increase on the structured surface, and its quantitative analysis has been performed. In terms of CHF, the critical size of micro structure for CHF enhancement has been observed and analyzed based on the capillary wicking effect. We suggested a capillary limit to CHF delay for modeling capillary induced liquid inflow through microstructured surfaces. The critical size of the capillary limit on the prepared structured surface, determined by a model, could be reasonable explanation points for the experimental results (optimal size for CHF delay). The present experimental results also showed clearly the critical size (10 - 20 μm) for CHF delay, predicted by capillary limit analysis. This study provides fundamental insight into BHT and CHF enhancement of structured surfaces, and an optimal design guide for the required CHF and boiling heat-transfer performance. Finally, this study can contribute the basic understanding of the boiling on designed microstructure surface, and it also suggest the optimal micro scaled structured surface of boiling

  18. Nuclear boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux in titanium dioxide-water nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Tomio; Takamura, Masahiro; Kamiya, Takahito

    2011-01-01

    Nucleate boiling heat transfer was experimentally studied for saturated pool boiling of water-based nanofluids. Since significant nanoparticle deposition on the heated surface was observed after the nucleate boiling in nanofluids, measurement of CHF was also carried out using the nanoparticle deposited heated surface; pure water was used in the CHF measurement. In the present work, the heated surface was a 20 mm diameter cupper surface, and titanium-dioxide was selected as the material of nanoparticles. Experiments were performed for upward- and downward-facing surfaces. Although the CHFs for the downward-facing surface were generally lower than those for the upward-facing surface, the CHFs for the nanoparticle deposited surface were about 1.9 times greater than those for the bare surface in both the configurations. The CHF improvement corresponded well to the reduction of the surface contact angle. During the nucleate boiling in nanofluids, the boiling heat transfer showed peculiar behavior; it was first deteriorated, then improved, and finally approached to an equilibrium state. This observation indicated that the present nanofluid had competing effects to deteriorate and improve the nucleate boiling heat transfer. It was assumed that the wettability and the roughness of the heated surface were influenced by the deposited nanoparticles to cause complex variation of the number of active nucleation sites. During the nucleate boiling of pure water using the downward-facing surface, a sudden increase in the wall temperature was observed stochastically probably due to the accumulation of bubbles beneath the heated surface. Such behavior was not observed when the pure water was replaced by the nanofluid. (author)

  19. Cattaneo-Christov on heat and mass transfer of unsteady Eyring Powell dusty nanofluid over sheet with heat and mass flux conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamatha S. Upadhay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat and mass flux conditions on magnetohydrodynamic unsteady Eyring-Powell dusty nanofluid over a sheet is addressed. The combined effect of Brownian motion and thermophoresis in nanofluid modeling are retained. The Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model is imposed. A set of similarity variables are utilized to form ordinary differential system from the prevailing partial differential equations. The problem of ordinary differential system (ODS is analyzed numerically through Runge-Kutta based shooting method. Graphical results of pertinent parameters on the velocity, temperature and nanoparticle concentration are studied. Skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt and Sherwood number are also addressed with help of graphs and also validated the present solutions with already existing solutions in the form of table. It is found that the thermal relaxation parameter improves the heat transfer rate and minimizes the mass transfer rate. The heat transfer rate is higher in prescribed heat flux (PHF case when compared with prescribed wall temperature (PWT case.

  20. Prediction of turbulent heat transfer with surface blowing using a non-linear algebraic heat flux model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, F.; Younis, B.A.; Bellettre, J.; Lallemand, A.

    2003-01-01

    The paper reports on the prediction of the effects of blowing on the evolution of the thermal and velocity fields in a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer developing over a porous surface. Closure of the time-averaged equations governing the transport of momentum and thermal energy is achieved using a complete Reynolds-stress transport model for the turbulent stresses and a non-linear, algebraic and explicit model for the turbulent heat fluxes. The latter model accounts explicitly for the dependence of the turbulent heat fluxes on the gradients of mean velocity. Results are reported for the case of a heated boundary layer which is first developed into equilibrium over a smooth impervious wall before encountering a porous section through which cooler fluid is continuously injected. Comparisons are made with LDA measurements for an injection rate of 1%. The reduction of the wall shear stress with increase in injection rate is obtained in the calculations, and the computed rates of heat transfer between the hot flow and the wall are found to agree well with the published data

  1. Impact of heat source/sink on radiative heat transfer to Maxwell nanofluid subject to revised mass flux condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M.; Irfan, M.; Khan, W. A.

    2018-06-01

    Nanofluids retain noteworthy structure that have absorbed attentions of numerous investigators because of their exploration in nanotechnology and nanoscience. In this scrutiny a mathematical computation of 2D flows of Maxwell nanoliquid influenced by a stretched cylinder has been established. The heat transfer structure is conceded out in the manifestation of thermal radiation and heat source/sink. Moreover, the nanoparticles mass flux condition is engaged in this exploration. This newly endorsed tactic is more realistic where the conjecture is made that the nanoparticle flux is zero and nanoparticle fraction regulates itself on the restrictions consequently. By utilizing apposite conversion the governing PDEs are transformed into ODEs and then tackled analytically via HAM. The attained outcomes are plotted and deliberated in aspect for somatic parameters. It is remarked that with an intensification in the Deborah number β diminish the liquid temperature while it boosts for radiation parameter Rd . Furthermore, the concentration of Maxwell liquid has conflicting impact for Brownian motion Nb and thermophoresis parameters Nt .

  2. Temporal variability in phosphorus transfers: classifying concentration–discharge event dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Haygarth

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of temporal variability in relationships between phosphorus (P concentration (Cp and discharge (Q is linked to a simple means of classifying the circumstances of Cp–Q relationships in terms of functional types of response. New experimental data at the upstream interface of grassland soil and catchment systems at a range of scales (lysimeters to headwaters in England and Australia are used to demonstrate the potential of such an approach. Three types of event are defined as Types 1–3, depending on whether the relative change in Q exceeds the relative change in Cp (Type 1, whether Cp and Q are positively inter-related (Type 2 and whether Cp varies yet Q is unchanged (Type 3. The classification helps to characterise circumstances that can be explained mechanistically in relation to (i the scale of the study (with a tendency towards Type 1 in small scale lysimeters, (ii the form of P with a tendency for Type 1 for soluble (i.e., p–Q relationships that can be developed further to contribute to future models of P transfer and delivery from slope to stream. Studies that evaluate the temporal dynamics of the transfer of P are currently grossly under-represented in comparison with models based on static/spatial factors. Keywords: phosphorus, concentration, discharge, lysimeters, temporal dynamics, overland flow

  3. Temporal variability in phosphorus transfers: classifying concentration-discharge event dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haygarth, P.; Turner, B. L.; Fraser, A.; Jarvis, S.; Harrod, T.; Nash, D.; Halliwell, D.; Page, T.; Beven, K.

    The importance of temporal variability in relationships between phosphorus (P) concentration (Cp) and discharge (Q) is linked to a simple means of classifying the circumstances of Cp-Q relationships in terms of functional types of response. New experimental data at the upstream interface of grassland soil and catchment systems at a range of scales (lysimeters to headwaters) in England and Australia are used to demonstrate the potential of such an approach. Three types of event are defined as Types 1-3, depending on whether the relative change in Q exceeds the relative change in Cp (Type 1), whether Cp and Q are positively inter-related (Type 2) and whether Cp varies yet Q is unchanged (Type 3). The classification helps to characterise circumstances that can be explained mechanistically in relation to (i) the scale of the study (with a tendency towards Type 1 in small scale lysimeters), (ii) the form of P with a tendency for Type 1 for soluble (i.e., <0.45 μm P forms) and (iii) the sources of P with Type 3 dominant where P availability overrides transport controls. This simple framework provides a basis for development of a more complex and quantitative classification of Cp-Q relationships that can be developed further to contribute to future models of P transfer and delivery from slope to stream. Studies that evaluate the temporal dynamics of the transfer of P are currently grossly under-represented in comparison with models based on static/spatial factors.

  4. Discrete event simulation for petroleum transfers involving harbors, refineries and pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marcella S.R.; Lueders, Ricardo; Delgado, Myriam R.B.S. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays a great effort has been spent by companies to improve their logistics in terms of programming of events that affect production and distribution of products. In this case, simulation can be a valuable tool for evaluating different behaviors. The objective of this work is to build a discrete event simulation model for scheduling of operational activities in complexes containing one harbor and two refineries interconnected by a pipeline infrastructure. The model was developed in Arena package, based on three sub-models that control pier allocation, loading of tanks, and transfers to refineries through pipelines. Preliminary results obtained for a given control policy, show that profit can be calculated by taking into account many parameters such as oil costs on ships, pier using, over-stay of ships and interface costs. Such problem has already been considered in the literature but using different strategies. All these factors should be considered in a real-world operation where decision making tools are necessary to obtain high returns. (author)

  5. Parallel Jacobian-free Newton Krylov solution of the discrete ordinates method with flux limiters for 3D radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, William F.; Liu Xu

    2012-01-01

    The present study introduces a parallel Jacobian-free Newton Krylov (JFNK) general minimal residual (GMRES) solution for the discretized radiative transfer equation (RTE) in 3D, absorbing, emitting and scattering media. For the angular and spatial discretization of the RTE, the discrete ordinates method (DOM) and the finite volume method (FVM) including flux limiters are employed, respectively. Instead of forming and storing a large Jacobian matrix, JFNK methods allow for large memory savings as the required Jacobian-vector products are rather approximated by semiexact and numerical formulations, for which convergence and computational times are presented. Parallelization of the GMRES solution is introduced in a combined memory-shared/memory-distributed formulation that takes advantage of the fact that only large vector arrays remain in the JFNK process. Results are presented for 3D test cases including a simple homogeneous, isotropic medium and a more complex non-homogeneous, non-isothermal, absorbing–emitting and anisotropic scattering medium with collimated intensities. Additionally, convergence and stability of Gram–Schmidt and Householder orthogonalizations for the Arnoldi process in the parallel GMRES algorithms are discussed and analyzed. Overall, the introduction of JFNK methods results in a parallel, yet scalable to the tested 2048 processors, and memory affordable solution to 3D radiative transfer problems without compromising the accuracy and convergence of a Newton-like solution.

  6. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  7. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S. [Department of Chemistry, The Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D. [Graduate Program in the Biophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  8. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex

  9. A combined ANN-GA and experimental based technique for the estimation of the unknown heat flux for a conjugate heat transfer problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    M K, Harsha Kumar; P S, Vishweshwara; N, Gnanasekaran; C, Balaji

    2018-05-01

    The major objectives in the design of thermal systems are obtaining the information about thermophysical, transport and boundary properties. The main purpose of this paper is to estimate the unknown heat flux at the surface of a solid body. A constant area mild steel fin is considered and the base is subjected to constant heat flux. During heating, natural convection heat transfer occurs from the fin to ambient. The direct solution, which is the forward problem, is developed as a conjugate heat transfer problem from the fin and the steady state temperature distribution is recorded for any assumed heat flux. In order to model the natural convection heat transfer from the fin, an extended domain is created near the fin geometry and air is specified as a fluid medium and Navier Stokes equation is solved by incorporating the Boussinesq approximation. The computational time involved in executing the forward model is then reduced by developing a neural network (NN) between heat flux values and temperatures based on back propagation algorithm. The conjugate heat transfer NN model is now coupled with Genetic algorithm (GA) for the solution of the inverse problem. Initially, GA is applied to the pure surrogate data, the results are then used as input to the Levenberg- Marquardt method and such hybridization is proven to result in accurate estimation of the unknown heat flux. The hybrid method is then applied for the experimental temperature to estimate the unknown heat flux. A satisfactory agreement between the estimated and actual heat flux is achieved by incorporating the hybrid method.

  10. Type B investigation of the iridium contamination event at the High Flux Isotope Reactor on September 7, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    On the title date, at ORNL, area radiation alarms sounded during a routine transfer of a shielding cask (containing 60 Ci 192 Ir) from the HFIR pool side to a transport truck. Small amounts of Ir were released from the cask onto the reactor bay floor. The floor was cleaned, and the cask was shipped to a hot cell at Building 3047 on Oct. 3, 1993. The event was caused by rupture of one of the Ir target rods after it was loaded into the cask for normal transport operations; the rupture was the result of steam generation in the target rod soon after it was placed in the cask (water had entered the target rod through a tiny defect in a weld while it was in the reactor under pressure). While the target rods were in the reactor and reactor pool, there was sufficient cooling to prevent steam generation; when the target rod was loaded into the dry transport cask, the temperature increased enough to result in boiling of the trapped water and produced high enough pressure to result in rupture. The escaping steam ejected some of the Ir pellets. The event was reported as Occurrence Report Number ORO--MMES-X10HFIR-1993-0030, dated Sept. 8, 1993. Analysis indicated that the following conditions were probable causes: less than adequate welding procedures, practices, or techniques, material controls, or inspection methods, or combination thereof, could have led to weld defects, affecting the integrity of target rod IR-75; less than adequate secondary containment in the cask allowed Ir pellets to escape

  11. Heat transfer to sub- and supercritical water flowing upward in a vertical tube at low mass fluxes: numerical analysis and experimental validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odu, Samuel Obarinu; Koster, P.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; van der Hoef, Martin Anton; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer to supercritical water (SCW) flowing upward in a vertical heated tube at low mass fluxes (G ≤ 20 kg/m2 s) has been numerically investigated in COMSOL Multiphysics and validated with experimental data. The turbulence models, essential to describing local turbulence, in COMSOL have been

  12. Quality of Interhospital Transfer Communication Practices and Association With Adverse Events on an Internal Medicine Hospitalist Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borofsky, Jennifer S; Bartsch, Jason C; Howard, Alan B; Repp, Allen B

    Communication practices around interhospital transfer have not been rigorously assessed in adult medicine patients. Furthermore, the clinical implications of such practices have not been reported. This case-control study was designed to assess the quality of communication between clinicians during interhospital transfer and to determine if posttransfer adverse events (PTAEs) are associated with suboptimal communication. Cases included patients transferred to a Medicine Hospitalist Service from an outside hospital who subsequently experienced a PTAE, defined as unplanned transfer to an intensive care unit or death within 24 hours of transfer. Control patients also underwent interhospital transfer but did not experience a PTAE. A blinded investigator retrospectively reviewed the recorded pretransfer phone conversations between sending and receiving clinicians for adherence to a set of 13 empiric best practice communication elements. The primary outcome was the mean communication score, on a scale of 0-13. Mean scores between PTAE (8.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.6-8.9) and control groups (7.9; 95% CI, 7.1-8.8) did not differ significantly (p = .50), although suboptimal communication on a subset of these elements was associated with increased PTAEs. Communication around interhospital transfer appears suboptimal compared with an empiric set of standard communication elements. Posttransfer adverse events were not associated with aggregate adherence to these standards.

  13. U-Pb Dating of Calcite to Constrain Basinal Brine Flux Events: An Example from the Upper Midwest USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasbury, T.; Luczaj, J.

    2017-12-01

    Calcite forms in a variety of settings and can be the product of surface to deep basinal fluids. As such, this mineral can uniquely record details of the fluids responsible for its formation. The forms of calcium carbonates and their stratigraphic relationships from the thin section to the regional scale give important insights on pulses of fluids. A fundamental question is the age of such fluid pulses. While calcite excludes uranium (U) from its crystal structure, some is incorporated and depending on the U/Pb ratio, this provides an opportunity for radiometric dating. Calcite crystals of various sizes and crystal habits are found in Paleozoic carbonate rocks throughout the region from the western Michigan basin to the upper Mississippi valley. These are typically associated with Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) mineralization, including galena, sphalerite, and iron sulfides, but typically post-date the main MVT event. We have analyzed a variety of these calcites and find multiple generations of calcite, separated by tens of millions of years. The initial Pb isotope ratios are similar to the isotope ratios of nearby galena, strongly suggesting a genetic relationship. Our oldest ages are 200 Ma, and we find ages ranging into the Cenozoic. Based on the Paleozoic-hosted galena Pb-isotope isoscapes from the region, the fluids may have been sourced from both the Michigan and Illinois basins. An important and unanswered question is what would cause significant fluid movement out of the basins substantially after Appalachian orogenesis. Noble gas data from brines in the Michigan Basin have a mantle component and have been suggested to be responsible for recognized elevated temperatures across the basin (Ma et al., 2009). Multiple thermal events during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras may have an internal heat source related to reactivation of faults of the Keweenawan Rift system below the Michigan Basin. Perhaps a mantle heat source from below episodically fluxes into the

  14. Nuclear event time histories and computed site transfer functions for locations in the Los Angeles region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A.M.; Covington, P.A.; Park, R.B.; Borcherdt, R.D.; Perkins, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents a collection of Nevada Test Site (NTS) nuclear explosion recordings obtained at sites in the greater Los Angeles, Calif., region. The report includes ground velocity time histories, as well as, derived site transfer functions. These data have been collected as part of a study to evaluate the validity of using low-level ground motions to predict the frequency-dependent response of a site during an earthquake. For this study 19 nuclear events were recorded at 98 separate locations. Some of these sites have recorded more than one of the nuclear explosions, and, consequently, there are a total of 159, three-component station records. The location of all the recording sites are shown in figures 1–5, the station coordinates and abbreviations are given in table 1. The station addresses are listed in table 2, and the nuclear explosions that were recorded are listed in table 3. The recording sites were chosen on the basis of three criteria: (1) that the underlying geological conditions were representative of conditions over significant areas of the region, (2) that the site was the location of a strong-motion recording of the 1971 San Fernando earthquake, or (3) that more complete geographical coverage was required in that location.

  15. An abnormally slow proton transfer reaction in a simple HBO derivative due to ultrafast intramolecular-charge transfer events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcos, Noemí; Gutierrez, Mario; Liras, Marta; Sánchez, Félix; Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2015-07-07

    We report on the steady-state, picosecond and femtosecond time-resolved studies of a charge and proton transfer dye 6-amino-2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (6A-HBO) and its methylated derivative 6-amino-2-(2'-methoxyphenyl)benzoxazole (6A-MBO), in different solvents. With femtosecond resolution and comparison with the photobehaviour of 6A-MBO, we demonstrate for 6A-HBO in solution, the photoproduction of an intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) process at S1 taking place in ∼140 fs or shorter, followed by solvent relaxation in the charge transferred species. The generated structure (syn-enol charge transfer conformer) experiences an excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) reaction to produce a keto-type tautomer. This subsequent proton motion occurs in 1.2 ps (n-heptane), 14 ps (DCM) and 35 ps (MeOH). In MeOH, it is assisted by the solvent molecules and occurs through tunneling for which we got a large kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of about 13. For the 6A-DBO (deuterated sample in CD3OD) the global proton-transfer reaction takes place in 200 ps, showing a remarkable slow KIE regime. The slow ESIPT reaction in DCM (14 ps), not through tunnelling as it is not sensitive to OH/OD exchange, has however to overcome an energy barrier using intramolecular as well as solvent coordinates. The rich ESIPT dynamics of 6A-HBO in the used solutions is governed by an ICT reaction, triggered by the amino group, and it is solvent dependent. Thus, the charge injection to a 6A-HBO molecular frame makes the ICT species more stable, and the phenol group less acidic, slowing down the subsequent ESIPT reaction. Our findings bring new insights into the coupling between ICT and ESIPT reactions on the potential-energy surfaces of several barriers.

  16. Mass transfer inside a flux hood for the sampling of gaseous emissions from liquid surfaces - Experimental assessment and emission rate rescaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Ademir A.; Lucernoni, Federico; Santos, Jane M.; Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Le-Minh, Nhat; Stuetz, Richard M.

    2018-04-01

    This study assesses the mass transfer of compounds inside the US EPA flux hood, one of the enclosure devices most commonly employed for the direct measurement of atmospheric emissions from liquid surfaces in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Experiments comprised the evaporation of water and the volatilisation of a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Special attention was given to the evaluation of the mass transfer coefficients in the microenvironment created by the flux hood and the effects of concentration build up in the hood's headspace. The VOCs emission rates and the water evaporation rates generally increased with the sweep air flow rate, as did the mass transfer coefficients for all compounds. The emission of compounds whose volatilisation is significantly influenced by the gas phase was greatly affected by concentration build up, whereas this effect was not significant for liquid phase-controlled compounds. The gas-film mass transfer coefficient (kG) estimated inside the US EPA flux hood was of the same order as the respective kG reported in the literature for wind tunnel-type devices, but the emission rates measured by the flux hood can be expected to be lower, due to the concentration build-up. Compared against an emission model for the passive surfaces in WWTPs, the mass transfer of acetic acid (representing a gas phase-dominated compound) inside the US EPA flux hood was equivalent to conditions of wind speeds at 10 m height (U10) of 0.27, 0.51 and 0.99 m s-1, respectively, for sweep air flow rates of 2, 5 and 10 L min-1. On the other hand, for higher wind speeds, the emission rates of gas phase-controlled compounds obtained with the flux hood can be considerably underestimated: for instance, at U10 = 5 m s-1, the emission rates of acetic acid inside the flux hood would be approximately 23, 12 and 6 times lower than the emission rates in the field, for sweep air flow rates of 2, 5 and 10 L min-1, respectively. A procedure is presented in

  17. In Silico Prediction of Horizontal Gene Transfer Events in Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus Reveals Protocooperation in Yogurt Manufacturing▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengjin; Siezen, Roland J.; Nauta, Arjen

    2009-01-01

    Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, used in yogurt starter cultures, are well known for their stability and protocooperation during their coexistence in milk. In this study, we show that a close interaction between the two species also takes place at the genetic level. We performed an in silico analysis, combining gene composition and gene transfer mechanism-associated features, and predicted horizontally transferred genes in both L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus. Putative horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events that have occurred between the two bacterial species include the transfer of exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis genes, transferred from S. thermophilus to L. bulgaricus, and the gene cluster cbs-cblB(cglB)-cysE for the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, transferred from L. bulgaricus or Lactobacillus helveticus to S. thermophilus. The HGT event for the cbs-cblB(cglB)-cysE gene cluster was analyzed in detail, with respect to both evolutionary and functional aspects. It can be concluded that during the coexistence of both yogurt starter species in a milk environment, agonistic coevolution at the genetic level has probably been involved in the optimization of their combined growth and interactions. PMID:19395564

  18. In silico prediction of horizontal gene transfer events in Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus reveals protocooperation in yogurt manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengjin; Siezen, Roland J; Nauta, Arjen

    2009-06-01

    Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, used in yogurt starter cultures, are well known for their stability and protocooperation during their coexistence in milk. In this study, we show that a close interaction between the two species also takes place at the genetic level. We performed an in silico analysis, combining gene composition and gene transfer mechanism-associated features, and predicted horizontally transferred genes in both L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus. Putative horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events that have occurred between the two bacterial species include the transfer of exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis genes, transferred from S. thermophilus to L. bulgaricus, and the gene cluster cbs-cblB(cglB)-cysE for the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, transferred from L. bulgaricus or Lactobacillus helveticus to S. thermophilus. The HGT event for the cbs-cblB(cglB)-cysE gene cluster was analyzed in detail, with respect to both evolutionary and functional aspects. It can be concluded that during the coexistence of both yogurt starter species in a milk environment, agonistic coevolution at the genetic level has probably been involved in the optimization of their combined growth and interactions.

  19. On the feasibility of using satellite gravity observations for detecting large-scale solid mass transfer events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peidou, Athina C.; Fotopoulos, Georgia; Pagiatakis, Spiros

    2017-10-01

    The main focus of this paper is to assess the feasibility of utilizing dedicated satellite gravity missions in order to detect large-scale solid mass transfer events (e.g. landslides). Specifically, a sensitivity analysis of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity field solutions in conjunction with simulated case studies is employed to predict gravity changes due to past subaerial and submarine mass transfer events, namely the Agulhas slump in southeastern Africa and the Heart Mountain Landslide in northwestern Wyoming. The detectability of these events is evaluated by taking into account the expected noise level in the GRACE gravity field solutions and simulating their impact on the gravity field through forward modelling of the mass transfer. The spectral content of the estimated gravity changes induced by a simulated large-scale landslide event is estimated for the known spatial resolution of the GRACE observations using wavelet multiresolution analysis. The results indicate that both the Agulhas slump and the Heart Mountain Landslide could have been detected by GRACE, resulting in {\\vert }0.4{\\vert } and {\\vert }0.18{\\vert } mGal change on GRACE solutions, respectively. The suggested methodology is further extended to the case studies of the submarine landslide in Tohoku, Japan, and the Grand Banks landslide in Newfoundland, Canada. The detectability of these events using GRACE solutions is assessed through their impact on the gravity field.

  20. A new type of ion injection event observed by Viking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Woch, J.; Shapshak, M.; Elphinstone, R.

    1993-01-01

    The authors report on the observation of a new type of ion injection event observed by Viking spacecraft several degrees equatorward of the cusp. Its signature seems considerably different than previously reported events such as flux transfer events or impulsive or transient magnetosheath plasma injection events. It consists of low energy ions, as the pattern drops sharply above 100 to 200 eV

  1. Studies in boiling heat transfer in two phase flow through tube arrays: nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient and maximum heat flux as a function of velocity and quality of Freon-113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani, R.

    1983-01-01

    The nucleate boiling heat-transfer coefficient and the maximum heat flux were studied experimentally as functions of velocity, quality and heater diameter for single-phase flow, and two-phase flow of Freon-113 (trichlorotrifluorethane). Results show: (1) peak heat flux: over 300 measured peak heat flux data from two 0.875-in. and four 0.625-in.-diameter heaters indicated that: (a) for pool boiling, single-phase and two-phase forced convection boiling the only parameter (among hysteresis, rate of power increase, aging, presence and proximity of unheated rods) that has a statistically significant effect on the peak heat flux is the velocity. (b) In the velocity range (0 0 position or the point of impact of the incident fluid) and the top (180 0 position) of the test element, respectively

  2. The concentration, source and deposition flux of ammonium and nitrate in atmospheric particles during dust events at a coastal site in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jianhua; Liu, Xiaohuan; Yao, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ruifeng; Chen, Xiaojing; Lin, Xuehui; Gao, Huiwang; Liu, Ruhai

    2018-01-01

    Asian dust has been reported to carry anthropogenic reactive nitrogen during transport from source areas to the oceans. In this study, we attempted to characterize NH4+ and NO3- in atmospheric particles collected at a coastal site in northern China during spring dust events from 2008 to 2011. Based on the mass concentrations of NH4+ and NO3- in each total suspended particle (TSP) sample, the samples can be classified into increasing or decreasing types. In Category 1, the concentrations of NH4+ and NO3- were 20-440 % higher in dust day samples relative to samples collected immediately before or after a dust event. These concentrations decreased by 10-75 % in the dust day samples in Categories 2 and 3. Back trajectory analysis suggested that multiple factors, such as the transport distance prior to the reception site, the mixing layer depth on the transport route and the residence time across highly polluted regions, might affect the concentrations of NH4+ and NO3-. NH4+ in the dust day samples was likely either in the form of ammonium salts existing separately to dust aerosols or as the residual of incomplete reactions between ammonium salts and carbonate salts. NO3- in the dust day samples was attributed to various formation processes during the long-range transport. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model results showed that the contribution of soil dust increased from 23 to 36 % on dust days, with decreasing contributions from local anthropogenic inputs and associated secondary aerosols. The estimated deposition flux of NNH4++NO3- varied greatly from event to event; e.g., the dry deposition flux of NNH4++NO3- increased by 9-285 % in Category 1 but decreased by 46-73 % in Category 2. In Category 3, the average dry deposition fluxes of particulate nitrate and ammonium decreased by 46 % and increased by 10 %, respectively, leading to 11-48 % decrease in the fluxes of NNH4++NO3-.

  3. Radiant and convective heat transfer for flow of a transparent gas in a short tube with prescribed sinusoidal wall heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Lemos, M.J.S.

    1982-01-01

    The present analysis accounts for radiant and convective heat transfer for a transparent fluid flowing in a short tube with prescribed wall heat flux. The heat flux distribution used was of sine shape with maximum at the middle of the tube. Such a solution is the approximate one for axial power in a nuclear reactor. The solutions for the tube wall and gas bulk temperatures were obtained by successive substitutions for the wall and gas balance energy equations. The results show a decrease of 30% for the maximum wall temperature using black surface (e = 1). In this same case, the increasing in the gas temperature shows a decrease of 58%

  4. Design and control strategy applying the novel highly effective magnetic flux coupling (HEMFC) scheme for a non-contact power transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.-P.; Huang, W.-N.; Chen, P.-S.; Fan, T.-Y.; Chen, M.-P.; Teng, C.-C.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the novel design concept for highly effective magnetic flux coupling (HEMFC) schemes, based on enhancement of path guiding effect for leakage flux transmitting, is proposed for a non-contact power transfer system. Two implementation techniques are presented herein utilizing simple structure opinions of specific slant air gap as well as adding of metal bushing components. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the improvement of magnetic coupling ratio and overall system efficiency are achieved by applying the two HEMFC schemes as the power transmitting devices

  5. Installation for the study of heat transfer with high flux density; Installation d'etude de transmission de chaleur a densite de flux elevee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin, M; Schwab, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    As a result of their very low vapor pressure, metals with a low fusion point (sodium, sodium-potassium alloys, etc.) can be used at high temperature, as heating fluids, in installations whose internal pressure is close to atmospheric pressure. Owing to the very high convection coefficients which can be reached with these fluids and to the large temperature differences utilizable, it is possible to produce through the exchange surfaces considerable heat flux densities, of the order of those which exist through the canning of fuel elements in nuclear reactors. The installation described allowed a flux density of more than 200 W/cm{sup 2} to be obtained, the heating fluid being a Na-K alloy (containing 56 per cent by weight of potassium) brought to a temperature around 550 deg. C. (author) [French] Par suite de leur tres faible pression de vapeur, les metaux a bas point de fusion (sodium, alliages sodium-potassium, etc.) peuvent etre utilises a haute temperature, comme fluides de chauffage, dans des installations dont la pression interne est voisine de la pression atmospherique. Grace aux coefficients de convection tres eleves que ces fluides permettent d'atteindre et aux importantes differences de temperature utilisables, il est possible de produire, a travers les surfaces d'echange, des densites de flux de chaleur considerables, de l'ordre de celles qui existent a travers les gaines des elements combustibles des reacteurs nucleaires. L'installation decrite a permis l'obtention d'une densite de flux de plus, de 200 W/cm{sup 2}, le fluide chauffant etant de l'alliage Na-K (a 56 pour cent en poids de potassium) porte a une temperature voisine de 550 deg. C. (auteur)

  6. Wide Area Protection Scheme Preventing Cascading Events Caused by Load Flow Transferring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Haishun

    2013-01-01

    Load flow transferring after an initial contingency is regarded as one of the main reasons of causing unexpected cascading trips. A multi agent system (MAS) based wide area protection strategy is proposed in this paper to predict the load flow transferring from the point of view of impedance relays...

  7. Magnetic-flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  8. ILL High Flux Reactor in the event of an earthquake: Safety targets, technical approaches and work carried out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plewinski, Francois; Coiscault, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin is a pan-European research organisation and the world leader in neutron science and technology. Since 1971 it has been operating the ILL High-Flux Reactor (HFR), the most intense continuous neutron source in the world. The ILL is governed by an intergovernmental Convention between France, Germany and the United Kingdom, which was signed in 1967; since then several other countries have joined the ILL as Scientific Member countries: Italy, Spain, Switzerland, Russia, Austria, the Czech Republic and Sweden. The fourth ten-year extension to the agreement was signed at the end of 2002, thus ensuring that the Institute will continue to operate until at least the end of 2013. Thanks to the reliability of the HFR since its very first years of operation, scientific output at the ILL has developed in a spectacular fashion, allowing the Institute to become the world's foremost neutron facility in terms of scientific publications. The Millennium Programme, a 20 MEURO development plan, was set up in 2000 with the aim of launching an accelerated but sustainable programme of instrument renewal which will maintain the ILL's leading position. Over the next 10 years, a further 100 MEURO of investment is foreseen for the Millennium Programme. By way of comparison, the annual ILL general budget is around 75 MEURO. In 2002 the facility underwent a general safety review, including an assessment of the impact of a safe shutdown earthquake. The Refit Programme for upgrading the installations and improving safety levels is now under way, in order to allow the ILL to operate for at least another 20 years. The contents of the paper is as follows: 1. Context; 2. HFR operations and scientific experiments; 3. HFR operations - Safety; 3.1. Operation at nominal power; 3.2. Automatic reactor shutdown - Transition to natural convection; 4. Seismic scenario; 4.1. Target equivalent doses for local populations; 4.2. Relevant source terms; 4.3. Radiological

  9. Homotopy Perturbation Method for Thin Film Flow and Heat Transfer over an Unsteady Stretching Sheet with Internal Heating and Variable Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chung Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the effects of variable heat flux and internal heat generation on the flow and heat transfer in a thin film on a horizontal sheet in the presence of thermal radiation. Similarity transformations are used to transform the governing equations to a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The obtained differential equations are solved approximately by the homotopy perturbation method (HPM. The effects of various parameters governing the flow and heat transfer in this study are discussed and presented graphically. Comparison of numerical results is made with the earlier published results under limiting cases.

  10. Study on subcooled-forced flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux of solid particle-water two-phase mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Mochizuki, Manabu; Ohtake, Hiroyasu

    1999-01-01

    The effect of solid particle introduction on forced flow boiling and the critical heat flux was examined for the mixture of subcooled-water and 0.6 mm glass beads. When the particles were introduced, the growth on of a superheated layer near a wall seemed to be suppressed and the onset of nucleate boiling was delayed. The particles tempted for bubbles to condense at nucleation sites, and then the initiation of net vapor generation was also delayed and sifted to a high wall-superheat region. The nucleate boiling heat transfer was augmented by the particles, which considered to be caused by the combination of the suppression of the superheated layer growth and the promotion of the condensation and dissipation of the bubbles. The wall superheat at the critical heat flux condition was sifted to a high wall superheat region and the critical heat flux itself was also elevated a little. (author)

  11. Analytical solution to the problem of heat transfer in an MHD flow inside a channel with prescribed sinusoidal wall heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zniber, K.; Oubarra, A.; Lahjomri, J.

    2005-01-01

    An MHD laminar flow through a two dimensional channel subjected to a uniform magnetic field and heated at the walls of the conduit over the whole length with a sinusoidal heat flux of vanishing mean value or not, is studied analytically. General expressions of the temperature distribution and of the local and mean Nusselt numbers are obtained by using the technique of linear operators in the case of negligible Joule and viscous dissipation and by taking into account the axial conduction effect. The principal results show that an increase of the local Nusselt number with Hartmann number is observed, and, far from the inlet section, the average heat transfer between the fluid and the walls shows a significant improvement at all values of Hartmann number used when the frequency of the prescribed sinusoidal wall heat flux is increasing in the case of vanishing mean value of the heat flux and this is true especially at low Peclet numbers

  12. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY FOR HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT BY LAMINAR FORCED CONVECTION FROM HORIZONTAL AND INCLINED TUBE HEATED WITH CONSTANT HEAT FLUX, USING TWO TYPES OF POROUS MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamir K. Jassem

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An experimental forced laminar study was presented in this research for an air flowing through a circular channel for different angles ( ,30o,45o,60o, the channel was heated at constant heat flux , the channel also was packed with steel and glass spheres respectively . The tests were done for three values of Peclets number (2111.71,3945.42,4575.47 with changing the heat flux for each case and five times for each number.The results showed that the dimensionless temperature distribution  will decrease with increasing the dimensionless channel length for all cases with changing Peclet number, heat flux and inclination angles, and its lowest value will be for glass spheres at highest flux, while at lower flux for , and the decreasing in dimensionless temperature was closed for both types of packed at other inclination angles.The study declared that the local Nusselt number decreases with increasing the dimensionless length of the channel for both packeds and for different applied heat flux, also through this study it was declared that the average Nusselt increases as Peclet number increases for both packed. Its value for the glass spheres is greater than the steel spheres with percentage (98.3% at small Peclet, and percentage (97.2% at large Peclet number for the horizontal tube, and (98.3% at small Peclet number and (97.8% at large Peclet number at  .Through this study its was found that average Nusselt number increases along the channel as the heat flux increases, because the bulk temperature will increase as the flow proceeds toward the end of the channel , so the heat transfer coefficient will increase.  It was declared from this study that in the case of the steel packed the heat transfer will occur mainly by conduction, while in the case of glass packed the heat transfer will occur mainly by laminar forced convection, where the lowest Nusselt number (Nu=3.8 was found when the pipe is horizontal and lowest heat flux and lowest Peclet number.  

  13. On the determination of the overall heat transmission coefficient and soil heat flux for a fog cooled, naturally ventilated greenhouse: Analysis of radiation and convection heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Ghany, Ahmed M.; Kozai, Toyoki

    2006-01-01

    A physical model for analyzing the radiative and convective heat transfer in a fog cooled, naturally ventilated greenhouse was developed for estimating the overall heat transmission coefficient based on the conduction, convection and thermal radiation heat transfer coefficients and for predicting the soil heat flux. The contribution of the water vapor of the inside air to the emission and absorption of thermal radiation was determined. Measurements of the outside and inside greenhouse environments to be used in the analysis were conducted around solar noon (12:19-13:00) on a hot sunny day to provide the maximum solar radiation transmission into the greenhouse. The net solar radiation flux measured at the greenhouse floor showed a reasonable agreement with the predicted value. The net fluxes were estimated around noon. The average net radiation (solar and thermal) at the soil surface was 220.0 W m -2 , the average soil heat flux was 155.0 W m -2 and the average contribution of the water vapor of the inside air to the thermal radiation was 22.0 W m -2 . The average overall heat transmission coefficient was 4.0 W m -2 C -1 and was in the range between 3.0 W m -2 C -1 and 6.0 W m -2 C -1 under the different hot summer conditions between the inside and outside of the naturally ventilated, fog cooled greenhouse

  14. Analysis of the dual phase lag bio-heat transfer equation with constant and time-dependent heat flux conditions on skin surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaei Poor Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on temperature response of skin tissue due to time-dependent surface heat fluxes. Analytical solution is constructed for DPL bio-heat transfer equation with constant, periodic and pulse train heat flux conditions on skin surface. Separation of variables and Duhamel’s theorem for a skin tissue as a finite domain are employed. The transient temperature responses for constant and time-dependent boundary conditions are obtained and discussed. The results show that there is major discrepancy between the predicted temperature of parabolic (Pennes bio-heat transfer, hyperbolic (thermal wave and DPL bio-heat transfer models when high heat flux accidents on the skin surface with a short duration or propagation speed of thermal wave is finite. The results illustrate that the DPL model reduces to the hyperbolic model when τT approaches zero and the classic Fourier model when both thermal relaxations approach zero. However for τq = τT the DPL model anticipates different temperature distribution with that predicted by the Pennes model. Such discrepancy is due to the blood perfusion term in energy equation. It is in contrast to results from the literature for pure conduction material, where the DPL model approaches the Fourier heat conduction model when τq = τT . The burn injury is also investigated.

  15. Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Karyakin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015 was held during 21st–25th October 2015 at the Novotel Hotel, Chumphon, Thailand, one of the most favored travel destinations in Asia. The 10th ARRCN Symposium 2017 will be held during October 2017 in the Davao, Philippines. International Symposium on the Montagu's Harrier (Circus pygargus «The Montagu's Harrier in Europe. Status. Threats. Protection», organized by the environmental organization «Landesbund für Vogelschutz in Bayern e.V.» (LBV was held on November 20-22, 2015 in Germany. The location of this event was the city of Wurzburg in Bavaria.

  16. Taking up an event: Brand image transfer during the FIFA World Cup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijens, P.; Smit, E.; Moorman, M.

    2009-01-01

    A real-life study (N = 1299) into brand images during and after the 2006 FIFA World Cup football tournament showed that the event was a good platform for the creation of brand images through ‘take-up’ advertising in which the brand was associated with the event. Exposure level and involvement with

  17. Virtual disjunct eddy covariance measurements of organic compound fluxes from a subalpine forest using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Karl

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A `virtual' disjunct eddy covariance (vDEC device was tested with field measurements of biogenic VOC fluxes at a subalpine forest site in the Rocky Mountains of the USA. A PTR-MS instrument was used as the VOC sensor. Daily peak emission fluxes of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO, methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde were around 1.5, 1, 0.8 and 0.4 mg m-2 h-1, respectively. High pass filtering due to long sampling lines was investigated in laboratory experiments, and suggested that VOC losses in PTFA lines are generally governed by diffusion laws. Memory effects and surface reactions did not seem to play a dominant role. Model estimates of MBO fluxes compared well with measured fluxes. The results also suggest that latent heat and sensible heat fluxes are reasonably well correlated with VOC fluxes and could be used to predict variations in VOC emissions. The release of MBO, methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde resulted in significant change of tropospheric oxidant levels and a 10--40% increase in ozone levels, as inferred from a photochemical box model. We conclude that vDEC with a PTR-MS instrument is a versatile tool for simultaneous field analysis of multiple VOC fluxes.

  18. Heat transfer in flow past a continuously moving semi-infinite flat plate in transverse magnetic field with heat flux

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, T.V.R.

    Thermal boundary layer on a continuously moving semi-infinite flat plate in the presence of transverse magnetic field with heat flux has been examined. Similarity solutions have been derived and the resulting equations are integrated numerically...

  19. Constraining the Spatial Extent of Marine Oil Snow Sedimentation and Flocculent Accumulation Following the Deepwater Horizon Event Using an Excess 210Pb Flux Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, P T; Brooks, G R; Larson, R A; Holmes, C W; O'Malley, B J; Hollander, D J

    2017-06-06

    Following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) event in 2010, there were several lines of evidence indicating the presence of marine oil snow sedimentation and flocculent accumulation (MOSSFA). A significant amount of marine oil snow formed in the water column of the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM), settled rapidly, and ultimately accumulated in the sediments of the nGoM. This study utilized a commonly used radioisotope tracer (excess 210 Pb, 210 Pb xs ) from 32 sediment cores collected from 2010 to 2013 to characterize the spatial extent of MOSSFA on the seafloor. Relative to pre-DWH conditions, an increase in 210 Pb xs flux occurred in two distinct regions: (1) in the western portion of the study area on an east-northeast to west-southwest axis, stretching 230 km southwest and 140 km northeast of the DWH wellhead, and (2) in the eastern portion of the study area on a 70 km northeast to southwest axis near the DeSoto Canyon. The total sedimentary spatial extent of MOSSFA, as calculated by increased 210 Pb xs flux after 2010, ranged from 12 805 to 35 425 km 2 . 210 Pb xs flux provides a valuable tool for documenting the spatial extent of MOSSFA following DWH and will continue to aid in the determination of advective transport and ultimate depocenters of MOSSFA material.

  20. Sea-to-air flux of dimethyl sulfide in the South and North Pacific Ocean as measured by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry coupled with the gradient flux technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Yuko; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Inomata, Satoshi; Ikeda, Kohei; Iwata, Toru; Kameyama, Sohiko; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Gamo, Toshitaka; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Furuya, Ken

    2017-07-01

    Exchange of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) between the surface ocean and the lower atmosphere was examined by using proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry coupled with the gradient flux (PTR-MS/GF) system. We deployed the PTR-MS/GF system and observed vertical gradients of atmospheric DMS just above the sea surface in the subtropical and transitional South Pacific Ocean and the subarctic North Pacific Ocean. In total, we obtained 370 in situ profiles, and of these we used 46 data sets to calculate the sea-to-air flux of DMS. The DMS flux determined was in the range from 1.9 to 31 μmol m-2 d-1 and increased with wind speed and biological activity, in reasonable accordance with previous observations in the open ocean. The gas transfer velocity of DMS derived from the PTR-MS/GF measurements was similar to either that of DMS determined by the eddy covariance technique or that of insoluble gases derived from the dual tracer experiments, depending on the observation sites located in different geographic regions. When atmospheric conditions were strongly stable during the daytime in the subtropical ocean, the PTR-MS/GF observations captured a daytime versus nighttime difference in DMS mixing ratios in the surface air overlying the ocean surface. The difference was mainly due to the sea-to-air DMS emissions and stable atmospheric conditions, thus affecting the gradient of DMS. This indicates that the DMS gradient is strongly controlled by diurnal variations in the vertical structure of the lower atmosphere above the ocean surface.

  1. Study on Enhancement of Sub-Cooled Flow Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical Heat Flux of Solid-Water Two-Phase Mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuo Koizumi; Hiroyasu Ohtake; Tomoyuki Suzuki

    2002-01-01

    The influence of particle introduction into a subcooled water flow on boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux (CHF) was examined. When the water velocity was low, the particles crowded on the bottom wall of the flow channel and flowed just like sliding on the wall. When the water velocity was high, the particles were well dispersed in the water flow. In the non-boiling region, the heat transfer was augmented by the introduction of the particles into the water flow. As the introduction of the particles were increased, the augmentation was also increased in the high water flow rate region. However, it was independent upon the particle introduction rate in the low water flow rate region. The onset of boiling was delayed by the particle inclusion. The boiling heat transfer was enhanced by the particles. However, it was rather decreased in the high heat flux fully-developed-boiling region. The CHF was decreased by the particle inclusion in the low water flow region and was not affected in the high water flow region. (authors)

  2. Assessment and limitation of radioactivity transfers in the event of a postulated severe PWR accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauvain, J.

    1992-01-01

    This report constitutes the supporting material for a lecture on severe accidents which could occur on PWR type nuclear reactors. It is assumed for present purposes that the reader has at least a rudimentary acquaintance with the basics of general physics if not with the operating processes of these reactors. After defining what is meant by a ''severe accident'' on a reactor, the possible phenomenology of such an accident is qualitatively described: loss of coolant and loss of containment integrity. A certain number of elements are then given for the quantitative assessment of these phenomena involving possible radioactivity transfers within and outside the plant. In conclusion, available means are indicated for the limitation and control of these environmental transfers. (author). 5 refs, figs

  3. Light induced intramolecular electron and energy transfer events in rigidly linked borondipyrromethene: Corrole Dyad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giribabu, Lingamallu, E-mail: giribabu@iict.res.in [Inorganic & Physical Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Tarnaka, Hyderabad 500007, Telangana (India); Jain, Kanika [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences & Pharmacy, Central University of Rajasthan, Kishangarh, Dist. Ajmer, Rajasthan 305817 (India); Sudhakar, Kolanu; Duvva, Naresh [Inorganic & Physical Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Tarnaka, Hyderabad 500007, Telangana (India); Chitta, Raghu, E-mail: raghuchitta@curaj.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences & Pharmacy, Central University of Rajasthan, Kishangarh, Dist. Ajmer, Rajasthan 305817 (India)

    2016-09-15

    We have designed and synthesized a photo-induced energy/electron donor–acceptor conjugate comprising of corrole linked to BODIPY at the 5-position via ester linkage. The dyad was characterized by elemental analysis, MALDI-MS, UV-Visible, {sup 1}H NMR fluorescence spectroscopy (steady-state and time-resolved) as well as electrochemical methods. A comparison of the UV–visible and {sup 1}H NMR spectra of the dyad with those of the corresponding individual model compounds (i.e., BODIPY-CO{sub 2}H and BPFC-OH) reveal that there exist minimum π–π interactions between BODIPY and corrole π-planes. Quenched emission of BODIPY and corrole part of the dyad has been observed in five different solvents. Excitation spectral data provided evidence for an intramolecular excitation energy transfer (EET) from the singlet BODIPY to the corrole and an intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from singlet state of corrole to ground state of BODIPY. Detailed analysis of the data suggests that Forster's dipole–dipole mechanism does not adequately explain this energy transfer but, an electron exchange mediated mechanism can, in principle, contribute to the intramolecular EET.

  4. Theoretical perspectives on electron transfer and charge separation events in photochemical water cleavage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, J.J.; Lenoir, P.M.; Musho, M.K.; Tembe, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    We study in this paper the dynamics induced by models for photochemical water cleavage systems, focusing on the spatial and temporal factors influencing electron transfer and charge separation processes in such systems. The reaction-diffusion theory is formulated in full generality and the consequences explored in a number of spatio-temporal regimes, viz. the spatially homogeneous system in the long-time limit (i.e. the steady state for a well-stirred system), the spatially homogeneous system in evolution, and the spatially inhomogeneous system in evolution (where, in the latter study, we consider electron transfer at the cluster surface to be governed by a rate constant that reflects the localized nature of such processes). The results of numerical simulations are presented for all three cases and used to highlight the importance of heterogeneous environments in enhancing the cage escape yield of charge separated species, and to demonstrate the dependence of the hydrogen yield on the localization of electron-transfer processes in the vicinity of the microcatalyst surface

  5. Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Aarkrog, Vibe

    Bogen er den første samlede indføring i transfer på dansk. Transfer kan anvendes som praksis-filosofikum. Den giver en systematisk indsigt til den studerende, der spørger: Hvordan kan teoretisk viden bruges til at reflektere over handlinger i situationer, der passer til min fremtidige arbejdsplads?...

  6. Inverse heat transfer analysis of a functionally graded fin to estimate time-dependent base heat flux and temperature distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Haw-Long; Chang, Win-Jin; Chen, Wen-Lih; Yang, Yu-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Time-dependent base heat flux of a functionally graded fin is inversely estimated. ► An inverse algorithm based on the conjugate gradient method and the discrepancy principle is applied. ► The distributions of temperature in the fin are determined as well. ► The influence of measurement error and measurement location upon the precision of the estimated results is also investigated. - Abstract: In this study, an inverse algorithm based on the conjugate gradient method and the discrepancy principle is applied to estimate the unknown time-dependent base heat flux of a functionally graded fin from the knowledge of temperature measurements taken within the fin. Subsequently, the distributions of temperature in the fin can be determined as well. It is assumed that no prior information is available on the functional form of the unknown base heat flux; hence the procedure is classified as the function estimation in inverse calculation. The temperature data obtained from the direct problem are used to simulate the temperature measurements. The influence of measurement errors and measurement location upon the precision of the estimated results is also investigated. Results show that an excellent estimation on the time-dependent base heat flux and temperature distributions can be obtained for the test case considered in this study.

  7. Heat transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Heat transfer. Heat conduction in solid slab. Convective heat transfer. Non-linear temperature. variation due to flow. HEAT FLUX AT SURFACE. conduction/diffusion.

  8. Convective Heat Transfer Scaling of Ignition Delay and Burning Rate with Heat Flux and Stretch Rate in the Equivalent Low Stretch Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    To better evaluate the buoyant contributions to the convective cooling (or heating) inherent in normal-gravity material flammability test methods, we derive a convective heat transfer correlation that can be used to account for the forced convective stretch effects on the net radiant heat flux for both ignition delay time and burning rate. The Equivalent Low Stretch Apparatus (ELSA) uses an inverted cone heater to minimize buoyant effects while at the same time providing a forced stagnation flow on the sample, which ignites and burns as a ceiling fire. Ignition delay and burning rate data is correlated with incident heat flux and convective heat transfer and compared to results from other test methods and fuel geometries using similarity to determine the equivalent stretch rates and thus convective cooling (or heating) rates for those geometries. With this correlation methodology, buoyant effects inherent in normal gravity material flammability test methods can be estimated, to better apply the test results to low stretch environments relevant to spacecraft material selection.

  9. Estimation of Surface Temperature and Heat Flux by Inverse Heat Transfer Methods Using Internal Temperatures Measured While Radiantly Heating a Carbon/Carbon Specimen up to 1920 F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Michelle; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Glass, David

    2015-01-01

    The ability to solve the heat conduction equation is needed when designing materials to be used on vehicles exposed to extremely high temperatures; e.g. vehicles used for atmospheric entry or hypersonic flight. When using test and flight data, computational methods such as finite difference schemes may be used to solve for both the direct heat conduction problem, i.e., solving between internal temperature measurements, and the inverse heat conduction problem, i.e., using the direct solution to march forward in space to the surface of the material to estimate both surface temperature and heat flux. The completed research first discusses the methods used in developing a computational code to solve both the direct and inverse heat transfer problems using one dimensional, centered, implicit finite volume schemes and one dimensional, centered, explicit space marching techniques. The developed code assumed the boundary conditions to be specified time varying temperatures and also considered temperature dependent thermal properties. The completed research then discusses the results of analyzing temperature data measured while radiantly heating a carbon/carbon specimen up to 1920 F. The temperature was measured using thermocouple (TC) plugs (small carbon/carbon material specimens) with four embedded TC plugs inserted into the larger carbon/carbon specimen. The purpose of analyzing the test data was to estimate the surface heat flux and temperature values from the internal temperature measurements using direct and inverse heat transfer methods, thus aiding in the thermal and structural design and analysis of high temperature vehicles.

  10. Net sea–air CO2 flux uncertainties in the Bay of Biscay based on the choice of wind speed products and gas transfer parameterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Otero

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of sea–air CO2 fluxes is largely dependent on wind speed through the gas transfer velocity parameterization. In this paper, we quantify uncertainties in the estimation of the CO2 uptake in the Bay of Biscay resulting from the use of different sources of wind speed such as three different global reanalysis meteorological models (NCEP/NCAR 1, NCEP/DOE 2 and ERA-Interim, one high-resolution regional forecast model (HIRLAM-AEMet, winds derived under the Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP project, and QuikSCAT winds in combination with some of the most widely used gas transfer velocity parameterizations. Results show that net CO2 flux estimations during an entire seasonal cycle (September 2002–September 2003 may vary by a factor of ~ 3 depending on the selected wind speed product and the gas exchange parameterization, with the highest impact due to the last one. The comparison of satellite- and model-derived winds with observations at buoys advises against the systematic overestimation of NCEP-2 and the underestimation of NCEP-1. In the coastal region, the presence of land and the time resolution are the main constraints of QuikSCAT, which turns CCMP and ERA-Interim in the preferred options.

  11. Sensitivity of secondary production and export flux to choice of trophic transfer formulation in marine ecosystem models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas R.; Hessen, Dag O.; Mitra, Aditee; Mayor, Daniel J.; Yool, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    The performance of four contemporary formulations describing trophic transfer, which have strongly contrasting assumptions as regards the way that consumer growth is calculated as a function of food C:N ratio and in the fate of non-limiting substrates, was compared in two settings: a simple steady-state ecosystem model and a 3D biogeochemical general circulation model. Considerable variation was seen in predictions for primary production, transfer to higher trophic levels and export to the ocean interior. The physiological basis of the various assumptions underpinning the chosen formulations is open to question. Assumptions include Liebig-style limitation of growth, strict homeostasis in zooplankton biomass, and whether excess C and N are released by voiding in faecal pellets or via respiration/excretion post-absorption by the gut. Deciding upon the most appropriate means of formulating trophic transfer is not straightforward because, despite advances in ecological stoichiometry, the physiological mechanisms underlying these phenomena remain incompletely understood. Nevertheless, worrying inconsistencies are evident in the way in which fundamental transfer processes are justified and parameterised in the current generation of marine ecosystem models, manifested in the resulting simulations of ocean biogeochemistry. Our work highlights the need for modellers to revisit and appraise the equations and parameter values used to describe trophic transfer in marine ecosystem models.

  12. Effects of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles deposition on critical heat flux of R-123 in flow boiling heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seok Bin; Bang, In Cheol [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    In this study, R-123 flow boiling experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of nanoparticle deposition on heater surfaces on flow critical heat flux (CHF) and boiling heat transfer. It is known that CHF enhancement by nanoparticles results from porous structures that are very similar to layers of Chalk River unidentified deposit formed on nuclear fuel rod surfaces during the reactor operation period. Although previous studies have investigated the surface effects through surface modifications, most studies are limited to pool boiling conditions, and therefore, the effects of porous surfaces on flow boiling heat transfer are still unclear. In addition, there have been only few reports on suppression of wetting for decoupled approaches of reasoning. In this study, bare and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticle-coated surfaces were prepared for the study experiments. The CHF of each surface was measured with different mass fluxes of 1,600 kg/m{sup 2}s, 1,800 kg/m{sup 2}s, 2,100 kg/m{sup 2}s, 2,400 kg/m{sup 2}s, and 2,600 kg/m{sup 2}s. The nanoparticle-coated tube showed CHF enhancement up to 17% at a mass flux of 2,400 kg/m{sup 2}s compared with the bare tube. The factors for CHF enhancement are related to the enhanced rewetting process derived from capillary action through porous structures built-up by nanoparticles while suppressing relative wettability effects between two sample surfaces as a highly wettable R-123 refrigerant was used as a working fluid.

  13. Plasma membrane potential depolarization and cytosolic calcium flux are early events involved in tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) plant-to-plant communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebelo, Simon A; Matsui, Kenji; Ozawa, Rika; Maffei, Massimo E

    2012-11-01

    Tomato plants respond to herbivory by emitting volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are released into the surrounding atmosphere. We analyzed the tomato herbivore-induced VOCs and tested the ability of tomato receiver plants to detect tomato donor volatiles by analyzing early responses, including plasma membrane potential (V(m)) variations and cytosolic calcium ([Ca²⁺](cyt)) fluxes. Receiver tomato plants responded within seconds to herbivore-induced VOCs with a strong V(m) depolarization, which was only partly recovered by fluxing receiver plants with clean air. Among emitted volatiles, we identified by GC-MS some green leaf volatiles (GLVs) such as (E)-2-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, the monoterpene α-pinene, and the sesquiterpene β-caryophyllene. GLVs were found to exert the stronger V(m) depolarization, when compared to α-pinene and β-caryophyllene. Furthermore, V(m) depolarization was found to increase with increasing GLVs concentration. GLVs were also found to induce a strong [Ca²⁺](cyt) increase, particularly when (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate was tested both in solution and with a gas. On the other hand, α-pinene and β-caryophyllene, which also induced a significant V(m) depolarization with respect to controls, did not exert any significant effect on [Ca²⁺](cyt) homeostasis. Our results show for the first time that plant perception of volatile cues (especially GLVs) from the surrounding environment is mediated by early events, occurring within seconds and involving the alteration of the plasma membrane potential and the [Ca²⁺](cyt) flux. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An assessment of the critical heat flux approaches of thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes using bundle data from the Heat Transfer Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Lee

    1994-01-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) bundle data from the Heat Transfer Research Facility of Columbia University are used to check the validity of the CHF approaches used in thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes for light water reactors. The CHF approaches assessed include the Biasi et al. correlation of TRAC, the Groeneveld et al. CHF table lookup approach of RELAP5/MOD3, the CHF table lookup approach of CATHARE, and the CHF approach of RETRAN. Depending on system pressure, RETRAN uses the B and W2, Barnett, and modified Barnett correlations and a linear interpolation scheme to predict CHF. Results show that among these CHF approaches, the Groeneveld et al. approach has the best prediction accuracy and the smallest uncertainty in the estimation of the HTRF bundle data. On the average, the Groeneveld et al. approach overpredicts the uniform axial heat flux distribution by 3.6% and the nonuniform axial heat flux distribution by 0.9%. The performance of the RETRAN approach is comparable with that of the Groenevel et al. Approach for uniform axial heat flux. In general, the accuracy and the uncertainty of all the approaches, except that of CATHARE, are worse under a nonuniform axial heat distribution than under a uniform axial heat distribution. All the CHF approaches assessed have a tendency to overpredict the HTRF bundle data at low pressure, low measured CHF, and high CHF quality. The performance of the Groenevel et al. approach is improved through a CHF table update and modification of the bundle correction factor using the HTRF bundle data

  15. Influence of landscape composition and diversity on contaminant flux in terrestrial food webs: a case study of trace metal transfer to European blackbirds Turdus merula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Clémentine; Coeurdassier, Michaël; Faivre, Bruno; Baurand, Pierre-Emmanuel; Giraudoux, Patrick; van den Brink, Nico W; Scheifler, Renaud

    2012-08-15

    Although understanding the influence of the spatial arrangement of habitats and interacting communities on the processes of pollutant flux and impacts is critical for exposure and risk assessment, to date few studies have been devoted to this emergent topic. We tested the hypothesis that landscape composition and diversity affect the transfer of trace metals to vertebrates. Bioaccumulation of Cd and Pb in blood and feathers of European blackbirds Turdus merula (n=138) was studied over a smelter-impacted area (Northern France). Landscape composition (type and occurrence of the different habitats) and diversity (number of different habitat types and the proportional area distribution among habitat types) were computed around bird capture locations. Diet composition and contamination were assessed. No sex-related differences were detected, while age-related patterns were found: yearlings showed a sharper increase of tissue residues along the pollution gradient than older birds. Factors determining bird exposure acted at nested spatial scale. On a broad scale, environmental contamination mainly influenced metal levels in blackbirds, tissue residues increasing with soil contamination. At a finer grain, landscape composition and soil properties (pH, organic matter, clay) influenced metal transfer, while no influence of landscape diversity was detected. Landscape composition better explained metal transfer than soil properties did. Diet composition varied according to landscape composition, but diet diversity was not influenced by landscape diversity. Surprisingly, metal accumulation in some insect taxa was as high as in earthworms (known as hyper-accumulators). Results strongly suggested that variations in diet composition were the drivers through which landscape composition influenced metal transfer to blackbirds. This study shows that landscape features can affect pollutant transfer in food webs, partly through ecological processes related to spatial and foraging

  16. Stress Transfer Processes during Great Plate Boundary Thrusting Events: A Study from the Andaman and Nicobar Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, V.; Rajendran, K.

    2010-12-01

    The response of subduction zones to large earthquakes varies along their strike, both during the interseismic and post-seismic periods. The December 26, 2004 earthquake nucleated at 3° N latitude and its rupture propagated northward, along the Andaman-Sumatra subduction zone, terminating at 15°N. Rupture speed was estimated at about 2.0 km per second in the northern part under the Andaman region and 2.5 - 2.7 km per second under southern Nicobar and North Sumatra. We have examined the pre and post-2004 seismicity to understand the stress transfer processes within the subducting plate, in the Andaman (10° - 15° N ) and Nicobar (5° - 10° N) segments. The seismicity pattern in these segments shows distinctive characteristics associated with the outer rise, accretionary prism and the spreading ridge, all of which are relatively better developed in the Andaman segment. The Ninety East ridge and the Sumatra Fault System are significant tectonic features in the Nicobar segment. The pre-2004 seismicity in both these segments conform to the steady-state conditions wherein large earthquakes are fewer and compressive stresses dominate along the plate interface. Among the pre-2004 great earthquakes are the 1881 Nicobar and 1941 Andaman events. The former is considered to be a shallow thrust event that generated a small tsunami. Studies in other subduction zones suggest that large outer-rise tensional events follow great plate boundary breaking earthquakes due to the the up-dip transfer of stresses within the subducting plate. The seismicity of the Andaman segment (1977-2004) concurs with the steady-state stress conditions where earthquakes occur dominantly by thrust faulting. The post-2004 seismicity shows up-dip migration along the plate interface, with dominance of shallow normal faulting, including a few outer rise events and some deeper (> 100 km) strike-slip faulting events within the subducting plate. The September 13, 2002, Mw 6.5 thrust faulting earthquake at

  17. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on further studies on long range energy transfer between curcumine as donor and another thiazine dye, thionine, which is closely related to methylene blue as energy harvester (Figure 1). Since thionine is known to have a higher quantum yield of singlet oxygen sensitization than methylene blue [8], it is ...

  18. A comparison of the heat transfer capabilities of two manufacturing methods for high heat flux water-cooled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKoon, R.H.

    1986-10-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to compare the heat transfer characteristics of water-cooled copper devices manufactured via conventional drilled passage construction and via a technique whereby molten copper is cast over a network of preformed cooling tubes. Two similar test blocks were constructed; one using the drilled passage technique, the other via casting copper over Monel pipe. Each test block was mounted in a vacuum system and heated uniformly on the top surface using a swept electron beam. From the measured absorbed powers and resultant temperatures, an overall heat transfer coefficient was calculated. The maximum heat transfer coefficient calculated for the case of the drilled passage test block was 2534 Btu/hr/ft 2 / 0 F. This corresponded to an absorbed power density of 320 w/cm 2 and resulted in a maximum recorded copper temperature of 346 0 C. Corresponding figures for the cast test block were 363 Btu/hr/ft 2 / 0 F, 91 w/cm 2 , and 453 0 C

  19. Gill lipid metabolism and unidirectional Na+ flux in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) after transfer to dilute media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.J.M.; Grosell, M.; Rosenkilde, P.

    1999-01-01

    The present study investigated the mechanism involved when fish tighten their gill membrane after transfer to dilute media. Ten individually assayed eels adapted to fresh water (EW) and labelled with radioactive Na-22 in the plasma showed mean exchange rates in equilibrium with ambient radioactive...... Na-24 in FW at 70 mu mol kg(-1) h(-1). Just after transfer to demineralized water (DW), the mean Na+ release rate went up to 120 mu molkg(-1) h(-1); after 24 h in DW it came down again and levelled off at 40 mu mol kg(-1) h(-1) during a period of up to 2 weeks. During the same period the mean Na......% of the total C-14-activity incorporated into gill lipids as (C-14) wax alcohols (WA; octadecanol and eicosanol). This percentage went up to 50% shortly after transfer to DW and came down again to about 20% after 2 weeks in DW. Single eels labelled with Na-22 in the plasma showed a statistically significant...

  20. Modeling of permeate flux and mass transfer resistances in the reclamation of molasses wastewater by a novel gas-sparged nanofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Tejal Manish; Nath, Kaushik [G H Patel College of Engineering and Technology, Gujarat (India)

    2014-10-15

    A semi-empirical model has been applied to predict the permeate flux and mass transfer resistances during the cross flow nanofiltration of molasses wastewater in flat-sheet module. The model includes laminar flow regime as well as flow in presence of gas sparging at two different gas velocities. Membrane hydraulic resistance (R{sub m}), osmotic pressure resistance (R{sub osm}) and the concentration polarization resistance (R{sub cp}) were considered in series. The concentration polarization resistance was correlated to the operating conditions, namely, the feed concentration, the trans-membrane pressure difference and the cross flow velocity for a selected range of experiments. There was an appreciable reduction of concentration polarization resistance R{sub cp}{sup spar} in presence of gas sparging. Both the concentration polarization resistance R{sub cp}{sup lam} and osmotic pressure resistance R{sub osm} decreased with cross-flow velocity, but increased with feed concentration and the operating pressure. Experimental and theoretical permeate flux values as a function of cross flow velocity for both the cases, in the presence and absence of gas sparging, were also compared.

  1. Convective heat transfer for a gaseous slip flow in micropipe and parallel-plate microchannel with uniform wall heat flux: effect of axial heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddout, Y.; Essaghir, E.; Oubarra, A.; Lahjomri, J.

    2018-06-01

    Thermally developing laminar slip flow through a micropipe and a parallel plate microchannel, with axial heat conduction and uniform wall heat flux, is studied analytically by using a powerful method of self-adjoint formalism. This method results from a decomposition of the elliptic energy equation into a system of two first-order partial differential equations. The advantage of this method over other methods, resides in the fact that the decomposition procedure leads to a selfadjoint problem although the initial problem is apparently not a self-adjoint one. The solution is an extension of prior studies and considers a first order slip model boundary conditions at the fluid-wall interface. The analytical expressions for the developing temperature and local Nusselt number in the thermal entrance region are obtained in the general case. Therefore, the solution obtained could be extended easily to any hydrodynamically developed flow and arbitrary heat flux distribution. The analytical results obtained are compared for select simplified cases with available numerical calculations and they both agree. The results show that the heat transfer characteristics of flow in the thermal entrance region are strongly influenced by the axial heat conduction and rarefaction effects which are respectively characterized by Péclet and Knudsen numbers.

  2. Modeling of permeate flux and mass transfer resistances in the reclamation of molasses wastewater by a novel gas-sparged nanofiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Tejal Manish; Nath, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    A semi-empirical model has been applied to predict the permeate flux and mass transfer resistances during the cross flow nanofiltration of molasses wastewater in flat-sheet module. The model includes laminar flow regime as well as flow in presence of gas sparging at two different gas velocities. Membrane hydraulic resistance (R m ), osmotic pressure resistance (R osm ) and the concentration polarization resistance (R cp ) were considered in series. The concentration polarization resistance was correlated to the operating conditions, namely, the feed concentration, the trans-membrane pressure difference and the cross flow velocity for a selected range of experiments. There was an appreciable reduction of concentration polarization resistance R cp spar in presence of gas sparging. Both the concentration polarization resistance R cp lam and osmotic pressure resistance R osm decreased with cross-flow velocity, but increased with feed concentration and the operating pressure. Experimental and theoretical permeate flux values as a function of cross flow velocity for both the cases, in the presence and absence of gas sparging, were also compared

  3. Transfer laws between water and freon 113 for average volumetric steam quality, pressure drop, and critical heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabizadeh, H.

    1977-01-01

    Simulation of the thermohydraulic processes of the steady-state reactor operation with boiling water and typical fuel element geometries leads to considerable increase of the heat rates to be tranferred and thus to an increase of the experimental cost which can hardly be justified. By proper choice of a model fluid with low heat of evaporation the system parameters like pressure, temperature, and heat rate, while retaining the original geometry, may be reduced to a fraction of those of the original fluid water. This permits not only a decrease in experimental cost but also a modification of the existing calculation data under more favorable experimental conditions. Starting from these considerations the cooling medium R113 was used as model fluid in carrying out the experiments. The necessary knowledge of the thermodynamical laws of simularity, however, have to be determined first of all in simple geometries and the scaling factors are then derived from them. In this connection the following experimental studies have been carried out with R113: a) average volumetric steam quality; b) two-phase pressure drop; c) critical heat flux. (orig.) [de

  4. Deduction of probable events of lateral gene transfer through comparison of phylogenetic trees by recursive consolidation and rearrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlebois Robert L

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When organismal phylogenies based on sequences of single marker genes are poorly resolved, a logical approach is to add more markers, on the assumption that weak but congruent phylogenetic signal will be reinforced in such multigene trees. Such approaches are valid only when the several markers indeed have identical phylogenies, an issue which many multigene methods (such as the use of concatenated gene sequences or the assembly of supertrees do not directly address. Indeed, even when the true history is a mixture of vertical descent for some genes and lateral gene transfer (LGT for others, such methods produce unique topologies. Results We have developed software that aims to extract evidence for vertical and lateral inheritance from a set of gene trees compared against an arbitrary reference tree. This evidence is then displayed as a synthesis showing support over the tree for vertical inheritance, overlaid with explicit lateral gene transfer (LGT events inferred to have occurred over the history of the tree. Like splits-tree methods, one can thus identify nodes at which conflict occurs. Additionally one can make reasonable inferences about vertical and lateral signal, assigning putative donors and recipients. Conclusion A tool such as ours can serve to explore the reticulated dimensionality of molecular evolution, by dissecting vertical and lateral inheritance at high resolution. By this, we mean that individual nodes can be examined not only for congruence, but also for coherence in light of LGT. We assert that our tools will facilitate the comparison of phylogenetic trees, and the interpretation of conflicting data.

  5. Effect of slip on heat transfer and entropy generation characteristics of simplified Phan-Thien–Tanner fluids with viscous dissipation under uniform heat flux boundary conditions: Exponential formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Exponential formulation of s-PTT model used. • Heat transfer and entropy generation characteristics studied. • Effects of three slip laws examined. • Exponential formulation more accurate than linear formulation. - Abstract: This study concerns the heat transfer and entropy generation characteristics of viscoelastic fluid flow modeled by the exponential formulation of simplified Phan-Thien–Tanner (s-PTT) model. This is the first such study in literature of thermal behavior of viscoelastic fluids modeled by the exponential formulation of s-PTT model. The flow between two parallel plates is laminar, hydrodynamically and thermally fully developed, viscous dissipative and subject to uniform heat flux on the walls. The slip velocity boundary condition is imposed on the fluid–solid interface and the slip is captured by three slip laws, namely, Navier's non-linear slip law, Hatzikiriakos slip law, and asymptotic slip law. The governing equations have been solved analytically. Closed form solutions for the velocity distribution have been derived while the temperature distribution is presented in terms of an infinite but convergent series. The results pertaining to the three slip laws have been presented in detail. Finally, a comparison has been made between the results for exponential formulation and those for the linear formulation of the s-PTT model. The comparison shows that results for linear formulation deviate significantly from those for exponential formulation and thus the accuracy of the exponential formulation justifies the extra mathematical complexity which it entails.

  6. Swift J1644+57 gone MAD: the case for dynamically important magnetic flux threading the black hole in a jetted tidal disruption event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Metzger, Brian D.; Giannios, Dimitrios; Kelley, Luke Z.

    2014-01-01

    The unusual transient Swift J1644+57 likely resulted from a collimated relativistic jet, powered by the sudden onset of accretion on to a massive black hole (BH) following the tidal disruption (TD) of a star. However, several mysteries cloud the interpretation of this event, including (1) the extreme flaring and `plateau' shape of the X-ray/γ-ray light curve during the first t - ttrig ˜ 10 d after the γ-ray trigger; (2) unexpected rebrightening of the forward shock radio emission at t - ttrig ˜ months; (3) lack of obvious evidence for jet precession, despite the misalignment typically expected between the angular momentum of the accretion disc and BH; (4) recent abrupt shut-off in the jet X-ray emission at t - ttrig ˜ 1.5 yr. Here, we show that all of these seemingly disparate mysteries are naturally resolved by one assumption: the presence of strong magnetic flux Φ• threading the BH. Just after the TD event, Φ• is dynamically weak relative to the high rate of fall-back accretion dot{M}, such that the accretion disc (jet) freely precesses about the BH axis = our line of sight. As dot{M} decreases, however, Φ• becomes dynamically important, leading to a state of `magnetically arrested disk' (MAD). MAD naturally aligns the jet with the BH spin, but only after an extended phase of violent rearrangement (jet wobbling), which in Swift J1644+57 starts a few days before the γ-ray trigger and explains the erratic early light curve. Indeed, the entire X-ray light curve can be fitted to the predicted power-law decay dot{M} ∝ t^{-α } (α ≃ 5/3 - 2.2) if the TD occurred a few weeks prior to the γ-ray trigger. Jet energy directed away from the line of sight, either prior to the trigger or during the jet alignment process, eventually manifests as the observed radio rebrightening, similar to an off-axis (orphan) γ-ray burst afterglow. As suggested recently, the late X-ray shut-off occurs when the disc transitions to a geometrically thin (jetless) state once

  7. Modeling the influence of coupled mass transfer processes on mass flux downgradient of heterogeneous DNAPL source zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lurong; Wang, Xinyu; Mendoza-Sanchez, Itza; Abriola, Linda M

    2018-04-01

    Sequestered mass in low permeability zones has been increasingly recognized as an important source of organic chemical contamination that acts to sustain downgradient plume concentrations above regulated levels. However, few modeling studies have investigated the influence of this sequestered mass and associated (coupled) mass transfer processes on plume persistence in complex dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones. This paper employs a multiphase flow and transport simulator (a modified version of the modular transport simulator MT3DMS) to explore the two- and three-dimensional evolution of source zone mass distribution and near-source plume persistence for two ensembles of highly heterogeneous DNAPL source zone realizations. Simulations reveal the strong influence of subsurface heterogeneity on the complexity of DNAPL and sequestered (immobile/sorbed) mass distribution. Small zones of entrapped DNAPL are shown to serve as a persistent source of low concentration plumes, difficult to distinguish from other (sorbed and immobile dissolved) sequestered mass sources. Results suggest that the presence of DNAPL tends to control plume longevity in the near-source area; for the examined scenarios, a substantial fraction (43.3-99.2%) of plume life was sustained by DNAPL dissolution processes. The presence of sorptive media and the extent of sorption non-ideality are shown to greatly affect predictions of near-source plume persistence following DNAPL depletion, with plume persistence varying one to two orders of magnitude with the selected sorption model. Results demonstrate the importance of sorption-controlled back diffusion from low permeability zones and reveal the importance of selecting the appropriate sorption model for accurate prediction of plume longevity. Large discrepancies for both DNAPL depletion time and plume longevity were observed between 2-D and 3-D model simulations. Differences between 2- and 3-D predictions increased in the presence of

  8. Modeling the influence of coupled mass transfer processes on mass flux downgradient of heterogeneous DNAPL source zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lurong; Wang, Xinyu; Mendoza-Sanchez, Itza; Abriola, Linda M.

    2018-04-01

    Sequestered mass in low permeability zones has been increasingly recognized as an important source of organic chemical contamination that acts to sustain downgradient plume concentrations above regulated levels. However, few modeling studies have investigated the influence of this sequestered mass and associated (coupled) mass transfer processes on plume persistence in complex dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones. This paper employs a multiphase flow and transport simulator (a modified version of the modular transport simulator MT3DMS) to explore the two- and three-dimensional evolution of source zone mass distribution and near-source plume persistence for two ensembles of highly heterogeneous DNAPL source zone realizations. Simulations reveal the strong influence of subsurface heterogeneity on the complexity of DNAPL and sequestered (immobile/sorbed) mass distribution. Small zones of entrapped DNAPL are shown to serve as a persistent source of low concentration plumes, difficult to distinguish from other (sorbed and immobile dissolved) sequestered mass sources. Results suggest that the presence of DNAPL tends to control plume longevity in the near-source area; for the examined scenarios, a substantial fraction (43.3-99.2%) of plume life was sustained by DNAPL dissolution processes. The presence of sorptive media and the extent of sorption non-ideality are shown to greatly affect predictions of near-source plume persistence following DNAPL depletion, with plume persistence varying one to two orders of magnitude with the selected sorption model. Results demonstrate the importance of sorption-controlled back diffusion from low permeability zones and reveal the importance of selecting the appropriate sorption model for accurate prediction of plume longevity. Large discrepancies for both DNAPL depletion time and plume longevity were observed between 2-D and 3-D model simulations. Differences between 2- and 3-D predictions increased in the presence of

  9. Measurement of event shapes at large momentum transfer with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dinut, Florin; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Goshaw, Alfred; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollefrath, Michael; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kraus, Jana; Kreiss, Sven; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lane, Jenna; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepold, Florian; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schäfer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schöning, André; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Maria; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xie, Song; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zanello, Lucia; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2012-11-20

    A measurement of event shape variables is presented for large momentum transfer proton-proton collisions using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Six event shape variables calculated using hadronic jets are studied in inclusive multi-jet events in 35 pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV. These measurements are compared to predictions by three Monte Carlo event generators containing leading-logarithmic parton showers matched to leading order matrix elements for 2 $\\to$ 2 and 2 $\\to$ n (n=2,...6) scattering. Measurements of the third-jet resolution parameter, aplanarity, thrust, sphericity, and transverse sphericity are generally well described. The mean value of each event shape variable is evaluated as a function of the average momentum of the two leading jets pT1 and pT2, with a mean pT approaching 1 TeV.

  10. A critical heat flux approach for square rod bundles using the 1995 Groeneveld CHF table and bundle data of heat transfer research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.

    2000-01-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF) approach using CHF look-up tables has become a widely accepted CHF prediction technique. In these approaches, the CHF tables are developed based mostly on the data bank for flow in circular tubes. A set of correction factors was proposed by Groeneveld et al. [Groeneveld, D.C., Cheng, S.C., Doan, T. (1986)] to extend the application of the CHF table to other flow situations including flow in rod bundles. The proposed correction factors are based on a limited amount of data not specified in the original paper. The CHF approach of Groeneveld and co-workers is extensively used in the thermal hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors. In 1996, Groeneveld et al. proposed a new CHF table to predict CHF in circular tubes [Groeneveld, D.C., et al., 1996. The 1995 look-up table for Critical Heat Flux. Nucl. Eng. Des. 163(1), 23]. In the present study, a set of correction factors is developed to extend the applicability of the new CHF table to flow in rod bundles of square array. The correction factors are developed by minimizing the statistical parameters of the ratio of the measured and predicted bundle CHF data from the Heat Transfer Research Facility. The proposed correction factors include: the hydraulic diameter factor (K hy ), the bundle factor (K bf ), the heated length factor (K hl ), the grid spacer factor (K sp ), the axial flux distribution factors (K nu ), the cold wall factor (K cw ) and the radial power distribution factor (K rp ). The value of constants in these correction factors is different when the heat balance method (HBM) and direct substitution method (DSM) are adopted to predict the experimental results of HTRF. With the 1995 Groeneveld CHF Table and the proposed correction factors, the average relative error is 0.1 and 0.0% for HBM and DSM, respectively, and the root mean square (RMS) error is 31.7% in DSM and 17.7% in HBM for 9852 square array data points of HTRF. (orig.)

  11. Critical heat flux evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banner, D.

    1995-01-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is of importance for nuclear safety and represents the major limiting factors for reactor cores. Critical heat flux is caused by a sharp reduction in the heat transfer coefficient located at the outer surface of fuel rods. Safety requires that this phenomenon also called the boiling crisis should be precluded under nominal or incidental conditions (Class I and II events). CHF evaluation in reactor cores is basically a two-step approach. Fuel assemblies are first tested in experimental loops in order to determine CHF limits under various flow conditions. Then, core thermal-hydraulic calculations are performed for safety evaluation. The paper will go into more details about the boiling crisis in order to pinpoint complexity and lack of fundamental understanding in many areas. Experimental test sections needed to collect data over wide thermal-hydraulic and geometric ranges are described CHF safety margin evaluation in reactors cores is discussed by presenting how uncertainties are mentioned. From basic considerations to current concerns, the following topics are discussed; knowledge of the boiling crisis, CHF predictors, and advances thermal-hydraulic codes. (authors). 15 refs., 4 figs

  12. Genomic Evidence of Chemotrophic Metabolisms in Deep-Dwelling Chloroflexi Conferred by Ancient Horizontal Gene Transfer Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momper, L. M.; Magnabosco, C.; Amend, J.; Osburn, M. R.; Fournier, G. P.

    2017-12-01

    The marine and terrestrial subsurface biospheres represent quite likely the largest reservoirs for life on Earth, directly impacting surface processes and global cycles throughout Earth's history. In the deep subsurface biosphere (DSB) organic carbon and energy are often extremely scarce. However, archaea and bacteria are able to persist in the DSB to at least 3.5 km below surface [1]. Understanding how they persist, and by what metabolisms they subsist, are key questions in this biosphere. To address these questions we investigated 5 global DSB environments: one legacy mine in South Dakota, USA, 3 mines in South Africa and marine fluids circulating beneath the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Boreholes within these mines provided access to fluids buried beneath the earth's surface and sampled depths down to 3.1 km. Geochemical data were collected concomitantly with DNA for metagenomic sequencing. We examined genomes of the ancient and deeply branching Chloroflexi for metabolic capabilities and interrogated the geochemical drivers behind those metabolisms with in situ thermodynamic modeling of reaction energetics. In total, 23 Chloroflexi genomes were identified and analyzed from the 5 subsurface sites. Genes for nitrate reduction (nar) and sulfite reduction (dsr) were found in many of the South Africa Chloroflexi but were absent from genomes collected in South Dakota. Indeed, nitrate reduction was among the most energetically favorable reactions in South African fluids (10-14 kJ cell-1 sec -1 per mol of reactant) and sulfur reduction with Fe2+ or H2 was also exergonic [2]. Conversely, genes for nitrite and nitrous oxide reduction (nrf, nir and nos) were found in genomes collected in South Dakota and Juan de Fuca, but not South Africa. We examined the origin of genes conferring these metabolisms in the Chloroflexi genomes. We discovered evidence for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) for all of these putative metabolisms. Retention of these genes in Chloroflexi lineages indicates

  13. Large-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flow and Heat Transfer in a Mildly Expanded Channel of IFMIF High Flux Test Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinji Ebara; Takehiko Yokomine; Akihiko Shimizu

    2006-01-01

    During irradiation test periods in the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), irradiated materials must be maintained at constant temperatures because irradiation characteristics of materials have a large dependency on temperature. In the high flux test module of the IFMIF, required performances for temperature control using gas-cooling and heater-heating are especially stringent because available space for temperature control is remarkably restricted due to very small irradiation volume of about 0.5 l. We proposed an alternative design of the test module with advantages of temperature monitoring and temperature uniformity in specimens. This design employs a rectangular duct as the vessel to pack capsules housing specimens compactly into the small irradiation volume. In the vessel the coolant flows between the capsules and vessel wall. In the basic design, both thickness of a vessel wall and a width of cooling channel are considered as 1.0 mm. Since inside the vessel gaseous helium of several atmospheric pressure flows as a coolant and a low vacuum environment is kept outside the vessel for safety requirements and thermal stress is foreseen to appear due to nuclear heating of the vessel itself, the vessel wall is considered to deform readily and this leads expansion of the cooling channels. It is also considered that a slight expansion of the vessel can have severe influence on the cooling performance due to the initial narrow channel width of 1.0 mm. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate cooling performances for the coolant flowing in the deformed channel. We conduct a finite element analysis of turbulent heat transfer in a mildly expanded channel using large-eddy simulation in this study. In a numerical system, fluid is enclosed by three-dimensionally expanded vessel wall and flat capsule wall, and flows into the system with a fully developed velocity profile. In this study, we focus not only on the cooling performances but also on change in

  14. High plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein levels may favour reduced incidence of cardiovascular events in men with low triglycerides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borggreve, Susanna E.; Hillege, Hans L.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; de Jong, Paul E.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Grobbee, Diederik E.; van Tol, Arie; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2007-01-01

    High cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) concentrations are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in subjects with high triglycerides. We determined the relationship of plasma CETP with incident CVD in a population with relatively low triglycerides. A nested

  15. Thermal hydraulic characteristics of the pool-type FBR 'ARES' eliminating intermediate heat-transfer system. 2. Transient characteristics in representative events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Yoshihisa; Ueda, Nobuyuki; Kinoshita, Izumi; Yoshida, Kazuo

    1999-01-01

    An innovative plant concept (ARES), which eliminates intermediate heat-transfer system, was proposed in order to reduce the construction cost of the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). In the present study, representative events of the ARES were picked up and plant transient analysis was conducted in order to reveal the thermal hydraulic characteristics of the ARES. The main results of the analysis are as follows: (1) The core was sufficiently cooled without sodium boiling in an event of mis-operation of the siphon break system. (2) The disturbances of the SG transfer to the core within about 30 seconds in a event of the feed water increasing. This transition period is less than half that of the conventional LMFBR. However, the transient characteristics of the ARES are very similar to those of the conventional LMFBR. Based on these results, it is only necessary to consider the short transition period in order to design the control system. (3) Based on the results of the calculation of a total blackout accident, it is concluded that the use of the SG-side cooling together is profitable in order to satisfy the design safety criteria in design basis events. In the case of full natural-circulation cooling, the use of the SG-side cooling together is profitable in order to satisfy the design safety criteria. (author)

  16. Eddy covariance emission and deposition flux measurements using proton transfer reaction – time of flight – mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS): comparison with PTR-MS measured vertical gradients and fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, J.H.; Goldstein, A.H.; Timkovsky, J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330541676; Fares, S.; Weber, R.; Karlik, J.; Holzinger, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337989338

    2013-01-01

    During summer 2010, a proton transfer reaction – time of flight – mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) and a quadrupole proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) were deployed simultaneously for one month in an orange orchard in the Central Valley of California to collect continuous data

  17. High plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein levels may favour reduced incidence of cardiovascular events in men with low triglycerides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borggreve, Susanna E.; Hillege, Hans L.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; de Jong, Paul E.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Grobbee, Diederik E.; van Tol, Arie; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    Aims High cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) concentrations are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in subjects with high triglycerides. We determined the relationship of plasma CETP with incident CVD in a population with relatively low triglycerides. Methods and

  18. Increased accumulation of cuticular wax and expression of lipid transfer protein in response to periodic drying events in leaves of tree tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kimberly D; Teece, Mark A; Smart, Lawrence B

    2006-01-01

    Cuticular wax deposition and composition affects drought tolerance and yield in plants. We examined the relationship between wax and dehydration stress by characterizing the leaf cuticular wax of tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca L. Graham) grown under periodic dehydration stress. Total leaf cuticular wax load increased after each of three periods of dehydration stress using a CH2Cl2 extraction process. Overall, total wax load increased 1.5- to 2.5-fold, but composition of the wax was not altered. Homologous series of wax components were classified into organic groups; n-hentriacontane was the largest component (>75%) with alcohols and fatty acids representing drying event. Leaves excised from plants subjected to multiple drying events were more resistant to water loss compared to leaves excised from well-watered plants, indicating that there is a negative relationship between total wax load and epidermal conductance. Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are thought to be involved in the transfer of lipids through the extracellular matrix for the formation of cuticular wax. Using northern analysis, a 6-fold increase of tree tobacco LTP gene transcripts was observed after three drying events, providing further evidence that LTP is involved in cuticle deposition. The simplicity of wax composition and the dramatic wax bloom displayed by tree tobacco make this an excellent species in which to study the relationship between leaf wax deposition and drought tolerance.

  19. The impact of adverse health events on consumption: Understanding the mediating effect of income transfers, wealth, and health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiarz, Patryk; Yilmazer, Tansel

    2017-12-01

    Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics for years 1999-2013, we investigate the impact of physical and mental illnesses on household consumption and financial status. In comparison to severe physical health problems, mental illnesses lead to larger decreases in labor income. Increases in public and private transfers following the onset of a mental illness do not completely offset the decline in labor income. Consequently, we find a significant decrease in consumption expenditures after the household head experiences a mental problem. On the other hand, public and private transfers and accumulated wealth offset the relatively smaller decline in labor income and enable households with severe physical problems to smooth their consumption. Health insurance helps to prevent larger drops in consumption after the onset of a mental health problem. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Flux measurement of methanol, acetaldehyde and other oxygenated VOCs from crop harvesting using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry and surface layer gradient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindinger, C.; Jordan, A.; Karl, T.; Guenther, A.; Tschiersch, J.; Ruckerbauer, F.; Paretzke, H.

    2002-01-01

    PTR-MS technique was used to measure fluxes of various VOC's including oxygenates using surface layer gradient method. The VOC concentrations and temperature were measured at heights of about 0.5 m and 3.9 m above ground at field site in St. Johann in Tirol during and after grass cutting (24th and 25th of May 2000) in order to calculate fluxes. The sensible heat flux was obtained by a sonic anemometer with turbulence data analyzer. The major crop in this part of Austria are perennial grasses used for livestock farming. We observed VOC emission fluxes including methanol and acetaldehyde as the major volatile, C 5 and C 6 leaf wound compounds with lesser amounts and traces of acetone and butanone. This composition of VOC's is very similar to that released from slashed pasture grass. At the same time, VOC fluxes were measured with PTR-MS and eddy covariance method. Comparing the flux data of methanol and acetaldehyde of both days have shown very similar results. (author)

  1. Zircons reveal magma fluxes in the Earth's crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricchi, Luca; Simpson, Guy; Schaltegger, Urs

    2014-07-24

    Magma fluxes regulate the planetary thermal budget, the growth of continents and the frequency and magnitude of volcanic eruptions, and play a part in the genesis and size of magmatic ore deposits. However, because a large fraction of the magma produced on the Earth does not erupt at the surface, determinations of magma fluxes are rare and this compromises our ability to establish a link between global heat transfer and large-scale geological processes. Here we show that age distributions of zircons, a mineral often present in crustal magmatic rocks, in combination with thermal modelling, provide an accurate means of retrieving magma fluxes. The characteristics of zircon age populations vary significantly and systematically as a function of the flux and total volume of magma accumulated in the Earth's crust. Our approach produces results that are consistent with independent determinations of magma fluxes and volumes of magmatic systems. Analysis of existing age population data sets using our method suggests that porphyry-type deposits, plutons and large eruptions each require magma input over different timescales at different characteristic average fluxes. We anticipate that more extensive and complete magma flux data sets will serve to clarify the control that the global heat flux exerts on the frequency of geological events such as volcanic eruptions, and to determine the main factors controlling the distribution of resources on our planet.

  2. The potential for buoyant displacement gas release events in Tank 241-SY-102 after waste transfer from Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, BE; Meyer, P.E.; Chen, G.

    2000-01-01

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) is a double-shell, radioactive waste storage tank with waste that, before the recent transfer and water back-dilution operations, was capable of retaining gas and producing buoyant displacement (BD) gas release events (GREs). Some BD GREs caused gas concentrations in the tank headspace to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL). A BD GRE occurs when a portion of the nonconvective layer retains enough gas to become buoyant, rises to the waste surface, breaks up, and releases some of its stored gas. The installation of a mixer pump in 1993 successfully mitigated gas retention in the settled solids layer in SY-101 and has since prevented BD GREs. However, operation of the mixer pump over the years caused gas retention in the floating crust layer and a corresponding accelerated waste level growth. The accelerating crust growth trend observed in 1997--98 led to initiation of sequences of waste removal and water back-dilutions in December 1999. Waste is removed from the mixed slurry layer in Tank SY-101 and transferred into Tank 241-Sy-102 (SY-102). Water is then added back to dissolve soluble solids that retain gas. The initial transfer of 89,500 gallons of SY-101 waste, diluted in-line at 0.94:1 by volume with water, to SY-102 was conducted in December 1999. The second transfer of 230,000 gallons of original SY-101 waste, diluted approximately 0.9:1, was completed in January 2000, and the third transfer of 205,500 gallons of original SY-101 waste diluted at 0.9:1 was completed in March 2000

  3. Multi-wavelength high-resolution observations of a small-scale emerging magnetic flux event and the chromospheric and coronal response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Kosovichev, Alexander; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl, E-mail: svargas@bbso.njit.edu [Big Bear Solar Observatory, NJIT, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314-9672 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    State-of-the-art solar instrumentation is now revealing magnetic activity of the Sun with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions. Observations with the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) of the Big Bear Solar Observatory are making next steps in our understanding of the solar surface structure. Granular-scale magnetic flux emergence and the response of the solar atmosphere are among the key research topics of high-resolution solar physics. As part of a joint observing program with NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission on 2013 August 7, the NST observed active region NOAA 11,810 in the photospheric TiO 7057 Å band with a resolution of pixel size of 0.''034 and chromospheric He I 10830 Å and Hα 6563 Å wavelengths. Complementary data are provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode space-based telescopes. The region displayed a group of solar pores, in the vicinity of which we detect a small-scale buoyant horizontal magnetic flux tube causing granular alignments and interacting with the preexisting ambient field in the upper atmospheric layers. Following the expansion of distorted granules at the emergence site, we observed a sudden appearance of an extended surge in the He I 10830 Å data (bandpass of 0.05 Å). The IRIS transition region imaging caught ejection of a hot plasma jet associated with the He I surge. The SDO/HMI data used to study the evolution of the magnetic and Doppler velocity fields reveal emerging magnetic loop-like structures. Hinode/Ca II H and IRIS filtergrams detail the connectivities of the newly emerged magnetic field in the lower solar chromosphere. From these data, we find that the orientation of the emerging magnetic field lines from a twisted flux tube formed an angle of ∼45° with the overlying ambient field. Nevertheless, the interaction of emerging magnetic field lines with the pre-existing overlying field generates high-temperature emission regions and boosts the

  4. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based approach for investigating late endosome–lysosome retrograde fusion events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, A.M.; Goldman, S.D.B.; Krise, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, lysosomes have been considered to be a terminal endocytic compartment. Recent studies suggest that lysosomes are quite dynamic, being able to fuse with other late endocytic compartments as well as with the plasma membrane. Here we describe a quantitative fluorescence energy transfer (FRET)-based method for assessing rates of retrograde fusion between terminal lysosomes and late endosomes in living cells. Late endosomes were specifically labeled with 800-nm latex beads that were conjugated with streptavidin and Alexa Fluor 555 (FRET donor). Terminal lysosomes were specifically labeled with 10,000-MW dextran polymers conjugated with biotin and Alexa Fluor 647 (FRET acceptor). Following late endosome–lysosome fusion, the strong binding affinity between streptavidin and biotin brought the donor and acceptor fluorophore molecules into close proximity, thereby facilitating the appearance of a FRET emission signal. Because apparent size restrictions in the endocytic pathway do not permit endocytosed latex beads from reaching terminal lysosomes in an anterograde fashion, the appearance of the FRET signal is consistent with retrograde transport of lysosomal cargo back to late endosomes. We assessed the efficiency of this transport step in fibroblasts affected by different lysosome storage disorders—Niemann–Pick type C, mucolipidosis type IV, and Sandhoff’s disease, all of which have a similar lysosomal lipid accumulation phenotype. We report here, for the first time, that these disorders can be distinguished by their rate of transfer of lysosome cargos to late endosomes, and we discuss the implications of these findings for developing new therapeutic strategies. PMID:19109922

  5. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based approach for investigating late endosome-lysosome retrograde fusion events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, A M; Goldman, S D B; Krise, J P

    2009-03-01

    Traditionally, lysosomes have been considered to be a terminal endocytic compartment. Recent studies suggest that lysosomes are quite dynamic, being able to fuse with other late endocytic compartments as well as with the plasma membrane. Here we describe a quantitative fluorescence energy transfer (FRET)-based method for assessing rates of retrograde fusion between terminal lysosomes and late endosomes in living cells. Late endosomes were specifically labeled with 800-nm latex beads that were conjugated with streptavidin and Alexa Fluor 555 (FRET donor). Terminal lysosomes were specifically labeled with 10,000-MW dextran polymers conjugated with biotin and Alexa Fluor 647 (FRET acceptor). Following late endosome-lysosome fusion, the strong binding affinity between streptavidin and biotin brought the donor and acceptor fluorophore molecules into close proximity, thereby facilitating the appearance of a FRET emission signal. Because apparent size restrictions in the endocytic pathway do not permit endocytosed latex beads from reaching terminal lysosomes in an anterograde fashion, the appearance of the FRET signal is consistent with retrograde transport of lysosomal cargo back to late endosomes. We assessed the efficiency of this transport step in fibroblasts affected by different lysosome storage disorders-Niemann-Pick type C, mucolipidosis type IV, and Sandhoff's disease, all of which have a similar lysosomal lipid accumulation phenotype. We report here, for the first time, that these disorders can be distinguished by their rate of transfer of lysosome cargos to late endosomes, and we discuss the implications of these findings for developing new therapeutic strategies.

  6. Influence of landscape composition and diversity on contaminant flux in terrestrial food webs: A case study of trace metal transfer to European blackbirds Turdus merula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritsch, C.; Coeurdassier, M.; Faivre, B.; Baurand, P.E.; Giraudoux, P.; Brink, van den N.W.; Scheifler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Although understanding the influence of the spatial arrangement of habitats and interacting communities on the processes of pollutant flux and impacts is critical for exposure and risk assessment, to date few studies have been devoted to this emergent topic. We tested the hypothesis that landscape

  7. Molecular evolution of glutamine synthetase II: Phylogenetic evidence of a non-endosymbiotic gene transfer event early in plant evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tartar Aurélien

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine synthetase (GS is essential for ammonium assimilation and the biosynthesis of glutamine. The three GS gene families (GSI, GSII, and GSIII are represented in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. In this study, we examined the evolutionary relationship of GSII from eubacterial and eukaryotic lineages and present robust phylogenetic evidence that GSII was transferred from γ-Proteobacteria (Eubacteria to the Chloroplastida. Results GSII sequences were isolated from four species of green algae (Trebouxiophyceae, and additional green algal (Chlorophyceae and Prasinophytae and streptophyte (Charales, Desmidiales, Bryophyta, Marchantiophyta, Lycopodiophyta and Tracheophyta sequences were obtained from public databases. In Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses, eubacterial (GSIIB and eukaryotic (GSIIE GSII sequences formed distinct clades. Both GSIIB and GSIIE were found in chlorophytes and early-diverging streptophytes. The GSIIB enzymes from these groups formed a well-supported sister clade with the γ-Proteobacteria, providing evidence that GSIIB in the Chloroplastida arose by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses suggest that GSIIB and GSIIE coexisted for an extended period of time but it is unclear whether the proposed HGT happened prior to or after the divergence of the primary endosymbiotic lineages (the Archaeplastida. However, GSIIB genes have not been identified in glaucophytes or red algae, favoring the hypothesis that GSIIB was gained after the divergence of the primary endosymbiotic lineages. Duplicate copies of the GSIIB gene were present in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, and Physcomitrella patens. Both GSIIB proteins in C. reinhardtii and V. carteri f. nagariensis had N-terminal transit sequences, indicating they are targeted to the chloroplast or mitochondrion. In contrast, GSIIB proteins of P. patens lacked transit sequences, suggesting

  8. MHD effects and heat transfer for the UCM fluid along with Joule heating and thermal radiation using Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, S., E-mail: sajidshah313@yahoo.com; Hussain, S.; Sagheer, M. [Department of Mathematics, Capital University of Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-08-15

    Present study examines the numerical analysis of MHD flow of Maxwell fluid with thermal radiation and Joule heating by considering the recently developed Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model which explains the time relaxation characteristics for the heat flux. The objective is to analyze the governing parameters such as viscoelastic fluid parameter, Magnetic parameter, Eckert and Prandtl number’s impact on the velocity and temperature profiles through graphs and tables. Suitable similarity transformations have been used to reduce the formulated PDEs into a system of coupled non-linear ODEs. Shooting technique has been invoked for finding the numerical solutions of the dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles. Additionally, the MATLAB built-in routine bvp4c has also been used to verify and strengthen the results obtained by shooting method. From some special cases of the present work, a comparison with the previously published results has been presented.

  9. Effect of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux on buoyancy MHD nanofluid flow and heat transfer over a stretching sheet in the presence of Joule heating and thermal radiation impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogonchi, A. S.; Ganji, D. D.

    2018-06-01

    In this study, buoyancy MHD nanofluid flow and heat transfer over a stretching sheet in the presence of Joule heating and thermal radiation impacts, are studied. Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model instead of conventional Fourier's law of heat conduction is applied to investigate the heat transfer characteristics. A similarity transformation is used to transmute the governing momentum and energy equations into non-linear ordinary differential equations with the appropriate boundary conditions. The obtained non-linear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically. The impacts of diverse active parameters such as the magnetic parameter, the radiation parameter, the buoyancy parameter, the heat source parameter, the volume fraction of nanofluid and the thermal relaxation parameter are examined on the velocity and temperature profiles. In addition, the value of the Nusselt number is calculated and presented through figures. The results demonstrate that the temperature profile is lower in the case of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model as compared to Fourier's law. Moreover, the Nusselt number raises with the raising volume fraction of nanofluid and it abates with the ascending the radiation parameter.

  10. Comparison of energy fluxes at the land surface-atmosphere interface in an Alpine valley as simulated with different models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Grossi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of a research project coupling meteorological and hydrological models in mountainous areas a distributed Snow-Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model was developed and applied to simulate the energy fluxes at the land surface – atmosphere interface in an Alpine valley (Toce Valley - North Italy during selected flood events in the last decade. Energy fluxes simulated by the distributed energy transfer model were compared with those simulated by a limited area meteorological model for the event of June 1997 and the differences in the spatial and temporal distribution. The Snow/Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model was also applied to simulate the energy fluxes at the land surface-atmosphere interface for a single cell, assumed to be representative of the Siberia site (Toce Valley, where a micro-meteorological station was installed and operated for 2.5 months in autumn 1999. The Siberia site is very close to the Nosere site, where a standard meteorological station was measuring precipitation, air temperature and humidity, global and net radiation and wind speed during the same special observing period. Data recorded by the standard meteorological station were used to force the energy transfer model and simulate the point energy fluxes at the Siberia site, while turbulent fluxes observed at the Siberia site were used to derive the latent heat flux from the energy balance equation. Finally, the hourly evapotranspiration flux computed by this procedure was compared to the evapotranspiration flux simulated by the energy transfer model. Keywords: energy exchange processes, land surface-atmosphere interactions, turbulent fluxes

  11. Concentration-discharge relationships during an extreme event: Contrasting behavior of solutes and changes to chemical quality of dissolved organic material in the Boulder Creek Watershed during the September 2013 flood: SOLUTE FLUX IN A FLOOD EVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, Garrett P. [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder Colorado USA; Rock, Nathan D. [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder Colorado USA; Gabor, Rachel S. [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder Colorado USA; Pitlick, John [Department of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder Colorado USA; Tfaily, Malak [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; McKnight, Diane M. [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder Colorado USA

    2017-07-01

    During the week of September 10-17, 2013, close to 20 inches of rain fell across Boulder County, Colorado, USA. This rainfall represented a 1000-year event that caused massive hillslope erosion, landslides, and mobilization of sediments. The resultant stream flows corresponded to a 100-year flood. For the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (BC-CZO), this event provided an opportunity to study the effect of extreme rainfall on solute concentration-discharge relationships and biogeochemical catchment processes. We observed base cation and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations at two sites on Boulder Creek following the recession of peak flow. We also isolated three distinct fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) for chemical characterization. At the upper site, which represented the forested mountain catchment, the concentrations of the base cations Ca, Mg and Na were greatest at the peak flood and decreased only slightly, in contrast with DOC and K concentrations, which decreased substantially. At the lower site within urban corridor, all solutes decreased abruptly after the first week of flow recession, with base cation concentrations stabilizing while DOC and K continued to decrease. Additionally, we found significant spatiotemporal trends in the chemical quality of organic matter exported during the flood recession, as measured by fluorescence, 13C-NMR spectroscopy, and FTICR-MS. Similar to the effect of extreme rainfall events in driving landslides and mobilizing sediments, our findings suggest that such events mobilize solutes by the flushing of the deeper layers of the critical zone, and that this flushing regulates terrestrial-aquatic biogeochemical linkages during the flow recession.

  12. Interactive effects in transfer-appropriate processing for event-based prospective memory: the roles of effort, ongoing task, and PM cue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, Drew H; McBride, Dawn M; Petrella, Samantha N

    2013-10-01

    Past studies (e.g., Marsh, Hicks, & Cook Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 31:68-75, 2005; Meiser & Schult European Journal of Cognitive Psychology 20:290-311, 2008) have shown that transfer-appropriate processing (TAP) effects in event-based prospective memory (PM) depend on the effort directed toward the ongoing task. In the present study, we addressed mixed findings from these studies and examined monitoring in TAP and transfer-inappropriate processing (TIP) conditions. In two experiments, a semantic or orthographic ongoing task was paired with a PM cue that either was matched in processing (TAP) or did not match in processing (TIP). Within each condition, effort was varied across trials. The results indicated that PM accuracy was higher in TAP than in TIP conditions, regardless of effort condition, supporting the findings reported by Meiser and Schult. Ex-Gaussian functions were fit to the mean reaction times (cf. Brewer Journal of Psychology 219:117-124, 2011) in order to examine monitoring across conditions. The analysis of distributional skew (τ parameter) showed sensitivity to ongoing task instructions and properties of the PM cues. These results support Meiser and Schult's suggestion that TIP conditions require more attentional processing, and they also afford novel discussion on the interactive effects of ongoing task condition, PM cue properties, and manipulations of effort.

  13. In situ measurement of mesopelagic particle sinking rates and the control of carbon transfer to the ocean interior during the Vertical Flux in the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) voyages in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, T. W.; Bray, S. G.; Buesseler, K. O.; Lamborg, C. H.; Manganini, S.; Moy, C.; Valdes, J.

    2008-07-01

    Among the parameters affecting carbon transfer to the ocean interior, particle sinking rates vary three orders of magnitude and thus more than primary production, f-ratios, or particle carbon contents [e.g., Boyd, P.W., Trull, T.W., 2006. Understanding the export of marine biogenic particles: is there consensus? Progress in Oceanography 4, 276-312, doi:10.1016/j.pocean.2006.10.007]. Very few data have been obtained from the mesopelagic zone where the majority of carbon remineralization occurs and the attenuation of the sinking flux is determined. Here, we report sinking rates from ˜300 m depth for the subtropical (station ALOHA, June 2004) and subarctic (station K2, July 2005) North Pacific Ocean, obtained from short (6.5 day) deployments of an indented rotating sphere (IRS) sediment trap operating as an in situ settling column [Peterson, M.L., Wakeham, S.G., Lee, C., Askea, M.A., Miquel, J.C., 2005. Novel techniques for collection of sinking particles in the ocean and determining their settling rates. Limnology and Oceanography Methods 3, 520-532] to separate the flux into 11 sinking-rate fractions ranging from >820 to >2 m d -1 that are collected by a carousel for further analysis. Functioning of the IRS trap was tested using a novel programming sequence to check that all particles have cleared the settling column prior to the next delivery of particles by the 6-hourly rotation cycle of the IRS. There was some evidence (from the flux distribution among the cups and photomicroscopy of the collected particles) that very slow-sinking particles may have been under-collected because they were unable to penetrate the brine-filled collection cups, but good evidence for appropriate collection of fast-settling fractions. Approximately 50% of the particulate organic carbon (POC) flux was sinking at greater than 100 m d -1 at both stations. At ALOHA, more than 15% of the POC flux sank at >820 m d -1, but low fluxes make this uncertain, and precluded resolution of particles

  14. Uso de transdutores de fluxo de calor no estudo da transferência de calor em alimentos embalados The use of heat flux transducers to study heat transfer in canned foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Carciofi

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A densidade de fluxo de calor que atravessa uma superfície é classicamente determinada mediante a medição das temperaturas apropriadas e da aplicação da Lei de Fourier. Uma alternativa a esse procedimento é a utilização de transdutores de fluxo de calor, os quais geram um sinal elétrico proporcional ao fluxo térmico que os atravessa. Neste trabalho, processos de aquecimento e de resfriamento de alimentos foram estudados em laboratório, utilizando-se um recipiente de vidro cilíndrico para simular uma embalagem. Dois transdutores de fluxo de calor a gradiente tangencial foram previamente instalados no recipiente, revestindo completamente a superfície lateral do mesmo. O recipiente contendo a amostra foi inserido em banho de água circulante à temperatura constante. Os sinais fornecidos pelos transdutores e por termopares inseridos no interior do recipiente foram registrados por um sistema de aquisição de dados computadorizado. Os resultados obtidos com o uso dos transdutores foram comparados com aqueles obtidos através de balanços de energia realizados a partir dos dados experimentais de evolução temporal das temperaturas da amostra junto à superfície interna da embalagem e no centro da mesma. A comparação mostrou que os transdutores de fluxo de calor a gradiente tangencial puderam determinar os fluxos de calor, com tempo de resposta característico dos termopares. Os resultados apresentados mostraram a viabilidade de utilização desses fluxímetros no estudo não destrutivo e não invasivo dos processos de aquecimento e de resfriamento de alimentos, fornecendo informações complementares àquelas obtidas pelo uso de termopares instalados no interior da embalagem.Heat flux determination in thermal processes is classically carried out by appropriate temperature measurements and the application of the Fourier Law. An alternative to this procedure is to determine the heat flux that crosses a surface using heat flux

  15. Heat transfer calculations for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Technical specifications: bases for safety limits and limiting safety system settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, T.M.; Swanks, J.H.

    1977-09-01

    Heat transfer analyses, in support of the preparation of the HFIR technical specifications, were made to establish the bases for the safety limits and limiting safety system settings applicable to the HFIR. The results of these analyses, along with the detailed bases, are presented

  16. Seasonality of Overstory and Understory Fluxes in a Semi-Arid Oak Savanna: What can be Learned from Comparing Measured and Modeled Fluxes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz-Yaseef, N.; Sonnentag, O.; Kobayashi, H.; Chen, J. M.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Ma, S.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Semi-arid climates experience large seasonal and inter-annual variability in radiation and precipitation, creating natural conditions adequate to study how year-to-year changes affect atmosphere-biosphere fluxes. Especially, savanna ecosystems, that combine tree and below-canopy components, create a unique environment in which phenology dramatically changes between seasons. We used a 10-year flux database in order to define seasonal and interannual variability of climatic inputs and fluxes, and evaluate model capability to reproduce observed variability. This is based on the perception that model capability to construct the deviation, and not the average, is important in order to correctly predict ecosystem sensitivity to climate change. Our research site is a low density and low LAI (0.8) semi-arid savanna, located at Tonzi Ranch, Northern California. In this system, trees are active during the warm season (Mar - Oct), and grasses are active during the wet season (Dec - May). Measurements of carbon and water fluxes above and below the tree canopy using eddy covariance and supplementary measurements have been made since 2001. Fluxes were simulated using bio-meteorological process-oriented ecosystem models: BEPS and 3D-CAONAK. Models were partly capable of reproducing fluxes on daily scales (R2=0.66). We then compared model outputs for different ecosystem components and seasons, and found distinct seasons with high correlations while other seasons were purely represented. Comparison was much higher for ET than for GPP. The understory was better simulated than the overstory. CANOAK overestimated spring understory fluxes, probably due to the capability to directly calculated 3D radiative transfer. BEPS underestimated spring understory fluxes, following the pre-description of grass die-off. Both models underestimated peak spring overstory fluxes. During winter tree dormant, modeled fluxes were null, but occasional high fluxes of both ET and GPP were measured following

  17. Structures for handling high heat fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The divertor is recognized as one of the main performance limiting components for ITER. This paper reviews the critical issues for structures that are designed to withstand heat fluxes >5 MW/m 2 . High velocity, sub-cooled water with twisted tape inserts for enhanced heat transfer provides a critical heat flux limit of 40-60 MW/m 2 . Uncertainties in physics and engineering heat flux peaking factors require that the design heat flux not exceed 10 MW/m 2 to maintain an adequate burnout safety margin. Armor tiles and heat sink materials must have a well matched thermal expansion coefficient to minimize stresses. The divertor lifetime from sputtering erosion is highly uncertain. The number of disruptions specified for ITER must be reduced to achieve a credible design. In-situ plasma spray repair with thick metallic coatings may reduce the problems of erosion. Runaway electrons in ITER have the potential to melt actively cooled components in a single event. A water leak is a serious accident because of steam reactions with hot carbon, beryllium, or tungsten that can mobilize large amounts of tritium and radioactive elements. If the plasma does not shutdown immediately, the divertor can melt in 1-10 s after a loss of coolant accident. Very high reliability of carbon tile braze joints will be required to achieve adequate safety and performance goals. Most of these critical issues will be addressed in the near future by operation of the Tore Supra pump limiters and the JET pumped divertor. An accurate understanding of the power flow out of edge of a DT burning plasma is essential to successful design of high heat flux components. (orig.)

  18. Numerical study of natural convection heat transfer in a horizontal channel provided with rectangular blocks releasing uniform heat flux and mounted on its lower wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkas, M.; Amahmid, A.; Hasnaoui, M.

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional laminar steady natural convection in a horizontal channel with the upper wall maintained cold at a constant temperature and the lower one provided with rectangular heating blocks, periodically distributed, has been studied numerically. The blocks are connected with adiabatic segments and their surfaces are assumed to release a uniform heat flux. The study is performed using air as the working fluid (Pr = 0.72). The spacing between the blocks is maintained constant (C = l'/H' = 0.5) while the Rayleigh number and the relative height of the blocks are respectively varied in the ranges 10 2 ≤ Ra ≤ 2 x 10 6 and 1/8 ≤ B = h'/H' ≤ 1/2. The effect of the computational domain length on the multiplicity of solutions is investigated. Flow and temperature fields are also produced for various combinations of the governing parameters. It is demonstrated that, depending on the length of the computational domain and the governing parameters, different flow structures can be obtained

  19. Energy flux of hot atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wotzak, G.P.; Kostin, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    The process in which hot atoms collide with thermal atoms of a gas, transfer kinetic energy to them, and produce additional hot atoms is investigated. A stochastic method is used to obtain numerical results for the spatial and time dependent energy flux of hot atoms in a gas. The results indicate that in hot atom systems a front followed by an intense energy flux of hot atoms may develop

  20. Transient events at the magnetopause and bipolar magnetic signatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krupařová, Oksana; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Přech, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 115, September (2015), s. 19-26 ISSN 0032-0633 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19376S; GA ČR GP13-37174P Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : flux transfer events * magnetopause deformation * magnetosheath * fluctuations * magnetic reconnection * foreshock bubbles Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.942, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0032063315000434#

  1. Ion-Scale Secondary Flux Ropes Generated by Magnetopause Reconnection as Resolved by MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, J. P.; Phan, T. D.; Cassak, P. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Haggerty, C.; Malakit, K.; Shay, M. A.; Mistry, R.; Oieroset, M.; Russell, C. T.; hide

    2016-01-01

    New Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) observations of small-scale (approx. 7 ion inertial length radius) flux transfer events (FTEs) at the dayside magnetopause are reported. The 1O km MMS tetrahedron size enables their structure and properties to be calculated using a variety of multispacecraft techniques, allowing them to be identified as flux ropes, whose flux content is small (approx. 22 kWb).The current density, calculated using plasma and magnetic field measurements independently, is found to be filamentary. lntercomparison of the plasma moments with electric and magnetic field measurements reveals structured non-frozen-in ion behavior. The data are further compared with a particle-in-cell simulation. It is concluded that these small-scale flux ropes, which are not seen to be growing, represent a distinct class of FTE which is generated on the magnetopause by secondary reconnection.

  2. Dynamics of Charged Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachas, Constantin; Bunster, Claudio; Henneaux, Marc

    2009-01-01

    In three spacetime dimensions the world volume of a magnetic source is a single point, an event. We make the event dynamical by regarding it as the imprint of a flux-carrying particle impinging from an extra dimension. This can be generalized to higher spacetime dimensions and to extended events. We exhibit universal observable consequences of the existence of events and argue that events are as important as particles or branes. We explain how events arise on the world volume of membranes in M theory, and in a Josephson junction in superconductivity.

  3. Fast heat flux modulation at the nanoscale

    OpenAIRE

    van Zwol, P. J.; Joulain, K.; Abdallah, P. Ben; Greffet, J. J.; Chevrier, J.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new concept for electrically controlled heat flux modulation. A flux contrast larger than 10 dB is expected with switching time on the order of tens of nanoseconds. Heat flux modulation is based on the interplay between radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale and phase change materials. Such large contrasts are not obtainable in solids, or in far field. As such this opens up new horizons for temperature modulation and actuation at the nanoscale.

  4. Magnetic flux conversion and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state in S-1 spheromak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janos, A.

    1985-09-01

    S-1 Spheromak currents and magnetic fluxes have been measured with Rogowski coils and flux loops external to the plasma. Toroidal plasma currents up to 350 kA and spheromak configuration lifetimes over 1.0 msec have been achieved at moderate power levels. The plasma formation in the S-1 Spheromak device is based on an inductive transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic flux from a toroidal ''flux core'' to the plasma. Formation is programmed to guide the configuration into a force-free, minimum-energy Taylor state. Properly detailed programming of the formation process is found not to be essential since plasmas adjust themselves during formation to a final equilibrium near the Taylor state. After formation, if the plasma evolves away from the stable state, then distinct relaxation oscillation events occur which restore the configuration to that stable state. The relaxation process involves reconnection of magnetic field lines, and conversion of poloidal to toroidal magnetic flux (and vice versa) has been observed and documented. The scaling of toroidal plasma current and toroidal magnetic flux in the plasma with externally applied currents is consistent with the establishment of a Taylor state after formation. In addition, the magnetic helicity is proportional to that injected from the flux core, independent of how that helicity is generated

  5. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step...... length, step height, and.flux start level. Filtrating 8 kg/m(3) yeast cell suspensions by a vibrating 0.45 x 10(-6) m pore size microfiltration hollow fiber module, critical fluxes from 5.6 x 10(-6) to 1.2 x 10(-5) m/s have been measured using various step lengths from 300 to 1200 seconds. Thus......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  6. Flux driven turbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, P.; Ottaviani, M.; Sarazin, Y.; Beyer, P.; Benkadda, S.; Waltz, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with tokamak plasma turbulence in the case where fluxes are fixed and profiles are allowed to fluctuate. These systems are intermittent. In particular, radially propagating fronts, are usually observed over a broad range of time and spatial scales. The existence of these fronts provide a way to understand the fast transport events sometimes observed in tokamaks. It is also shown that the confinement scaling law can still be of the gyroBohm type in spite of these large scale transport events. Some departure from the gyroBohm prediction is observed at low flux, i.e. when the gradients are close to the instability threshold. Finally, it is found that the diffusivity is not the same for a turbulence calculated at fixed flux than at fixed temperature gradient, with the same time averaged profile. (author)

  7. Fusion events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboufirassi, M; Angelique, J.C.; Bizard, G.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Buta, A.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Genoux-Lubain, A.; Horn, D.; Kerambrun, A.; Laville, J.L.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lefebvres, F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Meslin, C.; Metivier, V.; Nakagawa, T.; Peter, J.; Popescu, R.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E.; Wieloch, A.; Yuasa-Nakagawa, K.

    1998-01-01

    The fusion reactions between low energy heavy ions have a very high cross section. First measurements at energies around 30-40 MeV/nucleon indicated no residue of either complete or incomplete fusion, thus demonstrating the disappearance of this process. This is explained as being due to the high amount o energies transferred to the nucleus, what leads to its total dislocation in light fragments and particles. Exclusive analyses have permitted to mark clearly the presence of fusion processes in heavy systems at energies above 30-40 MeV/nucleon. Among the complete events of the Kr + Au reaction at 60 MeV/nucleon the majority correspond to binary collisions. Nevertheless, for the most considerable energy losses, a class of events do occur for which the detected fragments appears to be emitted from a unique source. These events correspond to an incomplete projectile-target fusion followed by a multifragmentation. Such events were singled out also in the reaction Xe + Sn at 50 MeV/nucleon. For the events in which the energy dissipation was maximal it was possible to isolate an isotropic group of events showing all the characteristics of fusion nuclei. The fusion is said to be incomplete as pre-equilibrium Z = 1 and Z = 2 particles are emitted. The cross section is of the order of 25 mb. Similar conclusions were drown for the systems 36 Ar + 27 Al and 64 Zn + nat Ti. A cross section value of ∼ 20 mb was determined at 55 MeV/nucleon in the first case, while the measurement of evaporation light residues in the last system gave an upper limit of 20-30 mb for the cross section at 50 MeV/nucleon

  8. Analysis of the Portuguese legal framework concerning the safeguarding of employees' rights in the event of the transfer of an undertaking or an establishment compliance with the directive 2001/23/CE of 12 march 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia de Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The undertaking, business, or part of an undertaking or business can be transferred to another person or corporation as a result of a merger or a legal transfer, transitory or definitive. As a consequence of the transfer, there is subrogation ex lege of the transferee in the rights and obligations arising from the employment relationship existing on the date of a transfer. This issue is of the utmost importance to accomplish the freedom of the employer negotiate the undertaking and the protection of employees' rights as well. The Portuguese legal framework has been shaped by Directive 77/187/ CEE and subsequently by Directive 2001/23/CE. In this paper, in order to assess the compliance of the legal framework concerning the enshrined in Labor Code with the Directive 2001/23/CE, it will be performed a comparative analysis between both regulations, which will be coordinated with the case law from the Court of Justice and Portuguese Courts. We will conclude that, apart from some issues, the Portuguese labour law regarding the safeguarding of employees' rights in the event of the transfer of an undertaking complies with the Directive 2001/23 /CE and the case law from the Court of Justice.

  9. Layered Fault Rocks Below the West Salton Detachment Fault (WSDF), CA Record Multiple Seismogenic? Slip Events and Transfer of Material to a Fault Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axen, G. J.; Luther, A. L.; Selverstone, J.; Mozley, P.

    2011-12-01

    Unique layered cataclasites (LCs) occur locally along footwall splays, S of the ~N-dipping, top-E WSDF. They are well exposed in a NW-plunging antiform that folds the LCs and their upper and lower bounding faults. Layers range from very fine-grained granular shear zones 1-2 mm thick and cm's to m's long, to medium- to coarse-grained isotropic granular cataclasite with floating clasts up to 4-5 cm diameter in layers up to ~30 cm thick and 3 to >10 m long. The top, N-flank contact is ~5 m structurally below the main WSDF. Maximum thickness of the LCs is ~5 m on the S flank of the antiform, where the upper 10-50 cm of LCs are composed of relatively planar layers that are subparallel to the upper fault, which locally displays ultracataclasite. Deeper layers are folded into open to isoclinal folds and are faulted. Most shear-sense indicators show N-side-to-E or -SE slip, and include: (1) aligned biotite flakes and mm-scale shear bands that locally define a weak foliation dipping ~ESE, (2) sharp to granular shears, many of which merge up or down into fine-grained layers and, in the base of the overlying granodiorite, (3) primary reidel shears and (4) folded pegmatite dikes. Biotite is unaltered and feldspars are weakly to strongly altered to clays and zeolites. Zeolites also grew in pores between clasts. XRF analyses suggest minimal chemical alteration. The upper fault is sharp and relatively planar, carries granular to foliated cataclasitic granodiorite that grades up over ~2-4 m into punky, microcracked but plutonic-textured rock with much of the feldspar alteration seen in LC clasts. Some upper-plate reidels bend into parallelism with the top fault and bound newly formed LC layers. The basal fault truncates contorted layers and lacks evidence of layers being added there. We infer that the deeper, contorted layers are older and that the LC package grew upward by transfer of cataclasized slices from the overlying granodiorite while folding was ongoing. Particle

  10. The flux database concerted action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.G.; Donnelly, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the background to the UIR action on the development of a flux database for radionuclide transfer in soil-plant systems. The action is discussed in terms of the objectives, the deliverables and the progress achieved so far by the flux database working group. The paper describes the background to the current initiative and outlines specific features of the database and supporting documentation. Particular emphasis is placed on the proforma used for data entry, on the database help file and on the approach adopted to indicate data quality. Refs. 3 (author)

  11. Impact of catastrophic events on small mountainous rivers: Temporal and spatial variations in suspended- and dissolved-solid fluxes along the Choshui River, central western Taiwan, during typhoon Mindulle, July 2-6, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliman, J. D.; Lee, T. Y.; Huang, J. C.; Kao, S. J.

    2017-05-01

    Small mountainous rivers deliver disproportionately large quantities of suspended and dissolved solids to the global ocean, often in response to catastrophic events such as earthquakes or floods. Here we report on the impact of a major flood on the Choshui River, central-western Taiwan, generated by typhoon Mindulle, July 2-6, 2004, five years after the nearby Mw 7.6 Chichi earthquake. Water samples taken at 3-h intervals at three stations along main stem, as well as from two downriver tributaries, allow us to delineate the temporal and spatial variability in concentrations and fluxes of suspended and dissolved constituents within the middle and lower portions of the river in response to this flood. High suspended-sediment concentrations, some as high as 200 g/l, reflected the rapid erosion of landslide scars and debris deposits generated by super-typhoon Herb in 1996 and the 1999 Chichi earthquake. Dissolved-solid and suspended-sediment discharges totaled 0.22 and 70 million tons (mt), 50 mt of which were discharged in just two days. Particulate organic carbon (POC) discharge, most of which was pre-modern in age, was 195,000 t. More than half of the discharged water, POC and dissolved solids came from upriver, whereas about 70% of the suspended sediment and 60% of the dissolved nitrate came from two downriver tributaries, the Chenyoulan and Qingshui rivers. Spatial and temporal differences in the character and discharge of suspended and dissolved solids within and between rivers in the Choshui drainage basin reflect different geologies, landslide histories, the effects of human impact, and the abrupt draining of the Tsaoling landslide lake in the Qingshui basin, as well as the possible shifting of importance of groundwater vs. overland flow. Neither wind-blown pollutants nor sea salts appear to have contributed significantly to dissolved solid character or discharge. Sediment contribution from the landslides in the Chenyoulan basin generated by super-typhoon Herb

  12. Formation of field-twisting flux tubes on the magnetopause and solar wind particle entry into the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.; Shimada, T.; Tanaka, M.; Hayashi, T.; Watanabe, K.

    1986-01-01

    A global interaction between the solar wind with a southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the magnetosphere is studied using a semi-global simulation model. A magnetic flux tube in which field lines are twisted is created as a result of repeated reconnection between the IMF and the outermost earth-rooted magnetic field near the equatorial plane and propagates to higher latitudes. When crossing the polar cusp, the flux tube penetrates into the magnetosphere reiterating reconnection with the earth-rooted higher latitude magnetic field, whereby solar wind particles are freely brought inside the magnetosphere. The flux tube structure has similarities in many aspects to the flux transfer events (FTEs) observed near the dayside magnetopause

  13. Critical heat flux, post dry-out and their augmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, G.P.; Mariani, A.

    1999-01-01

    The report shows the state of art review on the critical heat flux and the post-dryout heat transfer. The work, which is a merge of original researches carried out at the Institute of Thermal Fluid Dynamic of ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) and a thorough review of the recent literature, is divided in four chapters: critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling; critical heat flux in saturated flow boiling; post-dryout heat transfer; enhancement of critical heat flux and post-dryout heat transfer [it

  14. Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munn, W.I.

    1981-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Hanford site a few miles north of Richland, Washington, is a major link in the chain of development required to sustain and advance Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) technology in the United States. This 400 MWt sodium cooled reactor is a three loop design, is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy, and is the largest research reactor of its kind in the world. The purpose of the facility is three-fold: (1) to provide a test bed for components, materials, and breeder reactor fuels which can significantly extend resource reserves; (2) to produce a complete body of base data for the use of liquid sodium in heat transfer systens; and (3) to demonstrate inherent safety characteristics of LMFBR designs

  15. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  16. rf SQUID system as tunable flux qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, B. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy)]. E-mail: b.ruggiero@cib.na.cnr.it; Granata, C. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Vettoliere, A. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Rombetto, S. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Russo, R. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Russo, M. [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Corato, V. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Seconda Universita di Napoli, I-81031 Aversa (Italy); Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Silvestrini, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Seconda Universita di Napoli, I-81031 Aversa (Italy); Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy)

    2006-08-21

    We present a fully integrated rf SQUID-based system as flux qubit with a high control of the flux transfer function of the superconducting transformer modulating the coupling between the flux qubit and the readout system. The control of the system is possible by including into the superconducting flux transformer a vertical two-Josephson-junctions interferometer (VJI) in which the Josephson current is precisely modulated from a maximum to zero by a transversal magnetic field parallel to the flux transformer plane. The proposed system can be also used in a more general configuration to control the off-diagonal terms in the Hamiltonian of the flux qubit and to turn on and off the coupling between two or more qubits.

  17. Molecular Events Involved in a Single Cycle of Ligand Transfer from an ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, LolCDE, to a Molecular Chaperone, LolA*

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Naohiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    An ATP binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli in an ATP-dependent manner, leading to the formation of a complex between a lipoprotein and a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. LolA is proposed to undergo a conformational change upon the lipoprotein binding. The lipoprotein is then transferred from the LolA-lipoprotein complex to the outer membrane via LolB. Unlike most ATP binding cassette transporters med...

  18. Measurement of event shapes at large momentum transfer with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Gallus, Petr; Gunther, Jaroslav; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Juránek, Vojtěch; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Růžička, Pavel; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Tic, Tomáš; Valenta, J.; Vrba, Václav; Zeman, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 11 (2012), s. 1-22 ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : event shapes * jets * LHC * ATLAS * parton showers Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.247, year: 2012 http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1206.2135

  19. Elementary heat transfer analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, Stephen; Hartnett, James P

    1976-01-01

    Elementary Heat Transfer Analysis provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of the nature of transient heat conduction. This book presents a thorough understanding of the thermal energy equation and its application to boundary layer flows and confined and unconfined turbulent flows. Organized into nine chapters, this book begins with an overview of the use of heat transfer coefficients in formulating the flux condition at phase interface. This text then explains the specification as well as application of flux boundary conditions. Other chapters consider a derivation of the tra

  20. Ventomod: a dynamic model for leaf to fruit transfer of radionuclides in processing tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) following a direct contamination event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.; Strebl, F.; Carini, F.; Gerzabek, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results on the calibration and validation of a model (Ventomod) for leaf to fruit transfer of 134 Cs, 85 Sr and 65 Zn in processing tomato plants after leaf contamination. Several models (e.g FARMLAND) that deal specifically with the transfer of radionuclides to fruits are adaptations of models that were developed for agricultural crops such as leafy green vegetables. 'Ventomod' represents a dynamic evaluation model exclusively built for the short-term behaviour of radionuclide depositions. It forecasts the level of radionuclide contamination in ripe processing tomato fruits following an accidental radionuclide release into the atmosphere. A validation of the developed model by data sets from an independent experiment showed that the model successfully reproduced the observed radionuclide distribution and dynamics in tomato fruits. The level of uncertainty was within the normal range of similar assessment models. Fo a more general use of this model further testing with independent data sets from experiments obtained under different environmental conditions and data from other horticulturally important plant species would be desirable

  1. LEGAL ASPECTS OF THE TRANSPOSITION OF DIRECTIVE 2001/23/EC REGARDING THE SAFEGUARDING OF EMPLOYEES’ RIGHTS IN THE EVENT OF TRANSFERS IN THE ROMANIAN LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELICIA BEJAN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of undertakings, businesses or parts of undertakings or businesses by legal transfer or merger determine important changes in the structure of the participant entities. The change of their juridical organisation has significant consequences on the employees’ rights, reason why, both nationally and internationally, normative acts that would regulate appropriate safeguarding mechanisms have been adopted. The paper aims to analyse the transposition into national law of the communitarian norms in the field. As a result, the legal aspects with regards to which the legislator chose a restrictive transposition, as well as the additional rights established by them in favour of the employees, in comparison to the directive are identified. At the same time, the study emphasizes the aspects with regards to which the Romanian law requires to be changed and therefore makes some proposals de lege ferenda, so that the transposition of the communitarian normative act into national law would be a precise one and consistent to the other dispositions regarding national law.

  2. Heat transfer in smooth tubes, between parallel plates, along a semi-infinite plate, in annular spaces and along tube bundles for exponential distribution of the heat flux in forced, laminar or turbulent flow; Transfert de chaleur dans des tubes lisses, entre des plaques planes paralleles, le long d'une plaque plane, dans des espaces annulaires et le long de faisceaux tubulaires pour une repartition exponentielle du flux de chaleur en ecoulement force, laminaire ou turbulent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graber, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91 - Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-04-01

    By introducing an additional parameter F{sub 0}, the processes known hitherto for calculating heat transfer are extended to the heat flux distributions following an exponential law q{sub w} = exp(mx) which give a heat transfer coefficient, independent of position for laminar and turbulent flow with a linear pressure drop. For laminar flow along a semi-infinite plate, the heat flux distribution in accordance with the law qw = x{sup m} leads to the Nusselt number, regardless of the position. Nu is then determined by the thickness of the thermal boundary layer. For the annular space, the equations for explicit calculation of the temperature field will be given, as well as the Nusselt number in laminar flow and constant heat flux. In turbulent flow, the laws of distribution of eddy diffusivity for momentum in a tube, established by H. Reichardt, adapted for the annular space and the tube bundle, give the velocity field and the coefficient of friction and thus permit solution of the heat transfer equations. The results of the numerical calculation are given in the tables and diagrams for an extended range of the various parameters and compared with the experimental results. A simple process to determine the lower limit of the thermal entry length will be described. (author) [French] Par l'introduction d'un parametre supplementaire F{sub 0}, les procedes connus jusqu'a present pour le calcul du transfert de chaleur sont etendus aux repartitions exponentielles q{sub w} = exp(mx) du flux de chaleur qui indiquent un coefficient de transfert de chaleur independant de l'endroit pour l'ecoulement laminaire ou turbulent avec chute de pression lineaire. Pour l'ecoulement laminaire le long d'une plaque plane, la repartition du flux de chaleur selon la loi q{sub w} = x{sup m} conduit au nombre de Nusselt independant de l'endroit. Nu est alors determine par l'epaisseur de la couche limite thermique. Pour l'espace annulaire, seront indiquees les equations pour le calcul explicite du

  3. Heat transfer in smooth tubes, between parallel plates, along a semi-infinite plate, in annular spaces and along tube bundles for exponential distribution of the heat flux in forced, laminar or turbulent flow; Transfert de chaleur dans des tubes lisses, entre des plaques planes paralleles, le long d'une plaque plane, dans des espaces annulaires et le long de faisceaux tubulaires pour une repartition exponentielle du flux de chaleur en ecoulement force, laminaire ou turbulent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graber, H. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91 - Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-04-01

    By introducing an additional parameter F{sub 0}, the processes known hitherto for calculating heat transfer are extended to the heat flux distributions following an exponential law q{sub w} = exp(mx) which give a heat transfer coefficient, independent of position for laminar and turbulent flow with a linear pressure drop. For laminar flow along a semi-infinite plate, the heat flux distribution in accordance with the law qw = x{sup m} leads to the Nusselt number, regardless of the position. Nu is then determined by the thickness of the thermal boundary layer. For the annular space, the equations for explicit calculation of the temperature field will be given, as well as the Nusselt number in laminar flow and constant heat flux. In turbulent flow, the laws of distribution of eddy diffusivity for momentum in a tube, established by H. Reichardt, adapted for the annular space and the tube bundle, give the velocity field and the coefficient of friction and thus permit solution of the heat transfer equations. The results of the numerical calculation are given in the tables and diagrams for an extended range of the various parameters and compared with the experimental results. A simple process to determine the lower limit of the thermal entry length will be described. (author) [French] Par l'introduction d'un parametre supplementaire F{sub 0}, les procedes connus jusqu'a present pour le calcul du transfert de chaleur sont etendus aux repartitions exponentielles q{sub w} = exp(mx) du flux de chaleur qui indiquent un coefficient de transfert de chaleur independant de l'endroit pour l'ecoulement laminaire ou turbulent avec chute de pression lineaire. Pour l'ecoulement laminaire le long d'une plaque plane, la repartition du flux de chaleur selon la loi q{sub w} = x{sup m} conduit au nombre de Nusselt independant de l'endroit. Nu est alors determine par l'epaisseur de la couche limite thermique. Pour l'espace annulaire, seront

  4. Measuring Fast Calcium Fluxes in Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes have multiple Ca2+ fluxes of varying duration that work together to optimize function 1,2. Changes in Ca2+ activity in response to extracellular agents is predominantly regulated by the phospholipase Cβ- Gαq pathway localized on the plasma membrane which is stimulated by agents such as acetylcholine 3,4. We have recently found that plasma membrane protein domains called caveolae5,6 can entrap activated Gαq7. This entrapment has the effect of stabilizing the activated state of Gαq and resulting in prolonged Ca2+ signals in cardiomyocytes and other cell types8. We uncovered this surprising result by measuring dynamic calcium responses on a fast scale in living cardiomyocytes. Briefly, cells are loaded with a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. In our studies, we used Ca2+ Green (Invitrogen, Inc.) which exhibits an increase in fluorescence emission intensity upon binding of calcium ions. The fluorescence intensity is then recorded for using a line-scan mode of a laser scanning confocal microscope. This method allows rapid acquisition of the time course of fluorescence intensity in pixels along a selected line, producing several hundreds of time traces on the microsecond time scale. These very fast traces are transferred into excel and then into Sigmaplot for analysis, and are compared to traces obtained for electronic noise, free dye, and other controls. To dissect Ca2+ responses of different flux rates, we performed a histogram analysis that binned pixel intensities with time. Binning allows us to group over 500 traces of scans and visualize the compiled results spatially and temporally on a single plot. Thus, the slow Ca2+ waves that are difficult to discern when the scans are overlaid due to different peak placement and noise, can be readily seen in the binned histograms. Very fast fluxes in the time scale of the measurement show a narrow distribution of intensities in the very short time bins whereas longer Ca2+ waves show binned data with a broad

  5. Radon flux measurement methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Five methods for measuring radon fluxes are evaluated: the accumulator can, a small charcoal sampler, a large-area charcoal sampler, the ''Big Louie'' charcoal sampler, and the charcoal tent sampler. An experimental comparison of the five flux measurement techniques was also conducted. Excellent agreement was obtained between the measured radon fluxes and fluxes predicted from radium and emanation measurements

  6. Physics of magnetic flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Ryutova, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first account of the physics of magnetic flux tubes from their fundamental properties to collective phenomena in an ensembles of flux tubes. The physics of magnetic flux tubes is absolutely vital for understanding fundamental physical processes in the solar atmosphere shaped and governed by magnetic fields. High-resolution and high cadence observations from recent space and  ground-based instruments taken simultaneously at different heights and temperatures not only show the ubiquity of filamentary structure formation but also allow to study how various events are interconnected by system of magnetic flux tubes. The book covers both theory and observations. Theoretical models presented in analytical and phenomenological forms are tailored for practical applications. These are welded with state-of-the-art observations from early decisive ones to the most recent data that open a new phase-space for exploring the Sun and sun-like stars. Concept of magnetic flux tubes is central to various magn...

  7. Binding events of (S )-N -(3-oxo-octanoyl)-homoserine lactone with agrobacterium tumefaciens mutant cells studied by saturation transfer difference NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabeca, Luis Fernando; Pomini, Armando Mateus; Cruz, Pedro Luiz R.; Marsaioli, Anita J. [University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Chemistry Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Quorum-sensing is a widely studied communication phenomenon in bacteria, which involves the production and detection of signaling substances in relation with cell density and colony behavior. Herein, the membrane binding interactions of the signal (S)-N-(3-oxo-octanoyl)-HSL with A. tumefaciens NTL4(pZLR4) cells were studied using saturation transfer difference NMR spectroscopy (STD-NMR). The substance epitope map was obtained showing that the hydrophobic acyl chain is the most important interacting site for the signal and the cell membrane. Results were interpreted upon comparisons with a simpler system, using liposomes as membrane models. Some insights on the use of b-cyclodextrin as acyl-HSL carrier were also provided. (author)

  8. Identification of horizontally transferred genes in the genus Colletotrichum reveals a steady tempo of bacterial to fungal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Vinicio D Armijos; Sukno, Serenella A; Thon, Michael R

    2015-01-02

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the stable transmission of genetic material between organisms by means other than vertical inheritance. HGT has an important role in the evolution of prokaryotes but is relatively rare in eukaryotes. HGT has been shown to contribute to virulence in eukaryotic pathogens. We studied the importance of HGT in plant pathogenic fungi by identifying horizontally transferred genes in the genomes of three members of the genus Colletotrichum. We identified eleven HGT events from bacteria into members of the genus Colletotrichum or their ancestors. The HGT events include genes involved in amino acid, lipid and sugar metabolism as well as lytic enzymes. Additionally, the putative minimal dates of transference were calculated using a time calibrated phylogenetic tree. This analysis reveals a constant flux of genes from bacteria to fungi throughout the evolution of subphylum Pezizomycotina. Genes that are typically transferred by HGT are those that are constantly subject to gene duplication and gene loss. The functions of some of these genes suggest roles in niche adaptation and virulence. We found no evidence of a burst of HGT events coinciding with major geological events. In contrast, HGT appears to be a constant, albeit rare phenomenon in the Pezizomycotina, occurring at a steady rate during their evolution.

  9. A time-varying magnetic flux concentrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibret, B; Premaratne, M; Lewis, P M; Thomson, R; Fitzgerald, P B

    2016-01-01

    It is known that diverse technological applications require the use of focused magnetic fields. This has driven the quest for controlling the magnetic field. Recently, the principles in transformation optics and metamaterials have allowed the realization of practical static magnetic flux concentrators. Extending such progress, here, we propose a time-varying magnetic flux concentrator cylindrical shell that uses electric conductors and ferromagnetic materials to guide magnetic flux to its center. Its performance is discussed based on finite-element simulation results. Our proposed design has potential applications in magnetic sensors, medical devices, wireless power transfer, and near-field wireless communications. (paper)

  10. OpenFLUX: efficient modelling software for 13C-based metabolic flux analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Lars K

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quantitative analysis of metabolic fluxes, i.e., in vivo activities of intracellular enzymes and pathways, provides key information on biological systems in systems biology and metabolic engineering. It is based on a comprehensive approach combining (i tracer cultivation on 13C substrates, (ii 13C labelling analysis by mass spectrometry and (iii mathematical modelling for experimental design, data processing, flux calculation and statistics. Whereas the cultivation and the analytical part is fairly advanced, a lack of appropriate modelling software solutions for all modelling aspects in flux studies is limiting the application of metabolic flux analysis. Results We have developed OpenFLUX as a user friendly, yet flexible software application for small and large scale 13C metabolic flux analysis. The application is based on the new Elementary Metabolite Unit (EMU framework, significantly enhancing computation speed for flux calculation. From simple notation of metabolic reaction networks defined in a spreadsheet, the OpenFLUX parser automatically generates MATLAB-readable metabolite and isotopomer balances, thus strongly facilitating model creation. The model can be used to perform experimental design, parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis either using the built-in gradient-based search or Monte Carlo algorithms or in user-defined algorithms. Exemplified for a microbial flux study with 71 reactions, 8 free flux parameters and mass isotopomer distribution of 10 metabolites, OpenFLUX allowed to automatically compile the EMU-based model from an Excel file containing metabolic reactions and carbon transfer mechanisms, showing it's user-friendliness. It reliably reproduced the published data and optimum flux distributions for the network under study were found quickly ( Conclusion We have developed a fast, accurate application to perform steady-state 13C metabolic flux analysis. OpenFLUX will strongly facilitate and

  11. Transfer anisotropy effect in a turbulent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychenkov, V.Yu.; Gradov, O.M.; Silin, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A theory is developed of transfer phenomena with pronounced ion-sound turbulence. A transfer anisotropy effect is observed which is due to the temperature gradient. The corresponding fluxes across the effective force vector generating the turbulence are found to be considerably greater than the longitudinal fluxes in a plasma with a comparatively low degree of nonisothermality. In a strongly nonisothermal plasma the suppression of transverse fluxes occurs, corresponding to the growth of thermal insulation of the current-carrying plasma filaments

  12. Heat Transfer in Large Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent

    Heat transfer between the cylinder gas and the piston surface during combustion in large two-stroke uniflow scavenged marine diesel engines has been investigated in the present work. The piston surface experiences a severe thermal load during combustion due to the close proximity of the combustion...... zone to the surface. At the same time, cooling of the piston crown is relatively complicated. This can cause large thermal stresses in the piston crown and weakening of the material strength, which may be critical as it can lead to formation of cracks. Information about the piston surface heat transfer...... is thus important for the engine manufactures. The piston surface heat transfer was studied in the event of impingement of hot combustion products on the piston during combustion, and an estimate was obtained of the peak heat flux level experienced on the piston surface. The investigation was carried out...

  13. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  14. Heat transfer and fire spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hal E. Anderson

    1969-01-01

    Experimental testing of a mathematical model showed that radiant heat transfer accounted for no more than 40% of total heat flux required to maintain rate of spread. A reasonable prediction of spread was possible by assuming a horizontal convective heat transfer coefficient when certain fuel and flame characteristics were known. Fuel particle size had a linear relation...

  15. The Flux Database Concerted Action (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.G.; Donnelly, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    The background to the IUR action on the development of a flux database for radionuclide transfer in soil-plant systems is summarised. The action is discussed in terms of the objectives, the deliverables and the progress achieved by the flux database working group. The paper describes the background to the current initiative, outlines specific features of the database and supporting documentation, and presents findings from the working group's activities. The aim of the IUR flux database working group is to bring together researchers to collate data from current experimental studies investigating aspects of radionuclide transfer in soil-plant systems. The database will incorporate parameters describing the time-dependent transfer of radionuclides between soil, plant and animal compartments. Work under the EC Concerted Action considers soil-plant interactions. This initiative has become known as the radionuclide flux database. It is emphasised that the word flux is used in this case simply to indicate the flow of radionuclides between compartments in time. (author)

  16. Heat transfer characteristics of supercritical pressure waster in vertical upward annular channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Han; Bi Qincheng; Yang Zhendong; Wu Gang

    2013-01-01

    Within the range of pressure from 23 to 28 MPa, mass flux from 350 to 1000 kg/(m 2 · s), and outside wall heat flux from 200 to 1000 kW/m 2 , experimental investigation was conducted on the heat transfer characteristics of supercritical pressure water in vertical upward annular channels. The effects of heat flux, pressure, mass flux and spiral spacer on heat transfer were analyzed, and two types of heat transfer deterioration occurred in the experiments were compared. The experimental results show that the heat transfer of water can be enhanced by increasing the mass flux or decreasing the wall heat flux. The effect of pressure on heat transfer is not uniform and depends on heat transfer form. It was found that the spiral spacer not only enhances the heat transfer of water, but also delays the heat transfer deterioration which occurs in high heat flux and low mass flux conditions. (authors)

  17. TRANSFERENCE BEFORE TRANSFERENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaminio, Vincenzo

    2017-10-01

    This paper is predominantly a clinical presentation that describes the transmigration of one patient's transference to another, with the analyst functioning as a sort of transponder. It involves an apparently accidental episode in which there was an unconscious intersection between two patients. The author's aim is to show how transference from one case may affect transference in another, a phenomenon the author calls transference before transference. The author believes that this idea may serve as a tool for understanding the unconscious work that takes place in the clinical situation. In a clinical example, the analyst finds himself caught up in an enactment involving two patients in which he becomes the medium of what happens in session. © 2017 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  18. Flux transformers made of commercial high critical temperature superconducting wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyvorne, H; Scola, J; Fermon, C; Jacquinot, J F; Pannetier-Lecoeur, M

    2008-02-01

    We have designed flux transformers made of commercial BiSCCO tapes closed by soldering with normal metal. The magnetic field transfer function of the flux transformer was calculated as a function of the resistance of the soldered contacts. The performances of different kinds of wires were investigated for signal delocalization and gradiometry. We also estimated the noise introduced by the resistance and showed that the flux transformer can be used efficiently for weak magnetic field detection down to 1 Hz.

  19. Neutron flux distribution forecasting device of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi

    1991-01-01

    A neutron flux distribution is forecast by using current data obtained from a reactor. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux monitor disposed in various positions in the reactor, (2) a forecasting means for calculating and forecasting a one-dimensional neutron flux distribution relative to imaginable events by using data obtained from the neutron flux monitor and physical models, and (3) a display means for displaying the results forecast in the forecasting means to a reactor operation console. Since the forecast values for the one-dimensional neutron flux distribution relative to the imaginable events are calculated in the device of the present invention by using data obtained from the neutron flux monitor and the physical models, the data as a base of the calculation are new and the period for calculating the forecast values can be shortened. Accordingly, although there is a worry of providing some errors in the forecast values, they can be utilized sufficiently as reference data. As a result, the reactor can be operated more appropriately. (I.N.)

  20. Visualisation of heat transfer in laminar flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speetjens, M.F.M.; Steenhoven, van A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Heat transfer in fluid flows traditionally is examined in terms of temperature field and heat-transfer coefficients at non-adiabatic walls. However, heat transfer may alternatively be considered as the transport of thermal energy by the total convective-conductive heat flux in a way analogous to the

  1. Turbulent Fogwater Flux Measurements Above A Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, R.; Eugster, W.; Buetzberger, P.; Siegwolf, R.

    Many forest ecosystems in elevated regions receive a significant fraction of their wa- ter and nutrient input by the interception of fogwater. Recently, several studies have demonstrated the suitability of the eddy covariance technique for the direct measure- ment of turbulent liquid water fluxes. Since summer 2001 a fogwater flux measure- ment equipment has been running at a montane site above a mixed forest canopy in Switzerland. The measurement equipment consists of a high-speed size-resolving droplet spectrometer and a three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer. The chemical composition of the fogwater was determined from samples collected with a modified Caltech active strand collector. The deposition of nutrients by fog (occult deposition) was calculated by multiplying the total fogwater flux (total of measured turbulent and calculated gravitational flux) during each fog event by the ionic concentrations found in the collected fogwater. Several uncertainties still exist as far as the accuracy of the measurements is con- cerned. Although there is no universal statistical approach for testing the quality of the liquid water flux data directly, results of independent data quality checks of the two time series involved in the flux computation and accordingly the two instruments (ultrasonic anemometer and the droplet spectrometer) are presented. Within the measurement period, over 80 fog events with a duration longer than 2.5 hours were analyzed. An enormous physical and chemical heterogeneity among these fog events was found. We assume that some of this heterogeneity is due to the fact that fog or cloud droplets are not conservative entities: the turbulent flux of fog droplets, which can be referred to as the liquid water flux, is affected by phase change processes and coagulation. The measured coexistence of upward fluxes of small fog droplets (di- ameter < 10 µm) with the downward transport of larger droplets indicates the influ- ence of such processes. With the

  2. Magnetotail Reconnection and Flux Circulation: Jupiter and Saturn Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, C. M.; Vogt, M. F.; Slavin, J. A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Boardsen, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Jovian magnetosphere has been visited by eight spacecraft, and the magnetometer data have been used to identify dozens of plasmoids and 250 field dipolarizations associated with magnetic reconnection in the tail [e.g. Vogt et al., 2010]. Since the arrival of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn in 2004, the magnetometer instrument has also been used to identify reconnection signatures. The deepest magnetotail orbits were in 2006, and during this time 34 signatures of plasmoids were identified. In this study we compare the statistical properties of plasmoids at Jupiter and Saturn such as duration, size, location, and recurrence period. Such parameters can be influenced by many factors, including the different Dungey cycle timescales and cross-magnetospheric potential drops at the two planets. We present superposed epoch analyses of plasmoids at the two planets to determine their average properties and to infer their role in the reconfiguration of the nightside of the magnetosphere. We examine the contributions of plasmoids to the magnetic flux transfer cycle at both planets. At Jupiter, there is evidence of an extended interval after reconnection where the field remains northward (analogous to the terrestrial post-plasmoid plasma sheet). At Saturn we see a similar feature, and calculate the amount of flux closed on average in reconnection events, leading us to an estimation of the recurrence rate of plasmoid release.

  3. Compact neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavi, V.; Phatak, P.R.; Bahadur, C.; Bayala, A.K.; Jakati, R.K.; Sathian, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A compact size neutron flux monitor has been developed incorporating standard boards developed for smart radiation monitors. The sensitivity of the monitors is 0.4cps/nV. It has been tested up to 2075 nV flux with standard neutron sources. It shows convincing results even in high flux areas like 6m away from the accelerator in RMC (Parel) for 106/107 nV. These monitors have a focal and remote display, alarm function with potential free contacts for centralized control and additional provision of connectivity via RS485/Ethernet. This paper describes the construction, working and results of the above flux monitor

  4. Event Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korosec, D.

    2000-01-01

    The events in the nuclear industry are investigated from the license point of view and from the regulatory side too. It is well known the importance of the event investigation. One of the main goals of such investigation is to prevent the circumstances leading to the event and the consequences of the event. The protection of the nuclear workers against nuclear hazard, and the protection of general public against dangerous effects of an event could be achieved by systematic approach to the event investigation. Both, the nuclear safety regulatory body and the licensee shall ensure that operational significant events are investigated in a systematic and technically sound manner to gather information pertaining to the probable causes of the event. One of the results should be appropriate feedback regarding the lessons of the experience to the regulatory body, nuclear industry and general public. In the present paper a general description of systematic approach to the event investigation is presented. The systematic approach to the event investigation works best where cooperation is present among the different divisions of the nuclear facility or regulatory body. By involving management and supervisors the safety office can usually improve their efforts in the whole process. The end result shall be a program which serves to prevent events and reduce the time and efforts solving the root cause which initiated each event. Selection of the proper method for the investigation and an adequate review of the findings and conclusions lead to the higher level of the overall nuclear safety. (author)

  5. Bulk and export production fluxes from sediment traps in the Gulf of Aqaba, north Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfstein, A.; Kienast, S.; Shaked, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Real time observations of the dynamics between dust input, primary production, and export production in deep oligotrophic waters are extremely rare. This is especially true in the context of the direct response and lag time between nutrient supply (e.g., dust), the oceanic biogeochemical response and the signal transfer from the water to sedimentary record. Here, we present the first direct measurments of bulk and export production fluxes in the deep oligotrophic Gulf of Aqaba (GOA), northern Red Sea, located between the hyper-arid Sahara and Arabia Deserts. This study is based on a coupled sediment trap array that provides daily- and monthly- resolution since January 2014. This coupled configuration allows for a unique collection of marine particulates, whereby the annual and seasonal patterns can be evaluated in the context of discrete (daily-timescale) events such as abrupt dust storms, floods and biological blooms. The marine organic C and N fluxes range annually between 0.02-0.25 and 0.001-0.1 g d-1 m-2, respectively. Both show a sharp decay with depth, corresponding to the "Martin curve" (Martin et al., 1987, Deep-Sea Research, 34, 267-285). Importantly, the daily-resolution sampling provides insights to the seasonal increase in export production during the winter and early spring. Rather than a smooth seasonal cycle, this increase is driven by only very few short events, lasting no more than a few days, during which export production increases by an order of magnitude above the baseline. Yet, the nature of these export production "spikes" is non-unique because they reflect different "trigger" events such as dust storms or water column mixing. Accordingly, we present a quantitative evaluation of the observations in the context of coeval dust flux records and the physical and chemical configuration of the GOA over the time of sampling period, and present and quantitative mass balance of particle fluxes in this deep yet land-locked marine setting.

  6. Primary cosmic ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor

    2001-05-01

    We discuss the primary cosmic ray flux from the point of view of particle interactions and production of atmospheric neutrinos. The overall normalization of the cosmic ray flux and its time variations and site dependence are major ingredients of the atmospheric neutrino predictions and the basis for the derivation of the neutrino oscillation parameters.

  7. Flux cutting in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, A M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes experiments and theories of flux cutting in superconductors. The use of the flux line picture in free space is discussed. In superconductors cutting can either be by means of flux at an angle to other layers of flux, as in longitudinal current experiments, or due to shearing of the vortex lattice as in grain boundaries in YBCO. Experiments on longitudinal currents can be interpreted in terms of flux rings penetrating axial lines. More physical models of flux cutting are discussed but all predict much larger flux cutting forces than are observed. Also, cutting is occurring at angles between vortices of about one millidegree which is hard to explain. The double critical state model and its developments are discussed in relation to experiments on crossed and rotating fields. A new experiment suggested by Clem gives more direct information. It shows that an elliptical yield surface of the critical state works well, but none of the theoretical proposals for determining the direction of E are universally applicable. It appears that, as soon as any flux flow takes place, cutting also occurs. The conclusion is that new theories are required. (perspective)

  8. Critical heat flux, post dry-out and their augmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celata, G.P.; Mariani, A. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, S. Maria di Galeria, RM (Italy). Dipt. Energia

    1999-07-01

    The report shows the state of art review on the critical heat flux and the post-dryout heat transfer. The work, which is a merge of original researches carried out at the Institute of Thermal Fluid Dynamic of ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) and a thorough review of the recent literature, is divided in four chapters: critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling; critical heat flux in saturated flow boiling; post-dryout heat transfer; enhancement of critical heat flux and post-dryout heat transfer. [Italian] Si passa in rassegna lo stato dell'arte sulla crisi termica e sullo scambio termico post-crisi, che compendia studi tradizionali condotti dall'ENEA. Il rapporto e' suddiviso in quattro parti: crisi termica in ebollizione sottoraffreddata; crisi termica in ebollizione satura; scambio termico dopo la crisi termica; incremento del flusso termico critico e dello scambio termico post-crisi.

  9. Critical heat flux, post dry-out and their augmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celata, G P; Mariani, A [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, S. Maria di Galeria, RM (Italy). Dipt. Energia

    1999-07-01

    The report shows the state of art review on the critical heat flux and the post-dryout heat transfer. The work, which is a merge of original researches carried out at the Institute of Thermal Fluid Dynamic of ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) and a thorough review of the recent literature, is divided in four chapters: critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling; critical heat flux in saturated flow boiling; post-dryout heat transfer; enhancement of critical heat flux and post-dryout heat transfer. [Italian] Si passa in rassegna lo stato dell'arte sulla crisi termica e sullo scambio termico post-crisi, che compendia studi tradizionali condotti dall'ENEA. Il rapporto e' suddiviso in quattro parti: crisi termica in ebollizione sottoraffreddata; crisi termica in ebollizione satura; scambio termico dopo la crisi termica; incremento del flusso termico critico e dello scambio termico post-crisi.

  10. Heat flux microsensor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J. P.; Hager, J. M.; Onishi, S.; Diller, T. E.

    1992-01-01

    A thin-film heat flux sensor has been fabricated on a stainless steel substrate. The thermocouple elements of the heat flux sensor were nickel and nichrome, and the temperature resistance sensor was platinum. The completed heat flux microsensor was calibrated at the AEDC radiation facility. The gage output was linear with heat flux with no apparent temperature effect on sensitivity. The gage was used for heat flux measurements at the NASA Langley Vitiated Air Test Facility. Vitiated air was expanded to Mach 3.0 and hydrogen fuel was injected. Measurements were made on the wall of a diverging duct downstream of the injector during all stages of the hydrogen combustion tests. Because the wall and the gage were not actively cooled, the wall temperature reached over 1000 C (1900 F) during the most severe test.

  11. Flux-limited diffusion models in radiation hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomraning, G.C.; Szilard, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    The authors discuss certain flux-limited diffusion theories which approximately describe radiative transfer in the presence of steep spatial gradients. A new formulation is presented which generalizes a flux-limited description currently in widespread use for large radiation hydrodynamic calculations. This new formation allows more than one Case discrete mode to be described by a flux-limited diffusion equation. Such behavior is not extant in existing formulations. Numerical results predicted by these flux-limited diffusion models are presented for radiation penetration into an initially cold halfspace. 37 refs., 5 figs

  12. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors: Design and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors: Design and Methodology: (1) Heat flux is one of a number of parameters, together with pressure, temperature, flow, etc. of interest to engine designers and fluid dynamists, (2) The measurement of heat flux is of interest in directly determining the cooling requirements of hot section blades and vanes, and (3)In addition, if the surface and gas temperatures are known, the measurement of heat flux provides a value for the convective heat transfer coefficient that can be compared with the value provided by CFD codes.

  13. Experimental measurements and analytical analysis related to gas turbine heat transfer. Part 1: Time-averaged heat-flux and surface-pressure measurements on the vanes and blades of the SSME fuel-side turbine and comparison with prediction. Part 2: Phase-resolved surface-pressure and heat-flux measurements on the first blade of the SSME fuel-side turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Time averaged Stanton number and surface-pressure distributions are reported for the first-stage vane row, the first stage blade row, and the second stage vane row of the Rocketdyne Space Shuttle Main Engine two-stage fuel-side turbine. Unsteady pressure envelope measurements for the first blade are also reported. These measurements were made at 10 percent, 50 percent, and 90 percent span on both the pressure and suction surfaces of the first stage components. Additional Stanton number measurements were made on the first stage blade platform blade tip, and shroud, and at 50 percent span on the second vane. A shock tube was used as a short duration source of heated and pressurized air to which the turbine was subjected. Platinum thin-film heat flux gages were used to obtain the heat flux measurements, while miniature silicon-diaphragm flush-mounted pressure transducers were used to obtain the pressure measurements. The first stage vane Stanton number distributions are compared with predictions obtained using a version of STAN5 and a quasi-3D Navier-Stokes solution. This same quasi-3D N-S code was also used to obtain predictions for the first blade and the second vane.

  14. Experimental study of the atmospheric neutrino flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, K.S.; Kajita, T.; Koshiba, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have observed 277 fully contained events in the KAMIOKANDE detector. The number of electron-like single prong events is in good agreement with the predictions of a Monte Carlo calculation based on atmospheric neutrino interactions in the detector. On the other hand, the number of muon-like single prong events is 59 ± 7 %(statistical error) of the predicted number of the Monte Carlo calculation. We are unable to explain the data as the result of systematic detector effects or uncertainties in the atmospheric neutrino fluxes. (author)

  15. SENTINEL EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Robida

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Objective of the article is a two year statistics on sentinel events in hospitals. Results of a survey on sentinel events and the attitude of hospital leaders and staff are also included. Some recommendations regarding patient safety and the handling of sentinel events are given.Methods. In March 2002 the Ministry of Health introduce a voluntary reporting system on sentinel events in Slovenian hospitals. Sentinel events were analyzed according to the place the event, its content, and root causes. To show results of the first year, a conference for hospital directors and medical directors was organized. A survey was conducted among the participants with the purpose of gathering information about their view on sentinel events. One hundred questionnaires were distributed.Results. Sentinel events. There were 14 reports of sentinel events in the first year and 7 in the second. In 4 cases reports were received only after written reminders were sent to the responsible persons, in one case no reports were obtained. There were 14 deaths, 5 of these were in-hospital suicides, 6 were due to an adverse event, 3 were unexplained. Events not leading to death were a suicide attempt, a wrong side surgery, a paraplegia after spinal anaesthesia, a fall with a femoral neck fracture, a damage of the spleen in the event of pleural space drainage, inadvertent embolization with absolute alcohol into a femoral artery and a physical attack on a physician by a patient. Analysis of root causes of sentinel events showed that in most cases processes were inadequate.Survey. One quarter of those surveyed did not know about the sentinel events reporting system. 16% were having actual problems when reporting events and 47% beleived that there was an attempt to blame individuals. Obstacles in reporting events openly were fear of consequences, moral shame, fear of public disclosure of names of participants in the event and exposure in mass media. The majority of

  16. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics.We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...

  17. Continuous magnetic flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A method and means for altering the intensity of a magnetic field by transposing flux from one location to the location desired fro the magnetic field are examined. The device described includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, is dimensioned to be insertable into one of the cavities and to substantially fill the cavity. Magnetic flux is first trapped in the cavities by establishing a magnetic field while the superconducting material is above the critical temperature at which it goes superconducting. Thereafter, the temperature of the material is reduced below the critical value, and then the exciting magnetic field may be removed. By varying the ratios of the areas of the two cavities, it is possible to produce a field having much greater flux density in the second, smaller cavity, into which the flux transposed.

  18. Flux in Tallinn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  19. Flux shunts for undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1993-05-01

    Undulators for high-performance applications in synchrotron-radiation sources and periodic magnetic structures for free-electron lasers have stringent requirements on the curvature of the electron's average trajectory. Undulators using the permanent magnet hybrid configuration often have fields in their central region that produce a curved trajectory caused by local, ambient magnetic fields such as those of the earth. The 4.6 m long Advanced Light Source (ALS) undulators use flux shunts to reduce this effect. These flux shunts are magnetic linkages of very high permeability material connecting the two steel beams that support the magnetic structures. The shunts reduce the scalar potential difference between the supporting beams and carry substantial flux that would normally appear in the undulator gap. Magnetic design, mechanical configuration of the flux shunts and magnetic measurements of their effect on the ALS undulators are described

  20. Diameter effect on critical heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanase, A.; Cheng, S.C.; Groeneveld, D.C.; Shan, J.Q.

    2009-01-01

    The critical heat flux look-up table (CHF LUT) is widely used to predict CHF for various applications, including design and safety analysis of nuclear reactors. Using the CHF LUT for round tubes having inside diameters different from the reference 8 mm involves conversion of CHF to 8 mm. Different authors [Becker, K.M., 1965. An Analytical and Experimental Study of Burnout Conditions in Vertical Round Ducts, Aktiebolaget Atomenergie Report AE 177, Sweden; Boltenko, E.A., et al., 1989. Effect of tube diameter on CHF at various two phase flow regimes, Report IPE-1989; Biasi, L., Clerici, G.C., Garriba, S., Sala, R., Tozzi, A., 1967. Studies on Burnout, Part 3, Energia Nucleare, vol. 14, pp. 530-536; Groeneveld, D.C., Cheng, S.C., Doan, T., 1986. AECL-UO critical heat flux look-up table. Heat Transfer Eng., 7, 46-62; Groeneveld et al., 1996; Hall, D.D., Mudawar, I., 2000. Critical heat flux for water flow in tubes - II subcooled CHF correlations. Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 43, 2605-2640; Wong, W.C., 1996. Effect of tube diameter on critical heat flux, MaSC dissertation, Ottawa Carleton Institute for Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of Ottawa] have proposed several types of correlations or factors to describe the diameter effect on CHF. The present work describes the derivation of new diameter correction factor and compares it with several existing prediction methods

  1. Influence of the heat flux and of the gas on heat transfer and friction coefficients in a smooth cylindrical tube; Influence du flux de chaleur et de la nature du gaz sur les coefficients d'echange et le frottement dans un tube cylindrique lisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpont, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-12-15

    The stainless steel tube used for the experiments is heated by means of d.c current; its inside diameter is 40 mm; its length is about 5.80 meters. Special core has been taken (heated rocket) to avoid heat loss and to provide very accurate measurements. The cooling gases tested are air and carbon dioxide at a pressure of 2.6 to 19 psi; the Reynolds number ranges from 70,000 to 10{sup 6}, the wall temperature and the heat flux reach respectively 430 deg C and 16 watts/cm{sup 2}. The Reynolds number Re{sub m}, Stanton number M{sub m} and friction coefficient f are computed by evaluating the physical properties of the gases at the mean temperature T{sub m}. For a given Reynolds number, a decrease of M{sub m} and of f is observed hen the heat flux increases, this decrease reaches 10 per cent in the experiments described. A formulation is proposed to express this effect in terms of a heat flow parameter (T{sub m} - T{sub m}) / T{sub p} used as a corrective factor (T{sub p} = wall temperature). The correlation formulae are: M{sub m} = 0.0168 Re{sub m}{sup -0.18} P{sub m}{sup -0.6} (1 - 0.4 [(T{sub p} - T{sub m}) / T{sub p}]) for air f = f{sub 0} (1 0.25 [(T{sub p} - T{sub m}) / T{sub p}]) for air M{sub m} = 0.0171 Re{sub m}{sup -0.18} P{sub m}{sup -0.6} (1 - 0.2 [(T{sub p} - T{sub m}) / T{sub p}]) for carbon dioxide f = f{sub 0} (1 - 0.20 [(T{sub p} - T{sub m}) / T{sub p}]) for carbon dioxide where f{sub 0} = the friction coefficient for isotherm flow. (author) [French] Le tube utilite a un diametre interieur de 40 mm; sa longueur est de 5,80 m environ; il est en acier inoxydable et chauffe par un courant continu. Des precautions particulieres (enceinte chauffante exterieure) ont ete prises pour eviter tout echange de chaleur avec le milieu exterieur et permettre des mesures extremement precises. Les gaz de refroidissement experimentes sont l'air et le gaz corbonique sous une pression de 1,8 a 13 hpz; les nombres de Reynolds vont de 70 000 a 10{sup 6}, la temperature de

  2. Actinide and Xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides

  3. Actinide and xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D. L.; Sailor, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides

  4. Actinide and Xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, M. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Olson, K.; Henderson, D.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides.

  5. The Oceanic Flux Program: A three decade time-series of particle flux in the deep Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J. C.; Conte, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    The Oceanic Flux Program (OFP), 75 km SE of Bermuda, is the longest running time-series of its kind. Initiated in 1978, the OFP has produced an unsurpassed, nearly continuous record of temporal variability in deep ocean fluxes, with a >90% temporal coverage at 3200m depth. The OFP, in conjunction with the co-located Bermuda-Atlantic Time Series (BATS) and the Bermuda Testbed Mooring (BTM) time-series, has provided key observations enabling detailed assessment of how seasonal and non-seasonal variability in the deep ocean is linked with the overlying physical and biogeochemical environment. This talk will focus on the short-term flux variability that overlies the seasonal flux pattern in the Sargasso Sea, emphasizing episodic extreme flux events. Extreme flux events are responsible for much of the year-to-year variability in mean annual flux and are most often observed during early winter and late spring when surface stratification is weak or transient. In addition to biological phenomena (e.g. salp blooms), passage of productive meso-scale features such as eddies, which alter surface water mixing characteristics and surface export fluxes, may initiate some extreme flux events. Yet other productive eddies show a minimal influence on the deep flux, underscoring the importance of upper ocean ecosystem structure and midwater processes on the coupling between the surface ocean environment and deep fluxes. Using key organic and inorganic tracers, causative processes that influence deep flux generation and the strength of the coupling with the surface ocean environment can be identified.

  6. Neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Naotaka.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention greatly saves an analog processing section such as an analog filter and an analog processing circuit. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux detection means for detecting neutron fluxed in the reactor, (2) a digital filter means for dividing signals corresponding to the detected neutron fluxes into predetermined frequency band regions, (3) a calculation processing means for applying a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band regions to the neutron flux detection signals divided by the digital filter means. With such a constitution, since the neutron detection signals are processed by the digital filter means, the accuracy is improved and the change for the property of the filter is facilitated. Further, when a neutron flux level is obtained, a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band region can be conducted without the analog processing circuit. Accordingly, maintenance and accuracy are improved by greatly decreasing the number of parts. Further, since problems inherent to the analog circuit are solved, neutron fluxes are monitored at high reliability. (I.S.)

  7. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Yoichiro.

    1995-01-01

    In a neutron flux monitoring device, there are disposed a neutron flux measuring means for outputting signals in accordance with the intensity of neutron fluxes, a calculation means for calculating a self power density spectrum at a frequency band suitable to an object to be measured based on the output of the neutron flux measuring means, an alarm set value generation means for outputting an alarm set value as a comparative reference, and an alarm judging means for comparing the alarm set value with the outputted value of the calculation means to judge requirement of generating an alarm and generate an alarm in accordance with the result of the judgement. Namely, the time-series of neutron flux signals is put to fourier transformation for a predetermined period of time by the calculation means, and from each of square sums for real number component and imaginary number component for each of the frequencies, a self power density spectrum in the frequency band suitable to the object to be measured is calculated. Then, when the set reference value is exceeded, an alarm is generated. This can reliably prevent generation of erroneous alarm due to neutron flux noises and can accurately generate an alarm at an appropriate time. (N.H.)

  8. Fast transfer of shared data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmer, C.; Abbott, D.J.; Heyes, W.G.; Jostizembski, E.; MacLeod, R.W.; Wolin, E.

    2000-01-01

    The Event Transfer system enables its users to produce events (data) and share them with other users by utilizing shared memory on either Solaris or Linux-based computers. Its design emphasizes speed, reliability, ease of use, and recoverability from crashes. In addition to fast local operation, the ET system allows network transfer of events. Using multi-threaded code based on POSIX threades and mutexes, a successful implementation was developed which allowed passing events over 500 kHz on a 4 cpu Sun workstation and 150 kHz on a dual cpu PC

  9. Short-term natural δ13C and δ18O variations in pools and fluxes in a beech forest: the transfer of isotopic signal from recent photosynthates to soil respired CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Matteucci

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The fate of photosynthetic products within the plant-soil continuum determines how long the reduced carbon resides within the ecosystem and when it returns back to the atmosphere in the form of respiratory CO2. We have tested the possibility of measuring natural variation in δ13C and δ18O to disentangle the potential times needed to transfer carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis down to trunk, roots and, in general, to belowground up to its further release in the form of soil respiration into the atmosphere in a beech (Fagus sylvatica forest. We have measured the variation in stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in plant material and in soil respired CO2 every three hours for three consecutive days. Possible steps and different signs of post-photosynthetic fractionation during carbon translocation were also identified. A 12 h-periodicity was observed for variation in δ13C in soluble sugars in the top crown leaves and it can be explained by starch day/night dynamics in synthesis and breakdown and by stomatal limitations under elevated vapour pressure deficits. Photosynthetic products were transported down the trunk and mixed with older carbon pools, therefore causing the dampening of the δ13C signal variation. The strongest periodicity of 24 h was found in δ13C in soil respiration indicating changes in root contribution to the total CO2 efflux. Other non-biological causes like diffusion fractionation and advection induced by gas withdrawn from the measurement chamber complicate data interpretation on this step of C transfer path. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify the speed of carbohydrates' translocation from the point of assimilation to the trunk breast height because leaf-imprinted enrichment of δ18O in soluble sugars was less modified along the downward transport and was well related to environmental parameters potentially linked to stomatal conductance. The speed of carbohydrates translocation from the site of

  10. Neutron flux measurement utilizing Campbell technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.

    2000-01-01

    Application of the Campbell technique for the neutron flux measurement is described in the contribution. This technique utilizes the AC component (noise) of a neutron chamber signal rather than a usually used DC component. The Campbell theorem, originally discovered to describe noise behaviour of valves, explains that the root mean square of the AC component of the chamber signal is proportional to the neutron flux (reactor power). The quadratic dependence of the reactor power on the root mean square value usually permits to accomplish the whole current power range of the neutron flux measurement by only one channel. Further advantage of the Campbell technique is that large pulses of the response to neutrons are favoured over small pulses of the response to gamma rays in the ratio of their mean square charge transfer and thus, the Campbell technique provides an excellent gamma rays discrimination in the current operational range of a neutron chamber. The neutron flux measurement channel using state of the art components was designed and put into operation. Its linearity, accuracy, dynamic range, time response and gamma discrimination were tested on the VR-1 nuclear reactor in Prague, and behaviour under high neutron flux (accident conditions) was tested on the TRIGA nuclear reactor in Vienna. (author)

  11. The Open Flux Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, J. A.; Caplan, R. M.; Downs, C.; Riley, P.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Henney, C. J.; Arge, C. N.; Liu, Y.; Derosa, M. L.; Yeates, A.; Owens, M. J.

    2017-10-01

    The heliospheric magnetic field is of pivotal importance in solar and space physics. The field is rooted in the Sun’s photosphere, where it has been observed for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full-disk magnetograms are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) the open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes (CHs) observed in emission and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. In this study, we calculate both magnetohydrodynamic and potential field source surface solutions using 14 different magnetic maps produced from five different types of observatory magnetograms, for the time period surrounding 2010 July. We have found that for all of the model/map combinations, models that have CH areas close to observations underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match the interplanetary flux, the modeled open field regions are larger than CHs observed in EUV emission. In an alternative approach, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining automatically detected CHs for Carrington rotation 2098 with observatory synoptic magnetic maps. This approach also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. Our results imply that either typical observatory maps underestimate the Sun’s magnetic flux, or a significant portion of the open magnetic flux is not rooted in regions that are obviously dark in EUV and X-ray emission.

  12. The Open Flux Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linker, J. A.; Caplan, R. M.; Downs, C.; Riley, P.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R. [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Henney, C. J. [Air Force Research Lab/Space Vehicles Directorate, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Arge, C. N. [Science and Exploration Directorate, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Liu, Y. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Derosa, M. L. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street B/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Yeates, A. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Owens, M. J., E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com [Space and Atmospheric Electricity Group, Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Earley Gate, P.O. Box 243, Reading RG6 6BB (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-10

    The heliospheric magnetic field is of pivotal importance in solar and space physics. The field is rooted in the Sun’s photosphere, where it has been observed for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full-disk magnetograms are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) the open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes (CHs) observed in emission and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. In this study, we calculate both magnetohydrodynamic and potential field source surface solutions using 14 different magnetic maps produced from five different types of observatory magnetograms, for the time period surrounding 2010 July. We have found that for all of the model/map combinations, models that have CH areas close to observations underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match the interplanetary flux, the modeled open field regions are larger than CHs observed in EUV emission. In an alternative approach, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining automatically detected CHs for Carrington rotation 2098 with observatory synoptic magnetic maps. This approach also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. Our results imply that either typical observatory maps underestimate the Sun’s magnetic flux, or a significant portion of the open magnetic flux is not rooted in regions that are obviously dark in EUV and X-ray emission.

  13. A new disjunct eddy-covariance system for BVOC flux measurements - validation on CO2 and H2O fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghi, R.; Durand, P.; Jambert, C.; Jarnot, C.; Delon, C.; Serça, D.; Striebig, N.; Ferlicoq, M.; Keravec, P.

    2012-12-01

    The disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) method is an interesting alternative to the conventional eddy covariance (EC) method because it allows the estimation of turbulent fluxes of species for which fast sensors are not available. We have developed and validated a new disjunct sampling system (called MEDEE). This system is built with chemically inert materials. Air samples are taken quickly and alternately in two cylindrical reservoirs, the internal pressures of which are regulated by a moving piston. The MEDEE system was designed to be operated either on the ground or aboard an aircraft. It is also compatible with most analysers since it transfers the air samples at a regulated pressure. To validate the system, DEC and EC measurements of CO2 and latent heat fluxes were performed concurrently during a field campaign. EC fluxes were first compared to simulated DEC (SDEC) fluxes and then to actual DEC fluxes. Both the simulated and actual DEC fluxes showed a good agreement with EC fluxes in terms of correlation. The determination coefficients (R2) were 0.93 and 0.91 for DEC and SDEC latent heat fluxes, respectively. For DEC and SDEC CO2 fluxes R2 was 0.69 in both cases. The conditions of low fluxes experienced during the campaign impaired the comparison of the different techniques especially for CO2 flux measurements. Linear regression analysis showed an 14% underestimation of DEC fluxes for both CO2 and latent heat compared to EC fluxes. A first field campaign, focusing on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, was carried out to measure isoprene fluxes above a downy oak (Quercus Pubescens) forest in the south-east of France. The measured standard emission rate was in the lower range of reported values in earlier studies. Further analysis will be conducted through ground-based and airborne campaigns in the coming years.

  14. A relativistic radiation transfer benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munier, A.

    1988-01-01

    We use the integral form of the radiation transfer equation in an one dimensional slab to determine the time-dependent propagation of the radiation energy, flux and pressure in a collisionless homogeneous medium. First order v/c relativistic terms are included and the solution is given in the fluid frame and the laboratory frame

  15. Advances in heat transfer enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Sujoy Kumar; Sundén, Bengt; Wu, Zan

    2016-01-01

    This Brief addresses the phenomena of heat transfer enhancement. A companion edition in the SpringerBrief Subseries on Thermal Engineering and Applied Science to three other monographs including “Critical Heat Flux in Flow Boiling in Microchannels,” this volume is idea for professionals, researchers, and graduate students concerned with electronic cooling.

  16. Meromorphic flux compactification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damian, Cesar [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Universidad de Guanajuato,Carretera Salamanca-Valle de Santiago Km 3.5+1.8 Comunidad de Palo Blanco,Salamanca (Mexico); Loaiza-Brito, Oscar [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Guanajuato,Loma del Bosque No. 103 Col. Lomas del Campestre C.P 37150 León, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2017-04-26

    We present exact solutions of four-dimensional Einstein’s equations related to Minkoswki vacuum constructed from Type IIB string theory with non-trivial fluxes. Following https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)187; https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)188 we study a non-trivial flux compactification on a fibered product by a four-dimensional torus and a two-dimensional sphere punctured by 5- and 7-branes. By considering only 3-form fluxes and the dilaton, as functions on the internal sphere coordinates, we show that these solutions correspond to a family of supersymmetric solutions constructed by the use of G-theory. Meromorphicity on functions constructed in terms of fluxes and warping factors guarantees that flux and 5-brane contributions to the scalar curvature vanish while fulfilling stringent constraints as tadpole cancelation and Bianchi identities. Different Einstein’s solutions are shown to be related by U-dualities. We present three supersymmetric non-trivial Minkowski vacuum solutions and compute the corresponding soft terms. We also construct a non-supersymmetric solution and study its stability.

  17. Meromorphic flux compactification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damian, Cesar; Loaiza-Brito, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    We present exact solutions of four-dimensional Einstein’s equations related to Minkoswki vacuum constructed from Type IIB string theory with non-trivial fluxes. Following https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)187; https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)188 we study a non-trivial flux compactification on a fibered product by a four-dimensional torus and a two-dimensional sphere punctured by 5- and 7-branes. By considering only 3-form fluxes and the dilaton, as functions on the internal sphere coordinates, we show that these solutions correspond to a family of supersymmetric solutions constructed by the use of G-theory. Meromorphicity on functions constructed in terms of fluxes and warping factors guarantees that flux and 5-brane contributions to the scalar curvature vanish while fulfilling stringent constraints as tadpole cancelation and Bianchi identities. Different Einstein’s solutions are shown to be related by U-dualities. We present three supersymmetric non-trivial Minkowski vacuum solutions and compute the corresponding soft terms. We also construct a non-supersymmetric solution and study its stability.

  18. Flux Pinning in Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  19. Dynamic SEP event probability forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Ling, A.

    2015-10-01

    The forecasting of solar energetic particle (SEP) event probabilities at Earth has been based primarily on the estimates of magnetic free energy in active regions and on the observations of peak fluxes and fluences of large (≥ M2) solar X-ray flares. These forecasts are typically issued for the next 24 h or with no definite expiration time, which can be deficient for time-critical operations when no SEP event appears following a large X-ray flare. It is therefore important to decrease the event probability forecast with time as a SEP event fails to appear. We use the NOAA listing of major (≥10 pfu) SEP events from 1976 to 2014 to plot the delay times from X-ray peaks to SEP threshold onsets as a function of solar source longitude. An algorithm is derived to decrease the SEP event probabilities with time when no event is observed to reach the 10 pfu threshold. In addition, we use known SEP event size distributions to modify probability forecasts when SEP intensity increases occur below the 10 pfu event threshold. An algorithm to provide a dynamic SEP event forecast, Pd, for both situations of SEP intensities following a large flare is derived.

  20. Transfer anisotropy in a turbulent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychenkov, V.Y.; Gradov, O.M.; Silin, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    We formulate a theory for transfer phenomena in a plasma with developed ion-sound turbulence. A transfer anisotropy effect caused by a temperature gradient is revealed. The corresponding fluxes transverse to the effective force vector (1) which generates the turbulence turn out to be considerably larger than the longitudinal fluxes in a plasma with a relatively small degree of nonisothermality. For a strongly nonisothermal plasma a suppression of the transverse fluxes takes place and corresponds to a growth of the thermal insulation of the current-carrying plasma filaments

  1. Transient heat transfer characteristics of liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Osami

    1976-01-01

    The transient heat transfer characteristics of liquid helium are investigated. The critical burnout heat fluxes for pulsive heating are measured, and empirical relations between the critical burnout heat flux and the length of the heat pulse are given. The burnout is detected by observing the super-to-normal transition of the temperature sensor which is a thin lead film prepared on the heated surface by vacuum evaporation. The mechanism of boiling heat transfer for pulsive heating is discussed, and theoretical relations between the critical burnout heat flux and the length of the heat pulse are derived. The empirical data satisfy the theoretical relations fairly well. (auth.)

  2. A finite element calculation of flux pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    A flux pump is not only a fascinating example of the power of Faraday’s concept of flux lines, but also an attractive way of powering superconducting magnets without large electronic power supplies. However it is not possible to do this in HTS by driving a part of the superconductor normal, it must be done by exceeding the local critical density. The picture of a magnet pulling flux lines through the material is attractive, but as there is no direct contact between flux lines in the magnet and vortices, unless the gap between them is comparable to the coherence length, the process must be explicable in terms of classical electromagnetism and a nonlinear V-I characteristic. In this paper a simple 2D model of a flux pump is used to determine the pumping behaviour from first principles and the geometry. It is analysed with finite element software using the A formulation and FlexPDE. A thin magnet is passed across one or more superconductors connected to a load, which is a large rectangular loop. This means that the self and mutual inductances can be calculated explicitly. A wide strip, a narrow strip and two conductors are considered. Also an analytic circuit model is analysed. In all cases the critical state model is used, so the flux flow resistivity and dynamic resistivity are not directly involved, although an effective resistivity appears when J c is exceeded. In most of the cases considered here is a large gap between the theory and the experiments. In particular the maximum flux transferred to the load area is always less than the flux of the magnet. Also once the threshold needed for pumping is exceeded the flux in the load saturates within a few cycles. However the analytic circuit model allows a simple modification to allow for the large reduction in I c when the magnet is over a conductor. This not only changes the direction of the pumped flux but leads to much more effective pumping.

  3. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Yasushi; Mitsubori, Minehisa; Ohashi, Kazunori.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a neutron flux monitoring device for preventing occurrence of erroneous reactor scram caused by the elevation of the indication of a start region monitor (SRM) due to a factor different from actual increase of neutron fluxes. Namely, judgement based on measured values obtained by a pulse counting method and a judgment based on measured values obtained by a Cambel method are combined. A logic of switching neutron flux measuring method to be used for monitoring, namely, switching to an intermediate region when both of the judgements are valid is adopted. Then, even if the indication value is elevated based on the Cambel method with no increase of the counter rate in a neutron source region, the switching to the intermediate region is not conducted. As a result, erroneous reactor scram such as 'shorter reactor period' can be avoided. (I.S.)

  4. Heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Heat transfer takes place between material systems as a result of a temperature difference. The transmission process involves energy conversions governed by the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The heat transfer proceeds from a high-temperature region to a low-temperature region, and because of the finite thermal potential, there is an increase in entropy. Thermodynamics, however, is concerned with equilibrium states, which includes thermal equilibrium, irrespective of the time necessary to attain these equilibrium states. But heat transfer is a result of thermal nonequilibrium conditions, therefore, the laws of thermodynamics alone cannot describe completely the heat transfer process. In practice, most engineering problems are concerned with the rate of heat transfer rather than the quantity of heat being transferred. Resort then is directed to the particular laws governing the transfer of heat. There are three distinct modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Although these modes are discussed separately, all three types may occur simultaneously

  5. Turbulent Mixing and Vertical Heat Transfer in the Surface Mixed Layer of the Arctic Ocean: Implication of a Cross-Pycnocline High-Temperature Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yusuke; Takeda, Hiroki

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on the mixing processes in the vicinity of surface mixed layer (SML) of the Arctic Ocean. Turbulence activity and vertical heat transfer are quantitatively characterized in the Northwind Abyssal Plain, based on the RV Mirai Arctic cruise, during the transition from late summer to early winter 2014. During the cruise, noticeable storm events were observed, which came over the ship's location and contributed to the deepening of the SML. According to the ship-based microstructure observation, within the SML, the strong wind events produced enhanced dissipation rates of turbulent kinetic energy in the order of magnitude of ɛ = 10-6-10-4W kg-1. On thermal variance dissipation rate, χ increases toward the base of SML, reaching O(10-7) K2 s-1, resulting in vertical heat flux of O(10) W m-2. During the occasional energetic mixing events, the near-surface warm water was transferred downward and penetrated through the SML base, creating a cross-pycnocline high-temperature anomaly (CPHTA) at approximately 20-30 m depth. Near CPHTA, the vertical heat flux was anomalously magnified to O(10-100) W m-2. Following the fixed-point observation, in the regions of marginal and thick ice zones, the SML heat content was monitored using an autonomous drifting buoy, UpTempO. During most of the ice-covered period, the ocean-to-ice turbulent heat flux was dominant, rather than the diapycnal heat transfer across the SML bottom interface.

  6. Flashed-feed VMD configuration as a novel method for eliminating temperature polarization effect and enhancing water vapor flux

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem; Alpatova, Alla; Lee, Jung Gil; Francis, Lijo; Ghaffour, NorEddine

    2018-01-01

    The coupling of heat and mass transfer in membrane distillation (MD) process makes enhancing water vapor flux and determining MD membrane mass transfer coefficient (MTC) fairly challenging due to the development of temperature gradient near

  7. Effects of quartz on crystallization behavior of mold fluxes and microstructural characteristics of flux film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Liu; Xiuli, Han; Mingduo, Li; Di, Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Mold fluxes are mainly prepared using cement clinker, quartz, wollastonite, borax, fluorite, soda ash and other mineral materials. Quartz, as one of the most common and essential materials, was chosen for this study to analyze itseffects on crystallization temperature, critical cooling rate, crystal incubation time, crystallization ratio and phases of flux film. We used the research methods of process mineralogy with the application of the single hot thermocouple technique, heat flux simulator, polarizing microscope, X-ray diffraction, etc. Results: By increasing the quartz content from 16 mass% to 24 mass%, the crystallization temperature, critical cooling rate and crystallization ratio of flux film decreased, and the crystal incubation time was extended. Meanwhile, the mineralogical structure of the flux film changed, with a large amount of wollastonite precipitation and a significant decrease in the cuspidine content until it reached zero. This showed a steady decline in the heat transfer control capacity of the flux film. The reason for the results above is that, by increasing the quartz content, the silicon-oxygen tetrahedron network structure promoted a rise in viscosity and restrained ion migration, inhibiting crystal nucleation and growth, leading to the weakening of the crystallization and a decline in the crystallization ratio.

  8. Atmospheric neutrino fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, M.; Kasahara, K.; Hidaka, K.; Midorikawa, S.

    1990-02-01

    A detailed Monte Carlo simulation of neutrino fluxes of atmospheric origin is made taking into account the muon polarization effect on neutrinos from muon decay. We calculate the fluxes with energies above 3 MeV for future experiments. There still remains a significant discrepancy between the calculated (ν e +antiν e )/(ν μ +antiν μ ) ratio and that observed by the Kamiokande group. However, the ratio evaluated at the Frejus site shows a good agreement with the data. (author)

  9. Flux-limited diffusion coefficients in reactor physics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pounders, J.; Rahnema, F.; Szilard, R.

    2007-01-01

    Flux-limited diffusion theory has been successfully applied to problems in radiative transfer and radiation hydrodynamics, but its relevance to reactor physics has not yet been explored. The current investigation compares the performance of a flux-limited diffusion coefficient against the traditionally defined transport cross section. A one-dimensional BWR benchmark problem is examined at both the assembly and full-core level with varying degrees of heterogeneity. (authors)

  10. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Against a background of rather mixed evidence about transfer pricing practices in multinational enterprises (MNEs) and varying attitudes on the part of tax authorities, this paper explores how multiple aims in transfer pricing can be pursued across four different transfer pricing regimes. A MNE h...

  11. HEAT TRANSFER METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambill, W.R.; Greene, N.D.

    1960-08-30

    A method is given for increasing burn-out heat fluxes under nucleate boiling conditions in heat exchanger tubes without incurring an increase in pumping power requirements. This increase is achieved by utilizing a spinning flow having a rotational velocity sufficient to produce a centrifugal acceleration of at least 10,000 g at the tube wall. At this acceleration the heat-transfer rate at burn out is nearly twice the rate which can be achieved in a similar tube utilizing axial flow at the same pumping power. At higher accelerations the improvement over axial flow is greater, and heat fluxes in excess of 50 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr/sq ft can be achieved.

  12. Experimental study of heat transfer for parallel flow in tube bundles with constant heat flux and for medium Prandtl numbers; Etude experimentale du transfert de chaleur dans des faisceaux tubulaires en ecoulement parallele pour une densite de flux thermique constante dans le domaine des nombres de Prandtl moyens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91 - Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-01

    The heat transfer parameters were determined experimentally in electrically heated tube bundles for turbulent flow parallel to the axis. The tubes were arranged in a pattern of equilateral triangles. The ratios of the distance between the axes of the tubes to their external diameter were 1.60 and 1.25 in the two test sections studied. The experiments were carried out with distilled water and with a mixture of 60 per cent ethylene glycol and 40 per cent water. The values obtained for the Prandtl numbers in this way fell within the range from 2.3 to 18. The Reynolds numbers were varied between 10{sup 4} and 2.10{sup 5}. The relation between the mean heat transfer coefficients and the friction factor in the tube bundles was found from the experiments as: Nu = [Re Pr {zeta}/8]/[1+{radical}({zeta}/8) 8.8 (Pr-1.3) Pr{sup -0.22}]. The experimentally determined mean Nusselt numbers were also given by the following function: Nu = (0.0122 + 0.00245 p/d) Re{sup 0.86} Pr{sup 0.4}, with a maximum deviation of {+-}4 per cent. For certain local Nusselt numbers, deviations of up to 20 per cent with respect to the relations given were observed. (author) [French] Dans des faisceaux tubulaires a chauffage electrique parcourus par un ecoulement turbulent parallele a l'axe, on a determine experimentalement les parametres du transfert de chaleur. Les centres des sections droites des tubes etaient des sommets de triangles equilateraux. Les rapports de la distance a l'axe des tubes et leur diametre exterieur dans les deux veines de mesure etudiees etaient de 1.60 et 1.25. Des essais furent effectues avec de l'eau distillee ainsi qu'avec un melange de 60 pour cent de glycol ethylenique et 40 pour cent d'eau. Les valeurs des nombres de Prandtl obtenues ainsi etaient situees entre 2.3 a 18. On a fait varier les nombres de Reynolds entre 10{sup 4} et 2.10{sup 5}. La relation entre les nombres caracteristiques de transfert de chaleur moyens et la perte de charge dans les faisceaux tabulaires

  13. Radiation flux measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corte, E.; Maitra, P.

    1977-01-01

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs a differential pair of transistors, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the differential pair produce a signal representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a signal representing the true root mean square logarithmic output. 3 claims, 2 figures

  14. Soluble organic nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Qualls; Bruce L. Haines; Wayne Swank

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives in this study were (i) compare fluxes of the dissolved organic nutrients dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in a clearcut area and an adjacent mature reference area. (ii) determine whether concentrations of dissolved organic nutrients or inorganic nutrients were greater in clearcut areas than in reference areas,...

  15. Flux vacua and supermanifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Pietro Antonio [CERN, Theory Unit, CH-1211 Geneva, 23 (Switzerland); Marescotti, Matteo [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Torino, Via Giuria 1, I-10125, Turin (Italy)

    2007-01-15

    As been recently pointed out, physically relevant models derived from string theory require the presence of non-vanishing form fluxes besides the usual geometrical constraints. In the case of NS-NS fluxes, the Generalized Complex Geometry encodes these informations in a beautiful geometrical structure. On the other hand, the R-R fluxes call for supergeometry as the underlying mathematical framework. In this context, we analyze the possibility of constructing interesting supermanifolds recasting the geometrical data and RR fluxes. To characterize these supermanifolds we have been guided by the fact topological strings on supermanifolds require the super-Ricci flatness of the target space. This can be achieved by adding to a given bosonic manifold enough anticommuting coordinates and new constraints on the bosonic sub-manifold. We study these constraints at the linear and non-linear level for a pure geometrical setting and in the presence of p-form field strengths. We find that certain spaces admit several super-extensions and we give a parameterization in a simple case of d bosonic coordinates and two fermionic coordinates. In addition, we comment on the role of the RR field in the construction of the super-metric. We give several examples based on supergroup manifolds and coset supermanifolds.

  16. Flux vacua and supermanifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Pietro Antonio; Marescotti, Matteo

    2007-01-01

    As been recently pointed out, physically relevant models derived from string theory require the presence of non-vanishing form fluxes besides the usual geometrical constraints. In the case of NS-NS fluxes, the Generalized Complex Geometry encodes these informations in a beautiful geometrical structure. On the other hand, the R-R fluxes call for supergeometry as the underlying mathematical framework. In this context, we analyze the possibility of constructing interesting supermanifolds recasting the geometrical data and RR fluxes. To characterize these supermanifolds we have been guided by the fact topological strings on supermanifolds require the super-Ricci flatness of the target space. This can be achieved by adding to a given bosonic manifold enough anticommuting coordinates and new constraints on the bosonic sub-manifold. We study these constraints at the linear and non-linear level for a pure geometrical setting and in the presence of p-form field strengths. We find that certain spaces admit several super-extensions and we give a parameterization in a simple case of d bosonic coordinates and two fermionic coordinates. In addition, we comment on the role of the RR field in the construction of the super-metric. We give several examples based on supergroup manifolds and coset supermanifolds

  17. Atmospheric neutrino fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The atmospheric neutrino fluxes, which are responsible for the main background in proton decay experiments, have been calculated by two independent methods. There are discrepancies between the two sets of results regarding latitude effects and up-down asymmetries, especially for neutrino energies Esub(ν) < 1 GeV. (author)

  18. Flux scaling: Ultimate regime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Flux scaling: Ultimate regime. With the Nusselt number and the mixing length scales, we get the Nusselt number and Reynolds number (w'd/ν) scalings: and or. and. scaling expected to occur at extremely high Ra Rayleigh-Benard convection. Get the ultimate regime ...

  19. Tunable heat transfer with smart nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardin, Michele; Comitani, Federico; Vailati, Alberto

    2012-06-01

    Strongly thermophilic nanofluids are able to transfer either small or large quantities of heat when subjected to a stable temperature difference. We investigate the bistability diagram of the heat transferred by this class of nanofluids. We show that bistability can be exploited to obtain a controlled switching between a conductive and a convective regime of heat transfer, so as to achieve a controlled modulation of the heat flux.

  20. Boiling Heat Transfer to Halogenated Hydrocarbon Refrigerants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Suguru; Fujita, Yasunobu

    The current state of knowledge on heat transfer to boiling refrigerants (halogenated hydrocarbons) in a pool and flowing inside a horizontal tube is reviewed with an emphasis on information relevant to the design of refrigerant evaporators, and some recommendations are made for future research. The review covers two-phase flow pattern, heat transfer characteristics, correlation of heat transfer coefficient, influence of oil, heat transfer augmentation, boiling from tube-bundle, influence of return bend, burnout heat flux, film boiling, dryout and post-dryout heat transfer.

  1. Vertical divergence of fogwater fluxes above a spruce forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, R.; Eugster, W.; Wrzesinsky, T.; Klemm, O.

    Two almost identical eddy covariance measurement setups were used to measure the fogwater fluxes to a forest ecosystem in the "Fichtelgebirge" mountains (Waldstein research site, 786 m a.s.l.) in Germany. During the first experiment, an intercomparison was carried out with both setups running simultaneously at the same measuring height on a meteorological tower, 12.5 m above the forest canopy. The results confirmed a close agreement of the turbulent fluxes between the two setups, and allowed to intercalibrate liquid water content (LWC) and gravitational fluxes. During the second experiment, the setups were mounted at a height of 12.5 and 3 m above the canopy, respectively. For the 22 fog events, a persistent negative flux divergence was observed with a greater downward flux at the upper level. To extrapolate the turbulent liquid water fluxes measured at height z to the canopy of height hc, a conversion factor 1/[1+0.116( z- hc)] was determined. For the fluxes of nonvolatile ions, no such correction is necessary since the net evaporation of the fog droplets appears to be the primary cause of the vertical flux divergence. Although the net evaporation reduces the liquid water flux reaching the canopy, it is not expected to change the absolute amount of ions dissolved in fogwater.

  2. Design of a flux buffer based on the flux shuttle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenson, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the design considerations for a flux buffer based on the flux-shuttle concept. Particular attention is given to the issues of flux popping, stability of operation and saturation levels for a large input. Modulation techniques used in order to minimize 1/f noise, in addition to offsets are also analyzed. Advantages over conventional approaches using a SQUID for a flux buffer are discussed. Results of computer simulations are presented

  3. A Unified Model for Tidal Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lixin; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Roth, Nathaniel; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Miller, M. Coleman

    2018-06-01

    In the past few years wide-field optical and UV transient surveys and X-ray telescopes have allowed us to identify a few dozen candidate tidal disruption events (TDEs). While in theory the physical processes in TDEs are ubiquitous, a few distinct classes of TDEs have been observed. Some TDEs radiate mainly in NUV/optical, while others produce prominent X-rays. Moreover, relativistic jets have been observed in only a handful of TDEs. This diversity might be related to the details of the super-Eddington accretion and emission physics relevant to TDE disks. In this Letter, we utilize novel three-dimensional general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamics simulations to study the super-Eddington compact disk phase expected in TDEs. Consistent with previous studies, geometrically thick disks, wide-angle optically thick fast outflows, and relativistic jets are produced. The outflow density and velocity depend sensitively on the inclination angle, and hence so does the reprocessing of emission produced from the inner disk. We then use Monte Carlo radiative transfer to calculate the reprocessed spectra and find that that the observed ratio of optical to X-ray fluxes increases with increasing inclination angle. This naturally leads to a unified model for different classes of TDEs in which the spectral properties of the TDE depend mainly on the viewing angle of the observer with respect to the orientation of the disk.

  4. Flux Limiter Lattice Boltzmann for Compressible Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Li Yingjun; Xu Aiguo; Zhang Guangcai

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new flux limiter scheme with the splitting technique is successfully incorporated into a multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for shacked compressible flows. The proposed flux limiter scheme is efficient in decreasing the artificial oscillations and numerical diffusion around the interface. Due to the kinetic nature, some interface problems being difficult to handle at the macroscopic level can be modeled more naturally through the LB method. Numerical simulations for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability show that with the new model the computed interfaces are smoother and more consistent with physical analysis. The growth rates of bubble and spike present a satisfying agreement with the theoretical predictions and other numerical simulations. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  5. Lobotomy of flux compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe [Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, University of Uppsala,Box 803, SE-751 08 Uppsala (Sweden); Guarino, Adolfo [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics,Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Roest, Diederik [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on T{sup 6} with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification allowing for critical points. It corresponds to a type IIA background given by a product of two 3-tori with SO(3) twists and results in a unique theory (gauging) with a non-semisimple gauge algebra. Besides the known four AdS solutions surviving the orientifold projection to N=4 induced by O6-planes, this theory contains a novel AdS solution that requires non-trivial orientifold-odd fluxes, hence being a genuine critical point of the N=8 theory.

  6. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Carsten; Rossing, Christian Plesner

    trade internally as the units have to decide what prices should be paid for such inter-unit transfers. One important challenge is to uncover the consequences that different transfer prices have on the willingness in the organizational units to coordinate activities and trade internally. At the same time...... the determination of transfer price will affect the size of the profit or loss in the organizational units and thus have an impact on the evaluation of managers‟ performance. In some instances the determination of transfer prices may lead to a disagreement between coordination of the organizational units...

  7. Physics of magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Priest, E. R.; Lee, L. C.

    The present work encompasses papers on the structure, waves, and instabilities of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs), photospheric flux tubes (PFTs), the structure and heating of coronal loops, solar prominences, coronal mass ejections and magnetic clouds, flux ropes in planetary ionospheres, the magnetopause, magnetospheric field-aligned currents and flux tubes, and the magnetotail. Attention is given to the equilibrium of MFRs, resistive instability, magnetic reconnection and turbulence in current sheets, dynamical effects and energy transport in intense flux tubes, waves in solar PFTs, twisted flux ropes in the solar corona, an electrodynamical model of solar flares, filament cooling and condensation in a sheared magnetic field, the magnetopause, the generation of twisted MFRs during magnetic reconnection, ionospheric flux ropes above the South Pole, substorms and MFR structures, evidence for flux ropes in the earth magnetotail, and MFRs in 3D MHD simulations.

  8. Heat transfer study under supercritical pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Tohru; Yoshida, Suguru; Mori, Hideo; Morooka, Shinichi; Komita, Hideo; Nishida, Kouji

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were performed on heat transfer and pressure drop of a supercritical pressure fluid flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube of a small diameter, using HCFC22 as a test fluid. Following results were obtained. (1) Characteristics of the heat transfer are similar to those for the tubes of large diameter. (2) The effect of tube diameter on the heat transfer was seen for a 'normal heat transfer, but not for a 'deteriorated' heat transfer. (3) The limit heat flux for the occurrence of deterioration in heat transfer becomes larger with smaller diameter tube. (4) The Watts and Chou correlation has the best prediction performance for the present data in the 'normal' heat transfer region. (5) Frictional pressure drop becomes smaller than that for an isothermal flow in the region near the pseudocritical point, and this reduction was more remarkable for the deteriorated' heat transfer. (author)

  9. Visualisation of heat transfer in unsteady laminar flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speetjens, M.F.M.; Steenhoven, van A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Heat transfer in fluid flows traditionally is examined in terms of temperature fields and heat-transfer coefficients. However, heat transfer may alternatively be considered as the transport of thermal energy by the total convective-conductive heat flux in a way analogous to the transport of fluid by

  10. Visualisation of heat transfer in 3D unsteady flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speetjens, M.F.M.; Steenhoven, van A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Heat transfer in fluid flows traditionally is examined in terms oftemperature field and heat-transfer coefficients at non-adiabaticwalls. However, heat transfer may alternatively be considered asthe transport of thermal energy by the total convective-conductiveheat flux in a way analogous to the

  11. Determination of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes from atmospheric neutrino data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Maltoni, M.; Rojo, J.

    2006-06-01

    The precise knowledge of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes is a key ingredient in the interpretation of the results from any atmospheric neutrino experiment. In the standard data analysis, these fluxes are theoretical inputs obtained from sophisticated numerical calculations based on the convolution of the primary cosmic ray spectrum with the expected yield of neutrinos per incident cosmic ray. In this work we present an alternative approach to the determination of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes based on the direct extraction from the experimental data on neutrino event rates. The extraction is achieved by means of a combination of artificial neural networks as interpolants and Monte Carlo methods for faithful error estimation. (author)

  12. Determination of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes from atmospheric neutrino data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, Concepcion; Maltoni, Michele; Rojo, Joan

    2006-01-01

    The precise knowledge of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes is a key ingredient in the interpretation of the results from any atmospheric neutrino experiment. In the standard data analysis, these fluxes are theoretical inputs obtained from sophisticated numerical calculations based on the convolution of the primary cosmic ray spectrum with the expected yield of neutrinos per incident cosmic ray. In this work we present an alternative approach to the determination of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes based on the direct extraction from the experimental data on neutrino event rates. The extraction is achieved by means of a combination of artificial neural networks as interpolants and Monte Carlo methods for faithful error estimation

  13. CO2 fluxes near a forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, Monique Y.; Zhang, Gensheng

    2008-01-01

    In contrast with recent advances on the dynamics of the flow at a forest edge, few studies have considered its role on scalar transport and, in particular, on CO2 transfer. The present study addresses the influence of the abrupt roughness change on forest atmosphere CO2 exchange and contrasts...... as a function of both sources/sinks distribution and the vertical structure of the canopy. Results suggest that the ground source plays a major role in the formation of wave-like vertical CO2 flux behavior downwind of a forest edge, despite the fact that the contribution of foliage sources/sinks changes...

  14. Comparison between Evapotranspiration Fluxes Assessment Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casola, A.; Longobardi, A.; Villani, P.

    2009-11-01

    Knowledge of hydrological processes acting in the water balance is determinant for a rational water resources management plan. Among these, the water losses as vapour, in the form of evapotranspiration, play an important role in the water balance and the heat transfers between the land surface and the atmosphere. Mass and energy interactions between soil, atmosphere and vegetation, in fact, influence all hydrological processes modificating rainfall interception, infiltration, evapotraspiration, surface runoff and groundwater recharge.A numbers of methods have been developed in scientific literature for modelling evapotranspiration. They can be divided in three main groups: i) traditional meteorological models, ii) energy fluxes balance models, considering interaction between vegetation and the atmosphere, and iii) remote sensing based models. The present analysis preliminary performs a study of fluxes directions and an evaluation of energy balance closure in a typical Mediterranean short vegetation area, using data series recorded from an eddy covariance station, located in the Campania region, Southern Italy. The analysis was performed on different seasons of the year with the aim to assess climatic forcing features impact on fluxes balance, to evaluate the smaller imbalance and to highlight influencing factors and sampling errors on balance closure. The present study also concerns evapotranspiration fluxes assessment at the point scale. Evapotranspiration is evaluated both from empirical relationships (Penmann-Montheit, Penmann F AO, Prestley&Taylor) calibrated with measured energy fluxes at mentioned experimental site, and from measured latent heat data scaled by the latent heat of vaporization. These results are compared with traditional and reliable well known models at the plot scale (Coutagne, Turc, Thorthwaite).

  15. Event Index - a LHCb Event Search System

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00392208; Kazeev, Nikita; Redkin, Artem

    2015-12-23

    LHC experiments generate up to $10^{12}$ events per year. This paper describes Event Index - an event search system. Event Index's primary function is quickly selecting subsets of events from a combination of conditions, such as the estimated decay channel or stripping lines output. Event Index is essentially Apache Lucene optimized for read-only indexes distributed over independent shards on independent nodes.

  16. Critical heat flux in flow boiling in microchannels

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Sujoy Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This Brief concerns the important problem of critical heat flux in flow boiling in microchannels. A companion edition in the SpringerBrief Subseries on Thermal Engineering and Applied Science to “Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Flow Boiling in Microchannels,” by the same author team, this volume is idea for professionals, researchers, and graduate students concerned with electronic cooling.

  17. Study on coal char ignition by radiant heat flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkikh, A. G.; Slyusarskiy, K. V.

    2017-11-01

    The study on coal char ignition by CO2-continuous laser was carried out. The coal char samples of T-grade bituminous coal and 2B-grade lignite were studied via CO2-laser ignition setup. Ignition delay times were determined at ambient condition in heat flux density range 90-200 W/cm2. The average ignition delay time value for lignite samples were 2 times lower while this difference is larger in high heat flux region and lower in low heat flux region. The kinetic constants for overall oxidation reaction were determined using analytic solution of simplified one-dimensional heat transfer equation with radiant heat transfer boundary condition. The activation energy for lignite char was found to be less than it is for bituminous coal char by approximately 20 %.

  18. Helium cosmic ray flux measurements at Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kerry; Pinsky, Lawrence; Andersen, Vic; Zeitlin, Cary; Cleghorn, Tim; Cucinotta, Frank; Saganti, Premkumar; Atwell, William; Turner, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The helium energy spectrum in Martian orbit has been observed by the MARIE charged particle spectrometer aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The orbital data were taken from March 13, 2002 to October 28, 2003, at which time a very intense Solar Particle Event caused a loss of communication between the instrument and the spacecraft. The silicon detector stack in MARIE is optimized for the detection of protons and helium in the energy range below 100MeV/n, which typically includes almost all of the flux during SPEs. This also makes MARIE an efficient detector for GCR helium in the energy range of 50-150MeV/n. We will present the first fully normalized flux results from MARIE, using helium ions in this energy range

  19. Helium cosmic ray flux measurements at Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kerry [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd. Houston, TX 77204 (United States)]. E-mail: ktlee@ems.jsc.nasa.gov; Pinsky, Lawrence [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd. Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Andersen, Vic [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd. Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Zeitlin, Cary [National Space Biomedical Research Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Cleghorn, Tim [NASA Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Road 1, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Cucinotta, Frank [NASA Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Road 1, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Saganti, Premkumar [Prairie View A and M University, P.O. Box 519, Prairie View, TX 77446-0519 (United States); Atwell, William [The Boeing Company, Houston, TX (United States); Turner, Ron [Advancing National Strategies and Enabling Results (ANSER), Arlington, Virginia (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The helium energy spectrum in Martian orbit has been observed by the MARIE charged particle spectrometer aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The orbital data were taken from March 13, 2002 to October 28, 2003, at which time a very intense Solar Particle Event caused a loss of communication between the instrument and the spacecraft. The silicon detector stack in MARIE is optimized for the detection of protons and helium in the energy range below 100MeV/n, which typically includes almost all of the flux during SPEs. This also makes MARIE an efficient detector for GCR helium in the energy range of 50-150MeV/n. We will present the first fully normalized flux results from MARIE, using helium ions in this energy range.

  20. Australian methane fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates are provided for the amount of methane emitted annually into the atmosphere in Australia for a variety of sources. The sources considered are coal mining, landfill, motor vehicles, natural gas suply system, rice paddies, bushfires, termites, wetland and animals. This assessment indicates that the major sources of methane are natural or agricultural in nature and therefore offer little scope for reduction. Nevertheless the remainder are not trival and reduction of these fluxes could play a significant part in any Australian action on the greenhouse problem. 19 refs., 7 tabs., 1 fig

  1. Simulating events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferretti, C; Bruzzone, L [Techint Italimpianti, Milan (Italy)

    2000-06-01

    The Petacalco Marine terminal on the Pacific coast in the harbour of Lazaro Carclenas (Michoacan) in Mexico, provides coal to the thermoelectric power plant at Pdte Plutarco Elias Calles in the port area. The plant is being converted from oil to burn coal to generate 2100 MW of power. The article describes the layout of the terminal and equipment employed in the unloading, coal stacking, coal handling areas and the receiving area at the power plant. The contractor Techint Italimpianti has developed a software system, MHATIS, for marine terminal management which is nearly complete. The discrete event simulator with its graphic interface provides a real-type decision support system for simulating changes to the terminal operations and evaluating impacts. The article describes how MHATIS is used. 7 figs.

  2. Event generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, D.; Gulminelli, F.; Lopez, O.; Vient, E.

    1998-01-01

    The results concerning the heavy ion collision simulations at Fermi energies by means of phenomenological models obtained in the last two years ar presented. The event generators are essentially following the phase of elaboration of analysis methods of data obtained by INDRA or NAUTILUS 4 π multidetectors. To identify and correctly quantify a phenomenon or a physical quantity it is necessary to verify by simulation the feasibility and validity of the analysis and also to estimate the bias introduced by the experimental filter. Many studies have shown this, for instance: the determination of the collision reaction plan for flow studies, determination of kinematical characteristics of the quasi-projectiles, and the excitation energy measurement stored in the hot nuclei. To Eugene, the currently utilised generator, several improvements were added: introduction of space-time correlations between the different products emitted in the decay of excited nuclei by calculating the trajectories of the particles in the final phase of the reaction; taking into account in the decay cascade of the discrete levels of the lighter fragments; the possibility of the schematically description of the explosion of the nucleus by simultaneous emission of multi-fragments. Thus, by comparing the calculations with the data relative to heavy systems studied with the NAUTILUS assembly it was possible to extract the time scales in the nuclear fragmentation. The utilisation of these event generators was extended to the analysis of INDRA data concerning the determination of the vaporization threshold in the collisions Ar + Ni and also the research of the expansion effects in the collisions Xe + Sn at 50 MeV/u

  3. "Transfer Shock" or "Transfer Ecstasy?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickens, John M.

    The alleged characteristic drop in grade point average (GPA) of transfer students and the subsequent rise in GPA was investigated in this study. No statistically significant difference was found in first term junior year GPA between junior college transfers and native Florida State University students after the variance accounted for by the…

  4. Maximum power flux of auroral kilometric radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.F.; Fainberg, J.

    1991-01-01

    The maximum auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) power flux observed by distant satellites has been increased by more than a factor of 10 from previously reported values. This increase has been achieved by a new data selection criterion and a new analysis of antenna spin modulated signals received by the radio astronomy instrument on ISEE 3. The method relies on selecting AKR events containing signals in the highest-frequency channel (1980, kHz), followed by a careful analysis that effectively increased the instrumental dynamic range by more than 20 dB by making use of the spacecraft antenna gain diagram during a spacecraft rotation. This analysis has allowed the separation of real signals from those created in the receiver by overloading. Many signals having the appearance of AKR harmonic signals were shown to be of spurious origin. During one event, however, real second harmonic AKR signals were detected even though the spacecraft was at a great distance (17 R E ) from Earth. During another event, when the spacecraft was at the orbital distance of the Moon and on the morning side of Earth, the power flux of fundamental AKR was greater than 3 x 10 -13 W m -2 Hz -1 at 360 kHz normalized to a radial distance r of 25 R E assuming the power falls off as r -2 . A comparison of these intense signal levels with the most intense source region values (obtained by ISIS 1 and Viking) suggests that multiple sources were observed by ISEE 3

  5. CHARITY EVENT

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    Fund raising Pakistan     Dear Colleagues, Following the monsoon rains that have caused devastating flooding in Pakistan, taken the lives of more than 1500 people, displaced 20 million and destroyed hundreds of thousands of homes, CERN Management and the Staff Association are organizing a collection to help the victims of what UN Secretary General, Ban Ki-moon, has described as a disaster worse than any he has witnessed before. The money collected will be transferred equally to Caritas (www.caritas.ch) and to the Swiss Labour Assistance (www.sah.ch) guaranteeing proper use of the funds. From today you can pay your donations into a special UBS account, marking “Pakistan flooding” as the reason for payment.   BIC:        UBSWCHZH80A IBAN:    CH85 0027 9279 HU10 6832 1 Account number: 279-HU106832.1 Account Holder: Association du personnel CERN, 1211 GENEVA 23   Mr Ban went on to sa...

  6. Neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Eiji; Tai, Ichiro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the measuring accuracy and the reponse time within an allowable range in accordance with the change of neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. Constitution: Neutron fluxes within a nuclear reactor pressure vessel are detected by detectors, converted into pulse signals and amplified in a range switching amplifier. The amplified signals are further converted through an A/D converter and digital signals from the converter are subjected to a square operation in an square operation circuit. The output from the circuit is inputted into an integration circuit to selectively accumulate the constant of 1/2n, 1 - 1/2n (n is a positive integer) respectively for two continuing signals to perform weighing. Then, the addition is carried out to calculate the integrated value and the addition number is changed by the chane in the number n to vary the integrating time. The integrated value is inputted into a control circuit to control the value of n so that the fluctuation and the calculation time for the integrated value are within a predetermined range and, at the same time, the gain of the range switching amplifier is controlled. (Seki, T.)

  7. Mesoscopic fluctuations in biharmonically driven flux qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrón, Alejandro; Domínguez, Daniel; Sánchez, María José

    2017-01-01

    We investigate flux qubits driven by a biharmonic magnetic signal, with a phase lag that acts as an effective time reversal broken parameter. The driving induced transition rate between the ground and the excited state of the flux qubit can be thought of as an effective transmittance, profiting from a direct analogy between interference effects at avoided level crossings and scattering events in disordered electronic systems. For time scales prior to full relaxation, but large compared to the decoherence time, this characteristic rate has been accessed experimentally by Gustavsson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 016603 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.016603 and its sensitivity with both the phase lag and the dc flux detuning explored. In this way, signatures of universal conductance fluctuationslike effects have been analyzed and compared with predictions from a phenomenological model that only accounts for decoherence, as a classical noise. Here we go beyond the classical noise model and solve the full dynamics of the driven flux qubit in contact with a quantum bath employing the Floquet-Born-Markov master equation. Within this formalism, the computed relaxation and decoherence rates turn out to be strongly dependent on both the phase lag and the dc flux detuning. Consequently, the associated pattern of fluctuations in the characteristic rates display important differences with those obtained within the mentioned phenomenological model. In particular, we demonstrate the weak localizationlike effect in the average values of the relaxation rate. Our predictions can be tested for accessible but longer time scales than the current experimental times.

  8. Fast nanoscale heat-flux modulation with phase-change materials

    OpenAIRE

    Van Zwol , Pieter; Joulain , Karl; Ben-Abdallah , Philippe; Greffet , Jean-Jacques; Chevrier , Joël

    2011-01-01

    International audience; We introduce a new concept for electrically controlled heat flux modulation. A flux contrast larger than 10 dB is expected with switching time on the order of tens of nanoseconds. Heat flux modulation is based on the interplay between radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale and phase change materials. Such large contrasts are not obtainable in solids, or in far field. As such this opens up new horizons for temperature modulation and actuation at the nanoscale.

  9. Events diary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    as Imperial College, the Royal Albert Hall, the Royal College of Art, the Natural History and Science Museums and the Royal Geographical Society. Under the heading `Shaping the future together' BA2000 will explore science, engineering and technology in their wider cultural context. Further information about this event on 6 - 12 September may be obtained from Sandra Koura, BA2000 Festival Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science, 23 Savile Row, London W1X 2NB (tel: 0171 973 3075, e-mail: sandra.koura@britassoc.org.uk ). Details of the creating SPARKS events may be obtained from creating.sparks@britassoc.org.uk or from the website www.britassoc.org.uk . Other events 3 - 7 July, Porto Alegre, Brazil VII Interamerican conference on physics education: The preparation of physicists and physics teachers in contemporary society. Info: IACPE7@if.ufrgs.br or cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar/iacpe/iacpei.htm 27 August - 1 September, Barcelona, Spain GIREP conference: Physics teacher education beyond 2000. Info: www.blues.uab.es/phyteb/index.html

  10. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR FLARES AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (≥1000 km s –1 ) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (α values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Å fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes ≥1 pr cm –2 s –1 sr –1 ) and (b) fast CMEs were ∼1.3-1.4 compared to ∼1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and ∼2 for the peak 1-8 Å fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of ∼0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  11. Methanol and other VOC fluxes from a Danish beech forest during late springtime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schade, Gunnar W.; Solomon, Sheena J.; Dellwik, Ebba

    2011-01-01

    In-canopy mixing ratio gradients and above-canopy fluxes of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using a commercial proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest in Denmark. Fluxes of methanol were bidirectional: Emission...

  12. Use of a PTR-MS for Multicomponent Flux Measurements over a Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dommen, J; Spirig, C [FAL Reckenholz (Switzerland); Neftel, A [FAL Reckenholz (Switzerland); Thielmann, A [MPI Mainz (Georgia)

    2004-03-01

    A proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer was used to determine fluxes of biogenically emitted organic compounds over a forest canopy with the eddy covariance method. It was shown that several compounds can be simultaneously measured at a frequency high enough to calculate their fluxes. (author)

  13. Station Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — ixed rail transit external system transfers for systems within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The modes of...

  14. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    On the base of technological opportunities and of the environmental target of the various sectors of energy system this paper intend to conjugate the opportunity/objective with economic and social development through technology transfer and information dissemination [it

  15. Heat flux limiting sleeves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William G.

    1985-01-01

    A heat limiting tubular sleeve extending over only a portion of a tube having a generally uniform outside diameter, the sleeve being open on both ends, having one end thereof larger in diameter than the other end thereof and having a wall thickness which decreases in the same direction as the diameter of the sleeve decreases so that the heat transfer through the sleeve and tube is less adjacent the large diameter end of the sleeve than adjacent the other end thereof.

  16. Simulation of heat transfer in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyvoloski, G.

    1990-01-01

    Heat transfer can play an important role in fluid flow near the emplacement site of high-level nuclear waste. The effects on far- field flow can be important in understanding net moisture fluxes above the repository zone. The convection in the unsaturated zone at the Yucca Mountain site was responsible for this movement. If this is so, then the convection could provide a mechanism for drying the rock above the repository zone and thus provide a buffer for heavy rainfall events. In addition, the convection would increase the movement of gaseous radionuclides such as 14 CO 2 , tritiated water vapor, and 129 I (Weeks, 1987). Because of the complexity of the problem, numerical models were required to calculate gas flow and vapor transport at the site. Kipp previously modeled this problem using the code HST3D. This code represents the flow of a single-phase fluid with both heat- and mass-transfer effects included. Water density and partial pressure effects are accounted for by the virtual temperature method. In this paper, the problem was simulated using the code FEHMN, a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer code being developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. The work described in this paper was done in preparation of the upcoming problem to be formulated for the Performance Assessment Calculation Exercise. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  17. Geophysical events

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13(3), March 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-002 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid.

  18. Sediment transfer dynamics in the Illgraben

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, G. L.; Molnar, P.; McArdell, B. W.; Schlunegger, F.; Burlando, P.

    2012-04-01

    resumed. During this time hillslope erosion exceeded channel erosion by 0.14myr¯ 1 indicating that hillslopes eroded independently of channel incision. Channel sediment transfer was transport-limited at the scale of the study as suggested by the aggradation of the channel in periods of very high hillslope flux and its apparent relation to variables connected to runoff generation such as precipitation and snowmelt. We have developed a conceptual model of sediment transfer based on our data set with which to investigate sediment transfer dynamics in a probabilistic sense. A stochastic sediment input from the hillslopes is generated from our magnitude-frequency model of landslides. Sediment is fed into a hillslope storage component, where a fraction is redeposited in long-term storage. Sediment in short-term storage is subsequently fed into the channel system and is only removed given a transport event (rainfall or snowmelt) of sufficient magnitude and sufficient available sediment. Transport events are generated stochastically using a weather generator. We calibrate the model with available data. Despite its simplicity the model reproduces the storage and discharge behavior of the channel system observed over the study period and enables us to test the sensitivity of the system to different parameters and system structures.

  19. Seasonality of dipteran-mediated methylmercury flux from ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumchal, Matthew M; Drenner, Ray W; Hall, MacGregor N; Polk, D Kirkland; Williams, Edward B; Ortega-Rodriguez, Celeste L; Kennedy, James H

    2018-03-12

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an aquatic contaminant that can be transferred to terrestrial predators by emergent aquatic insects. We assessed the effects of month and pond permanence on dipteran-mediated MeHg flux (calculated as emergent dipteran biomass × dipteran MeHg concentration) in 10 experimental ponds. Emergent dipterans were collected weekly from permanent ponds with bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus; n = 5) and semipermanent ponds without fish (n = 5) over a 7-mo period (February-August, 2015). We detected a significant effect of month on MeHg flux from 6 dipteran taxa and aggregate MeHg flux, with the highest MeHg flux from herbivorous/detritivorous chironomid midges and predatory midges in March; biting midges, phantom midges and herbivorous/detritivorous orthoclad midges in April; and mosquitoes in August. Aggregate dipteran-mediated MeHg flux peaked in April and then declined throughout the remainder of the summer. We did not detect a significant main effect of pond permanence or a significant month × pond permanence interaction effect on MeHg flux for any of the taxa examined in the present study or for aggregate MeHg flux. Given their ubiquity in aquatic systems and their importance in food webs at the land-water interface, dipterans are important taxa that should not be overlooked as a part of the Hg cycle. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;9999:1-6. © 2018 SETAC. © 2018 SETAC.

  20. Parasitic momentum flux in the tokamak core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.

    2017-10-01

    Tokamak plasmas rotate spontaneously without applied torque. This intrinsic rotation is important for future low-torque devices such as ITER, since rotation stabilizes certain instabilities. In the mid-radius `gradient region,' which reaches from the sawtooth inversion radius out to the pedestal top, intrinsic rotation profiles may be either flat or hollow, and can transition suddenly between these two states, an unexplained phenomenon referred to as rotation reversal. Theoretical efforts to explain the mid-radius rotation shear have largely focused on quasilinear models, in which the phase relationships of some selected instability result in a nondiffusive momentum flux (``residual stress''). In contrast, the present work demonstrates the existence of a robust, fully nonlinear symmetry-breaking momentum flux that follows from the free-energy flow in phase space and does not depend on any assumed linear eigenmode structure. The physical origin is an often-neglected portion of the radial ExB drift, which is shown to drive a symmetry-breaking outward flux of co-current momentum whenever free energy is transferred from the electrostatic potential to ion parallel flows. The fully nonlinear derivation relies only on conservation properties and symmetry, thus retaining the important contribution of damped modes. The resulting rotation peaking is counter-current and scales as temperature over plasma current. As first demonstrated by Landau, this free-energy transfer (thus also the corresponding residual stress) becomes inactive when frequencies are much higher than the ion transit frequency, which allows sudden transitions between hollow and flat profiles. Simple estimates suggest that this mechanism may be consistent with experimental observations. This work was funded in part by the Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics and in part by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. Flux compactifications and generalized geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grana, Mariana

    2006-01-01

    Following the lectures given at CERN Winter School 2006, we present a pedagogical overview of flux compactifications and generalized geometries, concentrating on closed string fluxes in type II theories. We start by reviewing the supersymmetric flux configurations with maximally symmetric four-dimensional spaces. We then discuss the no-go theorems (and their evasion) for compactifications with fluxes. We analyse the resulting four-dimensional effective theories for Calabi-Yau and Calabi-Yau orientifold compactifications, concentrating on the flux-induced superpotentials. We discuss the generic mechanism of moduli stabilization and illustrate with two examples: the conifold in IIB and a T 6 /(Z 3 x Z 3 ) torus in IIA. We finish by studying the effective action and flux vacua for generalized geometries in the context of generalized complex geometry

  2. Flux compactifications and generalized geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grana, Mariana [Service de Physique Theorique, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2006-11-07

    Following the lectures given at CERN Winter School 2006, we present a pedagogical overview of flux compactifications and generalized geometries, concentrating on closed string fluxes in type II theories. We start by reviewing the supersymmetric flux configurations with maximally symmetric four-dimensional spaces. We then discuss the no-go theorems (and their evasion) for compactifications with fluxes. We analyse the resulting four-dimensional effective theories for Calabi-Yau and Calabi-Yau orientifold compactifications, concentrating on the flux-induced superpotentials. We discuss the generic mechanism of moduli stabilization and illustrate with two examples: the conifold in IIB and a T{sup 6} /(Z{sub 3} x Z{sub 3}) torus in IIA. We finish by studying the effective action and flux vacua for generalized geometries in the context of generalized complex geometry.

  3. Boiling heat transfer on horizontal tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Nucleate boiling heat transfer characteristics for a tube in a bundle differ from that for a single tube in a pool and this difference is known as 'tube bundle effect.' There exist two bundle effects, positive and negative. The positive bundle effect enhances heat transfer due to convective flow induced by rising bubbles generated from the lower tubes, while the negative bundle effect deteriorates heat transfer due to vapor blanketing caused by accumulation of bubbles. Staggered tube bundles tested and found that the upper tubes in bundles have higher heat transfer coefficients than the lower tubes. The effects of various parameters such as pressure, tube geometry and oil contamination on heat transfer have been examined. Some workers attempted to clarify the mechanism of occurrence of 'bundle effect' by testing tube arrangements of small scale. All reported only enhancement in heat transfer but results showed the symptom of heat transfer deterioration at higher heat fluxes. As mentioned above, it has not been clarified so far even whether the 'tube bundle effect' should serve as enhancement or deterioration of heat transfer in nucleate boiling. In this study, experiments are performed in detail by using bundles of small scale, and effects of heat flux distribution, pressure and tube location are clarified. Furthermore, some consideration on the mechanisms of occurrence of 'tube bundle effect' is made and a method for prediction of heat transfer rate is proposed

  4. Simulation of solar radiative transfer in cumulus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuev, V.E.; Titov, G.A. [Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-04-01

    This work presents a 3-D model of radiative transfer which is used to study the relationship between the spatial distribution of cumulus clouds and fluxes (albedo and transmittance) of visible solar radiation.

  5. Geometrical Relationship Between Interplanetary Flux Ropes and Their Solar Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marubashi, K.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cho, K.-S.; Park, Y.-D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the physical connection between interplanetary flux ropes (IFRs) near Earth and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) by comparing the magnetic field structures of IFRs and CME source regions. The analysis is based on the list of 54 pairs of ICMEs (interplanetary coronal mass ejections) and CMEs that are taken to be the most probable solar source events. We first attempted to identify the flux rope structure in each of the 54 ICMEs by fitting models with a cylinder and torus magnetic field geometry, both with a force-free field structure. This analysis determined the possible geometries of the identified flux ropes. Then we compared the flux rope geometries with the magnetic field structure of the solar source regions. We obtained the following results: (1) Flux rope structures are seen in 51 ICMEs out of the 54. The result implies that all ICMEs have an intrinsic flux rope structure, if the three exceptional cases are attributed to unfavorable observation conditions. (2) It is possible to find flux rope geometries with the main axis orientation close to the orientation of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) in the solar source regions, the differences being less than 25°. (3) The helicity sign of an IFR is strongly controlled by the location of the solar source: flux ropes with positive (negative) helicity are associated with sources in the southern (northern) hemisphere (six exceptions were found). (4) Over two-thirds of the sources in the northern hemisphere are concentrated along PILs with orientations of 45° ± 30° (measured clockwise from the east), and over two-thirds in the southern hemisphere along PILs with orientations of 135° ± 30°, both corresponding to the Hale boundaries. These results strongly support the idea that a flux rope with the main axis parallel to the PIL erupts in a CME and that the erupted flux rope propagates through the interplanetary space with its orientation maintained and is observed as an IFR.

  6. MHD simulation of the Bastille day event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linker, Jon, E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com; Torok, Tibor; Downs, Cooper; Lionello, Roberto; Titov, Viacheslav; Caplan, Ronald M.; Mikić, Zoran; Riley, Pete [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego CA, USA 92121 (United States)

    2016-03-25

    We describe a time-dependent, thermodynamic, three-dimensional MHD simulation of the July 14, 2000 coronal mass ejection (CME) and flare. The simulation starts with a background corona developed using an MDI-derived magnetic map for the boundary condition. Flux ropes using the modified Titov-Demoulin (TDm) model are used to energize the pre-event active region, which is then destabilized by photospheric flows that cancel flux near the polarity inversion line. More than 10{sup 33} ergs are impulsively released in the simulated eruption, driving a CME at 1500 km/s, close to the observed speed of 1700km/s. The post-flare emission in the simulation is morphologically similar to the observed post-flare loops. The resulting flux rope that propagates to 1 AU is similar in character to the flux rope observed at 1 AU, but the simulated ICME center passes 15° north of Earth.

  7. Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory (HFIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory is used to develop advanced, flexible, thin film gauge instrumentation for the Air Force Research Laboratory....

  8. High Flux Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    maximum jet velocity (6.36 m/s), and maximum number of jets (nine). Wadsworth and Mudawar [49] describe the use of a single slotted nozzle to provide...H00503 (ASME), pp. 121-128, 1989. 40 49. D. C. Wadsworth and I. Mudawar , "Cooling of a Multichip Electronic Module by Means of Confined Two-Dimensional...Jets of Dielectric Liquid," HTD-Vol. 111, Heat Transfer in Electrglif, Book No. H00503 (ASME), pp. 79-87, 1989. 50. D.C. Wadsworth and I. Mudawar

  9. Sea-to-air and diapycnal nitrous oxide fluxes in the eastern tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kock

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea-to-air and diapycnal fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O into the mixed layer were determined during three cruises to the upwelling region off Mauritania. Sea-to-air fluxes as well as diapycnal fluxes were elevated close to the shelf break, but elevated sea-to-air fluxes reached further offshore as a result of the offshore transport of upwelled water masses. To calculate a mixed layer budget for N2O we compared the regionally averaged sea-to-air and diapycnal fluxes and estimated the potential contribution of other processes, such as vertical advection and biological N2O production in the mixed layer. Using common parameterizations for the gas transfer velocity, the comparison of the average sea-to-air and diapycnal N2O fluxes indicated that the mean sea-to-air flux is about three to four times larger than the diapycnal flux. Neither vertical and horizontal advection nor biological production were found sufficient to close the mixed layer budget. Instead, the sea-to-air flux, calculated using a parameterization that takes into account the attenuating effect of surfactants on gas exchange, is in the same range as the diapycnal flux. From our observations we conclude that common parameterizations for the gas transfer velocity likely overestimate the air-sea gas exchange within highly productive upwelling zones.

  10. KoFlux: Korean Regional Flux Network in AsiaFlux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.

    2002-12-01

    AsiaFlux, the Asian arm of FLUXNET, held the Second International Workshop on Advanced Flux Network and Flux Evaluation in Jeju Island, Korea on 9-11 January 2002. In order to facilitate comprehensive Asia-wide studies of ecosystem fluxes, the meeting launched KoFlux, a new Korean regional network of long-term micrometeorological flux sites. For a successful assessment of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, an accurate measurement of surface fluxes of energy and water is one of the prerequisites. During the 7th Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment (GAME) held in Nagoya, Japan on 1-2 October 2001, the Implementation Committee of the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) was established. One of the immediate tasks of CEOP was and is to identify the reference sites to monitor energy and water fluxes over the Asian continent. Subsequently, to advance the regional and global network of these reference sites in the context of both FLUXNET and CEOP, the Korean flux community has re-organized the available resources to establish a new regional network, KoFlux. We have built up domestic network sites (equipped with wind profiler and radiosonde measurements) over deciduous and coniferous forests, urban and rural rice paddies and coastal farmland. As an outreach through collaborations with research groups in Japan, China and Thailand, we also proposed international flux sites at ecologically and climatologically important locations such as a prairie on the Tibetan plateau, tropical forest with mixed and rapid land use change in northern Thailand. Several sites in KoFlux already begun to accumulate interesting data and some highlights are presented at the meeting. The sciences generated by flux networks in other continents have proven the worthiness of a global array of micrometeorological flux towers. It is our intent that the launch of KoFlux would encourage other scientists to initiate and

  11. An algebraic stress/flux model for two-phase turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.

    1995-12-01

    An algebraic stress model (ASM) for turbulent Reynolds stress and a flux model for turbulent heat flux are proposed for two-phase bubbly and slug flows. These mathematical models are derived from the two-phase transport equations for Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux, and provide C μ , a turbulent constant which defines the level of eddy viscosity, as a function of the interfacial terms. These models also include the effect of heat transfer. When the interfacial drag terms and the interfacial momentum transfer terms are absent, the model reduces to a single-phase model used in the literature

  12. Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  13. 27 CFR 555.53 - License and permit not transferable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... part before commencing business or operations. However, for rules on right of succession, see § 555.59. ... transferable to another person. In the event of the lease, sale, or other transfer of the business or...

  14. Does historical wildfire activity alter metal fluxes to northern lakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, N.; Chetelat, J.; Vermaire, J. C.; Palmer, M.; Black, J.; Pellisey, J.; Tracz, B.; van der Wielen, S.

    2017-12-01

    Current drought conditions in northwestern Canada are conducive to more frequent and severe wildfires that may mobilize mercury and other metals accumulated in soil and biomass. There is evidence that wildfires can remobilize and transport mercury within and outside catchments by atmospheric volatilization, particulate emissions and catchment soil erosion. However, the effect of fires on mercury fluxes to nearby lake sediments remains unclear. In this study, we use a combination of 10 dated lake sediment cores and four nearby ombrotrophic peatland cores to investigate the effects of wildfires on mercury fluxes to lake sediments. Lakes varying in catchment size and distance from recent fire events were sampled. Mercury concentrations in the environmental archives were measured, and macroscopic charcoal particles (>100 um) were counted at high resolution in the sediments to observe the co-variation of the local fire history and mercury fluxes. Mercury flux recorded in ombrotrophic peat cores provided an estimate of the historical atmospheric mercury flux from local and regional atmospheric deposition. The mercury flux recorded in lake sediments corresponds to the sum of direct atmospheric deposition and catchment transport. In combination, these archives will allow for the partitioning of mercury loading attributable to catchment transport from direct atmospheric deposition. After correcting the fluxes for particle focusing and terragenic elements input, flux from different lakes will be compared based on their catchment size and their temporal and spatial proximity known fire events. Altogether, our preliminary results using these paleolimnological methods will provide new insights on mercury transport processes that are predicted to become more important under a changing climate.

  15. New method for determining central axial orientation of flux rope embedded within current sheet using multipoint measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, ZhaoYu; Chen, Tao; Yan, GuangQing

    2016-10-01

    A new method for determining the central axial orientation of a two-dimensional coherent magnetic flux rope (MFR) via multipoint analysis of the magnetic-field structure is developed. The method is devised under the following geometrical assumptions: (1) on its cross section, the structure is left-right symmetric; (2) the projected structure velocity is vertical to the line of symmetry. The two conditions can be naturally satisfied for cylindrical MFRs and are expected to be satisfied for MFRs that are flattened within current sheets. The model test demonstrates that, for determining the axial orientation of such structures, the new method is more efficient and reliable than traditional techniques such as minimum-variance analysis of the magnetic field, Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction, and the more recent method based on the cylindrically symmetric assumption. A total of five flux transfer events observed by Cluster are studied using the proposed approach, and the application results indicate that the observed structures, regardless of their actual physical properties, fit the assumed geometrical model well. For these events, the inferred axial orientations are all in excellent agreement with those obtained using the multi-GS reconstruction technique.

  16. From elementary flux modes to elementary flux vectors: Metabolic pathway analysis with arbitrary linear flux constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamt, Steffen; Gerstl, Matthias P.; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Müller, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) emerged as a formal concept to describe metabolic pathways and have become an established tool for constraint-based modeling and metabolic network analysis. EFMs are characteristic (support-minimal) vectors of the flux cone that contains all feasible steady-state flux vectors of a given metabolic network. EFMs account for (homogeneous) linear constraints arising from reaction irreversibilities and the assumption of steady state; however, other (inhomogeneous) linear constraints, such as minimal and maximal reaction rates frequently used by other constraint-based techniques (such as flux balance analysis [FBA]), cannot be directly integrated. These additional constraints further restrict the space of feasible flux vectors and turn the flux cone into a general flux polyhedron in which the concept of EFMs is not directly applicable anymore. For this reason, there has been a conceptual gap between EFM-based (pathway) analysis methods and linear optimization (FBA) techniques, as they operate on different geometric objects. One approach to overcome these limitations was proposed ten years ago and is based on the concept of elementary flux vectors (EFVs). Only recently has the community started to recognize the potential of EFVs for metabolic network analysis. In fact, EFVs exactly represent the conceptual development required to generalize the idea of EFMs from flux cones to flux polyhedra. This work aims to present a concise theoretical and practical introduction to EFVs that is accessible to a broad audience. We highlight the close relationship between EFMs and EFVs and demonstrate that almost all applications of EFMs (in flux cones) are possible for EFVs (in flux polyhedra) as well. In fact, certain properties can only be studied with EFVs. Thus, we conclude that EFVs provide a powerful and unifying framework for constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks. PMID:28406903

  17. EU Development of High Heat Flux Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, J.; Lorenzetto, P.; Majerus, P.; Merola, M.; Pitzer, D.; Roedig, M.

    2005-01-01

    The development of plasma facing components for next step fusion devices in Europe is strongly focused to ITER. Here a wide spectrum of different design options for the divertor target and the first wall have been investigated with tungsten, CFC, and beryllium armor. Electron beam simulation experiments have been used to determine the performance of high heat flux components under ITER specific thermal loads. Beside thermal fatigue loads with power density levels up to 20 MWm -2 , off-normal events are a serious concern for the lifetime of plasma facing components. These phenomena are expected to occur on a time scale of a few milliseconds (plasma disruptions) or several hundred milliseconds (vertical displacement events) and have been identified as a major source for the production of neutron activated metallic or tritium enriched carbon dust which is of serious importance from a safety point of view.The irradiation induced material degradation is another critical concern for future D-T-burning fusion devices. In ITER the integrated neutron fluence to the first wall and the divertor armour will remain in the order of 1 dpa and 0.7 dpa, respectively. This value is low compared to future commercial fusion reactors; nevertheless, a nonnegligible degradation of the materials has been detected, both for mechanical and thermal properties, in particular for the thermal conductivity of carbon based materials. Beside the degradation of individual material properties, the high heat flux performance of actively cooled plasma facing components has been investigated under ITER specific thermal and neutron loads

  18. Evaluation of Heat Flux Measurement as a New Process Analytical Technology Monitoring Tool in Freeze Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollrath, Ilona; Pauli, Victoria; Friess, Wolfgang; Freitag, Angelika; Hawe, Andrea; Winter, Gerhard

    2017-05-01

    This study investigates the suitability of heat flux measurement as a new technique for monitoring product temperature and critical end points during freeze drying. The heat flux sensor is tightly mounted on the shelf and measures non-invasively (no contact with the product) the heat transferred from shelf to vial. Heat flux data were compared to comparative pressure measurement, thermocouple readings, and Karl Fischer titration as current state of the art monitoring techniques. The whole freeze drying process including freezing (both by ramp freezing and controlled nucleation) and primary and secondary drying was considered. We found that direct measurement of the transferred heat enables more insights into thermodynamics of the freezing process. Furthermore, a vial heat transfer coefficient can be calculated from heat flux data, which ultimately provides a non-invasive method to monitor product temperature throughout primary drying. The end point of primary drying determined by heat flux measurements was in accordance with the one defined by thermocouples. During secondary drying, heat flux measurements could not indicate the progress of drying as monitoring the residual moisture content. In conclusion, heat flux measurements are a promising new non-invasive tool for lyophilization process monitoring and development using energy transfer as a control parameter. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Flux trapping in superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, C.; Bolore, M.; Bonin, B.; Charrier, J.P.; Daillant, B.; Gratadour, J.; Koechlin, F.; Safa, H.

    1992-01-01

    The flux trapped in various field cooled Nb and Pb samples has been measured. For ambient fields smaller than 3 Gauss, 100% of the flux is trapped. The consequences of this result on the behavior of superconducting RF cavities are discussed. (author) 12 refs.; 2 figs

  20. Squeezing Flux Out of Fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Merging transcriptomics or metabolomics data remains insufficient for metabolic flux estimation. Ramirez et al. integrate a genome-scale metabolic model with extracellular flux data to predict and validate metabolic differences between white and brown adipose tissue. This method allows both metab...

  1. Data Acquisition and Flux Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebmann, C.; Kolle, O; Heinesch, B

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation....

  2. Heat transfer in two-phase flow of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbotin, V.I.; Deev, V.I.; Solodovnikov, V.V.; Arkhipov, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    The results of experimental study of heat transfer in two-phase helium flow are presented. The effect of operating parameters (pressure, mass velocity, heat flux and quality) on boiling heat transfer intensity was investigated. A significant influence of boiling process prehistory on heat transfer coefficients was demonstrated. On the basis of experimental data obtained three typical regimes of flow boiling heat transfer were found. Analogy of heat transfer in flow boiling and pool boiling of helium and noncryogenic liquids was established. Correlations were developed which are in close agreement with available heat transfer data

  3. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boury, C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper emphasizes in the specific areas of design, engineering and component production. This paper presents what Framatome has to offer in these areas and its export oriented philosophy. Then, a typical example of this technology transfer philosophy is the collaboration with the South Korean firm, Korea Heavy Industries Corporation (KHIC) for the supply of KNU 9 and KNU 10 power stations

  4. Solar proton fluxes since 1956

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    The fluxes of protons emitted during solar flares since 1956 were evaluated. The depth-versus-activity profiles of 56 Co in several lunar rocks are consistent with the solar-proton fluxes detected by experiments on several satellites. Only about 20% of the solar-proton-induced activities of 22 Na and 55 Fe in lunar rocks from early Apollo missions were produced by protons emitted from the sun during solar cycle 20 (1965--1975). The depth-versus-activity data for these radionuclides in several lunar rocks were used to determine the fluxes of protons during solar cycle 19 (1954--1964). The average proton fluxes for cycle 19 are about five times those for both the last million years and for cycle 20. These solar-proton flux variations correlate with changes in sunspot activity

  5. Charge-dependent correlations from event-by-event anomalous hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirono, Yuji [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Hirano, Tetsufumi [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Kharzeev, Dmitri E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Department of Physics and RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We report on our recent attempt of quantitative modeling of the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) in heavy-ion collisions. We perform 3+1 dimensional anomalous hydrodynamic simulations on an event-by-event basis, with constitutive equations that contain the anomaly-induced effects. We also develop a model of the initial condition for the axial charge density that captures the statistical nature of random chirality imbalances created by the color flux tubes. Basing on the event-by-event hydrodynamic simulations for hundreds of thousands of collisions, we calculate the correlation functions that are measured in experiments, and discuss how the anomalous transport affects these observables.

  6. High heat flux tests at divertor relevant conditions on water-cooled swirl tube targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, J.; Boscary, J.

    1994-01-01

    High heat flux experiments were performed to provide a technology for heat flux removal under NET/ITER relevant conditions. The water-cooled rectangular test sections were made of hardened copper with a stainless steel twisted tape installed inside a circular channel and one-side heated. The tests aimed to investigate the heat transfer and the critical heat flux in the subcooled boiling regime. A CHF data base of 63 values was established. Test results have shown the thermalhydraulic ability of swirl tubes to sustain an incident heat flux up to a 30 MW.m -2 range. (author) 10 refs.; 7 figs

  7. Quantum transport in coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, L.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum transport properties are instrumental to understanding quantum coherent transport processes. Potential applications of quantum transport are widespread, in areas ranging from quantum information science to quantum engineering, and not restricted to quantum state transfer, control and manipulation. Here, we study light transport in a ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The ring configuration, with an arbitrary number of resonators embedded, forms a two-arm Aharonov–Bohm interferometer. The influence of magnetic flux on light transport is investigated. Tuning the magnetic flux can lead to resonant transmission, while half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to completely destructive interference and transmission zeros in an interferometer with two equal arms. -- Highlights: •The light transport is investigated through ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic field. •Aharonov–Bohm ring interferometer of arbitrary configuration is investigated. •The half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to destructive interference and transmission zeros for two-arm at equal length. •Complete transmission is available via tuning synthetic magnetic flux.

  8. Partitioning Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes using Correlation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, T. M.

    2008-12-01

    A variety of methods are currently available to partition water vapor fluxes (into components of transpiration and direct evaporation) and carbon dioxide fluxes (into components of photosynthesis and respiration), using chambers, isotopes, and regression modeling approaches. Here, a methodology is presented that accounts for correlations between high-frequency measurements of water vapor (q) and carbon dioxide (c) concentrations being influenced by their non-identical source-sink distributions and the relative magnitude of their constituent fluxes. Flux-variance similarity assumptions are applied separately to the stomatal and the non-stomatal exchange, and the flux components are identified by considering the q-c correlation. Water use efficiency for the vegetation, and how it varies with respect to vapor pressure deficit, is the only input needed for this approach that uses standard eddy covariance measurements. The method is demonstrated using data collected over a corn field throughout a growing season. In particular, the research focuses on the partitioning of the water flux with the aim of improving how direct evaporation is handled in soil-vegetation- atmosphere transfer models over the course of wetting and dry-down cycles.

  9. Experimental investigation of convection heat transfer of CO2 at supercritical pressures in a vertical circular tube at high Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhihui; Jiang Peixue

    2008-01-01

    Convection heat transfer during the upward flow of CO 2 at supercritical pressures in a vertical circular tube (d in = 2 mm) at high Reynolds numbers was investigated experimentally, and the effects of heat fluxes, mass fluxes, inlet temperatures, pressures, buoyancy and thermal acceleration on the convection heat transfer was analyzed. The results show that the tube wall temperature occurs abnormally distribution for high heat-fluxes with upward flow. The degree of deteriorated heat transfer increases with increasing heat flux. Increasing of the mass flux delays the occurrence of the deterioration of heat transfer and weakens the deterioration of heat transfer down-stream section. The inlet temperature strongly influences the heat transfer. The deterioration degree of heat transfer decreases with increasing pressure. (authors)

  10. Sunward-propagating Solar Energetic Electrons inside Multiple Interplanetary Flux Ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Herrero, Raúl; Hidalgo, Miguel A.; Carcaboso, Fernando; Blanco, Juan J. [Dpto. de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad de Alcalá, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Dresing, Nina; Klassen, Andreas; Heber, Bernd [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, University of Kiel, D-24118, Kiel (Germany); Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid [Institute of Physics/Kanzelhöhe Observatory, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Bučík, Radoslav [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, D-37077, Göttingen (Germany); Lario, David, E-mail: raul.gomezh@uah.es [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    On 2013 December 2 and 3, the SEPT and STE instruments on board STEREO-A observed two solar energetic electron events with unusual sunward-directed fluxes. Both events occurred during a time interval showing typical signatures of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The electron timing and anisotropies, combined with extreme-ultraviolet solar imaging and radio wave spectral observations, are used to confirm the solar origin and the injection times of the energetic electrons. The solar source of the ICME is investigated using remote-sensing observations and a three-dimensional reconstruction technique. In situ plasma and magnetic field data combined with energetic electron observations and a flux-rope model are used to determine the ICME magnetic topology and the interplanetary electron propagation path from the Sun to 1 au. Two consecutive flux ropes crossed the STEREO-A location and each electron event occurred inside a different flux rope. In both cases, the electrons traveled from the solar source to 1 au along the longest legs of the flux ropes still connected to the Sun. During the December 2 event, energetic electrons propagated along the magnetic field, while during the December 3 event they were propagating against the field. As found by previous studies, the energetic electron propagation times are consistent with a low number of field line rotations N < 5 of the flux rope between the Sun and 1 au. The flux rope model used in this work suggests an even lower number of rotations.

  11. Fractional flux excitations and flux creep in a superconducting film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyuksyutov, I.F.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the transport properties of a modulated superconducting film in a magnetic field parallel to the film. Modulation can be either intrinsic, due to the layered structure of the high-T c superconductors, or artificial, e.g. due to thickness modulation. This system has an infinite set ( >) of pinned phases. In the pinned phase the excitation of flux loops with a fractional number of flux quanta by the applied current j results in flux creep with a generated voltage V ∝ exp[-jo/j[. (orig.)

  12. Vaccine Adverse Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... in the primary immunization series in infants Report Adverse Event Report a Vaccine Adverse Event Contact FDA ( ...

  13. Thermohydraulic behaviour and heat transfer in the molten core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reineke, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    Increasing the application of nuclear reactors to produce electrical power extremely unprobable accidents should be investigated too. In the Federal Republic of Germany, a research program is performed for some years engaged in accidents at light water reactors in which the melting of the reactor core is presumed. A part of this program is to investigate the thermohydraulic and the heat transfer behavior in an accumulation of molten core material. The knowledge of these events is necessary to analyse the accident exactly. Further on the results of this work are of great importance to build a catcher for the molten core material. As a result of the decay heat the molten material is heated up and the density differences induce a free convection motion. In this work the thermohydraulic behavior and the distribution of the escaping heat fluxes for several accumulations of molten core material were determined. The numerical methods for solving the system of partial differential equation were used to develop computer codes, able to compute the average and local heat fluxes at the walls enclosing the molten core material and the inside increase of the temperature. The numerical computations were confirmed and verified by experimental investigations. In these investigations the molten core material was always assumed as a homogeneous fluid. In this case, the results could be reproduced by simple power laws

  14. Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes over a lake: comparison between eddy covariance, floating chambers and boundary layer method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-M. Erkkilä

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Freshwaters bring a notable contribution to the global carbon budget by emitting both carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 to the atmosphere. Global estimates of freshwater emissions traditionally use a wind-speed-based gas transfer velocity, kCC (introduced by Cole and Caraco, 1998, for calculating diffusive flux with the boundary layer method (BLM. We compared CH4 and CO2 fluxes from BLM with kCC and two other gas transfer velocities (kTE and kHE, which include the effects of water-side cooling to the gas transfer besides shear-induced turbulence, with simultaneous eddy covariance (EC and floating chamber (FC fluxes during a 16-day measurement campaign in September 2014 at Lake Kuivajärvi in Finland. The measurements included both lake stratification and water column mixing periods. Results show that BLM fluxes were mainly lower than EC, with the more recent model kTE giving the best fit with EC fluxes, whereas FC measurements resulted in higher fluxes than simultaneous EC measurements. We highly recommend using up-to-date gas transfer models, instead of kCC, for better flux estimates. BLM CO2 flux measurements had clear differences between daytime and night-time fluxes with all gas transfer models during both stratified and mixing periods, whereas EC measurements did not show a diurnal behaviour in CO2 flux. CH4 flux had higher values in daytime than night-time during lake mixing period according to EC measurements, with highest fluxes detected just before sunset. In addition, we found clear differences in daytime and night-time concentration difference between the air and surface water for both CH4 and CO2. This might lead to biased flux estimates, if only daytime values are used in BLM upscaling and flux measurements in general. FC measurements did not detect spatial variation in either CH4 or CO2 flux over Lake Kuivajärvi. EC measurements, on the other hand, did not show any spatial variation in CH4 fluxes but did show a clear difference

  15. Conjugate Heat Transfer Study in Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Niranjan; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Peetala, Ravi Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Coupled and decoupled conjugate heat transfer (CHT) studies are carried out to imitate experimental studies for heat transfer measurement in hypersonic flow regime. The finite volume based solvers are used for analyzing the heat interaction between fluid and solid domains. Temperature and surface heat flux signals are predicted by both coupled and decoupled CHT analysis techniques for hypersonic Mach numbers. These two methodologies are also used to study the effect of different wall materials on surface parameters. Effectiveness of these CHT solvers has been verified for the inverse problem of wall heat flux recovery using various techniques reported in the literature. Both coupled and decoupled CHT techniques are seen to be equally useful for prediction of local temperature and heat flux signals prior to the experiments in hypersonic flows.

  16. Monte Carlo surface flux tallies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Particle fluxes on surfaces are difficult to calculate with Monte Carlo codes because the score requires a division by the surface-crossing angle cosine, and grazing angles lead to inaccuracies. We revisit the standard practice of dividing by half of a cosine 'cutoff' for particles whose surface-crossing cosines are below the cutoff. The theory behind this approximation is sound, but the application of the theory to all possible situations does not account for two implicit assumptions: (1) the grazing band must be symmetric about 0, and (2) a single linear expansion for the angular flux must be applied in the entire grazing band. These assumptions are violated in common circumstances; for example, for separate in-going and out-going flux tallies on internal surfaces, and for out-going flux tallies on external surfaces. In some situations, dividing by two-thirds of the cosine cutoff is more appropriate. If users were able to control both the cosine cutoff and the substitute value, they could use these parameters to make accurate surface flux tallies. The procedure is demonstrated in a test problem in which Monte Carlo surface fluxes in cosine bins are converted to angular fluxes and compared with the results of a discrete ordinates calculation.

  17. CrossRef Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M  J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E  F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X  D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M  J; Chang, Y  H; Chen, A  I; Chen, G  M; Chen, H  S; Cheng, L; Chou, H  Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C  H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y  M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M  B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R  J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D  M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K  H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K  C; He, Z  H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T  H; Huang, H; Huang, Z  C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W  Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S  C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G  N; Kim, K  S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M  S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H  T; Lee, S  C; Leluc, C; Li, H  S; Li, J  Q; Li, Q; Li, T  X; Li, W; Li, Z  H; Li, Z  Y; Lim, S; Lin, C  H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S  Q; Lu, Y  S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J  Z; Lv, S  S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D  C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J  Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X  M; Qin, X; Qu, Z  Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P  G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J  S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S  M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E  S; Shan, B  S; Shi, J  Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J  W; Sun, W  H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X  W; Tang, Z  C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C  C; Ting, S  M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J  P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L  Q; Wang, N  H; Wang, Q  L; Wang, X; Wang, X  Q; Wang, Z  X; Wei, C  C; Weng, Z  L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R  Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y  J; Yu, Z  Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J  H; Zhang, S  D; Zhang, S  W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z  M; Zhu, Z  Q; Zhuang, H  L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×105 antiproton events and 2.42×109 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p¯, proton p, and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e− flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  18. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Illustrated by the example of the FRG's nuclear energy exports, it is shown that the nuclear technology transfer leads to new dimensions of intergovernmental relations, which hold within themselves on account of multiple state-to-state, scientific, industrial and - last but not least - personal contacts the chance of far-reaching friendships between countries and people. If the chance is taken, this can also be seen as an important contribution towards maintaining the peace. (orig.) [de

  19. Transfer Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Daniel; Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The technique described here, transfer zymography, was developed to overcome two limitations of conventional zymography. When proteolytic enzymes are resolved by nonreducing SDS-PAGE into a polyacrylamide gel with copolymerized protein substrate, the presence of the protein substrate can result in anomalous, often slower, migration of the protease and an estimated mass higher than its actual mass. A further drawback is that the presence of a high background of substrate protein interferes with proteomic analysis of the protease band by excision, tryptic digestion, and LC-MS/MS analysis. In transfer zymography, the proteolytic enzymes are resolved by conventional nonreducing SDS-PAGE, without protein substrate in the gel. The proteins in the resolving gel are then electrophoretically transferred to a receiving gel that contains the protein substrate, by a process similar to western blotting. The receiving gel is then processed in a manner similar to conventional zymography. SDS is removed by Triton X-100 and incubated in conditions suitable for the proteolytic activity. After protein staining, followed by destaining, bands representing regions with active protease are visualized as clear bands in a darkly stained background. For proteomic analysis, electrophoresis is carried out simultaneously on a second resolving gel, and the bands corresponding to the clear regions in the receiving gel after zymogram development are excised for proteomic analysis.

  20. RAPTOR. I. Time-dependent radiative transfer in arbitrary spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronzwaer, T.; Davelaar, J.; Younsi, Z.; Mościbrodzka, M.; Falcke, H.; Kramer, M.; Rezzolla, L.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Observational efforts to image the immediate environment of a black hole at the scale of the event horizon benefit from the development of efficient imaging codes that are capable of producing synthetic data, which may be compared with observational data. Aims: We aim to present RAPTOR, a new public code that produces accurate images, animations, and spectra of relativistic plasmas in strong gravity by numerically integrating the equations of motion of light rays and performing time-dependent radiative transfer calculations along the rays. The code is compatible with any analytical or numerical spacetime. It is hardware-agnostic and may be compiled and run both on GPUs and CPUs. Methods: We describe the algorithms used in RAPTOR and test the code's performance. We have performed a detailed comparison of RAPTOR output with that of other radiative-transfer codes and demonstrate convergence of the results. We then applied RAPTOR to study accretion models of supermassive black holes, performing time-dependent radiative transfer through general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamical (GRMHD) simulations and investigating the expected observational differences between the so-called fast-light and slow-light paradigms. Results: Using RAPTOR to produce synthetic images and light curves of a GRMHD model of an accreting black hole, we find that the relative difference between fast-light and slow-light light curves is less than 5%. Using two distinct radiative-transfer codes to process the same data, we find integrated flux densities with a relative difference less than 0.01%. Conclusions: For two-dimensional GRMHD models, such as those examined in this paper, the fast-light approximation suffices as long as errors of a few percent are acceptable. The convergence of the results of two different codes demonstrates that they are, at a minimum, consistent. The public version of RAPTOR is available at the following URL: http://https://github.com/tbronzwaer/raptor

  1. Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of heat flux sensors for gas turbine blades and vanes and the demonstration of heat transfer measurement methods are reported. The performance of the heat flux sensors was evaluated in a cylinder in cross flow experiment and compared with two other heat flux measurement methods, the slug calorimeter and a dynamic method based on fluctuating gas and surface temperature. Two cylinders, each instrumented with an embedded thermocouple sensor, a Gardon gauge, and a slug calorimeter, were fabricated. Each sensor type was calibrated using a quartz lamp bank facility. The instrumented cylinders were then tested in an atmospheric pressure combustor rig at conditions up to gas stream temperatures of 1700K and velocities to Mach 0.74. The test data are compared to other measurements and analytical prediction.

  2. Prediction of pool void fraction by new drift flux correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, I.; Ishii, M.

    1986-06-01

    A void fraction for a bubbling or boiling pool system is one of the important parameters in analyzing heat and mass transfer processes. Using the drift flux formulation, correlations for the pool void fraction have been developed in collaboration with a large number of experimental data. It has been found that the drift velocity in a pool system depends upon vessel diameter, system pressure, gas flux and fluid physical properties. The results show that the relative velocity and void fraction can be quite different from those predicted by conventional correlations. In terms of the rise velocity, four different regimes are identified. These are bubbly, churn-turbulent, slug and cap bubble regimes. The present correlations are shown to agree with the experimental data over wide ranges of parameters such as vessel diameter, system pressure, gas flux and physical properties. 39 refs., 41 figs

  3. Prediction of critical heat flux in vertical pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, S.; Healzer, J.M.; Abdollahian, D.

    1981-01-01

    A previously developed semi-empirical model for adiabatic two-phase annular flow ix extended to predict the critical heat flux (CHF) in a vertical pipe. The model exhibits a sharply declining curve of CHF versus steam quality (X) at low X, and is relatively independent of the heat flux distribution. In this region, vaporization of the liquid film controls. At high X, net deposition upon the liquid film becomes important and CHF versus X flattens considerably. In this zone, CHF is dependent upon the heat flux distribution. Model predictions are compared to test data and an empirical correlation. The agreement is generally good if one employs previously reported mass transfer coefficients. (orig.)

  4. CATASTROPHIC EVENTS MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciumas Cristina

    2013-07-01

    insurance companies, reinsurers, stock exchanges, institutions specialized in cat events modeling in order to develop and use alongside compulsory and facultative insurance of buildings new alternative risk transfer solutions as catastrophe bonds(also known as cat bonds.

  5. Metabolic fuels: regulating fluxes to select mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-15

    Animals must regulate the fluxes of multiple fuels to support changing metabolic rates that result from variation in physiological circumstances. The aim of fuel selection strategies is to exploit the advantages of individual substrates while minimizing the impact of disadvantages. All exercising mammals share a general pattern of fuel selection: at the same %V(O(2,max)) they oxidize the same ratio of lipids to carbohydrates. However, highly aerobic species rely more on intramuscular fuels because energy supply from the circulation is constrained by trans-sarcolemmal transfer. Fuel selection is performed by recruiting different muscles, different fibers within the same muscles or different pathways within the same fibers. Electromyographic analyses show that shivering humans can modulate carbohydrate oxidation either through the selective recruitment of type II fibers within the same muscles or by regulating pathway recruitment within type I fibers. The selection patterns of shivering and exercise are different: at the same %V(O(2,max)), a muscle producing only heat (shivering) or significant movement (exercise) strikes a different balance between lipid and carbohydrate oxidation. Long-distance migrants provide an excellent model to characterize how to increase maximal substrate fluxes. High lipid fluxes are achieved through the coordinated upregulation of mobilization, transport and oxidation by activating enzymes, lipid-solubilizing proteins and membrane transporters. These endurance athletes support record lipolytic rates in adipocytes, use lipoprotein shuttles to accelerate transport and show increased capacity for lipid oxidation in muscle mitochondria. Some migrant birds use dietary omega-3 fatty acids as performance-enhancing agents to boost their ability to process lipids. These dietary fatty acids become incorporated in membrane phospholipids and bind to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors to activate membrane proteins and modify gene expression.

  6. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  7. Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Priest, E R; Lee, L C

    1990-01-01

    The American Geophysical Union Chapman Conference on the Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes was held at the Hamilton Princess Hotel, Hamilton, Bermuda on March 27–31, 1989. Topics discussed ranged from solar flux ropes, such as photospheric flux tubes, coronal loops and prominences, to flux ropes in the solar wind, in planetary ionospheres, at the Earth's magnetopause, in the geomagnetic tail and deep in the Earth's magnetosphere. Papers presented at that conference form the nucleus of this book, but the book is more than just a proceedings of the conference. We have solicited articles from all interested in this topic. Thus, there is some material in the book not discussed at the conference. Even in the case of papers presented at the conference, there is generally a much more detailed and rigorous presentation than was possible in the time allowed by the oral and poster presentations.

  8. Notes on neutron flux measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to get an useful guide to carry out topical neutron flux measurements. Although the foil activation technique is used in the majority of the cases, other techniques, such as those based on fission chambers and self-powered neutron detectors, are also shown. Special interest is given to the description and application of corrections on the measurement of relative and absolute induced activities by several types of detectors (scintillators, G-M and gas proportional counters). The thermal arid epithermal neutron fluxes, as determined in this work, are conventional or effective (West cots fluxes), which are extensively used by the reactor experimentalists; however, we also give some expressions where they are related to the integrated neutron fluxes, which are used in neutron calculations. (Author) 16 refs

  9. Specification of ROP flux shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byung Joo; Gray, A.

    1997-06-01

    The CANDU 9 480/SEU core uses 0.9% SEU (Slightly Enriched Uranium) fuel. The use f SEU fuel enables the reactor to increase the radial power form factor from 0.865, which is typical in current natural uranium CANDU reactors, to 0.97 in the nominal CANDU 9 480/SEU core. The difference is a 12% increase in reactor power. An additional 5% increase can be achieved due to a reduced refuelling ripple. The channel power limits were also increased by 3% for a total reactor power increase of 20%. This report describes the calculation of neutron flux distributions in the CANDU 9 480/SEU core under conditions specified by the C and I engineers. The RFSP code was used to calculate of neutron flux shapes for ROP analysis. Detailed flux values at numerous potential detector sites were calculated for each flux shape. (author). 6 tabs., 70 figs., 4 refs

  10. Specification of ROP flux shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Byung Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Gray, A [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1997-06-01

    The CANDU 9 480/SEU core uses 0.9% SEU (Slightly Enriched Uranium) fuel. The use f SEU fuel enables the reactor to increase the radial power form factor from 0.865, which is typical in current natural uranium CANDU reactors, to 0.97 in the nominal CANDU 9 480/SEU core. The difference is a 12% increase in reactor power. An additional 5% increase can be achieved due to a reduced refuelling ripple. The channel power limits were also increased by 3% for a total reactor power increase of 20%. This report describes the calculation of neutron flux distributions in the CANDU 9 480/SEU core under conditions specified by the C and I engineers. The RFSP code was used to calculate of neutron flux shapes for ROP analysis. Detailed flux values at numerous potential detector sites were calculated for each flux shape. (author). 6 tabs., 70 figs., 4 refs.

  11. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a light-water cooled and moderated reactor that is the United States’ highest flux reactor-based neutron source. HFIR...

  12. Flux networks in metabolic graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, P B; Queiros, S M Duarte; Jones, J L

    2009-01-01

    A metabolic model can be represented as a bipartite graph comprising linked reaction and metabolite nodes. Here it is shown how a network of conserved fluxes can be assigned to the edges of such a graph by combining the reaction fluxes with a conserved metabolite property such as molecular weight. A similar flux network can be constructed by combining the primal and dual solutions to the linear programming problem that typically arises in constraint-based modelling. Such constructions may help with the visualization of flux distributions in complex metabolic networks. The analysis also explains the strong correlation observed between metabolite shadow prices (the dual linear programming variables) and conserved metabolite properties. The methods were applied to recent metabolic models for Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Methanosarcina barkeri. Detailed results are reported for E. coli; similar results were found for other organisms

  13. Topology of Event Horizon

    OpenAIRE

    Siino, Masaru

    1997-01-01

    The topologies of event horizons are investigated. Considering the existence of the endpoint of the event horizon, it cannot be differentiable. Then there are the new possibilities of the topology of the event horizon though they are excluded in smooth event horizons. The relation between the topology of the event horizon and the endpoint of it is revealed. A torus event horizon is caused by two-dimensional endpoints. One-dimensional endpoints provide the coalescence of spherical event horizo...

  14. Boundary fluxes for nonlocal diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortazar, Carmen; Elgueta, Manuel; Rossi, Julio D.; Wolanski, Noemi

    We study a nonlocal diffusion operator in a bounded smooth domain prescribing the flux through the boundary. This problem may be seen as a generalization of the usual Neumann problem for the heat equation. First, we prove existence, uniqueness and a comparison principle. Next, we study the behavior of solutions for some prescribed boundary data including blowing up ones. Finally, we look at a nonlinear flux boundary condition.

  15. Flux tubes at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cea, Paolo [INFN, Sezione di Bari,Via G. Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell’Università di Bari,Via G. Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Cosmai, Leonardo [INFN, Sezione di Bari,Via G. Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Cuteri, Francesca; Papa, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria & INFN-Cosenza,Ponte Bucci, cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Cosenza) (Italy)

    2016-06-07

    The chromoelectric field generated by a static quark-antiquark pair, with its peculiar tube-like shape, can be nicely described, at zero temperature, within the dual superconductor scenario for the QCD confining vacuum. In this work we investigate, by lattice Monte Carlo simulations of the SU(3) pure gauge theory, the fate of chromoelectric flux tubes across the deconfinement transition. We find that, if the distance between the static sources is kept fixed at about 0.76 fm ≃1.6/√σ and the temperature is increased towards and above the deconfinement temperature T{sub c}, the amplitude of the field inside the flux tube gets smaller, while the shape of the flux tube does not vary appreciably across deconfinement. This scenario with flux-tube “evaporation” above T{sub c} has no correspondence in ordinary (type-II) superconductivity, where instead the transition to the phase with normal conductivity is characterized by a divergent fattening of flux tubes as the transition temperature is approached from below. We present also some evidence about the existence of flux-tube structures in the magnetic sector of the theory in the deconfined phase.

  16. P fluxes and exotic branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, Davide M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Riccioni, Fabio [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Risoli, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2016-12-21

    We consider the N=1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a T{sup 6}/[ℤ{sub 2}×ℤ{sub 2}] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  17. P fluxes and exotic branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, Davide M.; Riccioni, Fabio; Risoli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We consider the N=1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a T 6 /[ℤ 2 ×ℤ 2 ] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  18. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

    2007-08-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and

  19. Long term monitoring at Solfatara of Pozzuoli (Campi Flegrei, Italy): 1998-2014, fifteen years of soil CO2 flux measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardellini, Carlo; Chiodini, Giovanni; Rosiello, Angelo; Bagnato, Emanuela; Avino, Rosario; Frondini, Francesco; Donnini, Marco; Caliro, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    for the transfer of magmatic fluids towards the shallower portion of the hydrothermal system; the second event of DDS enlargement well correlates with the recent unrest phase of the system, characterised by an acceleration of the ground uplift. The comparison of the CO2 flux data with the chemical composition of the main fumaroles suggests that the enlargements in the extension of the DDS are controlled by processes of pressurization of the buried gas plume feeding the Solfatara manifestation.

  20. Facilitating Transfers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    to specific logics of temporalisation and spatial expansion of a diverse set of social processes in relation to, for example, the economy, politics, science and the mass media. On this background, the paper will more concretely develop a conceptual framework for classifying different contextual orders...... that the essential functional and normative purpose of regulatory governance is to facilitate, stabilise and justify the transfer of condensed social components (such as economic capital and products, political decisions, legal judgements, religious beliefs and scientific knowledge) from one social contexts...

  1. Characteristics of flux variations of energetic particles associated with storm sudden commencement at synchronous orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomomura, Kiyoshi; Kato, Yoshio; Sakurai, Tohru

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of flux variations of energetic particles associated with Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) are examined on the basis of the particle's data observed by solid state detecter onboard the synchronous satellite, GMS ''Himawari'', during the period from Febuary 1978 to August 1979. The energy of the particles are covered from 1.2 to 4.0 MeV for proton and greater than 2 MeV for electron, respectively. The flux variations for protons generally increase in association with SSC. However, for electrons, they show the increase except 7 events (the decrease event) among 40 events studied. It is evident that the values of the flux attained immediately after SSC (J) clearly depend on those just before SSC(J 0 ). They follow a Power law (J proportional J 0 sup( n)). The variation of the proton flux ( + ΔJ + = + J - J 0+ ) increases with the value of the flux just before SSC. In both increase and decrease events for electrons, the variation of the flux tends to increase until the flux just before SSC attains the value of 10 4 , then to decrease as its value exceeds 10 4 . (author)

  2. Origin of the High-energy Neutrino Flux at IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carceller, J. M.; Illana, J. I.; Masip, M.; Meloni, D.

    2018-01-01

    We discuss the spectrum of the different components in the astrophysical neutrino flux reaching the Earth, and the possible contribution of each component to the high-energy IceCube data. We show that the diffuse flux from cosmic ray (CR) interactions with gas in our galaxy implies just two events among the 54-event sample. We argue that the neutrino flux from CR interactions in the intergalactic (intracluster) space depends critically on the transport parameter δ describing the energy dependence in the diffusion coefficient of galactic CRs. Our analysis motivates a {E}-2.1 neutrino spectrum with a drop at PeV energies that fits the data well, including the non-observation of the Glashow resonance at 6.3 PeV. We also show that a CR flux described by an unbroken power law may produce a neutrino flux with interesting spectral features (bumps and breaks) related to changes in the CR composition.

  3. Heat transfer coeffcient for boiling carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen Høgaard; Jensen, Per Henrik

    1997-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop for boiling carbon dioxide (R744) flowing in a horizontal pipe has been measured. The pipe is heated by condensing R22 outside the pipe. The heat input is supplied by an electrical heater wich evaporates the R22. With the heat flux assumed constant over...... the whole surface and with measured temperature difference between the inner surface and the evaporation temperature a mean heat transfer coefficient is calculated. The calculated heat transfer coefficient has been compared with the Chart Correlation of Shah. The Chart Correlation predicts too low heat...... transfer coefficient but the ratio between the measured and the calculated heat transfer coefficient is nearly constant and equal 1.9. With this factor the correlation predicts the measured data within 14% (RMS). The pressure drop is of the same order as the measuring uncertainty and the pressure drop has...

  4. Effects of tree species, water and nitrogen on mycorrhizal C flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyailo, O.; Matvienko, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mycorrhiza plays an important role in global carbon cycle, especially, in forest soils, yet the effect of tree species on the amount and timing of C transfer through roots to myccorhiza is largely unknown. We studied the C transport to mycorrhiza under 6 most commonly dominant in boreal forests tree species using the mesh collars installed at the Siberian afforestation experiment. The CO2 flux from mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal mesh collars indicated the mycorrhizal C flux. Tree species strongly differed in C flux to mycorrhiza: more C was transferred by deciduous species than by conifers. The mycorrhizal CO2 flux was not linked to soil temperature but rather to trees phenology and to photosynthetic activity. All tree species transfered more carbon to mycorrhiza during the second half of summer and in September, this is because all the carbon photosynthesized earlier is used for building the tree biomass. Seasonal variation in C transfer to mycorrhiza was much larger than hourly variation (within a day). Nitrogen application (50 kg/ha) increased mycorrhizal C flux only under Scots pine, but not under larch, thus the effect of N application is tree species dependent. We found under most tree species that more C was transferred by trees to mycorrhiza in root-free collars, where the soil moisture was higher than in collars with roots. This suggests that trees preferentially support those parts of mycorrhiza, which can gain extra-resources.

  5. Surface wettability and subcooling on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suroto, Bambang Joko; Kohno, Masamichi; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2018-02-01

    The effect of varying surface wettabilities and subcooling on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer at intermediate heat flux has been examined and investigated. The experiments were performed using pure water as the working fluid and subcooling ranging from 0, 5 and 10 K, respectively. The three types of heat transfer block were used that are bare surface/hydrophilic (polished copper), superhydrophilic/TiO2-coated on copper and hydrophobic/PTFE surface. The experimental results will be examined by the existing model. The results show that the heat transfer performance of surfaces with PTFE coating is better at low heat flux. While for an intermediate heat flux, superhydrophilic surface (TiO2) is superior compared to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. It is observed that the heat transfer performance is decreasing when the sub cooling degree is increased.

  6. A forced convective heat transfer model for two-phase hydrogen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasch, J.; Anghaie, S.

    2007-01-01

    A consistent event in the use of hydrogen in nuclear thermal propulsion is film boiling, in which the wall heat is so large that liquid can not exist at the wall. Instead, vapor interfaces with the wall and liquid flows in the core of the duct. To better understand heat transfer under these conditions, a select set of hydrogen test data from these conditions are analyzed. This paper presents the results of an extensive literature search for film boiling heat transfer models. A representative cross-section of these models is then applied to the data. The heat transfer coefficient data were found difficult to predict and highly dependent upon the flow regime. Pre-critical heat flux correlations completely fail to predict the heat transfer of inverted film boiling conditions. Pool boiling models for inverted film boiling also are inappropriate. Current force convection models for inverted film boiling, while far better than the previous two classes of models, still generate large predictive errors. It is recommended that for the inverted annular film boiling flow regime the modified equilibrium bulk Dittus-Boelter model be used. For agitated inverted annular film boiling and dispersed film boiling regimes associated with positive equilibrium qualities, the Hendricks model should be used. (A.C.)

  7. Inorganic carbon fluxes on the Mackenzie Shelf of the Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Jacoba; Thomas, Helmuth; Myers, Paul G.; Hu, Xianmin; Mucci, Alfonso

    2018-02-01

    The Mackenzie Shelf in the southeastern Beaufort Sea is a region that has experienced large changes in the past several decades as warming, sea-ice loss, and increased river discharge have altered carbon cycling. Upwelling and downwelling events are common on the shelf, caused by strong, fluctuating along-shore winds, resulting in cross-shelf Ekman transport, and an alternating estuarine and anti-estuarine circulation. Downwelling carries dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and other remineralization products off the shelf and into the deep basin for possible long-term storage in the world's oceans. Upwelling carries DIC and nutrient-rich waters from the Pacific-origin upper halocline layer (UHL) onto the shelf. Profiles of DIC and total alkalinity (TA) taken in August and September of 2014 are used to investigate the cycling of carbon on the Mackenzie Shelf. The along-shore transport of water and the cross-shelf transport of DIC are quantified using velocity field output from a simulation of the Arctic and Northern Hemisphere Atlantic (ANHA4) configuration of the Nucleus of European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) framework. A strong upwelling event prior to sampling on the Mackenzie Shelf took place, bringing CO2-rich (elevated pCO2) water from the UHL onto the shelf bottom. The maximum on-shelf DIC flux was estimated at 16.9×103 mol C d-1 m-2 during the event. The maximum on-shelf transport of DIC through the upwelling event was found to be 65±15×10-3 Tg C d-1. TA and the oxygen isotope ratio of water (δ18O-H2O) are used to examine water-mass distributions in the study area and to investigate the influence of Pacific Water, Mackenzie River freshwater, and sea-ice melt on carbon dynamics and air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the surface mixed layer. Understanding carbon transfer in this seasonally dynamic environment is key to quantify the importance of Arctic shelf regions to the global carbon cycle and provide a basis for understanding how it will

  8. Inorganic carbon fluxes on the Mackenzie Shelf of the Beaufort Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mol

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Mackenzie Shelf in the southeastern Beaufort Sea is a region that has experienced large changes in the past several decades as warming, sea-ice loss, and increased river discharge have altered carbon cycling. Upwelling and downwelling events are common on the shelf, caused by strong, fluctuating along-shore winds, resulting in cross-shelf Ekman transport, and an alternating estuarine and anti-estuarine circulation. Downwelling carries dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and other remineralization products off the shelf and into the deep basin for possible long-term storage in the world's oceans. Upwelling carries DIC and nutrient-rich waters from the Pacific-origin upper halocline layer (UHL onto the shelf. Profiles of DIC and total alkalinity (TA taken in August and September of 2014 are used to investigate the cycling of carbon on the Mackenzie Shelf. The along-shore transport of water and the cross-shelf transport of DIC are quantified using velocity field output from a simulation of the Arctic and Northern Hemisphere Atlantic (ANHA4 configuration of the Nucleus of European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO framework. A strong upwelling event prior to sampling on the Mackenzie Shelf took place, bringing CO2-rich (elevated pCO2 water from the UHL onto the shelf bottom. The maximum on-shelf DIC flux was estimated at 16.9×103 mol C d−1 m−2 during the event. The maximum on-shelf transport of DIC through the upwelling event was found to be 65±15×10−3 Tg C d−1. TA and the oxygen isotope ratio of water (δ18O-H2O are used to examine water-mass distributions in the study area and to investigate the influence of Pacific Water, Mackenzie River freshwater, and sea-ice melt on carbon dynamics and air–sea fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2 in the surface mixed layer. Understanding carbon transfer in this seasonally dynamic environment is key to quantify the importance of Arctic shelf regions to the global carbon cycle and provide a basis

  9. Event segmentation ability uniquely predicts event memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Jesse Q; Zacks, Jeffrey M; Hambrick, David Z; Zacks, Rose T; Kurby, Christopher A; Bailey, Heather R; Eisenberg, Michelle L; Beck, Taylor M

    2013-11-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Radionuclide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark H. Anderson; MichaelL. Corradini; Riccardo Bonazza; Jeremy R. Licht

    2007-01-01

    A supercritical water heat transfer facility has been built at the University of Wisconsin to study heat transfer in a circular and square annular flow channel. A series of integral heat transfer measurements has been carried out over a wide range of heat flux, mass velocity and bulk water temperatures at a pressure of 25 MPa. The circular annular test section geometry is a 1.07 cm diameter heater rod within a 4.29 diameter flow channel

  12. Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark H. Anderson; MichaelL. Corradini; Riccardo Bonazza; Jeremy R. Licht

    2007-10-03

    A supercritical water heat transfer facility has been built at the University of Wisconsin to study heat transfer in ancircular and square annular flow channel. A series of integral heat transfer measurements has been carried out over a wide range of heat flux, mas velocity and bulk water temperatures at a pressure of 25 MPa. The circular annular test section geometry is a 1.07 cm diameter heater rod within a 4.29 diameter flow channel.

  13. The inverse Numerical Computer Program FLUX-BOT for estimating Vertical Water Fluxes from Temperature Time-Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauth, N.; Schmidt, C.; Munz, M.

    2016-12-01

    Heat as a natural tracer to quantify water fluxes between groundwater and surface water has evolved to a standard hydrological method. Typically, time series of temperatures in the surface water and in the sediment are observed and are subsequently evaluated by a vertical 1D representation of heat transport by advection and dispersion. Several analytical solutions as well as their implementation into user-friendly software exist in order to estimate water fluxes from the observed temperatures. Analytical solutions can be easily implemented but assumptions on the boundary conditions have to be made a priori, e.g. sinusoidal upper temperature boundary. Numerical models offer more flexibility and can handle temperature data which is characterized by irregular variations such as storm-event induced temperature changes and thus cannot readily be incorporated in analytical solutions. This also reduced the effort of data preprocessing such as the extraction of the diurnal temperature variation. We developed a software to estimate water FLUXes Based On Temperatures- FLUX-BOT. FLUX-BOT is a numerical code written in MATLAB which is intended to calculate vertical water fluxes in saturated sediments, based on the inversion of measured temperature time series observed at multiple depths. It applies a cell-centered Crank-Nicolson implicit finite difference scheme to solve the one-dimensional heat advection-conduction equation. Besides its core inverse numerical routines, FLUX-BOT includes functions visualizing the results and functions for performing uncertainty analysis. We provide applications of FLUX-BOT to generic as well as to measured temperature data to demonstrate its performance.

  14. A Review of Wettability Effect on Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Gwang Hyeok; Jeun, Gyoo Dong; Kim, Sung Joong

    2012-01-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) and nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient (NBHTC) are the key parameters characterizing pool boiling heat transfer. These variables are complicatedly related to thermal-hydraulic parameters of surface wettability, nucleation site density, bubble departure diameter and frequency, to mention a few. In essence, wettability effect on pool boiling heat transfer has been a major fuel to enhance the CHF. Often, however, the improved wettability effect hinders the nucleate boiling. Thus a comprehensive review of such wettability effect may enlighten a further study in this boiling heat transfer area. Phan et al. described surface wettability effects on boiling heat transfer

  15. Thermal problems on high flux beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.T.

    1983-09-01

    Wiggler and undulator magnets can provide very intense photon flux densities to beam line components. This paper addresses some thermal/materials consequences due to such impingement. The LBL/Exxon/SSRL hybrid-wiggler Beam Line VI now nearing operation will be able to provide up to approx. 7 kW of total photon power at planned SPEAR operating conditions. The first masks are located at 6.5 meters from the source and may receive a peak power density (transverse to the beam) exceeding 20 kW/cm 2 . Significantly, this heat transfer rate exceeds that radiated from the sun's surface (7 kW/cm 2 ) and is comparable to that of welding torches. Clearing, cooling and configuration are of critical importance. Configurations for the first fixed mask, the movable mask, and the pivot mask on this beam line are presented together with considerations of thermal stress fatigue and of heat transfer by conduction to water-cooling circuits. Some preliminary information on heating of crystals and mirrors is also presented

  16. Analyzer of neutron flux in real time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas S, A.S.; Carrillo M, R.A.; Balderas, E.G.

    1999-01-01

    With base in the study of the real signals of neutron flux of instability events occurred in the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant where the nucleus oscillation phenomena of the reactor are in the 0 to 2.5 Hz range, it has been seen the possibility about the development a surveillance and diagnostic equipment capable to analyze in real time the behavior of nucleus in this frequencies range. An important method for surveillance the stability of the reactor nucleus is the use of the Power spectral density which allows to determine the frequencies and amplitudes contained in the signals. It is used an instrument carried out by LabVIEW graphic programming with a data acquisition card of 16 channels which works at Windows 95/98 environment. (Author)

  17. Plastic scintillator detector for pulsed flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplun, A. A.; Taraskin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A neutron detector, providing charged particle detection capability, has been designed. The main purpose of the detector is to measure pulsed fluxes of both charged particles and neutrons during scientific experiments. The detector consists of commonly used neutron-sensitive ZnS(Ag) / 6LiF scintillator screens wrapping a layer of polystyrene based scintillator (BC-454, EJ-254 or equivalent boron loaded plastic). This type of detector design is able to log a spatial distribution of events and may be scaled to any size. Different variations of the design were considered and modelled in specialized toolkits. The article presents a review of the detector design features as well as simulation results.

  18. Plastic scintillator detector for pulsed flux measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadilin, V V; Kaplun, A A; Taraskin, A A

    2017-01-01

    A neutron detector, providing charged particle detection capability, has been designed. The main purpose of the detector is to measure pulsed fluxes of both charged particles and neutrons during scientific experiments. The detector consists of commonly used neutron-sensitive ZnS(Ag) / 6 LiF scintillator screens wrapping a layer of polystyrene based scintillator (BC-454, EJ-254 or equivalent boron loaded plastic). This type of detector design is able to log a spatial distribution of events and may be scaled to any size. Different variations of the design were considered and modelled in specialized toolkits. The article presents a review of the detector design features as well as simulation results. (paper)

  19. Coordinates for Representing Radiation Belt Particle Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Juan G.; Lejosne, Solène

    2018-02-01

    Fifty years have passed since the parameter "L-star" was introduced in geomagnetically trapped particle dynamics. It is thus timely to review the use of adiabatic theory in present-day studies of the radiation belts, with the intention of helping to prevent common misinterpretations and the frequent confusion between concepts like "distance to the equatorial point of a field line," McIlwain's L-value, and the trapped particle's adiabatic L* parameter. And too often do we miss in the recent literature a proper discussion of the extent to which some observed time and space signatures of particle flux could simply be due to changes in magnetospheric field, especially insofar as off-equatorial particles are concerned. We present a brief review on the history of radiation belt parameterization, some "recipes" on how to compute adiabatic parameters, and we illustrate our points with a real event in which magnetospheric disturbance is shown to adiabatically affect the particle fluxes measured onboard the Van Allen Probes.

  20. Structures of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes and comparison with their solar sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qiang [Department of Space Science/CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Qiu, Jiong [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Dasgupta, B.; Khare, A.; Webb, G. M., E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu, E-mail: qiu@physics.montana.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    Whether a magnetic flux rope is pre-existing or formed in situ in the Sun's atmosphere, there is little doubt that magnetic reconnection is essential to release the flux rope during its ejection. During this process, the question remains: how does magnetic reconnection change the flux-rope structure? In this work, we continue with the original study of Qiu et al. by using a larger sample of flare-coronal mass ejection (CME)-interplanetary CME (ICME) events to compare properties of ICME/magnetic cloud (MC) flux ropes measured at 1 AU and properties of associated solar progenitors including flares, filaments, and CMEs. In particular, the magnetic field-line twist distribution within interplanetary magnetic flux ropes is systematically derived and examined. Our analysis shows that, similar to what was found before, for most of these events, the amount of twisted flux per AU in MCs is comparable with the total reconnection flux on the Sun, and the sign of the MC helicity is consistent with the sign of the helicity of the solar source region judged from the geometry of post-flare loops. Remarkably, we find that about half of the 18 magnetic flux ropes, most of them associated with erupting filaments, have a nearly uniform and relatively low twist distribution from the axis to the edge, and the majority of the other flux ropes exhibit very high twist near the axis, up to ≳ 5 turns per AU, which decreases toward the edge. The flux ropes are therefore not linearly force-free. We also conduct detailed case studies showing the contrast of two events with distinct twist distribution in MCs as well as different flare and dimming characteristics in solar source regions, and discuss how reconnection geometry reflected in flare morphology may be related to the structure of the flux rope formed on the Sun.

  1. Heat tranfer decrease during water boiling in a tube for the heat flux step distribution by the tube length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remizov, O.V.; Sergeev, V.V.; Yurkov, Yu.I.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the heat flux distribution along the circular tube length on supercritical convective heat transfer at parameters typical for steam generators heated by liquid metal is studied. The effect of conditions in a under- and a supercritical zones of a vertical tube with independently heated lower and upper sections on supercritical convective heat transfer is studied on a water circulation loop at 9.8-17.7 MPa pressure and 330-1000 kg/m 2 s mass velocities. The experimental heat fluxes varied within the following limits: at the upper section from 0 to 474 kW/m 2 , at the lower section from 190 to 590 kW/m 2 . Analysis of the obtained data shows that when heat flux changes in the supercritical zone rewetting of the heated surface and simultaneous existence of two critical zones are observed. The effect of heat flux in the supercritical zone on convective heat transfer is ambiguous: the heat flux growth up to 60-100 kW/m 2 leads to increasing minimum values of the heat transfer factor in the supercritical zone, and a further heat flux growth - to their reduction. The conclusion is made that the value of heat flux in the undercritical zone affects convective heat transfer in the supercritical zone mainly through changing the value of critical vapour content

  2. Flux flow and flux dynamics in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.H.; Turchinskaya, M.; Swartzendruber, L.J.; Roitburd, A.; Lundy, D.; Ritter, J.; Kaiser, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    Because high temperature superconductors, including BYCO and BSSCO, are type 2 superconductors with relatively low H(sub c 1) values and high H(sub c 2) values, they will be in a critical state for many of their applications. In the critical state, with the applied field between H(sub c 1) and H(sub c 2), flux lines have penetrated the material and can form a flux lattice and can be pinned by structural defects, chemical inhomogeneities, and impurities. A detailed knowledge of how flux penetrates the material and its behavior under the influence of applied fields and current flow, and the effect of material processing on these properties, is required in order to apply, and to improve the properties of these superconductors. When the applied field is changed rapidly, the time dependence of flux change can be divided into three regions, an initial region which occurs very rapidly, a second region in which the magnetization has a 1n(t) behavior, and a saturation region at very long times. A critical field is defined for depinning, H(sub c,p) as that field at which the hysteresis loop changes from irreversible to reversible. As a function of temperature, it is found that H(sub c,p) is well described by a power law with an exponent between 1.5 and 2.5. The behavior of H(sub c,p) for various materials and its relationship to flux flow and flux dynamics are discussed

  3. Heat