WorldWideScience

Sample records for fluss-sensitiver in-vivo 4d-mrt

  1. The in vivo biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms...... have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo...... experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms...

  2. Desmosomes In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Garrod

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure, function, and regulation of desmosomal adhesion in vivo are discussed. Most desmosomes in tissues exhibit calcium-independent adhesion, which is strongly adhesive or “hyperadhesive”. This is fundamental to tissue strength. Almost all studies in culture are done on weakly adhesive, calcium-dependent desmosomes, although hyperadhesion can be readily obtained in confluent cell culture. Calcium dependence is a default condition in vivo, found in wounds and embryonic development. Hyperadhesion appears to be associated with an ordered arrangement of the extracellular domains of the desmosomal cadherins, which gives rise to the intercellular midline identified in ultrastructural studies. This in turn probably depends on molecular order in the desmosomal plaque. Protein kinase C downregulates hyperadhesion and there is preliminary evidence that it may also be regulated by tyrosine kinases. Downregulation of desmosomes in vivo may occur by internalisation of whole desmosomes rather than disassembly. Hyperadhesion has implications for diseases such as pemphigus.

  3. Cadmium analysis in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.

    1980-12-01

    The report describes the development of a method for in vivo Cd-analysis. The method is based on the analysis of the prompt gamma radiation which is emitted by neutron capture of the isotope Cd113. Different parts of the body can be analysed selectively by neutrons in the interval of 1 to 100 KeV. The results show that the level of Cd in Kidneys can be measured without exceeding the dose of 40 mrad and that only 20% uncertainty is introduced when analysing Cd. The development has been made at the R2 reactor in Studsvik using 25 KeV neutrons. (G.B.)

  4. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology in vivo Nanotechnology in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-04-01

    -imaging labels [4]. A surface hydroxyl group renders silicon quantum dots soluble in water and the photoluminescence can be made stable with oxygen-passivation. In addition, researchers in Japan have demonstrated how the initially modest yield in the preparation of silicon quantum dots can be improved to tens of milligrams per batch, thus further promoting their application in bio-imaging [5]. In the search for non-toxic quantum dots, researchers at the Amrita Centre for Nanoscience in India have prepared heavy metal-free quantum dot bio-probes based on single phase ZnS [6]. The quantum dots are selectively doped with metals, transition metals and halides to provide tuneable luminescence properties, and they are surface conjugated with folic acid for cancer targeting. The quantum dots were demonstrated to be water-soluble, non-toxic in normal and cancer cell lines, and have bright, tuneable luminescence. So far most of the quantum dots developed for bio-imaging have had excitation and emission wavelengths in the visible spectrum, which is highly absorbed by tissue. This limits imaging with these quantum dots to superficial tissues. This week, researchers in China and the US reported work developing functionalized dots for in vivo tumour vasculature in the infrared part of the spectrum [7]. In addition the quantum dots were functionalised with glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides, which target the vasculature of almost all types of growing tumours, unlike antibody- or aptamer-mediated targeting strategies that are specific to a particular cancer type. In this issue, researchers in China and the US demonstrate a novel type of contrast agent for ultrasonic tumour imaging [8]. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonic tumour imaging extends the diagnostic and imaging capabilities of traditional techniques. The use of nanoparticles as ultrasound contrast agents exploits the presence of open pores in the range of 380 to 780 nm in tumour blood vessels, which enhance the permeability and retention

  5. Nanodiamonds for In Vivo Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, KiranJ; Hasani, Masoumeh; Zheng, Tingting; Schirhagl, Romana

    2018-05-01

    Due to their unique optical properties, diamonds are the most valued gemstones. However, beyond the sparkle, diamonds have a number of unique properties. Their extreme hardness gives them outstanding performance as abrasives and cutting tools. Similar to many materials, their nanometer-sized form has yet other unique properties. Nanodiamonds are very inert but still can be functionalized on the surface. Additionally, they can be made in very small sizes and a narrow size distribution. Nanodiamonds can also host very stable fluorescent defects. Since they are protected in the crystal lattice, they never bleach. These defects can also be utilized for nanoscale sensing since they change their optical properties, for example, based on temperature or magnetic fields in their surroundings. In this Review, in vivo applications are focused upon. To this end, how different diamond materials are made and how this affects their properties are discussed first. Next, in vivo biocompatibility studies are reviewed. Finally, the reader is introduced to in vivo applications of diamonds. These include drug delivery, aiding radiology, labeling, and use in cosmetics. The field is critically reviewed and a perspective on future developments is provided. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. In vivo counting of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, H.E.

    1985-03-01

    A state-of-the-art radiation detector system consisting of six individually mounted intrinsic germanium planar detectors, each 20 cm 2 by 13 mm thick, mounted together such that the angle of the whole system can be changed to match the slope of the chest of the person being counted, is described. The sensitivity of the system for counting uranium and plutonium in vivo and the precedures used in calibrating the system are also described. Some results of counts done on uranium mill workers are presented. 15 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Nanomaterials for In Vivo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2017-02-08

    In vivo imaging, which enables us to peer deeply within living subjects, is producing tremendous opportunities both for clinical diagnostics and as a research tool. Contrast material is often required to clearly visualize the functional architecture of physiological structures. Recent advances in nanomaterials are becoming pivotal to generate the high-resolution, high-contrast images needed for accurate, precision diagnostics. Nanomaterials are playing major roles in imaging by delivering large imaging payloads, yielding improved sensitivity, multiplexing capacity, and modularity of design. Indeed, for several imaging modalities, nanomaterials are now not simply ancillary contrast entities, but are instead the original and sole source of image signal that make possible the modality's existence. We address the physicochemical makeup/design of nanomaterials through the lens of the physical properties that produce contrast signal for the cognate imaging modality-we stratify nanomaterials on the basis of their (i) magnetic, (ii) optical, (iii) acoustic, and/or (iv) nuclear properties. We evaluate them for their ability to provide relevant information under preclinical and clinical circumstances, their in vivo safety profiles (which are being incorporated into their chemical design), their modularity in being fused to create multimodal nanomaterials (spanning multiple different physical imaging modalities and therapeutic/theranostic capabilities), their key properties, and critically their likelihood to be clinically translated.

  8. In-vivo quantitative measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    So far by positron CT, the quantitative analyses of oxygen consumption rate, blood flow distribution, glucose metabolic rate and so on have been carried out. The largest merit of using the positron CT is the observation and verification of mankind have become easy. Recently, accompanying the rapid development of the mapping tracers for central nervous receptors, the observation of many central nervous receptors by the positron CT has become feasible, and must expectation has been placed on the elucidation of brain functions. The conditions required for in vitro processes cannot be realized in strict sense in vivo. The quantitative measurement of in vivo tracer method is carried out by measuring the accumulation and movement of a tracer after its administration. The movement model of the mapping tracer for central nervous receptors is discussed. The quantitative analysis using a steady movement model, the measurement of dopamine receptors by reference method, the measurement of D 2 receptors using 11C-Racloprode by direct method, and the possibility of measuring dynamics bio-reaction are reported. (K.I.)

  9. In vivo fertilization of banana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taliane Leila Soares

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the in vivo fertilization process of banana cultivars. The diploid hybrid (AA 091087-01 was the male progenitor. Flower samples were checked for fertilization from the first to the twentieth day after pollination. The size of the diploid ovules increased gradually at the beginning of the seed formation process. On the other hand, in the AAA triploids (Cavendish subgroup, the not fertilized ovules were aborted. In the AAB triploids (Prata subgroup some ovules were fertilized. The flowers of Grand Naine, Nanicão and 'Pacovan' cultivars presented necrosis in the distal part of the ovary on the first day after pollination. Necrosis can hinder pollen tube growth towards the ovule, which might be related to the low seed yield in 'Pacovan' cultivars and to the absence of seeds in the Cavendish subgroup cultivars.

  10. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruchten, D.A.; Hickman, D.P.

    1991-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs

  11. In Vivo Imaging of Molecularly Targeted Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid identification of in vivo affinity ligands would have far-reaching applications for imaging specific molecular targets, in vivo systems imaging, and medical use. We have developed a high-throughput method for identifying and optimizing ligands to map and image biologic targets of interest in vivo. We directly labeled viable phage clones with far-red fluorochromes and comparatively imaged them in vivo by multichannel fluorescence ratio imaging. Using Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (osteonectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 as model targets, we show that: 1 fluorescently labeled phage retains target specificity on labeling; 2 in vivo distribution can be quantitated (detection thresholds of ~ 300 phage/mm3 tissue throughout the entire depth of the tumor using fluorescent tomographic imaging; and 3 fluorescently labeled phage itself can serve as a replenishable molecular imaging agent. The described method should find widespread application in the rapid in vivo discovery and validation of affinity ligands and, importantly, in the use of fluorochrome-labeled phage clones as in vivo imaging agents.

  12. Lymphotoxin prevention of diethylnitrosamine carcinogenesis in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransom, J.H.; Evans, C.H.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Development of intervention measures to control cancer would be facilitated by being able to monitor in vivo carcinogenesis by in vitro quantitation of early indices of neoplastic transformation to assess the in vivo effectiveness of preventive-therapeutic measures. Pregnant Syrian golden hamsters were used in an in vivo-in vitro transplacental model of carcinogenesis to determine the extent that in vivo administration of immunologic hormone preparations along with chemical carcinogen would prevent morphologic transformation assessed in vitro. Pregnant hamsters at 10-11 days of gestation were given injections ip of 3 mg diethylnitrosamine (DENA)/100 g body weight and were killed 2 days later when fetal cells were seeded for colony formation. The frequency of morphologically transformed colonies was assessed after 7 days of growth. Cloning efficiency and mean transformation frequency after DENA exposure were 3.6% and 1 X 10(-4) per cell seeded, respectively. The ip injection of an immunologic hormone preparation reduced the transformation frequency by 46%. The hormone preparation, containing 10,000 U of lymphotoxin but no detectable interferon, was the ultrafiltered lymphokines (greater than 10,000 mol wt) from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated hamster peritoneal leukocytes. The effect of lymphotoxin on cocarcinogenic exposure of fetal cells to DENA in vivo followed by X-irradiation in vitro was also determined. Cells exposed to 250 rad in vitro had a cloning efficiency of 0.5% and a transformation frequency of 0.4 X 10(-4) per cell seeded. After DENA injection and X-irradiation, the transformation frequency increased to 1 X 10(-4) and was inhibited 64% by lymphotoxin in vivo. Thus immunologic hormones (e.g., lymphotoxin) can prevent carcinogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, in vitro quantitation of transformation is a rapid means for evaluating therapeutic and autochthonous effector mechanisms for their ability to prevent or otherwise modulate carcinogenesis in vivo

  13. Muscle-Driven In Vivo Nanogenerator

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhou

    2010-05-05

    (Figure Presented) A nanogenerator based on a single piezoelectric fine wire producing an alternating current (AC) is successfully used for the harvesting of biomechanical energy under in vivo conditions. We demonstrate the implanting and working of such a nanogenerator in a live rat where it harvests energy generated by its breathing or heart beating. This study shows the potential of applying these nanogenerators for driving in vivo nanodevices. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KCaA, Weinheim.

  14. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented

  15. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented.

  16. In vivo cell tracking with bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Molecular imaging is a fast growing biomedical research that allows the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms. In vivo tracking of cells is an indispensable technology for development and optimization of cell therapy for replacement or renewal of damaged or diseased tissue using transplanted cells, often autologous cells. With outstanding advantages of bioluminescence imaging, the imaging approach is most commonly applied for in vivo monitoring of transplanted stem cells or immune cells in order to assess viability of administered cells with therapeutic efficacy in preclinical small animal models. In this review, a general overview of bioluminescence is provided and recent updates of in vivo cell tracking using the bioluminescence signal are discussed.

  17. In Vivo Production of Entomopathogenic Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Morales-Ramos, Juan A; Rojas, M Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    In nature, entomopathogenic nematodes in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema are obligate parasites of insects. The nematodes are used widely as biopesticides for suppression of insect pests. More than a dozen entomopathogenic nematode species have been commercialized for use in biological control. Most nematodes intended for commercial application are produced in artificial media via solid or liquid fermentation. However, for laboratory research and small greenhouse or field trials, in vivo production of entomopathogenic nematodes is the common method of propagation. Additionally, small companies continue to produce nematodes using in vivo methods for application in niche markets. Advances in mechanization and alternative production routes (e.g., production geared toward application of nematodes in infected host cadavers) can improve efficiency and economy of scale. The objective of this chapter is to describe basic and advanced procedures for in vivo production of entomopathogenic nematodes.

  18. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mijnheer, Ben; Beddar, Sam; Izewska, Joanna; Reft, Chester

    2013-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors’ opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks

  19. Computational design of in vivo biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, Bálint; Gali, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals (or quantum dots) are very promising agents for bioimaging applications because their optical properties are superior compared to those of conventional organic dyes. However, not all the properties of these quantum dots suit the stringent criteria of in vivo applications, i.e. their employment in living organisms that might be of importance in therapy and medicine. In our review, we first summarize the properties of an ‘ideal’ biomarker needed for in vivo applications. Despite recent efforts, no such hand-made fluorescent quantum dot exists that may be considered as ‘ideal’ in this respect. We propose that ab initio atomistic simulations with predictive power can be used to design ‘ideal’ in vivo fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles. We briefly review such ab initio methods that can be applied to calculate the electronic and optical properties of very small nanocrystals, with extra emphasis on density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT which are the most suitable approaches for the description of these systems. Finally, we present our recent results on this topic where we investigated the applicability of nanodiamonds and silicon carbide nanocrystals for in vivo bioimaging. (topical review)

  20. In vivo X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlgren, L.

    1980-02-01

    Measurements on five occupationally exposed persons have shown that it is possible to use X-ray fluorescence analysis for in vivo measurements of lead in the skeleton. The technique for calibrating in vivo X-ray fluorescence measurements of lead in bone tissue has been studied in detail and a two-component phantom simulating the bone and the soft tissue parts of the finger constructed. The technique has been used for in vivo measurements on 22 occupationally exposed persons. The minimum detectable concentration of lead in fingerbones was found to be around 20 μg x g -1 . The lead concentrations in their skeletons and blood were compared: the correlation was poor. The variations in lead concentrations in the skeleton have been studied in occupationally exposed persons and in samples from archaeological skeletons. The sensitivity and the minimum detectable concentration of cadmium in the kidney cortex in in vivo measurements has been studied by measurements on kidney models. The minimum detectable concentration was 20 μg x g -1 at a skin-kidney distance of 30 mm and 40 μg x g -1 at 40 mm. Five persons occupationally exposed were studied. (Author)

  1. In-vivo optical investigation of psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Cicchi, Riccardo; Bruscino, Nicola; Alfieri, Domenico; Massi, Daniela; Lotti, Torello; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2011-03-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease of the skin characterized by hyperkeratosis, hyperproliferation of the epidermis, inflammatory cell accumulation and increased dilatation of dermal papillary blood vessels. Cases of psoriasis were investigated in vivo with optical means in order to evaluate the potential of in vivo optical biopsy. A Polarization Multispectral Dermoscope was employed for the macroscopic observation. Features such as the 'dotted' blood vessels pattern was observed with high contrast. The average size of dot vessels in Psoriasis was measured to be 974 μm2 which is much higher compared to healthy skin. High resolution image sections of the epidermis and the dermis were produced with a custom made Multiphoton Microscope. Imaging extended from the surface of the lesion down to the papillary dermis, at a depth of 200 μm. In the epidermis, a characteristic morphology of the stratum corneum found only in Psoriasis was revealed. Additionally, the cytoplasmic area of the cells in the stratum spinosum layer was found to be smaller than normal. In the dermis the morphological features were more pronounced, where the elongated dermal papillae dominated the papillary layer. Their length exceeds 100μm, which is a far greater value compared to that of healthy skin. These in vivo observations are consistent with the ex vivo histopathological observations, supporting both the applicability and potentiality of multispectral dermoscopy and multiphoton microscopy in the field of in vivo optical investigation and biopsy of skin.

  2. Miniature semiconductor detectors for in vivo dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, A. B.; Cutajar, D.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Takacs, G.; Cornelius, I. M.; Yudelev, M.; Zaider, M.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon mini-semiconductor detectors are found in wide applications for in vivo personal dosimetry and dosimetry and Micro-dosimetry of different radiation oncology modalities. These applications are based on integral and spectroscopy modes of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor and silicon p-n junction detectors. The advantages and limitations of each are discussed. (authors)

  3. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijnheer, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Izewska, Joanna [Division of Human Health, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna 1400 (Austria); Reft, Chester [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  4. Muscle-Driven In Vivo Nanogenerator

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhou; Zhu, Guang; Yang, Rusen; Wang, Aurelia C.; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2010-01-01

    of such a nanogenerator in a live rat where it harvests energy generated by its breathing or heart beating. This study shows the potential of applying these nanogenerators for driving in vivo nanodevices. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KCaA, Weinheim.

  5. In vivo gluten challenge in coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HJ Ellis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo gluten challenge has been used since the early 1950s to study the role of cereal fractions in celiac disease. While early studies relied on crude indicators of celiac toxicity, the advent of jejunal biopsy and sophisticated immunohistochemical techniques has allowed accurate studies to be performed. Studies to determine the nature of the cereal component that is toxic to patients with celiac disease have concentrated on wheat because of its nutritional importance. A number of in vitro studies indicated the presence of one or more celiac-activating epitopes with the N-terminus of the A-gliadin molecule. In vivo challenge with three synthetic peptides subsequently indicated the toxicity of a peptide corresponding to amino acids 31 to 49 of A-gliadin. In vivo gluten challenge is the gold standard for the assessment of celiac toxicity; however, jejunal biopsy is a relatively invasive procedure, thus, other methods have been investigated. Direct infusion of the rectum with gluten has been shown to result in an increase in mucosal intraepithelial lymphocytes, occurring only in celiac patients. This method has been used to study the celiac toxicity of gliadin subfractions. The in vitro technique of small intestinal biopsy organ culture is also a useful tool and appears to give the same results as in vivo challenge. The importance of tiny amounts of gliadin in the diet, such as that which occurs in wheat starch, has been studied by in vivo challenge; this technique has clarified the position of oats in the gluten-free diet. Several studies suggest that this cereal may be included in the diet of most adult celiac patients. Studies of the transport of gliadin across the enterocyte following ingestion or challenge suggest that gliadin may be metabolized by a different pathway in celiac disease. This could result in an abnormal presentation to the immune system, triggering a pathogenic rather than a tolerogenic response.

  6. Microstructural imaging of human neocortex in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Luke J; Kirilina, Evgeniya; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2018-03-24

    The neocortex of the human brain is the seat of higher brain function. Modern imaging techniques, chief among them magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), allow non-invasive imaging of this important structure. Knowledge of the microstructure of the neocortex has classically come from post-mortem histological studies of human tissue, and extrapolations from invasive animal studies. From these studies, we know that the scale of important neocortical structure spans six orders of magnitude, ranging from the size of axonal diameters (microns), to the size of cortical areas responsible for integrating sensory information (centimetres). MRI presents an opportunity to move beyond classical methods, because MRI is non-invasive and MRI contrast is sensitive to neocortical microstructure over all these length scales. MRI thus allows inferences to be made about neocortical microstructure in vivo, i.e. MRI-based in vivo histology. We review recent literature that has applied and developed MRI-based in vivo histology to probe the microstructure of the human neocortex, focusing specifically on myelin, iron, and neuronal fibre mapping. We find that applications such as cortical parcellation (using R 1 maps as proxies for myelin content) and investigation of cortical iron deposition with age (using R 2 * maps) are already contributing to the frontiers of knowledge in neuroscience. Neuronal fibre mapping in the cortex remains challenging in vivo, but recent improvements in diffusion MRI hold promise for exciting applications in the near future. The literature also suggests that utilising multiple complementary quantitative MRI maps could increase the specificity of inferences about neocortical microstructure relative to contemporary techniques, but that further investment in modelling is required to appropriately combine the maps. In vivo histology of human neocortical microstructure is undergoing rapid development. Future developments will improve its specificity, sensitivity, and

  7. Lack of indirect sensitization in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetzel, F.W.; Avery, K.; Mensinger, M.; Frinak, S.; Tidwell, C.

    1985-01-01

    The possible utility of respiratory inhibiting drugs as indirect radiation sensitizers has been investigated in both in vitro and in vivo systems. In vitro studies were conducted in V79 monolayer and spheroid cultures examining both respiratory inhibition and radiation survival as end points. These drugs (BCNU, Mustargen and Chlorambucil) were found to be potent respiratory inhibitors and, in the spheroid system, to be effective indirect radiation sensitizers with enhancement ratios of approximately 2.0. In vivo studies with these drugs have also been conducted in a C/sub 3/H mouse MCa tumor system to determine if the same reoxygenation effect observed in spheroids could be demonstrated in the solid tumor system. Detailed microelectrode studies, employing each drug at its LD/sub 10/ level, have been unable to demonstrate any drug induced reoxygenation for any of the drugs tested. Complete details are presented

  8. Advanced tools for in vivo skin analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, Krzysztof; Zakowiecki, Daniel; Stefanowska, Justyna

    2010-05-01

    A thorough examination of the skin is essential for accurate disease diagnostics, evaluation of the effectiveness of topically applied drugs and the assessment of the results of dermatologic surgeries such as skin grafts. Knowledge of skin parameters is also important in the cosmetics industry, where the effects of skin care products are evaluated. Due to significant progress in the electronics and computer industries, sophisticated analytic devices are increasingly available for day-to-day diagnostics. The aim of this article is to review several advanced methods for in vivo skin analysis in humans: magnetic resonance imaging, electron paramagnetic resonance, laser Doppler flowmetry and time domain reflectometry. The molecular bases of these techniques are presented, and several interesting applications in the field are discussed. Methods for in vivo assessment of the biomechanical properties of human skin are also reviewed.

  9. In Vivo Radiobioassay and Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay monitoring for intakes of radioactive material is an essential part of the internal dosimetry program for radiation workers at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. This monitoring program includes direct measurements of radionuclides in the body by detecting photons that exit the body and analyses of radionuclides in excreta samples. The specialized equipment and instrumentation required to make the direct measurements of these materials in the body are located at the In Vivo Radiobioassay and Research Facility (IVRRF). The IVRRF was originally built in 1960 and was designed expressly for the in vivo measurement of radioactive material in Hanford workers. Most routine in vivo measurements are performed annually and special measurements are performed as needed. The primary source terms at the Hanford Site include fission and activation products (primarily 137Cs and 90Sr), uranium, uranium progeny, and transuranic radionuclides. The facility currently houses five shielded counting systems, men's and women's change rooms and an instrument maintenance and repair shop. Four systems include high purity germanium detectors and one system utilizes large sodium iodide detectors. These systems are used to perform an average of 7,000 measurements annually. This includes approximately 5000 whole body measurements analyzed for fission and activation products and 2000 lung measurements analyzed for americium, uranium, and plutonium. Various other types of measurements are performed periodically to estimate activity in wounds, the thyroid, the liver, and the skeleton. The staff maintains the capability to detect and quantify activity in essentially any tissue or organ. The in vivo monitoring program that utilizes the facility is accredited by the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for direct radiobioassay.

  10. Pharmaceutical applications of in vivo EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, K.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the applications of in vivo EPR in the field of pharmacy. In addition to direct detection of free radical metabolites and measurement of oxygen, EPR can be used to characterize the mechanisms of drug release from biodegradable polymers. Unique information about drug concentration, the microenvironment (viscosity, polarity, pH) and biodistribution (by localized measurement or EPR Imaging) can be obtained. (author)

  11. Adenovirus sequences required for replication in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, K; Pearson, G D

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the in vivo replication properties of plasmids carrying deletion mutations within cloned adenovirus terminal sequences. Deletion mapping located the adenovirus DNA replication origin entirely within the first 67 bp of the adenovirus inverted terminal repeat. This region could be further subdivided into two functional domains: a minimal replication origin and an adjacent auxillary region which boosted the efficiency of replication by more than 100-fold. The minimal origin occup...

  12. - In vivo monitoring of 5-FU

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the in vivo-monitoring of the enrichment of 5-FU liposomes in liver and liver metastases by MRI methods. Relative signal intensities of liver and tumor tissue were determined. After sacrifying animals concentrations of 5-FU and it´s active intracellular metabolite M3 were measured by HPLC techniques. We used CC531 adenocarcinoma in the liver of WAG/Rij rats as a standardized liver tumor model in our investigatio...

  13. In vivo imaging of human biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an extremely powerful method for studying aspects of the biochemistry of defined regions of the human body, literally 'in-vivo' biochemistry. To place this technique in the broader perspective of medical diagnostic methods an introduction is given to some of the more important imaging methods which are already widely used clinically. A brief summary of the most recently developed imaging method, which is based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy, is also included

  14. Multiphoton spectroscopy of human skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Hans G.; Weinigel, Martin; König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    In vivo multiphoton-intensity images and emission spectra of human skin are reported. Optical sections from different depths of the epidermis and dermis have been measured with near-infrared laser-pulse excitation. While the intensity images reveal information on the morphology, the spectra show emission characteristics of main endogenous skin fluorophores like keratin, NAD(P)H, melanin, elastin and collagen as well as of second harmonic generation induced by the excitation-light interaction with the dermal collagen network.

  15. In Vivo Cytogenetic Studies on Aspartame

    OpenAIRE

    AlSuhaibani, Entissar S.

    2010-01-01

    Aspartame (a-Laspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methylester) is a dipeptide low-calorie artificial sweetener that is widely used as a nonnutritive sweetener in foods and drinks. The safety of aspartame and its metabolic breakdown products (phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol) was investigated in vivo using chromosomal aberration (CA) test and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test in the bone marrow cells of mice. Swiss Albino male mice were exposed to aspartame (3.5, 35, 350 mg/kg body weight)....

  16. Cells in Dengue Virus Infection In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sansanee Noisakran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue has been recognized as one of the most important vector-borne emerging infectious diseases globally. Though dengue normally causes a self-limiting infection, some patients may develop a life-threatening illness, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF/dengue shock syndrome (DSS. The reason why DHF/DSS occurs in certain individuals is unclear. Studies in the endemic regions suggest that the preexisting antibodies are a risk factor for DHF/DSS. Viremia and thrombocytopenia are the key clinical features of dengue virus infection in patients. The amounts of virus circulating in patients are highly correlated with severe dengue disease, DHF/DSS. Also, the disturbance, mainly a transient depression, of hematological cells is a critical clinical finding in acute dengue patients. However, the cells responsible for the dengue viremia are unresolved in spite of the intensive efforts been made. Dengue virus appears to replicate and proliferate in many adapted cell lines, but these in vitro properties are extremely difficult to be reproduced in primary cells or in vivo. This paper summarizes reports on the permissive cells in vitro and in vivo and suggests a hematological cell lineage for dengue virus infection in vivo, with the hope that a new focus will shed light on further understanding of the complexities of dengue disease.

  17. Gut proteases target Yersinia invasin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freund Sandra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia enterocolitica is a common cause of food borne gastrointestinal disease. After oral uptake, yersiniae invade Peyer's patches of the distal ileum. This is accomplished by the binding of the Yersinia invasin to β1 integrins on the apical surface of M cells which overlie follicle associated lymphoid tissue. The gut represents a barrier that severely limits yersiniae from reaching deeper tissues such as Peyer's patches. We wondered if gut protease attack on invasion factors could contribute to the low number of yersiniae invading Peyer's patches. Findings Here we show that invasin is rapidly degraded in vivo by gut proteases in the mouse infection model. In vivo proteolytic degradation is due to proteolysis by several gut proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, and pepsin. Protease treated yersiniae are shown to be less invasive in a cell culture model. YadA, another surface adhesin is cleaved by similar concentrations of gut proteases but Myf was not cleaved, showing that not all surface proteins are equally susceptible to degradation by gut proteases. Conclusions We demonstrate that gut proteases target important Yersinia virulence factors such as invasin and YadA in vivo. Since invasin is completely degraded within 2-3 h after reaching the small intestine of mice, it is no longer available to mediate invasion of Peyer's patches.

  18. In vivo dosimetry during breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, M.A.; Herbert, C.E.; Joseph, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In vivo dosimetry during breast irradiation can be difficult due to frequent use of wedged fields, and the contour of the breast. In vivo measurements of central-axis entrance dose were made on 62 breast patients for two consecutive fractions. Discrepancies from expected doses of up to 13.4 % were found for lateral tangential fields (mean 4.31 %). It was proposed that large discrepancies were due to i) dosimetric I and setup errors, and ii) diode misplacement errors. An investigation of the effect of diode misplacement error was undertaken by reviewing possible measurement errors for 20 randomly selected breast treatments. A Monte Carlo study was used to examine the expected measurement error as a function of the standard deviation (SD) in diode placement error (see figure). A strong relationship was found between breast contour and wedge angle. Diode misplacement in the presence of a large wedge angle was identified as a major possible source of measurement error. For the sample of treatments considered, the Monte Carlo study showed that, ignoring general dosimetric errors, mean errors of 4 % are feasible for setup errors of the order of 1 cm (the width of the diode). This study has shown that accurate in vivo dosimetry requires separating measurements errors out from diode readings in order not to overestimate the actual dosimetric errors occurring at treatment time. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  19. Visualization of multidrug resistance in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrikse, N.H.; Franssen, E.J.F.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Vries, E.G.E. de; Vaalburg, W.

    1999-01-01

    Various mechanisms are involved in multidrug resistance (MDR) for chemotherapeutic drugs, such as the drug efflux pumps, P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP). In this review the mechanisms involved in MDR are described and results are reviewed with particular attention to the in vivo imaging of Pgp and MRP. Various detection assays provide information about the presence of drug efflux pumps at the mRNA and protein levels. However, these methods do not yield information about the dynamic function of Pgp and MRP in vivo. For the study of Pgp- and MRP-mediated transport, single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and positron emission tomography (PET) are available. Technetium-99m sestamibi is a substrate for Pgp and MRP, and has been used in clinical studies for tumour imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of the Pgp pump. Other 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals, such as 99m Tc-tetrofosmin and several 99 Tc-Q complexes, are also substrates for Pgp, but to date only results from in vitro and animal studies are available for these compounds. Several agents, including [ 11 C]colchicine, [ 11 C]verapamil and [ 11 C]daunorubicin, have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo. The results suggest that radiolabelled colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin are feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumours. Uptake of [ 11 C]colchicine and [ 11 C]verapamil is relatively high in the chest area, reducing the value of both tracers for monitoring Pgp-mediated drug transport in tumours located in this region. In addition, it has to be borne in mind that only comparison of Pgp-mediated transport of radioalabelled substrates in the absence and in the presence of Pgp blockade gives quantitative information on Pgp-mediated pharmacokinetics. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP. Therefore, N-[ 11 C]acetyl-leukotriene E 4 provides an opportunity to study MRP

  20. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seunghoon; Kim, Sehui; Kim, Jeehyun; Lee, Changho; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong

    2013-01-01

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo

  1. Audio frequency in vivo optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adie, Steven G.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Armstrong, Julian J.; Alexandrov, Sergey A.; Sampson, David D.

    2009-05-01

    We present a new approach to optical coherence elastography (OCE), which probes the local elastic properties of tissue by using optical coherence tomography to measure the effect of an applied stimulus in the audio frequency range. We describe the approach, based on analysis of the Bessel frequency spectrum of the interferometric signal detected from scatterers undergoing periodic motion in response to an applied stimulus. We present quantitative results of sub-micron excitation at 820 Hz in a layered phantom and the first such measurements in human skin in vivo.

  2. Audio frequency in vivo optical coherence elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adie, Steven G; Kennedy, Brendan F; Armstrong, Julian J; Alexandrov, Sergey A; Sampson, David D

    2009-01-01

    We present a new approach to optical coherence elastography (OCE), which probes the local elastic properties of tissue by using optical coherence tomography to measure the effect of an applied stimulus in the audio frequency range. We describe the approach, based on analysis of the Bessel frequency spectrum of the interferometric signal detected from scatterers undergoing periodic motion in response to an applied stimulus. We present quantitative results of sub-micron excitation at 820 Hz in a layered phantom and the first such measurements in human skin in vivo.

  3. In vivo P-31 MR diffusion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moonen, C.T.W.; Vanzijl, P.C.M.; LeBihan, D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the Stejskal-Tanner diffusion spin-echo sequence modified for the in vivo diffusion spectroscopy. The apparent diffusion constant D α was measured as a function of the diffusion time. Contrary to the results in phantom samples, a strong dependency of the D α for phosphocreatine (PCr) in the rat muscle tissue on diffusion time was observed, clearly indicating restricted diffusion effects and allowing an approximation of the size of the restricted volume (8-13 μm). This size fits well with the known dimensions of a normal muscle cell

  4. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seunghoon, E-mail: hsh860504@gmail.com; Kim, Sehui, E-mail: sehui0916@nate.com; Kim, Jeehyun, E-mail: jeehk@knu.ac.kr, E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Changho, E-mail: ch31037@postech.edu; Jeon, Mansik, E-mail: msjeon@postech.edu [Department of Creative IT Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulhong, E-mail: jeehk@knu.ac.kr, E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu [Department of Creative IT Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14221 (United States)

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  5. Sampling system for in vivo ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jorgen Arendt; Mathorne, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Newly developed algorithms for processing medical ultrasound images use the high frequency sampled transducer signal. This paper describes demands imposed on a sampling system suitable for acquiring such data and gives details about a prototype constructed. It acquires full clinical images...... at a sampling frequency of 20 MHz with a resolution of 12 bits. The prototype can be used for real time image processing. An example of a clinical in vivo image is shown and various aspects of the data acquisition process are discussed....

  6. In vitro and in vivo Development of Cloned Ovine Embryos using in vitro and in vivo Matured Oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, P; Nagashima, H; Sun, F-J

    1995-01-01

    Cloning of sheep embryos by nucleus transplantation can be achieved by using in vivo matured (oviductal) oocytes and in vivo culture. However, these steps involve cumbersome procedures. Therefore, the effects of in vivo vs. the equivalent in vitro procedures on the pre-implantation development of...

  7. Endogenous fibrinolysis facilitates clot retraction in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Andre L; Alwis, Imala; Maclean, Jessica A A; Priyananda, Pramith; Hawkett, Brian; Schoenwaelder, Simone M; Jackson, Shaun P

    2017-12-07

    Clot retraction refers to the process whereby activated platelets transduce contractile forces onto the fibrin network of a thrombus, which over time increases clot density and decreases clot size. This process is considered important for promoting clot stability and maintaining blood vessel patency. Insights into the mechanisms regulating clot retraction at sites of vascular injury have been hampered by a paucity of in vivo experimental models. By pairing localized vascular injury with thrombin microinjection in the mesenteric circulation of mice, we have demonstrated that the fibrin network of thrombi progressively compacts over a 2-hour period. This was a genuine retraction process, as treating thrombi with blebbistatin to inhibit myosin IIa-mediated platelet contractility prevented shrinkage of the fibrin network. Real-time confocal analysis of fibrinolysis after recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) administration revealed that incomplete proteolysis of fibrin polymers markedly facilitated clot retraction. Similarly, inhibiting endogenous fibrinolysis with tranexamic acid reduced retraction of fibrin polymers in vivo. In vitro clot retraction experiments indicated that subthreshold doses of tPA facilitated clot retraction through a plasmin-dependent mechanism. These effects correlated with changes in the elastic modulus of fibrin clots. These findings define the endogenous fibrinolytic system as an important regulator of clot retraction, and show that promoting clot retraction is a novel and complementary means by which fibrinolytic enzymes can reduce thrombus size. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. In vivo human buccal permeability of nicotine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Charlotte L; Olin, Helle B D; Dalhoff, Kim

    2006-01-01

    The aim was to examine the in vivo buccal pH-dependent permeability of nicotine in humans and furthermore compare the in vivo permeability of nicotine to previous in vitro permeability data. The buccal permeability of nicotine was examined in a three-way cross-over study in eight healthy non......-smokers using a buccal perfusion cell. The disappearance of nicotine from perfusion solutions with pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1 was studied for 3h. The apparent permeability of nicotine (P(app)) was determined at each pH value. Parotid saliva was collected in an attempt to assess systemic levels of nicotine....... The disappearance rate of nicotine increased significantly as the pH increased, which resulted in P(app) values of 0.57+/-0.55 x 10(-4), 2.10+/-0.23 x 10(-4), and 3.96+/-0.54 x 10(-4)cms(-1) (mean+/-S.D.) at pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1, respectively. A linear relationship (R(2)=0.993) was obtained between the P...

  9. Experimental In Vivo Models of Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Segal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Candidiasis is a multifaceted fungal disease including mucosal-cutaneous, visceral, and disseminated infections caused by yeast species of the genus Candida. Candida infections are among the most common human mycoses. Candida species are the third to fourth most common isolates from bloodstream infections in neutropenic or immunocompromised hospitalized patients. The mucosal-cutaneous forms—particularly vaginal infections—have a high prevalence. Vaginitis caused by Candida species is the second most common vaginal infection. Hence, candidiasis is a major subject for research, including experimental in vivo models to study pathogenesis, prevention, or therapy of the disease. The following review article will focus on various experimental in vivo models in different laboratory animals, such as mammals (mice, rats, rabbits, the fruit fly–Drosophila melanogaster, the larvae of the moth Galleria mellonella, or the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The review will describe the induction of the different clinical forms of candidiasis in the various models and the validity of such models in mimicking the human clinical situations. The use of such models for the assessment of antifungal drugs, evaluation of potential vaccines to protect before candidiasis, exploration of Candida virulence factors, and comparison of pathogenicity of different Candida species will be included in the review. All of the above will be reported as based on published studies of numerous investigators as well as on the research of the author and his group.

  10. Does simvastatin stimulate bone formation in vivo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chorev Michael

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins, potent compounds that inhibit cholesterol synthesis in the liver have been reported to induce bone formation, both in tissue culture and in rats and mice. To re-examine potential anabolic effects of statins on bone formation, we compared the activity of simvastatin (SVS to the known anabolic effects of PTH in an established model of ovariectomized (OVX Swiss-Webster mice. Methods Mice were ovariectomized at 12 weeks of age (T0, remained untreated for 5 weeks to allow development of osteopenia (T5, followed by treatment for 8 weeks (T13. Whole, trabecular and cortical femoral bone was analyzed by micro-computed tomography (micro CT. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS was used to detect the presence of SVS and its active metabolite, simvastatin β-hydroxy acid (SVS-OH in the mouse serum. Results Trabecular BV/TV at T13 was 4.2 fold higher in animals treated with PTH (80 micro-g/kg/day compared to the OVX-vehicle treated group (p in vivo study. Conclusions While PTH demonstrated the expected anabolic effect on bone, SVS failed to stimulate bone formation, despite our verification by LC/MS of the active SVS-OH metabolite in mouse serum. While statins have clear effects on bone formation in vitro, the formulation of existing 'liver-targeted' statins requires further refinement for efficacy in vivo.

  11. Oxide nano crystals for in vivo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, E.

    2005-01-01

    For small animal, fluorescence imaging is complementary with other techniques such as nuclear imaging (PET, SPECT). In vivo imaging studies imply the development of new luminescent probes, with a better sensitivity and a better biological targeting. These markers must filled biological and optical conditions. Our goal is to study new doped lanthanides oxide nano-crystals, their properties, their functionalization and their ability to target biological molecules. Characterizations of Y 2 O 3 :Eu and Y 2 SiO 5 :Eu nano-crystals (light diffusion, spectrometry, microscopy) allowed the determination of their size, their fluorescence properties but also their photo-bleaching. Means of stabilization of the nanoparticles were also studied in order to decrease their aggregation. Gd 2 O 3 :Eu nano-crystals were as well excited by X rays. Nano-crystals of Y 2 SiO 5 :Eu were functionalized, and organic ligands grafting evidenced by fluorescence and NMR. The functionalized nano-crystals could then recognized biological targets (streptavidin-biotin) and be incubated in the presence of HeLa cells. This report deals with the properties of these nano-crystals and their ability to meet the optical and biological conditions required for the application of in vivo imaging. (author)

  12. In vivo NMR spectroscopy of ripening avocado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, A.B.; Smith, G.M.; Nichols, B.

    1987-01-01

    Ripening of avocado fruit is associated with a dramatic increase in respiration. Previous studies have indicated that the increase in respiration is brought about by activation of the glycolytic reaction catalyzing the conversion of fructose-6-phosphate to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The authors reinvestigated the proposed role of glycolytic regulation in the respiratory increase using in vivo 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using an external surface coil and analysis of phosphofructokinase (PFK), phosphofructophosphotransferase (PFP), and fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (fru 2,6-P 2 ) levels in ripening avocado fruit. In vivo 31 P NMR spectroscopy revealed large increases in ATP levels accompanying the increase in respiration. Both glycolytic enzymes, PFK and PFP, were present in avocado fruit, with the latter activity being highly stimulated by fru 2,6-P 2 . Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate levels increased approximately 90% at the onset of ripening, indicating that the respiratory increase in ripening avocado may be regulated by the activation of PFP brought about by an increase in fru 2,6-P 2

  13. Fluorescence based molecular in vivo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Molecular imaging represents a modern research area that allows the in vivo study of molecular biological process kinetics using appropriate probes and visualization methods. This methodology may be defined- apart from the contrast media injection - as non-abrasive. In order to reach an in vivo molecular process imaging as accurate as possible the effects of the used probes on the biological should not be too large. The contrast media as important part of the molecular imaging can significantly contribute to the understanding of molecular processes and to the development of tailored diagnostics and therapy. Since more than 15 years PTB is developing optic imaging systems that may be used for fluorescence based visualization of tissue phantoms, small animal models and the localization of tumors and their predecessors, and for the early recognition of inflammatory processes in clinical trials. Cellular changes occur during many diseases, thus the molecular imaging might be of importance for the early diagnosis of chronic inflammatory diseases. Fluorescent dyes can be used as unspecific or also as specific contrast media, which allow enhanced detection sensitivity

  14. In vivo radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taghian, Alphonse; Freeman, Jill; Suit, Herman; DuBois, Willem; Budach, Wilfried; Baumann, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Human glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most resistant tumors to radiation. In previous reports, we have demonstrated a wide range of radiation sensitivity of GBM in vitro; that is, SF 2 values of 0.2 to 0.8. The great sensitivity of some of the cell lines is not in accord with the almost invariably fatal clinical outcome of patients with GBM. The sensitivity of cells in vitro pertains to cells cultured in optimal nutritional conditions. The TCD 50 (the radiation dose necessary to control 50% of the tumors locally) determined in lab animals is analogous to the use of radiation with curative intent in clinical radiation oncology. The aim of the present study was (a) to evaluate the sensitivity of GBM in vivo relative to that of other tumor types and (b) assess the relationship between the single dose TCD 50 of the xenografts and the sensitivity of the corresponding cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: The TCD 50 assay was used to study twelve human tumor lines. Four previously published values were added. A total of 10 GBM, 4 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 1 soft tissue sarcoma (STS), and 1 cancer colon (CC) are included in the analysis. For further suppression of the residual immune system, all the animals received 6 Gy whole-body irradiation 1 day before transplantation. Local tumor irradiations were given as a single dose, under conditions of clamp hypoxia using a Cs irradiator. Results: The TCD 50 values for the 10 GBM xenografts varied between 32.5 and 75.2 Gy, with an average of 47.2 ± 13.1 Gy. The TCD 50 values for the SCC were similar to those of the GBM and ranged from 40.7 and 54.4 Gy, with a mean of 46.8 ± 6.4. The difference between the average TCD 50 of GBM and SCC was not significant. The STS and CC xenografts had TCD 50 values of 46.0 and 49.2 Gy, respectively. No correlation was found between the TCD 50 in vivo and the SF 2 or D 0 in vitro. Conclusions: Our data on GBM xenografts showed a wide range of sensitivities to single dose

  15. In vivo radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghian, Alphonse; Freeman, Jill; Suit, Herman; DuBois, Willem; Budach, Wilfried; Baumann, Michael

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: Human glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most resistant tumors to radiation. In previous reports, we have demonstrated a wide range of radiation sensitivity of GBM in vitro; that is, SF{sub 2} values of 0.2 to 0.8. The great sensitivity of some of the cell lines is not in accord with the almost invariably fatal clinical outcome of patients with GBM. The sensitivity of cells in vitro pertains to cells cultured in optimal nutritional conditions. The TCD{sub 50} (the radiation dose necessary to control 50% of the tumors locally) determined in lab animals is analogous to the use of radiation with curative intent in clinical radiation oncology. The aim of the present study was (a) to evaluate the sensitivity of GBM in vivo relative to that of other tumor types and (b) assess the relationship between the single dose TCD{sub 50} of the xenografts and the sensitivity of the corresponding cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: The TCD{sub 50} assay was used to study twelve human tumor lines. Four previously published values were added. A total of 10 GBM, 4 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 1 soft tissue sarcoma (STS), and 1 cancer colon (CC) are included in the analysis. For further suppression of the residual immune system, all the animals received 6 Gy whole-body irradiation 1 day before transplantation. Local tumor irradiations were given as a single dose, under conditions of clamp hypoxia using a Cs irradiator. Results: The TCD{sub 50} values for the 10 GBM xenografts varied between 32.5 and 75.2 Gy, with an average of 47.2 {+-} 13.1 Gy. The TCD{sub 50} values for the SCC were similar to those of the GBM and ranged from 40.7 and 54.4 Gy, with a mean of 46.8 {+-} 6.4. The difference between the average TCD{sub 50} of GBM and SCC was not significant. The STS and CC xenografts had TCD{sub 50} values of 46.0 and 49.2 Gy, respectively. No correlation was found between the TCD{sub 50} in vivo and the SF{sub 2} or D{sub 0} in vitro. Conclusions: Our data on GBM

  16. In vivo measurement of urethral dose profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toye, W.C.; Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology,; Duchesne, G.M.; Das, K.R.; Cee, A.; Mameghan, H.; Johnston, P.N.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Quality assurance becomes a critical requirement when radiographs are routinely used in planning of treatments. In HDR prostate brachytherapy, the surrounding organs at risk of complications are the bladder and the rectum. However, of particular concern is the urethra that runs centrally through the prostate gland, as an unavoidably high dose can occur in the central region in order to achieve a minimum peripheral dose to a small target volume. Although high urethral doses have previously been related to increased urinary symptoms, some recent studies have not found such a correlation. The aim of this study was firstly, to identify dosimetric indicators of urethral morbidity following HDR prostate brachytherapy (4F x of 5.0 Gy), and secondly, to test the validity of calculated dose values. The in vivo measurements utilised a TLD (LiF:Mg,Ti) train formed by loading eight TLD rods alternating with 1,0 cm brass spacers into a fine plastic flexible tube. The length and diameter of plastic tubing was approximately 45cm and 0.15cm respectively, while the train length was 11.8 cm from the tip of the tube. The TLD train was placed into the central lumen of an 18 F three-way urethral catheter prior to its insertion. Significant urinary morbidity was defined prospectively as a score of a total of 3 or more points for severity from 5 symptoms categories. The five symptoms evaluated were hesitancy, frequency/nocturia, dysuria, haematuria and incontinence. The introduction of in vivo measurements to enhance the existing dosimetric analysis may be required to fully test the quantitative relationships (e.g. dose-volume ratios). Placement of TLDs within the urethra results in measurements whose accuracy is unaffected by internal organ motion as the hollow urethra must move with the prostate. The dose recorded by the TLDs is determined independently of the predictive algorithm used by the treatment planning system, and prostate location errors (e.g. due to image

  17. In vivo dosimetry in radiation therapy in Sweden; In vivo-dosimetri inom straalbehandling i Sverige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Jacob; Blomquist, Michael (Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeaa (Sweden))

    2010-07-15

    A prerequisite for achieving high radiation safety for patients receiving external beam radiation therapy is that the hospitals have a quality assurance program. The program should include include monitoring of the radiation dose given to the patient. Control measurements are performed both at the system level and at the individual level. Control measurement is normally performed using in vivo dosimetry, e.g. a method to measure the radiation dose at the individual level during the actual radiation treatment time. In vivo dosimetry has proven to be an important tool to detect and prevent serious errors in patient treatment. The purpose of this research project was to identify the extent to which vivo dosimetry is used and the methods available for this at Swedish radiation therapy clinics. The authority also wanted to get an overall picture of how hospitals manage results of in vivo dosimetry, and how clinics control radiation dose when using modern treatment techniques. The report reflects the situation in Swedish radiotherapy clinics 2007. The report shows that all hospitals use some form of in vivo dosimetry. The instruments used are mainly diodes and termoluminiscence dosimeters

  18. Radon and its daughters in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundo, J.

    1983-01-01

    Some aspects of the behavior of radon and its short-lived daughters in vivo are described and a relationship between the radon exhalation rate and time after a meal is demonstrated. A major but short-lived postprandial increase in the exhalation rate of radon produced from skeletally-deposited radium was observed and a similar effect in exhalation rate of environmental radon by persons containing no radium was noted. Persons living in houses with elevated concentrations of radon may contain sufficient activity for its detection by external gamma-ray counting. Some of the activity observed is due to inhaled daughter-products in the chest, and some to daughter-products associated with and produced by the decay of radon throughout the body. 3 references, 8 figures. (MF)

  19. In Vivo Cytogenetic Studies on Aspartame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entissar S. AlSuhaibani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartame (a-Laspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methylester is a dipeptide low-calorie artificial sweetener that is widely used as a nonnutritive sweetener in foods and drinks. The safety of aspartame and its metabolic breakdown products (phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol was investigated in vivo using chromosomal aberration (CA test and sister chromatid exchange (SCE test in the bone marrow cells of mice. Swiss Albino male mice were exposed to aspartame (3.5, 35, 350 mg/kg body weight. Bone marrow cells isolated from femora were analyzed for chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. Treatment with aspartame induced dose dependently chromosome aberrations at all concentrations while it did not induce sister chromatid exchanges. On the other hand, aspartame did not decrease the mitotic index (MI. However, statistical analysis of the results show that aspartame is not significantly genotoxic at low concentration.

  20. Chemical labeling of gluatmate decarboxylase in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rando, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    Mouse brain glutamate decarboxylase(s) was specifically titrated in vivo and in crude brain homogenates by a combination of gabaculine and [alpha-3H]acetylenic gamma-aminobutyric acid. This specific titration is based on the differential spectra of action of these two mechanism-based enzyme inactivators. The specificity of the titration in vitro was demonstrated by showing that the time course of radioactivity incorporation exactly paralleled the time course for glutamate of decarboxylase inactivation. This means that there is approximately 0.66 nmol of glutamate decarboxylase/0.5 g of mouse brain, assuming the stoichiometry of inactivator bound to enzyme is one. This value is similar to the one obtained from a calculation based on the enzyme purification data

  1. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, B; Bench, G; Keating III, G; Palmblad, M; Vogel, J; Grant, P G; Hillegonds, D

    2004-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS

  2. NMR studies of cerebral metabolism in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prichard, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The nature and extent of the potential synergism between PET and NMR methods is not yet well appreciated in the biomedical community. The long-range interest of medical neurobiology will be well served by efforts of PET and NMR scientists to follow each others' work so that opportunities for productive interchange can be efficiently exploited. Appreciation of the synergism by the rest of the biomedical community will follow naturally. PET is said by the people doing it to be still in its infancy, for they are more concerned with advancing their discipline than with admiring its already impressive achievements. On the scale of the same developmental metaphor, many NMR methods for studying the living human brain are still in utero. The best way to provide the reader a sense of the current status and future course of NMR research in medical neurobiology is by discussion of published in vivo studies. Such a discussion, adapted from another article is what follows

  3. Techniques of in vivo neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chettle, D.R.; Fremlin, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    This review is dealt with under the following headings, intended to reflect the different factors affecting the measurement sensitivity, starting with the choice of neutron source and proceeding, through the reaction characteristics, to the detection system, the questions of dosimetry and ethical constraints being also discussed: 1) neutron sources, slowing down and interaction processes, energy spectrum and flux uniformity, timing 2) neutron reactions used for in vivo analyses 3) detectors, choice, geometrical considerations and detector shielding 4) data collection and processing 5) interpretation, major elements, absolute or sequential measurements, relationship to other parameters 6) dosimetry, framework for dose levels, biological effects of neutron interactions, neutron doses in practice 7) implications for measurement of calcium, nitrogen and cadmium. (U.K.)

  4. Radon and its daughters in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundo, J

    1984-05-01

    Prolonged exposure to radon should build up a reservoir of radon in body fat and fluids. If the subject moved to an environment with a lower radon concentration from an environment with a higher level of radon, the result would be an exhalation of radon, and the initial exhalation rate of radon should depend of the radon concentration inhaled. This paper describes the behavior of radon and its daughters in vivo and a relationship between the radon exhalation rate and the time after a meal. A major but short-lived postprandial increase in the exhalation rate of radon was observed. The author reports a similar effect in the exhalation rate of radon by persons containing no radium. It should be noted that the possibility exists that a large amount of radon daughters in the chest may interfere in the investigation of possible internal contamination with plutonium or other actinides by external counting. 8 figures.

  5. Radon and its daughters in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundo, J

    1984-05-01

    Prolonged exposure to radon should build up a reservoir of radon in body fat and fluids. Movement of the subject to an environment with a lower radon concentration from an environment with a higher level of radon would result in an exhalation of radon, and the initial exhalation rate of radon should depend on the radon concentration inhaled. This paper describes the behavior of radon and its daughters in vivo and a relationship between the radon exhalation rate and the time after a meal. A major but short-lived postprandial increase in the exhalation rate of radon was observed. We report a similar effect in the exhalation rate of radon by persons containing no radium. It should be noted that the possibility exists that a large amount of radon daughters in the chest may interfere in the investigation of possible internal contamination with plutonium or other actinides by external counting. (author).

  6. Implantable optoelectronic probes for in vivo optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseri, Ege; Kuzum, Duygu

    2017-06-01

    More than a decade has passed since optics and genetics came together and lead to the emerging technologies of optogenetics. The advent of light-sensitive opsins made it possible to optically trigger the neurons into activation or inhibition by using visible light. The importance of spatiotemporally isolating a segment of a neural network and controlling nervous signaling in a precise manner has driven neuroscience researchers and engineers to invest great efforts in designing high precision in vivo implantable devices. These efforts have focused on delivery of sufficient power to deep brain regions, while monitoring neural activity with high resolution and fidelity. In this review, we report the progress made in the field of hybrid optoelectronic neural interfaces that combine optical stimulation with electrophysiological recordings. Different approaches that incorporate optical or electrical components on implantable devices are discussed in detail. Advantages of various different designs as well as practical and fundamental limitations are summarized to illuminate the future of neurotechnology development.

  7. In vivo nuclear imaging of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Sup; Cheon, Gi Jeong [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis plays a role in the pathophysiology of many kinds of diseases and in the response of treatment. Compared to the necrosis, the apoptosis a genetically controlled and energy-dependent process which removes the unwanted cells from the body; programmed cell death or cell suicide. During the apoptosis, phosphatidylserine is expressed in the cytoplasmic outer membrane in the early phase. Annexin V, an endogenous human protein (MW=35 kD), has an affinity of about 10{sup -9} M for the phosphatidylserine exposed on the outer membrane of apoptotic cells. Annexin V can be radiolabeled with {sup 99}mTc by HYNIC or EC chelators, which can be used as an radiotracer for the in vivo imaging of apoptosis. In this article, we reviewed the apoptosis, radiolabeling of annexin V, and the experimental and clinical data using annexin V imaging.

  8. In vivo nanotoxicity assays in plant models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Mamta; Ernest, Vinita; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing application of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) in consumer products like textiles, cosmetics, washing machines and other household products increases their chance to reach the environment. Intensive research is required to assess the nanoparticles' toxicity to the environmental system. The toxicological effect of nanoparticles has been studied at the miniscule scale and requires intensive research to be conducted to assess its unknown effects. Plants are the primary target species which need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. So far, the mechanisms of toxicity of nanoparticles to the plant system remains largely unknown and little information on the potential uptake of nanoparticles by plants and their subsequent fate within the food chain is available. The phytoxicological behaviour of silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles on Allium cepa and seeds of Zea mays (maize), Cucumis sativus (cucumber) and Lycopersicum esculentum (tomato) was done. The in vitro studies on A. cepa have been done to check the cytotoxicological effects including mitotic index, chromosomal aberrations, vagrant chromosomes, sticky chromosomes, disturbed metaphase, breaks and formation of micronucleus. In vitro and in vivo studies on seed systems exposed to different concentration of nanoparticles dispersion to check phytotoxicity end point as root length, germination effect, adsorption and accumulation of nanoparticles (uptake studies) into the plant systems. In vivo studies in a seed system was done using phytagel medium. Biochemical studies were done to check effect on protein, DNA and thiobarbituric acid reactive species concentration. FT-IR studies were done to analyze the functional and conformational changes in the treated and untreated samples. The toxicological effects of nanoparticles had to be studied at the miniscule scale to address existing environment problems or prevent future problems. The

  9. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of cervix cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubina, S.; Sathe, Priyanka; Dora, Tapas Kumar; Chopra, Supriya; Maheshwari, Amita; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Cervix-cancer is the third most common female cancer worldwide. It is the leading cancer among Indian females with more than million new diagnosed cases and 50% mortality, annually. The high mortality rates can be attributed to late diagnosis. Efficacy of Raman spectroscopy in classification of normal and pathological conditions in cervix cancers on diverse populations has already been demonstrated. Our earlier ex vivo studies have shown the feasibility of classifying normal and cancer cervix tissues as well as responders/non-responders to Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The present study was carried out to explore feasibility of in vivo Raman spectroscopic methods in classifying normal and cancerous conditions in Indian population. A total of 182 normal and 132 tumor in vivo Raman spectra, from 63 subjects, were recorded using a fiberoptic probe coupled HE-785 spectrometer, under clinical supervision. Spectra were acquired for 5 s and averaged over 3 times at 80 mW laser power. Spectra of normal conditions suggest strong collagenous features and abundance of non-collagenous proteins and DNA in case of tumors. Preprocessed spectra were subjected to Principal Component-Linear Discrimination Analysis (PCLDA) followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Classification efficiency of ~96.7% and 100% for normal and cancerous conditions respectively, were observed. Findings of the study corroborates earlier studies and suggest applicability of Raman spectroscopic methods in combination with appropriate multivariate tool for objective, noninvasive and rapid diagnosis of cervical cancers in Indian population. In view of encouraging results, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  10. In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2010-07-01

    An overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance. Overall responsibility for the management of the IVMP rests with the Program Manager (PM). The PM is responsible for providing the required in vivo counting services for Hanford Site contractor employees in accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and the specific statements of work.

  11. In vivo analysis of the Notch receptor S1 cleavage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Lake

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A ligand-independent cleavage (S1 in the extracellular domain of the mammalian Notch receptor results in what is considered to be the canonical heterodimeric form of Notch on the cell surface. The in vivo consequences and significance of this cleavage on Drosophila Notch signaling remain unclear and contradictory. We determined the cleavage site in Drosophila and examined its in vivo function by a transgenic analysis of receptors that cannot be cleaved. Our results demonstrate a correlation between loss of cleavage and loss of in vivo function of the Notch receptor, supporting the notion that S1 cleavage is an in vivo mechanism of Notch signal control.

  12. Passive in vivo elastography from skeletal muscle noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Conti, Stephane; Roux, Philippe; Kuperman, W. A.

    2007-01-01

    Measuring the in vivo elastic properties of muscles (e.g., stiffness) provides a means for diagnosing and monitoring muscular activity. The authors demonstrated a passive in vivo elastography technique without an active external radiation source. This technique instead uses cross correlations of contracting skeletal muscle noise recorded with skin-mounted sensors. Each passive sensor becomes a virtual in vivo shear wave source. The results point to a low-cost, noninvasive technique for monitoring biomechanical in vivo muscle properties. The efficacy of the passive elastography technique originates from the high density of cross paths between all sensor pairs, potentially achieving the same sensitivity obtained from active elastography methods

  13. In vivo predictive dissolution: transport analysis of the CO2 , bicarbonate in vivo buffer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Brian J; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Amidon, Gordon L; Amidon, Gregory E

    2014-11-01

    Development of an oral in vivo predictive dissolution medium for acid drugs with a pKa in the physiological range (e.g., Biopharmaceutics Classification System Class IIa) requires transport analysis of the complex in vivo CO2 /bicarbonate buffering system. In this report, we analyze this buffer system using hydrodynamically defined rotating disk dissolution. Transport analysis of drug flux was predicted using the film model approach of Mooney et al based on equilibrium assumptions as well as accounting for the slow hydration reaction, CO2 + H2 O → H2 CO3 . The accuracy of the models was compared with experimentally determined results using the rotating disk dissolution of ibuprofen, indomethacin, and ketoprofen. The equilibrium and slow hydration reaction rate models predict significantly different dissolution rates. The experimental results are more accurately predicted by accounting for the slow hydration reaction under a variety of pH and hydrodynamic conditions. Although the complex bicarbonate buffering system requires further consideration given its dynamic nature in vivo, a simplifying irreversible reaction (IRR) transport analysis accurately predicts in vitro rotating disk dissolution rates of several carboxylic acid drugs. This IRR transport model provides further insight into bicarbonate buffer and can be useful in developing more physiologically relevant buffer systems for dissolution testing. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Synovial tissue hypoxia and inflammation in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ng, C T

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia is a microenvironmental feature in the inflamed joint, which promotes survival advantage for cells. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of partial oxygen pressure in the synovial tissue (tPO(2)) in patients with inflammatory arthritis with macroscopic\\/microscopic inflammation and local levels of proinflammatory mediators. METHODS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis underwent full clinical assessment and video arthroscopy to quantify macroscopic synovitis and measure synovial tPO(2) under direct visualisation. Cell specific markers (CD3 (T cells), CD68 (macrophages), Ki67 (cell proliferation) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (cell apoptosis)) were quantified by immunohistology. In vitro migration was assessed in primary and normal synoviocytes (synovial fibroblast cells (SFCs)) using a wound repair scratch assay. Levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta), interferon gamma (IFNgamma), IL6, macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha (MIP3alpha) and IL8 were quantified, in matched serum and synovial fluid, by multiplex cytokine assay and ELISA. RESULTS: The tPO(2) was 22.5 (range 3.2-54.1) mm Hg and correlated inversely with macroscopic synovitis (r=-0.421, p=0.02), sublining CD3 cells (-0.611, p<0.01) and sublining CD68 cells (r=-0.615, p<0.001). No relationship with cell proliferation or apoptosis was found. Primary and normal SFCs exposed to 1% and 3% oxygen (reflecting the median tPO(2) in vivo) induced cell migration. This was coupled with significantly higher levels of synovial fluid tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), IL1beta, IFNgamma and MIP3alpha in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (all p values <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show a direct in vivo correlation between synovial tPO(2), inflammation and cell migration, thus it is proposed that hypoxia is a possible primary driver of inflammatory processes in the arthritic joint.

  15. MOSFET dosimetry: temperature effects in-vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.K.N.; Cheung, T.; Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, Wollongong, NSW

    2004-01-01

    Full text: This note investigates temperature effects on dosimetry using a Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) for radiotherapy x-ray treatment. This was performed by analysing the dose response and threshold voltage outputs for MOSFET dosimeters as a function of ambient temperature. Results have shown the clinical semiconductor dosimetry system (CSDS) MOSFET provides stable dose measurements with temperatures varying from 15 deg C up to 40 deg C. Thus standard irradiations performed at room temperature can be directly compared to in-vivo dose assessments performed at near body temperature without a temperature correction function. The MOSFET dosimeter threshold voltage varies with temperature and this level is dependant on the dose history of the MOSFET dosimeter. However the variation can be accounted for in the measurement method. For accurate dosimetry the detector should be placed for approximately 60 seconds on a patient to allow thermal equilibrium before measurements are taken with the final reading performed whilst still attached to the patient or conversely left for approximately 120 seconds after removal from the patient if initial readout was measured at room temperature to allow temperature equilibrium to be established. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  16. Lymphocyte electrotaxis in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Francis; Baldessari, Fabio; Gyenge, Christina Crenguta; Sato, Tohru; Chambers, Robert D; Santiago, Juan G; Butcher, Eugene C

    2008-08-15

    Electric fields are generated in vivo in a variety of physiologic and pathologic settings, including penetrating injury to epithelial barriers. An applied electric field with strength within the physiologic range can induce directional cell migration (i.e., electrotaxis) of epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and neutrophils suggesting a potential role in cell positioning during wound healing. In the present study, we investigated the ability of lymphocytes to respond to applied direct current (DC) electric fields. Using a modified Transwell assay and a simple microfluidic device, we show that human PBLs migrate toward the cathode in physiologically relevant DC electric fields. Additionally, electrical stimulation activates intracellular kinase signaling pathways shared with chemotactic stimuli. Finally, video microscopic tracing of GFP-tagged immunocytes in the skin of mouse ears reveals that motile cutaneous T cells actively migrate toward the cathode of an applied DC electric field. Lymphocyte positioning within tissues can thus be manipulated by externally applied electric fields, and may be influenced by endogenous electrical potential gradients as well.

  17. Radical reactions in vivo - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saran, M.; Bors, W.

    1990-01-01

    Generation of radicals in vivo depends on metabolic activities. The reactions are usually influenced by (i) the presence and concentration of oxygen, (ii) the availability of transition metals (effects of binding and compartimentalization), (iii) the level of reductants and antioxidants (e.g. nutritional effects). The effects of radicals are thought to be due to (i) membrane damage (affecting passive or active transport through altered fluidity/function interrelationships, intercellular messenging through modifications in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes); (ii) protein damage (e.g. affecting membrane transporters, channel proteins, receptor or regulatory proteins, immunomodulators); (iii) damage to DNA. Defense mechanisms consist of (i) prevention of the 'spreading' of primary damage by low molecular weight antioxidants (e.g. vitamin E, GSH, vitamin C, β-carotene, uric acid); (ii) prevention or limitation of 'secondary' damage by enzymes (e.g. GSH-peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase, DT-diaphorase) and/or chelators; (iii) repair processes, e.g. lipid degradation/membrane repair enzymes (phospholipases, peroxidases, some transferases and reductases), protein disposal or repair enzymes (proteases, GSSG-reductase), DNA degradation or repair enzymes (exonucleases III, endonucleases III and IV, glycosylases, polymerases). Recent hypotheses on a messenging function of the superoxide anion O 2 - are discussed and possible implications of cross-reactions between O 2 - and nitric oxide (endothelium-derived relaxing factor EDRF) are shortly mentioned. (orig.)

  18. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Jan; Norris, Francesca; Cleary, Jon; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Johnson, Peter; Scambler, Pete; Lythgoe, Mark; Beard, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The ability to noninvasively image embryonic vascular anatomy in mouse models is an important requirement for characterizing the development of the normal cardiovascular system and malformations in the heart and vascular supply. Photoacoustic imaging, which can provide high resolution non invasive images of the vasculature based upon optical absorption by endogenous hemoglobin, is well suited to this application. In this study, photoacoustic images of mouse embryos were obtained ex vivo and in vivo. The images show intricate details of the embryonic vascular system to depths of up to 10 mm, which allowed whole embryos to be imaged in situ. To achieve this, an all-optical photoacoustic scanner and a novel time reversal image reconstruction algorithm, which provide deep tissue imaging capability while maintaining high spatial resolution and contrast were employed. This technology may find application as an imaging tool for preclinical embryo studies in developmental biology as well as more generally in preclinical and clinical medicine for studying pathologies characterized by changes in the vasculature.

  19. Optical stimulation of peripheral nerves in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jonathon D.

    This dissertation documents the emergence and validation of a new clinical tool that bridges the fields of biomedical optics and neuroscience. The research herein describes an innovative method for direct neurostimulation with pulsed infrared laser light. Safety and effectiveness of this technique are first demonstrated through functional stimulation of the rat sciatic nerve in vivo. The Holmium:YAG laser (lambda = 2.12 mum) is shown to operate at an optimal wavelength for peripheral nerve stimulation with advantages over standard electrical neural stimulation; including contact-free stimulation, high spatial selectivity, and lack of a stimulation artifact. The underlying biophysical mechanism responsible for transient optical nerve stimulation appears to be a small, absorption driven thermal gradient sustained at the axonal layer of nerve. Results explicitly prove that low frequency optical stimulation can reliably stimulate without resulting in tissue thermal damage. Based on the positive results from animal studies, these optimal laser parameters were utilized to move this research into the clinic with a combined safety and efficacy study in human subjects undergoing selective dorsal rhizotomy. The clinical Holmium:YAG laser was used to effectively stimulate human dorsal spinal roots and elicit functional muscle responses recorded during surgery without evidence of nerve damage. Overall these results predict that this technology can be a valuable clinical tool in various neurosurgical applications.

  20. In vitro and in vivo Development of Cloned Ovine Embryos using in vitro and in vivo Matured Oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, P; Nagashima, H; Sun, F-J

    1995-01-01

    Cloning of sheep embryos by nucleus transplantation can be achieved by using in vivo matured (oviductal) oocytes and in vivo culture. However, these steps involve cumbersome procedures. Therefore, the effects of in vivo vs. the equivalent in vitro procedures on the pre-implantation development...... matured oocytes were enucleated and fused with inserted blastomeres from donor embryos. In vitro matured oocytes were enucleated and allowed to age prior to blastomere insertion and electrofusion. Fused embryos were cultured for approximately 132 h either in vivo in ligated sheep oviducts or in vitro...

  1. Measuring protein breakdown rate in individual proteins in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Kjaer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo.......To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo....

  2. In-vivo evaluation of convex array synthetic aperture imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Høgholm; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an in-vivo study of synthetic transmit aperture (STA) imaging in comparison to conventional imaging, evaluating whether STA imaging is feasible in-vivo, and whether the image quality obtained is comparable to traditional scanned imaging in terms of penetration depth, spatial...

  3. Nevomelanocytic atypia detection by in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrida Vaišnorienė

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Nevus with histopathologically confirmed nevomelanocytic atypia (dysplastic nevus could not be distinguished from nevus without atypia using analyzed in vivo RCM features of melanocytic atypia. More accurate diagnostics by means of in vivo RCM needs further investigation on reflectance of single and nested cutaneous melanocytes in benign and malignant skin lesions.

  4. In vivo monitoring of angiogenesis within Matrigel chambers using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David; Ley, Carsten Dan; Søgaard, Lise Vejby

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a critical process in tumour development and presents an important target for the development of a range of anti-cancer agents . To assess the in vivo efficacy of these ‘angiotherapeutics', a simple and reproducible in vivo model would be of significant value. Here we show...

  5. In vivo NMR spectroscopy of the liver. Spectroscopie RMN du foie in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehenson, P.; Cuenod, C.A.; Syrota, A. (CEA, 91 - Orsay (FR). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot)

    1989-01-01

    The application of in vivo MR spectroscopy to the study of the liver is currently an expanding field of research. Owing to technical difficulties, the results obtained thus far were mainly those of animal observations. Several nuclei have been considered: hydrogen, phosphorus, carbon or fluorine. This non-traumatic method allows following and quantifying the various metabolic pathways, especially during hepatic diseases. The major metabolic pathways, i.e. neoglycogenesis, glycogenolysis, Krebs' cycle, etc., are studied, as well as their alterations during diseases such as ischemia, diabetes or alcoholism. The development of this promising technique requires the cooperation of various clinical and fundamental disciplines.

  6. In vivo cell kinetics in breast carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Maria; Agnantis, Niki J; Kamina, Sevasti; Demou, Asimina; Zagorianakou, Panayiota; Katsaraki, Aphroditi; Kanavaros, Panayiotis

    2001-01-01

    Disruption of the balance between apoptosis and proliferation is considered to be an important factor in the development and progression of tumours. In the present study we determined the in vivo cell kinetics along the spectrum of apparently normal epithelium, hyperplasia, preinvasive lesions and invasive carcinoma, in breast tissues affected by fibrocystic changes in which preinvasive and/or invasive lesions developed, as a model of breast carcinogenesis. A total of 32 areas of apparently normal epithelium and 135 ductal proliferative and neoplastic lesions were studied. More than one epithelial lesion per case were analyzed. The apoptotic index (AI) and the proliferative index (PI) were expressed as the percentage of TdT-mediated dUTP-nick end-labelling (TUNEL) and Ki-67-positive cells, respectively. The PI/AI (P/A index) was calculated for each case. The AIs and PIs were significantly higher in hyperplasia than in apparently normal epithelium (P = 0.04 and P = 0.0005, respectively), in atypical hyperplasia than in hyperplasia (P = 0.01 and P = 0.04, respectively) and in invasive carcinoma than in in situ carcinoma (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). The two indices were similar in atypical hyperplasia and in in situ carcinoma. The P/A index increased significantly from normal epithelium to hyperplasia (P = 0.01) and from preinvasive lesions to invasive carcinoma (P = 0.04) whereas it was decreased (non-significantly) from hyperplasia to preinvasive lesions. A strong positive correlation between the AIs and the PIs was found (r = 0.83, P < 0.001). These findings suggest accelerating cell turnover along the continuum of breast carcinogenesis. Atypical hyperplasias and in situ carcinomas might be kinetically similar lesions. In the transition from normal epithelium to hyperplasia and from preinvasive lesions to invasive carcinoma the net growth of epithelial cells results from a growth imbalance in favour of proliferation. In the transition from hyperplasia

  7. Endothelial cells present antigens in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tellides George

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune recognition of vascular endothelial cells (EC has been implicated in allograft rejection, protection against pathogens, and lymphocyte recruitment. However, EC pervade nearly all tissues and predominate in none, complicating any direct test of immune recognition. Here, we examined antigen presentation by EC in vivo by testing immune responses against E. coli β-galactosidase (β-gal in two lines of transgenic mice that express β-gal exclusively in their EC. TIE2-lacZ mice express β-gal in all EC and VWF-lacZ mice express β-gal in heart and brain microvascular EC. Results Transgenic and congenic wild type FVB mice immunized with β-gal expression vector DNA or β-gal protein generated high titer, high affinity antisera containing comparable levels of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, suggesting equivalent activation of T helper cell subsets. The immunized transgenic mice remained healthy, their EC continued to express β-gal, and their blood vessels showed no histological abnormalities. In response to β-gal in vitro, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from immunized transgenic and FVB mice proliferated, expressed CD25, and secreted IFN-γ. Infection with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding β-gal raised equivalent responses in transgenic and FVB mice. Hearts transplanted from transgenic mice into FVB mice continued to beat and the graft EC continued to express β-gal. These results suggested immunological ignorance of the transgene encoded EC protein. However, skin transplanted from TIE2-lacZ onto FVB mice lost β-gal+ EC and the hosts developed β-gal-specific antisera, demonstrating activation of host immune effector mechanisms. In contrast, skin grafted from TIE2-lacZ onto VWF-lacZ mice retained β-gal+ EC and no antisera developed, suggesting a tolerant host immune system. Conclusion Resting, β-gal+ EC in transgenic mice tolerize specific lymphocytes that would otherwise respond against β-gal expressed by EC within

  8. In vitro-in vivo correlation in skin permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, D; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2014-02-01

    In vitro skin permeation studies have been used extensively in the development and optimisation of delivery of actives in vivo. However, there are few reported correlations of such in vitro studies with in vivo data. The aim of this study was to investigate the skin permeation of a model active, niacinamide, both in vitro and in vivo. Conventional diffusion cell studies were conducted in human skin to determine niacinamide permeation from a range of vehicles which included dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), propylene glycol (PG), propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML), N-methyl 2-pyrrolidone (NMP), Miglyol 812N® (MG), and mineral oil (MO). Single, binary or ternary systems were examined. The same vehicles were subsequently examined to investigate niacinamide delivery in vivo. For this proof-of-concept study one donor was used for the in vitro studies and one volunteer for the in vivo investigations to minimise biovariability. Analysis of in vitro samples was conducted using HPLC and in vivo uptake of niacinamide was evaluated using Confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS). The amount of niacinamide permeated through skin in vitro was linearly proportional to the intensity of the niacinamide signal determined in the stratum corneum in vivo. A good correlation was observed between the signal intensities of selected vehicles and niacinamide signal intensity. The findings provide further support for the use of CRS to monitor drug delivery into and across the skin. In addition, the results highlight the critical role of the vehicle and its disposition in skin for effective dermal delivery.

  9. Modeling the in vivo case with in vitro nanotoxicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Michael L; Wagner, Andrew J; Hussain, Saber M; Bleckmann, Charles

    2008-01-01

    As more in vitro nanotoxicity data appear in the literature, these findings must be translated to in vivo effects to define nanoparticle exposure risk. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling has played a significant role in guiding and validating in vivo studies for molecular chemical exposure and can develop as a significant tool in guiding similar nanotoxicity studies. This study models the population dynamics of a single cell type within a specific tissue. It is the first attempt to model the in vitro effects of a nanoparticle exposure, in this case aluminum (80 nm) and its impact on a population of rat alveolar macrophages (Wagner et al. 2007, J. Phys. Chem. B 111:7353-7359). The model demonstrates how in vitro data can be used within a simulation setting of in vivo cell dynamics and suggests that PBPK models should be developed quickly to interpret nanotoxicity data, guide in vivo study design, and accelerate nanoparticle risk assessment.

  10. Preparation, Characterisation and In Vivo Evaluation of Silybin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    The nanoparticles sustained the release of the drug both in vitro and in vivo for up to 10 days and offered better ... without affecting normal ECM synthesis, effectively delivered ... oral bioavailability problems with sylibin can be avoided since ...

  11. [Genomic research of traditional Chinese medicines in vivo metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shui-Ming; Bai, Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Yan

    2016-11-01

    Gene is the base of in vivo metabolism and effectiveness for traditional Chinese medicines (TCM), and the gene expression, regulation and modification are used as the research directions to perform the TCM multi-component, multi-link and multi-target in vivo metabolism studies, which will improve the research on TCM metabolic proecess, effect target and molecular mechanism. Humans are superorganisms with 1% genes inherited from parents and 99% genes from various parts of the human body, mainly coming from the microorganisms in intestinal flora. These indicate that genetically inherited human genome and "second genome" could affect the TCM in vivo metabolism from inheritance and "environmental" aspects respectively. In the present paper, typical case study was used to discuss related TCM in vivo metabolic genomics research, mainly including TCM genomics research and gut metagenomics research, as well as the personalized medicine evoked from the individual difference of above genomics (metagenomics). Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  12. An evaluation of preference for video and in vivo modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Kaneen B; Leblanc, Linda A; Dillon, Courtney M; Bates, Stephanie L

    2010-01-01

    We assessed preference for video or in vivo modeling using a concurrent-chains arrangement with 3 children with autism. The two modeling conditions produced similar acquisition rates and no differential selection (i.e., preference) for all 3 participants.

  13. Cystoscopic optical coherence tomography for urinary bladder imaging in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. G.; Adler, H.; Chan, D.; Jain, A.; Xie, H. K.; Wu, Z. L.; Pan, Y. T.

    2006-02-01

    This paper summarizes the development of new 2D MEMS mirrors and the pertinent modification to improve OCT endoscopic catheter packaging suitable for in vivo imaging diagnosis of bladder cancers. Comparative study of the newly developed endocopic OCT versus the bench-top OCT is presented. Results of in vivo OCT cystoscopy based on a porcine acute inflammation model are presented to compare time-domain OCT and spectral-domain OCT for in vivo imaging. In addition, results of spectral-domain Doppler OCT are presented to image blood flow in the lamina propria of the bladder. The results of our in vivo animal study using the presented OCT endoscope are discussed for potential problems in the future clinical applications.

  14. In vivo antiplasmodial effect of chloroform extracts of Artemisia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... Full Length Research Paper. In vivo antiplasmodial effect of ... responsible for over a million deaths each year (Breman,. 2001). In tropical and ... A major breakthrough of the past decades has been the discovery by Chinese ...

  15. In vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of inulin

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Hong-Mei; Zhou, Hai-Zhu; Yang, Jun-Yan; Li, Ran; Song, Hui; Wu, Hong-Xin

    2018-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of inulin. The in vitro assays demonstrated that the antioxidant activities of inulin, including the DPPH radical scavenging activity, ABTS scavenging activity and ferric reducing power, were weak and significantly lower than those of Vitamin C (P < 0.05). The influence of dietary supplementation with inulin on the antioxidant status of laying hens was evaluated with in vivo antioxidant assays. The results ...

  16. Oncology In Vivo Data Integration for Hypothesis Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available AstraZeneca’s Oncology in vivo data integration platform brings multidimensional data from animal model efficacy, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data to animal model profiling data and public in vivo studies. Using this platform, scientists can cluster model efficacy and model profiling data together, quickly identify responder profiles and correlate molecular characteristics to pharmacological response. Through meta-analysis, scientists can compare pharmacology between single and combination treatments, between different drug scheduling and administration routes.

  17. In vitro and in vivo applications of tumor markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.; Ricolleau, G.; Fumoleau, P.; Vuillez, J.P.H.; Chetanneau, A.; Peltier, P.; Lacroix, H.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo applications of tumor markers are reviewed. Concerning in vitro applications, the following topics are developed: ideal marker criterion; present availability of markers; immunoassay methodology; clinical applications; future prospects (oncogenes). In vivo applications deal with immunoscintigraphy a new imaging technique, different from conventional morphological methods, based on specific recognition of antigenic target and involving many immunologic, hemodynamic and methodologic parameters. These various parameters are presented and clinical applications and future prospects of immunoscintigraphy are evaluated [fr

  18. Defining human mesenchymal stem cell efficacy in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennon Donald P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs can suppress graft versus host disease (GvHD and have profound anti-inflammatory and regenerative capacity in stroke, infarct, spinal cord injury, meniscus regeneration, tendinitis, acute renal failure, and heart disease in human and animal models of disease. There is significant clinical hMSC variability in efficacy and the ultimate response in vivo. The challenge in hMSC based therapy is defining the efficacy of hMSC in vivo. Models which may provide insight into hMSC bioactivity in vivo would provide a means to distinguish hMSCs for clinical utility. hMSC function has been described as both regenerative and trophic through the production of bioactive factors. The regenerative component involves the multi-potentiality of hMSC progenitor differentiation. The secreted factors generated by the hMSCs are milieu and injury specific providing unique niches for responses in vivo. These bioactive factors are anti-scarring, angiogenic, anti-apoptotic as well as regenerative. Further, from an immunological standpoint, hMSC's can avoid host immune response, providing xenographic applications. To study the in vivo immuno-regulatory effectiveness of hMSCs, we used the ovalbumin challenge model of acute asthma. This is a quick 3 week in vivo pulmonary inflammation model with readily accessible ways of measuring effectiveness of hMSCs. Our data show that there is a direct correlation between the traditional ceramic cube score to hMSCs attenuation of cellular recruitment due to ovalbumin challenge. The results from these studies verify the in vivo immuno-modulator effectiveness of hMSCs and support the potential use of the ovalbumin model as an in vivo model of hMSC potency and efficacy. Our data also support future directions toward exploring hMSCs as an alternative therapeutic for the treatment of airway inflammation associated with asthma.

  19. Intermuscular force transmission between human plantarflexor muscles in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Schwartz, Sidse; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2010-01-01

    of the present study was to investigate if intermuscular force transmission occurs within and between human plantarflexor muscles in vivo. Seven subjects performed four types of either active contractile tasks or passive joint manipulations: passive knee extension, voluntary isometric plantarflexion, voluntary...... surae muscles was seen during passive hallux extension. Large interindividual differences with respect to deep plantarflexor activation during voluntary contractions were observed. The present results suggest that force may be transmitted between the triceps surae muscles in vivo, while only limited...

  20. Radio-marking and in vivo imagery of oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehnast, Bertrand

    2000-01-01

    This research thesis is part of activities aimed at the development of new molecules like oligonucleotides. Its first objective was the development and validation of a marking method with fluorine-18 of oligonucleotides for their in-vivo pharmacological assessment with positron emission tomography (PET). Further investigations addressed the use of iodine-125 for oligonucleotide marking purpose. This radio-marking, and in vivo and ex vivo imagery techniques are described, and their potential is highlighted for the pharmacological assessment of different oligonucleotides

  1. The development and utilization of in vivo systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Serres, F.J.; Matsushima, Taijiro.

    1986-01-01

    The 13th Joint Conference on the Development and Utilization of in vivo Short-Term Tests for Mutagenicity and Carcinogenicity was attended by five scientists from Japan and 21 scientists from the U.S.A. A total of five sessions were held under the topics (1) In vivo Genetic Tests: Development-Utilization; (2) Activation of Oncogenes; (3) Progress Reports in Cancer Epidemiology and Food Mutagen Research. (Auth.)

  2. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of [ 3 H]Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in [14C]iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress [an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures], although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results

  3. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  4. Disposable Fluidic Actuators for Miniature In-Vivo Surgical Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourghodrat, Abolfazl; Nelson, Carl A

    2017-03-01

    Fusion of robotics and minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has created new opportunities to develop diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Surgical robotics is advancing from externally actuated systems to miniature in-vivo robotics. However, with miniaturization of electric-motor-driven surgical robots, there comes a trade-off between the size of the robot and its capability. Slow actuation, low load capacity, sterilization difficulties, leaking electricity and transferring produced heat to tissues, and high cost are among the key limitations of the use of electric motors in in-vivo applications. Fluid power in the form of hydraulics or pneumatics has a long history in driving many industrial devices and could be exploited to circumvent these limitations. High power density and good compatibility with the in-vivo environment are the key advantages of fluid power over electric motors when it comes to in-vivo applications. However, fabrication of hydraulic/pneumatic actuators within the desired size and pressure range required for in-vivo surgical robotic applications poses new challenges. Sealing these types of miniature actuators at operating pressures requires obtaining very fine surface finishes which is difficult and costly. The research described here presents design, fabrication, and testing of a hydraulic/pneumatic double-acting cylinder, a limited-motion vane motor, and a balloon-actuated laparoscopic grasper. These actuators are small, seal-less, easy to fabricate, disposable, and inexpensive, thus ideal for single-use in-vivo applications. To demonstrate the ability of these actuators to drive robotic joints, they were modified and integrated in a robotic arm. The design and testing of this surgical robotic arm are presented to validate the concept of fluid-power actuators for in-vivo applications.

  5. Endocavitary in vivo Dosimetry for IMRT Treatments of Gynecologic Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cilla, Savino; Macchia, Gabriella; Digesù, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco; Sabatino, Domenico; Morganti, Alessio G.; Piermattei, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy and reproducibility of endometrial carcinoma treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was assessed by means of in vivo dosimetry. Six patients who had previously undergone radical hysterectomy for endometrial carcinoma were treated with IMRT using a vaginal applicator with radio-opaque fiducial markers. An ion-chamber inserted into the applicator supplied an endocavitary in vivo dosimetry for quality assurance purposes. The ratio R = D/D TPS between the in vivo measured dose D and the predicted dose by the treatment planning system D TPS was determined for every fraction of the treatment. Results showed that 90% and 100% of the ratios resulted equal to 1 within 5% and 10%, respectively. The mean value of the ratios distribution for the 6 patients was R = 0.995 and the SD = 0.034. The ratio R* between the measured and predicted total doses for each patient was near to 1, within 2%. The dosimetric results suggest that the use of a vaginal applicator in an image-guided approach could make the interfractions target position stable and reproducible, allowing a safe use of the IMRT technique in the treatment of postoperative vaginal vault. In vivo dosimetry may supply useful information about the discrimination of random vs. systematic errors. The workload is minimum and this in vivo dosimetry can be applied also in the clinical routine.

  6. Using exomarkers to assess mitochondrial reactive species in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Angela; Cochemé, Helena M; Li Pun, Pamela Boon; Apostolova, Nadezda; Smith, Robin A J; Larsen, Lesley; Larsen, David S; James, Andrew M; Fearnley, Ian M; Rogatti, Sebastian; Prime, Tracy A; Finichiu, Peter G; Dare, Anna; Chouchani, Edward T; Pell, Victoria R; Methner, Carmen; Quin, Caroline; McQuaker, Stephen J; Krieg, Thomas; Hartley, Richard C; Murphy, Michael P

    2014-02-01

    The ability to measure the concentrations of small damaging and signalling molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo is essential to understanding their biological roles. While a range of methods can be applied to in vitro systems, measuring the levels and relative changes in reactive species in vivo is challenging. One approach towards achieving this goal is the use of exomarkers. In this, exogenous probe compounds are administered to the intact organism and are then transformed by the reactive molecules in vivo to produce a diagnostic exomarker. The exomarker and the precursor probe can be analysed ex vivo to infer the identity and amounts of the reactive species present in vivo. This is akin to the measurement of biomarkers produced by the interaction of reactive species with endogenous biomolecules. Our laboratories have developed mitochondria-targeted probes that generate exomarkers that can be analysed ex vivo by mass spectrometry to assess levels of reactive species within mitochondria in vivo. We have used one of these compounds, MitoB, to infer the levels of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide within flies and mice. Here we describe the development of MitoB and expand on this example to discuss how better probes and exomarkers can be developed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Current methods to study reactive oxygen species - pros and cons and biophysics of membrane proteins. Guest Editor: Christine Winterbourn. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-10-21

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses.

  8. Contracting in vivo research: what are the issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Wendy J

    2007-07-01

    As a result of increasing internal and external pressures, research institutions are using contract research organizations for the conduct of in vivo research. Many issues arise when contracting animal research, including concern regarding animal health and welfare. Each sponsor institution should develop a program for outsourced in vivo research that evaluates and ensures appropriate care and use of research animals. Each sponsoring institution should consider establishing a policy and procedure for how outsourced in vivo studies will be approved, conducted, and monitored. An approved list of contract facilities can be established on the basis of accepted standards for animal care and use. Written contracts should include confidentiality agreements, the delineation of animal ownership, and the expectation to comply with all applicable regulations and guidelines for research animal care and use. Finally, a process for communication of adverse study or animal welfare events should be established. Thorough evaluation of contract organizations will help ensure appropriate research animal care and use.

  9. Biological evaluation of dental materials, in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, H.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper, the correlation between the user of tissue culture for in vitro tests and the tissue irritability and pupal response observed in in vitro tests, will be discussed. It would produce confusion if dental materials were standardised with the unreliable parameter of the living system in dynamic balance. Biological tests, both in vitro and in vivo, should be used for pre-standards testing, without any political control to establish physicochemical standards. As a first step, corrosion tests and the dissolution dosje of toxic components from the material in the tissue culture medium and/or artificial salvia should be standardised under conditions simulating the oral environment. The CNC method and photo-pattern analysis are used for the interpretation of cytotoxicity. The need for biological testing, both in vitro and in vivo, definitely exists in order to obtain physicochemical standards, with a biological simulation depending upon the feedback obtained from the results of in vitro and in vivo tests

  10. In vivo endoscopic multi-beam optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Standish, Beau A; Mariampillai, Adrian; Munce, Nigel R; Leung, Michael K K; Vitkin, I Alex [Deptartment of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Lee, Kenneth K C; Yang, Victor X D [Ontario Cancer Institute/University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)], E-mail: standish@ee.ryerson.ca

    2010-02-07

    A multichannel optical coherence tomography (multi-beam OCT) system and an in vivo endoscopic imaging probe were developed using a swept-source OCT system. The distal optics were micro-machined to produce a high numerical aperture, multi-focus fibre optic array. This combination resulted in a transverse design resolution of <10 {mu}m full width half maximum (FWHM) throughout the entire imaging range, while also increasing the signal intensity within the focus of the individual channels. The system was used in a pre-clinical rabbit study to acquire in vivo structural images of the colon and ex vivo images of the oesophagus and trachea. A good correlation between the structural multi-beam OCT images and H and E histology was achieved, demonstrating the feasibility of this high-resolution system and its potential for in vivo human endoscopic imaging.

  11. In vivo endoscopic multi-beam optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standish, Beau A; Mariampillai, Adrian; Munce, Nigel R; Leung, Michael K K; Vitkin, I Alex; Lee, Kenneth K C; Yang, Victor X D

    2010-01-01

    A multichannel optical coherence tomography (multi-beam OCT) system and an in vivo endoscopic imaging probe were developed using a swept-source OCT system. The distal optics were micro-machined to produce a high numerical aperture, multi-focus fibre optic array. This combination resulted in a transverse design resolution of <10 μm full width half maximum (FWHM) throughout the entire imaging range, while also increasing the signal intensity within the focus of the individual channels. The system was used in a pre-clinical rabbit study to acquire in vivo structural images of the colon and ex vivo images of the oesophagus and trachea. A good correlation between the structural multi-beam OCT images and H and E histology was achieved, demonstrating the feasibility of this high-resolution system and its potential for in vivo human endoscopic imaging.

  12. Cerenkov Luminescence Tomography for In Vivo Radiopharmaceutical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI is a cost-effective molecular imaging tool for biomedical applications of radiotracers. The introduction of Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT relative to planar CLI can be compared to the development of X-ray CT based on radiography. With CLT, quantitative and localized analysis of a radiopharmaceutical distribution becomes feasible. In this contribution, a feasibility study of in vivo radiopharmaceutical imaging in heterogeneous medium is presented. Coupled with a multimodal in vivo imaging system, this CLT reconstruction method allows precise anatomical registration of the positron probe in heterogeneous tissues and facilitates the more widespread application of radiotracers. Source distribution inside the small animal is obtained from CLT reconstruction. The experimental results demonstrated that CLT can be employed as an available in vivo tomographic imaging of charged particle emitters in a heterogeneous medium.

  13. In vivo cellular imaging using fluorescent proteins - Methods and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Monti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and genetic engineering of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cell biology. What was previously invisible to the cell often can be made visible with the use of fluorescent proteins. With this words, Robert M. Hoffman introduces In vivo Cellular Imaging Using Fluorescent proteins, the eighteen chapters book dedicated to the description of how fluorescence proteins have changed the way to analyze cellular processes in vivo. Modern researches aim to study new and less invasive methods able to follow the behavior of different cell types in different biological contexts: for example, how cancer cells migrate or how they respond to different therapies. Also, in vivo systems can help researchers to better understand animal embryonic development so as how fluorescence proteins may be used to monitor different processes in living organisms at the molecular and cellular level.

  14. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  15. In Vivo Histamine Optical Nanosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. Clark

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this communication we discuss the development of ionophore based nanosensors for the detection and monitoring of histamine levels in vivo. This approach is based on the use of an amine-reactive, broad spectrum ionophore which is capable of recognizing and binding to histamine. We pair this ionophore with our already established nanosensor platform, and demonstrate in vitro and in vivo monitoring of histamine levels. This approach enables capturing rapid kinetics of histamine after injection, which are more difficult to measure with standard approaches such as blood sampling, especially on small research models. The coupling together of in vivo nanosensors with ionophores such as nonactin provide a way to generate nanosensors for novel targets without the difficult process of designing and synthesizing novel ionophores.

  16. In vivo demonstration of surgical task assistance using miniature robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawks, Jeff A; Kunowski, Jacob; Platt, Stephen R

    2012-10-01

    Laparoscopy is beneficial to patients as measured by less painful recovery and an earlier return to functional health compared to conventional open surgery. However, laparoscopy requires the manipulation of long, slender tools from outside the patient's body. As a result, laparoscopy generally benefits only patients undergoing relatively simple procedures. An innovative approach to laparoscopy uses miniature in vivo robots that fit entirely inside the abdominal cavity. Our previous work demonstrated that a mobile, wireless robot platform can be successfully operated inside the abdominal cavity with different payloads (biopsy, camera, and physiological sensors). We hope that these robots are a step toward reducing the invasiveness of laparoscopy. The current study presents design details and results of laboratory and in vivo demonstrations of several new payload designs (clamping, cautery, and liquid delivery). Laboratory and in vivo cooperation demonstrations between multiple robots are also presented.

  17. In vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of inulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Hong-Mei; Zhou, Hai-Zhu; Yang, Jun-Yan; Li, Ran; Song, Hui; Wu, Hong-Xin

    2018-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of inulin. The in vitro assays demonstrated that the antioxidant activities of inulin, including the DPPH radical scavenging activity, ABTS scavenging activity and ferric reducing power, were weak and significantly lower than those of Vitamin C (P inulin on the antioxidant status of laying hens was evaluated with in vivo antioxidant assays. The results indicated that inulin supplementation quadratically improved the egg production rate of the laying hens (P inulin levels increased (P inulin levels increased (P inulin has the potential to improve the antioxidant status of laying hens.

  18. Tracking of multimodal therapeutic nanocomplexes targeting breast cancer in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Rizia; Chen, Wenxue; Bartels, Marc; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Botero, Maria F; McAninch, Robin Ward; Contreras, Alejandro; Schiff, Rachel; Pautler, Robia G; Halas, Naomi J; Joshi, Amit

    2010-12-08

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics with local delivery and external electromagnetic field modulation holds extraordinary promise for soft-tissue cancers such as breast cancer; however, knowledge of the distribution and fate of nanoparticles in vivo is crucial for clinical translation. Here we demonstrate that multiple diagnostic capabilities can be introduced in photothermal therapeutic nanocomplexes by simultaneously enhancing both near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We track nanocomplexes in vivo, examining the influence of HER2 antibody targeting on nanocomplex distribution over 72 h. This approach provides valuable, detailed information regarding the distribution and fate of complex nanoparticles designed for specific diagnostic and therapeutic functions.

  19. Opto-ultrasound imaging in vivo in deep tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si, Ke; YanXu; Zheng, Yao; Zhu, Xinpei; Gong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    It is of keen importance of deep tissue imaging with high resolution in vivo. Here we present an opto-ultrasound imaging method which utilizes an ultrasound to confine the laser pulse in a very tiny spot as a guide star. The results show that the imaging depth is 2mm with a resolution of 10um. Meanwhile, the excitation power we used is less than 2mW, which indicates that our methods can be applied in vivo without optical toxicity and optical bleaching due to the excitation power. (paper)

  20. Microscopia confocal in vivo na cistinose: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Gustavo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A cistinose é doença autossômica recessiva rara caracterizada pelo acúmulo do aminoácido cistina livre dentro dos lisossomos e geralmente é fatal na primeira década de vida na ausência de transplante renal. O presente estudo tem por objetivo relatar os achados da microscopia confocal in vivo em paciente adulto com cistinose infantil. O exame de microscopia confocal in vivo revelou que há diferenças quanto à intensidade de acometimento, tamanho e forma dos depósitos nas diversas camadas corneanas.

  1. Positron emission tomography for measuring metabolism in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear medical imaging always relates to changes at the cellular or molecular level of organization of the body. For years, such changes, summarily called metabolism, permitted radionuclides as tracers to produce information on rather gross organ structure and function. Yet, more recently, increasing emphasis is placed on metabolic reactions themselves; this development is of considerable promise to the clinician, because disease begins and nearly always expresses itself by alterations of metabolism. PET greatly helps to investigate and describe in vivo individual steps within the complex network of enzyme catalized reactions that maintain life; in fact, PET allows studies of biochemistry in vivo. (Author)

  2. Imaging the glutamatergic system in vivo - relevance to schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bressan, R.A.; Pilowsky, L.S. [Inst. of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom); Inst. of Nuclear Medicine, University College of London Medical School (United Kingdom)

    2000-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating psychiatric illness. Its pathophysiology is not fully clarified. Animal data, in vitro and indirect in vivo imaging support glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction in the disorder. A lack of suitable ligands has obstructed direct evaluation of the NMDA receptor hypofunction hypothesis of schizophrenia. Many research groups are working towards developing appropriate single-photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography ligands for the NMDA receptor. This paper briefly presents evidence for links between glutamatergic system dysfunction and schizophrenia. It reviews the radioligands to evaluate glutamatergic receptors in vivo and discusses issues in developing novel ligands for the glutamatergic system. (orig.)

  3. Imaging the glutamatergic system in vivo - relevance to schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressan, R.A.; Pilowsky, L.S.

    2000-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating psychiatric illness. Its pathophysiology is not fully clarified. Animal data, in vitro and indirect in vivo imaging support glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction in the disorder. A lack of suitable ligands has obstructed direct evaluation of the NMDA receptor hypofunction hypothesis of schizophrenia. Many research groups are working towards developing appropriate single-photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography ligands for the NMDA receptor. This paper briefly presents evidence for links between glutamatergic system dysfunction and schizophrenia. It reviews the radioligands to evaluate glutamatergic receptors in vivo and discusses issues in developing novel ligands for the glutamatergic system. (orig.)

  4. Management system of in vivo reports of activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.C.; Dantas, A.L.A.; Lourenco, M.C.; Dantas, B.M.

    2005-01-01

    The SGRIMA (management system of in vivo reports of activity measurements) is a software for Windows developed specifically for the Laboratory of In Vivo Measurements of the IRD - Brazilian Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry -, in order to manage the individual monitoring process that includes personal data archiving, data relating to the parameters of each measure and calculation results of activity. The software was developed in MS Visual Basic 6, using a MS Access database and can be run on personal computers with MS Windows 98 or higher

  5. Manipulating the in vivo immune response by targeted gene knockdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Judy

    2015-08-01

    Aptamers, nucleic acids selected for high affinity binding to proteins, can be used to activate or antagonize immune mediators or receptors in a location and cell-type specific manner and to enhance antigen presentation. They can also be linked to other molecules (other aptamers, siRNAs or miRNAs, proteins, toxins) to produce multifunctional compounds for targeted immune modulation in vivo. Aptamer-siRNA chimeras (AsiCs) that induce efficient cell-specific knockdown in immune cells in vitro and in vivo can be used as an immunological research tool or potentially as an immunomodulating therapeutic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. In vivo dosimetric control for the management of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Lopez, Jorge L.; Piquet del Castillo, Pedro; Garcia Riveron, Juan W.; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo; Alonso Samper, Jose L.; Frank Castillo, Luis; Almiral Gomez, Jorge

    1996-01-01

    A detailed study has been carried out on the possibilities of LiF encapsulated powder, for in vivo dosimetry in intracavitary implants by means of the Amersham manual afterloading system. In vivo dosimetry was carried out in 40 patients randomly selected, which were treated as for their clinical stage. The absorbed dose was measured in points of interest placed in the urinary bladder and the rectum by thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD); the results of these measures were compared with the calculated values, using perpendicular plates and the isodose curves given by Amersham

  7. In vivo potency revisited - Keep the target in sight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Johan; Peletier, Lambertus A; Hjorth, Stephan

    2018-04-01

    Potency is a central parameter in pharmacological and biochemical sciences, as well as in drug discovery and development endeavors. It is however typically defined in terms only of ligand to target binding affinity also in in vivo experimentation, thus in a manner analogous to in in vitro studies. As in vivo potency is in fact a conglomerate of events involving ligand, target, and target-ligand complex processes, overlooking some of the fundamental differences between in vivo and in vitro may result in serious mispredictions of in vivo efficacious dose and exposure. The analysis presented in this paper compares potency measures derived from three model situations. Model A represents the closed in vitro system, defining target binding of a ligand when total target and ligand concentrations remain static and constant. Model B describes an open in vivo system with ligand input and clearance (Cl (L) ), adding in parallel to the turnover (k syn , k deg ) of the target. Model C further adds to the open in vivo system in Model B also the elimination of the target-ligand complex (k e(RL) ) via a first-order process. We formulate corresponding equations of the equilibrium (steady-state) relationships between target and ligand, and complex and ligand for each of the three model systems and graphically illustrate the resulting simulations. These equilibrium relationships demonstrate the relative impact of target and target-ligand complex turnover, and are easier to interpret than the more commonly used ligand-, target- and complex concentration-time courses. A new potency expression, labeled L 50 , is then derived. L 50 is the ligand concentration at half-maximal target and complex concentrations and is an amalgamation of target turnover, target-ligand binding and complex elimination parameters estimated from concentration-time data. L 50 is then compared to the dissociation constant K d (target-ligand binding affinity), the conventional Black & Leff potency estimate EC 50

  8. Functional imaging of the multidrug resistance in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Tae

    2001-01-01

    Although diverse mechanisms are involved in multidrug resistance for chemotherapeutic drugs, the development of cellular P-glycoprotein(Pgp) and multidrug-resistance associated protein (MRP) are improtant factors in the chemotherapy failure to cancer. Various detection assays provide information about the presence of drug efflux pumps at the mRNA and protein levels. However these methods do not yield information about dynamic function of Pgp and MRP in vivo. Single photon emission tomograpy (SPECT) and positron emission tomograpy (PET) are available for the detection of Pgp and MRP-mediated transport. 99m Tc-sestaMIBI and other 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals are substrates for Pgp and MRP, and have been used in clinical studies of tumor imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of Pgp pump. Colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin labeled with 11 C have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo and reported to be feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumors. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP and N- (11 C]acetyl-leukotriene E4 provides an opportunity to study MRP function non-invasively in vivo. Results obtained from recent publications are reviewed to confirm the feasibility of using SPECT and PET to study the functionality of MDR transportes in vivo

  9. Advancing Molecular Therapies through In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton McCaffrey

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective development of therapeutics that target the molecular basis of disease is dependent on testing new therapeutic moieties and delivery strategies in animal models of human disease. Accelerating the analyses of these models and improving their predictive value through whole animal imaging methods, which provide data in real time and are sensitive to the subtle changes, are crucial for rapid advancement of these approaches. Modalities based on optics are rapid, sensitive, and accessible methods for in vivo analyses with relatively low instrumentation costs. In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI is one of these optically based imaging methods that enable rapid in vivo analyses of a variety of cellular and molecular events with extreme sensitivity. BLI is based on the use of light-emitting enzymes as internal biological light sources that can be detected externally as biological indicators. BLI has been used to test spatio-temporal expression patterns of both target and therapeutic genes in living laboratory animals where the contextual influences of whole biological systems are preserved. BLI has also been used to analyze gene delivery, immune cell therapies, and the in vivo efficacy of inhibitory RNAs. New tools for BLI are being developed that will offer greater flexibility in detection and analyses. BLI can be used to accelerate the evaluation of experimental therapeutic strategies and whole body imaging offers the opportunity of revealing the effects of novel approaches on key steps in disease processes.

  10. Bioavailability and in vivo metabolism of intact glucosinolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian; Frandsen, Heidi Blok; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2016-01-01

    Health benefits associated with consumption of cruciferous vegetables have received considerable attention with a hitherto focus on the role and bioactivity of glucosinolate degradation products. We investigated the in vivo metabolism of intact glucosinolates by following their fate in digesta an...

  11. In vivo study of human skin using pulsed terahertz radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickwell, E; Cole, B E; Fitzgerald, A J; Pepper, M; Wallace, V P

    2004-01-01

    Studies in terahertz (THz) imaging have revealed a significant difference between skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma) and healthy tissue. Since water has strong absorptions at THz frequencies and tumours tend to have different water content from normal tissue, a likely contrast mechanism is variation in water content. Thus, we have previously devised a finite difference time-domain (FDTD) model which is able to closely simulate the interaction of THz radiation with water. In this work we investigate the interaction of THz radiation with normal human skin on the forearm and palm of the hand in vivo. We conduct the first ever systematic in vivo study of the response of THz radiation to normal skin. We take in vivo reflection measurements of normal skin on the forearm and palm of the hand of 20 volunteers. We compare individual examples of THz responses with the mean response for the areas of skin under investigation. Using the in vivo data, we demonstrate that the FDTD model can be applied to biological tissue. In particular, we successfully simulate the interaction of THz radiation with the volar forearm. Understanding the interaction of THz radiation with normal skin will form a step towards developing improved imaging algorithms for diagnostic detection of skin cancer and other tissue disorders using THz radiation

  12. Quantification of Lung Metastases from In Vivo Mouse Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Joan; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    Cancer research has made significant progress in terms of understanding and targeting primary tumors; however, the challenge remains for the successful treatment of metastatic cancers. This highlights the importance to use in vivo models to study the metastatic process, as well as for preclinical...

  13. In vivo study of human skin using pulsed terahertz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickwell, E [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Cole, B E [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Fitzgerald, A J [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Pepper, M [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Wallace, V P [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-07

    Studies in terahertz (THz) imaging have revealed a significant difference between skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma) and healthy tissue. Since water has strong absorptions at THz frequencies and tumours tend to have different water content from normal tissue, a likely contrast mechanism is variation in water content. Thus, we have previously devised a finite difference time-domain (FDTD) model which is able to closely simulate the interaction of THz radiation with water. In this work we investigate the interaction of THz radiation with normal human skin on the forearm and palm of the hand in vivo. We conduct the first ever systematic in vivo study of the response of THz radiation to normal skin. We take in vivo reflection measurements of normal skin on the forearm and palm of the hand of 20 volunteers. We compare individual examples of THz responses with the mean response for the areas of skin under investigation. Using the in vivo data, we demonstrate that the FDTD model can be applied to biological tissue. In particular, we successfully simulate the interaction of THz radiation with the volar forearm. Understanding the interaction of THz radiation with normal skin will form a step towards developing improved imaging algorithms for diagnostic detection of skin cancer and other tissue disorders using THz radiation.

  14. On EPR detection of nitric oxide in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Faassen, E.E.H.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO ) is a peculiar radical: Ground state is not paramagnetic (g = 0 since orbital and spin magnetic moments cancel); low reactivity with other molecules except superoxide (O2 ); thermodynamically unstable; dimerizes to N2O2; difficult to detect in-vivo.

  15. In vivo and In vitro Evaluations of Intestinal Gabapentin Absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malte Selch; Frølund, Sidsel; Nøhr, Martha Kampp

    2015-01-01

    of gabapentin by both in vivo and in vitro investigations METHODS: Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined following a range of intravenous (5-100 mg/kg) and oral doses (10-200 mg/kg) in rats. Transepithelial transport (50 μM-50 mM) and apical uptake of gabapentin (0.01-50 mM) were investigated in Caco-2...... cells. The effect of co-application of the LAT-inhibitor, BCH, and the b(0,+)-substrate, L-lysine, on intestinal transport of gabapentin was evaluated in vivo and in vitro. RESULTS: Gabapentin showed dose-dependent oral absorption kinetics and dose-independent disposition kinetics. Co-application of BCH...... inhibited intestinal absorption in vivo and apical uptake in vitro, whereas no effect was observed following co-application of L-lysine. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows for the first time that BCH was capable of inhibiting intestinal absorption of gabapentin in vivo. Furthermore, in Caco-2 cell...

  16. Noninvasive in vivo oximetric imaging by radiofrequency FT EPR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, S; Yamada, K; Irie, A; Murugesan, R; Cook, JA; Devasahayam, N; Van Dam, GM; Mitchell, JB; Krishna, MC

    A novel method, called relaxo-oximetry, for rapid spatially resolved in vivo measurements of oxygen concentration using time-domain radiofrequency (RF) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is described. Time-domain data from triaryl methyl (TAM)-based single-electron contrast agents were processed

  17. Preparation, Characterisation and In Vivo Evaluation of Silybin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Silybin nanoparticles were successfully prepared using o/w emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The nanoparticles sustained the release of the drug both in vitro and in vivo for up to 10 days and offered better pharmacokinetic properties than the free drug itself. Intravenous nanoparticulate administration ...

  18. In vivo Evaluation of Amoxicillin Trihydrate and Clarithromycin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vivo clearance efficacy of the microspheres was evaluated in a Wistar rat model after induction of H. pylori infection. Amoxicillin and clarithromycin-loaded microspheres were administered twice daily for three days. H. Pylori clearance was evaluated by assessing colony count. Results: Treatment with plain drug solution ...

  19. In vivo dosimetry: trends and prospects for brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Rosenfeld, A.; Beddar, S.

    2014-01-01

    The error types during brachytherapy (BT) treatments and their occurrence rates are not well known. The limited knowledge is partly attributed to the lack of independent verification systems of the treatment progression in the clinical workflow routine. Within the field of in vivo dosimetry (IVD)...

  20. In vivo dosimetry in radiation therapy in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Jacob; Blomquist, Michael

    2010-07-01

    A prerequisite for achieving high radiation safety for patients receiving external beam radiation therapy is that the hospitals have a quality assurance program. The program should include include monitoring of the radiation dose given to the patient. Control measurements are performed both at the system level and at the individual level. Control measurement is normally performed using in vivo dosimetry, e.g. a method to measure the radiation dose at the individual level during the actual radiation treatment time. In vivo dosimetry has proven to be an important tool to detect and prevent serious errors in patient treatment. The purpose of this research project was to identify the extent to which vivo dosimetry is used and the methods available for this at Swedish radiation therapy clinics. The authority also wanted to get an overall picture of how hospitals manage results of in vivo dosimetry, and how clinics control radiation dose when using modern treatment techniques. The report reflects the situation in Swedish radiotherapy clinics 2007. The report shows that all hospitals use some form of in vivo dosimetry. The instruments used are mainly diodes and termoluminiscence dosimeters

  1. In Vivo Evaluation of Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Hansen, Peter Møller; Lange, Theis

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound in vivo imaging using synthetic aperture sequential beamformation (SASB) is compared with conventional imaging in a double blinded study using side-by-side comparisons. The objective is to evaluate if the image quality in terms of penetration depth, spatial resolution, contrast...

  2. 40 CFR 79.64 - In vivo micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... micronucleus assay. (a) Purpose. The micronucleus assay is an in vivo cytogenetic test which uses erythrocytes... that, because it contains RNA, can be differentiated by appropriate staining techniques from a normochromatic erythrocyte (NCE), which lacks RNA. In one to two days, a PCE matures into a NCE. (c) Test method...

  3. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of alginate and alginatechitosan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AL-CS) beads for oral application and to evaluate their in vitro characteristics and in vivo activities. Methods: AL and AL-CS beads were prepared using ionotropic gelation. The beads were evaluated for particle size, surface morphology, drug ...

  4. Bioresponsive probes for molecular imaging: concepts and in vivo applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhoven, S.M. van; Robillard, M.S.; Langereis, S.; Grull, H.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a powerful tool to visualize and characterize biological processes at the cellular and molecular level in vivo. In most molecular imaging approaches, probes are used to bind to disease-specific biomarkers highlighting disease target sites. In recent years, a new subset of

  5. Enhancement of In Vitro Skin Transport and In Vivo Hypoglycemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Matrix-type transdermal patches containing GMD, drug coprecipitate or its inclusion complex ... influence of pH and motility; avoid hepatic first- pass effect; and reduce .... The enhancement factor (EF) was calculated ... Pharmacokinetic evaluation of GMD patches .... comparison of in vivo performance of GMD (2.5.

  6. In vivo neutron activation at Toronto 1967-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, J.E.; McNeill, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    Since the inception of work on in vivo neutron activation analysis at Toronto in 1967, the project has grown until these procedures are in routine diagnostic use at the Toronto General Hospital. Approximately 300 calcium tests and 600 nitrogen tests are carried out each year. Cadmium tests are also available. (author)

  7. In vivo tumor radiobiology of heavy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, S.B.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1980-01-01

    The response of tumor cells systems to irradiation with carbon, neon and argon beams at various positions in the plateau and extended-peak regions of the Bragg ionization curve is being evaluated from experiments conducted both in vivo and in vitro. The radiobiological end points being studied include: tumor volume response, cellular survival after tumor irradiation in situ, and cell-kinetic parameters

  8. In Vivo H MR spectroscopic imaging of human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Bo Young; Suh, Tae Suk; Choi, Kyo Ho; Bahk, Yong Whee; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the spatial distribution of various proton metabolites in the human brain with use of water-suppressed in vivo H MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) technique. All of water-suppressed in vivo H MRSI were performed on 1.5 T whole-body MRI/MRS system using Stimulated Echo Acquisition Method (STEAM) Chemical Shift Imaging (CSI) pulse sequence. T1-weighted MR images were used for CSI field of view (FOV; 24 cm). Voxel size of 1.5 cm 3 was designated from the periphery of the brain which was divided by 1024 X 16 X 16 data points. Metabolite images of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine/ phosphocreatine (Cr) + choline/phosphocholine (Cho), and complex of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) + glutamate (Glu) were obtained on the human brain. Our preliminary study suggests that in vivo H MRSI could provide the metabolite imaging to compensate for hypermetabolism on Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans on the basis of the metabolic informations on brain tissues. The unique ability of in vivo H MRSI to offer noninvasive information about tissue biochemistry in disease states will stimulate on clinical research and disease diagnosis

  9. Resin-Bonded Bridges in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Johannes Hilbrandt van der

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis in vitro and in vivo studies on the clinical application of resin-bonded bridges are described and discussed. The development of different types of resin-bonded bridges is described in chapter 1. The bridges are often made by boding a cast metal retainer fitted with and artificial

  10. In vivo near infrared (NIRS) sensor attachment using fibrin bioadhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnab, Andrew; Pagano, Roberto; Kwon, Brian; Dumont, Guy; Shadgan, Babak

    2018-02-01

    Background: `Tisseel' (Baxter Healthcare, Deerfield, IL) is a fibrin-based sealant that is commonly used during spine surgery to augment dural repairs. We wish to intra-operatively secure a near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) sensor to the dura in order to monitor the tissue hemodynamics of the underlying spinal cord. To determine if `Tisseel' sealant adversely attenuates NIR photon transmission. Methods: We investigated `Tisseel' in both an in vitro and in vivo paradigm. For in vitro testing, we used a 1 mm pathlength cuvette containing either air or `Tisseel' interposed between a NIR light source (760 and 850 nm) and a photodiode detector and compared transmittance. For in vivo testing, a continuous wave (760 and 850 nm) spatiallyresolved NIRS device was placed over the triceps muscle using either conventional skin apposition (overlying adhesive bandage) or bioadhesion with `Tisseel'. Raw optical data and tissue saturation index (TSI%) collected at rest were compared. Results: In-vitro NIR light absorption by `Tisseel' was very high, with transmittance reduced by 95% compared to air. In-vivo muscle TSI% values were 80% with conventional attachment and 20% using fibrin glue. Conclusion: The optical properties of `Tisseel' significantly attenuate NIR light during in-vitro transmittance and critically compromise photon transmission in-vivo.

  11. In vivo testing of novel vaccine prototypes against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antenucci, Fabio; Fougeroux, Cyrielle; Deeney, Alannah

    2018-01-01

    vesicles from its outer membrane (OM), accordingly defined as outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Thanks to their antigenic similarity to the OM, OMVs have emerged as a promising tool in vaccinology. In this study we describe the in vivo testing of several vaccine prototypes for the prevention of infection...

  12. Characterisation of mechanical behaviour of human skin in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douven, L.F.A.; Meijer, R.; Oomens, C.W.J.

    2000-01-01

    Characterization of the biomechanical properties of human skin in vivo is studied both experimentally and by numerical modeling. These properties can be important in the evaluation of skin condition (e.g. aging) as well as skin disorders. In this study the authors focus on the static behavior of the

  13. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, Marc Arthur; van der Heide, Emile

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on

  14. Biodegradable xylitol-based elastomers: In vivo behavior and biocompatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Bruggeman (Joost); C.J. Bettinger (Christopher); R.S. Langer (Robert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBiodegradable elastomers based on polycondensation reactions of xylitol with sebacic acid, referred to as poly(xylitol sebacate) (PXS) elastomers have recently been developed. We describe the in vivo behavior of PXS elastomers. Four PXS elastomers were synthesized, characterized, and

  15. In-vivo morphologic and spectroscopic investigation of Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Cicchi, Riccardo; Bruscino, Nicola; Alfieri, Domenico; Massi, Daniela; Lotti, Torello; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2011-07-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease of the skin characterized by hyperkeratosis, hyperproliferation of the epidermis, inflammatory cell accumulation and increased dilatation of dermal papillary blood vessels. Cases of psoriasis were investigated in vivo with optical means in order to evaluate the potential of in vivo optical biopsy. A Polarization Multispectral Dermoscope was employed for the macroscopic observation. Features such as the 'dotted' blood vessels pattern was observed with high contrast. High resolution image sections of the epidermis and the dermis were produced with a custom made Multiphoton Microscope. Imaging extended from the surface of the lesion down to the papillary dermis, at a depth of 200 μm. In the epidermis, a characteristic morphology of the stratum corneum found only in Psoriasis was revealed. Additionally, the cytoplasmic area of the cells in the stratum spinosum layer was found to be smaller than normal. In the dermis the morphological features were more pronounced, where the elongated dermal papillae dominated the papillary layer. Their length exceeds 100μm, which is a far greater value compared to that of healthy skin. These in vivo observations are consistent with the ex vivo histopathological observations, supporting both the applicability and potentiality of multispectral dermoscopy and multiphoton microscopy in the field of in vivo optical investigation and biopsy of skin.

  16. In vivo dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential for exposure to pyrethroid pesticides has risen recently because of their increased use. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin and permethrin in the rat. Hair on the dorsal side of anesthetized adult m...

  17. Imaging N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise Dahl; van Gennip, Maria; Jakobsen, Tim Holm

    2011-01-01

    In order to study N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing in vivo, we present a protocol using an Escherichia coli strain equipped with a luxR-based monitor system, which in the presence of exogenous AHL molecules expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Lungs from mice challenged...

  18. Imaging N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Maria; Jakobsen, Tim Holm

    2018-01-01

    In order to study N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing in vivo, we present a protocol using an Escherichia coli strain equipped with a luxR-based monitor system, which in the presence of exogenous AHL molecules expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Lungs from mice challenged...

  19. Bioresponsive probes for molecular imaging : Concepts and in vivo applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijnhoven, S.M.J.; Robillard, M.S.; Langereis, S.; Grüll, H.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a powerful tool to visualize and characterize biological processes at the cellular and molecular level in vivo. In most molecular imaging approaches, probes are used to bind to disease-specific biomarkers highlighting disease target sites. In recent years, a new subset of

  20. Examples of in-vivo blood vector velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Nielsen, Kristian R.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper examples of in-vivo blood vector velocity images of the carotid artery are presented. The transverse oscillation (TO) method for blood vector velocity estimation has been used to estimate the vector velocities and the method is first evaluated in a circulating flowrig where...

  1. In Vivo Imaging of Natural Killer Cell Trafficking in Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, Filippo; Rapisarda, Anna Serafina; Stabile, Helena; Malviya, Gaurav; Manni, Isabella; Bonanno, Elena; Piaggio, Giulia; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela; Signore, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NKs) are important effectors of the innate immune system, with marked antitumor activity. Imaging NK trafficking in vivo may be relevant to following up the efficacy of new therapeutic approaches aiming at increasing tumor-infiltrating NKs (TINKs). The specific aims of present

  2. In vivo Antimalarial Activity of Methanol and Water Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: The possible active compounds responsible for the observed chemosupression may be flavonoids, terpeneoids and anthraquinones which are present in the extract. This is the first report on the in vivo antimalarial activity of E. thorifolium. Keywords: Antimalarial, Eryngium thorifolium, Plasmodium berghei, ...

  3. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, E. van der

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables.This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the

  4. In vivo detection of apoptosis in an intracardiac tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, L; Dumont, E A; Thimister, P W; Heidendal, G A; DeBruine, A P; Elenbaas, T W; Boersma, H H; van Heerde, W L; Reutelingsperger, C P

    2001-01-01

    We previously demonstrated in vivo imaging of cell death in the myocardia of patients with acute myocardial infarction using technetium Tc 99m–labeled annexin-V (99mTc-p-annexin-V [Apomate], Theseus Imaging, Cambridge, Mass) and nuclear imaging.1 Because high proliferation and apoptotic indices have

  5. In vivo human corneal hydration control dynamics: A new model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odenthal, M.T.P.; Nieuwendaal, C.P.; Venema, H.W.; Oosting, J.; Kok, J.H.C.; Kijlstra, A.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE. To introduce a new model describing human in vivo corneal deswelling after hypoxic contact lens wear, based on a damped harmonic oscillator, which can describe an overshoot in corneal deswelling, to compare this new model with the currently used exponential model, and also to test whether a

  6. In vivo human corneal hydration control dynamics: a new model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odenthal, M. T.; Nieuwendaal, C. P.; Venema, H. W.; Oosting, J.; Kok, J. H. C.; Kijlstra, A.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To introduce a new model describing human in vivo corneal deswelling after hypoxic contact lens wear, based on a damped harmonic oscillator, which can describe an overshoot in corneal deswelling, to compare this new model with the currently used exponential model, and also to test whether a

  7. Validation criteria of an internal dosimetry laboratory in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro L, M. de las M.

    2014-10-01

    People working with radioactive materials, under certain circumstances (e.g. not using the proper protective equipment, an incident not covered, etc.) could be incorporated into the body. The radiation protection programs include direct measurement methods -in vivo- or indirect -in vitro- or both, to know that radioactive material is incorporated into the body. The monitoring measurements of internal contamination or (Radio-bioassay) are carried out with the purpose of determining the amount of radioactive material incorporated in the body; estimate the effective dose and committed dose; management administration of radiation protection; appropriate medical management; and to provide the data necessary for the legal requirements and the preservation of records. The measurement methods used in the monitoring of internal contamination must be validated by the combination of the following processes: calibration, using standards reference materials and/or simulators; execute systematic research, using control samples; and intercomparison between laboratories and performance tests. In this paper the validation criteria of an internal dosimetry laboratory in vivo are presented following the information provided by the standard ANSI N13-30-1996 and ISO/TEC 17025-2005 as are the criteria of facilities, staff training, interpretation of measurements, performance criteria for monitoring of internal contamination in vivo, results reporting and records retention. Thereby we achieve standardized quantitative performance criteria of truthfulness, accuracy and detection limit and a consensus on statistical definitions to establish the validation plan of a monitoring laboratory of internal contamination in vivo. (Author)

  8. In vivo myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion and nuclear reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Yasuyuki; Vagnozzi, Ronald J; Millay, Douglas P

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge regarding cellular fusion and nuclear reprogramming may aid in cell therapy strategies for skeletal muscle diseases. An issue with cell therapy approaches to restore dystrophin expression in muscular dystrophy is obtaining a sufficient quantity of cells that normally fuse with muscle. Here we conferred fusogenic activity without transdifferentiation to multiple non-muscle cell types and tested dystrophin restoration in mouse models of muscular dystrophy. We previously demonstrated that myomaker, a skeletal muscle-specific transmembrane protein necessary for myoblast fusion, is sufficient to fuse 10T 1/2 fibroblasts to myoblasts in vitro. Whether myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion is functional in vivo and whether the newly introduced nonmuscle nuclei undergoes nuclear reprogramming has not been investigated. We showed that mesenchymal stromal cells, cortical bone stem cells, and tail-tip fibroblasts fuse to skeletal muscle when they express myomaker. These cells restored dystrophin expression in a fraction of dystrophin-deficient myotubes after fusion in vitro. However, dystrophin restoration was not detected in vivo although nuclear reprogramming of the muscle-specific myosin light chain promoter did occur. Despite the lack of detectable dystrophin reprogramming by immunostaining, this study indicated that myomaker could be used in nonmuscle cells to induce fusion with muscle in vivo, thereby providing a platform to deliver therapeutic material.-Mitani, Y., Vagnozzi, R. J., Millay, D. P. In vivo myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion and nuclear reprogramming. © FASEB.

  9. Helium induces preconditioning in human endothelium in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Kirsten F.; Oei, Gezina T. M. L.; Brevoord, Daniel; Stroes, Erik S.; Nieuwland, Rienk; Schlack, Wolfgang S.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Weber, Nina C.; Preckel, Benedikt

    2013-01-01

    Helium protects myocardium by inducing preconditioning in animals. We investigated whether human endothelium is preconditioned by helium inhalation in vivo. Forearm ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) in healthy volunteers (each group n = 10) was performed by inflating a blood pressure cuff for 20 min.

  10. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  11. HIM-herbal ingredients in-vivo metabolism database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hong; Tang, Kailin; Liu, Qi; Sun, Yi; Huang, Qi; Zhu, Ruixin; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Duanfeng; Huang, Chenggang; Cao, Zhiwei

    2013-05-31

    Herbal medicine has long been viewed as a valuable asset for potential new drug discovery and herbal ingredients' metabolites, especially the in vivo metabolites were often found to gain better pharmacological, pharmacokinetic and even better safety profiles compared to their parent compounds. However, these herbal metabolite information is still scattered and waiting to be collected. HIM database manually collected so far the most comprehensive available in-vivo metabolism information for herbal active ingredients, as well as their corresponding bioactivity, organs and/or tissues distribution, toxicity, ADME and the clinical research profile. Currently HIM contains 361 ingredients and 1104 corresponding in-vivo metabolites from 673 reputable herbs. Tools of structural similarity, substructure search and Lipinski's Rule of Five are also provided. Various links were made to PubChem, PubMed, TCM-ID (Traditional Chinese Medicine Information database) and HIT (Herbal ingredients' targets databases). A curated database HIM is set up for the in vivo metabolites information of the active ingredients for Chinese herbs, together with their corresponding bioactivity, toxicity and ADME profile. HIM is freely accessible to academic researchers at http://www.bioinformatics.org.cn/.

  12. Radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo by 3-nitrotriazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibamoto, Y.; Sakano, K.; Kimura, R.; Nishidai, T.; Nishimoto, S.; Ono, K.; Kagiya, T.; Abe, M.

    1986-01-01

    A series of 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazole derivatives bearing various types of side chain (R) at the N1-position (AK-2000 series) were synthesized and their radiosensitizing effect and toxicity in vitro and in vivo were investigated, in comparison with those of Misonidazole (MISO), SR-2508, and RSU-1069. Of the fifteen 3-nitrotriazoles tested, all had sensitizing effects in vitro on hypoxic V79 cells. Also, all but one had definite effects on solid EMT6/KU and SCCVII tumors in vivo. For many of the triazole compounds, the degree of radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo appeared identical. However, they were generally less efficient, both in vitro and in vivo, than the corresponding 2-nitroimidazoles, whereas their aerobic cytotoxicity and toxicity to mice (LD50/7) were comparable to those of the 2-nitroimidazoles. Considering the sensitizing effect and toxicity, AK-2123 (R = CH 2 CONHC 2 H 4 OCH 3 ) may be as useful as MISO, but none of the triazoles have been proved to be superior to SR-2508

  13. Methods of in-vivo mouse lung micro-CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recheis, Wolfgang A.; Nixon, Earl; Thiesse, Jacqueline; McLennan, Geoffrey; Ross, Alan; Hoffman, Eric

    2005-04-01

    Micro-CT will have a profound influence on the accumulation of anatomical and physiological phenotypic changes in natural and transgenetic mouse models. Longitudinal studies will be greatly facilitated, allowing for a more complete and accurate description of events if in-vivo studies are accomplished. The purpose of the ongoing project is to establish a feasible and reproducible setup for in-vivo mouse lung micro-computed tomography (μCT). We seek to use in-vivo respiratory-gated μCT to follow mouse models of lung disease with subsequent recovery of the mouse. Methodologies for optimizing scanning parameters and gating for the in-vivo mouse lung are presented. A Scireq flexiVent ventilated the gas-anesthetized mice at 60 breaths/minute, 30 cm H20 PEEP, 30 ml/kg tidal volume and provided a respiratory signal to gate a Skyscan 1076 μCT. Physiologic monitoring allowed the control of vital functions and quality of anesthesia, e.g. via ECG monitoring. In contrary to longer exposure times with ex-vivo scans, scan times for in-vivo were reduced using 35μm pixel size, 158ms exposure time and 18μm pixel size, 316ms exposure time to reduce motion artifacts. Gating via spontaneous breathing was also tested. Optimal contrast resolution was achieved at 50kVp, 200μA, applying an aluminum filter (0.5mm). There were minimal non-cardiac related motion artifacts. Both 35μm and 1μm voxel size images were suitable for evaluation of the airway lumen and parenchymal density. Total scan times were 30 and 65 minutes respectively. The mice recovered following scanning protocols. In-vivo lung scanning with recovery of the mouse delivered reasonable image quality for longitudinal studies, e.g. mouse asthma models. After examining 10 mice, we conclude μCT is a feasible tool evaluating mouse models of lung pathology in longitudinal studies with increasing anatomic detail available for evaluation as one moves from in-vivo to ex-vivo studies. Further developments include automated

  14. Clinical applications of in vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Kim, Junhyung; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Chun, Byungseon; Gweon, Daegab

    2008-02-01

    Living skin for basic and clinical research can be evaluated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) non-invasively. CLSM imaging system can achieve skin image its native state either "in vivo" or "fresh biopsy (ex vivo)" without fixation, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. This study examines the potential fluorescent CLSM with a various exogenous fluorescent contrast agent, to provide with more resolution images in skin. In addition, in vivo fluorescent CLSM researchers will be extended a range of potential clinical application. The prototype of our CLSM system has been developed by Prof. Gweon's group. The operating parameters are composed of some units, such as illuminated wavelength 488 nm, argon illumination power up to 20mW on the skin, objective lens, 0.9NA oil immersion, axial resolution 1.0μm, field of view 200μm x 100μm (lateral resolution , 0.3μm). In human volunteer, fluorescein sodium was administrated topically and intradermally. Animal studies were done in GFP transgenic mouse, IRC mouse and pig skin. For imaging of animal skin, fluorescein sodium, acridine orange, and curcumine were used for fluorescein contrast agent. We also used the GFP transgenic mouse for fluorescein CLSM imaging. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. Curcumin is a yellow food dye that has similar fluorescent properties to fluorescein sodium. Acridin Orange can be highlight nuclei in viable keratinocyte. In vivo CLSM of transgenic GFP mouse enable on in vivo, high resolution view of GFP expressing skin tissue. GFP signals are brightest in corneocyte, kertinocyte, hair and eccrine gland. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. In

  15. Evaluating In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation of Toxicokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambaugh, John F; Hughes, Michael F; Ring, Caroline L; MacMillan, Denise K; Ford, Jermaine; Fennell, Timothy R; Black, Sherry R; Snyder, Rodney W; Sipes, Nisha S; Wetmore, Barbara A; Westerhout, Joost; Setzer, R Woodrow; Pearce, Robert G; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Thomas, Russell S

    2018-05-01

    Prioritizing the risk posed by thousands of chemicals potentially present in the environment requires exposure, toxicity, and toxicokinetic (TK) data, which are often unavailable. Relatively high throughput, in vitro TK (HTTK) assays and in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) methods have been developed to predict TK, but most of the in vivo TK data available to benchmark these methods are from pharmaceuticals. Here we report on new, in vivo rat TK experiments for 26 non-pharmaceutical chemicals with environmental relevance. Both intravenous and oral dosing were used to calculate bioavailability. These chemicals, and an additional 19 chemicals (including some pharmaceuticals) from previously published in vivo rat studies, were systematically analyzed to estimate in vivo TK parameters (e.g., volume of distribution [Vd], elimination rate). For each of the chemicals, rat-specific HTTK data were available and key TK predictions were examined: oral bioavailability, clearance, Vd, and uncertainty. For the non-pharmaceutical chemicals, predictions for bioavailability were not effective. While no pharmaceutical was absorbed at less than 10%, the fraction bioavailable for non-pharmaceutical chemicals was as low as 0.3%. Total clearance was generally more under-estimated for nonpharmaceuticals and Vd methods calibrated to pharmaceuticals may not be appropriate for other chemicals. However, the steady-state, peak, and time-integrated plasma concentrations of nonpharmaceuticals were predicted with reasonable accuracy. The plasma concentration predictions improved when experimental measurements of bioavailability were incorporated. In summary, HTTK and IVIVE methods are adequately robust to be applied to high throughput in vitro toxicity screening data of environmentally relevant chemicals for prioritizing based on human health risks.

  16. Free-radical probes for functional in vivo EPR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, S.; Krishna, M. C.

    2007-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is one of the recent functional imaging modalities that can provide valuable in vivo physiological information on its own merit and aids as a complimentary imaging technique to MRI and PET of tissues especially with respect to in vivo pO II (oxygen partial pressure), redox status and pharmacology. EPR imaging mainly deals with the measurement of distribution and in vivo dynamics and redox changes using special nontoxic paramagnetic spin probes that can be infused into the object of investigation. These spin probes should be characterized by simple EPR spectra, preferably with narrow EPR lines. The line width should be reversibly sensitive to the concentration of in vivo pO II with a linear dependence. Several non-toxic paramagnetic probes, some particulate and insoluble and others water-soluble and infusible (by intravenous or intramuscular injection) have been developed which can be effectively used to quantitatively assess tissue redox status, and tumor hypoxia. Quantitative assessment of the redox status of tissue in vivo is important in investigating oxidative stress, and that of tissue pO II is very important in radiation oncology. Other areas in which EPR imaging and oxymetry may help are in the investigation of tumorangiogenesis, wound healing, oxygenation of tumor tissue by the ingestion of oxygen-rich gases, etc. The correct choice of the spin probe will depend on the modality of measurement (whether by CW or time-domain EPR imaging) and the particular physiology interrogated. Examples of the available spin probes and some EPR imaging applications employing them are presented.

  17. In vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes in total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, F.F.; Amaral, L.L.; Costa, A.M.; Netto, T.G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is the characterization and application of silicon diode detectors for in vivo dosimetry in total body irradiation (TBI) treatments. It was evaluated the diode response with temperature, dose rate, gantry angulations and field size. A maximum response variation of 2.2% was obtained for temperature dependence. The response variation for dose rate and angular was within 1.2%. For field size dependence, the detector response increased with field until reach a saturation region, where no more primary radiation beam contributes for dose. The calibration was performed in a TBI setup. Different lateral thicknesses from one patient were simulated and then the calibration factors were determined by means of maximum depth dose readings. Subsequent to calibration, in vivo dosimetry measurements were performed. The response difference between diode readings and the prescribed dose for all treatments was below 4%. This difference is in agreement as recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), which is ±5%. The present work to test the applicability of a silicon diode dosimetry system for performing in vivo dose measurements in TBI techniques presented good results. These measurements demonstrated the value of diode dosimetry as a treatment verification method and its applicability as a part of a quality assurance program in TBI treatments. - Highlights: ► Characterization of a silicon diode dosimetry system. ► Application of the diodes for in vivo dosimetry in total body irradiation treatments. ► Implementation of in vivo dosimetry as a part of a quality assurance program in radiotherapy

  18. In vivo SPECT reporter gene imaging of regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Sharif-Paghaleh

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs were identified several years ago and are key in controlling autoimmune diseases and limiting immune responses to foreign antigens, including alloantigens. In vivo imaging techniques including intravital microscopy as well as whole body imaging using bioluminescence probes have contributed to the understanding of in vivo Treg function, their mechanisms of action and target cells. Imaging of the human sodium/iodide symporter via Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT has been used to image various cell types in vivo. It has several advantages over the aforementioned imaging techniques including high sensitivity, it allows non-invasive whole body studies of viable cell migration and localisation of cells over time and lastly it may offer the possibility to be translated to the clinic. This study addresses whether SPECT/CT imaging can be used to visualise the migratory pattern of Tregs in vivo. Treg lines derived from CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ cells were retrovirally transduced with a construct encoding for the human Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS and the fluorescent protein mCherry and stimulated with autologous DCs. NIS expressing self-specific Tregs were specifically radiolabelled in vitro with Technetium-99m pertechnetate ((99mTcO(4(- and exposure of these cells to radioactivity did not affect cell viability, phenotype or function. In addition adoptively transferred Treg-NIS cells were imaged in vivo in C57BL/6 (BL/6 mice by SPECT/CT using (99mTcO(4(-. After 24 hours NIS expressing Tregs were observed in the spleen and their localisation was further confirmed by organ biodistribution studies and flow cytometry analysis. The data presented here suggests that SPECT/CT imaging can be utilised in preclinical imaging studies of adoptively transferred Tregs without affecting Treg function and viability thereby allowing longitudinal studies within disease models.

  19. In vivo oxidation in remelted highly cross-linked retrievals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, B H; Van Citters, D W; Currier, J H; Collier, J P

    2010-10-20

    Elimination of free radicals to prevent oxidation has played a major role in the development and product differentiation of the latest generation of highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearing materials. In the current study, we (1) examined oxidation in a series of retrieved remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearings from a number of device manufacturers and (2) compared the retrieval results with findings for shelf-stored control specimens. The hypothesis was that radiation-cross-linked remelted ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene would maintain oxidative stability in vivo comparable with the stability during shelf storage and in published laboratory aging tests. Fifty remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular liners and nineteen remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene tibial inserts were received after retrieval from twenty-one surgeons from across the U.S. Thirty-two of the retrievals had been in vivo for two years or more. Each was measured for oxidation with use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A control series of remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular liners from three manufacturers was analyzed with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure free radical content and with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to measure oxidation initially and after eight to nine years of shelf storage in air. The never-implanted, shelf-aged controls had no measurable free-radical content initially or after eight to nine years of shelf storage. The never-implanted controls showed no increase in oxidation during shelf storage. Oxidation measurements showed measurable oxidation in 22% of the retrieved remelted highly cross-linked liners and inserts after an average of two years in vivo. Because never-implanted remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight

  20. Clinical application of in vivo dosimetry for external telecobalt machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, H. H. M.

    2011-01-01

    In external beam radiotherapy quality assurance is carried out on the individual components of treatment chain. The patient simulating device, planning system and treatment machine are tested regularly according to set protocols developed by national and international organizations. Even thought these individual systems are not tested for errors which can be made in the transfer between the systems. The best quality assurance for the treatment planning chain. In vivo dosimetry is used as a quality assurance tool for verifying dosimetry as either the entrance or exit surface of the patient undergoing external beam radiotherapy. It is a proven reliable method of checking overall treatment accuracy, allowing verification of dosimetry and dose calculation as well as patient treatment setup. Accurate in vivo dosimetry is carried out if diodes and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). the main detector types in use for in vivo dosimetry, are carefully calibrated and the factors influencing their sensitivity are taken into account. The aim of this study was to verify the response of TLDs type (LiF: Mg, Cu, p) use in radiotherapy, to establish calibration procedure for TLDs and to evaluate entrance dose obtained by the treatment planning system with measured dose using thermoluminescence detectors. Calibration of TLDs was done using Cobalt-60 teletherapy machine, linearity and calibration factors were determined. Measurements were performed in random phantom for breast irradiation (for the breast irradiation ( For the breast irradiation technique considered, wedge field was used). All TLDs were processed and analyzed at RICK. In vivo dosimetry represents a technique that has been widely employed to evaluate the dose to the patient mainly in radiotherapy. Thermoluminescent dosimeters are considered the gold stander for in vivo dosimetry and do not require cables for measurements which makes them ideal for mail based studies and have no dose rate or temperature dependence

  1. In vivo red cell destruction by anti-Lu6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issitt, P.D.; Valinsky, J.E.; Marsh, W.L.; DiNapoli, J.; Gutgsell, N.S.

    1990-01-01

    An example is presented of an IgG1, anti-Lu6, that reacted by indirect antiglobulin test and was capable of destroying antigen-positive red cells in vivo. Two methods for the measurement of red cell survival, 51 Cr labeling and flow cytometry, gave the same result: 20 percent of the test dose of Lu:6 red cells was destroyed in the first hour after injection and 80 percent in the first 24 hours. The clinical relevance of the antibody was correctly predicted by an in vitro monocyte monolayer assay. The finding that this example of anti-Lu6 was clinically significant should not be taken to mean that all antibodies directed against high-incidence Lutheran and Lutheran system-related antigens will behave similarly. When such antibodies are encountered, in vivo and/or in vitro studies to assess their clinical significance are necessary before rare blood is used for transfusion

  2. Estimation of in-vivo pulses in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1994-01-01

    and the three-dimensional, attenuated ultrasound field for a concave transducer. Pulses are estimated from in-vivo liver data showing good resemblance to a pulse measured as the response from a planar reflector and then properly attenuated. The main application for the algorithm is to function......An algorithm for the estimation of one-dimensional in-vivo ultrasound pulses is derived. The routine estimates a set of ARMA parameters describing the pulse and uses data from a number of adjacent rf lines. Using multiple lines results in a decrease in variance on the estimated parameters...... and significantly reduces the risk of terminating the algorithm at a local minimum. Examples from use on synthetic data confirms the reduction in variance and increased chance of successful minimization termination. Simulations are also reported indicating the relation between the one-dimensional pulse...

  3. On in-vivo skin topography metrology and replication techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, B-G; Blunt, L; Thomas, T R

    2005-01-01

    Human skin metrology is an area of growing interest for many disciplines both in research and for commercial purposes. Changes in the skin topography are an early stage diagnosis tool not only for diseases but also give indication of the response to medical and cosmetic treatment. This paper focuses on the evaluation of in vivo and in vitro methodologies for accurate measurements of skin and outlines the quantitative characterisation of the skin topography. The study shows the applicability of in-vivo skin topography characterisation and also the advantages and limitations compared to conventional replication techniques. Finally, aspects of stripe projection methodology and 3D characterisation are discussed as a background to the proposed methodology in this paper

  4. In vivo imaging agents: an international market report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a global perspective of the in vivo imaging agents business to market planning executives who are working for companies that develop, produce and distribute various types of in vivo imaging agents. Others that could find this study useful include investment bankers, regulatory and governmental authorities and purchasers of these products. The study attempts to diligently provide market data by type for important geographic markets - Western Europe, the U.S.A., and Japan. A competitive intelligence section which discusses companies involved in these markets constitutes the last part of this study. These profiles are not intended to extensively evaluate each company's marketing strengths or strategies but to provide a general idea of the market presence and prospects. A combination of primary and secondary research is used for all findings. (author)

  5. Characterization of in vivo chemistry of cations in the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousa, S.A.; Williams, S.J.; Sands, H.

    1987-01-01

    A variety of laboratory procedures can be used to define the chemistry and pharmacokinetics of myocardial cationic imaging agents. These methods are utilized to define the in vivo chemistry of cationic heart agents, in order to understand the kinetics and mechanisms of: tissue and cellular transport, subcellular distribution, and intracellular localization. Transport across cell membranes can be active, passive or facilitated. Studies performed in erythrocytes, heart cells, slices and isolated perfused hearts using methods for separation of metabolites have shown a high degree of myocardial specificity for [99mTc]hexakis alkyl isonitrile by an uptake mechanism different from 201 Tl. These studies demonstrate the importance of in vivo chemistry and pharmacokinetics in the development of new radiopharmaceuticals. 31 references

  6. Orderly recruitment of motor units under optical control in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Michael E; Thompson, Kimberly R; Deisseroth, Karl; Delp, Scott L

    2010-10-01

    A drawback of electrical stimulation for muscle control is that large, fatigable motor units are preferentially recruited before smaller motor units by the lowest-intensity electrical cuff stimulation. This phenomenon limits therapeutic applications because it is precisely the opposite of the normal physiological (orderly) recruitment pattern; therefore, a mechanism to achieve orderly recruitment has been a long-sought goal in physiology, medicine and engineering. Here we demonstrate a technology for reliable orderly recruitment in vivo. We find that under optical control with microbial opsins, recruitment of motor units proceeds in the physiological recruitment sequence, as indicated by multiple independent measures of motor unit recruitment including conduction latency, contraction and relaxation times, stimulation threshold and fatigue. As a result, we observed enhanced performance and reduced fatigue in vivo. These findings point to an unanticipated new modality of neural control with broad implications for nervous system and neuromuscular physiology, disease research and therapeutic innovation.

  7. An ovine in vivo framework for tracheobronchial stent analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Donnacha J; Thiebes, Anja Lena; Cornelissen, Christian G; O'Shea, Mary B; O'Brien, Barry; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Bruzzi, Mark; McHugh, Peter E

    2017-10-01

    Tracheobronchial stents are most commonly used to restore patency to airways stenosed by tumour growth. Currently all tracheobronchial stents are associated with complications such as stent migration, granulation tissue formation, mucous plugging and stent strut fracture. The present work develops a computational framework to evaluate tracheobronchial stent designs in vivo. Pressurised computed tomography is used to create a biomechanical lung model which takes into account the in vivo stress state, global lung deformation and local loading from pressure variation. Stent interaction with the airway is then evaluated for a number of loading conditions including normal breathing, coughing and ventilation. Results of the analysis indicate that three of the major complications associated with tracheobronchial stents can potentially be analysed with this framework, which can be readily applied to the human case. Airway deformation caused by lung motion is shown to have a significant effect on stent mechanical performance, including implications for stent migration, granulation formation and stent fracture.

  8. Impact of in Vivo Ischemic Time on RNA Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper; Kierkeby, Lene T.; Eiholm, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    immediately following the tumor removal. The time from clamping the main arterial supply to resection and removal of the tumor was used to estimate the in vivo ischemic time. We did not observe a significant difference in RNA quality between normal tissue and tumor tissue. We observed a significant......Considerable effort has been made to improve differentiated diagnostics as well as personalized treatment for colorectal cancer patients. High-quality fresh frozen tissue is often required to investigate relevant molecular signatures in these patients. In RNA expression studies, the “RNA integrity...... number” is widely accepted as a reliable marker of RNA quality. Here, we investigate the feasibility of obtaining high-quality tissue from a colon cancer biobank and the impact of in vivo ischemic time and various technical and clinicopathological factors on RNA quality. Biopsies were obtained...

  9. Validating in vivo Raman spectroscopy of bone in human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Francis W. L.; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy can non-destructively measure properties of bone related to mineral density, mineral composition, and collagen composition. Bone properties can be measured through the skin in animal and human subjects, but correlations between the transcutaneous and exposed bone measurements have only been reported for human cadavers. In this study, we examine human subjects to collect measurements transcutaneously, on surgically exposed bone, and on recovered bone fragments. This data will be used to demonstrate in vivo feasibility and to compare transcutaneous and exposed Raman spectroscopy of bone. A commercially available Raman spectrograph and optical probe operating at 785 nm excitation are used for the in vivo measurements. Requirements for applying Raman spectroscopy during a surgery are also discussed.

  10. In vivo SELEX for Identification of Brain-penetrating Aptamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congsheng Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological barriers of the brain impair drug delivery for treatment of many neurological disorders. One delivery approach that has not been investigated for their ability to penetrate the brain is RNA-based aptamers. These molecules can impart delivery to peripheral tissues and circulating immune cells, where they act as ligand mimics or can be modified to carry payloads. We developed a library of aptamers and an in vivo evolution protocol to determine whether specific aptamers could be identified that would home to the brain after injection into the peripheral vasculature. Unlike biopanning with recombinant bacteriophage libraries, we found that the aptamer library employed here required more than 15 rounds of in vivo selection for convergence to specific sequences. The aptamer species identified through this approach bound to brain capillary endothelia and penetrated into the parenchyma. The methods described may find general utility for targeting various payloads to the brain.

  11. Applications of nuclear technologies for in-vivo elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Wielopolski, L.

    1982-01-01

    Measurement facilities developed, to date, include a unique whole-body-counter, (WBC); a total-body neutron-activation facility (TBNAA); and a partial-body activation facility (PBNAA). A variation of the prompt-gamma neutron-activation technique for measuring total-body nitrogen was developed to study body composition of cancer patients and the effect of nutritional regimens on the composition. These new techniques provide data in numerous clinical studies not previously amenable to investigation. The development and perfection of these techniques provide unique applications of radiation and radioisotopes to the early diagnosis of certain diseases and the evaluation of therapeutic programs. The PBNAA technique has been developed and calibrated for in-vivo measurement of metals. Development has gone forward on prompt-gamma neutron activation for the measurement of cadmium, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) for measurement of iron. Other techniques are being investigated for in-vivo measurement of metals such as silicon and beryllium

  12. The in vivo measurement of radiocaesium activity in broiler chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeschl, M.; Balas, J.

    2000-01-01

    Contamination of certain areas of Europe with radiocaesium from the Chernobyl accident led to a higher 137 Cs accumulation (i.e. 300-600 Bq kg -1 ) in grain and to potential post-accident contamination of broiler chickens. In future, such contamination may require a simple determination of the 137 Cs activity concentration in broiler chicken meat which would lead to measures for preventing the recommended limits of radionuclide contamination of the meat for human consumption from being exceeded. This paper describes the development of a rapid method for the in vivo monitoring of the broiler chicken using a lead-shielded sodium iodide detector. The method enables simply fixed live chicken to be monitored, the results showing a good correlation (R 2 =0.98) with measurements of meat from chicken previously monitored in vivo prior to slaughter

  13. Highly Effective Gene Transfection In Vivo by Alkylated Polyethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Fortune

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We mechanistically explored the effect of increased hydrophobicity of the polycation on the efficacy and specificity of gene delivery in mice. N-Alkylated linear PEIs with varying alkyl chain lengths and extent of substitution were synthesized and characterized by biophysical methods. Their in vivo transfection efficiency, specificity, and biodistribution were investigated. N-Ethylation improves the in vivo efficacy of gene expression in the mouse lung 26-fold relative to the parent polycation and more than quadruples the ratio of expression in the lung to that in all other organs. N-Propyl-PEI was the best performer in the liver and heart (581- and 3.5-fold enhancements, resp. while N-octyl-PEI improved expression in the kidneys over the parent polymer 221-fold. As these enhancements in gene expression occur without changing the plasmid biodistribution, alkylation does not alter the cellular uptake but rather enhances transfection subsequent to cellular uptake.

  14. In vivo calcium imaging of the aging and diseased brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhoff, Gerhard; Busche, Marc A.; Garaschuk, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, in vivo calcium imaging became a powerful tool for studying brain function. With the use of two-photon microscopy and modern labelling techniques, it allows functional studies of individual living cells, their processes and their interactions within neuronal networks. In vivo calcium imaging is even more important for studying the aged brain, which is hard to investigate in situ due to the fragility of neuronal tissue. In this article, we give a brief overview of the techniques applicable to image aged rodent brain at cellular resolution. We use multicolor imaging to visualize specific cell types (neurons, astrocytes, microglia) as well as the autofluorescence of the ''aging pigment'' lipofuscin. Further, we illustrate an approach for simultaneous imaging of cortical cells and senile plaques in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.)

  15. Characterization of oxidation end product of plasma albumin 'in vivo'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Luca; Bruschi, Maurizio; Candiano, Giovanni; Petretto, Andrea; Dimasi, Nazzareno; Del Boccio, Piero; Urbani, Andrea; Rialdi, Giovanni; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2006-10-20

    Anti-oxidants are paradoxically much lower in plasma than inside cells even blood is comparably exposed to the oxidative stress. 'In vitro' models suggest a critical role of albumin as substitutive anti-oxidant in plasma but no proof for this role is available 'in vivo.' Herein, we demonstrate by LC/MS/MS that plasma albumin undergoes massive oxidation in primary nephrotic syndrome, involving stable sulphonation SO3- of the free SH of Cys 34 with +48Da increase in exact mass of the protein (ESI-MS) and formation of a fast moving isoform in the pH range between 5 and 7. Physical-chemical experiments with DSC and fluorescence spectra indicate a thermal stabilization of the structure upon oxidation. This is the first demonstration of massive oxidation of albumin 'in vivo' that reflects a functional role of the protein. Free radicals should be implicated in the pathogenesis of proteinuria in human FSGS.

  16. In vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of inulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Mei Shang

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of inulin. The in vitro assays demonstrated that the antioxidant activities of inulin, including the DPPH radical scavenging activity, ABTS scavenging activity and ferric reducing power, were weak and significantly lower than those of Vitamin C (P < 0.05. The influence of dietary supplementation with inulin on the antioxidant status of laying hens was evaluated with in vivo antioxidant assays. The results indicated that inulin supplementation quadratically improved the egg production rate of the laying hens (P < 0.01. The antioxidant enzyme activities in the serum, including SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px, and the total antioxidant capacity increased quadratically as inulin levels increased (P < 0.001. The levels of MDA in the serum decreased quadratically as inulin levels increased (P < 0.001. These findings suggest that inulin has the potential to improve the antioxidant status of laying hens.

  17. Recent molecular approaches to understanding astrocyte function in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eDavila

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are a predominant glial cell type in the nervous systems, and are becoming recognized as important mediators of normal brain function as well as neurodevelopmental, neurological, and neurodegenerative brain diseases. Although numerous potential mechanisms have been proposed to explain the role of astrocytes in the normal and diseased brain, research into the physiological relevance of these mechanisms in vivo is just beginning. In this review, we will summarize recent developments in innovative and powerful molecular approaches, including knockout mouse models, transgenic mouse models, and astrocyte-targeted gene transfer/expression, which have led to advances in understanding astrocyte biology in vivo that were heretofore inaccessible to experimentation. We will examine the recently improved understanding of the roles of astrocytes - with an emphasis on astrocyte signaling - in the context of both the healthy and diseased brain, discuss areas where the role of astrocytes remains debated, and suggest new research directions.

  18. Applying the ARRIVE Guidelines to an In Vivo Database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha A Karp

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE guidelines were developed to address the lack of reproducibility in biomedical animal studies and improve the communication of research findings. While intended to guide the preparation of peer-reviewed manuscripts, the principles of transparent reporting are also fundamental for in vivo databases. Here, we describe the benefits and challenges of applying the guidelines for the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC, whose goal is to produce and phenotype 20,000 knockout mouse strains in a reproducible manner across ten research centres. In addition to ensuring the transparency and reproducibility of the IMPC, the solutions to the challenges of applying the ARRIVE guidelines in the context of IMPC will provide a resource to help guide similar initiatives in the future.

  19. Famine versus feast: understanding the metabolism of tumors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayers, Jared R; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2015-03-01

    To fuel unregulated proliferation, cancer cells alter metabolism to support macromolecule biosynthesis. Cell culture studies have revealed how different oncogenic mutations and nutrients impact metabolism. Glucose and glutamine are the primary fuels used in vitro; however, recent studies have suggested that utilization of other amino acids as well as lipids and protein can also be important to cancer cells. Early investigations of tumor metabolism are translating these findings to the biology of whole tumors and suggest that additional complexity exists beyond nutrient availability alone in vivo. Whole-body metabolism and tumor heterogeneity also influence the metabolism of tumor cells, and successful targeting of metabolism for cancer therapy will require an understanding of tumor metabolism in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In Vivo Real Time Volumetric Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological....... This paper investigates the in vivo applicability and sensitivity of volumetric SA imaging. Utilizing the transmit events to generate a set of virtual point sources, a frame rate of 25 Hz for a 90° x 90° field-of-view was achieved. Data were obtained using a 3.5 MHz 32 x 32 elements 2-D phased array...... transducer connected to the experimental scanner (SARUS). Proper scaling is applied to the excitation signal such that intensity levels are in compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations for in vivo ultrasound imaging. The measured Mechanical Index and spatial-peak- temporal...

  1. Engineering Cell Fate for Tissue Regeneration by In Vivo Transdifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lázaro, I; Kostarelos, K

    2016-02-01

    Changes in cell identity occur in adult mammalian organisms but are rare and often linked to disease. Research in the last few decades has thrown light on how to manipulate cell fate, but the conversion of a particular cell type into another within a living organism (also termed in vivo transdifferentiation) has only been recently achieved in a limited number of tissues. Although the therapeutic promise of this strategy for tissue regeneration and repair is exciting, important efficacy and safety concerns will need to be addressed before it becomes a reality in the clinical practice. Here, we review the most relevant in vivo transdifferentiation studies in adult mammalian animal models, offering a critical assessment of this potentially powerful strategy for regenerative medicine.

  2. In vivo proton MR spectroscopy of canine status epilepticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstrom, J.C.; Partington, C.R.; Perman, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    Invasive studies of rodent seizure models have demonstrated twice-normal lactate accumulation at the seizure focus. The authors investigated metabolic changes in canine kainic acid-induced seizures by means of in vivo volume-selective water-suppressed proton MR spectroscopy (MVSTE pulse sequence). Spectra from several experiments are presented demonstrating changes in lactate and MR imaging-visible lipid concentration. Spectra were obtained with interlaced acquisition from the brain and an external standard for relative quantification, with best-case line width of 4 Hz and typical line widths of 7-15 Hz at 1.5 T. Direct injection of NAA and lactate in the brain allowed in vivo identification of resonances

  3. Modulating Hippocampal Plasticity with In Vivo Brain Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-17

    wires were left unhooked from stimulation device. Following stimulation , the animals were returned to their homecage until time of euthanasia and...current stimulation (tDCS) to enhance cognitive training: effect of timing of stimulation . Exp Brain Res 232:3345-3351. 15 DISTRIBUTION...AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2016-0082 MODULATING HIPPOCAMPAL PLASTICITY WITH IN-VIVO BRAIN STIMULATION Joyce G. Rohan Oakridge Institute

  4. Ranking the in vivo toxicity of nanomaterials in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchio, G.; Galeone, A.; Malvindi, M. A. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Center for Bio-Molecular Nanotechnologies-UniLe (Italy); Cingolani, R. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Central Research Laboratories (Italy); Pompa, P. P., E-mail: pierpaolo.pompa@iit.it [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Center for Bio-Molecular Nanotechnologies-UniLe (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    In this work, we propose a quantitative assessment of nanoparticles toxicity in vivo. We show a quantitative ranking of several types of nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, cadmium-based QDs, cadmium-free QDs, and iron oxide NPs, with different coating and/or surface chemistries), providing a categorization of their toxicity outcomes. This strategy may offer an innovative high-throughput screening tool of nanomaterials, of potential and broad interest to the nanoscience community.

  5. Using and Designing Platforms for In Vivo Education Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Joseph Jay; Ostrow, Korinn; Xiong, Xiaolu; Glassman, Elena; Kim, Juho; Maldonado, Samuel G.; Li, Na; Reich, Justin; Hefferman, Neil

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to typical laboratory experiments, the everyday use of online educational resources by large populations and the prevalence of software infrastructure for A/B testing leads us to consider how platforms can embed in vivo experiments that do not merely support research, but ensure practical improvements to their educational components. Examples are presented of randomized experimental comparisons conducted by subsets of the authors in three widely used online educational platforms K...

  6. The measurement of oxygen in vivo using EPR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, Harold M.; Clarkson, Robert B.

    1998-01-01

    The measurement of pO 2 in vivo using EPR has some features which have already led to very useful applications and this approach is likely to have increasingly wide and effective use. It is based on the effect of oxygen on EPR spectra which provides a sensitive and accurate means to measure pO 2 quantitatively. The development of oxygen-sensitive paramagnetic materials which are very stable, combined with instrumental developments, has been crucial to the in vivo applications of this technique. The physical basis and biological applications of in vivo EPR oximetry are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the use of EPR spectroscopy at 1 GHz using particulate paramagnetic materials for the repetitive and non-invasive measurement of pO 2 in tissues. In vivo EPR has already produced some very useful results which have contributed significantly to solving important biological problems. The characteristics of EPR oximetry which appear to be especially useful are often complementary to existing techniques for measuring oxygen in tissues. These characteristics include the capability of making repeated measurements from the same site, high sensitivity to low levels of oxygen, and non-invasive options. The existing techniques are especially useful for studies in small animals, where the depth of measurements is not an overriding issue. In larger animals and potentially in human subjects, non-invasive techniques seem to be immediately applicable to study phenomena very near the surface (within 10 mm) while invasive techniques have some very promising uses. The clinical uses of EPR oximetry which seem especially promising and likely to be undertaken in the near future are long-term monitoring of the status and response to treatment of peripheral vascular disease and optimizing cancer therapy by enabling it to be modified on the basis of the pO 2 measured in the tumour. (author)

  7. Bio-Mechatronics: From Insects to In-Vivo Mechatronics

    OpenAIRE

    Vaidyanathan, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Automatic Control & Systems Engineering is pleased to announce the following seminar: Bio-Mechatronics: From Insects to In-Vivo Mechatronics Dr Ravi Vaidyanathan Department of Mechanical Engineering Imperial College Wednesday, 25th September 2013 at 14:00, LT02, Sir Henry Stephenson Building Mechatronics is the synergistic combination of precision engineering, electronic control, and systems thinking in the design of products and manufacturing processes. Bio-Mechatron...

  8. In vivo stem cell transplantation using reduced cell numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Takeo W

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cell (DPSC) characterization is essential for regeneration of a dentin/pulp like complex in vivo. This is especially important for identifying the potential of DPSCs to function as stem cells. Previously reported DPSC transplantation methods have used with huge numbers of cells, along with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP), gelatin and fibrin, and collagen scaffolds. This protocol describe a transplantation protocol that uses fewer cells and a temperature-responsive cell culture dish.

  9. In vivo dosimetry with L-alpha-alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boey, R; Van Der Velden, K [Industriele Hogeschool van het Gemeenschapsonderwijs Limburg, Hasselt (Belgium); Schaeken, B [Algemeen Ziekenhuis Middelheim, Antwerp (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1995-12-01

    When organic substances are irradiated, stable electrons can be formed. The concentration of these electrons is detected via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), a non-destructive form of dosimetry. L-alpha-alanine is extremely suited as a detector because of its high stability and high yield of unpaired electrons. With an EMS 104 spectrometer, we measure the peak-to-peak value of the first derivate of the resonance-spectrum. This value is proportional to the concentration of unpaired electrons and therefore with the absorbed dose. Prior to the in vivo measurements in teletherapy, a calibration curve had to be established. This clearly showed a linear relationship between the EPR-signal and the absorbed dose, except for very low dose where precision was low (20% 1 sd). This indicates that the background signal of the dosimeter is strongly orientation dependent. For this reason it was decided to use pre-irradiated detectors. A number of in vivo measurements has been performed. It was found that the error propagation plays a major role in the calculation of the measured absorbed dose, in the range 1 Gy-6 Gy. Contrary to in vivo measurements in brachytherapy, where higher doses are measured, large uncertainties (30% 1 sd) on the entry dose calculations were observed. For this reason, it is recommended to use a statistical method of reducing this standard deviation to an acceptable level. The proposed method, consisting of 2 detectors and the usage of weight coefficients on our standard deviations, gave promising results. However, theoretical calculations and in vivo measurements show that this method is still not satisfactory to reduce the uncertainty to an acceptable standard in clinical situations.

  10. In vivo brain microdialysis: advances in neuropsychopharmacology and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvesh, Altaf S; Carroll, Richard T; Geldenhuys, Werner J; Gudelsky, Gary A; Klein, Jochen; Meshul, Charles K; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J

    2011-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Microdialysis is an important in vivo sampling technique, useful in the assay of extracellular tissue fluid. The technique has both pre-clinical and clinical applications but is most widely used in neuroscience. The in vivo microdialysis technique allows measurement of neurotransmitters such as acetycholine (ACh), the biogenic amines including dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT), amino acids such as glutamate (Glu) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), as well as the metabolites of the aforementioned neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides in neuronal extracellular fluid in discrete brain regions of laboratory animals such as rodents and non-human primates. AREAS COVERED: In this review we present a brief overview of the principles and procedures related to in vivo microdialysis and detail the use of this technique in the pre-clinical measurement of drugs designed to be used in the treatment of chemical addiction, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and as well as psychiatric disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia. This review offers insight into the tremendous utility and versatility of this technique in pursuing neuropharmacological investigations as well its significant potential in rational drug discovery. EXPERT OPINION: In vivo microdialysis is an extremely versatile technique, routinely used in the neuropharmacological investigation of drugs used for the treatment of neurological disorders. This technique has been a boon in the elucidation of the neurochemical profile and mechanism of action of several classes of drugs especially their effects on neurotransmitter systems. The exploitation and development of this technique for drug discovery in the near future will enable investigational new drug candidates to be rapidly moved into the clinical trial stages and to market thus providing new successful therapies for neurological diseases

  11. Ultrastructural features of Mimulus aurantiacus (Scrophulariaceae) pollen tubes in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Ekici,Nuran; Dane,Feruzan; Olgun,Göksel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to give information on ultrastructure of in vivo pollen tubes of Mimulus aurantiacus which were collected from the Botanical Garden of the University of California at Berkeley. Materials were prepared according to electron microscopy methods and examined under Zeiss electron microscope. Four zones were examined in the pollen tubes of Mimulus aurantiacus. APICAL ZONE: Mitochondria, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, rough endoplasmic reticulum, dictyosomes and secretory ves...

  12. Ranking the in vivo toxicity of nanomaterials in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecchio, G.; Galeone, A.; Malvindi, M. A.; Cingolani, R.; Pompa, P. P.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we propose a quantitative assessment of nanoparticles toxicity in vivo. We show a quantitative ranking of several types of nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, cadmium-based QDs, cadmium-free QDs, and iron oxide NPs, with different coating and/or surface chemistries), providing a categorization of their toxicity outcomes. This strategy may offer an innovative high-throughput screening tool of nanomaterials, of potential and broad interest to the nanoscience community

  13. Hematin-derived anticoagulant. Generation in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Prolongation of clotting times produced by hematin was investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Hematin-derived anticoagulant (HDA) was found to be due to a degradative product or derivative of hematin, and was generated in vitro in standing (aging) aqueous solutions of the parent compound. Generation of HDA in vitro was inhibited by antioxidants. The anticoagulant effect of HDA was inhibited by freshly prepared hematin, fresh Sn-protoporphyrin, imidazole, or the iron chelator desferrioxamine....

  14. In vitro and in vivo approaches to study osteocyte biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalajzic, Ivo; Matthews, Brya G; Torreggiani, Elena; Harris, Marie A; Divieti Pajevic, Paola; Harris, Stephen E

    2013-06-01

    Osteocytes, the most abundant cell population of the bone lineage, have been a major focus in the bone research field in recent years. This population of cells that resides within mineralized matrix is now thought to be the mechanosensory cell in bone and plays major roles in the regulation of bone formation and resorption. Studies of osteocytes had been impaired by their location, resulting in numerous attempts to isolate primary osteocytes and to generate cell lines representative of the osteocytic phenotype. Progress has been achieved in recent years by utilizing in vivo genetic technology and generation of osteocyte directed transgenic and gene deficiency mouse models. We will provide an overview of the current in vitro and in vivo models utilized to study osteocyte biology. We discuss generation of osteocyte-like cell lines and isolation of primary osteocytes and summarize studies that have utilized these cellular models to understand the functional role of osteocytes. Approaches that attempt to selectively identify and isolate osteocytes using fluorescent protein reporters driven by regulatory elements of genes that are highly expressed in osteocytes will be discussed. In addition, recent in vivo studies utilizing overexpression or conditional deletion of various genes using dentin matrix protein (Dmp1) directed Cre recombinase are outlined. In conclusion, evaluation of the benefits and deficiencies of currently used cell lines/genetic models in understanding osteocyte biology underlines the current progress in this field. The future efforts will be directed towards developing novel in vitro and in vivo models that would additionally facilitate in understanding the multiple roles of osteocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biocompatibility of Polyhydroxybutyrate Microspheres: in vitro and in vivo Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Shishatskaya, Ekaterina I.; Voinova, Olga N.; Goreva, Anastasya V.; Mogilnaya, Olga A.; Volova, Tatiana G.

    2008-01-01

    Microspheres have been prepared from the resorbable linear polyester of β-hydroxybutyric acid (polyhydroxybutyrate, PHB) by the solvent evaporation technique and investigated in vitro and in vivo. Biocompatibility of the microspheres has been proved in tests in the culture of mouse fibroblast cell line NIH 3Т3 and in experiments on intramuscular implantation of the microspheres to Wistar rats for 3 months. Tissue response to the implantation of polymeric microspheres has been found to consist...

  16. In vivo facet joint loading of the canine lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttermann, G R; Schendel, M J; Kahmann, R D; Lewis, J L; Bradford, D S

    1992-01-01

    This study describes a technique to measure in vivo loads and the resultant load-contact locations in the facet joint of the canine lumbar spine. The technique is a modification of a previously described in vitro method that used calibrated surface strains of the lateral aspect of the right L3 cranial articular process. In the present study, strains were measured during various in vivo static and dynamic activities 3 days after strain gage implantation. The in vivo recording technique and its errors, which depend on the location of the applied facet loads, is described. The results of applying the technique to five dogs gave the following results. Relative resultant contact load locations on the facet tended to be in the central and caudal portion of the facet in extension activities, central and cranial in standing, and cranial and ventral in flexion or right-turning activities. Right-turning contact locations were ventral and cranial to left-turning locations. Resultant load locations at peak loading during walking were in the central region of the facet, whereas resultant load locations at minimum loading during walking were relatively craniad. This resultant load-contact location during a walk gait cycle typically migrated in an arc with a displacement of 4 mm from minimum to maximum loading. Static tests resulted in a range of facet loads of 0 N in flexion and lying to 185 N for two-legged standing erect, and stand resulted in facet loads of 26 +/- 15 N (mean +/- standard deviation [SD]). Dynamic tests resulted in peak facet loads ranging from 55 N while walking erect to 170 N for climbing up stairs. Maximum walk facet loads were 107 +/- 27 N. The technique is applicable to in vivo studies of a canine facet joint osteoarthritis model and may be useful for establishing an understanding of the biomechanics of low-back pain.

  17. In Vivo Diffuse Optical Tomography and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingze Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT are two attractive imaging techniques for in vivo physiological and psychological research. They have distinct advantages such as non-invasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, high sensitivity and longitudinal monitoring. This paper reviews the key components of DOT and FMT. Light propagation model, mathematical reconstruction algorithm, imaging instrumentation and medical applications are included. Future challenges and perspective on optical tomography are discussed.

  18. Study on advancement of in vivo counting using mathematical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinase, Sakae [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-05-01

    To obtain an assessment of the committed effective dose, individual monitoring for the estimation of intakes of radionuclides is required. For individual monitoring of exposure to intakes of radionuclides, direct measurement of radionuclides in the body - in vivo counting- is very useful. To advance in a precision in vivo counting which fulfills the requirements of ICRP 1990 recommendations, some problems, such as the investigation of uncertainties in estimates of body burdens by in vivo counting, and the selection of the way to improve the precision, have been studied. In the present study, a calibration technique for in vivo counting application using Monte Carlo simulation was developed. The advantage of the technique is that counting efficiency can be obtained for various shapes and sizes that are very difficult to change for phantoms. To validate the calibration technique, the response functions and counting efficiencies of a whole-body counter installed in JAERI were evaluated using the simulation and measurements. Consequently, the calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. The method for the determination of counting efficiency curves as a function of energy was developed using the present technique and a physiques correction equation was derived from the relationship between parameters of correction factor and counting efficiencies of the JAERI whole-body counter. The uncertainties in body burdens of {sup 137}Cs estimated with the JAERI whole-body counter were also investigated using the Monte Carlo simulation and measurements. It was found that the uncertainties of body burdens estimated with the whole-body counter are strongly dependent on various sources of uncertainty such as radioactivity distribution within the body and counting statistics. Furthermore, the evaluation method of the peak efficiencies of a Ge semi-conductor detector was developed by Monte Carlo simulation for optimum arrangement of Ge semi-conductor detectors for

  19. Ranking the in vivo toxicity of nanomaterials in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, G.; Galeone, A.; Malvindi, M. A.; Cingolani, R.; Pompa, P. P.

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we propose a quantitative assessment of nanoparticles toxicity in vivo. We show a quantitative ranking of several types of nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, cadmium-based QDs, cadmium-free QDs, and iron oxide NPs, with different coating and/or surface chemistries), providing a categorization of their toxicity outcomes. This strategy may offer an innovative high-throughput screening tool of nanomaterials, of potential and broad interest to the nanoscience community.

  20. In vivo myograph measurement of muscle contraction at optimal length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Aminul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current devices for measuring muscle contraction in vivo have limited accuracy in establishing and re-establishing the optimum muscle length. They are variable in the reproducibility to determine the muscle contraction at this length, and often do not maintain precise conditions during the examination. Consequently, for clinical testing only semi-quantitative methods have been used. Methods We present a newly developed myograph, an accurate measuring device for muscle contraction, consisting of three elements. Firstly, an element for adjusting the axle of the device and the physiological axis of muscle contraction; secondly, an element to accurately position and reposition the extremity of the muscle; and thirdly, an element for the progressive pre-stretching and isometric locking of the target muscle. Thus it is possible to examine individual in vivo muscles in every pre-stretched, specified position, to maintain constant muscle-length conditions, and to accurately re-establish the conditions of the measurement process at later sessions. Results In a sequence of experiments the force of contraction of the muscle at differing stretching lengths were recorded and the forces determined. The optimum muscle length for maximal force of contraction was established. In a following sequence of experiments with smaller graduations around this optimal stretching length an increasingly accurate optimum muscle length for maximal force of contraction was determined. This optimum length was also accurately re-established at later sessions. Conclusion We have introduced a new technical solution for valid, reproducible in vivo force measurements on every possible point of the stretching curve. Thus it should be possible to study the muscle contraction in vivo to the same level of accuracy as is achieved in tests with in vitro organ preparations.

  1. IODOBELL in vivo kits for in situ labelling with iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koernyei, Jozsef; Lakatos, Mihaly; Kecskes, Ferenc; Mahunka, Imre; Mikecz, Pal; Ando, Laszlo

    1988-01-01

    A system of in vivo kits called IODOBELL was developed in the Institute of Isotopes, Budapest. The production of hepatodecanoic acid for cardiology, iodo-hippuranic acid for kidney diagnostics and a special pharmaceutical, IODOBELL-MIGB for the indication of feochromocitoma and neuroblastoma is reported. The heptadecanoic acid kit is under human examination, the other two are to be tested in the near future. IODOBELL kits contribute to the wider use of 123 I in Hungary. (author) 6 refs

  2. A Novel Paramagnetic Substrate for Detecting Myeloperoxidase Activity in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S. Shazeeb

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bis-phenylamides and bis-hydroxyindolamides of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-gadolinium (DTPA(Gd are paramagnetic reducing substrates of peroxidases that enable molecular imaging of peroxidase activity in vivo. Specifically, gadolinium chelates of bis-5-hydroxytryptamide-DTPA (bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd have been used to image localized inflammation in animal models by detecting neutrophil-derived myeloperoxidase (MPO activity at the inflammation site. However, in other preclinical disease models, bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd presents technical challenges due to its limited solubility in vivo. Here we report a novel MPO-sensing probe obtained by replacing the reducing substrate serotonin (5-HT with 5-hydroxytryptophan (HTrp. Characterization of the resulting probe (bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd in vitro using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and enzyme kinetic analysis showed that bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd (1 improves solubility in water; (2 acts as a substrate for both horseradish peroxidase and MPO enzymes; (3 induces cross-linking of proteins in the presence of MPO; (4 produces oxidation products, which bind to plasma proteins; and (5 unlike bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd, does not follow first-order reaction kinetics. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MR! in mice demonstrated that bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd was retained for up to 5 days in MPO-containing sites and cleared faster than bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd from MPO-negative sites. Bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd should offer improvements for MR! of MPO-mediated inflammation in vivo, especially in high-field MR!, which requires a higher dose of contrast agent.

  3. A novel paramagnetic substrate for detecting myeloperoxidase activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazeeb, Mohammed S; Xie, Yang; Gupta, Suresh; Bogdanov, Alexei A

    2012-01-01

    Bis-phenylamides and bis-hydroxyindolamides of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-gadolinium (DTPA(Gd)) are paramagnetic reducing substrates of peroxidases that enable molecular imaging of peroxidase activity in vivo. Specifically, gadolinium chelates of bis-5-hydroxytryptamide-DTPA (bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd)) have been used to image localized inflammation in animal models by detecting neutrophil-derived myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity at the inflammation site. However, in other preclinical disease models, bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd) presents technical challenges due to its limited solubility in vivo. Here we report a novel MPO-sensing probe obtained by replacing the reducing substrate serotonin (5-HT) with 5-hydroxytryptophan (HTrp). Characterization of the resulting probe (bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd)) in vitro using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and enzyme kinetic analysis showed that bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd) (1) improves solubility in water; (2) acts as a substrate for both horseradish peroxidase and MPO enzymes; (3) induces cross-linking of proteins in the presence of MPO; (4) produces oxidation products, which bind to plasma proteins; and (5) unlike bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd), does not follow first-order reaction kinetics. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mice demonstrated that bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd) was retained for up to 5 days in MPO-containing sites and cleared faster than bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd) from MPO-negative sites. Bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd) should offer improvements for MRI of MPO-mediated inflammation in vivo, especially in high-field MRI, which requires a higher dose of contrast agent.

  4. Radiation-induced bystander effects in vivo are sex specific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koturbash, Igor; Kutanzi, Kristy; Hendrickson, Karl; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Kogosov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) effects span beyond the area of direct exposure and can be observed in neighboring and distant naive cells and organs. This phenomenon is termed a 'bystander effect'. IR effects in directly exposed tissue in vivo are epigenetically mediated and distinct in males and females. Yet, IR-induced bystander effects have never been explored in a sex-specificity domain. We used an in vivo mouse model, whereby the bystander effects are studied in spleen of male and female animals subjected to head exposure when the rest of the body is protected by a medical-grade lead shield. We analyzed the induction of DNA damage and alterations in global DNA methylation. Molecular parameters were correlated with cellular proliferation and apoptosis levels. The changes observed in bystander organs are compared to the changes in unexposed animals and animals exposed to predicted and measured scatter doses. We have found the selective induction of DNA damage levels, global DNA methylation, cell proliferation and apoptosis in exposed and bystander spleen tissue of male and female mice. Sex differences were significantly diminished in animals subjected to a surgical removal of gonads. These data constitute the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced bystander effects in mouse spleen in vivo. We show the role of sex hormones in spleen bystander responses and discuss implications of the observed changes

  5. Resurrection of DNA function in vivo from an extinct genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Pask

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a burgeoning repository of information available from ancient DNA that can be used to understand how genomes have evolved and to determine the genetic features that defined a particular species. To assess the functional consequences of changes to a genome, a variety of methods are needed to examine extinct DNA function. We isolated a transcriptional enhancer element from the genome of an extinct marsupial, the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus or thylacine, obtained from 100 year-old ethanol-fixed tissues from museum collections. We then examined the function of the enhancer in vivo. Using a transgenic approach, it was possible to resurrect DNA function in transgenic mice. The results demonstrate that the thylacine Col2A1 enhancer directed chondrocyte-specific expression in this extinct mammalian species in the same way as its orthologue does in mice. While other studies have examined extinct coding DNA function in vitro, this is the first example of the restoration of extinct non-coding DNA and examination of its function in vivo. Our method using transgenesis can be used to explore the function of regulatory and protein-coding sequences obtained from any extinct species in an in vivo model system, providing important insights into gene evolution and diversity.

  6. A Guide to Studying Human Hair Follicle Cycling In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Won; Kloepper, Jennifer; Langan, Ewan A; Kim, Yongsoo; Yeo, Joongyeub; Kim, Min Ji; Hsi, Tsai-Ching; Rose, Christian; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Lee, Seok-Jong; Seykora, John; Kim, Jung Chul; Sung, Young Kwan; Kim, Moonkyu; Paus, Ralf; Plikus, Maksim V

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo lifelong cyclical transformations, progressing through stages of rapid growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and relative "quiescence" (telogen). Given that HF cycling abnormalities underlie many human hair growth disorders, the accurate classification of individual cycle stages within skin biopsies is clinically important and essential for hair research. For preclinical human hair research purposes, human scalp skin can be xenografted onto immunocompromised mice to study human HF cycling and manipulate long-lasting anagen in vivo. Although available for mice, a comprehensive guide on how to recognize different human hair cycle stages in vivo is lacking. In this article, we present such a guide, which uses objective, well-defined, and reproducible criteria, and integrates simple morphological indicators with advanced, (immuno)-histochemical markers. This guide also characterizes human HF cycling in xenografts and highlights the utility of this model for in vivo hair research. Detailed schematic drawings and representative micrographs provide examples of how best to identify human HF stages, even in suboptimally sectioned tissue, and practical recommendations are given for designing human-on-mouse hair cycle experiments. Thus, this guide seeks to offer a benchmark for human hair cycle stage classification, for both hair research experts and newcomers to the field. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prototype to measure bracket debonding force in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssika Lagni Tonus

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Material biodegradation that occurs in the mouth may interfere in the bonding strength between the bracket and the enamel, causing lower bond strength values in vivo, in comparison with in vitro studies. Objective: To develop a prototype to measure bracket debonding force in vivo and to evaluate, in vitro, the bond strength obtained with the prototype. Methods: A original plier (3M Unitek was modified by adding one strain gauge directly connected to its claw. An electronic circuit performed the reading of the strain gauge, and the software installed in a computer recorded the values of the bracket debonding force, in kgf. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the facial surface of 30 bovine incisors with adhesive materials. In Group 1 (n = 15, debonding was carried out with the prototype, while tensile bond strength testing was performed in Group 2 (n = 15. A universal testing machine was used for the second group. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was recorded. Results: According to Student’s t test (α = 0.05, Group 1 (2.96 MPa and Group 2 (3.08 MPa were not significantly different. ARI score of 3 was predominant in the two groups. Conclusion: The prototype proved to be reliable for obtaining in vivo bond strength values for orthodontic brackets.

  8. Nanotoxicity: the growing need for in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Hans C; Chan, Warren C W

    2007-12-01

    Nanotoxicology is emerging as an important subdiscipline of nanotechnology. Nanotoxicology refers to the study of the interactions of nanostructures with biological systems with an emphasis on elucidating the relationship between the physical and chemical properties (e.g. size, shape, surface chemistry, composition, and aggregation) of nanostructures with induction of toxic biological responses. In the past five years, a majority of nanotoxicity research has focused on cell culture systems; however, the data from these studies could be misleading and will require verification from animal experiments. In vivo systems are extremely complicated and the interactions of the nanostructures with biological components, such as proteins and cells, could lead to unique biodistribution, clearance, immune response, and metabolism. An understanding of the relationship between the physical and chemical properties of the nanostructure and their in vivo behavior would provide a basis for assessing toxic response and more importantly could lead to predictive models for assessing toxicity. In this review article, we describe the assumptions and challenges in the nanotoxicity field and provide a rationale for in vivo animal studies to assess nanotoxicity.

  9. In vivo rapid field map measurement and shimming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Shoichi; Kassai, Yoshimori; Kondo, Masafumi; Kuhara, Shigehide; Satoh, Kozo; Seo, Yasutsugu.

    1992-01-01

    MR imaging and MR spectroscopy need a homogeneous static magnetic field. The static field characteristics are determined by the magnet's homogeneity, the set-up conditions, and the magnetic suspectibility of the subject itself. The field inhomogeneity is usually minimized only once when the apparatus is installed. However, field distortions arising from the magnetic susceptibility differ with each subject and region. To overcome this problem, in vivo shimming can be carried out to improve the homogeneity. The procedures are too lengthy when applying the conventional shimming techniques in vivo. We have developed a new field map measurement technique using a double gradient-recalled echo phase mapping. The values of the currents for the 13-channel shim coils are derived by least squares fitting to the field map and automatically applied to the shim coils. The proposed technique can rapidly and accurately measure the field map in vivo and correct the field inhomogeneity. The results show that this technique improves the homogeneity, especially in regions having a simple field distribution. However, local sharp field distortions which can not be practically corrected by shimming occur near the eyes, ears, heart, etc. due to abrupt susceptibility changes. (author)

  10. In-vivo elemental analysis at Birmingham 1968-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chettle, D.R.; Scott, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques have been developed to measure a number of elements in-vivo. Some have been measured by producing a radioactive isotope in the body by neutron bombardment and subsequently counting γ-rays given off during its decay. Measurements of calcium and sodium have been those most frequently used; copper, iron and phosphorus have also been measured in this way. Gamma-rays emitted 10 -18 s-10 -12 s following neutron capture have also been used for elemental analysis. This method, which involved detectors being in position by the subject during the neutron irradiation, has been widely applied to measurements of both nitrogen and cadmium. Preliminary studies of nuclear resonance scattering have suggested that this could be used for in-vivo elemental analysis, provided technical difficulties in source preparation could be overcome. Recently the use of X-ray fluorescence has been investigated for in-vivo analyses of lead in bone; the extension of this technique to measure mercury in the kidney is under consideration. (author)

  11. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. (Clinical Research Centre, Harrow (England))

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  12. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D.

    1990-01-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of [2H5]phenylalanine, [1-13C]propionate, and [1-13C]leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD

  13. Radiation-induced bystander effects in vivo are sex specific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koturbash, Igor; Kutanzi, Kristy; Hendrickson, Karl; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Kogosov, Dmitry [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Kovalchuk, Olga [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada)], E-mail: olga.kovalchuk@uleth.ca

    2008-07-03

    Ionizing radiation (IR) effects span beyond the area of direct exposure and can be observed in neighboring and distant naive cells and organs. This phenomenon is termed a 'bystander effect'. IR effects in directly exposed tissue in vivo are epigenetically mediated and distinct in males and females. Yet, IR-induced bystander effects have never been explored in a sex-specificity domain. We used an in vivo mouse model, whereby the bystander effects are studied in spleen of male and female animals subjected to head exposure when the rest of the body is protected by a medical-grade lead shield. We analyzed the induction of DNA damage and alterations in global DNA methylation. Molecular parameters were correlated with cellular proliferation and apoptosis levels. The changes observed in bystander organs are compared to the changes in unexposed animals and animals exposed to predicted and measured scatter doses. We have found the selective induction of DNA damage levels, global DNA methylation, cell proliferation and apoptosis in exposed and bystander spleen tissue of male and female mice. Sex differences were significantly diminished in animals subjected to a surgical removal of gonads. These data constitute the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced bystander effects in mouse spleen in vivo. We show the role of sex hormones in spleen bystander responses and discuss implications of the observed changes.

  14. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J; Jacobs, Russell E; Cherry, Simon R

    2008-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and <10% reduction in the fraction of radioactive decay events detected by the PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner.

  15. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Sequestration Enhances In Vivo Cartilage Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina M. Medeiros Da Cunha

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autologous chondrocyte transplantation for cartilage repair still has unsatisfactory clinical outcomes because of inter-donor variability and poor cartilage quality formation. Re-differentiation of monolayer-expanded human chondrocytes is not easy in the absence of potent morphogens. The Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF plays a master role in angiogenesis and in negatively regulating cartilage growth by stimulating vascular invasion and ossification. Therefore, we hypothesized that its sole microenvironmental blockade by either VEGF sequestration by soluble VEGF receptor-2 (Flk-1 or by antiangiogenic hyperbranched peptides could improve chondrogenesis of expanded human nasal chondrocytes (NC freshly seeded on collagen scaffolds. Chondrogenesis of several NC donors was assessed either in vitro or ectopically in nude mice. VEGF blockade appeared not to affect NC in vitro differentiation, whereas it efficiently inhibited blood vessel ingrowth in vivo. After 8 weeks, in vivo glycosaminoglycan deposition was approximately two-fold higher when antiangiogenic approaches were used, as compared to the control group. Our data indicates that the inhibition of VEGF signaling, independently of the specific implementation mode, has profound effects on in vivo NC chondrogenesis, even in the absence of chondroinductive signals during prior culture or at the implantation site.

  16. Cylindromatosis mediates neuronal cell death in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjam, Goutham K; Terpolilli, Nicole Angela; Diemert, Sebastian; Eisenbach, Ina; Hoffmann, Lena; Reuther, Christina; Herden, Christiane; Roth, Joachim; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Culmsee, Carsten

    2018-01-19

    The tumor-suppressor cylindromatosis (CYLD) is a deubiquitinating enzyme and key regulator of cell proliferation and inflammation. A genome-wide siRNA screen linked CYLD to receptor interacting protein-1 (RIP1) kinase-mediated necroptosis; however, the exact mechanisms of CYLD-mediated cell death remain unknown. Therefore, we investigated the precise role of CYLD in models of neuronal cell death in vitro and evaluated whether CYLD deletion affects brain injury in vivo. In vitro, downregulation of CYLD increased RIP1 ubiquitination, prevented RIP1/RIP3 complex formation, and protected neuronal cells from oxidative death. Similar protective effects were achieved by siRNA silencing of RIP1 or RIP3 or by pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 with necrostatin-1. In vivo, CYLD knockout mice were protected from trauma-induced brain damage compared to wild-type littermate controls. These findings unravel the mechanisms of CYLD-mediated cell death signaling in damaged neurons in vitro and suggest a cell death-mediating role of CYLD in vivo.

  17. Radiation-induced bystander effects in vivo are sex specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koturbash, Igor; Kutanzi, Kristy; Hendrickson, Karl; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Kogosov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-07-03

    Ionizing radiation (IR) effects span beyond the area of direct exposure and can be observed in neighboring and distant naïve cells and organs. This phenomenon is termed a 'bystander effect'. IR effects in directly exposed tissue in vivo are epigenetically mediated and distinct in males and females. Yet, IR-induced bystander effects have never been explored in a sex-specificity domain. We used an in vivo mouse model, whereby the bystander effects are studied in spleen of male and female animals subjected to head exposure when the rest of the body is protected by a medical-grade lead shield. We analyzed the induction of DNA damage and alterations in global DNA methylation. Molecular parameters were correlated with cellular proliferation and apoptosis levels. The changes observed in bystander organs are compared to the changes in unexposed animals and animals exposed to predicted and measured scatter doses. We have found the selective induction of DNA damage levels, global DNA methylation, cell proliferation and apoptosis in exposed and bystander spleen tissue of male and female mice. Sex differences were significantly diminished in animals subjected to a surgical removal of gonads. These data constitute the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced bystander effects in mouse spleen in vivo. We show the role of sex hormones in spleen bystander responses and discuss implications of the observed changes.

  18. In Vivo Force Decay of Niti Closed Coil Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Crystal; Nguyen, Tung; Koroluk, Lorne; Ko, Ching-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nickel-titanium (NiTi) closed coil springs are purported to deliver constant forces over extended ranges of activation and working times. In vivo studies supporting this claim are limited. The objective of this study is to evaluate changes in force decay properties of NiTi closed coil springs after clinical use. Methods Pseudoelastic force-deflection curves for 30 NiTi coil springs (used intra-orally) and 15 matched laboratory control springs (simulated intra-oral conditions - artificial saliva, 37°C) were tested pre- and post-retrieval via Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) and the Instron machine, respectively, to evaluate amount of force loss and hysteresis change following 4, 8, or 12 weeks of working time (n=10 per group). Effect of the oral environment and clinical use on force properties were evaluated by comparing in vivo and in vitro data. Results The springs studied showed a statistically significant decrease in force (~12%) following 4 weeks of clinical use (pspace closure at an average rate of 0.91mm per month was still observed despite this decrease in force. In vivo and in vitro force loss data were not statistically different. Conclusions NiTi closed coil springs do not deliver constant forces when used intra-orally, but they still allow for space closure rates of ~1mm/month. PMID:24703289

  19. Novel in vivo techniques to visualize kidney anatomy and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kidokoro, Kengo; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2015-07-01

    Intravital imaging using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become an increasingly popular and widely used experimental technique in kidney research over the past few years. MPM allows deep optical sectioning of the intact, living kidney tissue with submicron resolution, which is unparalleled among intravital imaging approaches. MPM has solved a long-standing critical technical barrier in renal research to study several complex and inaccessible cell types and anatomical structures in vivo in their native environment. Comprehensive and quantitative kidney structure and function MPM studies helped our better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the healthy and diseased kidney. This review summarizes recent in vivo MPM studies with a focus on the glomerulus and the filtration barrier, although select, glomerulus-related renal vascular and tubular functions are also mentioned. The latest applications of serial MPM of the same glomerulus in vivo, in the intact kidney over several days, during the progression of glomerular disease are discussed. This visual approach, in combination with genetically encoded fluorescent markers of cell lineage, has helped track the fate and function (e.g., cell calcium changes) of single podocytes during the development of glomerular pathologies, and provided visual proof for the highly dynamic, rather than static, nature of the glomerular environment. Future intravital imaging applications have the promise to further push the limits of optical microscopy, and to advance our understanding of the mechanisms of kidney injury. Also, MPM will help to study new mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration, a cutting-edge area of kidney research.

  20. Development and clinical application of In Vivo dosimetry for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Hirofumi; Oita, Masataka; Tominaga, Masahide; Oto, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    In practical radiotherapy, it is important to deliver radiation to the target correctly and safely according to the treatment planning. The control of radiation dose delivered to each patient in radiotherapy mainly relies on the prediction based on the result of pre-treatment verification and irradiation accuracy of treatment machines. In Vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy is the procedure of quality assurance by the way of direct measurement for the patient whether the calculated prescribed dose in the treatment planning is delivered precisely. The history of In Vivo dosimetry is relatively long, and the TLD dosimetry for clinical radiotherapy started in early 1970's. After 1980's, owing to the development of semiconductor devices such as diode detectors, semiconductor arrays, the clinical applications for the dosimetry and diagnostic radiation imaging devices which contributed to the development of electric portal imaging devices and 2D semiconductor detectors were introduced. In recent years, these radiation measurement devices and non-invasive methods have been developed, they are becoming widespread as clinical practice. In this paper, we reviewed the In Vivo dosimetry devices and their characteristics, and technical application for radiotherapy. (author)

  1. In vivo detection of fluctuating brain steroid levels SHORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Maaya; Rensel, Michelle A.; Schlinger, Barney A.; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2015-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for in vivo measurement of steroid hormones in brain circuits of the zebra finch. In vivo microdialysis has been used successfully to detect fluctuating neurosteroids in the auditory forebrain (Remage-Healey et al., 2008; 2012; Ikeda et al., 2012) and in the hippocampus (Rensel et al., 2012; 2013) of behaving adult zebra finches. In some cases, the steroids measured are derived locally (e.g., ‘neurosteroids’ like estrogens in males) whereas in other cases the steroids measured reflect systemic circulating levels and/or central conversion (e.g., the primary androgen testosterone and the primary glucocorticoid corticosterone). We also describe the method of reverse-microdialysis (‘retrodialysis’) of compounds that can influence local steroid neurochemistry as well as behavior. In vivo microdialysis can now be used to study steroid signaling in the brain for a variety of experimental purposes. Furthermore, similar methods have been developed to examine changing levels of catecholamines in behaving zebra finches (e.g., Sasaki et al., 2006). Thus, the combined study of neurochemistry and behavior in a vocal learning species now has a new set of powerful tools. PMID:25342066

  2. Structural imprints in vivo decode RNA regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, Robert C; Flynn, Ryan A; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Crisalli, Pete; Lee, Byron; Jung, Jong-Wha; Kuchelmeister, Hannes Y; Batista, Pedro J; Torre, Eduardo A; Kool, Eric T; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-03-26

    Visualizing the physical basis for molecular behaviour inside living cells is a great challenge for biology. RNAs are central to biological regulation, and the ability of RNA to adopt specific structures intimately controls every step of the gene expression program. However, our understanding of physiological RNA structures is limited; current in vivo RNA structure profiles include only two of the four nucleotides that make up RNA. Here we present a novel biochemical approach, in vivo click selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment (icSHAPE), which enables the first global view, to our knowledge, of RNA secondary structures in living cells for all four bases. icSHAPE of the mouse embryonic stem cell transcriptome versus purified RNA folded in vitro shows that the structural dynamics of RNA in the cellular environment distinguish different classes of RNAs and regulatory elements. Structural signatures at translational start sites and ribosome pause sites are conserved from in vitro conditions, suggesting that these RNA elements are programmed by sequence. In contrast, focal structural rearrangements in vivo reveal precise interfaces of RNA with RNA-binding proteins or RNA-modification sites that are consistent with atomic-resolution structural data. Such dynamic structural footprints enable accurate prediction of RNA-protein interactions and N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) modification genome wide. These results open the door for structural genomics of RNA in living cells and reveal key physiological structures controlling gene expression.

  3. Prototype to measure bracket debonding force in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonus, Jéssika Lagni; Manfroi, Fernanda Borguetti; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Grigolo, Eduardo Correa; Helegda, Sérgio; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Material biodegradation that occurs in the mouth may interfere in the bonding strength between the bracket and the enamel, causing lower bond strength values in vivo, in comparison with in vitro studies. Objective: To develop a prototype to measure bracket debonding force in vivo and to evaluate, in vitro, the bond strength obtained with the prototype. Methods: A original plier (3M Unitek) was modified by adding one strain gauge directly connected to its claw. An electronic circuit performed the reading of the strain gauge, and the software installed in a computer recorded the values of the bracket debonding force, in kgf. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the facial surface of 30 bovine incisors with adhesive materials. In Group 1 (n = 15), debonding was carried out with the prototype, while tensile bond strength testing was performed in Group 2 (n = 15). A universal testing machine was used for the second group. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was recorded. Results: According to Student’s t test (α = 0.05), Group 1 (2.96 MPa) and Group 2 (3.08 MPa) were not significantly different. ARI score of 3 was predominant in the two groups. Conclusion: The prototype proved to be reliable for obtaining in vivo bond strength values for orthodontic brackets. PMID:28444011

  4. In vivo quantification of magnetically labelled cells by MRI relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Ulysse; Lajous, Hélène; El Atifi, Michèle; Bidart, Marie; Auboiroux, Vincent; Fries, Pascal Henry; Berger, François; Lahrech, Hana

    2016-11-01

    Cellular MRI, which visualizes magnetically labelled cells (cells*), is an active research field for in vivo cell therapy and tracking. The simultaneous relaxation rate measurements (R 2 *, R 2 , R 1 ) are the basis of a quantitative cellular MRI method proposed here. U937 cells were labelled with Molday ION Rhodamine B, a bi-functional superparamagnetic and fluorescent nanoparticle (U937*). U937* viability and proliferation were not affected in vitro. In vitro relaxometry was performed in a cell concentration range of [2.5 × 10 4 -10 8 ] cells/mL. These measurements show the existence of complementary cell concentration intervals where these rates vary linearly. The juxtaposition of these intervals delineates a wide cell concentration range over which one of the relaxation rates in a voxel of an in vivo image can be converted into an absolute cell concentration. The linear regime was found at high concentrations for R 1 in the range of [10 6 - 2 × 10 8 ] cells/mL, at intermediate concentrations for R 2 in [2.5 × 10 5 - 5 × 10 7 ] cells/mL and at low concentrations for R 2 * in [8 × 10 4 - 5 × 10 6 ] cells/mL. In vivo relaxometry was performed in a longitudinal study, with labelled U937 cells injected into a U87 glioma mouse model. Using in vitro data, maps of in vivo U937* concentrations were obtained by converting one of the in vivo relaxation rates to cell concentration maps. MRI results were compared with the corresponding optical images of the same brains, showing the usefulness of our method to accurately follow therapeutic cell biodistribution in a longitudinal study. Results also demonstrate that the method quantifies a large range of magnetically labelled cells*. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Qualichem in vivo: a tool for assessing the quality of in vivo studies and its application for bisphenol A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Maxim

    Full Text Available In regulatory toxicology, quality assessment of in vivo studies is a critical step for assessing chemical risks. It is crucial for preserving public health studies that are considered suitable for regulating chemicals are robust. Current procedures for conducting quality assessments in safety agencies are not structured, clear or consistent. This leaves room for criticism about lack of transparency, subjective influence and the potential for insufficient protection provided by resulting safety standards. We propose a tool called "Qualichem in vivo" that is designed to systematically and transparently assess the quality of in vivo studies used in chemical health risk assessment. We demonstrate its use here with 12 experts, using two controversial studies on Bisphenol A (BPA that played an important role in BPA regulation in Europe. The results obtained with Qualichem contradict the quality assessments conducted by expert committees in safety agencies for both of these studies. Furthermore, they show that reliance on standardized guidelines to ensure scientific quality is only partially justified. Qualichem allows experts with different disciplinary backgrounds and professional experiences to express their individual and sometimes divergent views-an improvement over the current way of dealing with minority opinions. It provides a transparent framework for expressing an aggregated, multi-expert level of confidence in a study, and allows a simple graphical representation of how well the study integrates the best available scientific knowledge. Qualichem can be used to compare assessments of the same study by different health agencies, increasing transparency and trust in the work of expert committees. In addition, it may be used in systematic evaluation of in vivo studies submitted by industry in the dossiers that are required for compliance with the REACH Regulation. Qualichem provides a balanced, common framework for assessing the quality of

  6. In-vivo singlet oxygen threshold doses for PDT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Timothy C; Kim, Michele M; Liang, Xing; Finlay, Jarod C; Busch, Theresa M

    2015-02-01

    Dosimetry of singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) is of particular interest because it is the major cytotoxic agent causing biological effects for type-II photosensitizers during photodynamic therapy (PDT). An in-vivo model to determine the singlet oxygen threshold dose, [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh , for PDT was developed. An in-vivo radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor mouse model was used to correlate the radius of necrosis to the calculation based on explicit PDT dosimetry of light fluence distribution, tissue optical properties, and photosensitizer concentrations. Inputs to the model include five photosensitizer-specific photochemical parameters along with [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh . Photosensitizer-specific model parameters were determined for benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) and compared with two other type-II photosensitizers, Photofrin ® and m-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC) from the literature. The mean values (standard deviation) of the in-vivo [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh are approximately 0.56 (0.26) and 0.72 (0.21) mM (or 3.6×10 7 and 4.6×10 7 singlet oxygen per cell to reduce the cell survival to 1/e) for Photofrin ® and BPD, respectively, assuming that the fraction of generated singlet oxygen that interacts with the cell is 1. While the values for the photochemical parameters (ξ, σ, g , β) used for BPD were preliminary and may need further refinement, there is reasonable confidence for the values of the singlet oxygen threshold doses. In comparison, the [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh value derived from in-vivo mouse study was reported to be 0.4 mM for mTHPC-PDT. However, the singlet oxygen required per cell is reported to be 9×10 8 per cell per 1/ e fractional kill in an in-vitro mTHPC-PDT study on a rat prostate cancer cell line (MLL cells) and is reported to be 7.9 mM for a multicell in-vitro EMT6/Ro spheroid model for mTHPC-PDT. A theoretical analysis is provided to relate the number of in-vitro singlet oxygen required per cell to reach cell killing of 1/ e to in-vivo singlet

  7. In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574, Rev 5.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2011-09-12

    The following sections provide an overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes the organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance.

  8. A comparison of in vivo and in vitro methods for determining availability of iron from meals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schricker, B.R.; Miller, D.D.; Rasmussen, R.R.; Van Campen, D.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison is made between in vitro and human and rat in vivo methods for estimating food iron availability. Complex meals formulated to replicate meals used by Cook and Monsen (Am J Clin Nutr 1976;29:859) in human iron availability trials were used in the comparison. The meals were prepared by substituting pork, fish, cheese, egg, liver, or chicken for beef in two basic test meals and were evaluated for iron availability using in vitro and rat in vivo methods. When the criterion for comparison was the ability to show statistically significant differences between iron availability in the various meals, there was substantial agreement between the in vitro and human in vivo methods. There was less agreement between the human in vivo and the rat in vivo and between the in vivo and the rat in vivo and between the in vitro and the rat in vivo methods. Correlation analysis indicated significant agreement between in vitro and human in vivo methods. Correlation between the rat in vivo and human in vivo methods were also significant but correlations between the in vitro and rat in vivo methods were less significant and, in some cases, not significant. The comparison supports the contention that the in vitro method allows a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate estimation of nonheme iron availability in complex meals

  9. AKTIVITAS HEPATOPROTEKTOR BATANG FIBRAURE TINCTORIA LOUR SECARA IN VIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Fikriah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Study on Fibraurea tinctoria Lour (FT stems gives information about its traditional utility as  yellow fever treatment. Research of antecedent of FT stem proved that inhibited lipid peroxidation more effective than tocopherol acetate. These study was intended to prove hepatoprotector activity of ethanolic FT stem extract by in vivo. FT stem extract was macerated using absolute ethanol during 5 days that was repeated  3 times . FT stem extract hepatoprotector activity by in vivo was tested using carbon tetrachloride induced hepatotoxicity on Wistar rat. They were given FT stem extract orally once a day at dose 50, 100, and 200 mg/kgBW and Curcumin at dose 50 mg/KgBW as positive control.  After 10 days, all groups were examined liver function (SGOT, SGPT, ALP, liver Malonedialdehide (MDA level by Thiobarbituric acid method,  and liver histopathology by Haemotoxylin-Eosin staining. Group that induced by CCl4 showed significant elevation of SGOT, SGPT and ALT also Liver MDA than group control. FT stem extract treatment inhibited elevation of SGOT, SGPT, ALT and Liver MDA significantly.Qualitative histopathological examination on Group 2 showed extensive fibrosis and necrosis, along with  periportal PMN and lymphocyte infiltration. FT stem extract treatment inhibited pathological change that was induced by CCl4. Dose elevation showed tendency of stronger inhibition on liver cell tissue destruction and inflammation. Key words: Fibraurea tinctoria, hepatoprotector, in vivo   Abstrak Penelusuran secara etnobotani, batang Fibraurea tinctoria Lour (FT digunakan untuk obat sakit kuning. Penelitian pendahuluan batang FT berkemampuan meredam peningkatan lipid peroksidasi secara in vitro yang lebih kuat dibandingkan dengan tokoferol asetat. Membuktikan khasiat ekstrak etanol batang FT sebagai hepatoprotektor secara in vivo. Batang FT dimaserasi dengan etanol absolut selama 3 x 5 hari. Uji hambatan kerusakan hati secara in vivo digunakan model tikus yang

  10. Imaging of Human Hepatic Stem Cells In Vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, E.W.

    2006-01-01

    Report on progress in MRI and PET of stem cell tracking. Human hepatic stem cell imaging for both MRI and PET have been accomplished within SCID/nod mice, and succeeded in cell specificity labeling with in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo image tracking. For MRI, stem cell labeling was accomplished by two methods: (1) in vitro labeling the stem cells just prior to in vivo transplantation, and/or (2) transplanting the stem cells into SCID/nod mice and in vivo specificity labeling the cells just prior to MRI. For labeling techniques 1 and 2, multiple image controls were utilized and include: (A) stem cells(-) and contrast label(-), (B) stem cells(+) and contrast label(-), and (C) stem cells(-) and contrast label(+) help to confirm signal noise background interference, which is a result of slight nonspecific cell labeling. Contrast labeled stem cells are directly transplanted into liver tissues, the tissues excised, and immediately MR imaged to determine cell dispersion dynamics. In this method, the contrast labeled cells appear as void foci throughout the organs. The images are imported into Metamorph imaging software and analyzed for foci radii, diameter, and to discern spheroid volumes. Then, cell numbers are extrapolated to understand ''imaged'' cell aggregate requirements using this technique. For this ex vivo method, a cell aggregate of ∼100 stem cells is required to MRI monitor signal activities. For in vivo imaging, contrast labeled human stem cells within SCID/nod mice are also confirmed as small foci voids and are evident within liver tissues. Initially, these short-term studies where accomplished by in vitro labeling stem cells, transplanting the cells, then in vivo imaging the tissues between days 3-15. Next and to avoid imaged time limitations of detaching contrast agents, the proliferative stem cells were labeled after transplantation, and before MR imaging. This was accomplished to confirm the ability to specifically label unique cell subsets after the

  11. In Vivo Characterization of a Vertebrate Ultra-conserved Enhancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Francis; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Holt, Amy; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len

    2004-10-01

    Genomic sequence comparisons between human, mouse and pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes (Fugu))have revealed a set of extremely conserved noncoding sequences. While this high degree of sequence conservation suggests severe evolutionary constraint and predicts a lack of tolerance to change in order to retain in vivo functionality, such elements have been minimally explored experimentally. In this study, we describe the in-depth characterization of an ancient conserved enhancer, Dc2 located near the dachshund gene, which displays a human-Fugu identity of 84 percent over 424 basepairs (bp). In addition to this large overall conservation, we find that Dc2 is characterized by the presence of a large block of sequence (144 bp) that is completely identical between human, mouse, chicken, zebrafish and Fugu. Through the testing of reporter vector constructs in transgenic mice, we observed that the 424 bp Dc2 conserved element is necessary and sufficient for brain tissue enhancer activity. In vivo analyses also revealed that the 144 bp 100 percent conserved sequence is necessary, but not sufficient, to replicate Dc2 enhancer function. However, the introduction of two separate 16 bp insertions into the highly conserved enhancer core did not cause any detectable modification of its in vivo activity. Our observations indicate that the 144 bp 100 percent conserved element is tolerant of change at least at the resolution of this transgenic mouse assay and suggest that purifying selection on Dc2 sequence might not be as strong as we predicted or that some unknown property also constrains this highly conserved enhancer sequence.

  12. Age-related changes in factor VII proteolysis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofosu, F A; Craven, S; Dewar, L; Anvari, N; Andrew, M; Blajchman, M A

    1996-08-01

    Previous studies have reported that pre-operative plasmas of patients over the age of 40 years who developed post-operative deep vein thrombosis (DVT) had approximately twice the amount of proteolysed factor VII found in plasmas of patients in whom prophylaxis with heparin or low M(r) heparin was successful. These and other studies also reported higher concentrations of thrombin-antithrombin III in pre- and post-operative plasmas of patients who developed post-operative thrombosis than in plasmas of patients in whom prophylaxis was successful. Whether the extent of factor VII proteolysis seen in the patients who developed post-operative DVT is related to the severity of their disease or age is not known. This report investigated age-related changes in the concentrations of total factor VII protein, factor VII zymogen, factor VIIa, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, thrombin-antithrombin III, and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 in normal plasmas and the relationships between these parameters. With the exception of thrombin-antithrombin III, statistically significant increases in the concentrations of these parameters with age were found. Additionally, the differences between the concentrations of total factor VII protein and factor VII zymogen, an index factor VII proteolysis in vivo, were statistically significant only for individuals over age 40. Using linear regression analysis, a significant correlation was found to exist between the concentrations of plasma factor VIIa and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2. Since factor VIIa-tissue factor probably initiates coagulation in vivo, we hypothesize that the elevated plasma factor VIIa (reflecting a less tightly regulated tissue factor activity and therefore increased thrombin production in vivo) accounts for the high risk for post-operative thrombosis seen in individuals over the age of 40.

  13. Photoreactivity of nifedipine in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, H; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G M

    1998-06-01

    Side effects of nitroaromatics used as drugs are often assumed to be caused by incomplete enzymatic reduction of the nitro group. However, photoactivation, although usually not considered as a cause of the toxic effects of nitroaromatics, can play a considerable role. Nifedipine, a nitroaromatic as well, is an important drug used in the treatment of myocardial ischaemia and hypertension. It is extremely sensitive to ultraviolet and visible light up to 450 nm and forms a nitroso derivative in vitro. In the present study it is shown that the nitroso compound is a short-lived intermediate in blood and plasma. It reacts with other constituents to form a stable lactam. In vivo, this lactam proves to be rapidly clear from the blood of rats and is excreted almost quantitatively via the bile. The first photoproduct of nifedipine, nitroso nifedipine, is shown to be converted into the lactam mentioned. Beside the lactam, two other products, which are considered to be derivatives of the lactam, are found. One of these two products is also found in the bile of a rat that was exposed to UVA light after intravenous nifedipine administration. This shows that in an in vivo situation, photoproducts can reach organs other than those exposed to the light. In vitro about 45 to 50% of the original amount of nifedipine is not recovered after exposure of nifedipine to UVA in the presence of bovine serum albumin or after incubation of nitroso nifedipine with bovine serum albumin in the dark. As complex binding of nifedipine of plasma proteins is high, the latter finding may have important implications for the situation in vivo.

  14. In vivo wall shear measurements within the developing zebrafish heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Aidan Jamison

    Full Text Available Physical forces can influence the embryonic development of many tissues. Within the cardiovascular system shear forces resulting from blood flow are known to be one of the regulatory signals that shape the developing heart. A key challenge in investigating the role of shear forces in cardiac development is the ability to obtain shear force measurements in vivo. Utilising the zebrafish model system we have developed a methodology that allows the shear force within the developing embryonic heart to be determined. Accurate wall shear measurement requires two essential pieces of information; high-resolution velocity measurements near the heart wall and the location and orientation of the heart wall itself. We have applied high-speed brightfield imaging to capture time-lapse series of blood flow within the beating heart between 3 and 6 days post-fertilization. Cardiac-phase filtering is applied to these time-lapse images to remove the heart wall and other slow moving structures leaving only the red blood cell movement. Using particle image velocimetry to calculate the velocity of red blood cells in different regions within the heart, and using the signal-to-noise ratio of the cardiac-phase filtered images to determine the boundary of blood flow, and therefore the position of the heart wall, we have been able to generate the necessary information to measure wall shear in vivo. We describe the methodology required to measure shear in vivo and the application of this technique to the developing zebrafish heart. We identify a reduction in shear at the ventricular-bulbar valve between 3 and 6 days post-fertilization and demonstrate that the shear environment of the ventricle during systole is constantly developing towards a more uniform level.

  15. In vivo wall shear measurements within the developing zebrafish heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, R Aidan; Samarage, Chaminda R; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J; Fouras, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Physical forces can influence the embryonic development of many tissues. Within the cardiovascular system shear forces resulting from blood flow are known to be one of the regulatory signals that shape the developing heart. A key challenge in investigating the role of shear forces in cardiac development is the ability to obtain shear force measurements in vivo. Utilising the zebrafish model system we have developed a methodology that allows the shear force within the developing embryonic heart to be determined. Accurate wall shear measurement requires two essential pieces of information; high-resolution velocity measurements near the heart wall and the location and orientation of the heart wall itself. We have applied high-speed brightfield imaging to capture time-lapse series of blood flow within the beating heart between 3 and 6 days post-fertilization. Cardiac-phase filtering is applied to these time-lapse images to remove the heart wall and other slow moving structures leaving only the red blood cell movement. Using particle image velocimetry to calculate the velocity of red blood cells in different regions within the heart, and using the signal-to-noise ratio of the cardiac-phase filtered images to determine the boundary of blood flow, and therefore the position of the heart wall, we have been able to generate the necessary information to measure wall shear in vivo. We describe the methodology required to measure shear in vivo and the application of this technique to the developing zebrafish heart. We identify a reduction in shear at the ventricular-bulbar valve between 3 and 6 days post-fertilization and demonstrate that the shear environment of the ventricle during systole is constantly developing towards a more uniform level.

  16. In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dawen; Stafford, Jason H.; Zhou, Heling; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2013-02-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, becomes exposed on the outer surface of viable (non-apoptotic) endothelial cells in tumor blood vessels, probably in response to oxidative stresses present in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, we optically imaged exposed PS on tumor vasculature in vivo using PGN635, a novel human monoclonal antibody that targets PS. PGN635 F(ab')2 was labeled with the near infrared (NIR) dye, IRDye 800CW. Human glioma U87 cells or breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into nude mice. When the tumors reached ~5 mm in diameter, 800CW- PGN635 was injected via a tail vein and in vivo dynamic NIR imaging was performed. For U87 gliomas, NIR imaging allowed clear detection of tumors as early as 4 h later, which improved over time to give a maximal tumor/normal ratio (TNR = 2.9 +/- 0.5) 24 h later. Similar results were observed for orthotopic MDA-MB-231 breast tumors. Localization of 800CW-PGN635 to tumors was antigen specific since 800CW-Aurexis, a control probe of irrelevant specificity, did not localize to the tumors, and pre-administration of unlabeled PGN635 blocked the uptake of 800CW-PGN635. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed that 800CW-PGN635 was binding to PS-positive tumor vascular endothelium. Our studies suggest that tumor vasculature can be successfully imaged in vivo to provide sensitive tumor detection.

  17. Recommendations for safety testing with the in vivo comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Marie Z

    2012-08-30

    While the in vivo comet assay increases its role in regulatory safety testing, deliberations about the interpretation of comet data continue. Concerns can arise regarding comet assay publications with limited data from non-blind testing of positive control compounds and using protocols (e.g. dose concentrations, sample times, and tissues) known to give an expected effect. There may be a tendency towards bias when the validation or interpretation of comet assay data is based on results generated by widely accepted but non-validated assays. The greatest advantages of the comet assay are its sensitivity and its ability to detect genotoxicity in tissues and at sample times that could not previously be evaluated. Guidelines for its use and interpretation in safety testing should take these factors into account. Guidelines should be derived from objective review of data generated by blind testing of unknown compounds dosed at non-toxic concentrations and evaluated in a true safety-testing environment, where the experimental design and conclusions must be defensible. However, positive in vivo comet findings with such compounds are rarely submitted to regulatory agencies and this data is typically unavailable for publication due to its proprietary nature. To enhance the development of guidelines for safety testing with the comet assay, and with the permission of several sponsors, this paper presents and discusses relevant data from multiple GLP comet studies conducted blind, with unknown pharmaceuticals and consumer products. Based on these data and the lessons we have learned through the course of conducting these studies, I suggest significant adjustments to the current conventions, and I provide recommendations for interpreting in vivo comet assay results in situations where risk must be evaluated in the absence of carcinogenicity or clinical data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pharmacological Modulation of Hemodynamics in Adult Zebrafish In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Brönnimann

    Full Text Available Hemodynamic parameters in zebrafish receive increasing attention because of their important role in cardiovascular processes such as atherosclerosis, hematopoiesis, sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis. To study underlying mechanisms, the precise modulation of parameters like blood flow velocity or shear stress is centrally important. Questions related to blood flow have been addressed in the past in either embryonic or ex vivo-zebrafish models but little information is available for adult animals. Here we describe a pharmacological approach to modulate cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish in vivo.Adult zebrafish were paralyzed and orally perfused with salt water. The drugs isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside were directly applied with the perfusate, thus closely resembling the preferred method for drug delivery in zebrafish, namely within the water. Drug effects on the heart and on blood flow in the submental vein were studied using electrocardiograms, in vivo-microscopy and mathematical flow simulations.Under control conditions, heart rate, blood flow velocity and shear stress varied less than ± 5%. Maximal chronotropic effects of isoprenaline were achieved at a concentration of 50 μmol/L, where it increased the heart rate by 22.6 ± 1.3% (n = 4; p < 0.0001. Blood flow velocity and shear stress in the submental vein were not significantly increased. Sodium nitroprusside at 1 mmol/L did not alter the heart rate but increased blood flow velocity by 110.46 ± 19.64% (p = 0.01 and shear stress by 117.96 ± 23.65% (n = 9; p = 0.03.In this study, we demonstrate that cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish can be efficiently modulated by isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside. Together with the suitability of the zebrafish for in vivo-microscopy and genetic modifications, the methodology described permits studying biological processes that are dependent on hemodynamic alterations.

  19. In vivo cellular imaging with microscopes enabled by MEMS scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Hyejun

    High-resolution optical imaging plays an important role in medical diagnosis and biomedical research. Confocal microscopy is a widely used imaging method for obtaining cellular and sub-cellular images of biological tissue in reflectance and fluorescence modes. Its characteristic optical sectioning capability also enables three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction. However, its use has mostly been limited to excised tissues due to the requirement of high numerical aperture (NA) lenses for cellular resolution. Microscope miniaturization can enable in vivo imaging to make possible early cancer diagnosis and biological studies in the innate environment. In this dissertation, microscope miniaturization for in vivo cellular imaging is presented. The dual-axes confocal (DAC) architecture overcomes limitations of the conventional single-axis confocal (SAC) architecture to allow for miniaturization with high resolution. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner is the central imaging component that is key in miniaturization of the DAC architecture. The design, fabrication, and characterization of the two-dimensional (2-D) MEMS scanner are presented. The gimbaled MEMS scanner is fabricated on a double silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer and is actuated by self-aligned vertical electrostatic combdrives. The imaging performance of the MEMS scanner in a DAC configuration is shown in a breadboard microscope setup, where reflectance and fluorescence imaging is demonstrated. Then, the MEMS scanner is integrated into a miniature DAC microscope. The whole imaging system is integrated into a portable unit for research in small animal models of human biology and disease. In vivo 3-D imaging is demonstrated on mouse skin models showing gene transfer and siRNA silencing. The siRNA silencing process is sequentially imaged in one mouse over time.

  20. T cells enhance gold nanoparticle delivery to tumors in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Laura C.; Bear, Adham S.; Young, Joseph K.; Lewinski, Nastassja A.; Kim, Jean; Foster, Aaron E.; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2011-12-01

    Gold nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy (PTT) has shown great potential for the treatment of cancer in mouse studies and is now being evaluated in clinical trials. For this therapy, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are injected intravenously and are allowed to accumulate within the tumor via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The tumor is then irradiated with a near infrared laser, whose energy is absorbed by the AuNPs and translated into heat. While reliance on the EPR effect for tumor targeting has proven adequate for vascularized tumors in small animal models, the efficiency and specificity of tumor delivery in vivo, particularly in tumors with poor blood supply, has proven challenging. In this study, we examine whether human T cells can be used as cellular delivery vehicles for AuNP transport into tumors. We first demonstrate that T cells can be efficiently loaded with 45 nm gold colloid nanoparticles without affecting viability or function (e.g. migration and cytokine production). Using a human tumor xenograft mouse model, we next demonstrate that AuNP-loaded T cells retain their capacity to migrate to tumor sites in vivo. In addition, the efficiency of AuNP delivery to tumors in vivo is increased by more than four-fold compared to injection of free PEGylated AuNPs and the use of the T cell delivery system also dramatically alters the overall nanoparticle biodistribution. Thus, the use of T cell chaperones for AuNP delivery could enhance the efficacy of nanoparticle-based therapies and imaging applications by increasing AuNP tumor accumulation.

  1. Fast in vivo volume dose reconstruction via reference dose perturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Mingli; Mo, Xiaohu; Parnell, Donald; Olivera, Gustavo; Galmarini, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate on-line reconstruction of in-vivo volume dose that accounts for both machine and patient discrepancy is not clinically available. We present a simple reference-dose-perturbation algorithm that reconstructs in-vivo volume dose fast and accurately. Methods: We modelled the volume dose as a function of the fluence map and density image. Machine (output variation, jaw/leaf position errors, etc.) and patient (setup error, weight loss, etc.) discrepancies between the plan and delivery were modelled as perturbation of the fluence map and density image, respectively. Delivered dose is modelled as perturbation of the reference dose due to change of the fluence map and density image. We used both simulated and clinical data to validate the algorithm. The planned dose was used as the reference. The reconstruction was perturbed from the reference and accounted for output-variations and the registered daily image. The reconstruction was compared with the ground truth via isodose lines and the Gamma Index. Results: For various plans and geometries, the volume doses were reconstructed in few seconds. The reconstruction generally matched well with the ground truth. For the 3%/3mm criteria, the Gamma pass rates were 98% for simulations and 95% for clinical data. The differences mainly appeared on the surface of the phantom/patient. Conclusions: A novel reference-dose-perturbation dose reconstruction model is presented. The model accounts for machine and patient discrepancy from planning. The algorithm is simple, fast, yet accurate, which makes online in-vivo 3D dose reconstruction clinically feasible.

  2. Astrocytes mediate in vivo cholinergic-induced synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Navarrete

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission represents the cellular basis of learning and memory. Astrocytes have been shown to regulate synaptic transmission and plasticity. However, their involvement in specific physiological processes that induce LTP in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that in vivo cholinergic activity evoked by sensory stimulation or electrical stimulation of the septal nucleus increases Ca²⁺ in hippocampal astrocytes and induces LTP of CA3-CA1 synapses, which requires cholinergic muscarinic (mAChR and metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR activation. Stimulation of cholinergic pathways in hippocampal slices evokes astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations, postsynaptic depolarizations of CA1 pyramidal neurons, and LTP of transmitter release at single CA3-CA1 synapses. Like in vivo, these effects are mediated by mAChRs, and this cholinergic-induced LTP (c-LTP also involves mGluR activation. Astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations and LTP are absent in IP₃R2 knock-out mice. Downregulating astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal by loading astrocytes with BAPTA or GDPβS also prevents LTP, which is restored by simultaneous astrocyte Ca²⁺ uncaging and postsynaptic depolarization. Therefore, cholinergic-induced LTP requires astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations, which stimulate astrocyte glutamate release that activates mGluRs. The cholinergic-induced LTP results from the temporal coincidence of the postsynaptic activity and the astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal simultaneously evoked by cholinergic activity. Therefore, the astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal is necessary for cholinergic-induced synaptic plasticity, indicating that astrocytes are directly involved in brain storage information.

  3. In vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regelsberger, Jan; Eicker, Sven; Siasios, Ioannis; Hänggi, Daniel; Kirsch, Matthias; Horn, Peter; Winkler, Peter; Signoretti, Stefano; Fountas, Kostas; Dufour, Henry; Barcia, Juan A; Sakowitz, Oliver; Westermaier, Thomas; Sabel, Michael; Heese, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Supplemental education is desirable for neurosurgical training, and the use of human cadaver specimen and virtual reality models is routine. An in vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery was introduced in 2005, and our recent experience with this unique model is outlined here. For the first time, porcine anatomy is illustrated with particular respect to neurosurgical procedures. The pros and cons of this model are described. The aim of the course was to set up a laboratory scenery imitating an almost realistic operating room in which anatomy of the brain and neurosurgical techniques in a mentored environment free from time constraints could be trained. Learning objectives of the course were to learn about the microsurgical techniques in cranial neurosurgery and the management of complications. Participants were asked to evaluate the quality and utility of the programme via standardized questionnaires by a grading scale from A (best) to E (worst). In total, 154 residents have been trained on the porcine model to date. None of the participants regarded his own residency programme as structured. The bleeding and complication management (97%), the realistic laboratory set-up (89%) and the working environment (94%) were favoured by the vast majority of trainees and confirmed our previous findings. After finishing the course, the participants graded that their skills in bone drilling, dissecting the brain and preserving cerebral vessels under microscopic magnification had improved to level A and B. In vivo hands-on courses, fully equipped with microsurgical instruments, offer an outstanding training opportunity in which bleeding management on a pulsating, vital brain represents a unique training approach. Our results have shown that education programmes still lack practical training facilities in which in vivo models may act as a complementary approach in surgical training.

  4. Gastric ulcer localization: Potential use of in vivo labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pera, A.; Rose, H.; Seavers, R.; Bekerman, C.; Pinsky, S.

    1984-01-01

    A previous work suggests that sucralfate labeled by binding to Tc-99m HSA permits the visualization of gastric ulcers. Potential problems with this technique are: 1) decreased binding of sucralfate to ulcer sites due to the labeling method of binding to exogenous protein (HSA); 2) overlying activity that may obscure identification of the ulcer. Because of these problems we have examined the possibility of direct in vivo Tc-99m labeling of sucralfate after it has already bound to the ulcer. In vitro studies were done to determine the binding of Tc-99m pertechnetate to sucralfate in the presence of tin in HCl solution at pHs comparable to those found in the stomach. Rapid and efficient labeling was achieved with 75-95% of the label bound to sucralfate at 30 minutes. In vivo studies were performed in rabbits with aspirin induced ulcers and in ulcer free human volunteers. The animal studies confirm that orally administered Tc-99m pertechnetate will bind to previously ingested sucralfate and that the labeled material will bind to the ulcers. Tc-99m pertechnetate was also shown to bind well to previously ingested sucralfate in humans. The results suggest that it is possible to label sucralfate in vivo. This method would offer the following advantages: 1) a simpler labeling procedure; 2) the potential of increased sensitivity by delaying the labeling until much of the sucralfate not bound to ulcer has passed, and thus decreasing the activity that remains in the stomach; and also by leaving the protein binding sites of the sucralfate free to interact with the ulcer since no exogenous protein is involved in labeling

  5. Metabolite quantitation in breast cancer by in vivo MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagananthan, Naranamangalam R.

    2014-01-01

    A large number of biochemical and imaging investigations are available for the diagnosis of cancer but detection is still a challenging task. Various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are used for the detection of tumors that gives morphological and functional details. On the other hand, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides metabolites or biochemicals at the molecular level. With technological advancement in MR, it is possible to detect in vivo metabolites from normal and pathological tissues that are present in millimolar concentrations and there are several localization methods available for the same. The commonest cancer in women is the breast cancer and is a leading cause of death among the female population worldwide. The in vivo localized proton MR spectroscopy of normal breast tissues is dominated by a huge lipid with little contribution from water while malignant breast tissues contain high water content. By suppressing the water and fat contribution, it is possible to detect choline containing compounds (tCho) in malignant breast tissues. The parameters obtained from in vivo proton MRS of breast tissues are water-to-fat (W-F) ratio and detection of tCho. tCho has been documented by many workers as a potential marker of breast malignancy. Recently, quantitative assessment of tCho concentration has been reported. There are two methods that are used for quantification of tCho: (a) semi-quantitative method that calculates the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the choline signal; and (b) determination of the absolute concentration of tCho using water as an internal and external reference. Both W-F ratio and tCho concentration have been evaluated as markers for assessment of tumor response to therapy. This talk would cover various MRS methods used for the diagnosis of breast cancer together with the details of the determination of the absolute and relative concentrations of metabolites. (author)

  6. Toxicity of polymeric nanoparticles in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Nadine; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Kockentiedt, Sarah; Hintz, Werner; Tomas, Jürgen; Sabel, Bernhard A.

    2014-06-01

    Polybutylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PBCA NPs) are candidates for a drug delivery system, which can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Because little is known about their toxicity, we exposed cells to PBCA NPs in vitro and in vivo and monitored their life and death assays. PBCA NPs were fabricated with different surfactants according to the mini-emulsion technique. Viabilities of HeLa and HEK293 cells after NP incubation were quantified by analysing cellular metabolic activity (MTT-test). We then repetitively injected i.v. rhodamine-labelled PBCA NP variations into rats and monitored the survival and morphology of retrogradely labelled neurons by in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) for five weeks. To test for carrier-efficacy and safety, PBCA NPs loaded with Kyotorphin were injected in rats, and a hot plate test was used to quantify analgesic effects. In vitro, we found dose-dependent cell death which was, however, only detectable at very high doses and mainly seen in the cultures incubated with NPs fabricated with the tensids SDS and Tween. However, the in vivo experiments did not show any NP-induced neuronal death, even with particles which were toxic at high dose in vitro, i.e. NPs with Tween and SDS. The increased pain threshold at the hot plate test demonstrated that PBCA NPs are able to cross the BBB and thus comprise a useful tool for drug delivery into the central nervous system (CNS). Our findings showing that different nanoparticle formulations are non-toxic have important implications for the value of NP engineering approaches in medicine.

  7. In vivo measurement of actinides in the human lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.L.; Campbell, G.W.; Griffith, R.V.

    1979-01-01

    The problems associated with the in vivo detection and measurement of actinides in the human lung are discussed together with various measurement systems currently in use. In particular, the methods and calibration procedures employed at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, namely, the use of twin Phoswich detectors and a new, more realistic, tissue-equivalent phantom, are described. Methods for the measurement of chest-wall thickness, fat content, and normal human background counts are also discussed. Detection-efficiency values and minimum detectable activity estimates are given for three common actinides, 238 Pu, 239 Pu, and 241 Am

  8. Stenosis differentially affects subendocardial and subepicardial arterioles in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkus, D; Vergroesen, I; Hiramatsu, O; Tachibana, H; Nakamoto, H; Toyota, E; Goto, M; Ogasawara, Y; Spaan, J A; Kajiya, F

    2001-04-01

    The presence of a coronary stenosis results primarily in subendocardial ischemia. Apart from the decrease in coronary perfusion pressure, a stenosis also decreases coronary flow pulsations. Applying a coronary perfusion system, we compared the autoregulatory response of subendocardial (n = 10) and subepicardial (n = 12) arterioles (production with N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine abrogated the effect of the stenosis on flow. We conclude that the decrease in pressure caused by a stenosis in vivo results in a larger decrease in diameter of the subendocardial arterioles than in the subepicardial arterioles, and furthermore stenosis selectively decreases the dilatory response of subendocardial arterioles. These two findings expand our understanding of subendocardial vulnerability to ischemia.

  9. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo

  10. Tissue hypoxygenation activates the adrenomedullin system in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofbauer, K H; Jensen, B L; Kurtz, A

    2000-01-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the influence of tissue hypo-oxygenation on the adrenomedullin (ADM) system in vivo. For this purpose, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to normobaric hypoxia (8% oxygen) or to functional anemia [0.1% carbon monoxide (CO)] or to cobalt chloride (60 mg/kg) for 6 h......-fold in all organs examined. Similarly, ADM-R mRNA abundance increased during hypoxia and CO inhalation in all organs examined with exception of the liver. The effects of hypoxia and of CO inhalation on ADM and ADM-R mRNAs were mimicked by injection of cobaltous chloride. Hypoxia also significantly...

  11. Glycogen as a biodegradable construction nanomaterial for in vivo use

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filippov, Sergey K.; Sedláček, Ondřej; Bogomolova, Anna; Vetrík, Miroslav; Jirák, D.; Kovář, J.; Kučka, Jan; Bals, S.; Turner, S.; Štěpánek, Petr; Hrubý, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 12 (2012), s. 1731-1738 ISSN 1616-5187 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/2078; GA ČR GAP108/12/0640; GA ČR GAP208/10/1600; GA ČR GPP207/10/P054 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : nanoparticles * in vivo imaging * glycogen Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.742, year: 2012

  12. Studying RNA-protein interactions in vivo by RNA immunoprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selth, Luke A; Close, Pierre; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2011-01-01

    and have significant effects on gene expression. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) is a powerful technique used to detect direct and indirect interactions between individual proteins and specific RNA molecules in vivo. Here, we describe RIP methods for both yeast and mammalian cells.......The crucial roles played by RNA-binding proteins in all aspects of RNA metabolism, particularly in the regulation of transcription, have become increasingly evident. Moreover, other factors that do not directly interact with RNA molecules can nevertheless function proximally to RNA polymerases...

  13. In vivo body composition studies in malnourished patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B J; Blagojevic, N

    1987-09-01

    The establishment of an in vivo TBN facility at Lucas Heights, together with measurement techniques for whole body and extracellular water, is leading to an expanded interest in the relationships between clinical status, body composition and dietary regimes. The ANSTO program provides the opportunity for the first quantitative assessments of these factors in Australia. Body composition studies provide a common link with other-wise unrelated physiological or psychological diseases, and a pool of normal data is being established. Substantial improvements in patient care and quality of life should result from this project, together with a deeper understanding of the importance of body composition in disease-induced malnutrition.

  14. Extraction, radioiodination, and in vivo catabolism of equine fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyne, C.P.; Hornof, W.J.; Kelly, A.B.; O'Brien, T.R.; DeNardo, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Equine fibrinogen was isolated and aliquots were stored frozen at -70 C before radiolabeling with 125I (half-life = 60.2 days; gamma = 35 keV, using monochloroiodine reagent. Radioiodination efficiencies were 49% to 53%, resulting in a labeled product with 98% protein-bound activity and 91% clottable radioactivity. In 6 equine in vivo investigations, plasma half-lives of 125I-labeled fibrinogen were from 4.1 to 5.2 days, corresponding to a mean daily plasma elimination rate of approximately 15%

  15. Intestinal microflora as potential modifiers of sensitizer activity in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Clarke, C.; Dawson, K.B.; Simpson, W.; Simmons, D.J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of mice (some bearing Lewis lung tumors), with penicillin (PEN) at 500 mg/l drinking water for one week prior to treatment with misonidazole (MIS), resulted in: the elimination of their anaerobic cecal flora; a decrease in MIS-induced neurotoxicity; an increase in pharmacological exposure to MIS; a decrease in MIS chemopotentiation; a probable increase in MIS radiosensitization; an increase in MIS induced hypothermia. Assuming no chemical interaction between PEN and MIS, these observations indicate that the intestinal microflora can influence the activity of MIS in vivo. The observed reduction in the neurotoxic but not the radiosensitizing potential of MIS following PEN treatment indicates a therapeutic benefit

  16. In vivo body composition studies in malnourished patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.; Blagojevic, N.

    1987-01-01

    The establishment of an in vivo TBN facility at Lucas Heights, together with measurement techniques for whole body and extracellular water, is leading to an expanded interest in the relationships between clinical status, body composition and dietary regimes. The ANSTO program provides the opportunity for the first quantitative assessments of these factors in Australia. Body composition studies provide a common link with other-wise unrelated physiological or psychological diseases, and a pool of normal data is being established. Substantial improvements in patient care and quality of life should result from this project, together with a deeper understanding of the importance of body composition in disease-induced malnutrition

  17. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography ('microCT') system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). For all in vivo studies, the head of the anesthetized rat was secured in a custom immobilization device for microCT imaging with 512 projections over 2 min at 60 kVp and 0.530 mA (I tube x t/rotation = 63.6 mAs). First, imaging without iodinated contrast was performed (a) to differentiate the effect of contrast agent in contrast-enhanced CT and (b) to examine the effectiveness of the immobilization device between two time points of CT acquisitions. Then, contrast-enhanced CT was performed with continuous administration of iopromide (300 mgI ml -1 at 1.2 ml min -1 ) to visualize aneurysms and other vascular formations in the carotid and cerebral arteries that may precede subarachnoid hemorrhage. The accuracy of registration between the noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT images with the immobilization device was compared against the images aligned with normalized mutual information using FMRIB's linear image registration tool (FLIRT). Translations and rotations were examined between the FLIRT-aligned noncontrast CT image and the nonaligned noncontrast CT image. These two data sets demonstrated translational and rotational differences of less than 0.5 voxel (∼85 μm) and 0.5 deg., respectively. Noncontrast CT demonstrated a very small volume (0.1 ml) of femoral arterial blood introduced surgically into the rodent brain. Continuous administration of iopromide during the CT acquisition produced consistent vascular contrast in the reconstructed CT images. As a result, carotid arteries and major cerebral blood vessels

  18. Viscous optical clearing agent for in vivo optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zijian; Jing, Lijia; Wu, Ning; lv, Pengyu; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Ren, Qiushi; Li, Changhui

    2014-07-01

    By allowing more photons to reach deeper tissue, the optical clearing agent (OCA) has gained increasing attention in various optical imaging modalities. However, commonly used OCAs have high fluidity, limiting their applications in in vivo studies with oblique, uneven, or moving surfaces. In this work, we reported an OCA with high viscosity. We measured the properties of this viscous OCA, and tested its successful performances in the imaging of a living animal's skin with two optical imaging modalities: photoacoustic microscopy and optical coherence tomography. Our results demonstrated that the viscous OCA has a great potential in the study of different turbid tissues using various optical imaging modalities.

  19. Medicina nucleara: introducerea in computerizarea investigatiei in vivo cu radionuclizi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateescu, Gh.; Dumitriu, L.; Notas, E.

    1981-12-01

    Firstly some bgsical aspects of nuclear medicine in vivo procedures along with the requirements for digital data handling in scintigraphic process are synthetically presented from the technical point of view. The essential features needed to interface an usual (Anger) gammacamera to a general-purpose computer are next underlined also emphasizing that an optional configuration for a computerized scintigraphic system could be implemented using a CORAL-4q11 minicomputer. Finally a system of programs, termed GAMMA-11, extensively used for scintigraphic studies is described together with a set of original algorithms which have been implemented as new FORTRAN programs and modularly included within this system. (authors)

  20. Mechanical properties of the human Achilles tendon, in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Nielsen, C H; Hegnsvad, S

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography has been widely applied for in vivo measurements of tendon mechanical properties. Assessments of human Achilles tendon mechanical properties have received great interest. Achilles tendon injuries predominantly occur in the tendon region between the Achilles-soleus myotendinous...... junction and Achilles-calcaneus osteotendinous junction i.e. in the free Achilles tendon. However, there has been no adequate ultrasound based method for quantifying the mechanical properties of the free human Achilles tendon. This study aimed to: 1) examine the mechanical properties of the free human...

  1. Targeting dendritic cells in vivo for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina eCaminschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that recognise cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumour immunity elicited using this immunisation strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialisation of DC-subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC-subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumour immunity. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress towards targeting human DC in vivo.

  2. Towards optimized naphthalocyanines as sonochromes for photoacoustic imaging in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell J. Duffy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we establish a methodology to predict photoacoustic imaging capabilities from the structure of absorber molecules (sonochromes. The comparative in vitro and in vivo screening of naphthalocyanines and cyanine dyes has shown a substitution pattern dependent shift in photoacoustic excitation wavelength, with distal substitution producing the preferred maximum around 800 nm. Central ion change showed variable production of photoacoustic signals, as well as singlet oxygen photoproduction and fluorescence with the optimum for photoacoustic imaging being nickel(II. Our approach paves the way for the design, evaluation and realization of optimized sonochromes as photoacoustic contrast agents. Keywords: Naphthalocyanines, Spectroscopy

  3. In Vivo Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics of Optimized Apidaecin Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rico; Knappe, Daniel; Wende, Elisabeth; Ostorházi, Eszter; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) represent promising alternative therapeutic options for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. PrAMPs are predominantly active against Gram-negative bacteria by inhibiting protein expression via at least two different modes of action, i.e., blocking the ribosomal exit tunnel of 70S ribosomes (oncocin-type binding) or inhibiting the assembly of the 50S ribosomal subunit (apidaecin-type binding). The in vivo efficacy and favorable biodistribution of oncocins confirmed the therapeutic potential of short PrAMPs for the first time, whereas the in vivo evaluation of apidaecins is still limited despite the promising efficacy of apidaecin-analog Api88 in an intraperitoneal murine infection model. Here, the in vivo efficacy of apidaecin-analog Api137 was studied, which rescued all NMRI mice from a lethal intraperitoneal infection with E. coli ATCC 25922 when administered three times intraperitoneal at doses of 0.6 mg/kg starting one hour after infection. When Api88 and Api137 were administered intravenous or intraperitoneal at doses of 5 and 20 mg/kg, their plasma levels were similarly low (<3 µg/mL) and fourfold lower than for oncocin-analog Onc72. This contradicted earlier expectation based on the very low serum stability of Api88 with a half-life time of only 5 min compared to 6 hrs and 3 hrs for Api137 and Onc72, respectively. Pharmacokinetic data relying on a sensitive mass spectrometry method utilizing multiple reaction monitoring and isotope-labeled peptides revealed that Api88 and Api137 were present in blood, urine, and kidney, and liver homogenates at similar levels accompanied by the same major metabolites comprising residues 1-16 and 1-17. The pretended discrepancy was solved, when all peptides were incubated in peritoneal lavage. Api137 was rapidly degraded at the C-terminus, while Api88 was rather stable despite releasing the same degradation products. Onc72 was very stable explaining its higher

  4. In vivo comparison of screen-film mammography and xeromammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagan, R.; Skubic, S.E.; Oravec, D.; Green, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    In vivo comparison of film-screen with grid and xeromammography was performed in 97 patients by three mammographers experienced with both modalities. The results show that file-screen modality is superior to xeromammography in the following areas: (1) in identifying of microcalcifications and determining their topographic characteristics; (2) in visualizing masses; and (3) in visualizing the nipple and entire skin line without artifacts. Both methods were equal in imaging of the parenchyma of dense breasts. The chest wall is somewhat better visualized with xeromammography, without providing any clinical advantage in the cases reviewed. The authors conclude that film-screen mammography with antiscatter grid is the preferred method in breast evaluation

  5. Effects of various vehicles on skin hydration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedersberg, S; Leopold, C S; Guy, R H

    2009-01-01

    The stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, regulates the passive loss of water to the environment. Furthermore, it is well accepted that drug penetration is influenced by skin hydration, which may be manipulated by the application of moisturizing or oleaginous vehicles. Measurements of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and of skin hydration using a corneometer, were used to assess the effect of different vehicles on stratum corneum barrier function in vivo in human volunteers. A microemulsion significantly increased skin hydration relative to a reference vehicle based on medium chain triglycerides; in contrast, Transcutol(R) lowered skin hydration. TEWL measurements confirmed these observations. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Can glycogen be measured by in vivo neutron activation analysis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutcliffe, J.F.; Smith, A.H.; King, R.F.G.H.; Smith, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The object of this note is to examine the feasibility of measuring liver glycogen using in vivo neutron activation analysis. The authors present equations which allow the mass of glycogen to be expressed in terms of the masses of oxygen, hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen. Using the most precise, published measurements of these elements, the standard deviation in the estimate of liver glycogen was 34 g. The magnitude of this error precluded observing changes in liver glycogen which are normally in the range 16 g to 72 g. However, this technique might be useful in detecting transient high concentrations of liver glycogen.(UK)

  7. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H [Center for Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)], E-mail: youngho.seo@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2008-04-07

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography ('microCT') system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). For all in vivo studies, the head of the anesthetized rat was secured in a custom immobilization device for microCT imaging with 512 projections over 2 min at 60 kVp and 0.530 mA (I{sub tube} x t/rotation = 63.6 mAs). First, imaging without iodinated contrast was performed (a) to differentiate the effect of contrast agent in contrast-enhanced CT and (b) to examine the effectiveness of the immobilization device between two time points of CT acquisitions. Then, contrast-enhanced CT was performed with continuous administration of iopromide (300 mgI ml{sup -1} at 1.2 ml min{sup -1}) to visualize aneurysms and other vascular formations in the carotid and cerebral arteries that may precede subarachnoid hemorrhage. The accuracy of registration between the noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT images with the immobilization device was compared against the images aligned with normalized mutual information using FMRIB's linear image registration tool (FLIRT). Translations and rotations were examined between the FLIRT-aligned noncontrast CT image and the nonaligned noncontrast CT image. These two data sets demonstrated translational and rotational differences of less than 0.5 voxel ({approx}85 {mu}m) and 0.5 deg., respectively. Noncontrast CT demonstrated a very small volume (0.1 ml) of femoral arterial blood introduced surgically into the rodent brain. Continuous administration of iopromide during the CT acquisition produced consistent vascular contrast in the reconstructed CT images. As a result, carotid

  8. In-vivo synthetic aperture flow imaging in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    A new method for acquiring flow images using synthetic aperture techniques in medical ultrasound is presented. The new approach makes it possible to have a continuous acquisition of flow data throughout the whole image simultaneously, and this can significantly improve blood velocity estimation.......2% and a mean relative bias of 3.4% using 24 pulse emissions at a flow angle of 45 degrees. The 24 emissions can be used for making a full-color flow map image. An in-vivo image of How in the carotid artery for a 29-year-old male also is presented. The full image is acquired using 24 emissions....

  9. In vivo measurements of bone-seeking radionuclides. Progress report, September 1, 1977--February 28, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, N.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: estimation of the skeletal burden of bone-seeking radionuclides from in vivo scintillation measurements of their content in the skull; contribution from radionuclides in the thoracic skeleton to in vivo measurements of activity in the lung; design and optimization characterictics of in vivo detection system; development of a calibration phantom structure for determining activity deposited in the thoracic skeleton; computer assisted in vivo measurements of internally deposited radionuclides using dual-crystal scintillation detectors; low energy, photon-emitting nuclides; reference spectra library; and in vivo measurements of exposed individuals

  10. In vivo measurements of bone-seeking radionuclides. Progress report, September 1, 1977--February 28, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, N.

    1978-11-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: estimation of the skeletal burden of bone-seeking radionuclides from in vivo scintillation measurements of their content in the skull; contribution from radionuclides in the thoracic skeleton to in vivo measurements of activity in the lung; design and optimization characterictics of in vivo detection system; development of a calibration phantom structure for determining activity deposited in the thoracic skeleton; computer assisted in vivo measurements of internally deposited radionuclides using dual-crystal scintillation detectors; low energy, photon-emitting nuclides; reference spectra library; and in vivo measurements of exposed individuals. (HLW)

  11. The relevance of cell transformation to carcinogenesis in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Despite the caveats concerning rodent as opposed to human cell transformation systems, the author concludes there are several areas in which cell transformation studies with rodent cells have shown clear relevance to carcinogenesis in vivo, especially studies of carcinogenic effects of high LET radiation, particularly dependence on dose rate. In vitro studies firmly established the generality of promotion by phorbol esters tumour promotors. Initial studies on suppression of transformation, notably by protease inhibitors, has led to the confirmation of this phenomenon in in vivo carcinogenesis; development of inhibitor preparations from natural sources suitable for long-term supplementation in human diet, is under investigation. The potential importance of these modifiers is further emphasized by mechanistic studies suggesting that radiation may initiate a large fraction of exposed cell population, and expression of transformation may be controlled to a large extent by environmental conditions including the presence of promoting or suppressing agents. Finally, cell transformation systems offer the opportunity for mechanistic studies of the initial stages of carcinogenesis. Provocative results have arisen in several areas consistent with findings in experimental animals. (author)

  12. Applications of nuclear technologies for in vivo elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Wielopolski, L.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives of this Department of Energy sponsored program are (1) to improve existing nuclear techniques, and (2) to develop new techniques for the analysis and solution of both medical problems and those associated with environmental pollution. Measurement facilities developed, to date, include a unique whole body counter, (WBC); a total body neutron activation facility (TBNAA); and a partial body activation facility (PBNAA). A variation of the prompt gamma neutron activation technique for measuring total body nitrogen has been developed to study body composition of cancer patients and the effect of nutritional regimens on the composition. These new techniques provide data in numerous clinical studies not previously amenable to investigation. The development and perfection of these techniques provide unique applications of radiation and radioisotopes to the early diagnosis of certain diseases and the evaluation of therapeutic programs. The PBNAA technique has been developed and calibrated for in vivo measurement of metals. Development has gone forward on prompt gamma neutron activation for the measurement of cadmium, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) for measurement of lead, and nuclear resonance scattering (NRS) for measurement of iron. Other techniques are being investigated for in vivo measurement of metals such as silicon and beryllium. Cardinal to all toxicological studies of Cd and other metal pollutants is an accurate and sensitive noninvasive technique for measuring organ burdens. In keeping with the mission of Brookhaven, these facilities have been made available to qualified scientists and members of the medical community throughout the world

  13. Optical design of an in vivo laparoscopic lighting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolong; Abdolmalaki, Reza Yazdanpanah; Mancini, Gregory J; Tan, Jindong

    2017-12-01

    This paper proposes an in vivo laparoscopic lighting system design to address the illumination issues, namely poor lighting uniformity and low optical efficiency, existing in the state-of-the-art in vivo laparoscopic cameras. The transformable design of the laparoscopic lighting system is capable of carrying purposefully designed freeform optical lenses for achieving lighting performance with high illuminance uniformity and high optical efficiency in a desired target region. To design freeform optical lenses for extended light sources such as LEDs with Lambertian light intensity distributions, we present an effective and complete freeform optical design method. The procedures include (1) ray map computation by numerically solving a standard Monge-Ampere equation; (2) initial freeform optical surface construction by using Snell's law and a lens volume restriction; (3) correction of surface normal vectors due to accumulated errors from the initially constructed surfaces; and (4) feedback modification of the solution to deal with degraded illuminance uniformity caused by the extended sizes of the LEDs. We employed an optical design software package to evaluate the performance of our laparoscopic lighting system design. The simulation results show that our design achieves greater than 95% illuminance uniformity and greater than 89% optical efficiency (considering Fresnel losses) for illuminating the target surgical region. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  14. Resveratrol and cancer: focus on in vivo evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lindsay G; D'Orazio, John A; Pearson, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is a naturally occurring polyphenol that provides a number of anti-aging health benefits including improved metabolism, cardioprotection, and cancer prevention. Much of the work on resveratrol and cancer comes from in vitro studies looking at resveratrol actions on cancer cells and pathways. There are, however, comparatively fewer studies that have investigated resveratrol treatment and cancer outcomes in vivo, perhaps limited by its poor bioavailability when taken orally. Although research in cell culture has shown promising and positive effects of resveratrol, evidence from rodents and humans is inconsistent. This review highlights the in vivo effects of resveratrol treatment on breast, colorectal, liver, pancreatic, and prostate cancers. Resveratrol supplementation in animal models of cancer has shown positive, neutral as well as negative outcomes depending on resveratrol route of administration, dose, tumor model, species, and other factors. Within a specific cancer type, there is variability between studies with respect to strain, age, and sex of animal used, timing and method of resveratrol supplementation, and dose of resveratrol used to study cancer endpoints. Together, the data suggest that many factors need to be considered before resveratrol can be used for human cancer prevention or therapy. PMID:24500760

  15. Localization of gastrointestinal deposition of mercuric chloride studied in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, J.B.; Andersen, H.L.; Soerensen, J.A.; Andersen, O.

    1992-01-01

    During the last 5 years, the site of gastrointestinal absorption of inorganic mercury has been attempted identified mainly by experiments using perfused intestinal segments in vitro or in situ. The present investigation will discuss the localization of the absorption site for mercuric chloride based on a completely undisturbed in vivo experimental model in mice. As the mice were allowed to eat their normal diet during the experimental period, the present results would independently add to existing knowledge on intestinal absorption sites for inorganic mercury. The mice were given 203 Hg labelled mercuric chloride orally, either through stomach tube or in the drinking water, and were killed after various time intervals. Mercury was localized and quantified in various segments of the gastrointestinal tract by gamma-counting. Time course analysis of the segmental deposition of mercury demonstrated that the deposition mainly takes place in the proximal jejunum and suggested that a larger part of the jejunum than previously reported is involved in absorption of mercury. Using this in vivo model, tetraethylthiuram disulfide was demonstrated to increase the intestinal deposition and absorption without changing the site of deposition. (au)

  16. Endoluminal MR imaging of porcine gastric structure in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaka, Hayato; Morita, Yoshinori; Matsuoka, Yuichiro

    2010-01-01

    Recently, several new endoscopic instruments have been developed. However, even with the full use of current modalities, the safety of endoscopic surgery is not guaranteed. Information regarding factors such as fibrosis and the blood vessels under the mucosa is very important for avoiding procedure-related complications. The aim of this study was to define the detailed anatomy of the gastric wall structure in vivo using original endoluminal radiofrequency coils for safer endoscopic therapy. Swine were used as the subjects and controlled with general anesthesia. Anatomical images were obtained with T1-weighted fast spin echo (T1FSE) and T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2FSE). Dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) angiography was also obtained with three-dimensional T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (3D-DMRA) following the injection of hyaluronic acid sodium into the submucosal layer. Porcine gastric wall structure was visualized, and four layers were discriminated in the T1FSE and T2FSE images. The vascular structure was clearly recognized in the submucosa on 3D-DMRA. Endoluminal MR imaging was able to visualize the porcine stomach with similar quality to endoscopic ultrasonography imaging. Additionally, it was possible to visualize the vascular structures in the submucosal layer. This is the first report to show that blood vessels under the gastric mucosa can be depicted in vivo. (author)

  17. In Vivo Nanotoxicity Testing using the Zebrafish Embryo Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Larissa Y; Golombek, Susanne K; Mertens, Marianne E; Pan, Yu; Laaf, Dominic; Broda, Janine; Jayapaul, Jabadurai; Möckel, Diana; Subr, Vladimir; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert; Simon, Ulrich; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2013-06-10

    Nanoparticles are increasingly used for biomedical purposes. Many different diagnostic and therapeutic applications are envisioned for nanoparticles, but there are often also serious concerns regarding their safety. Given the fact that numerous new nanomaterials are being developed every day, and that not much is known about the long-term toxicological impact of exposure to nanoparticles, there is an urgent need to establish efficient methods for nanotoxicity testing. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo assay has recently emerged as an interesting 'intermediate' method for in vivo nanotoxicity screening, enabling (semi-) high-throughput analyses in a system significantly more complex than cultured cells, but at the same time also less 'invasive' and less expensive than large-scale biocompatibility studies in mice or rats. The zebrafish embryo assay is relatively well-established in the environmental sciences, but it has not yet gained wide notice in the nanomedicine field. Using prototypic polymeric drug carriers, gold-based nanodiagnostics and nanotherapeutics, and iron oxide-based nanodiagnostics, we here show that toxicity testing using zebrafish embryos is easy, efficient and informative, and faithfully reflects, yet significantly extends, cell-based toxicity testing. We therefore expect that the zebrafish embryo assay will become a popular future tool for in vivo nanotoxicity screening.

  18. Triple Bioluminescence Imaging for In Vivo Monitoring of Cellular Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey A Maguire

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence imaging (BLI has shown to be crucial for monitoring in vivo biological processes. So far, only dual bioluminescence imaging using firefly (Fluc and Renilla or Gaussia (Gluc luciferase has been achieved due to the lack of availability of other efficiently expressed luciferases using different substrates. Here, we characterized a codon-optimized luciferase from Vargula hilgendorfii (Vluc as a reporter for mammalian gene expression. We showed that Vluc can be multiplexed with Gluc and Fluc for sequential imaging of three distinct cellular phenomena in the same biological system using vargulin, coelenterazine, and D-luciferin substrates, respectively. We applied this triple imaging system to monitor the effect of soluble tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL delivered using an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV on brain tumors in mice. Vluc imaging showed efficient sTRAIL gene delivery to the brain, while Fluc imaging revealed a robust antiglioma therapy. Further, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation in response to sTRAIL binding to glioma cells death receptors was monitored by Gluc imaging. This work is the first demonstration of trimodal in vivo bioluminescence imaging and will have a broad applicability in many different fields including immunology, oncology, virology, and neuroscience.

  19. Hyperspectral imaging of colonic polyps in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Neil T.; Elson, Daniel S.; Teare, Julian

    2017-02-01

    Standard endoscopic tools restrict clinicians to making subjective visual assessments of lesions detected in the bowel, with classification results depending strongly on experience level and training. Histological examination of resected tissue remains the diagnostic gold standard, meaning that all detected lesions are routinely removed. This subjects the patient to risk of polypectomy-related injury, and places significant workload and economic burdens on the hospital. An objective endoscopic classification method would allow hyperplastic polyps, with no malignant potential, to be left in situ, or low grade adenomas to be resected and discarded without histology. A miniature multimodal flexible endoscope is proposed to obtain hyperspectral reflectance and dual excitation autofluorescence information from polyps in vivo. This is placed inside the working channel of a conventional colonoscope, with the external scanning and detection optics on a bedside trolley. A blue and violet laser diode pair excite endogenous fluorophores in the respiration chain, while the colonoscope's xenon light source provides broadband white light for diffuse reflectance measurements. A push-broom HSI scanner collects the hypercube. System characterisation experiments are presented, defining resolution limits as well as acquisition settings for optimal spectral, spatial and temporal performance. The first in vivo results in human subjects are presented, demonstrating the clinical utility of the device. The optical properties (reflectance and autofluorescence) of imaged polyps are quantified and compared to the histologically-confirmed tissue type as well as the clinician's visual assessment. Further clinical studies will allow construction of a full robust training dataset for development of classification schemes.

  20. SV40 Assembly In Vivo and In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariella Oppenheim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Simian virus 40 (SV40 capsid is a T = 7d icosahedral lattice ∼45 nm in diameter surrounding the ∼5 kb circular minichromosome. The outer shell is composed of 360 monomers of the major capsid protein VP1, tightly bound in 72 pentamers. VP1 is a jellyroll β-barrel, with extending N- and C-terminal arms. The N-terminal arms bind DNA and face the interior of the capsid. The flexible C-arms tie together the 72 pentamers in three distinct kinds of interactions, thus facilitating the formation of a T = 7 icosahedron from identical pentameric building blocks. Assembly in vivo was shown to occur by addition of capsomers around the DNA. We apply a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches to study SV40 assembly. Our in vivo and in vitro studies suggest the following model: one or two capsomers bind at a high affinity to ses, the viral DNA encapsidation signal, forming the nucleation centre for assembly. Next, multiple capsomers attach concomitantly, at lower affinity, around the minichromosome. This increases their local concentration facilitating rapid, cooperative assembly reaction. Formation of the icosahedron proceeds either by gradual addition of single pentamers to the growing shell or by concerted assembly of pentamer clusters.

  1. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Xinyu [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Lab of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Han, Xingpeng [Department of Pathology, Tianjin Chest Hospital, Tianjin 300051 (China); Zhang, Fang [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Enzymology, Yangtze Delta Region Institute of Tsinghua University, Jiaxing 314006, Zhejiang (China); He, Miao [Life Sciences School, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Zhang, Yi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Zhi, Xiu-Yi, E-mail: xiuyizhi@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Zhao, Hong, E-mail: zhaohong9@sina.com [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Lab of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  2. Optical design of an in vivo laparoscopic lighting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolong; Abdolmalaki, Reza Yazdanpanah; Mancini, Gregory J.; Tan, Jindong

    2017-12-01

    This paper proposes an in vivo laparoscopic lighting system design to address the illumination issues, namely poor lighting uniformity and low optical efficiency, existing in the state-of-the-art in vivo laparoscopic cameras. The transformable design of the laparoscopic lighting system is capable of carrying purposefully designed freeform optical lenses for achieving lighting performance with high illuminance uniformity and high optical efficiency in a desired target region. To design freeform optical lenses for extended light sources such as LEDs with Lambertian light intensity distributions, we present an effective and complete freeform optical design method. The procedures include (1) ray map computation by numerically solving a standard Monge-Ampere equation; (2) initial freeform optical surface construction by using Snell's law and a lens volume restriction; (3) correction of surface normal vectors due to accumulated errors from the initially constructed surfaces; and (4) feedback modification of the solution to deal with degraded illuminance uniformity caused by the extended sizes of the LEDs. We employed an optical design software package to evaluate the performance of our laparoscopic lighting system design. The simulation results show that our design achieves greater than 95% illuminance uniformity and greater than 89% optical efficiency (considering Fresnel losses) for illuminating the target surgical region.

  3. Real Time Deconvolution of In-Vivo Ultrasound Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    and two wavelengths. This can be improved by deconvolution, which increase the bandwidth and equalizes the phase to increase resolution under the constraint of the electronic noise in the received signal. A fixed interval Kalman filter based deconvolution routine written in C is employed. It uses a state...... resolution has been determined from the in-vivo liver image using the auto-covariance function. From the envelope of the estimated pulse the axial resolution at Full-Width-Half-Max is 0.581 mm corresponding to 1.13 l at 3 MHz. The algorithm increases the resolution to 0.116 mm or 0.227 l corresponding...... to a factor of 5.1. The basic pulse can be estimated in roughly 0.176 seconds on a single CPU core on an Intel i5 CPU running at 1.8 GHz. An in-vivo image consisting of 100 lines of 1600 samples can be processed in roughly 0.1 seconds making it possible to perform real-time deconvolution on ultrasound data...

  4. 3D bioprinting and its in vivo applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nhayoung; Yang, Gi-Hoon; Lee, JaeHwan; Kim, GeunHyung

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of 3D bioprinting technology is to design and create functional 3D tissues or organs in situ for in vivo applications. 3D cell-printing, or additive biomanufacturing, allows the selection of biomaterials and cells (bioink), and the fabrication of cell-laden structures in high resolution. 3D cell-printed structures have also been used for applications such as research models, drug delivery and discovery, and toxicology. Recently, numerous attempts have been made to fabricate tissues and organs by using various 3D printing techniques. However, challenges such as vascularization are yet to be solved. This article reviews the most commonly used 3D cell-printing techniques with their advantages and drawbacks. Furthermore, up-to-date achievements of 3D bioprinting in in vivo applications are introduced, and prospects for the future of 3D cell-printing technology are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 444-459, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Analysis of Riboflavin Compounds in the Rabbit Cornea In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Arthur; Rudaz, Serge; Guinchard, Sylvie; Kling, Sabine; Richoz, Olivier; Hafezi, Farhad

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the composition and concentration of individual riboflavin compounds in the corneal stroma in vivo after soaking with various commercially available riboflavin formulations. Experiments were performed in 26 rabbit corneas in vivo: 24 corneas were soaked with riboflavin formulations for 30 minutes or with 0.9% NaCl for control (n = 2). After treatment, corneas were excised and prepared for ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) analysis. Additionally, computational chemical analysis of riboflavin compounds and keratan sulfate were performed. The amount of riboflavin and riboflavin phosphate isomers in cornea decreased by a factor of 10 to 100, when compared to the amount in riboflavin formulations. In particular, we found an inverse relationship in the ratio of riboflavin to riboflavin phosphate isomer concentration between formulations and cornea. The electronegativity and ionization potential of riboflavin and phosphate isomers are different. The inverse relationship observed might be explained by a stronger electronegativity of the phosphate isomers, leading to a stronger repulsion by corneal proteoglycans. Indicating the individual concentration of riboflavin compounds in formulations is more representative than the total riboflavin concentration. Riboflavin formulations and CXL protocols might be improved considering the differences in diffusion and ionization potentials of the different riboflavin compounds.

  6. Detecting cavitation in vivo from shock-wave therapy devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matula, Thomas J.; Yu, Jinfei; Bailey, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT) has been used as a treatment for plantar faciitis, lateral epicondylitis, shoulder tendonitis, non-unions, and other indications where conservative treatments have been unsuccessful. However, in many areas, the efficacy of SW treatment has not been well established, and the mechanism of action, particularly the role of cavitation, is not well understood. Research indicates cavitation plays an important role in other ultrasound therapies, such as lithotripsy and focused ultrasound surgery, and in some instances, cavitation has been used as a means to monitor or detect a biological effect. Although ESWT can generate cavitation easily in vitro, it is unknown whether or not cavitation is a significant factor in vivo. The purpose of this investigation is to use diagnostic ultrasound to detect and monitor cavitation generated by ESWT devices in vivo. Diagnostic images are collected at various times during and after treatment. The images are then post-processed with image-processing algorithms to enhance the contrast between bubbles and surrounding tissue. The ultimate goal of this research is to utilize cavitation as a means for optimizing shock wave parameters such as amplitude and pulse repetition frequency. [Work supported by APL internal funds and NIH DK43881 and DK55674.

  7. Guiding tissue regeneration with ultrasound in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalecki, Diane; Comeau, Eric S.; Raeman, Carol H.; Child, Sally Z.; Hobbs, Laura; Hocking, Denise C.

    2015-05-01

    Developing new technologies that enable the repair or replacement of injured or diseased tissues is a major focus of regenerative medicine. This paper will discuss three ultrasound technologies under development in our laboratories to guide tissue regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. A critical obstacle in tissue engineering is the need for rapid and effective tissue vascularization strategies. To address this challenge, we are developing acoustic patterning techniques for microvascular tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields provide a rapid, non-invasive approach to spatially pattern cells in three dimensions without affecting cell viability. Acoustic patterning of endothelial cells leads to the rapid formation of microvascular networks throughout the volumes of three-dimensional hydrogels, and the morphology of the resultant microvessel networks can be controlled by design of the ultrasound field. A second technology under development uses ultrasound to noninvasively control the microstructure of collagen fibers within engineered tissues. The microstructure of extracellular matrix proteins provides signals that direct cell functions critical to tissue regeneration. Thus, controlling collagen microfiber structure with ultrasound provides a noninvasive approach to regulate the mechanical properties of biomaterials and control cellular responses. The third technology employs therapeutic ultrasound to enhance the healing of chronic wounds. Recent studies demonstrate increased granulation tissue thickness and collagen deposition in murine dermal wounds exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In summary, ultrasound technologies offer noninvasive approaches to control cell behaviors and extracellular matrix organization and thus hold great promise to advance tissue regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Heartbeat OCT: in vivo intravascular megahertz-optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianshi; Pfeiffer, Tom; Regar, Evelyn; Wieser, Wolfgang; van Beusekom, Heleen; Lancee, Charles T.; Springeling, Geert; Krabbendam, Ilona; van der Steen, Antonius F.W.; Huber, Robert; van Soest, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac motion artifacts, non-uniform rotational distortion and undersampling affect the image quality and the diagnostic impact of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT). In this study we demonstrate how these limitations of IV-OCT can be addressed by using an imaging system that we called “Heartbeat OCT”, combining a fast Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser, fast pullback, and a micromotor actuated catheter, designed to examine a coronary vessel in less than one cardiac cycle. We acquired in vivo data sets of two coronary arteries in a porcine heart with both Heartbeat OCT, working at 2.88 MHz A-line rate, 4000 frames/s and 100 mm/s pullback speed, and with a commercial system. The in vivo results show that Heartbeat OCT provides faithfully rendered, motion-artifact free, fully sampled vessel wall architecture, unlike the conventional IV-OCT data. We present the Heartbeat OCT system in full technical detail and discuss the steps needed for clinical translation of the technology. PMID:26713214

  9. In vivo study of drug interaction with brain benzodiazepine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, O.; Shinotoh, H.; Ito, T.; Suzuki, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Yamasaki, T.

    1985-05-01

    The possibility of direct estimation of in vivo Bz receptor occupancy in brain was evaluated using C-11, or H-3-flumazepil (Ro15-1788). In animal experiments, 1 ..mu..Ci of H-3-Ro15-1788 was injected at 0.5 or 20 hr after i.v. injection of various dosage of clonazepam. Then radioactivity in cerebral cortex, cerebellum and blood at 5 min. after injection of the tracer was compared. Competitive inhibition of in vivo binding was clearly observed when clonazepam was pretreated at 0.5 hr before injection of the tracer. On the other hand, brain radioactivity was increased when clonazepam was administered at 20 hr before injection of the tracer. This increase in binding of H-3-Ro15-1788 might be caused by rebound of Bz receptor function by treatment with Bz agonist, and this rebound may have an important role in physiological function. Clinical investigation concerning drug interaction with brain Bz receptor was performed in normal volunteer and patients with neurological disorders. The distribution of C-11-Ro15-1788 in the brain of patients chronically treated with clonazepam were significantly heterogeneous. However, cerebral blood flow estimated with N-13 NH3 of these patients were normal.

  10. Quantification of osmotic water transport in vivo using fluorescent albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelle, Johann; Sow, Amadou; Vertommen, Didier; Jamar, François; Rippe, Bengt; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-10-15

    Osmotic water transport across the peritoneal membrane is applied during peritoneal dialysis to remove the excess water accumulated in patients with end-stage renal disease. The discovery of aquaporin water channels and the generation of transgenic animals have stressed the need for novel and accurate methods to unravel molecular mechanisms of water permeability in vivo. Here, we describe the use of fluorescently labeled albumin as a reliable indicator of osmotic water transport across the peritoneal membrane in a well-established mouse model of peritoneal dialysis. After detailed evaluation of intraperitoneal tracer mass kinetics, the technique was validated against direct volumetry, considered as the gold standard. The pH-insensitive dye Alexa Fluor 555-albumin was applied to quantify osmotic water transport across the mouse peritoneal membrane resulting from modulating dialysate osmolality and genetic silencing of the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1). Quantification of osmotic water transport using Alexa Fluor 555-albumin closely correlated with direct volumetry and with estimations based on radioiodinated ((125)I) serum albumin (RISA). The low intraperitoneal pressure probably accounts for the negligible disappearance of the tracer from the peritoneal cavity in this model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the appropriateness of pH-insensitive Alexa Fluor 555-albumin as a practical and reliable intraperitoneal volume tracer to quantify osmotic water transport in vivo. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. In vivo determination of arterial collagen synthesis in atherosclerotic rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opsahl, W.P.; DeLuca, D.J.; Ehrhart, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Collagen and non-collagen protein synthesis rates were determined in vivo in tissues from rabbits fed a control or atherogenic diet supplemented with 2% peanut oil and 0.25% cholesterol for 4 months. Rabbits received a bolus intravenous injection of L-[ 3 H]-proline (1.0 mCi/kg) and unlabeled L-proline (7 mmoles/kg) in 0.9% NaCl. Plasma proline specific activity decreased only 20% over 5 hr and was similar to the specific activity of free proline in tissues. Thoracic aortas from atherosclerotic rabbits exhibited raised plaques covering at least 75% of the surface. Thoracic intima plus a portion of the media (TIM) was separated from the remaining media plus adventitia (TMA). Dry delipidated weight, total collagen content, and collagen as a percent of dry weight were increased significantly in the TIM of atherosclerotic rabbits. Collagen synthesis rates and collagen synthesis as a percent of total protein synthesis were likewise increased both in the TIM and in the abdominal aortas. No differences from controls either in collagen content or collagen synthesis rates were observed in the TMA, lung or skin. These results demonstrate for the first time in vivo that formation of atherosclerotic plaques is associated with increased rates of collagen synthesis. Furthermore, as previously observed with incubations in vitro, collagen synthesis was elevated to a greater extent than noncollagen protein synthesis in atherosclerotic aortas from rabbits fed cholesterol plus peanut oil

  12. Multispectral fingerprinting for improved in vivo cell dynamics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Cameron HJ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracing cell dynamics in the embryo becomes tremendously difficult when cell trajectories cross in space and time and tissue density obscure individual cell borders. Here, we used the chick neural crest (NC as a model to test multicolor cell labeling and multispectral confocal imaging strategies to overcome these roadblocks. Results We found that multicolor nuclear cell labeling and multispectral imaging led to improved resolution of in vivo NC cell identification by providing a unique spectral identity for each cell. NC cell spectral identity allowed for more accurate cell tracking and was consistent during short term time-lapse imaging sessions. Computer model simulations predicted significantly better object counting for increasing cell densities in 3-color compared to 1-color nuclear cell labeling. To better resolve cell contacts, we show that a combination of 2-color membrane and 1-color nuclear cell labeling dramatically improved the semi-automated analysis of NC cell interactions, yet preserved the ability to track cell movements. We also found channel versus lambda scanning of multicolor labeled embryos significantly reduced the time and effort of image acquisition and analysis of large 3D volume data sets. Conclusions Our results reveal that multicolor cell labeling and multispectral imaging provide a cellular fingerprint that may uniquely determine a cell's position within the embryo. Together, these methods offer a spectral toolbox to resolve in vivo cell dynamics in unprecedented detail.

  13. Epigenetic remodeling and modification to preserve skeletogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Tanner C; Wildman, Benjamin J; Javed, Amjad; Lengner, Christopher J; Hassan, Mohammad Quamarul

    2018-12-01

    Current studies offer little insight on how epigenetic remodeling of bone-specific chromatin maintains bone mass in vivo. Understanding this gap and precise mechanism is pivotal for future therapeutic innovation to prevent bone loss. Recently, we found that low bone mass is associated with decreased H3K27 acetylation (activating histone modification) of bone specific gene promoters. Here, we aim to elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms by which a miRNA cluster controls bone synthesis and homeostasis by regulating chromatin accessibility and H3K27 acetylation. In order to decipher the epigenetic axis that regulates osteogenesis, we studied a drug inducible anti-miR-23a cluster (miR-23a Cl ZIP ) knockdown mouse model. MiR-23a cluster knockdown (heterozygous) mice developed high bone mass. These mice displayed increased expression of Runx2 and Baf45a, essential factors for skeletogenesis; and decreased expression of Ezh2, a chromatin repressor indispensable for skeletogenesis. ChIP assays using miR-23a Cl knockdown calvarial cells revealed a BAF45A-EZH2 epigenetic antagonistic mechanism that maintains bone formation. Together, our findings support that the miR-23a Cl connection with tissue-specific RUNX2-BAF45A-EZH2 function is a novel molecular epigenetic axis through which a miRNA cluster orchestrates chromatin modification to elicit major effects on osteogenesis in vivo.

  14. In vivo metabolite-specific imaging in tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurd, R.E.; Freeman, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have developed a practical method using proton MR imaging to map the level and distribution of metabolites in vivo. Of particular interest to the biochemist and the clinician is the presence of excess lactic acid in tissues, indicating hypoxia such as is found in certain solid tumors, or in ischemia that would occur during cardiac infarct or stroke. A two-dimensional double quantum coherence technique has been optimized to greatly reduce signal intensity from biologic water and to provide unambiguous editing of the lactic acid resonance from interfering lipid resonances. The method was tested using a General Electric 2.0-T CSI instrument fitted with actively shielded gradients. Two-dimensional double quantum coherence lactic acid edited images were obtained from an implanted RIF-1 tumor in C3H mice, showing heterogeneous distribution of lactic acid within the tumor. Very little lipid signal with respect to the lactic acid methyl resonance was observed. The lactic acid concentration of the tumor was determined to be 10 μmol/g wet by enzymatic assay. Metabolite-specific imaging using double quantum coherence transfer promises to yield noninvasive information about lactic acid levels and distribution in vivo at low field, relatively quickly, with low radio frequency power disposition and without the need for complex presaturation pulses

  15. Acute In Vivo Response to an Alternative Implant for Urogynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabiniano Roman Regueros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate in vivo the acute host response to an alternative implant designed for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI and pelvic organ prolapse (POP. Methods. A biodegradable scaffold was produced from poly-L-lactic acid (PLA using the electrospinning technique. Human and rat adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs were isolated and characterized by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and differentiation assays. PLA scaffolds were seeded and cultured for 2 weeks with human or rat ADSCs. Scaffolds with and without human or rat ADSCs were implanted subcutaneously on the abdominal wall of rats. After 3 and 7 days, 6 animals from each group were sacrificed. Sections from each sample were analyzed by Haematoxylin and Eosin staining, Sirius red staining, and immunohistochemistry for CD68, PECAM-1, and collagen I and III. Results. Animals responded to the scaffolds with an acute macrophage response. After 7 days of implantation, there was extensive host cell penetration, new blood vessel formation, and new collagen deposition throughout the full thickness of the samples without obvious differences between cell-containing and cell-free scaffolds. Conclusions. The acute in vivo response to an alternative implant (both with and without cells for the treatment of SUI and POP showed good acute integration into the host tissues.

  16. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordberg, Agneta

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high 11 C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by 11 C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  17. Mechanism of phosphaturia elicited by administration of phosphonoformate in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanScoy, M.; Loghman-Adham, M.; Onsgard, M.; Szczepanska-Konkel, M.; Homma, Sumiko; Knox, F.G.; Dousa, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined whether phosphonoformate (PFA) can cause phosphaturia through its direct action on brush-border membrane (BBM) in vivo. Infusion of PFA or of parathyroid hormone (PTH) to thyroparathyroidectomized rats caused a marked increase in fractional excretion of phosphate without changes in excretion of Na + or of GFR. The PFA-induced phosphaturia was not accompanied by an increase in urinary adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP); moreover, PFA added in vitro did not influence the PTH-sensitive adenylate cyclase and cAMP-phosphodiesterase in proximal convoluted tubules. In BBM vesicles (BBMV) from rats with PFA-elicited phosphaturia, neither the rate of Na + -P i symport nor Na + -dependent binding of [ 14 C]PFA on BBMV was changed, whereas in BBMV from PTH-infused rats the V max of Na + -P i symport decreased. PFA is almost completely ultrafiltrable; no metabolic transformation of PFA was detected after [ 14 C]PFA exposure to rat renal cortical slices, homogenate, or to blood. They conclude that PFA causes phosphaturia by direct inhibition of Na + -P i symport across BBM in proximal tubules, acting from the luminal side. Thus PFA (foscarnet) has a unique direct mechanism of phosphaturic effect, via its action on P i reabsorption in proximal tubules in vivo

  18. Aspartame induces angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesildal, F; Aydin, F N; Deveci, S; Tekin, S; Aydin, I; Mammadov, R; Fermanli, O; Avcu, F; Acikel, C H; Ozgurtas, T

    2015-03-01

    Angiogenesis is the process of generating new blood vessels from preexisting vessels and is considered essential in many pathological conditions. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of aspartame on angiogenesis in vivo chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and wound-healing models as well as in vitro 2,3-bis-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) and tube formation assays. In CAM assay, aspartame increased angiogenesis in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared with the control group, aspartame has significantly increased vessel proliferation (p aspartame group had better healing than control group, and this was statistically significant at p aspartame on human umbilical vein endothelial cells on XTT assay in vitro, but it was not statistically significant; and there was no antiangiogenic effect of aspartame on tube formation assay in vitro. These results provide evidence that aspartame induces angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo; so regular use may have undesirable effect on susceptible cases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. In Vivo Measurement of Glenohumeral Joint Contact Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bey MichaelJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to describe a technique for measuring in-vivo glenohumeral joint contact patterns during dynamic activities and to demonstrate application of this technique. The experimental technique calculated joint contact patterns by combining CT-based 3D bone models with joint motion data that were accurately measured from biplane x-ray images. Joint contact patterns were calculated for the repaired and contralateral shoulders of 20 patients who had undergone rotator cuff repair. Significant differences in joint contact patterns were detected due to abduction angle and shoulder condition (i.e., repaired versus contralateral. Abduction angle had a significant effect on the superior/inferior contact center position, with the average joint contact center of the repaired shoulder 12.1% higher on the glenoid than the contralateral shoulder. This technique provides clinically relevant information by calculating in-vivo joint contact patterns during dynamic conditions and overcomes many limitations associated with conventional techniques for quantifying joint mechanics.

  20. In vivo radiosensitizing effect of nitroimidazole derivative KIN-804

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Takuhito; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Onoyama, Yasuto; Murayama, Chieko; Mori, Yomoyuki; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hori, Hitoshi; Inayama, Seiichi

    1994-01-01

    In vivo characteristics of 2-nitroimidazole-1-methylacetohydroxamate (KIN-804), which is a newly developed hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, are presented. The toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and radiosensitizing effect of KIN-804 were studied by in vivo experiments using C3H/He mice bearing the SCCVII tumor. Results were compared with misonidazole (MISO). LD 50 7 of KIN-804 and MISO were 3200 mg/kg and 2000 mg/kg, respectively. The peak concentration of KIN-804 in the tumor occurred 20 min after intraperitoneal injection and reached about 62% of the maximum concentration in the blood. The concentrations in brain and sciatic nerve were very low and clearance from sciatic nerve was rapid. Enhancement ratios of KIN-804 calculated using the growth delay method were 1.22, 1.50, and 1.71 at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, respectively, compared with 1.36 for MISO at a dose of 100 mg/kg. In the TCD 50 assay, enhancement ratios at a dose of 200 mg/kg were 1.69 for KIN-804 and 1.52 for MISO, respectively. KIN-804 is a promising radiosensitizer since it shows less toxicity and higher radiosensitizing activity than MISO. 10 refs., 5 figs

  1. The ethics of in vivo calibrations in oral health surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Flávia Reis de; Narvai, Paulo Capel; Montagner, Miguel Ângelo

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the ethics of in vivo calibration, using the discourse of the administrators of the National Oral Health Survey (SBBrasil 2010) as a starting point. This is a qualitative research involving semi-structured individual interviews with 12 members of the Steering Group and Technical Advisory Committee of the Ministry of Health, and two coordinators, one State and the other Municipal. The discourse of the collective subject technique was used for data analysis. When asked about the experiences of SBBrasil 2010, which included ethical aspects, respondents identified the forms of standardization and training of teams who collected field data. For them, there is little scientific evidence to ethically support the way the training stage, including calibration, is carried out in oral health epidemiological surveys, as a certain unease can be predicted in participants of these studies. The ethics of a research also derives from its methodological rigor; the training process; and calibration in particular, is a fundamental technical and ethical requirement in surveys such as the SBBrasil 2010. The unease of the volunteers in face of test repetition does not ethically invalidate the in vivo calibration, but mechanisms to minimize it must be developed.

  2. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. ► Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. ► Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. ► Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  3. In vivo Monitoring of Serotonin by Nanomaterial Functionalized Acupuncture Needle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Tao; Tang, Li-Na; Ning, Yong; Shu, Qing; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture treatment is amazing but controversial. Up to now, the mechanism of treating diseases by acupuncture and moxibustion is still unclear, especially the occurrence of the molecular events in local acupoints. Herein, we report an extremely stable microsensor by modifying carbon nanotube (CNT) to the tip surface of acupuncture needle and applying this CNT-modified acupuncture needle for real time monitoring of serotonin (5-HT) in vivo. To stabilize CNT modification on the needle tip surface, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT) was employed as glue water to stick CNT on the needle. The detection limit of the CNT-modified needle was found to be approximately 50 nM and 78 nM in the PBS and the cell medium, respectively. In addition, the needle showed good selectivity to some inflammatory mediators and some electroactive molecules. For the first time, the CNT-modified needle could be directly probed into rat body for real time monitoring of 5-HT in vivo, showing a great potential for better understanding the mechanism of acupuncture treatment.

  4. Longevity in vivo of primary cell wall cellulose synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joseph Lee; Josephs, Cooper; Barnes, William J; Anderson, Charles T; Tien, Ming

    2018-02-01

    Our work focuses on understanding the lifetime and thus stability of the three main cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins involved in primary cell wall synthesis of Arabidopsis. It had long been thought that a major means of CESA regulation was via their rapid degradation. However, our studies here have uncovered that AtCESA proteins are not rapidly degraded. Rather, they persist for an extended time in the plant cell. Plant cellulose is synthesized by membrane-embedded cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs). The CSC is composed of cellulose synthases (CESAs), of which three distinct isozymes form the primary cell wall CSC and another set of three isozymes form the secondary cell wall CSC. We determined the stability over time of primary cell wall (PCW) CESAs in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, using immunoblotting after inhibiting protein synthesis with cycloheximide treatment. Our work reveals very slow turnover for the Arabidopsis PCW CESAs in vivo. Additionally, we show that the stability of all three CESAs within the PCW CSC is altered by mutations in individual CESAs, elevated temperature, and light conditions. Together, these results suggest that CESA proteins are very stable in vivo, but that their lifetimes can be modulated by intrinsic and environmental cues.

  5. In vivo hypertensive arterial wall uptake of radiolabeled liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodis, H.N.; Amartey, J.K.; Crawford, D.W.; Wickham, E.; Blankenhorn, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    Using five sham-operated and seven aortic coarctation-induced hypertensive New Zealand White rabbits intravenously injected with neutral small unilamellar vesicles loaded with [111In]nitrilotriacetic acid, we demonstrated in vivo that the normal aortic arterial wall participates in liposome uptake and that this uptake is increased in the hypertensive aortic wall by approximately threefold (p less than or equal to 0.0001). Among the three regions examined, aortic arch, thoracic aorta, and lower abdominal aorta, the difference in uptake between the normotensive and hypertensive arterial walls was significantly different, p less than or equal to 0.05, p less than or equal to 0.0001, and p less than 0.05, respectively. The uptake by the different regions of the hypertensive arterial wall is consistent with the pathological changes present in these areas. Furthermore, the extent of liposome uptake by the aortic wall is strongly correlated with the height of the blood pressure (r = 0.85, p = 0.001, n = 11). We conclude that neutral small unilamellar liposomes can be used to carry agents into the arterial wall in vivo in the study of hypertensive vascular disease and could be especially useful for the delivery of pharmacologically or biologically active agents that would otherwise be inactivated within the circulation or are impermeable to the arterial wall

  6. In vivo integrity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Abdelmonem, Abuelmagd M.; Ali, Zulqurnain; Alves, Frauke; Geiser, Marianne; Haberl, Nadine; Hartmann, Raimo; Hirn, Stephanie; de Aberasturi, Dorleta Jimenez; Kantner, Karsten; Khadem-Saba, Gülnaz; Montenegro, Jose-Maria; Rejman, Joanna; Rojo, Teofilo; de Larramendi, Idoia Ruiz; Ufartes, Roser; Wenk, Alexander; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles are frequently engineered with an organic surface coating to improve their physicochemical properties, and it is well known that their colloidal properties may change upon internalization by cells. While the stability of such nanoparticles is typically assayed in simple in vitro tests, their stability in a mammalian organism remains unknown. Here, we show that firmly grafted polymer shells around gold nanoparticles may degrade when injected into rats. We synthesized monodisperse radioactively labelled gold nanoparticles (198Au) and engineered an 111In-labelled polymer shell around them. Upon intravenous injection into rats, quantitative biodistribution analyses performed independently for 198Au and 111In showed partial removal of the polymer shell in vivo. While 198Au accumulates mostly in the liver, part of the 111In shows a non-particulate biodistribution similar to intravenous injection of chelated 111In. Further in vitro studies suggest that degradation of the polymer shell is caused by proteolytic enzymes in the liver. Our results show that even nanoparticles with high colloidal stability can change their physicochemical properties in vivo.

  7. Testing of new hypoxic cell sensitizers in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, H.B.; Sinesi, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    We tested five agents as potential sensitizers of hypoxic cells in vivo in mammary tumors in C3H mice in comparison with misonidazole. The LD/sub 50/2/ for desmethylmisonidazole was 2.7 mg/g body wt, compared to 1.3 for misonidazole. It was as effective in reducing the TCD 50 of MDAH-MCa-4 as were equitoxic doses of misonidazole. the LD/sub 50/2/ of SR-2508 was 3.3 mg/g and was as effective a sensitizer as misonidazole. Ro 07-0741 was more toxic, with an LD/sub 50/2/ of 0.6 mg/g, but was as effective as misonidazole at equitoxic doses. NP-1 was also more toxic than misonidazole (LA/sub 50/2/ = 04 mg/g) but was a less effective sensitizer. Rotenone, which causes sensitization by inhibiting cellular respiration, thus increasing the diffusion distance of oxygen, was extremely toxic (LD/sub 50/2/ - 0.003 mg/g), and systemic respiratory inhibition and the radioprotective effects of the dimethyl sulfoxide used to dissolve it rendered it totally ineffective as a sensitizer in vivo

  8. Longitudinal in vivo MR imaging of live earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budán, Ferenc; Kovács, Noémi; Engelmann, Péter; Horváth, Ildikó; Veres, Dániel S; Németh, Péter; Szigeti, Krisztián; Máthé, Domokos

    2014-11-01

    Earthworm (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae) species are used widely in eco-toxicological tests especially with contaminated soils. These long-term tests are reliable, but a high sample size is needed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can produce fast, robust, sensitive, and longitudinal morphological results using a small sample size. Performing longitudinal in vivo examinations of earthworms using MRI requires the need for anesthetics to completely avoid earthworm's moving. Our goal was to develop a simple and non-invasive method to anesthetize earthworms for in vivo longitudinal imaging studies. We investigated a number of different anesthesia methods and found that propan-2-ol and its vapor was optimal. We used a commercial sequential nanoScan® PET/MRI system (Mediso Ltd, Hungary, Budapest) to explore feasibility of MR imaging in immobilized earthworms. It was possible to visualize via micro MRI the brain, gastrointestinal tract, seminal vesicles, calciferous gland (Morren gland), and main blood vessels of the circulatory system. Our findings show the possibilities to examine changes in morphology using MRI of certain organs using a reversible, long-term immobilization method. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. In vivo toxicologic study of larger silica nanoparticles in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan WT

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Wai-Tao Chan,1–3 Cheng-Che Liu,4 Jen-Shiu Chiang Chiau,5 Shang-Ting Tsai,6 Chih-Kai Liang,6 Mei-Lien Cheng,5 Hung-Chang Lee,7,8 Chun-Yun Yeung,1,3,9 Shao-Yi Hou2,6 1Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, MacKay Children’s Hospital, 2Graduate Institute of Engineering Technology, National Taipei University of Technology, 3Mackay Medicine, Nursing, and Management College, 4Institute of Preventive Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, 5Department of Medical Research, MacKay Memorial Hospital, Hsinchu, 6Graduate Institute of Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, 7Department of Pediatrics, MacKay Memorial Hospital, Hsinchu, 8Department of Pediatrics, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 9Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Silica nanoparticles (SiNPs are being studied and used for medical purposes. As nanotechnology grows rapidly, its biosafety and toxicity have frequently raised concerns. However, diverse results have been reported about the safety of SiNPs; several studies reported that smaller particles might exhibit toxic effects to some cell lines, and larger particles of 100 nm were reported to be genotoxic to the cocultured cells. Here, we investigated the in vivo toxicity of SiNPs of 150 nm in various dosages via intravenous administration in mice. The mice were observed for 14 days before blood examination and histopathological assay. All the mice survived and behaved normally after the administration of nanoparticles. No significant weight change was noted. Blood examinations showed no definite systemic dysfunction of organ systems. Histopathological studies of vital organs confirmed no SiNP-related adverse effects. We concluded that 150 nm SiNPs were biocompatible and safe for in vivo use in mice. Keywords: in vivo, mice, silica nanoparticle, nanotoxicity

  10. In vivo imaging of the retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jessica Ijams Wolfing

    The retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells form an important layer of the retina because they are responsible for providing metabolic support to the photoreceptors. Techniques to image the RPE layer include autofluorescence imaging with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). However, previous studies were unable to resolve single RPE cells in vivo. This thesis describes the technique of combining autofluorescence, SLO, adaptive optics (AO), and dual-wavelength simultaneous imaging and registration to visualize the individual cells in the RPE mosaic in human and primate retina for the first time in vivo. After imaging the RPE mosaic non-invasively, the cell layer's structure and regularity were characterized using quantitative metrics of cell density, spacing, and nearest neighbor distances. The RPE mosaic was compared to the cone mosaic, and RPE imaging methods were confirmed using histology. The ability to image the RPE mosaic led to the discovery of a novel retinal change following light exposure; 568 nm exposures caused an immediate reduction in autofluorescence followed by either full recovery or permanent damage in the RPE layer. A safety study was conducted to determine the range of exposure irradiances that caused permanent damage or transient autofluorescence reductions. Additionally, the threshold exposure causing autofluorescence reduction was determined and reciprocity of radiant exposure was confirmed. Light exposures delivered by the AOSLO were not significantly different than those delivered by a uniform source. As all exposures tested were near or below the permissible light levels of safety standards, this thesis provides evidence that the current light safety standards need to be revised. Finally, with the retinal damage and autofluorescence reduction thresholds identified, the methods of RPE imaging were modified to allow successful imaging of the individual cells in the RPE mosaic while still ensuring retinal safety. This thesis has provided a

  11. Liposomal packaging generates Wnt protein with in vivo biological activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T Morrell

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Wnt signals exercise strong cell-biological and regenerative effects of considerable therapeutic value. There are, however, no specific Wnt agonists and no method for in vivo delivery of purified Wnt proteins. Wnts contain lipid adducts that are required for activity and we exploited this lipophilicity by packaging purified Wnt3a protein into lipid vesicles. Rather than being encapsulated, Wnts are tethered to the liposomal surface, where they enhance and sustain Wnt signaling in vitro. Molecules that effectively antagonize soluble Wnt3a protein but are ineffective against the Wnt3a signal presented by a cell in a paracrine or autocrine manner are also unable to block liposomal Wnt3a activity, suggesting that liposomal packaging mimics the biological state of active Wnts. When delivered subcutaneously, Wnt3a liposomes induce hair follicle neogenesis, demonstrating their robust biological activity in a regenerative context.

  12. The Transformation of Calcium Phosphate Bioceramics in Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hong-lian; CAO Xian-ying; LI Xiao-xi; YAN Yu-hua; LI Shi-pu

    2003-01-01

    To study the transformation process of calcium phosphate bioceramic in vivo,biodegradable porous β-tricalcium phosphate ceramics (β-TCP) were used in this experiment. The materials (φ5×8mm) were implanted in the tibia of rabbits. The β-TCP ceramics with bone tissue were retrieved and treated for histology, and then observed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an electron probe X-ray microanalyzer (EMPA) every month. The results show that β-TCP ceramics bond to bone directly,new bones are forming and maturing with materials continuous degrading,and the materials are nearly replaced by the formed bone finally.Parts of the materials were degraded,absorpted and recrystallized,the others dispersped on the cancellous bone and the Haversian lamella with an irregular arrangement incorporating in bone formation directly by remodeling structure.

  13. In-vivo neutron activation analysis: principles and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress. It seems likely that by the end of this century there will have been significant progress with this research tool, and exciting insights obtained into the nature and dynamics of human body composition

  14. Tubulin in vitro, in vivo and in silico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mershin, Andreas

    Tubulin, microtubules and associated proteins were studied theoretically, computationally and experimentally in vitro and in vivo in order to elucidate the possible role these play in cellular information processing and storage. Use of the electric dipole moment of tubulin as the basis for binary switches (biobits) in nanofabricated circuits was explored with surface plasmon resonance, refractometry and dielectric spectroscopy. The effects of burdening the microtubular cytoskeleton of olfactory associative memory neurons with excess microtubule associated protein TAU in Drosophila fruitflies were determined. To investigate whether tubulin may be used as the substrate for quantum computation as a bioqubit, suggestions for experimental detection of quantum coherence and entanglement among tubulin electric dipole moment states were developed.

  15. Endocrine disrupting properties in vivo of widely used azole fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Vinggaard, Anne; Hass, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of four commonly used azole fungicides, propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and ketoconazole, were tested in two short-term in vivo studies. Initially, the antiandrogenic effects of propiconazole and tebuconazole (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day each......) were examined in the Hershberger assay. In the second study, pregnant Wistar rats were dosed with propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole or ketoconazole (50 mg/kg/day each) from gestational day (GD) 7 to GD 21. Caesarian sections were performed on dams at GD 21. Tebuconazole and propiconazole...... demonstrated no antiandrogenic effects at doses between 50 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day in the Hershberger assay. In the in utero exposure toxicity study, ketoconazole, a pharmaceutical to treat human fungal infections, decreased anogenital distance and reduced testicular testosterone levels, demonstrating...

  16. Suppression induction in vivo by a T helper clone?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crispe, I N; Owens, T

    1985-01-01

    We have previously described a helper T cell clone which augments in vivo cytotoxic T cell responses when injected at 10(4) cells per mouse, but not at 10(5) per mouse (Crispe, I. N. et al., Immunology 1984. 52:55). To test whether this dose-response relationship was due to the induction...... of suppression, naive syngeneic mice were injected with 10(5) cloned T helper cells, and their spleen cells were subsequently assayed for suppressive activity in adoptive transfer experiments. Lymphocytes from such mice indeed suppressed an antigen-specific cytotoxic response, but only in the presence...... of the same T helper cell clone freshly added at the time of adoptive transfer. On this basis we argue that the distinction between T helper cell activity and T suppressor-inducer activity corresponds to differences in cell numbers, rather than to two separate cell lineages....

  17. Noninvasive control of rhodamine-loaded capsules distribution in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmashchuk, O.; Tarakanchikova, Y.; Seryogina, E.; Piavchenko, G.; Zherebtsov, E.; Dunaev, A.; Popov, A.; Meglinski, I.

    2018-04-01

    Using fluorescence spectroscopy system with fibre-optical probe, we investigated the dynamics of propagation and circulation in the microcirculatory system of experimental nanocapsules fluorescent-labelled (rhodamine TRITC) nanocapsules. The studies were carried out in clinically healthy Wistar rats. The model animals were divided into control group and group received injections of the nanocapsules. The fluorescent measurements conducted transcutaneously on the thigh surface. The administration of the preparation with the rhodamine concentration of 5 mg/kg of animal weight resulted in twofold increase of fluorescence intensity by reference to the baseline level. As a result of the study, it was concluded that fluorescence spectroscopy can be used for transdermal measurements of the rhodamine-loaded capsules in vivo.

  18. Brain Tissue Oxygen: In Vivo Monitoring with Carbon Paste Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Lowry

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In this communication we review selected experiments involving the use ofcarbon paste electrodes (CPEs to monitor and measure brain tissue O2 levels in awakefreely-moving animals. Simultaneous measurements of rCBF were performed using the H2clearance technique. Voltammetric techniques used include both differential pulse (O2 andconstant potential amperometry (rCBF. Mild hypoxia and hyperoxia produced rapidchanges (decrease and increase respectively in the in vivo O2 signal. Neuronal activation(tail pinch and stimulated grooming produced similar increases in both O2 and rCBFindicating that CPE O2 currents provide an index of increases in rCBF when such increasesexceed O2 utilization. Saline injection produced a transient increase in the O2 signal whilechloral hydrate produced slower more long-lasting changes that accompanied the behavioralchanges associated with anaesthesia. Acetazolamide increased O2 levels through an increasein rCBF.

  19. Efficient in vivo electroporation of the postnatal rodent forebrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Boutin

    Full Text Available Functional gene analysis in vivo represents still a major challenge in biomedical research. Here we present a new method for the efficient introduction of nucleic acids into the postnatal mouse forebrain. We show that intraventricular injection of DNA followed by electroporation induces strong expression of transgenes in radial glia, neuronal precursors and neurons of the olfactory system. We present two proof-of-principle experiments to validate our approach. First, we show that expression of a human isoform of the neural cell adhesion molecule (hNCAM-140 in radial glia cells induces their differentiation into cells showing a neural precursor phenotype. Second, we demonstrate that p21 acts as a cell cycle inhibitor for postnatal neural stem cells. This approach will represent an important tool for future studies of postnatal neurogenesis and of neural development in general.

  20. A dynamic model for in vivo virus replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacCarthy, J.E.; Kozak, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper a dynamic model of in vivo virus replication is presented. Kinetic equations are formulated to describe the overall process of replication and then analyzed using a ''synergetic'' approach. First the importance of a rate-limiting substrate is taken explicitly into account, and secondly the coupling between the processes considered (translation, replication and assembly) is strictly preserved; the analysis itself is carried out in the linear regime. The problems of defective-particle infections, standard-virus infections, inhibition of cellular synthesis, and the case of co-infected cells are treated. The various parameters of the model (initial cellular concentrations, rate constants) are specified using existing experimental data and the full (numerical) consequences of the model are explored in detail. The simple model developed is able to account qualitatively, and occasionally quantitatively, for the behavior observed experimentally for each of the problems cited above.

  1. In vitro proliferative capacity of vascular cells irradiated in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer-Dzoga, K.; Dimitrievich, G.S.; Griem, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Explants were prepared from rabbit vascular aortic layers and irradiated with x-ray doses ranging from 100 cGy-5 cGy. This resulted in a 50% reduction in number of outgrowing cells with doses of 100-125 gy. Doses of 250, 500 and 750 gy resulted in a reduction of 70, 90, and 95% respectively. However, when the rabbit was irradiated in vivo to a narrow mediastinal port immediately before the explantation of vascular tissue, the number of outgrowing cells was comparable to that of the irradiated control for doses up to 250 cGy, while doses of 500 and 750 cGy reduced outgrowth by 60 and 93% respectively. To test for in situ repair, the time interval between irradiation and explantation was prolonged from 1-4 hours in one hour increments. The results were scored as average number of cells/explant and average number of cells/growing culture

  2. In vivo studies of peritendinous tissue in exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, M; Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D

    2000-01-01

    Soft tissue injury of tendons represents a major problem within sports medicine. Although several animal and cell culture studies have addressed this, human experiments have been limited in their ability to follow changes in specific tissue directly in response to interventions. Recently, methods...... have allowed for in vivo determination of tissue concentrations and release rates of substances involved in metabolism, inflammation and collagen synthesis, together with the measurement of tissue blood flow and oxygenation in the peritendinous region around the Achilles tendon in humans during...... exercise. This coincides with a surprisingly marked drop in tissue pressure during contraction. With regards to both circulation, metabolism and collagen formation, peritendinous tissue represents a dynamic, responsive region that adapts markedly to acute muscular activity....

  3. In vivo release of FT-207 from irradiation polymerized composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Huaijiang; Kou Qinghe; Song Juzhong; Peng Tao; Chen Xiaohui; Zhang Dexi

    1999-01-01

    Polymer-drugs composite with long periods of controlled slow release was made by radiation induced polymerization in room temperature. In experiment in vivo, the composite was implanted subcutaneously the back of rabbits. The concentration of 1-(2-tetrahydrofuryl)-5-fluorouracil (FT-207) was determined by HPLC. The results of test showed that the concentration of serum drug is 1.0 μg/mL after 1 week in the polymer-drug composites group. The drug concentration of tissue surrounding the composites is 76.2 +- 10.4 μg/mL. The drug concentration in the far organ (e.g.the lung 1.2 +- 0.5 μg/mL) is lower than the tissue surrounding the composite. The serum drug is higher and shorter time by the routine methods. The serum concentration of FT-207 is lower an retarded by implanted

  4. In vivo evaluation on organ degeneration using radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Moon, C. J.; Kim, S. R.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of developed product on skin and reproductive system of animal due to irradiation via in vivo test, and finally acquire fundamental data for evaluation of protective materials on degenerative damages. - Evaluate the effect of candidate materials on UV-induced skin damages · Test the effect of candidate materials to protect the skin from photodamage, the gross and microscopic changes in the skin of hairless mice and materials-treated mice exposed chronically to UV - Evaluate the effect of developed product (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced reproductive system (female) damages - Evaluate the effect of developed product (HemoHIM) on chemical-induced reproductive system (female) damages - Evaluate the effect of developed product (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced reproductive system (male) damages - Evaluate the effect of developed product (HemoHIM) on chemical-induced reproductive system (male) damages

  5. Setup of IN VIVO Breast Cancer Models for Nanodrug Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schifter, Søren

    2013-01-01

    RNA/aptamer conjugates, or carriers such as liposome/chitosan/micelle spheres. As a first step towards testing of the efficacy of siRNA delivery in vivo via different conjugates and complexes, we aimed at developing a standardized breast cancer model system in mice. In this conception, a reporter gene is used...... differential knockdown efficacies and the readout can directly be performed by quantitative imaging using a Caliper IVIS system. In one line of experiments, we engineered non-metastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cells to express the luminescent reporter firefly luciferase (Luc2) along with a pro-metastatic micro......Synthetic lethality is a promising concept for future cancer treatment and using siRNAs as the synthetic lethal drug component allows for also covering the space considered as non-druggable by conventional small molecule drugs. Systemic administration of naked siRNA, however, does not result...

  6. Determination of in vivo RNA kinetics using RATE-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymotin, Benjamin; Athanasiadou, Rodoniki; Gresham, David

    2014-10-01

    The abundance of a transcript is determined by its rate of synthesis and its rate of degradation; however, global methods for quantifying RNA abundance cannot distinguish variation in these two processes. Here, we introduce RNA approach to equilibrium sequencing (RATE-seq), which uses in vivo metabolic labeling of RNA and approach to equilibrium kinetics, to determine absolute RNA degradation and synthesis rates. RATE-seq does not disturb cellular physiology, uses straightforward normalization with exogenous spike-ins, and can be readily adapted for studies in most organisms. We demonstrate the use of RATE-seq to estimate genome-wide kinetic parameters for coding and noncoding transcripts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. © 2014 Neymotin et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  7. In Vivo Imaging of Influenza Virus Infection in Immunized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Czakó

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunization is the cornerstone of seasonal influenza control and represents an important component of pandemic preparedness strategies. Using a bioluminescent reporter virus, we demonstrate the application of noninvasive in vivo imaging system (IVIS technology to evaluate the preclinical efficacy of candidate vaccines and immunotherapy in a mouse model of influenza. Sequential imaging revealed distinct spatiotemporal kinetics of bioluminescence in groups of mice passively or actively immunized by various strategies that accelerated the clearance of the challenge virus at different rates and by distinct mechanisms. Imaging findings were consistent with conclusions derived from virus titers in the lungs and, notably, were more informative than conventional efficacy endpoints in some cases. Our findings demonstrate the reliability of IVIS as a qualitative approach to support preclinical evaluation of candidate medical countermeasures for influenza in mice.

  8. Low density lipoprotein receptors: preliminary results on 'in vivo' study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupattelli, G.; Virgolini, I.; Li, S.R.; Sinzinger, H.

    1991-01-01

    Plasmatic levels of low density lipoproteins (LDL) are regulated by the receptor pathway and most LDL receptor are located in the liver. A receptor defect due to genetic mutations of the LDL receptor gene is the cause of familial hypercholesterolemia (F.H.), a disease characterized by high cholesterol levels and premature atherosclerosis. Injections of autologous radiolabelled LDL, followed by hepatic scintiscanning, can be used to obtain 'in vivo' quantification of hepatic receptor activity, both in normal and hypercholesterolemic patients. In this study we observe no hepatic increase of radioactivity in patients affected by F.H., confirming the liver receptor defect. Scintigraphy is a non-invasive technique which can be used to diagnose this disease and to monitor the efficiacy of hypolipidemic therapy. (Authors)

  9. Chromatin Dynamics in Vivo: A Game of Musical Chairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël P. Melters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Histones are a major component of chromatin, the nucleoprotein complex fundamental to regulating transcription, facilitating cell division, and maintaining genome integrity in almost all eukaryotes. In addition to canonical, replication-dependent histones, replication-independent histone variants exist in most eukaryotes. In recent years, steady progress has been made in understanding how histone variants assemble, their involvement in development, mitosis, transcription, and genome repair. In this review, we will focus on the localization of the major histone variants H3.3, CENP-A, H2A.Z, and macroH2A, as well as how these variants have evolved, their structural differences, and their functional significance in vivo.

  10. In vivo MRS metabolite quantification using genetic optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakostas, G. A.; Karras, D. A.; Mertzios, B. G.; van Ormondt, D.; Graveron-Demilly, D.

    2011-11-01

    The in vivo quantification of metabolites' concentrations, revealed in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) spectra, constitutes the main subject under investigation in this work. Significant contributions based on artificial intelligence tools, such as neural networks (NNs), with good results have been presented lately but have shown several drawbacks, regarding their quantification accuracy under difficult conditions. A general framework that encounters the quantification procedure as an optimization problem, which is solved using a genetic algorithm (GA), is proposed in this paper. Two different lineshape models are examined, while two GA configurations are applied on artificial data. Moreover, the introduced quantification technique deals with metabolite peaks' overlapping, a considerably difficult situation occurring under real conditions. Appropriate experiments have proved the efficiency of the introduced methodology, in artificial MRS data, by establishing it as a generic metabolite quantification procedure.

  11. BRE enhances in vivo growth of tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Ben Chung-Lap; Li Qing; Chow, Stephanie Ka-Yee; Ching, Arthur Kar-Keung; Liew, Choong Tsek; Lim, Pak-Leong; Lee, Kenneth Ka-Ho; Chan, John Yeuk-Hon; Chui, Y.-L.

    2005-01-01

    Human BRE, a death receptor-associating intracellular protein, attenuates apoptotic response of human and mouse tumor cell lines to death receptor stimuli in vitro. In this report, we addressed whether the in vitro antiapoptotic effect of BRE could impact on tumor growth in vivo. We have shown that the mouse Lewis lung carcinoma D122 stable transfectants of human BRE expression vector developed into local tumor significantly faster than the stable transfectants of empty vector and parental D122, in both the syngeneic C57BL/6 host and nude mice. In vitro growth of the BRE stable transfectants was, however, not accelerated. No significant difference in metastasis between the transfectants and the parental D122 was detected. Thus, overexpression of BRE promotes local tumor growth but not metastasis. We conclude that the enhanced tumor growth is more likely due to the antiapoptotic activity of BRE than any direct effect of the protein on cell proliferation

  12. Egghead and brainiac are essential for glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Pizette, Sandrine; Pedersen, Johannes W

    2004-01-01

    -acetylglucosaminyltransferase predicted by in vitro analysis to control synthesis of the glycosphingolipid core structure, GlcNAcbeta1-3Manbeta1-4Glcbeta1-Cer, found widely in invertebrates but not vertebrates. In this report we present direct in vivo evidence for this hypothesis. egghead and brainiac mutants lack elongated...... lactosylceramide glycosphingolipid biosynthetic pathway (Galbeta1-4Glcbeta1-Cer) using a human beta4-galactosyltransferase (beta4Gal-T6) transgene. Conversely, introduction of egghead in vertebrate cells (Chinese hamster ovary) resulted in near complete blockage of biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids...... and accumulation of Manbeta1-4Glcbeta1-Cer. The study demonstrates that glycosphingolipids are essential for development of complex organisms and suggests that the function of the Drosophila glycosphingolipids in development does not depend on the core structure....

  13. Fluorescent-Spectroscopic Research of in Vivo Tissues Pathological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraev, K. M.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Medzhidov, R. T.

    The steady-state spectra of autofluorescence and the reflection coefficient on the excitation wavelength of some stomach tissues in vivo with various pathological conditions (surface gastritis, displasia, cancer) are measured under excitation by the nitrogen laser irradiation (λex=337.1 nm). The contour expansion of obtained fluorescence spectra into contributions of components is conducted by the Gaussian-Lorentzian curves method. It is shown that at least 7 groups of fluorophores forming a total luminescence spectrum can be distinguished during the development of displasia and tumor processes. The correlation of intensities of flavins and NAD(P)·H fluorescence is determined and the degree of respiratory activity of cells for the functional condition considered is estimated. The evaluations of the fluorescence quantum yield of the tissue's researched are given.

  14. In vivo study of central receptors in man using pet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.C.

    1986-09-01

    Central neurotransmitter systems and receptors are intimately involved in the mechanism of several neurologic and phychiatric disorders. Although neurotransmitter concentration and receptor function can be measured regionnally post-mortem, studies performed during life may provide insight into changes at early stages of the disease as well as follow-up data on, and pharmacological modification of, such changes. Positron Tomography (PET) allows to monitor non-invasively the time-course of regional tissue tracer concentration following administration of a radioactive drug. If the latter is known to interact selectively with specific binding sites, it can be used to probe in vivo the regional distribution and affinity of the receptors involved. As shown in this progress report, several receptor systems can now be studied reliably in humans, using PET

  15. The in vivo measurement of radiocaesium activity in lambs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock, J.C.; Andrews, D.; Dunderdale, J.; Shaw, P.; Lally, A.

    1988-01-01

    Contamination of certain areas of the UK with radiocaesium from the Chernobyl accident led to restrictions being placed on the movement of lambs in these areas. To determine whether part of an area met the criteria for derestriction required the laboratory monitoring of meat from lambs sacrificed for the purpose. This was a slow process because there was no means of knowing which parts of an area had the lowest activity levels in lambs, that is where the chances of removing restrictions were the greatest. A rapid, simple and cheap method for the in vivo monitoring of caesium activity in lambs was developed. Correlation between the results from this method and in-laboratory measurements was reasonable. The method was used successfully to monitor lambs in Cumbria and north Wales during July and August 1986. (author)

  16. In vitro and in vivo studies on biodegradable magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lida Hou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure, mechanical property, electrochemical behavior and biocompatibility of magnesium alloy (BioDe MSM™ were studied in the present work. The experimental results demonstrated that grain refining induced by extrusion improves the alloy strength significantly from 162 MPa for the as-cast alloy to 241 MPa for the as-extruded one. The anticorrosion properties of the as-extruded alloy also increased. Furthermore, the hemolysis ratio was decreased from 4.7% for the as-cast alloy to 2.9% for the as-extruded one, both below 5%. BioDe MSM™ alloy shows good biocompatibility after being implanted into the dorsal muscle and the femoral shaft of the New Zealand rabbit, respectively, and there are no abnormalities after short-term implantation. In vivo observation indicated that the corrosion rate of this alloy varies with different implantation positions, with higher degradation rate in the femur than in the muscle.

  17. Non-Invasive In Vivo Ultrasound Temperature Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Mahdi

    New emerging technologies in thermal therapy require precise monitoring and control of the delivered thermal dose in a variety of situations. The therapeutic temperature changes in target tissues range from few degrees for releasing chemotherapy drugs encapsulated in the thermosensitive liposomes to boiling temperatures in complete ablation of tumors via cell necrosis. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has emerged as a promising modality for noninvasive surgery due to its ability to create precise mechanical and thermal effects at the target without affecting surrounding tissues. An essential element in all these procedures, however, is accurate estimation of the target tissue temperature during the procedure to ensure its safety and efficacy. The advent of diagnostic imaging tools for guidance of thermal therapy was a key factor in the clinical acceptance of these minimally invasive or noninvasive methods. More recently, ultrasound and magnetic resonance (MR) thermography techniques have been proposed for guidance, monitoring, and control of noninvasive thermal therapies. MR thermography has shown acceptable sensitivity and accuracy in imaging temperature change and it is currently FDA-approved on clinical HIFU units. However, it suffers from limitations like cost of integration with ultrasound therapy system and slow rate of imaging for real time guidance. Ultrasound, on the other hand, has the advantage of real time imaging and ease of integration with the therapy system. An infinitesimal model for imaging temperature change using pulse-echo ultrasound has been demonstrated, including in vivo small-animal imaging. However, this model suffers from limitations that prevent demonstration in more clinically-relevant settings. One limitation stems from the infinitesimal nature of the model, which results in spatial inconsistencies of the estimated temperature field. Another limitation is the sensitivity to tissue motion and deformation during in vivo, which

  18. In vivo MRS metabolite quantification using genetic optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papakostas, G A; Mertzios, B G; Karras, D A; Van Ormondt, D; Graveron-Demilly, D

    2011-01-01

    The in vivo quantification of metabolites' concentrations, revealed in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) spectra, constitutes the main subject under investigation in this work. Significant contributions based on artificial intelligence tools, such as neural networks (NNs), with good results have been presented lately but have shown several drawbacks, regarding their quantification accuracy under difficult conditions. A general framework that encounters the quantification procedure as an optimization problem, which is solved using a genetic algorithm (GA), is proposed in this paper. Two different lineshape models are examined, while two GA configurations are applied on artificial data. Moreover, the introduced quantification technique deals with metabolite peaks' overlapping, a considerably difficult situation occurring under real conditions. Appropriate experiments have proved the efficiency of the introduced methodology, in artificial MRS data, by establishing it as a generic metabolite quantification procedure

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo SERS Biosensing for Disease Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Joshua Moore

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available For many disease states, positive outcomes are directly linked to early diagnosis, where therapeutic intervention would be most effective. Recently, trends in disease diagnosis have focused on the development of label-free sensing techniques that are sensitive to low analyte concentrations found in the physiological environment. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS is a powerful vibrational spectroscopy that allows for label-free, highly sensitive, and selective detection of analytes through the amplification of localized electric fields on the surface of a plasmonic material when excited with monochromatic light. This results in enhancement of the Raman scattering signal, which allows for the detection of low concentration analytes, giving rise to the use of SERS as a diagnostic tool for disease. Here, we present a review of recent developments in the field of in vivo and in vitro SERS biosensing for a range of disease states including neurological disease, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and viral disease.

  20. In vivo phosphorylation of a peptide tag for protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goux, Marine; Fateh, Amina; Defontaine, Alain; Cinier, Mathieu; Tellier, Charles

    2016-05-01

    To design a new system for the in vivo phosphorylation of proteins in Escherichia coli using the co-expression of the α-subunit of casein kinase II (CKIIα) and a target protein, (Nanofitin) fused with a phosphorylatable tag. The level of the co-expressed CKIIα was controlled by the arabinose promoter and optimal phosphorylation was obtained with 2 % (w/v) arabinose as inductor. The effectiveness of the phosphorylation system was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (NUT-PAGE) and staining with a specific phosphoprotein-staining gel. The resulting phosphorylated tag was also used to purify the phosphoprotein by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, which relies on the specific interaction of phosphate moieties with Fe(III). The use of a single tag for both the purification and protein array anchoring provides a simple and straightforward system for protein analysis.

  1. Astatine-211 labelled proteins and their stability in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Changhou; Jin Jannan; Zhang Shuyuan; Wang Ketai; Zhang Dayuan; Zhou Maolun

    1989-01-01

    211 At or 131 I labelled proteins, e.g. 211 At-IgG or 211 At-BSA (bovine serum albumin) were prepared by 211 At reaction with the diazo-compound of para-aminobenzoic acid, which is then conjugated with IgG or BSA via an acylation reaction. The 211 At-carbon bond was found metabolically stable under in vivo conditions. For the labelling of proteins with 211 At or 131 I, other methods of direct oxidation are also described. The results show that for the labelling of proteins with 211 At, high rate of incorporation can be obtained with hydrogen peroxide as oxidant, but the labelling of proteins with 131 I is more favourable with the strong oxidant Chloramine-T. (author) 12 refs.; 6 figs

  2. Non-Invasive in vivo Imaging in Small Animal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Koo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real time in vivo molecular imaging in small animal models has become the essential bridge between in vitro data and their translation into clinical applications. The tremendous development and technological progress, such as tumour modelling, monitoring of tumour growth and detection of metastasis, has facilitated translational drug development. This has added to our knowledge on carcinogenesis. The modalities that are commonly used include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Computed Tomography (CT, Positron Emission Tomography (PET, bioluminescence imaging, fluorescence imaging and multi-modality imaging systems. The ability to obtain multiple images longitudinally provides reliable information whilst reducing animal numbers. As yet there is no one modality that is ideal for all experimental studies. This review outlines the instrumentation available together with corresponding applications reported in the literature with particular emphasis on cancer research. Advantages and limitations to current imaging technology are discussed and the issues concerning small animal care during imaging are highlighted.

  3. In vivo dissolution measurement with indium-111 summation peak ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay, M.; Woodward, M.A.; Brouwer, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dissolution of [ 111 In]labeled tablets was measured in vivo in a totally noninvasive manner by using a modification of the perturbed angular correlation technique known as the summation peak ratio method. This method, which requires the incorporation of only 10-12 microCi into the dosage form, provided reliable dissolution data after oral administration of [ 111 In]lactose tablets. These results were supported by in vitro experiments which demonstrated that the dissolution rate as measured by the summation peak ratio method was in close agreement with the dissolution rate of salicylic acid in a [ 111 In]salicylic acid tablet. The method has the advantages of using only one detector, thereby avoiding the need for complex coincidence counting systems, requiring less radioactivity, and being potentially applicable to a gamma camera imaging system

  4. Rapid in vivo vertical tissue sectioning by multiphoton tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten

    2018-02-01

    A conventional tool in the pathological field is histology which involves the analysis of thin sections of tissue in which specific cellular structures are stained with different dyes. The process to obtain these stained tissue sections is time consuming and invasive as it requires tissue removal, fixation, sectioning, and staining. Moreover, imaging of live tissue is not possible. We demonstrate that multiphoton tomography can provide within seconds, non-invasive, label-free, vertical images of live tissue which are in quality similar to conventional light micrographs of histologic stained specimen. In contrast to conventional setups based on laser scanning which image horizontally sections, the vertical in vivo images are directly recorded by combined line scanning and timed adjustments of the height of the focusing optics. In addition, multiphoton tomography provides autofluorescence lifetimes which can be used to determine the metabolic states of cells.

  5. Mobile In Vivo Infrared Data Collection and Diagnoses Comparison System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Frederick W. (Inventor); Moynihan, Philip I. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Described is a mobile in vivo infrared brain scan and analysis system. The system includes a data collection subsystem and a data analysis subsystem. The data collection subsystem is a helmet with a plurality of infrared (IR) thermometer probes. Each of the IR thermometer probes includes an IR photodetector capable of detecting IR radiation generated by evoked potentials within a user's skull. The helmet is formed to collect brain data that is reflective of firing neurons in a mobile subject and transmit the brain data to the data analysis subsystem. The data analysis subsystem is configured to generate and display a three-dimensional image that depicts a location of the firing neurons. The data analysis subsystem is also configured to compare the brain data against a library of brain data to detect an anomaly in the brain data, and notify a user of any detected anomaly in the brain data.

  6. In vivo expression of antimicrobial peptides in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Slotved, Hans-Christian; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present findings on expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in atopic dermatitis (AD) skin, focusing only on in vivo studies, and to discuss differences in results obtained using various skin sampling techniques and different methodology for analysis of AMPs....... The review also includes a discussion of the effect of frequently used treatments on AMP expression. Many studies have shown a reduced level of AMPs in lesional AD skin when compared to psoriatic skin, explaining the high frequency of AD-related infections. Interestingly, however, non-lesional AD skin has...... shown the same upregulation of AMPs after barrier disruption as non-lesional psoriatic skin. Various methods have been used to analyse AMP expression in the skin, and when comparing these methods, differences are revealed in AMP expression depending on the method used for sampling and analysis...

  7. Simultaneous molecular and anatomical imaging of the mouse in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertzen, Andrew L; Meadors, A Ken; Silverman, Robert W; Cherry, Simon R

    2002-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging technologies are opening up new windows into mouse biology. We have developed a mouse imaging system that integrates positron emission tomography (PET) with x-ray computed tomography (CT), allowing simultaneous anatomic and molecular imaging in vivo with the potential for precise registration of the two image volumes. The x-ray system consists of a compact mini-focal x-ray tube and an amorphous selenium flat panel x-ray detector with a low-noise CMOS readout. The PET system uses planar arrays of lutetium oxyorthosilicate scintillator coupled to position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. We describe the design of this dual-modality imaging system and show, for the first time, simultaneously acquired PET and CT images in a phantom and in mice

  8. Simultaneous molecular and anatomical imaging of the mouse in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertzen, Andrew L [Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Meadors, A Ken [Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Silverman, Robert W [Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cherry, Simon R [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2002-12-21

    Non-invasive imaging technologies are opening up new windows into mouse biology. We have developed a mouse imaging system that integrates positron emission tomography (PET) with x-ray computed tomography (CT), allowing simultaneous anatomic and molecular imaging in vivo with the potential for precise registration of the two image volumes. The x-ray system consists of a compact mini-focal x-ray tube and an amorphous selenium flat panel x-ray detector with a low-noise CMOS readout. The PET system uses planar arrays of lutetium oxyorthosilicate scintillator coupled to position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. We describe the design of this dual-modality imaging system and show, for the first time, simultaneously acquired PET and CT images in a phantom and in mice.

  9. Deconvolution of In Vivo Ultrasound B-Mode Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Stage, Bjarne; Mathorne, Jan

    1993-01-01

    An algorithm for deconvolution of medical ultrasound images is presented. The procedure involves estimation of the basic one-dimensional ultrasound pulse, determining the ratio of the covariance of the noise to the covariance of the reflection signal, and finally deconvolution of the rf signal from...... the transducer. Using pulse and covariance estimators makes the approach self-calibrating, as all parameters for the procedure are estimated from the patient under investigation. An example of use on a clinical, in-vivo image is given. A 2 × 2 cm region of the portal vein in a liver is deconvolved. An increase...... in axial resolution by a factor of 2.4 is obtained. The procedure can also be applied to whole images, when it is ensured that the rf signal is properly measured. A method for doing that is outlined....

  10. GABAergic Mechanisms in Schizophrenia: Linking Postmortem and In Vivo Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Jeroen C.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Marsman, Anouk

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder characterized by hallucinations, delusions, disorganized thinking, and impairments in cognitive functioning. Evidence from postmortem studies suggests that alterations in cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic) neurons contribute to the clinical features of schizophrenia. In vivo measurement of brain GABA levels using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers the possibility to provide more insight into the relationship between problems in GABAergic neurotransmission and clinical symptoms of schizophrenia patients. This study reviews and links alterations in the GABA system in postmortem studies, animal models, and human studies in schizophrenia. Converging evidence implicates alterations in both presynaptic and postsynaptic components of GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia, and GABA may thus play an important role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. MRS studies can provide direct insight into the GABAergic mechanisms underlying the development of schizophrenia as well as changes during its course. PMID:28848455

  11. GABAergic Mechanisms in Schizophrenia: Linking Postmortem and In Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen C. de Jonge

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder characterized by hallucinations, delusions, disorganized thinking, and impairments in cognitive functioning. Evidence from postmortem studies suggests that alterations in cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons contribute to the clinical features of schizophrenia. In vivo measurement of brain GABA levels using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS offers the possibility to provide more insight into the relationship between problems in GABAergic neurotransmission and clinical symptoms of schizophrenia patients. This study reviews and links alterations in the GABA system in postmortem studies, animal models, and human studies in schizophrenia. Converging evidence implicates alterations in both presynaptic and postsynaptic components of GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia, and GABA may thus play an important role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. MRS studies can provide direct insight into the GABAergic mechanisms underlying the development of schizophrenia as well as changes during its course.

  12. Real-time dynamic imaging of virus distribution in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean E Hofherr

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of viruses and gene therapy vectors is difficult to assess in a living organism. For instance, trafficking in murine models can usually only be assessed after sacrificing the animal for tissue sectioning or extraction. These assays are laborious requiring whole animal sectioning to ascertain tissue localization. They also obviate the ability to perform longitudinal or kinetic studies in one animal. To track viruses after systemic infection, we have labeled adenoviruses with a near-infrared (NIR fluorophore and imaged these after intravenous injection in mice. Imaging was able to track and quantitate virus particles entering the jugular vein simultaneous with injection, appearing in the heart within 500 milliseconds, distributing in the bloodstream and throughout the animal within 7 seconds, and that the bulk of virus distribution was essentially complete within 3 minutes. These data provide the first in vivo real-time tracking of the rapid initial events of systemic virus infection.

  13. Disappearance of nucleosome positioning in mitotic chromatin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Jun-ichiro; Ono, Tetsuya

    2005-04-15

    During mitosis, transcription is silenced and most transcription factors are displaced from their recognition sequences. By in vivo footprinting analysis, we have confirmed and extended previous studies showing loss of transcription factors from an RNA polymerase II promoter (c-FOS) and, for the first time, an RNA polymerase III promoter (U6) in HeLa cells. Because little was known about nucleosomal organization in mitotic chromosomes, we performed footprinting analysis for nucleosomes on these promoters in interphase and mitotic cells. During interphase, each of the promoters had a positioned nucleosome in the region intervening between proximal promoter elements and distal enhancer elements, but the strong nucleosome positioning disappeared during mitosis. Thus, the nucleosomal organization that appears to facilitate transcription in interphase cells may be lost in mitotic cells, and nucleosome positioning during mitosis does not seem to be a major component of the epigenetic mechanisms to mark genes for rapid reactivation after this phase.

  14. In vivo charge injection limits increased after 'unsafe' stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijs, Suzan; Sørensen, Søren; Rechendorff, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    was not observed with any of the stimulation protocols and no tissue damage was observed for the 20 mA – 200 Hz stimulation group. This indicates that the ‘safe potential window’ may not be applicable in vivo, as no damage was done stimulating with 20 mA at 200 Hz, while damage was done using the same current......The effect of unsafe stimulation on charge injection limits (Qinj) and pulsing capacitance (Cpulse) was investigated. Four stimulation protocols were applied: 20 mA – 200 and 400 Hz, 50 mA – 200 and 400 Hz. Increasing Qinj and Cpulse were observed for all stimulation protocols. Corrosion...

  15. Calcium dynamics of cortical astrocytic networks in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Hirase

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Large and long-lasting cytosolic calcium surges in astrocytes have been described in cultured cells and acute slice preparations. The mechanisms that give rise to these calcium events have been extensively studied in vitro. However, their existence and functions in the intact brain are unknown. We have topically applied Fluo-4 AM on the cerebral cortex of anesthetized rats, and imaged cytosolic calcium fluctuation in astrocyte populations of superficial cortical layers in vivo, using two-photon laser scanning microscopy. Spontaneous [Ca(2+](i events in individual astrocytes were similar to those observed in vitro. Coordination of [Ca(2+](i events among astrocytes was indicated by the broad cross-correlograms. Increased neuronal discharge was associated with increased astrocytic [Ca(2+](i activity in individual cells and a robust coordination of [Ca(2+](i signals in neighboring astrocytes. These findings indicate potential neuron-glia communication in the intact brain.

  16. In vivo multiphoton imaging of bile duct ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Feng-Chieh; Chen, Hsiao-Chin; Chang, Po-shou; Yang, Shu-Mei; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Bile is the exocrine secretion of liver and synthesized by hepatocytes. It is drained into duodenum for the function of digestion or drained into gallbladder for of storage. Bile duct obstruction is a blockage in the tubes that carry bile to the gallbladder and small intestine. However, Bile duct ligation results in the changes of bile acids in serum, liver, urine, and feces1, 2. In this work, we demonstrate a novel technique to image this pathological condition by using a newly developed in vivo imaging system, which includes multiphoton microscopy and intravital hepatic imaging chamber. The images we acquired demonstrate the uptake, processing of 6-CFDA in hepatocytes and excretion of CF in the bile canaliculi. In addition to imaging, we can also measure kinetics of the green fluorescence intensity.

  17. A Microfluidic Ion Pump for In Vivo Drug Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Uguz, Ilke

    2017-05-15

    Implantable devices offer an alternative to systemic delivery of drugs for the treatment of neurological disorders. A microfluidic ion pump (µFIP), capable of delivering a drug without the solvent through electrophoresis, is developed. The device is characterized in vitro by delivering γ-amino butyric acid to a target solution, and demonstrates low-voltage operation, high drug-delivery capacity, and high ON/OFF ratio. It is also demonstrated that the device is suitable for cortical delivery in vivo by manipulating the local ion concentration in an animal model and altering neural behavior. These results show that µFIPs represent a significant step forward toward the development of implantable drug-delivery systems.

  18. Clinical applications of in vivo neutron-activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress

  19. Validation of optical coherence tomography in vivo using cryostat histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambichler, T; Moussa, G; Regeniter, P; Kasseck, C; Hofmann, M R; Bechara, F G; Sand, M; Altmeyer, P; Hoffmann, K

    2007-01-01

    We aimed to validate for the first time optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements of epidermal thickness (ET) using cryopreparation for histology. OCT assessments of ET were performed on healthy skin using the algorithms as follows: first, peak-to-valley analysis of the A-scan (ET-OCT-V), second, line-traced image analysis of the B-scan (ET-OCT-IA). Histology was performed using cryostat sections which were also evaluated using the image analysis (ET-Histo). We selected 114 samples, including B-scans and corresponding histology, for method comparison between ET-OCT-IA and ET-Histo. Forty-two A-scans were available for method comparison between ET-OCT-V and ET-Histo. Bland and Altman plots revealed a marked bias with wide 95% limits of agreement for ET-OCT-V versus ET-Histo. Comparison of ET-OCT-IA versus ET-Histo revealed only a slight bias and narrow 95% limits of agreement. A-scan analysis for ET determination is linked to significant limitations and lacks agreement with histology. By contrast, we observed satisfactory agreement between ET-OCT-IA and ET-Histo indicating that both methods can be utilized interchangeably. OCT using the line-traced image analysis of the B-scan appears to be a valid and relatively practicable method for the determination of ET in vivo. Furthermore, the comparisons with the in vivo OCT profiles demonstrate that cryostat sectioning provides a better preservation of relative and absolute dimensions of skin layers than paraffin embedding. (note)

  20. Isofagomine in vivo effects in a neuronopathic Gaucher disease mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Sun

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological chaperone, isofagomine (IFG, enhances acid β-glucosidase (GCase function by altering folding, trafficking, and activity in wild-type and Gaucher disease fibroblasts. The in vivo effects of IFG on GCase activity, its substrate levels, and phenotype were evaluated using a neuronopathic Gaucher disease mouse model, 4L;C* (V394L/V394L + saposin C-/- that has CNS accumulation of glucosylceramide (GC and glucosylsphingosine (GS as well as progressive neurological deterioration. IFG administration to 4L;C* mice at 20 or 600 mg/kg/day resulted in life span extensions of 10 or 20 days, respectively, and increases in GCase activity and protein levels in the brain and visceral tissues. Cerebral cortical GC and GS levels showed no significant reductions with IFG treatment. Increases of GC or GS levels were detected in the visceral tissues of IFG treated (600 mg/kg/day mice. The attenuations of brain proinflammatory responses in the treated mice were evidenced by reductions in astrogliosis and microglial cell activation, and decreased p38 phosphorylation and TNFα levels. Terminally, axonal degeneration was present in the brain and spinal cord from untreated and treated 4L;C* mice. These data demonstrate that IFG exerts in vivo effects by enhancing V394L GCase protein and activity levels, and in mediating suppression of proinflammation, which led to delayed onset of neurological disease and extension of the life span of 4L;C* mice. However, this was not correlated with a reduction in the accumulation of lipid substrates.

  1. Discrete tomography in an in vivo small animal bone study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Casteele, Elke; Perilli, Egon; Van Aarle, Wim; Reynolds, Karen J; Sijbers, Jan

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the feasibility of a discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART) to be used in in vivo small animal bone studies. The advantage of discrete tomography is the possibility to reduce the amount of X-ray projection images, which makes scans faster and implies also a significant reduction of radiation dose, without compromising the reconstruction results. Bone studies are ideal for being performed with discrete tomography, due to the relatively small number of attenuation coefficients contained in the image [namely three: background (air), soft tissue and bone]. In this paper, a validation is made by comparing trabecular bone morphometric parameters calculated from images obtained by using DART and the commonly used standard filtered back-projection (FBP). Female rats were divided into an ovariectomized (OVX) and a sham-operated group. In vivo micro-CT scanning of the tibia was done at baseline and at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. The cross-section images were reconstructed using first the full set of projection images and afterwards reducing them in number to a quarter and one-sixth (248, 62, 42 projection images, respectively). For both reconstruction methods, similar changes in morphometric parameters were observed over time: bone loss for OVX and bone growth for sham-operated rats, although for DART the actual values were systematically higher (bone volume fraction) or lower (structure model index) compared to FBP, depending on the morphometric parameter. The DART algorithm was, however, more robust when using fewer projection images, where the standard FBP reconstruction was more prone to noise, showing a significantly bigger deviation from the morphometric parameters obtained using all projection images. This study supports the use of DART as a potential alternative method to FBP in X-ray micro-CT animal studies, in particular, when the number of projections has to be drastically minimized, which directly reduces

  2. Characterization of allergoids from ovalbumin in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, J; Casadevall, G; Puigneró, V; Queralt, J

    1996-01-01

    Several in vivo and in vitro methods for monitoring immunological properties of two allergoids obtained by formaldehyde treatment of ovalbumin (OA) were developed. The calculated molecular weight of allergoids was 80 kD (OA-F1) and 165 kD (OA-F2), respectively. The allergenic activity in vitro of allergoids in mast-cell histamine release assay was 1000 times lower than of OA. Both allergoids showed reduced ability to induce passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in the Sprague-Dawley rats or systemic anaphylaxis in Dunkin-Harley guinea-pigs. The ability of OA and allergoids to bind to the OA-specific IgE antibodies was measured in vivo by the inhibition of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA-inhibition). Allergoid binding to IgE was 51-66% lower than the native allergen. Moreover, the avidity of OA-specific IgG antibodies, measured by ELISA-inhibition, for allergoids and allergen was of the same order. Allergoids induced a different pattern of humoral immune response from that, induced by the native allergen. Thus, after immunization of BALB/c mouse, both allergoids induced a higher production of IgG and a lower production of IgE than OA, only OA-F2 induced a lower production of IgG1. The differences in the IgA response to the immunogens was not significant. Delayed hypersensitivity studies in the BALB/c mouse showed that allergoids were 5- to 12-times less effective in inducing a cell-mediated immune response than OA. The present study provides a battery of immunological methods for preclinical testing of modified allergens.

  3. Multi-spectral confocal microendoscope for in-vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Andrew Robert

    The concept of in-vivo multi-spectral confocal microscopy is introduced. A slit-scanning multi-spectral confocal microendoscope (MCME) was built to demonstrate the technique. The MCME employs a flexible fiber-optic catheter coupled to a custom built slit-scan confocal microscope fitted with a custom built imaging spectrometer. The catheter consists of a fiber-optic imaging bundle linked to a miniature objective and focus assembly. The design and performance of the miniature objective and focus assembly are discussed. The 3mm diameter catheter may be used on its own or routed though the instrument channel of a commercial endoscope. The confocal nature of the system provides optical sectioning with 3mum lateral resolution and 30mum axial resolution. The prism based multi-spectral detection assembly is typically configured to collect 30 spectral samples over the visible chromatic range. The spectral sampling rate varies from 4nm/pixel at 490nm to 8nm/pixel at 660nm and the minimum resolvable wavelength difference varies from 7nm to 18nm over the same spectral range. Each of these characteristics are primarily dictated by the dispersive power of the prism. The MCME is designed to examine cellular structures during optical biopsy and to exploit the diagnostic information contained within the spectral domain. The primary applications for the system include diagnosis of disease in the gastro-intestinal tract and female reproductive system. Recent data from the grayscale imaging mode are presented. Preliminary multi-spectral results from phantoms, cell cultures, and excised human tissue are presented to demonstrate the potential of in-vivo multi-spectral imaging.

  4. Curcumin Alleviates the Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders of Mice In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Xu, Wen-Hua; Sun, Wei; Sun, Yi; Guo, Zhi-Li; Yu, Xiao-Ling

    2017-12-01

    Curcumin is a natural polyphenol extracted from the turmeric rhizome, which has a wide range of biological activities, but until now the effects of curcumin on the gastrointestinal peristalsis have not been fully understood. In vivo study, we observed the effects of curcumin on gastric emptying and intestinal propulsion rates of mice in normal state and in delayed state by atropine (ATR) or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (L-Arg). An in vitro study explored the direct effects of curcumin on the intestinal contractility, but were studied through measuring spontaneous contraction of isolated jejunum of mice. Our results showed that intragastric administration of curcumin (200 mg/kg/day) for 10-20 days significantly improved gastric emptying and intestinal propulsion rates of mice delayed by ATR. Moreover, intragastric administration of curcumin (200 mg/kg/day) for 15 days also significantly improved mice gastric emptying and intestinal propulsion rates delayed by L-Arg. There was no significant effect on normal gastrointestinal propulsion of mice after intragastric administration of curcumin (200 mg/kg/day) for 1-20 days. When normal isolated jejunum of mice were incubated with curcumin in vitro, the amplitude of the spontaneous contractile waves of jejunum was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, curcumin reduced the amplitude of the contractile waves of jejunum in both contracted and relaxed state induced by acetylcholine or ATR individually. Taken together, our results suggest that curcumin has quite different effects on gastrointestinal peristalsis in vivo and in vitro. Moderate dose of curcumin by intragastric administration for more than 10 days can alleviate the functional gastrointestinal disorders of mice, but cannot affect normal gastrointestinal propulsion.

  5. Construction of radiation - induced metastasis model in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kuk; Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jae Sung; Hwang, Sang Gu; Kang, Joo Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    In treatment of cancer, distant metastases are important limiting factor because an estimated 50% of all cancer patients will develop metastases, and the metastases are major causing of cancer treatment failure. Recently a few reports indicated {gamma}-radiation induced an increase of invasiveness of several cancer cells. In this study, we had tried to show the possibility that radiation could also induce metastasis in vivo system. To prove our hypothesis, we constructed primary tumor by using C6-TL transfectant cell line expressing HSV1-tk and firefly luciferase (fLuc), and then {gamma}-radiation was treated to xenografts locally. Treatment of {gamma}-radiation to primary C6-TL xenografts of mice reduced size of xenografts and elongated survival of mice than those of mock control mice. But we also show that {gamma}-radiation treatment was followed by the growth of dormant metastases in various organs including lung and intestine after 2-4 weeks of {gamma}-radiation treatment. When bioluminescence imaging indicated growth of tumor in organs in mice, we sacrificed the mice and repeat acquired bioluminescence imaging after repeatedly. These images presented tumor growth locations exactly in organs. Because metastatic tumor candidates have morphology of foci, biopsies were performed for histological analysis or PCR analysis to confirm metastases. In most foci, histological analysis indicated several features of typical cancer tissue and PCR analysis showed present of fLuc gene in metastases. Detection of fLuc gene in metastases indicated these foci were originated from primary C6-TL xenografts, and the results suggest that {gamma}-radiation could promote metastasis in vivo as well as in vitro system. Although we need to understand changes of intracellular signaling or physiological phenomena of the radiation-induced metastasis yet, these results also imply that {gamma}-radiation treatment only to cancer patients need to pay attention carefully, and development of new

  6. Evaluation of a novel 4D in vivo dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherpak, A.; Ding, W.; Hallil, A.; Cygler, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    A prototype of a new 4D in vivo dosimetry system capable of simultaneous real-time position monitoring and dose measurement has been developed. The radiation positioning system (RADPOS) is controlled by a computer and combines two technologies: MOSFET radiation detector coupled with an electromagnetic positioning device. Special software has been developed that allows sampling position and dose either manually or automatically in user-defined time intervals. Preliminary tests of the new device include a dosimetric evaluation of the detector in 60 Co, 6 MV, and 18 MV beams and measurements of spatial position stability and accuracy. In addition, the effect of metals and other materials on the performance of the positioning system has been investigated. Results show that the RADPOS system can measure in-air dose profiles that agree, on average, within 3%-5% of diode measurements for the energies tested. The response of the detector is isotropic within 1.6% (1 SD) with a maximum deviation of ±4.0% over 360 deg. The maximum variation in the calibration coefficient over field sizes from 6x6 to 25x25 cm 2 was 2.3% for RADPOS probe with the high sensitivity MOSFET and 4.6% for the probe with the standard sensitivity MOSFET. Of the materials tested, only aluminum, lead, and brass caused shifts in the RADPOS read position. The magnitude of the shift varied between materials and size of the material sample. Nonmagnetic stainless steel (Grade 304) caused a distortion of less than 2 mm when placed within 10 mm of the detector; therefore, it can provide a reasonable alternative to other metals if required. The results of the preliminary tests indicate that the device can be used for in vivo dosimetry in 60 Co and high-energy beams from linear accelerators.

  7. The link between tissue elasticity and thermal dose in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapin-de Brosses, Emilie; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate in vivo the relationship between stiffness and thermal dose. For this purpose, shear wave elastography (SWE)—a novel ultrasound-based technique for real-time mapping of the stiffness of biological soft tissues—is performed in temperature-controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on nine anesthetized rats. Their right leg was put in a thermo-regulated waterbath. The right leg of each animal was heated at one particular temperature between 38 °C and 48.5 °C for 15 min to 3 h. Shear waves were generated in the muscle using the acoustic radiation force induced by a linear ultrasonic probe. The shear wave propagation was imaged in real time by the probe using an ultrafast scanner prototype (10 000 frames s −1 ). The local tissue stiffness was derived from the shear wave speed. Two optical fiber sensors were inserted into the muscle to measure in situ the temperature. Stiffness was found to increase strongly during the experiments. When expressed as a function of the thermal dose, the stiffness curves were found to be the same for all experiments. A thermal dose threshold was found at 202 min for an eightfold stiffness increase. Finally, the time–temperature relationship was established for different stiffness ratios. The slope of the time–temperature relationship based on stiffness measurements was found identical to the one obtained for cell death in the seminal paper on the thermal dose by Sapareto and Dewey in 1984 (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 10 787–800). The present results highlight the stiffness increase as a good indicator of thermal necrosis. SWE imaging can be used in vivo for necrosis threshold determination in thermal therapy.

  8. Duration of in vivo endotoxin tolerance in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Susan J; Jacobs, Carrie C; Cook, Vanessa L; Gandy, Jeffery C; Hauptman, Joseph G; Sordillo, Lorraine M

    2016-05-01

    Endotoxemia models are used to study mechanisms and treatments of early sepsis. Repeated endotoxin exposures induce periods of endotoxin tolerance, characterized by diminished proinflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and modulated production of proinflammatory cytokines. Repeated measure designs using equine endotoxemia models are rarely performed, despite the advantages associated with reduced variability, because the altered responsiveness would confound study results and because the duration of equine endotoxin tolerance is unknown. We determined the interval of endotoxin tolerance, in vivo, in horses based on physical, clinicopathologic, and proinflammatory gene expression responses to repeated endotoxin exposures. Six horses received 30 ng/kg LPS in saline infused over 30 min. Behavior pain scores, physical examination parameters, and blood for complete blood count and proinflammatory gene expression were obtained at predetermined intervals for 24h. Horses received a total of 3 endotoxin exposures. The first exposure was LPS 1, followed 7 days later by LPS 7 or 14-21 days later by LPS 14-21. Lipopolysaccharide exposures were allocated in a randomized, crossover design. Lipopolysaccharide produced clinical and clinicopathologic signs of endotoxemia and increased expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, PHorses exhibited evidence of endotoxin tolerance following LPS 7 but not following LPS 14-21. Horses had significantly lower pain scores, heart rates, respiratory rates and duration of fever, after LPS 7 compared to LPS 1 and LPS 14-21, Phorses after LPS 7, P=0.05. Clinical parameters and TNFα gene expression were similar or slightly increased in horses following LPS 14-21 compared to measurements made in horses following LPS 1, suggesting that endotoxin tolerance had subsided. A minimum of 3 weeks between experiments is warranted if repeated measures designs are used to assess in vivo response to endotoxin in

  9. Extending the spectrum of α-dicarbonyl compounds in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Christian; Liehr, Kristin; Girndt, Matthias; Ulrich, Christof; Glomb, Marcus A

    2014-10-10

    Maillard α-dicarbonyl compounds are known as central intermediates in advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation. Glucose is the primary source of energy for the human body, whereas l-threo-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is an essential nutrient, involved in a variety of enzymatic reactions. Thus, the Maillard degradation of glucose and ascorbic acid is of major importance in vivo. To understand the complex mechanistic pathways of AGE formation, it is crucial to extend the knowledge on plasma concentrations of reactive key α-dicarbonyl compounds (e.g. 1-deoxyglucosone). With the present work, we introduce a highly sensitive LC-MS/MS multimethod for human blood plasma based on derivatization with o-phenylenediamine under acidic conditions. The impact of workup and reaction conditions, particularly of pH, was thoroughly evaluated. A comprehensive validation provided the limit of detection, limit of quantitation, coefficients of variation, and recovery rates. The method includes the α-dicarbonyls 1-deoxyglucosone, 3-deoxyglucosone, glucosone, Lederer's glucosone, dehydroascorbic acid, 2,3-diketogulonic acid, 1-deoxypentosone, 3-deoxypentosone, 3,4-dideoxypentosone, pentosone, 1-deoxythreosone, 3-deoxythreosone, threosone, methylglyoxal, glyoxal; the α-keto-carboxylic acids pyruvic acid and glyoxylic acid; and the dicarboxylic acid oxalic acid. The method was then applied to the analyses of 15 healthy subjects and 24 uremic patients undergoing hemodialysis. The comparison of the results revealed a clear shift in the product spectrum. In most cases, the plasma levels of target analytes were significantly higher. Thus, this is the first time that a complete spectrum of α-dicarbonyl compounds relevant in vivo has been established. The results provide further insights into the chemistry of AGE formation and will be helpful to find specific markers to differentiate between the various precursors of glycation. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and

  10. In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy of the human cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, N J; Hendrikse, F; March, W F

    1999-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of a confocal Raman spectroscopic technique for the noninvasive assessment of corneal hydration in vivo in two legally blind subjects. A laser beam (632.8 nm; 15 mJ) was maintained on the cornea by using a microscope objective lens (x25 magnification, NA = 0.5, f = 10 mm) both for focusing the incident light as well as collecting the Raman backscattered light, in a 180 degrees backscatter configuration. An optical fiber, acting as the confocal pinhole for elimination of light from out-of-focus places, was coupled to a spectrometer that dispersed the collected light onto a sensitive array detector for rapid spectral data acquisition over a range from 2,890 to 3,590/cm(-1). Raman spectra were recorded from the anterior 100-150 microm of the cornea over a period before and after topical application of a mild dehydrating solution. The ratio between the amplitudes of the signals at 3,400/cm(-1) (OH-vibrational mode of water) and 2,940/cm(-1) (CH-vibrational mode of proteins) was used as a measure for corneal hydration. High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR = 25) Raman spectra were obtained from the human corneas by using 15 mJ of laser light energy. Qualitative changes in the hydration of the anteriormost part of the corneas could be observed as a result of the dehydrating agent. With adequate improvements in system safety, confocal Raman spectroscopy could potentially be applied clinically as a noninvasive tool for the assessment of corneal hydration in vivo.

  11. In vivo radioprotection by alpha-TMG: preliminary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyamitra, M; Devi, P U; Murase, H; Kagiya, V T

    2001-08-08

    alpha-TMG is a novel water-soluble derivative of Vitamin E that has shown excellent antioxidant activity. The parent compound has demonstrated protection against radiation induced chromosomal damage in vivo. Hence, the preliminary experiments to determine the radioprotective activity of alpha-TMG were carried out in adult Swiss albino mice. Acute toxicity of the drug was studied taking 24h, 72 h and 30 day mortality after a single intraperitoneal injection of 500-2000 mg/kg body weight of the drug. The drug LD(50) for 24h and 72 h/30 day survival were found to be 1120 and 1000 mg/kg body weight, respectively. The optimum time of drug administration and drug dose-dependent effect on in vivo radiation protection of bone marrow chromosomes was studied in mice. Injection of 600 mg/kg of the drug 15 min before or within 5, 15 or 30min after 3Gy whole body gamma radiation resulted in a significant decrease in the aberrant metaphases percent at 24h post-irradiation; the maximum effect was seen when the drug was given immediately after irradiation. Injection of 200-800 mg/kg TMG within 5 min of irradiation with 3 Gy produced a significant dose-dependent reduction in the radiation induced percent aberrant metaphases and in the frequency of micronucleated erythrocytes at 24h after exposure, with a corresponding decrease in the different types of aberrations. The optimum dose for protection without drug toxicity was 600 mg/kg body weight. At this dose, TMG produced 70 and >60% reduction in the radiation induced percent aberrant metaphases and micronucleated erythrocytes, respectively. The high water solubility and effectiveness when administered post-irradiation favor TMG as a likely candidate for protection in case of accidental exposures.

  12. Functional imaging: monitoring heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weisheng; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    The regulation of genetic elements can be monitored in living animals using photoproteins as reporters. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the key catabolic enzyme in the heme degradation pathway. Here, HO expression serves as a model for in vivo functional imaging of transcriptional regulation of a clinically relevant gene. HO enzymatic activity is inhibited by heme analogs, metalloporphyrins, but many members of this family of compounds also activate transcription of the HO-1 promoter. The degree of transcriptional activation by twelve metalloporphyrins, differing at the central metal and porphyrin ring substituents, was evaluated in both NIH 3T3 stable lines and transgenic animals containing HO-1 promoter-luciferase gene fusions. In the correlative cell culture assays, the metalloporphyrins increased transcription form the full length HO promoter fusion to varying degrees, but none increased transcription from a truncated HO-1 promoter. These results suggested that one or both of the two distal enhancer elements located at -4 and -10 Kb upstream from transcriptional start are required for HO-1 induction by heme and its analogs. The full-length HO-1-luc fusion was then evaluated as a transgene in mice. It was possible to monitor the effects of the metalloporphyrins, SnMP and ZnPP, in living animals over time. This spatiotemporal analyses of gene expression in vivo implied that alterations in porphyrin ring substituents and the central metal may affect the extent of gene activation. These data further indicate that using photoprotein reporters, subtle differences in gene expression can be monitored in living animals.

  13. In vivo measurement of vocal fold surface resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Masanobu; Kurita, Takashi; Dillon, Neal P; Kimball, Emily E; Garrett, C Gaelyn; Sivasankar, M Preeti; Webster, Robert J; Rousseau, Bernard

    2017-10-01

    A custom-designed probe was developed to measure vocal fold surface resistance in vivo. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate proof of concept of using vocal fold surface resistance as a proxy of functional tissue integrity after acute phonotrauma using an animal model. Prospective animal study. New Zealand White breeder rabbits received 120 minutes of airflow without vocal fold approximation (control) or 120 minutes of raised intensity phonation (experimental). The probe was inserted via laryngoscope and placed on the left vocal fold under endoscopic visualization. Vocal fold surface resistance of the middle one-third of the vocal fold was measured after 0 (baseline), 60, and 120 minutes of phonation. After the phonation procedure, the larynx was harvested and prepared for transmission electron microscopy. In the control group, vocal fold surface resistance values remained stable across time points. In the experimental group, surface resistance (X% ± Y% relative to baseline) was significantly decreased after 120 minutes of raised intensity phonation. This was associated with structural changes using transmission electron microscopy, which revealed damage to the vocal fold epithelium after phonotrauma, including disruption of the epithelium and basement membrane, dilated paracellular spaces, and alterations to epithelial microprojections. In contrast, control vocal fold specimens showed well-preserved stratified squamous epithelia. These data demonstrate the feasibility of measuring vocal fold surface resistance in vivo as a means of evaluating functional vocal fold epithelial barrier integrity. Device prototypes are in development for additional testing, validation, and for clinical applications in laryngology. NA Laryngoscope, 127:E364-E370, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. In vivo quantification of DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonsson, M.; Qvarnstroem, F.; Turesson, I.; Johansson, K.-A.; Nyman, J.; Hermansson, I.; Oden, A.; Book, M.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) can be introduced in the genome by exposure to exogenous agents such as ionising radiation and radio-mimetic chemicals. The biological importance of these breaks is significant even at low numbers. Inaccurate repair or lack of repair of a single DSB has the potential to kill a cell or lead to tumourigenesis. Thus the induction and repair of DSBs are crucial events in the onset of malignancies. Following the induction of DSBs, the core histone H2AX is rapidly phosphorylated at residue serine 139. This phosphorylated form of H2AX is referred to as gH2AX. Histones wrapped in megabase regions flanking these breaks are involved in this process, which results in the formation of discrete nuclear foci. It has previously been shown that a single DSB is sufficient to produce a detectable focus. So far there has been a lack of methods capable of measuring the amount of DSBs at clinically relevant quantities. Such a method would embrace a wide field of applications. It could be applied as a biological dosimeter when studying carcinogenic effects and provide the basis for an assay predicting individual radiosensitivity. We describe a measurement procedure that detects and quantifies small amounts of DSBs in vivo. This is accomplished using immunofluorescence detection of the molecular marker gH2AX. The gH2AX foci are quantified in histological sections using basic digital image analysis methods as the main component. In a primary assessment of the procedure we analysed the in vivo dose response of prostate cancer patients in clinical practice undergoing radiotherapy. Epidermal nucleated cells in skin biopsies taken 30 minutes following the first single dose delivered show linear dose response for low doses ranging from 0 - 1.2 Gy. The described procedure for double strand break quantification can detect dose changes as low as 0.18 Gy

  15. Sustainability of keratinocyte gene transfer and cell survival in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, K A; Khavari, P A

    1997-05-20

    The epidermis is an attractive site for therapeutic gene delivery because it is accessible and capable of delivering polypeptides to the systemic circulation. A number of difficulties, however, have emerged in attempts at cutaneous gene delivery, and central among these is an inability to sustain therapeutic gene production. We have examined two major potential contributing factors, viral vector stamina and involvement of long-lived epidermal progenitor cells. Human keratinocytes were either untreated or transduced with a retroviral vector for beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) at > 99% efficiency and then grafted onto immunodeficient mice to regenerate human epidermis. Human epidermis was monitored in vivo after grafting for clinical and histologic appearance as well as for gene expression. Although integrated vector sequences persisted unchanged in engineered epidermis at 10 weeks post-grafting, retroviral long terminal repeat (LTR)-driven beta-Gal expression ceased in vivo after approximately 4 weeks. Endogenous cellular promoters, however, maintained consistently normal gene expression levels without evidence of time-dependent decline, as determined by immunostaining with species-specific antibodies for human involucrin, filaggrin, keratinocyte transglutaminase, keratin 10, type VII collagen, and Laminin 5 proteins out to week 14 post-grafting. Transduced human keratinocytes generated multilayer epidermis sustained through multiple epidermal turnover cycles; this epidermis demonstrated retention of a spatially appropriate pattern of basal and suprabasal epidermal marker gene expression. These results confirm previous findings suggesting that viral promoter-driven gene expression is not durable and demonstrate that keratinocytes passaged in vitro can regenerate and sustain normal epidermis for prolonged periods.

  16. In vivo somatic mutation systems in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, L.B.

    1979-01-01

    In an effort to meet the need for a fast and cheap in vivo prescreen for inherited mammalian point mutations, a somatic forward-mutation method, originally developed in an x-ray experiment, has more recently been tested in work with chemical mutagens. The method makes use of coat-color mutations because the gene product is usually locally expressed, mosaics can be detected with minimal effort, and opportunities for making comparison with induction of germinal point mutations are greatest.--Following treatment of embryos that are heterozygous at specific coat-color loci, various induced genetic changes can result in expression of the recessive (RS) in clones derived from mutant melanocyte precursor cells. However, other events, such as decrease in the number of precursor cells, or disturbed differentiation, can also result in spots, which with careful classification can usually be distinguished from RS's on the basis of their location and color. When this is done, the relative RS frequencies for a series of compounds at least roughly parallel the relative spermatogonial mutation rates. The fact that easily measurable (though low) RS rates are obtained with compounds that have yielded negative results in spermatogonial tests is not surprising in view of the fact that RS's can be caused by several mechanisms besides point mutation.--In spite of the parallelism observed in one laboratory, the usefulness of the in vivo somatic mutation method as a prescreen could come to be doubted because of major discrepancies between results of similar experiments at different laboratories. However, It appears probable that at least some of these discrepancies are due to failure to discriminate between spots that probably resulted from melanocyte insufficiency and spots that resulted from expression of the recessive.--Reverse somatic mutation systems can potentially avoid some of the pitfalls of forward mutation systems. Such system are still in developmental stages

  17. Cardiac biplane strain imaging: initial in vivo experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopata, R G P; Nillesen, M M; Thijssen, J M; De Korte, C L [Clinical Physics Laboratory, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Verrijp, C N; Lammens, M M Y; Van der Laak, J A W M [Department of Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Singh, S K; Van Wetten, H B [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kapusta, L [Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: R.Lopata@cukz.umcn.nl

    2010-02-21

    In this study, first we propose a biplane strain imaging method using a commercial ultrasound system, yielding estimation of the strain in three orthogonal directions. Secondly, an animal model of a child's heart was introduced that is suitable to simulate congenital heart disease and was used to test the method in vivo. The proposed approach can serve as a framework to monitor the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. A 2D strain estimation technique using radio frequency (RF) ultrasound data was applied. Biplane image acquisition was performed at a relatively low frame rate (<100 Hz) using a commercial platform with an RF interface. For testing the method in vivo, biplane image sequences of the heart were recorded during the cardiac cycle in four dogs with an aortic stenosis. Initial results reveal the feasibility of measuring large radial, circumferential and longitudinal cumulative strain (up to 70%) at a frame rate of 100 Hz. Mean radial strain curves of a manually segmented region-of-interest in the infero-lateral wall show excellent correlation between the measured strain curves acquired in two perpendicular planes. Furthermore, the results show the feasibility and reproducibility of assessing radial, circumferential and longitudinal strains simultaneously. In this preliminary study, three beagles developed an elevated pressure gradient over the aortic valve ({delta}p: 100-200 mmHg) and myocardial hypertrophy. One dog did not develop any sign of hypertrophy ({delta}p = 20 mmHg). Initial strain (rate) results showed that the maximum strain (rate) decreased with increasing valvular stenosis (-50%), which is in accordance with previous studies. Histological findings corroborated these results and showed an increase in fibrotic tissue for the hearts with larger pressure gradients (100, 200 mmHg), as well as lower strain and strain rate values.

  18. Cardiac biplane strain imaging: initial in vivo experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopata, R G P; Nillesen, M M; Thijssen, J M; De Korte, C L; Verrijp, C N; Lammens, M M Y; Van der Laak, J A W M; Singh, S K; Van Wetten, H B; Kapusta, L

    2010-01-01

    In this study, first we propose a biplane strain imaging method using a commercial ultrasound system, yielding estimation of the strain in three orthogonal directions. Secondly, an animal model of a child's heart was introduced that is suitable to simulate congenital heart disease and was used to test the method in vivo. The proposed approach can serve as a framework to monitor the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. A 2D strain estimation technique using radio frequency (RF) ultrasound data was applied. Biplane image acquisition was performed at a relatively low frame rate (<100 Hz) using a commercial platform with an RF interface. For testing the method in vivo, biplane image sequences of the heart were recorded during the cardiac cycle in four dogs with an aortic stenosis. Initial results reveal the feasibility of measuring large radial, circumferential and longitudinal cumulative strain (up to 70%) at a frame rate of 100 Hz. Mean radial strain curves of a manually segmented region-of-interest in the infero-lateral wall show excellent correlation between the measured strain curves acquired in two perpendicular planes. Furthermore, the results show the feasibility and reproducibility of assessing radial, circumferential and longitudinal strains simultaneously. In this preliminary study, three beagles developed an elevated pressure gradient over the aortic valve (Δp: 100-200 mmHg) and myocardial hypertrophy. One dog did not develop any sign of hypertrophy (Δp = 20 mmHg). Initial strain (rate) results showed that the maximum strain (rate) decreased with increasing valvular stenosis (-50%), which is in accordance with previous studies. Histological findings corroborated these results and showed an increase in fibrotic tissue for the hearts with larger pressure gradients (100, 200 mmHg), as well as lower strain and strain rate values.

  19. Covariance J-resolved spectroscopy: Theory and application in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zohaib; Verma, Gaurav; Kumar, Anand; Thomas, M Albert

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a powerful tool capable of investigating the metabolic status of several tissues in vivo. In particular, single-voxel-based 1 H spectroscopy provides invaluable biochemical information from a volume of interest (VOI) and has therefore been used in a variety of studies. Unfortunately, typical one-dimensional MRS data suffer from severe signal overlap and thus important metabolites are difficult to distinguish. One method that is used to disentangle overlapping resonances is the two-dimensional J-resolved spectroscopy (JPRESS) experiment. Due to the long acquisition duration of the JPRESS experiment, a limited number of points are acquired in the indirect dimension, leading to poor spectral resolution along this dimension. Poor spectral resolution is problematic because proper peak assignment may be hindered, which is why the zero-filling method is often used to improve resolution as a post-processing step. However, zero-filling leads to spectral artifacts, which may affect visualization and quantitation of spectra. A novel method utilizing a covariance transformation, called covariance J-resolved spectroscopy (CovJ), was developed in order to improve spectral resolution along the indirect dimension (F 1 ). Comparison of simulated data demonstrates that peak structures remain qualitatively similar between JPRESS and the novel method along the diagonal region (F 1 = 0 Hz), whereas differences arise in the cross-peak (F 1 ≠0 Hz) regions. In addition, quantitative results of in vivo JPRESS data acquired on a 3T scanner show significant correlations (r 2 >0.86, pCOVariance Spectral Evaluation of 1 H Acquisitions using Representative prior knowledge' (Cov-SEHAR), was developed in order to quantify γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate from the CovJ spectra. These preliminary findings indicate that the CovJ method may be used to improve spectral resolution without hindering metabolite quantitation for J-resolved spectra

  20. Mechanism of action in VIVO of some pet radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachinidis, J.J.; Egan, G.F.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Scott, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Position Emission Tomography (PET) is a technique that utilises position-emitting radiopharmaceuticals to map the physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology of the human body. PET studies range from standard image displays that provide indices of physiological function to complex kinetic analysis methods for absolute quantification. This paper will review some of the important PET radiopharmaceuticals currently produced at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne and discuss their mechanism of action in vivo. Depending on their mechanism of action, PET radiopharmaceuticals may be divided into two categories. The first category is non-specific radiotracers which follow a biochemical pathway. The second category is specific radioligands which are involved in an interaction with a receptor transporter or a receptor site. Radiopharmaceuticals from the first category may be assessed using a single or two compartmental plasma-tissue model and allow a measurement of tissue extraction or metabolism.[ 15 O] water is a freely diffusable inert which is used for cerebral blood flow measurement; [ 18 F] FDG which follows the initial phases of glucose metabolism but does not enter the Krebs cycle after phosphorylation and therefore is effectively trapped in the cells, can be used for tissue glucose metabolism measurement in oncology, cardiology and neurology; and [ 18 F]fluoromisonidazole which is a bio-reductive drug that in vivo follows an intracellular reduction pathway, can be used for hypoxic tissue measurement in stroke and tumour evaluation. Radiopharmaceuticals from the second category may be assessed using a three-compartment model: - unmetabolised free ligand in plasma, - free ligand in tissue, - and specially bound ligand in tissue. These radiotracers such as [ 11 C] flumazenil, which is an antagonist with high affinity and selectivity for a central benzodiazepine receptors, are used to study the changes in density or affinity of these receptors

  1. The effect of PDT on H. influenzae biofilm in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; Chang, So-Young; Hwang, Dong-Jo; Kim, Young Hoon; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2010-02-01

    Biofilm formation has been demonstrated for many mucosal pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae. The presence of mucosal biofilms with chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) suggests that bacteria do not clear by antibiotics. Aim: To test the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on H. influenzae induced biofilm in vivo. Methods: Gerbils were divided into control (C), HI group, Laser (L), PS, PDT A, and PDT B groups. The C group received no treatment. HI group was injected with 20μl (108CFU/ml) of H. influenzae into the bullae and formation of biofilms in the bullae was obtained by 5 days. For L group, 120 J/cm2 (100 mw × 20 min) of 632 nm LD laser was irradiated by a fiber inserted into the bullae 5 days after the H. influenzaeinjection. For PS group, photofrin 40μl (1mg/ml) were injected into the bullae 5 days after the H. influenzae injection. PDT A group received photofrin 1 mg/ml and LD laser 120 J/cm2 that were administered into the bullae 5 days after the H. influenzae injection. PDT B group received photofrin 2 mg/ml and laser 150 J/cm2 5 days after the H. influenzae injection. The mucosal tissues in bullae were examined by H/E staining, and SEM. Results: The C group showed normal mucosa of bullae. The HI, L, and PS groups have shown well formed biofilm. Twenty five percent of the PDT A group and 50 % of the PDT B group have shown completely or partially resolved biofilm. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrated that PDT appears to be effective to treat experimental H. influenzae induced biofilms in vivo. Clinical implication: PDT may be an alternative to antibiotic treatment on otitis media with biofilm formation.

  2. In vivo facial soft tissue thicknesses of adult Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Carl N; Preisler, Rory

    2018-01-01

    Facial soft tissue thicknesses (FSTT) set important quantitative guides in craniofacial identification, but so far Australian FSTTs have only been published for supine cadavers. This study aimed to use B-mode ultrasound to measure FSTTs in living Australians (N=63 participants; n 1 =52 [x¯=21 years, s=2 years]; and n 2 =11 [x¯=54years, s=13years]) using 14 craniometric landmarks with participants in both upright and supine positions. The multiple pre-existing Australian cadaver investigations (n=7 reporting FSTT means and 6 of these reporting raw datasets) enabled living and cadaveric samples drawn from the same parent population to be compared. By using a non-invasive and safe imaging method (no ionising radiation) repeated measurements could be taken in the in vivo participants to gauge measurement reliability (and compare to pre-existing reliability for cadaver measurements): mean r-TEM=12%; max r-TEM=25%. In terms of changes between upright and supine positions (as measured by B-mode ultrasound) only 2 of 14 measured landmarks had FSTT changes in excess of 1mm. Comparisons of the in vivo ultrasound data to pre-existing needle puncture studies demonstrated that mean B-mode ultrasound measurements were very similar to cadaver values. Contrary to popular thought, but in keeping with the findings of prior meta-analyses, cadaver FSTT data are good proxies to living subjects, at least as measured by ultrasound. To increase sample sizes and triangulate upon ground truth FSTT values, weighted grand means combining all Australian samples were calculated (n range=280-385) and compared to the multi-group 2018 adult T-Tables (max. n=10,333). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. RECOVERY IN VIVO OF NONCULTURABLE SUBPOPULATION OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudin I.P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. As one of mesophilic, easily cultivated species of pathogenic bacteria, Salmonella enterica transformed into viable but nonculturable (VNC state in response to environmental stresses, including action of biocides. The cells in this state, preserve the integrity of membranes and metabolism of some, but not detected by conventional methods of cultivation. Some researchers suggest that the evolutionary significance of this phenomenon is part of an adaptive response aimed at long-term survival of bacteria in adverse conditions; others argue that it is the result of stochastic cellular damage, in which nonculturable cells are in a state of gradual death. In any case, the phenomenon of existence VNC pathogens if they retain the ability to restore its growth in vivo is a significant problem in medicine, pharmaceutical, veterinary, food industry. VNC subpopulation of S. enterica was obtained under action of ethanol. In this paper was investigated in vivo resuscitation VNC S. enterica using intraperitoneal injection of mice. Materials and methods. Obtaining of stressful S. enterica populations. Bacteria were grown to exponential phase in broth Luria–Bertani (LB. To 1.0 ml sample suspension diluted to 1.5 × 106 cells/ml was added 1.0 ml of ethanol at a concentration of 40 % (v/v. After exposure of 10 to 600 minutes in the suspension were added 8.0 ml of phosphate buffered saline (FBS, washed by centrifugation (4500 g for 5 minutes and serially diluted at a ratio of 1:10 (v/v samples were stained with LIVE/DEAD BacLight (produced by "Invitrogen", USA, filtrated on membrane filters for fluorescence microscopy and parallel plated on LB agar cup to determine colony-forming units (CFU per ml. In vivo resuscitation VNC S. enterica was made following way. Three groups of animals were inoculated by intraperitoneal injection: 1 103 culturable cells (0.1 ml suspension containing 104 CFU / ml; 2 103 VNC cells (0.1 ml suspension containing 104 cells

  4. In Vivo Self-Powered Wireless Cardiac Monitoring via Implantable Triboelectric Nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiang; Zhang, Hao; Shi, Bojing; Xue, Xiang; Liu, Zhuo; Jin, Yiming; Ma, Ye; Zou, Yang; Wang, Xinxin; An, Zhao; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Fan; Liu, Yang; Lang, Xilong; Xu, Zhiyun; Li, Zhou; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-07-26

    Harvesting biomechanical energy in vivo is an important route in obtaining sustainable electric energy for powering implantable medical devices. Here, we demonstrate an innovative implantable triboelectric nanogenerator (iTENG) for in vivo biomechanical energy harvesting. Driven by the heartbeat of adult swine, the output voltage and the corresponding current were improved by factors of 3.5 and 25, respectively, compared with the reported in vivo output performance of biomechanical energy conversion devices. In addition, the in vivo evaluation of the iTENG was demonstrated for over 72 h of implantation, during which the iTENG generated electricity continuously in the active animal. Due to its excellent in vivo performance, a self-powered wireless transmission system was fabricated for real-time wireless cardiac monitoring. Given its outstanding in vivo output and stability, iTENG can be applied not only to power implantable medical devices but also possibly to fabricate a self-powered, wireless healthcare monitoring system.

  5. N-[11C]methylpiperidine esters as acetylcholinesterase substrates: an in vivo structure-reactivity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbourn, Michael R.; Nguyen, Thinh B.; Snyder, Scott E.; Sherman, Phillip

    1998-01-01

    A series of simple esters incorporating the N-[ 11 C]methylpiperidine structure were examined as in vivo substrates for acetylcholinesterase in mouse brain. 4-N-[ 11 C]Methylpiperidinyl esters, including the acetate, propionate and isobutyrate esters, are good in vivo substrates for mammalian cholinesterases. Introduction of a methyl group at the 4-position of the 4-piperidinol esters, to form the ester of a teritary alcohol, effectively blocks enzymatic action. Methylation of 4- N-[ 11 C]methylpiperidinyl propionate at the 3-position gives a derivative with increased in vivo reactivity toward acetylcholinesterase. Esters of piperidinecarboxylic acids (nipecotic, isonipecotic and pipecolinic acid ethyl esters) are not hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase in vivo, nor do they act as in vivo inhibitors of the enzyme. This study has identified simple methods to both increase and decrease the in vivo reactivity of piperidinyl esters toward acetylcholinesterase

  6. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of novel radiotracers for the in vivo imaging of the norepinephrine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Alan A.; Patrick Johnson, David; Mozley, David; Hussey, Doug; Ginovart, Nathalie; Nobrega, Jose; Garcia, Armando; Meyer, Jeffery; Houle, Sylvain

    2003-01-01

    The (R,R) and (S,S) enantiomers of 2-[(2-methoxyphenoxy)phenylmethyl]morpholine (MeNER) have been radiolabelled with carbon-11 in good yield and at high specific activity. These radiotracers are close analogues of reboxetine, a potent and selective ligand for the norepinephrine transporter (NET). They were examined as potential ligands for imaging NET in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET). The in vivo brain distribution of both [ 11 C]-labeled enantiomers were evaluated in rats. Following tail-vein injection of the (R,R)-enantiomer regional brain uptake and washout of radioactivity was homogeneous at all time points examined (5-60 min). In contrast, administration of the (S,S)-enantiomer produced a heterogeneous distribution of radioactivity in brain with highest uptake in the hypothalamus, a NET rich region, and lowest uptake in the striatum, a brain region devoid of NET. Hypothalamus to striatum ratios of 2.5 to one were achieved at 60 min post injection of (S,S)-[ 11 C]-MeNER. Pre-injection of the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, reboxetine or desipramine, reduced hypothalamus to striatum ratios to near unity while reuptake inhibitors of dopamine and serotonin had no significant effect on binding. In vitro autoradiography studies (rat brain slices) with (S,S)-[ 11 C]-MeNER produced a regional distribution pattern that was consistent with the reported distribution of NET. (S,S)-[ 11 C]-MeNER has the potential to be the first successful PET ligand to image NET

  7. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of novel radiotracers for the in vivo imaging of the norepinephrine transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Alan A. E-mail: aaw@camhpet.on.ca; Patrick Johnson, David; Mozley, David; Hussey, Doug; Ginovart, Nathalie; Nobrega, Jose; Garcia, Armando; Meyer, Jeffery; Houle, Sylvain

    2003-02-01

    The (R,R) and (S,S) enantiomers of 2-[(2-methoxyphenoxy)phenylmethyl]morpholine (MeNER) have been radiolabelled with carbon-11 in good yield and at high specific activity. These radiotracers are close analogues of reboxetine, a potent and selective ligand for the norepinephrine transporter (NET). They were examined as potential ligands for imaging NET in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET). The in vivo brain distribution of both [{sup 11}C]-labeled enantiomers were evaluated in rats. Following tail-vein injection of the (R,R)-enantiomer regional brain uptake and washout of radioactivity was homogeneous at all time points examined (5-60 min). In contrast, administration of the (S,S)-enantiomer produced a heterogeneous distribution of radioactivity in brain with highest uptake in the hypothalamus, a NET rich region, and lowest uptake in the striatum, a brain region devoid of NET. Hypothalamus to striatum ratios of 2.5 to one were achieved at 60 min post injection of (S,S)-[{sup 11}C]-MeNER. Pre-injection of the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, reboxetine or desipramine, reduced hypothalamus to striatum ratios to near unity while reuptake inhibitors of dopamine and serotonin had no significant effect on binding. In vitro autoradiography studies (rat brain slices) with (S,S)-[{sup 11}C]-MeNER produced a regional distribution pattern that was consistent with the reported distribution of NET. (S,S)-[{sup 11}C]-MeNER has the potential to be the first successful PET ligand to image NET.

  8. A verification methodology for in vivo dosimetry in stereotactic radiotherapy; Uma metodologia para verificacao dosimetrica in vivo em radioterapia estereotaxica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Leonardo L.; Oliveira, Harley F.; Fairbanks, Leandro R., E-mail: leonardo.fis@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Nicolucci, Patricia; Netto, Thomaz G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Departamento de Fisica

    2012-12-15

    Radiotherapy of brain lesions near critical structures requires a high accuracy in the location and dose. The high precision is achieved by the location of the stereotactic apparatus. The accuracy in dose delivery should be accompanied by an accurate quality control in devices that involve the practice, however, still does not guarantee the dose at the time of therapy. The large number of fields and the small size of these conventional methods difficult dosimetry during treatment. The objective of this work was to develop a verification methodology in vivo dosimetry in stereotactic radiotherapy with the aid of the film radiochromic Linear Accelerator with multi leaf collimators Moduleaf. The technique uses film segments radiochromic Gafchromic EBT2, with dimensions of 1x1 cm{sup 2} in area outside the coupled micro-multileaf Moduleaf Siemens. These films were inserted in the region of the central axis of the beam. The films were irradiated and calibrated to obtain the factors that determine the size dependence of the dosimetric field. With these data, we designed a computer program which calculates the density of a film must acquire when subjected to an exposure in this setting. This study evaluated five non-coplanar plans, the first with 15 fields and the other with 25 fields. Before starting the procedure, the film segment is coupled to the device, and after the treatment, the relative density is evaluated and compared with the calculated. The average value of the verification at the time of radiation dosimetry compared with the calculated by the sheet was 1.5%. The data collected in this study showed a satisfactory agreement between measured and calculated by the program in the densitometer. Thus, a methodology was developed to verify in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy and stereotactic linear accelerator collimators Moduleaf. (author)

  9. Benzodiazepine receptor binding in vivo with (/sup 3/)-Ro 15-1788

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeders, N.E.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1985-07-29

    In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding has generally been studied by ex vivo techniques. In this investigation, the authors identify the conditions where (/sup 3/H)-Ro 15-1788 labels benzodiazepine receptors by true in vivo binding, i.e. where workable specific to nonspecific ratios are obtained in intact tissues without homogenization or washing. (/sup 3/H)-Flunitrazepam and (/sup 3/H)-clonazepam did not exhibit useful in vivo receptor binding. 39 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  10. Critical considerations when planning experimental in vivo studies in dental traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens O; Andersson, Lars

    2011-08-01

    In vivo studies are sometimes needed to understand healing processes after trauma. For several reasons, not the least ethical, such studies have to be carefully planned and important considerations have to be taken into account about suitability of the experimental model, sample size and optimizing the accuracy of the analysis. Several manuscripts of in vivo studies are submitted for publication to Dental Traumatology and rejected because of inadequate design, methodology or insufficient documentation of the results. The authors have substantial experience in experimental in vivo studies of tissue healing in dental traumatology and share their knowledge regarding critical considerations when planning experimental in vivo studies. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. In vivo and in vitro radiosensitivities ofnewly established mouse ascites tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, M.; Tsuboi, A.; Tsuchiya, T.

    1981-01-01

    The response of two newly established mouse mammary tumors to x irradiation in vitro and in vivo was studied by colony-forming assay in soft agar. Cells irradiated in vivo were more resistant than those irradiated in vitro. The D 0 values for in vitro irradiation were 112 rad at both exponential and stationary phases, while those for in vivo irradiation were 303 rad at exponential phase and 556 rad at stationary phase. This increase in D 0 value, which is greater than the OER, suggests that radiosensitivity in vivo cannot be explained only by hypoxia

  12. In vivo relevance of intercellular calcium signaling in Drosophila wing development

    OpenAIRE

    Brodskiy, Pavel; Brito-Robinson, Teresa; Levis, Megan; Narciso, Cody; Jangula, Jamison; Huizar, Francisco; Wu, Qinfeng; Zartman, Jeremiah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, organ-scale intercellular Ca2+ transients (ICTs) were reported in the Drosophila wing disc. However, the functional in vivo significance of ICTs remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the in vivo relevance of intercellular Ca2+ signaling and its impact on wing development. We report that Ca2+ signaling in vivo decreases as wing discs mature. Ca2+ signaling ex vivo responds to fly extract in a dose-dependent manner. This suggests ICTs occur in vivo due to chemical stimulus that...

  13. In-vivo dosimetry - how hard could it be?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremethick, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The radiotherapy community has often assumed that the absorbed dose was identical to the prescribed dose. Knowing what dose was delivered is generally limited to the comparison between measured watertank data and planning system calculations. Only recently has an attempt been made to quantify the uncertainties associated with the entire dosimetry chain. Although the capabilities of some planning systems' algorithms have been documented and provide an indication of the reliability of planning data there are many situations where they will fail to predict correct dose distributions (Metcalfe PE et al Aust Phys Eng Sci Med 16: 155-167; 1993). An incorrect dose distribution may result in a failure to provide the desired effect of the prescription. In vivo dosimetry, where detectors are usually placed on the patients skin near the entrance and exit ports provide a measurement of the dose delivered at these points. Correction factors are required to convert the measured dose to the actual dose at the point of interest, ideally the mid-tumour point. The validity, and an estimate in the overall uncertainty of the process must be determined. In July of 1994 an 18-month project commenced to develop and evaluate the use of in vivo dosimetry as part of the routine Quality Assurance program. Equipment included a Scanditronics DPD510 dosimeter and the older hemispherical type EDP-10 and EDP-20 diodes. All measurements were performed on Varian 2100C linear accelerators. Individual diode, entrance and exit correction factors were determined for energy, field size, SSD, all beam modifiers, incident angle and unique patient thickness. The project was limited to investigating pelvic, head and neck and breast treatments for entrance and exit measurements only as time available did not permit the evaluation of the mid-tumour dose. Approximately 8500 measurements were taken during the course of the project of which some 1200 were for the 46 patients chosen. Correction factors

  14. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of octyl methoxycinnamate liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Carvalho Varjão Mota A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aline de Carvalho Varjão Mota,1 Zaida Maria Faria de Freitas,1 Eduardo Ricci Júnior,1 Gisela Maria Dellamora-Ortiz,1 Ralph Santos-Oliveira,2 Rafael Antonio Ozzetti,3 André Luiz Vergnanini,3 Vanessa Lira Ribeiro,4 Ronald Santos Silva,4 Elisabete Pereira dos Santos11Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, 2Nuclear Engineering Institute, National Nuclear Energy Commission, 3Allergisa Dermatocosmetic Research, University of Campinas, São Paulo, 4Pharmacology and Toxicology Department, National Insitute of Quality Control in Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilAbstract: Solar radiation causes damage to human skin, and photoprotection is the main way to prevent these harmful effects. The development of sunscreen formulations containing nanosystems is of great interest in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries because of the many potential benefits. This study aimed to develop and evaluate an octyl methoxycinnamate (OMC liposomal nanosystem (liposome/OMC to obtain a sunscreen formulation with improved safety and efficacy by retaining OMC for longer on the stratum corneum.Methods: The liposome/OMC nanostructure obtained was tested for enzymatic hydrolysis with lipase from Rhizomucor miehei and biodistribution with liposomes labeled with technetium-99m. The liposome/OMC formulation was then incorporated in a gel formulation and tested for ocular irritation using the hen’s egg test-chorio-allantoic membrane (HET-CAM assay, in vitro and in vivo sun protection factor, in vitro release profile, skin biometrics, and in vivo tape stripping.Results: The liposome/OMC nanosystem was not hydrolyzed from R. miehei by lipase. In the biodistribution assay, the liposome/OMC formulation labeled with technetium-99m had mainly deposited in the skin, while for OMC the main organ was the liver, showing that the liposome had higher affinity for the skin than OMC. The liposome/OMC formulation was classified as nonirritating in

  15. In vivo mapping of vascular inflammation using multimodal imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R Jarrett

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Plaque vulnerability to rupture has emerged as a critical correlate to risk of adverse coronary events but there is as yet no clinical method to assess plaque stability in vivo. In the search to identify biomarkers of vulnerable plaques an association has been found between macrophages and plaque stability--the density and pattern of macrophage localization in lesions is indicative of probability to rupture. In very unstable plaques, macrophages are found in high densities and concentrated in the plaque shoulders. Therefore, the ability to map macrophages in plaques could allow noninvasive assessment of plaque stability. We use a multimodality imaging approach to noninvasively map the distribution of macrophages in vivo. The use of multiple modalities allows us to combine the complementary strengths of each modality to better visualize features of interest. Our combined use of Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI allows high sensitivity PET screening to identify putative lesions in a whole body view, and high resolution MRI for detailed mapping of biomarker expression in the lesions.Macromolecular and nanoparticle contrast agents targeted to macrophages were developed and tested in three different mouse and rat models of atherosclerosis in which inflamed vascular plaques form spontaneously and/or are induced by injury. For multimodal detection, the probes were designed to contain gadolinium (T1 MRI or iron oxide (T2 MRI, and Cu-64 (PET. PET imaging was utilized to identify regions of macrophage accumulation; these regions were further probed by MRI to visualize macrophage distribution at high resolution. In both PET and MR images the probes enhanced contrast at sites of vascular inflammation, but not in normal vessel walls. MRI was able to identify discrete sites of inflammation that were blurred together at the low resolution of PET. Macrophage content in the lesions was confirmed by histology.The multimodal

  16. Antifungal Activity of Gallic Acid In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Meng; Dawuti, Gulina; Dou, Qin; Ma, Yu; Liu, Heng-Ge; Aibai, Silafu

    2017-07-01

    Gallic acid (GA) is a polyphenol natural compound found in many medicinal plant species, including pomegranate rind (Punica granatum L.), and has been shown to have antiinflammatory and antibacterial properties. Pomegranate rind is used to treat bacterial and fungal pathogens in Uyghur and other systems of traditional medicine, but, surprisingly, the effects of GA on antifungal activity have not yet been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the inhibitory effects of GA on fungal strains both in vitro and in vivo. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the NCCLS (M38-A and M27-A2) standard method in vitro, and GA was found to have a broad spectrum of antifungal activity, with MICs for all the tested dermatophyte strains between 43.75 and 83.33 μg/mL. Gallic acid was also active against three Candida strains, with MICs between 12.5 and 100.0 μg/mL. The most sensitive Candida species was Candida albicans (MIC = 12.5 μg/mL), and the most sensitive filamentous species was Trichophyton rubrum (MIC = 43.75 μg/mL), which was comparable in potency to the control, fluconazole. The mechanism of action was investigated for inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis using an HPLC-based assay and an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Gallic acid reduced the activity of sterol 14α-demethylase P450 (CYP51) and squalene epoxidase in the T. rubrum membrane, respectively. In vivo model demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection administration of GA (80 mg/kg d) significantly enhanced the cure rate in a mice infection model of systemic fungal infection. Overall, our results confirm the antifungal effects of GA and suggest a mechanism of action, suggesting that GA has the potential to be developed further as a natural antifungal agent for clinical use. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. ''In vivo'' methodology for mutation induction in banana, cultivar ''Maca''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulmann Neto, A.; Domingues, E.T.; Alvarez, A.L.F.; Mendez, B.M.J.; Ando, A.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: The ''Maca'' cultivar is a banana of high acceptability in the south west of Brazil. However, it is very susceptible to several diseases. Due to the difficulties in the application of the traditional plant breeding methods, the Radiation Genetics Section of CENA is utilising the ''in vivo'', and the ''in vitro'' mutation breeding approach. The ''in vivo'' methodology is based on the work of HAMILTON. This method is being utilised in Brazil for rapid banana propagation. Rhizomes (20 cm diameter) were obtained from young field grown plants before flower differentiation. In these rhizomes, only 5-6 leaf sheaths were retained, the others being removed. The rhizomes were maintained in a greenhouse in boxes with vermiculite, covered with plastic. After one week, all leaf sheaths were removed, until the exposure of the meristematic apex with about 2 mm size. This apex was cut off with a scalpel and a cross shaped cut (2,5 cm) was made. This stimulates the development of lateral buds. After four months, the meristematic apices of these new buds were cut off in the same way and immediately the rhizomes were irradiated with gamma rays. Around the eliminated lateral buds callus developed and new lateral buds were formed. The LD 50 in relation to the number of these new buds produced was around 30 Gy. According to the author of the original method, from the callus one can obtain axillary or adventitious buds. In the early stages it is possible, based on the shape, to distinguish both types. The advantage of utilising adventitious buds originating from only one cell to avoid chimerism is well known in mutation breeding. However, it is not certain whether this is the case in the present method. After detachment from rhizomes and rooting in soil, plants with 15-20 cm height were inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense. After 3 weeks the plants showed symptoms of the Panama disease and screening could be done at this stage. The total time between the removal of

  18. ''In vivo'' methodology for mutation induction in banana, cultivar ''Maca''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulmann Neto, A; Domingues, E T; Alvarez, A L.F.; Mendez, B M.J.; Ando, A [Centre for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture (CENA), University of Sao Paulo, Piracicaba, SP. (Brazil)

    1990-07-01

    Full text: The ''Maca'' cultivar is a banana of high acceptability in the south west of Brazil. However, it is very susceptible to several diseases. Due to the difficulties in the application of the traditional plant breeding methods, the Radiation Genetics Section of CENA is utilising the ''in vivo'', and the ''in vitro'' mutation breeding approach. The ''in vivo'' methodology is based on the work of HAMILTON. This method is being utilised in Brazil for rapid banana propagation. Rhizomes (20 cm diameter) were obtained from young field grown plants before flower differentiation. In these rhizomes, only 5-6 leaf sheaths were retained, the others being removed. The rhizomes were maintained in a greenhouse in boxes with vermiculite, covered with plastic. After one week, all leaf sheaths were removed, until the exposure of the meristematic apex with about 2 mm size. This apex was cut off with a scalpel and a cross shaped cut (2,5 cm) was made. This stimulates the development of lateral buds. After four months, the meristematic apices of these new buds were cut off in the same way and immediately the rhizomes were irradiated with gamma rays. Around the eliminated lateral buds callus developed and new lateral buds were formed. The LD{sub 50} in relation to the number of these new buds produced was around 30 Gy. According to the author of the original method, from the callus one can obtain axillary or adventitious buds. In the early stages it is possible, based on the shape, to distinguish both types. The advantage of utilising adventitious buds originating from only one cell to avoid chimerism is well known in mutation breeding. However, it is not certain whether this is the case in the present method. After detachment from rhizomes and rooting in soil, plants with 15-20 cm height were inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense. After 3 weeks the plants showed symptoms of the Panama disease and screening could be done at this stage. The total time between the

  19. Expression of RANKL/OPG during bone remodeling in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, H., E-mail: tnk@ymghp.jp [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, 77 Ohsaki, Hofu, Yamaguchi 747-8511 (Japan); Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Mine, T. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Ogasa, H. [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Taguchi, T. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Liang, C.T. [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); National Health Research Institutes, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first study to determine the relationship between osteogenic differentiation and RANKL/OPG expression during bone remodeling in vivo. {yields} The OPG expression peak occurred during the bone formation phase, whereas the marked elevation of RANKL expression was observed during the bone resorption phase. {yields} Histological analysis showed that RANKL/OPG immunoreactivity was predominantly associated with bone marrow cells in the marrow cavity. {yields} The present study confirmed that RANKL/OPG are key factors linking bone formation to resorption during the bone remodeling process. -- Abstract: The interaction between receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) plays a dominant role in osteoclastogenesis. As both proteins are produced by osteoblast lineage cells, they are considered to represent a key link between bone formation and resorption. In this study, we investigated the expression of RANKL and OPG during bone remodeling in vivo to determine the relationship between osteoclastogenic stimulation and osteoblastic differentiation. Total RNA was prepared from rat femurs after marrow ablation on days 0, 3, 6, and 9. The temporal activation patterns of osteoblast-related genes (procollagen {alpha}1 (I), alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin) were examined by Northern blot analysis. An appreciable increase in the expression of these osteoblast markers was observed on day 3. The peak increase in gene expression was observed on day 6 followed by a slight reduction by day 9. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the OPG mRNA expression was markedly upregulated on day 6 and slightly decreased on day 9. In contrast, RANKL mRNA expression was increased by more than 20-fold on day 9. The RANKL/OPG ratio, an index of osteoclastogenic stimulation, peaked on day 9. Histological analysis showed that RANKL and OPG immunoreactivity were predominantly associated with bone marrow cells. The

  20. Expression of RANKL/OPG during bone remodeling in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Mine, T.; Ogasa, H.; Taguchi, T.; Liang, C.T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This is the first study to determine the relationship between osteogenic differentiation and RANKL/OPG expression during bone remodeling in vivo. → The OPG expression peak occurred during the bone formation phase, whereas the marked elevation of RANKL expression was observed during the bone resorption phase. → Histological analysis showed that RANKL/OPG immunoreactivity was predominantly associated with bone marrow cells in the marrow cavity. → The present study confirmed that RANKL/OPG are key factors linking bone formation to resorption during the bone remodeling process. -- Abstract: The interaction between receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) plays a dominant role in osteoclastogenesis. As both proteins are produced by osteoblast lineage cells, they are considered to represent a key link between bone formation and resorption. In this study, we investigated the expression of RANKL and OPG during bone remodeling in vivo to determine the relationship between osteoclastogenic stimulation and osteoblastic differentiation. Total RNA was prepared from rat femurs after marrow ablation on days 0, 3, 6, and 9. The temporal activation patterns of osteoblast-related genes (procollagen α1 (I), alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin) were examined by Northern blot analysis. An appreciable increase in the expression of these osteoblast markers was observed on day 3. The peak increase in gene expression was observed on day 6 followed by a slight reduction by day 9. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the OPG mRNA expression was markedly upregulated on day 6 and slightly decreased on day 9. In contrast, RANKL mRNA expression was increased by more than 20-fold on day 9. The RANKL/OPG ratio, an index of osteoclastogenic stimulation, peaked on day 9. Histological analysis showed that RANKL and OPG immunoreactivity were predominantly associated with bone marrow cells. The expression of bone formation

  1. Cellular antioxidant effects of atorvastatin in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassmann, Sven; Laufs, Ulrich; Müller, Kirsten; Konkol, Christian; Ahlbory, Katja; Bäumer, Anselm T; Linz, Wolfgang; Böhm, Michael; Nickenig, Georg

    2002-02-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) may exert direct effects on vascular cells and beneficially influence endothelial dysfunction. Because reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to vascular damage and dysfunction, we investigated the effect of atorvastatin on ROS production and the underlying mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. Cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells were incubated with 10 micromol/L atorvastatin. Angiotensin II-induced and epidermal growth factor-induced ROS production were significantly reduced by atorvastatin (dichlorofluorescein fluorescence laser microscopy). Atorvastatin downregulated mRNA expression of the NAD(P)H oxidase subunit nox1, whereas p22phox mRNA expression was not significantly altered (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Northern analysis). Membrane translocation of rac1 GTPase, which is required for the activation of NAD(P)H oxidase, was inhibited by atorvastatin (Western blot). mRNA expression of superoxide dismutase isoforms and glutathione peroxidase was not modified by atorvastatin, whereas catalase expression was upregulated at mRNA and protein levels, resulting in an increased enzymatic activity. Effects of atorvastatin on ROS production and nox1, rac1, and catalase expression were inhibited by L-mevalonate but not by 25-hydroxycholesterol. In addition, spontaneously hypertensive rats were treated with atorvastatin for 30 days. ROS production in aortic segments was significantly reduced in statin-treated rats (lucigenin chemiluminescence). Treatment with atorvastatin reduced vascular mRNA expression of p22phox and nox1 and increased aortic catalase expression. mRNA expression of superoxide dismutases, glutathione peroxidase, and NAD(P)H oxidase subunits gp91phox, p40phox, p47phox, and p67phox remained unchanged. Translocation of rac1 from the cytosol to the cell membrane was also reduced in vivo. Thus, atorvastatin exerts cellular antioxidant effects in cultured rat

  2. In vivo assessment of toxicity and pharmacokinetics of methylglyoxal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Manju; Talukdar, Dipa; Ghosh, Swapna; Bhattacharyya, Nivedita; Ray, Manju; Ray, Subhankar

    2006-01-01

    Previous in vivo studies from several laboratories had shown remarkable curative effect of methylglyoxal on cancer-bearing animals. In contrast, most of the recent in vitro studies have assigned a toxic role for methylglyoxal. The present study was initiated with the objective to resolve whether methylglyoxal is truly toxic in vivo and to reassess its therapeutic potential. Four species of animals, both rodent and non-rodent, were treated with different doses of methylglyoxal through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes. Acute (treatment for only 1 day) toxicity tests had been done with mouse and rat. These animals received 2, 1 and 0.3 g of methylglyoxal/kg of body weight in a day through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes respectively. Chronic (treatment for around a month) toxicity test had been done with mouse, rat, rabbit and dog. Mouse, rat and dog received 1, 0.3 and 0.1 g of methylglyoxal/kg of body weight in a day through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes respectively. Rabbit received 0.55, 0.3 and 0.1 g of methylglyoxal/kg of body weight in a day through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes respectively. It had been observed that methylglyoxal had no deleterious effect on the physical and behavioral pattern of the treated animals. Fertility and teratogenecity studies were done with rats that were subjected to chronic toxicity tests. It had been observed that these animals produced healthy litters indicating no damage of the reproductive systems as well as no deleterious effect on the offspring. Studies on several biochemical and hematological parameters of methylglyoxal-treated rats and dogs and histological studies of several organs of methylglyoxal-treated mouse were performed. These studies indicated that methylglyoxal had no apparent deleterious effect on some vital organs of these animals. A detailed pharmacokinetic study was done with mouse after oral administration of methylglyoxal. The effect of methylglyoxal alone and in

  3. Uterine microvascular sensitivity to nanomaterial inhalation: An in vivo assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapleton, P.A.; McBride, C.R.; Yi, J.; Nurkiewicz, T.R., E-mail: tnurkiewicz@hsc.wvu.edu

    2015-11-01

    With the tremendous number and diverse applications of engineered nanomaterials incorporated in daily human activity, exposure can no longer be solely confined to occupational exposures of healthy male models. Cardiovascular and endothelial cell dysfunction have been established using in vitro and in situ preparations, but the translation to intact in vivo models is limited. Intravital microscopy has been used extensively to understand microvascular physiology while maintaining in vivo neurogenic, humoral, and myogenic control. However, a tissue specific model to assess the influences of nanomaterial exposure on female reproductive health has not been fully elucidated. Female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to nano-TiO{sub 2} aerosols (171 ± 6 nm, 10.1 ± 0.39 mg/m{sup 3}, 5 h) 24-hours prior to experimentation, leading to a calculated deposition of 42.0 ± 1.65 μg. After verifying estrus status, vital signs were monitored and the right horn of the uterus was exteriorized, gently secured over an optical pedestal, and enclosed in a warmed tissue bath using intravital microscopy techniques. After equilibration, significantly higher leukocyte-endothelium interactions were recorded in the exposed group. Arteriolar responsiveness was assessed using ionophoretically applied agents: muscarinic agonist acetylcholine (0.025 M; ACh; 20, 40, 100, and 200 nA), and nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (0.05 M; SNP; 20, 40, and 100 nA), or adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (0.05 M; PE; 20, 40, and 100 nA) using glass micropipettes. Passive diameter was established by tissue superfusion with 10{sup −4} M adenosine. Similar to male counterparts, female SD rats present systemic microvascular dysfunction; however the ramifications associated with female health and reproduction have yet to be elucidated. - Highlights: • Female reproductive health associated with nanomaterial exposure is understudied. • We examined uterine microvascular alterations 24-hours after nano

  4. Iris ultrastructure in patients with synechiae as revealed by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy : In vivo iris ultrastructure in patients with Synechiae by Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Cheng, Hongbo; Guo, Ping; Zhang, Chun; Tang, Song; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-04-26

    Iris plays important roles in ocular physiology and disease pathogenesis. Currently it is technically challenging to noninvasively examine the human iris ultrastructure in vivo. The purpose of the current study is to reveal human iris ultrastructure in patients with synechiae by using noninvasive in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). The ultrastructure of iris in thirty one patients, each with synechiae but transparent cornea, was examined by in vivo LSCM. Five characteristic iris ultrastructures was revealed in patients with synechiae by in vivo LSCM, which include: 1. tree trunk-like structure; 2. tree branch/bush-like structure; 3. Fruit-like structure; 4. Epithelioid-like structure; 5. deep structure. Pigment granules can be observed as a loose structure on the top of the arborization structure. In iris-associated diseases with Tyndall's Phenomenon and keratic precipitates, the pigment particles are more likely to fall off from the arborization structure. The ultrastructure of iris in patients with synechiae has been visualized using in vivo LSCM. Five iris ultrastructures can be clearly observed, with some of the structures maybe disease-associated. The fall-off of the pigment particles may cause the Tyndall's Phenomenon positive. In vivo LSCM provides a non-invasive approach to observe the human iris ultrastructure under certain eye disease conditions, which sets up a foundation to visualize certain iris-associated diseases in the future.

  5. Lung cancer radiosensitization by CMNa in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xia; Ouyang Xienong; Ji Hongbing; Chen Zhonghua; Yang Rujun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To probe into the radiosensitization effect of CMNa on lung tumor cell lines after γ-irradiation combined with γ-knife to treat patients suffering from lung cancer. Methods: 1. Cells of small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446 and non-small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H596 irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays combined with or without CMNa were counted using trypan blue exclusion methods, and cell survival rate curves were depicted. 2. Patients suffering from lung cancer at different clinical stages were treated using γ-knife combined with or without CMNa, and the curative effect was evaluated 6 weeks after one cycle of treatment. Results: CMNa could significantly increase the sensitivity of lung cancer cell lines to γ-irradiation. Curative effect increased significantly by γ-knife treatment combined with CMNa i. e., the CR+PR rates for these two groups were 47.22% and 37.67% separately (P 0.05). Conclusion: CMNa could significantly increase the radiation sensitivity of lung cancer cell line cells in vitro and tumors in vivo, therefore, it could be used as a radiosensitization agent in clinical treatment of lung cancer. (authors)

  6. Synthesis, characterization and in vivo evaluation of biocompatible ferrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Lopez, M.T., E-mail: modesto@ugr.es [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain); Rodriguez, I.A. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain); Department of Histology (Tissue Engineering Group), University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Rodriguez-Arco, L. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain); Carriel, V. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain); Department of Histology (Tissue Engineering Group), University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Bonhome-Espinosa, A.B. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain); Campos, F. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain); Department of Histology (Tissue Engineering Group), University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Zubarev, A. [Department of Mathematical Physics, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Duran, J.D.G. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain)

    2017-06-01

    A hydrogel is a 3-D network of polymer chains in which water is the dispersion medium. Hydrogels have found extensive applications in the biomedical field due to their resemblance to living tissues. Furthermore, hydrogels can be endowed with exceptional properties by addition of synthetic materials. For example, magnetic field-sensitive gels, called ferrogels, are obtained by embedding magnetic particles in the polymer network. Novel living tissues with unique magnetic field-sensitive properties were recently prepared by 3-D cell culture in biocompatible ferrogels. This paper critically reviews the most recent progress and perspectives in their synthesis, characterization and biocompatibility evaluation. Optimization of ferrogels for this novel application requires low-density, strongly magnetic, multi-domain particles. Interestingly, the rheological properties of the resulting ferrogels in the absence of field were largely enhanced with respect to nonmagnetic hydrogels, which can only be explained by the additional cross-linking imparted by the embedded magnetic particles. Remarkably, rheological measurements under an applied magnetic field demonstrated that ferrogels presented reversibly tunable mechanical properties, which constitutes a unique advantage with respect to nonmagnetic hydrogels. In vivo evaluation of ferrogels showed good biocompatibility, with only some local inflammatory response, and no particle migration or damage to distant organs.

  7. In vivo bone regeneration using a novel porous bioactive composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie En [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Hu Yunyu [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)], E-mail: orth1@fmmn.edu.cn; Chen Xiaofeng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology University, Guangzhou (China); Bai Xuedong; Li Dan [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Ren Li [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang Ziru [Foreign Languages School, Northwest University Xi' an (China)

    2008-11-15

    Many commercial bone graft substitutes (BGS) and experimental bone tissue engineering scaffolds have been developed for bone repair and regeneration. This study reports the in vivo bone regeneration using a newly developed porous bioactive and resorbable composite that is composed of bioactive glass (BG), collagen (COL), hyaluronic acid (HYA) and phosphatidylserine (PS), BG-COL-HYA-PS. The composite was prepared by a combination of sol-gel and freeze-drying methods. A rabbit radius defect model was used to evaluate bone regeneration at time points of 2, 4 and 8 weeks. Techniques including radiography, histology, and micro-CT were applied to characterize the new bone formation. 8 weeks results showed that (1) nearly complete bone regeneration was achieved for the BG-COL-HYA-PS composite that was combined with a bovine bone morphogenetic protein (BMP); (2) partial bone regeneration was achieved for the BG-COL-HYA-PS composites alone; and (3) control remained empty. This study demonstrated that the novel BG-COL-HYA-PS, with or without the grafting of BMP incorporation, is a promising BGS or a tissue engineering scaffold for non-load bearing orthopaedic applications.

  8. In vivo biofilm formation on different dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Felicia; Grade, Sebastian; Kohorst, Philipp; Stiesch, Meike

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the formation of oral biofilm on various dental ceramics in vivo. Five different ceramic materials were included: a veneering glass- ceramic, a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, a yttrium-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP), a hot isostatically pressed (HIP) Y-TZP ceramic, and an HIP Y-TZP ceramic with 25% alumina. Test specimens were attached to individually designed acrylic appliances; five volunteers wore these appliances for 24 hours in the maxillary arch. After intraoral exposure, the samples were removed from the appliances and the adhering biofilms vitally stained. Then, the two-dimensional surface coating and thickness of the adhering biofilm were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA with the level of significance set at .05. Significant differences (P ceramic materials. The lowest surface coating (19.0%) and biofilm thickness (1.9 Μm) were determined on the HIP Y-TZP ceramic; the highest mean values were identified with the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (46.8%, 12.6 Μm). Biofilm formation on various types of dental ceramics differed significantly; in particular, zirconia exhibited low plaque accumulation. In addition to its high strength, low plaque accumulation makes zirconia a promising material for various indications (including implant abutments and telescopic crowns) that previously were met only with metal-based materials.

  9. Nanotechnology: from In Vivo Imaging System to Controlled Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Maria; Ishtiaq, Saba; Rabia, Samreen; Khatoon, Maryam; Zeb, Ahmad; Khan, Gul Majid; ur Rehman, Asim; ud Din, Fakhar

    2017-08-01

    Science and technology have always been the vitals of human's struggle, utilized exclusively for the development of novel tools and products, ranging from micro- to nanosize. Nanotechnology has gained significant attention due to its extensive applications in biomedicine, particularly related to bio imaging and drug delivery. Various nanodevices and nanomaterials have been developed for the diagnosis and treatment of different diseases. Herein, we have described two primary aspects of the nanomedicine, i.e., in vivo imaging and drug delivery, highlighting the recent advancements and future explorations. Tremendous advancements in the nanotechnology tools for the imaging, particularly of the cancer cells, have recently been observed. Nanoparticles offer a suitable medium to carryout molecular level modifications including the site-specific imaging and targeting. Invention of radionuclides, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes and use of gold nanoparticles in biosensors have revolutionized the field of imaging, resulting in easy understanding of the pathophysiology of disease, improved ability to diagnose and enhanced therapeutic delivery. This high specificity and selectivity of the nanomedicine is important, and thus, the recent advancements in this field need to be understood for a better today and a more prosperous future.

  10. In-Vivo Human Skin to Textiles Friction Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfarr, Lukas; Zagar, Bernhard

    2017-10-01

    We report on a measurement system to determine highly reliable and accurate friction properties of textiles as needed for example as input to garment simulation software. Our investigations led to a set-up that allows to characterize not just textile to textile but also textile to in-vivo human skin tribological properties and thus to fundamental knowledge about genuine wearer interaction in garments. The method of test conveyed in this paper is measuring concurrently and in a highly time resolved manner the normal force as well as the resulting shear force caused by a friction subject intending to slide out of the static friction regime and into the dynamic regime on a test bench. Deeper analysis of various influences is enabled by extending the simple model following Coulomb's law for rigid body friction to include further essential parameters such as contact force, predominance in the yarn's orientation and also skin hydration. This easy-to-use system enables to measure reliably and reproducibly both static and dynamic friction for a variety of friction partners including human skin with all its variability there might be.

  11. In vivo semiconductor dosimetry as part of routine quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millwater, C J; MacLeod, A S; Thwaites, D I

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes the initial physics testing necessary before diodes can be used for in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of a protocol for clinical use in head and neck treatment and the preliminary results acquired. 50 patients were entered into the pilot study. A total of 300 treatment set-ups were measured (184 entrance doses and 116 exit doses). Wedged and unwedged components of each field were measured separately, making the total number of entrance doses 284 and total number of exit doses 207. There was no significant systematic deviation in the measured entrance dose compared with the expected (mean +0.4%, SD 2.7%). Discrepancies between the observed and expected entrance doses of greater than 5% were recorded in 6% (16/284) of measurements. The mean of the measured exit doses was 2.4% lower than expected (SD 4.8%). Discrepancies between the observed and expected exist doses of greater than 5% were recorded in 32% (67/207) of measurements. Possible causes for these discrepancies are discussed. Overall analysis of the data for individual patients suggest that in one patient out of the 50 there may have been a delivered target volume dose discrepancy of greater than 5% (+6.5%). The significance of the results and the implications for routine use are discussed.

  12. Two-Stage Dynamics of In Vivo Bacteriophage Genome Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Wu, David; Gelbart, William; Knobler, Charles M.; Phillips, Rob; Kegel, Willem K.

    2018-04-01

    Biopolymer translocation is a key step in viral infection processes. The transfer of information-encoding genomes allows viruses to reprogram the cell fate of their hosts. Constituting 96% of all known bacterial viruses [A. Fokine and M. G. Rossmann, Molecular architecture of tailed double-stranded DNA phages, Bacteriophage 4, e28281 (2014)], the tailed bacteriophages deliver their DNA into host cells via an "ejection" process, leaving their protein shells outside of the bacteria; a similar scenario occurs for mammalian viruses like herpes, where the DNA genome is ejected into the nucleus of host cells, while the viral capsid remains bound outside to a nuclear-pore complex. In light of previous experimental measurements of in vivo bacteriophage λ ejection, we analyze here the physical processes that give rise to the observed dynamics. We propose that, after an initial phase driven by self-repulsion of DNA in the capsid, the ejection is driven by anomalous diffusion of phage DNA in the crowded bacterial cytoplasm. We expect that this two-step mechanism is general for phages that operate by pressure-driven ejection, and we discuss predictions of our theory to be tested in future experiments.

  13. Cellular respiration: replicating in vivo systems biology for in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This editorial develops a philosophy for expanding the scope of Journal of Breath Research (JBR) into the realm of cellular level study, and links certain topics back to more traditional systemic research for understanding human health based on exhaled breath constituents. The express purpose is to provide a publication outlet for novel breath related research that includes in vitro studies, especially those that explore the biological origin and expression of compounds that may ultimately influence the constituents of exhaled breath. The new topics include all manner of methods and instrumentations for making in vivo and in vitro measurements, the use of different biological media (blood, urine saliva, swabs) including human and microbial cell-lines, in vitro kinetic studies of metabolism, and advances in ex vivo methods for maintaining metabolic competency and viability of biological samples. Traditionally, JBR has published articles on human breath analysis for diagnosing disease, tracking health state, assessing the dose and effect of exogenous chemicals, and contributions of malodorous compounds from the oral/nasal cavity. These have also included research describing novel sampling and analytical technologies, most notably those implementing mass spectrometry, chemical sensors and optical measurement instrumentation (Amann and Smith 2013). The journal’s original scope has also embraced animal models as surrogates for human sampling, new mathematical and

  14. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaoyong, Zhu [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustav V Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Odeberg, Jacob [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustav V Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Hamsten, Anders [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustav V Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, Per [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustav V Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  15. In vivo models of human airway epithelium repair and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Coraux

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite an efficient defence system, the airway surface epithelium, in permanent contact with the external milieu, is frequently injured by inhaled pollutants, microorganisms and viruses. The response of the airway surface epithelium to an acute injury includes a succession of cellular events varying from the loss of the surface epithelium integrity to partial shedding of the epithelium or even to complete denudation of the basement membrane. The epithelium has then to repair and regenerate to restore its functions. The in vivo study of epithelial regeneration in animal models has shown that airway epithelial cells are able to dedifferentiate, spread, migrate over the denuded basement membrane and progressively redifferentiate to reconstitute a functional respiratory epithelium after several weeks. Humanised tracheal xenograft models have been developed in immunodeficient nude and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice in order to mimic the natural regeneration process of the human airway epithelium and to analyse the cellular and molecular events involved during the different steps of airway epithelial reconstitution. These models represent very powerful tools for analysing the modulation of the biological functions of the epithelium during its regeneration. They are also very useful for identifying stem/progenitor cells of the human airway epithelium. A better knowledge of the mechanisms involved in airway epithelium regeneration, as well as the characterisation of the epithelial stem and progenitor cells, may pave the way to regenerative therapeutics, allowing the reconstitution of a functional airway epithelium in numerous respiratory diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, cystic fibrosis and bronchiolitis.

  16. In vivo bone regeneration using a novel porous bioactive composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie En; Hu Yunyu; Chen Xiaofeng; Bai Xuedong; Li Dan; Ren Li; Zhang Ziru

    2008-01-01

    Many commercial bone graft substitutes (BGS) and experimental bone tissue engineering scaffolds have been developed for bone repair and regeneration. This study reports the in vivo bone regeneration using a newly developed porous bioactive and resorbable composite that is composed of bioactive glass (BG), collagen (COL), hyaluronic acid (HYA) and phosphatidylserine (PS), BG-COL-HYA-PS. The composite was prepared by a combination of sol-gel and freeze-drying methods. A rabbit radius defect model was used to evaluate bone regeneration at time points of 2, 4 and 8 weeks. Techniques including radiography, histology, and micro-CT were applied to characterize the new bone formation. 8 weeks results showed that (1) nearly complete bone regeneration was achieved for the BG-COL-HYA-PS composite that was combined with a bovine bone morphogenetic protein (BMP); (2) partial bone regeneration was achieved for the BG-COL-HYA-PS composites alone; and (3) control remained empty. This study demonstrated that the novel BG-COL-HYA-PS, with or without the grafting of BMP incorporation, is a promising BGS or a tissue engineering scaffold for non-load bearing orthopaedic applications

  17. In vivo metacarpophalanageal joint collateral ligament length changes during flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y C; Sheng, X M; Chen, J; Qian, Z W

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the in vivo length changes of the collateral ligaments of metacarpophalangeal joint during flexion. We obtained computed tomography scans of index, middle, ring and little fingers at 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° of joint flexion from six hands of six healthy adult volunteers. Three of them had their dominant right hand studied, and the other three had their non-dominant left hand studied. We measured and analysed the radial and ulnar collateral ligaments of each metacarpophalangeal joint from the reconstructed images. We found that the dorsal and middle portions of the both radial and ulnar collateral ligament lengthened progressively during digital flexion and reached the maximum at 90° flexion. The length of the volar portion increased from 0° to 30° flexion and then decreased from 30° to 60° flexion, reaching the minimum at 90°. In conclusion, three portions of collateral ligaments on both sides of the metacarpophalangeal joint have variable length changes during flexion, which act to stabilize the joint through its flexion arc.

  18. Physicochemical, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of flurbiprofen microemulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Muhammad; Ur Rahman, Nisar; Tavares, Guilherme D; Barbosa, Sávio F; Chacra, Nádia B; Löbenberg, Raimar; Sarfraz, Muhammad K

    2015-09-01

    Flurbiprofen, a potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is widely used for relief of pain in patients suffering from rheumatic diseases, migraine, sore throat and primary dysmenorrheal. However, this drug has many gastrointestinal side effects produced by its oral administration, such as gastric bleeding and peptic ulcer. These effects were responsible for non-compliance among patients, which ultimately results in treatment failure. The physicochemical properties of flurbiprofen, make it a suitable candidate for transdermal drug delivery, which can overcome the drawbacks of oral administration. In this sense, microemulsions have been proved to increase the cutaneous absorption of lipophilic drugs when compared to conventional drug delivery systems. The purpose of this study was to formulate and characterize gel based microemulsions, for topical delivery of flurbiprofen. Different gel bases, containing microemulsion and hydro-alcoholic solution of flurbiprofen, were developed and compared. In vitro study showed that gels containing microemulsion had a higher permeation rate than those containing hydro-alcoholic solutions. Additionally, formulation of Carbopol-I (microemulsion) showed higher percent of inhibition of inflammation than others bases. Further, skin irritation study demonstrated that Carbopol-I was none irritating. Flurbiprofen microemulsion incorporated on Carbopol-I showed physicochemical, in vitro and in vivo characteristics suitable for the development of alternative transdermal delivery formulation.

  19. Physicochemical, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of flurbiprofen microemulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUHAMMAD NAEEM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTFlurbiprofen, a potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is widely used for relief of pain in patients suffering from rheumatic diseases, migraine, sore throat and primary dysmenorrheal. However, this drug has many gastrointestinal side effects produced by its oral administration, such as gastric bleeding and peptic ulcer. These effects were responsible for non-compliance among patients, which ultimately results in treatment failure. The physicochemical properties of flurbiprofen, make it a suitable candidate for transdermal drug delivery, which can overcome the drawbacks of oral administration. In this sense, microemulsions have been proved to increase the cutaneous absorption of lipophilic drugs when compared to conventional drug delivery systems. The purpose of this study was to formulate and characterize gel based microemulsions, for topical delivery of flurbiprofen. Different gel bases, containing microemulsion and hydro-alcoholic solution of flurbiprofen, were developed and compared. In vitro study showed that gels containing microemulsion had a higher permeation rate than those containing hydro-alcoholic solutions. Additionally, formulation of Carbopol-I (microemulsion showed higher percent of inhibition of inflammation than others bases. Further, skin irritation study demonstrated that Carbopol-I was none irritating. Flurbiprofen microemulsion incorporated on Carbopol-I showed physicochemical, in vitro and in vivo characteristics suitable for the development of alternative transdermal delivery formulation.

  20. Theory and in vivo application of electroporative gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somiari, S; Glasspool-Malone, J; Drabick, J J; Gilbert, R A; Heller, R; Jaroszeski, M J; Malone, R W

    2000-09-01

    Efficient and safe methods for delivering exogenous genetic material into tissues must be developed before the clinical potential of gene therapy will be realized. Recently, in vivo electroporation has emerged as a leading technology for developing nonviral gene therapies and nucleic acid vaccines (NAV). Electroporation (EP) involves the application of pulsed electric fields to cells to enhance cell permeability, resulting in exogenous polynucleotide transit across the cytoplasmic membrane. Similar pulsed electrical field treatments are employed in a wide range of biotechnological processes including in vitro EP, hybridoma production, development of transgenic animals, and clinical electrochemotherapy. Electroporative gene delivery studies benefit from well-developed literature that may be used to guide experimental design and interpretation. Both theory and experimental analysis predict that the critical parameters governing EP efficacy include cell size and field strength, duration, frequency, and total number of applied pulses. These parameters must be optimized for each tissue in order to maximize gene delivery while minimizing irreversible cell damage. By providing an overview of the theory and practice of electroporative gene transfer, this review intends to aid researchers that wish to employ the method for preclinical and translational gene therapy, NAV, and functional genomic research.

  1. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of potential aluminum chelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, L; Muller, G; Burnel, D

    1995-10-01

    The potential for aluminium (Al) chelation by different compounds was determined using 2 in vitro techniques. The formation of stable complexes with Al in an aqueous solution was evaluated using pulse polarography. This technique allowed the influence of temperature and calcium (Ca) to be studied for each compound. Certain compounds (EDDHA, HAES, citric acid and HBED) showed great chelation in the absence of Ca2+ at a temperature of 37 +/- 1 C. An ultrafiltration technique combined with Al determination by atomic emission spectroscopy allowed the efficiency of different substances to complex Al that were previously bound to serum proteins to be estimated. The kinetics of chelation and minimum efficient concentration have been determined for all products studied. EDDHA had chelation potential similar to DFO. The real efficacies of the compounds were studied in vivo to compare the effectiveness of repeated administrations of the best chelating agents (EDDHA, DFO, HAES and tartaric acid) on the distribution and excretion of Al after repeated i.p. administrations to rats. Intraperitoneal EDDHA significantly increased urinary metal (Al, Ca, Cu, Fe and Zn) excretion. These excretions may be correlated to a renal toxic potential property.

  2. Synthetic biology devices for in vitro and in vivo diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomovic, Shimyn; Pardee, Keith; Collins, James J

    2015-11-24

    There is a growing need to enhance our capabilities in medical and environmental diagnostics. Synthetic biologists have begun to focus their biomolecular engineering approaches toward this goal, offering promising results that could lead to the development of new classes of inexpensive, rapidly deployable diagnostics. Many conventional diagnostics rely on antibody-based platforms that, although exquisitely sensitive, are slow and costly to generate and cannot readily confront rapidly emerging pathogens or be applied to orphan diseases. Synthetic biology, with its rational and short design-to-production cycles, has the potential to overcome many of these limitations. Synthetic biology devices, such as engineered gene circuits, bring new capabilities to molecular diagnostics, expanding the molecular detection palette, creating dynamic sensors, and untethering reactions from laboratory equipment. The field is also beginning to move toward in vivo diagnostics, which could provide near real-time surveillance of multiple pathological conditions. Here, we describe current efforts in synthetic biology, focusing on the translation of promising technologies into pragmatic diagnostic tools and platforms.

  3. Nanoparticles target early-stage breast cancer metastasis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Evgeniya; Zinger, Assaf; da Silva, Dana; Yaari, Zvi; Kajal, Ashima; Vardi-Oknin, Dikla; Goldfeder, Mor; Schroeder, Josh E.; Shainsky-Roitman, Janna; Hershkovitz, Dov; Schroeder, Avi

    2017-10-01

    Despite advances in cancer therapy, treating cancer after it has metastasized remains an unmet clinical challenge. In this study we demonstrate that 100 nm liposomes target triple-negative murine breast-cancer metastases post intravenous administration. Metastatic breast cancer was induced in BALB/c mice either experimentally, by a tail vein injection of 4T1 cells, or spontaneously, after implanting a primary tumor xenograft. To track their biodistribution in vivo the liposomes were labeled with multi-modal diagnostic agents, including indocyanine green and rhodamine for whole-animal fluorescent imaging, gadolinium for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and europium for a quantitative biodistribution analysis. The accumulation of liposomes in the metastases peaked at 24 h post the intravenous administration, similar to the time they peaked in the primary tumor. The efficiency of liposomal targeting to the metastatic tissue exceeded that of a non-liposomal agent by 4.5-fold. Liposomes were detected at very early stages in the metastatic progression, including metastatic lesions smaller than 2 mm in diameter. Surprisingly, while nanoparticles target breast cancer metastasis, they may also be found in elevated levels in the pre-metastatic niche, several days before metastases are visualized by MRI or histologically in the tissue. This study highlights the promise of diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles for treating metastatic cancer, possibly even for preventing the onset of the metastatic dissemination by targeting the pre-metastatic niche.

  4. In vivo toxicity studies of europium hydroxide nanorods in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Abdel Moneim, Soha S.; Wang, Enfeng; Dutta, Shamit; Patra, Sujata; Eshed, Michal; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Gedanken, Aharon; Shah, Vijay H.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    Lanthanide nanoparticles and nanorods have been widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in biomedical nanotechnology due to their fluorescence and pro-angiogenic properties to endothelial cells, respectively. Recently, we have demonstrated that europium (III) hydroxide [Eu III (OH) 3 ] nanorods, synthesized by the microwave technique and characterized by several physico-chemical techniques, can be used as pro-angiogenic agents which introduce future therapeutic treatment strategies for severe ischemic heart/limb disease, and peripheral ischemic disease. The toxicity of these inorganic nanorods to endothelial cells was supported by several in vitro assays. To determine the in vivo toxicity, these nanorods were administered to mice through intraperitoneal injection (IP) everyday over a period of seven days in a dose dependent (1.25 to 125 mg kg -1 day -1 ) and time dependent manner (8-60 days). Bio-distribution of europium elements in different organs was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Short-term (S-T) and long-term (L-T) toxicity studies (mice euthanized on days 8 and 60 for S-T and L-T, respectively) show normal blood hematology and serum clinical chemistry with the exception of a slight elevation of liver enzymes. Histological examination of nanorod-treated vital organs (liver, kidney, spleen and lungs) showed no or only mild histological changes that indicate mild toxicity at the higher dose of nanorods.

  5. In vivo studies of biotin absorption in distal rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, B.B.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have extended their previous studies of biotin absorption in rat proximal jejunum (PJ) to examine biotin absorptive capacity of rat ileum (I) and proximal colon (PC) using in vivo intestinal loop technique. Intestinal loops (2.5 cm) were filled with 0.3 ml of solution containing ( 3 H)-biotin and ( 14 C)-inulin in phosphate buffer, pH 6.5. Biotin absorption was determined on the basis of luminal biotin disappearance after correction for inulin recovery and averaged (pmol/loop-10 min; X +/- SEM). In related experiments, 5-cm loops of PJ, distal I (DI), or PC were filled with 0.5 ml of solution of similar composition (1.0 μM biotin). The abdominal cavity was closed and the rats were allowed to recover from anesthesia, then sacrificed 3 hr after injection. Biotin absorption averaged 96.2% (PJ), 93.2% (DI), and 25.8% (PC) of the dose administered. These differences were reflected in the radioactive biotin content of plasma and intestinal loop, kidney, and liver. These data demonstrate significant biotin absorption in rat DI and PC, as required if the intestinal microflora are to be considered as a source of biotin for the host

  6. Antioxidant Components of Cichorium intybus in Vitro and in Vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Ji Hyang; Kim, Jin Kyu; Yang, Deok Cho

    2005-01-01

    Cichorium intybus is a perennial herb of the Compositae Family, native of Europe, west and central Asia, north of Africa and South America. The plant grows to a height of about 50-150 cm. The flowering time of it is from July to September. The flower is lingulate and blue. The basal leaves and the stems of the C. intybus, when they are very tender, are edible. The root, dry and toasted, can be used as a substitute of coffee. Its tuberous roots store inulin as a reserve carbohydrate, which consists of a chain of fructose molecules with a termonal glucose molecule. It may be classified as a fructoligosaccharide, and can be found in more than 30,000 vegetal products. Amongst these vegetables, the chicory roots are outlined for the production of inulin on an industrial scale due to the root's stability in the production of long chains of GFn and constant growth, even in moderate climates. Its use in products with low calories and reduced fat levels, in Europe, the United States and Canada, is already quite widespread. The present experiment was carried out to indicate that C. intybus contains both prooxidant and antioxidant compounds which can act in vitro and in vivo

  7. Antioxidant Components of Cichorium intybus in Vitro and in Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Ji Hyang; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic research Institute, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Deok Cho [Chungbuk National Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Cichorium intybus is a perennial herb of the Compositae Family, native of Europe, west and central Asia, north of Africa and South America. The plant grows to a height of about 50-150 cm. The flowering time of it is from July to September. The flower is lingulate and blue. The basal leaves and the stems of the C. intybus, when they are very tender, are edible. The root, dry and toasted, can be used as a substitute of coffee. Its tuberous roots store inulin as a reserve carbohydrate, which consists of a chain of fructose molecules with a termonal glucose molecule. It may be classified as a fructoligosaccharide, and can be found in more than 30,000 vegetal products. Amongst these vegetables, the chicory roots are outlined for the production of inulin on an industrial scale due to the root's stability in the production of long chains of GFn and constant growth, even in moderate climates. Its use in products with low calories and reduced fat levels, in Europe, the United States and Canada, is already quite widespread. The present experiment was carried out to indicate that C. intybus contains both prooxidant and antioxidant compounds which can act in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Nanotechnology: from In Vivo Imaging System to Controlled Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Maria; Ishtiaq, Saba; Rabia, Samreen; Khatoon, Maryam; Zeb, Ahmad; Khan, Gul Majid; Ur Rehman, Asim; Ud Din, Fakhar

    2017-08-17

    Science and technology have always been the vitals of human's struggle, utilized exclusively for the development of novel tools and products, ranging from micro- to nanosize. Nanotechnology has gained significant attention due to its extensive applications in biomedicine, particularly related to bio imaging and drug delivery. Various nanodevices and nanomaterials have been developed for the diagnosis and treatment of different diseases. Herein, we have described two primary aspects of the nanomedicine, i.e., in vivo imaging and drug delivery, highlighting the recent advancements and future explorations. Tremendous advancements in the nanotechnology tools for the imaging, particularly of the cancer cells, have recently been observed. Nanoparticles offer a suitable medium to carryout molecular level modifications including the site-specific imaging and targeting. Invention of radionuclides, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes and use of gold nanoparticles in biosensors have revolutionized the field of imaging, resulting in easy understanding of the pathophysiology of disease, improved ability to diagnose and enhanced therapeutic delivery. This high specificity and selectivity of the nanomedicine is important, and thus, the recent advancements in this field need to be understood for a better today and a more prosperous future.

  9. In Vivo RNAi-Based Screens: Studies in Model Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Yamamoto-Hino

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a technique widely used for gene silencing in organisms and cultured cells, and depends on sequence homology between double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and target mRNA molecules. Numerous cell-based genome-wide screens have successfully identified novel genes involved in various biological processes, including signal transduction, cell viability/death, and cell morphology. However, cell-based screens cannot address cellular processes such as development, behavior, and immunity. Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans are two model organisms whose whole bodies and individual body parts have been subjected to RNAi-based genome-wide screening. Moreover, Drosophila RNAi allows the manipulation of gene function in a spatiotemporal manner when it is implemented using the Gal4/UAS system. Using this inducible RNAi technique, various large-scale screens have been performed in Drosophila, demonstrating that the method is straightforward and valuable. However, accumulated results reveal that the results of RNAi-based screens have relatively high levels of error, such as false positives and negatives. Here, we review in vivo RNAi screens in Drosophila and the methods that could be used to remove ambiguity from screening results.

  10. Application of cyclic activation to in vivo elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyrou, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experience over the past seven years with a prototype cyclic system, based on an oscillating 5Ci AmBe neutron source, suggests that multielemental in vivo analysis is possible and more specifically indicates that the determination of selenium and cadmium in liver may allow the examination of the interaction of the two elements at acceptable doses. Detection limits obtained for selenium and cadmium, in the same experiment but through different modes of detection i.e. the measurement of delayed gamma-rays from short-lived Se-77m (17.6 s) and prompt gamma-rays from Cd-114, in a cyclic sequence of irradiations, are 0.4 ppm and 6 ppm respectively, for a total irradiation period of 1800s and an equivalent dose to the irradiated region of 5mSv. The redesigning of the prototype system is being considered in order to decrease the detection limit of selenium to a value of 0.1 ppm or less and the effect of increasing the neutron flux tenfold is investigated. This could result in an improvement by a factor of 4 to 5 in detection, for the same dose. 36 references, 6 figures

  11. Histotripsy for Pediatric Cardiac Applications: In Vivo Neonatal Pig Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ryan M.; Owens, Gabe; Ensing, Gregory; Ludomirsky, Achiau; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the in vivo feasibility of using histotripsy to non-invasively create a flow channel between the ventricles by generating a perforation of the ventricular septum, clinically referred to as a ventricular septum defect (VSD). The overall goal is to develop a non-invasive procedure to aid in the treatment of neonatal patients with complex congenital heart diseases such as Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS). Histotripsy is a therapeutic ultrasound technique that produces mechanical fractionation of soft tissue through controlled cavitation. The study was conducted in a live and intact neonatal pig model. The ventricular septum in the neonatal pig heart was treated with histotripsy delivered by a spherically focused 1 MHz transducer positioned outside the chest wall. Histotripsy treatment was applied using 5-cycle ultrasound pulses at 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency with 12-18 MPa peak negative pressure. The treatment was guided and monitored with ultrasound imaging. In all nine subjects treated, a bubble cloud was generated on the ventricular septum using histotripsy, and visualized with ultrasound imaging. Within 20 seconds to 4 minutes following the initiation of a bubble cloud, a VSD was created in all nine pigs and confirmed by the detection of blood flow through the ventricular septum with color Doppler ultrasound. Gross morphology and histology on all hearts showed a demarcated perforation in the ventricular septum. This study shows that a VSD can be created in an intact neonatal animal using extracorporeal histotripsy under real-time ultrasound guidance.

  12. Progesterone lipid nanoparticles: Scaling up and in vivo human study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Elisabetta; Sguizzato, Maddalena; Drechsler, Markus; Mariani, Paolo; Carducci, Federica; Nastruzzi, Claudio; Cortesi, Rita

    2017-10-01

    This investigation describes a scaling up study aimed at producing progesterone containing nanoparticles in a pilot scale. Particularly hot homogenization techniques based on ultrasound homogenization or high pressure homogenization have been employed to produce lipid nanoparticles constituted of tristearin or tristearin in association with caprylic-capric triglyceride. It was found that the high pressure homogenization method enabled to obtain nanoparticles without agglomerates and smaller mean diameters with respect to ultrasound homogenization method. X-ray characterization suggested a lamellar structural organization of both type of nanoparticles. Progesterone encapsulation efficiency was almost 100% in the case of high pressure homogenization method. Shelf life study indicated a double fold stability of progesterone when encapsulated in nanoparticles produced by the high pressure homogenization method. Dialysis and Franz cell methods were performed to mimic subcutaneous and skin administration. Nanoparticles constituted of tristearin in mixture with caprylic/capric triglyceride display a slower release of progesterone with respect to nanoparticles constituted of pure tristearin. Franz cell evidenced a higher progesterone skin uptake in the case of pure tristearin nanoparticles. A human in vivo study, based on tape stripping, was conducted to investigate the performance of nanoparticles as progesterone skin delivery systems. Tape stripping results indicated a decrease of progesterone concentration in stratum corneum within six hours, suggesting an interaction between nanoparticle material and skin lipids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. In vivo PET imaging of neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, Julien; Sarazin, Marie; Bottlaender, Michel

    2018-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that neuroinflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of many neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer's disease (AD). Molecular imaging by PET may be a useful tool to assess neuroinflammation in vivo, thus helping to decipher the complex role of inflammatory processes in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and providing a potential means of monitoring the effect of new therapeutic approaches. For this objective, the main target of PET studies is the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), as it is overexpressed by activated microglia. In the present review, we describe the most widely used PET tracers targeting the TSPO, the methodological issues in tracer quantification and summarize the results obtained by TSPO PET imaging in AD, as well as in neurodegenerative disorders associated with AD, in psychiatric disorders and ageing. We also briefly describe alternative PET targets and imaging modalities to study neuroinflammation. Lastly, we question the meaning of PET imaging data in the context of a highly complex and multifaceted role of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases. This overview leads to the conclusion that PET imaging of neuroinflammation is a promising way of deciphering the enigma of the pathophysiology of AD and of monitoring the effect of new therapies.

  14. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L.I.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive tracers for in vivo clinical diagnosis fall within a narrow, strictly-defined set of specifications in respect of their physical properties, chemical and biochemical characteristics, and medical applications. The type of radioactive decay and physical half-life of the radionuclide are immutable properties which, along with the demands of production and supply, limit the choice of radionuclides used in medicine to only a small fraction of those known to exist. In use, the biochemical and physiological properties of a radiotracer are dictated by the chemical form of the radionuclide. This chemical form may range from elemental, molecular or ionic, to complex compounds formed by coordinate or covalent bonding of the radionuclide to either simple organic or inorganic molecules, or complex macromolecules. Few of the radiotracers which are tested in model systems ever become radiopharmaceuticals in the strictest sense. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals in use are reviewed. Drug legislation and regulations concerning drug manufacture, as well as hospital ethical constraints and legislation concerning unsealed sources of radiation must all be satisfied in order to translate a radiopharmaceutical from the laboratory to clinical use. (author)

  15. In vivo kinetics of intestinal absorption of riboflavin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feder, S.; Daniel, H.; Rehner, G.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate absorption kinetics of riboflavin under in vivo conditions, with blood and lymph circulation intact, the small intestine of anesthetized rats was perfused with [ 14 C]riboflavin in a concentration range between 0.31 and 10.00 mumol/L. Apart from the uptake of riboflavin from the perfusate, passage of the vitamin into the portal (vena portae) and peripheral (vena femoralis) blood was determined. The absorption proved to be a dual process: at low substrate concentrations (less than 2 mumol/L) a saturable component predominated; at higher concentrations simple diffusion was found to be the prevailing uptake mechanism. The apparent transport constant of the saturable component was calculated to be 0.38 mumol/L. [ 14 C]flavin concentrations in the portal and peripheral blood were estimated as a function of the riboflavin concentration of the perfusion media. The dual character of the absorption was reflected by the portal blood flavin levels. Due to the high retaining and equalizing capacity of the liver, the [ 14 C]flavin level of the peripheral blood was relatively low and obeyed saturation kinetics. Constants of elimination, determined by pharmacokinetic calculations, were different for the two blood compartments but independent of the concentration of riboflavin in the perfusion media

  16. In vivo biocompatibility evaluation of Cibacron blue-agarose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, J M; Rose, R; Yousef, M; Hunter, S K; Rodgers, V G

    1999-12-15

    This study investigated the biocompatibility of Cibacron blue-agarose as a biomaterial for microencapsulation. Cibacron blue-agarose is known to have an affinity for albumin under certain pH conditions and in the proper steric environment. Thus it was postulated that the material's high affinity for host albumin might reduce a secondary immune response and reduce the fibrotic overgrowth that often accompanies transplanted foreign materials. In vivo tests were performed using the Lewis rat model. Both Cibacron blue-agarose and plain agarose disks were prepared, with some disks from each group being pre-exposed to sera from Lewis rats. The disks were transplanted into the peritoneal cavities of Lewis rats. After 115 days the disks were excised. Fibrotic overgrowth was analyzed using light microscopy, and a blind study was used to measure the average growth thickness on each disk. The results demonstrated that all disks developed some fibrotic encapsulation and that the presence of Cibacron blue was not significant in reducing fibrotic overgrowth (p = 0.62). Agarose disks pre-exposed to sera had significantly less average overgrowth than any other group (p = 0. 06). Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. A silicon central pattern generator controls locomotion in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelstein, R J; Tenore, F; Guevremont, L; Etienne-Cummings, R; Mushahwar, V K

    2008-09-01

    We present a neuromorphic silicon chip that emulates the activity of the biological spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and creates locomotor patterns to support walking. The chip implements ten integrate-and-fire silicon neurons and 190 programmable digital-to-analog converters that act as synapses. This architecture allows for each neuron to make synaptic connections to any of the other neurons as well as to any of eight external input signals and one tonic bias input. The chip's functionality is confirmed by a series of experiments in which it controls the motor output of a paralyzed animal in real-time and enables it to walk along a three-meter platform. The walking is controlled under closed-loop conditions with the aide of sensory feedback that is recorded from the animal's legs and fed into the silicon CPG. Although we and others have previously described biomimetic silicon locomotor control systems for robots, this is the first demonstration of a neuromorphic device that can replace some functions of the central nervous system in vivo.

  18. Regenerative orthopaedics: in vitro, in vivo...in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geris, Liesbet

    2014-09-01

    In silico, defined in analogy to in vitro and in vivo as those studies that are performed on a computer, is an essential step in problem-solving and product development in classical engineering fields. The use of in silico models is now slowly easing its way into medicine. In silico models are already used in orthopaedics for the planning of complicated surgeries, personalised implant design and the analysis of gait measurements. However, these in silico models often lack the simulation of the response of the biological system over time. In silico models focusing on the response of the biological systems are in full development. This review starts with an introduction into in silico models of orthopaedic processes. Special attention is paid to the classification of models according to their spatiotemporal scale (gene/protein to population) and the information they were built on (data vs hypotheses). Subsequently, the review focuses on the in silico models used in regenerative orthopaedics research. Contributions of in silico models to an enhanced understanding and optimisation of four key elements-cells, carriers, culture and clinics-are illustrated. Finally, a number of challenges are identified, related to the computational aspects but also to the integration of in silico tools into clinical practice.

  19. Nuclear medicine. In vivo diagnosis, PET not included

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herain, C.; Machacek, C.; Menechal, P.; Aubert, B.; Rehel, J.L.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Barbe, R.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Donnarieix, D.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Guerin, C.; Marande, J.L.; Mercier, J.; Paycha, F.; Pierrat, N.

    2011-12-01

    This document deals with radiation protection measures and practices in the medical sector, more particularly when performing in vivo diagnosis in nuclear medicine. It indicates the concerned personnel, the procedure process, the associated hazards and the risks related to ionizing radiation (for sealed and unsealed sources). It describes how risk is to be assessed and exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification). It presents the different aspects of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures for the premises, the installation, radioactive wastes, and for radioactive effluents, protection measures and equipment, training and information, prevention, treatment of incidents and dysfunctions). It describes the various aspects of medical monitoring (personnel, pregnant and breast feeding women, medical and post-occupational file, processing of anomalies and incidents). It presents how risk management is to be assessed, and briefly evokes other related risks. An appendix presents an example of a workstation study in case of nuclear medicine

  20. Atm reactivation reverses ataxia telangiectasia phenotypes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Siena, Sara; Campolo, Federica; Gimmelli, Roberto; Di Pietro, Chiara; Marazziti, Daniela; Dolci, Susanna; Lenzi, Andrea; Nussenzweig, Andre; Pellegrini, Manuela

    2018-02-22

    Hereditary deficiencies in DNA damage signaling are invariably associated with cancer predisposition, immunodeficiency, radiation sensitivity, gonadal abnormalities, premature aging, and tissue degeneration. ATM kinase has been established as a central player in DNA double-strand break repair and its deficiency causes ataxia telangiectasia, a rare, multi-system disease with no cure. So ATM represents a highly attractive target for the development of novel types of gene therapy or transplantation strategies. Atm tamoxifen-inducible mouse models were generated to explore whether Atm reconstitution is able to restore Atm function in an Atm-deficient background. Body weight, immunodeficiency, spermatogenesis, and radioresistance were recovered in transgenic mice within 1 month from Atm induction. Notably, life span was doubled after Atm restoration, mice were protected from thymoma and no cerebellar defects were observed. Atm signaling was functional after DNA damage in vivo and in vitro. In summary, we propose a new Atm mouse model to investigate novel therapeutic strategies for ATM activation in ataxia telangiectasia disease.

  1. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    Radioactive tracers for in vivo clinical diagnosis fall within a narrow, strictly-defined set of specifications in respect of their physical properties, chemical and biochemical characteristics, and (approved) medical applications. The type of radioactive decay and physical half-life of the radionuclide are immutable properties which, along with the demands of production and supply, limit the choice of radionuclides used in medicine to only a small fraction of those known to exist. In use, the biochemical and physiological properties of a radiotracer are dictated by the chemical form of the radionuclide. This chemical form may range from elemental, molecular or ionic, to complex compounds formed by coordinate or covalent bonding of the radionuclide to either simple organic or inorganic molecules, or complex macromolecules. Few of the radiotracers which are tested in model systems ever become radiopharmaceuticals in the strictest sense. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals in use are reviewed. Drug legislation and regulations concerning drug manufacture, as well as hospital ethical constraints and legislation concerning unsealed sources of radiation must all be satisfied in order to translate a radiopharmaceutical from the laboratory to clinical use.

  2. Principles of E-cadherin supramolecular organization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong Quang, Binh-An; Mani, Madhav; Markova, Olga; Lecuit, Thomas; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2013-11-18

    E-cadherin plays a pivotal role in tissue morphogenesis by forming clusters that support intercellular adhesion and transmit tension. What controls E-cadherin mesoscopic organization in clusters is unclear. We use 3D superresolution quantitative microscopy in Drosophila embryos to characterize the size distribution of E-cadherin nanometric clusters. The cluster size follows power-law distributions over three orders of magnitude with exponential decay at large cluster sizes. By exploring the predictions of a general theoretical framework including cluster fusion and fission events and recycling of E-cadherin, we identify two distinct active mechanisms setting the cluster-size distribution. Dynamin-dependent endocytosis targets large clusters only, thereby imposing a cutoff size. Moreover, interactions between E-cadherin clusters and actin filaments control the fission in a size-dependent manner. E-cadherin clustering depends on key cortical regulators, which provide tunable and local control over E-cadherin organization. Our data provide the foundation for a quantitative understanding of how E-cadherin distribution affects adhesion and might regulate force transmission in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Preparation and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Tongshu Suppository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Astragalus polysaccharide (APS (used for intestinal protection was added to formulate the Tongshu suppository to improve the pharmacokinetics of Aceclofenac, which were assessed in New Zealand rabbits using an orthogonal experimental design. The single-agent Aceclofenac was taken as the control formulation. The concentration-time and drug release curves were drawn, and Tmax (min, Cmax (μg·mL−1, AUC0→∞, and MRT were compared using a pharmacokinetic systems program. The formulated Tongshu suppository had moderate hardness, a smooth surface with uniform color, and theoretical drug-loading rate of 8%. Its release rate was in accordance with the drug preparation requirements. The concentration-time curves and drug release curves revealed that the maximum concentrations (Cmax were 4.18±1.03 μg·mL−1 and 3.34±0.41 μg·mL−1 for the Tongshu and Aceclofenac suppositories, respectively, showing statistically insignificant difference, while the peak times were 34.87±4.69 min and 34.76±6.34 min, respectively, also showing statistically insignificant difference. Compared with the Aceclofenac suppository, the relative bioavailability of the Tongshu suppository was 104.4%, and the difference between them was statistically insignificant. In this experiment, the Tongshu suppository was prepared using the hot-melt method. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies confirmed it had higher bioavailability than the Aceclofenac suppository.

  4. Preparation and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Tongshu Suppository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Leilei; Lu, Kuan; Liu, Sisi; Zheng, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) (used for intestinal protection) was added to formulate the Tongshu suppository to improve the pharmacokinetics of Aceclofenac, which were assessed in New Zealand rabbits using an orthogonal experimental design. The single-agent Aceclofenac was taken as the control formulation. The concentration-time and drug release curves were drawn, and T max (min), C max (μg·mL−1), AUC0→∞, and MRT were compared using a pharmacokinetic systems program. The formulated Tongshu suppository had moderate hardness, a smooth surface with uniform color, and theoretical drug-loading rate of 8%. Its release rate was in accordance with the drug preparation requirements. The concentration-time curves and drug release curves revealed that the maximum concentrations (C max) were 4.18 ± 1.03 μg·mL−1 and 3.34 ± 0.41 μg·mL−1 for the Tongshu and Aceclofenac suppositories, respectively, showing statistically insignificant difference, while the peak times were 34.87 ± 4.69 min and 34.76 ± 6.34 min, respectively, also showing statistically insignificant difference. Compared with the Aceclofenac suppository, the relative bioavailability of the Tongshu suppository was 104.4%, and the difference between them was statistically insignificant. In this experiment, the Tongshu suppository was prepared using the hot-melt method. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies confirmed it had higher bioavailability than the Aceclofenac suppository. PMID:27610366

  5. In vivo spatial frequency domain spectroscopy of two layer media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nguyen, John Quan M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of tissue blood volume and local oxygen saturation can inform the assessment of tissue health, healing, and dysfunction. These quantities can be estimated from the contribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to the absorption spectrum of the dermis. However, estimation of blood related absorption in skin can be confounded by the strong absorption of melanin in the epidermis and epidermal thickness and pigmentation varies with anatomic location, race, gender, and degree of disease progression. Therefore, a method is desired that decouples the effect of melanin absorption in the epidermis from blood absorption in the dermis for a large range of skin types and thicknesses. A previously developed inverse method based on a neural network forward model was applied to simulated spatial frequency domain reflectance of skin for multiple wavelengths in the near infrared. It is demonstrated that the optical thickness of the epidermis and absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the dermis can be determined independently and with minimal coupling. Then, the same inverse method was applied to reflectance measurements from a tissue simulating phantom and in vivo human skin. Oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin concentrations were estimated from the volar forearms of weakly and strongly pigmented subjects using a standard homogeneous model and the present two layer model.

  6. Fluorescence Endoscopy in vivo based on Fiber-bundle Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zufiria, B.; Gomez-Garcia, P.; Stamatakis, K.; Vaquero, J.J.; Fresno, M.; Desco, M.; Ripoll, J.; Arranz, A.

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution imaging techniques have become important for the determination of the cellular organization that is coupled to organ function. In many cases the organ can be viewed without the need of ionizing radiation techniques in an easier way. This is the case of the gastrointestinal tract, an organ that can be directly accessed with endoscopy avoiding any invasive procedure. Here we describe the design, assembly and testing of a fluorescence high-resolution endoscope intended for the study of the cellular organization of the colon in an experimental mouse model of colon carcinoma. Access to the colon of the mouse took place using a fiber-optic bundle that redirects the light coming from a LED to produce fluorescence and detect it back through the fiber bundle. Results from in vivo and ex-vivo test using our fluorescence fiber bundle endoscope show altered tissue structure and destruction of the intestinal crypts in tumor-bearing areas compared with healthy tissue. (Author)

  7. In vivo small animal imaging: Current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagadis, George C.; Loudos, George; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Langer, Steve G.; Nikiforidis, George C.

    2010-01-01

    The use of small animal models in basic and preclinical sciences constitutes an integral part of testing new pharmaceutical agents prior to commercial translation to clinical practice. Whole-body small animal imaging is a particularly elegant and cost-effective experimental platform for the timely validation and commercialization of novel agents from the bench to the bedside. Biomedical imaging is now listed along with genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics as an integral part of biological and medical sciences. Miniaturized versions of clinical diagnostic modalities, including but not limited to microcomputed tomography, micromagnetic resonance tomography, microsingle-photon-emission tomography, micropositron-emission tomography, optical imaging, digital angiography, and ultrasound, have all greatly improved our investigative abilities to longitudinally study various experimental models of human disease in mice and rodents. After an exhaustive literature search, the authors present a concise and critical review of in vivo small animal imaging, focusing on currently available modalities as well as emerging imaging technologies on one side and molecularly targeted contrast agents on the other. Aforementioned scientific topics are analyzed in the context of cancer angiogenesis and innovative antiangiogenic strategies under-the-way to the clinic. Proposed hybrid approaches for diagnosis and targeted site-specific therapy are highlighted to offer an intriguing glimpse of the future.

  8. Ultrastructural features of Mimulus aurantiacus (Scrophulariaceae) pollen tubes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Nuran; Dane, Feruzan; Olgun, Göksel

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study is to give information on ultrastructure of in vivo pollen tubes of Mimulus aurantiacus which were collected from the Botanical Garden of the University of California at Berkeley. Materials were prepared according to electron microscopy methods and examined under Zeiss electron microscope. Four zones were examined in the pollen tubes of Mimulus aurantiacus. Apical zone: Mitochondria, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, rough endoplasmic reticulum, dictyosomes and secretory vesicles were observed. Subapical zone: This area contained abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum and occasionally some smooth endoplasmic reticulum. The polysomes, mitochondria, proplastids that contain starch, small vacuoles and a few lipid bodies were detected. Nuclear zone: Both generative and vegetative cell nuclei lie in this zone. The vegetative cell nucleus was large and long. Rough endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, ribosomes, dictyosomes, and amyloplasts that are rich of starch were observed. Vacuolation and plug formation zone: Cytoplasm of the tubes was full of large vacuoles. Few organelles such as mitochondria, dictyosome and rough endoplasmic reticulum were detected along their periphery.

  9. In vivo photoacoustic monitoring of anti-obesity photothermal lipolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghyun; Lee, Jung Ho; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Kim, Chulhong

    2018-02-01

    Obesity with a body mass index is greater than 30 kg/m2 is one of the rapidly growing diseases in advanced societies and can lead to stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart failure. Common methods of removing subcutaneous adipose tissues are liposuction and laser treatment. In this study, we used photoacoustic imaging to monitor the anti-obesity photothermal degradation process. To improve the photothermal lipid degradation efficiency without any invasive methods, we synthesized hyaluronic acid hollow hold nanosphere adipocyte targeting sequence peptide (HA-HAuNS-ATS) conjugates. The conjugate enhanced the skin penetration ability and biodegradability of the nanoparticles using hyaluronate and enhanced the targeting effect on adipose tissue with adipocyte targeting sequence peptide. Thus, the conjugate can be delivered to the adipose tissue by simply spreading the conjugate on the skin without any invasive method. Then, the photothermal lipolysis and delivery of the conjugate were photoacoustically monitored in vivo. These results demonstrate the potential for photoacoustic method to be applied for photothermal lipolysis monitoring.

  10. In vivo cardiac role of migfilin during experimental pressure overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubner, Bernhard Johannes; Moik, Daniel; Schuetz, Thomas; Reiner, Martin F; Voelkl, Jakob G; Streil, Katrin; Bader, Kerstin; Zhao, Lei; Scheu, Claudia; Mair, Johannes; Pachinger, Otmar; Metzler, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    Increased myocardial wall strain triggers the cardiac hypertrophic response by increasing cardiomyocyte size, reprogramming gene expression, and enhancing contractile protein synthesis. The LIM protein, migfilin, is a cytoskeleton-associated protein that was found to translocate in vitro into the nucleus in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, where it co-activates the pivotal cardiac transcription factor Csx/Nkx2.5. However, the in vivo role of migfilin in cardiac function and stress response is unclear. To define the role of migfilin in cardiac hypertrophy, we induced hypertension by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and compared cardiac morphology and function of migfilin knockout (KO) with wild-type (WT) hearts. Heart size and myocardial contractility were comparable in untreated migfilin KO and WT hearts, but migfilin-null hearts presented a reduced extent of hypertrophic remodelling in response to chronic hypertensile stress. Migfilin KO mice maintained their cardiac function for a longer time period compared with WT mice, which presented extensive fibrosis and death due to heart failure. Migfilin translocated into the nucleus of TAC-treated cardiomyocytes, and migfilin KO hearts showed reduced Akt activation during the early response to pressure overload. Our findings indicate an important role of migfilin in the regulation of cardiac hypertrophy upon experimental TAC. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. In vivo gene expression and immunoreactivity of Leptospira collagenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janwitthayanan, Weena; Keelawat, Somboon; Payungporn, Sunchai; Lowanitchapat, Alisa; Suwancharoen, Duangjai; Poovorawan, Yong; Chirathaworn, Chintana

    2013-06-12

    Pulmonary hemorrhage is an increasing cause of death of leptospirosis patients. Bacterial collagenase has been shown to be involved in lung hemorrhage induced by various infectious agents. According to Leptospira whole genome study, colA, a gene suggested to code for bacterial collagenase has been identified. We investigated colA gene expression in lung tissues of Leptospira infected hamsters. Golden Syrian Hamsters were injected intraperitoneally with Leptospira interrogans serovar Pyrogenes. The hamsters were sacrificed on days 3, 5 and 7 post-infection and lung tissues were collected for histological examination and RNA extraction. Lung pathologies including atelectasis and hemorrhage were observed. Expression of colA gene in lung tissues was demonstrated by both RT-PCR and real time PCR. In addition, ColA protein was cloned and the purified protein could react with sera from leptospirosis patients. Leptospira ColA protein may play a role in Leptospira survival or pathogenesis in vivo. Its reaction with leptospirosis sera suggests that this protein is immunogenic and could be another candidate for vaccine development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization and In Vivo Biological Performance of Biosilicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia M. Renno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After an introduction showing the growing interest in glasses and glass-ceramics as biomaterials used for bone healing, we describe a new biomaterial named Biosilicate. Biosilicate is the designation of a group of fully crystallized glass-ceramics of the Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 system. Several in vitro tests have shown that Biosilicate is a very active biomaterial and that the HCA layer is formed in less than 24 hours of exposure to “simulated body fluid” (SBF solution. Also, in vitro studies with osteoblastic cells have shown that Biosilicate disks supported significantly larger areas of calcified matrix compared to 45S5 Bioglass, indicating that this bioactive glass-ceramic may promote enhancement of in vitro bone-like tissue formation in osteogenic cell cultures. Finally, due to its special characteristics, Biosilicate has also been successfully tested in several in vivo studies. These studies revealed that the material is biocompatible, presents excellent bioactive properties, and is effective to stimulate the deposition of newly formed bone in animal models. All these data highlight the huge potential of Biosilicate to be used in bone regeneration applications.

  13. The in vivo behavior of copper-64-labeled azamacrocyclic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones-Wilson, Teresa M.; Deal, Kim A.; Anderson, Carolyn J.; McCarthy, Deborah W.; Kovacs, Zoltan; Motekaitis, Ramunas J.; Sherry, A. Dean; Martell, Arthur E.; Welch, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of copper radioisotopes in imaging and therapy applications has created a greater need for bifunctional chelates (BFCs) for complexing copper radioisotopes to biomolecules. It has been demonstrated that the charge and lipophilicity of the Cu-BFC complex has a significant effect on the in vivo behavior of the radiolabeled Cu-BFC-biomolecule conjugate. To evaluate the effects of charge, stability, and macrocyclic backbone size on the biological behavior of 64 Cu complexes, a series of macrocyclic 64 Cu complexes have been prepared, and the biodistributions of these agents were evaluated in normal Sprague-Dawley rats. Two macrocyclic backbones, dodecane and tetradecane, were evaluated; cyclen, DOTA, and DO2A were dodecane backbone derivatives, and cyclam, TETA, and et-cyclam were tetradecane backbone derivatives. The biodistributions of the 64 Cu-labeled complexes correlated with differences in the size of the macrocycle backbone and the formal charge of the complex. All compounds showed uptake and clearance through the liver and kidneys; however, the positively charged 64 Cu complexes showed significantly higher uptake in both of these organs than did the negatively charged or neutral complexes. 64 Cu-TETA, a negatively charged complex with the tetradecane backbone, had the most efficient clearance by 24 hours' postinjection. These data suggest that negatively charged complexes may have more favorable clearance properties when used as BFCs

  14. In vivo localization of cloned IL-2-dependent T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, A.M.; Palladino, M.A.; Oettgen, H.; De Sousa, M.

    1983-01-01

    The quantitative organ distribution and tissue microenvironment positioning of radioisotopically labeled cloned T cells were characterized. Intravenous (iv) injection of 51chromium ( 51 Cr)-labeled, long-term cultured cloned T-helper cells and cells from several cloned cytolytic T-lymphocyte lines (CTLL) resulted in poor localization of these cells in recipient lymphoid tissues, similar to results reported for activated lymphoblastoid cells. Simultaneous administration of interleukin 2 (IL-2) with labeled cells resulted in enhanced recovery from recipient spleen. By the intraperitoneal (ip) injection route, overall percentage recovery of injected radioactivity was lower than by the iv route, but significant localization to lymph nodes occurred. Examination of autoradiographs of tissue sections from recipients of [ 3 H]adenosine-labeled cells showed most label associated with intact, isolated cells in the liver, lungs, spleen, and small intestine. By 24 hr after iv injection, labeled cells in spleen sections were distributed to both nonlymphoid and T- and B-lymphoid areas. These findings suggest that poor localization of these cells to recipient lymphoid tissue is due both to intrinsic characteristics of cultured lymphocytes and to the possible reduced viability of IL-2-dependent cells in vivo

  15. Cell-specific monitoring of protein synthesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Kourtis

    Full Text Available Analysis of general and specific protein synthesis provides important information, relevant to cellular physiology and function. However, existing methodologies, involving metabolic labelling by incorporation of radioactive amino acids into nascent polypeptides, cannot be applied to monitor protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in live specimens. We have developed a novel approach for monitoring protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in vivo. Fluorescent reporter proteins such as GFP are expressed in specific cells and tissues of interest or throughout animals using appropriate promoters. Protein synthesis rates are assessed by following fluorescence recovery after partial photobleaching of the fluorophore at targeted sites. We evaluate the method by examining protein synthesis rates in diverse cell types of live, wild type or mRNA translation-defective Caenorhabditis elegans animals. Because it is non-invasive, our approach allows monitoring of protein synthesis in single cells or tissues with intrinsically different protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, it can be readily implemented in other organisms or cell culture systems.

  16. In vivo conjugation of nasal lavage proteins by hexahydrophthalic anhydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannesson, Gunvor; Lindh, Christian; Nielsen, Joern; Bjoerk, Birgitta; Rosqvist, Seema; Joensson, Bo A.G.

    2004-01-01

    Hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA), an industrially important chemical, is a highly allergenic compound. The aim of this work was to identify proteins in nasal lavage fluid (NLF) that form adducts with HHPA. Such bindings may induce production of specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) or affect physiological mechanisms of the proteins. NLF was obtained from HHPA-exposed volunteers, workers and exposed guinea pigs. HHPA-binding proteins were visualized with immunoblotting using a polyclonal antiserum against HHPA. The proteins were excised from sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels, digested with trypsin and identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and database searches. The antiserum was found to be specific for HHPA-bound proteins. In vivo formed HHPA-binding proteins in humans were identified as antileukoproteinase, immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin A (IgA), serum albumin and lactoferrin. In addition, several proteins binding to HHPA were found in NLFs from guinea pigs but these could not be identified from database searches. Hypotheses for development of airways diseases by adduction of this allergenic compound to the NLF proteins in humans were established

  17. In vitro and in vivo toxicity assessment of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Sharma, Neha; Maitra, S. S.

    2017-11-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized gene therapy, diagnostics and environmental remediation. Their bulk production, uses and disposal have posed threat to the environment. With the appearance of these nanoparticles in the environment, their toxicity assessment is an immediate concern. This review is an attempt to summarize the major techniques used in cytotoxity determination. The review also presents a detailed and elaborative discussion on the toxicity imposed by different types of nanoparticles including carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles, quantum dots, fullerenes, aluminium nanoparticles, zinc nanoparticles, iron nanoparticles, titanium nanoparticles and silica nanoparticles. It discusses the in vitro and in vivo toxological effects of nanoparticles on bacteria, microalgae, zebrafish, crustacean, fish, rat, mouse, pig, guinea pig, human cell lines and human. It also discusses toxological effects on organs such as liver, kidney, spleen, sperm, neural tissues, liver lysosomes, spleen macrophages, glioblastoma cells, hematoma cells and various mammalian cell lines. It provides information about the effects of nanoparticles on the gene-expression, growth and reproduction of the organisms.

  18. Release of peptides from Fibrinogen in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weibel, S.

    1986-01-01

    The dissertation deals experimentally with the following problem fields: The attempt was made to obtain extremely pure, native peptides from fibrinogen with micropreparation with the help of high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC); a HPLC-pure antigen which could be labelled (DAT-FPA) was also to be produced and a HPLC-purified, labelled antigen (J 125 DAT-FPA) for the radioimmunoassay was to be prepared. By applying HPLC-purified FPA-material to immunise rabbits, a highly specific antibody against FPA was obtained, and the radioimmunoassay was decisively improved. Furthermore, a method with a high recovery rate specific for the A-peptides could be found. A procedure was developed which is able to separate the modifications from the plasma from one another and to prove them specifically in ng-quantities. This is the first time that the sensitive method of high-pressure liquid chromatography is used to observe the effects of the snake venom enzymes on fibrinogen over a period of 20 hrs. The kinetics of intravenously administered J 123 DAT-FPA and, in comparison, J 123 FPB β 15-42 in vivo in rabbits with the help of a scintiscanning method, was investigated and the distribution in the organism and the ways of elimination were determined. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Transmission dose estimation algorithm for in vivo dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Hyong Geun; Shin, Kyo Chul; Huh, Soon Nyung; Woo, Hong Gyun; Ha, Sung Whan; Lee, Hyoung Koo

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of transmission dose is useful for in vivo dosimetry of QA purpose. The objective of this study is to develope an algorithm for estimation of tumor dose using measured transmission dose for open radiation field. Transmission dose was measured with various field size (FS), phantom thickness (Tp), and phantom chamber distance (PCD) with an acrylic phantom for 6 MV and 10 MV X-ray. Source to chamber distance (SCD) was set to 150 cm. Measurement was conducted with a 0.6 cc Farmer type ion chamber. Using measured data and regression analysis, an algorithm was developed for estimation of expected reading of transmission dose. Accuracy of the algorithm was tested with flat solid phantom with various settings. The algorithm consisted of quadratic function of log(A/P) (where A/P is area-perimeter ratio) and tertiary function of PCD. The algorithm could estimate dose with very high accuracy for open square field, with errors within ±0.5%. For elongated radiation field, the errors were limited to ±1.0%. The developed algorithm can accurately estimate the transmission dose in open radiation fields with various treatment settings

  20. Transmission dose estimation algorithm for in vivo dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hyong Geun; Shin, Kyo Chul [Dankook Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Soon Nyung; Woo, Hong Gyun; Ha, Sung Whan [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyoung Koo [Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Measurement of transmission dose is useful for in vivo dosimetry of QA purpose. The objective of this study is to develope an algorithm for estimation of tumor dose using measured transmission dose for open radiation field. Transmission dose was measured with various field size (FS), phantom thickness (Tp), and phantom chamber distance (PCD) with an acrylic phantom for 6 MV and 10 MV X-ray. Source to chamber distance (SCD) was set to 150 cm. Measurement was conducted with a 0.6 cc Farmer type ion chamber. Using measured data and regression analysis, an algorithm was developed for estimation of expected reading of transmission dose. Accuracy of the algorithm was tested with flat solid phantom with various settings. The algorithm consisted of quadratic function of log(A/P) (where A/P is area-perimeter ratio) and tertiary function of PCD. The algorithm could estimate dose with very high accuracy for open square field, with errors within {+-}0.5%. For elongated radiation field, the errors were limited to {+-}1.0%. The developed algorithm can accurately estimate the transmission dose in open radiation fields with various treatment settings.

  1. Chaperoning Roles of Macromolecules Interacting with Proteins in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baik L. Seong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The principles obtained from studies on molecular chaperones have provided explanations for the assisted protein folding in vivo. However, the majority of proteins can fold without the assistance of the known molecular chaperones, and little attention has been paid to the potential chaperoning roles of other macromolecules. During protein biogenesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptide chains interact with a variety of macromolecules, including ribosomes, RNAs, cytoskeleton, lipid bilayer, proteolytic system, etc. In general, the hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their substrates have been widely believed to be mainly responsible for the substrate stabilization against aggregation. Emerging evidence now indicates that other features of macromolecules such as their surface charges, probably resulting in electrostatic repulsions, and steric hindrance, could play a key role in the stabilization of their linked proteins against aggregation. Such stabilizing mechanisms are expected to give new insights into our understanding of the chaperoning functions for de novo protein folding. In this review, we will discuss the possible chaperoning roles of these macromolecules in de novo folding, based on their charge and steric features.

  2. Uncaria rhynchophylla induces angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Do-Young; Huh, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Jae-Dong; Cho, Eun-Mi; Baek, Yong-Hyeon; Yang, Ha-Ru; Cho, Yoon-Je; Kim, Kang-Il; Kim, Deog-Yoon; Park, Dong-Suk

    2005-12-01

    Angiogenesis consists of the proliferation, migration, and differentiation of endothelial cells, and angiogenic factors and matrix protein interactions modulate this process. The aim of this study was to determine the angiogenic properties of Uncaria rhynchophylla. Uncaria rhynchophylla significantly enhanced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Neutralization of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) by monoclonal antibody suppressed the Uncaria rhynchophylla stimulatory effect on proliferation. In addition, Uncaria rhynchophylla significantly increased chemotactic-migration on gelatin and tubular structures on Matrigel of HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, Uncaria rhynchophylla dose-dependently increased VEGF, and bFGF gene expression and protein secretion of HUVEC. The angiogenic activity of Uncaria rhynchophylla was confirmed using an in vivo Matrigel angiogenesis model, showing promotion of blood vessel formation. These results suggest that Uncaria rhynchophylla could potentially used to accelerate vascular wound healing or to promote the growth of collateral blood vessel in ischemic tissues.

  3. In vivo evaluation on organ degeneration using radiation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Moon, C. J.; Kim, S. R. [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of developed product on skin and reproductive system of animal due to irradiation via in vivo test, and finally acquire fundamental data for evaluation of protective materials on degenerative damages. <1st year> - Evaluate the effect of candidate materials on UV-induced skin damages {center_dot} Test the effect of candidate materials to protect the skin from photodamage, the gross and microscopic changes in the skin of hairless mice and materials-treated mice exposed chronically to UV <2nd year> - Evaluate the effect of developed product (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced reproductive system (female) damages - Evaluate the effect of developed product (HemoHIM) on chemical-induced reproductive system (female) damages <3rd year> - Evaluate the effect of developed product (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced reproductive system (male) damages - Evaluate the effect of developed product (HemoHIM) on chemical-induced reproductive system (male) damages

  4. Proteins of Bacuri almonds: nutritional value and in vivo digestibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalli Costa Barbosa Lima e Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacuri (Scheelea phalerata Mart. is a type of palm fruit tree widely distributed in the Brazilian Cerrado. The objective of this paper was to study the almonds of bacuri, in their form in natura and processed, focusing on their nutritional value through the profile of amino acids, anti-nutritional factors and in vivo digestibility. Raw and toasted samples of the almond presented a high level of proteins and fiber. Proteins of raw bacuri almond showed no limiting amino acid when compared to the ones recommended by FAO/WHO, and histidine was the most limiting essential amino acid in the toasted almonds. The almond of bacuri does not present anti- nutritional factors. In an assay with rats fed with control (casein, tests (bacuri almond flours and aproteic diets, we verified the quantity of ration ingested and body weight gain, determining the urinary and metabolic nitrogen. Rats treated with the test diets presented inferior values of True Digestibility (DV, (82.9 and 72.3%, respectively for the raw and toasted almonds when compared to the control group (92.3%. The raw bacuri almond presented a superior nutritional value to the one found in the toasted almond.

  5. Investigations on renal organic and inorganic solutes, in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    A basic question in renal physiology is how do the cells of the renal medulla survive the high concentrations of sodium chloride and urea which occur with antidiuresis. The problem is two-fold: (1) urea, being highly permeable to cell membranes, should enter the cell and adversely affect protein function; and (2) inorganic ions, being in much higher concentration extracellularly than intracellularly should dehydrate the cell. If these organic solutes exist in response to high concentrations of sodium chloride and urea, then their content should vary with diuretic state. Two protocols were developed to test the validity of this hypothesis. The first protocol used 31 P-NMR in vivo to monitor GPC content before, during, and after acute diuresis in an exteriorized rabbit kidney model. Changes in sodium distribution and tissue structure were monitored dynamically with 23 Na- and 1 H-NMR imaging, respectively. The second protocol used HPLC to quantitate each of the four organic solutes in renal inner medullary homogenates. Here, the effect of diuretic state and acute diuresis on organic solute content was assessed

  6. Novel shadowless imaging for eyes-like diagnosis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ning; Jiang, Kai; Li, Qi; Zhang, Lili; Ma, Li; Huang, Guoliang

    2016-10-01

    Eyes-like diagnosis was a traditional Chinese medicine method for many diseases, such as chronic gastritis, diabetes, hypertension etc. There was a close relationship between viscera and eyes-like. White-Eye was divided into fourteen sections, which corresponded to different viscera, so eyes-like was the reflection of status of viscera, in another words, it was an epitome of viscera health condition. In this paper, we developed a novel shadowless imaging technology and system for eyes-like diagnosis in vivo, which consisted of an optical shadowless imaging device for capturing and saving images of patients' eyes-like, and a computer linked to the device for image processing. A character matching algorithm was developed to extract the character of white-eye in corresponding sections of eyes-like images taken by the optical shadowless imaging device, according to the character of eyes-like, whether there were viscera diseases could be learned. A series of assays were carried out, and the results verified the feasibility of eyes-like diagnosis technique.

  7. Evaluation of human muscle in vivo by potassium radiometric measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Wanderson de P.

    2000-01-01

    Potassium is an essential element to the human metabolism and is present in all living cells, mainly in the striated muscular fibers. K-40 is one of the natural potassium isotopes with mass percentage of 0,0118% . This isotope emits beta particle and gamma rays with 1460 keV. The energy of K-40 photon and its uniform distribution within the human body allows its in vivo measurement. The objective of this study is to optimize this technique and evaluate the possibility of its medical application in order to quantify muscle increase during recovering procedures. Subjects of both sexes measured until this moment were divided into two groups. Subjects of Group 1 do not exercise routinely and subjects of Group 2 does. In Group 1 the average potassium mass, muscle mass and potassium concentration were (101±16)g of K, (20±3)kg of muscle and (1,3±0,3)g of K/kg of body mass, respectively, while in Group 2 average values were (125±38)g of K, (25±8)kg of muscle and (1,7±0,2)g of K/kg of body mass. The comparison between average values shows a clear difference, which allows to correlate a higher K mass with routine body activity. The technique has shown enough sensitivity for this application. (author)

  8. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Fre, Silvia

    2013-10-14

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive "triple negative" human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2(SAT) transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells.

  9. In Vivo Inhibition of Lipid Accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulistiyani; Purwakusumah, E. P.; Andrianto, D.

    2017-03-01

    This is a preliminary research report on the use of Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to establish anti-obesity screening assay of the natural plant resources. Nematode C. elegans has been used as experimental animal model for understanding lipid accumulation. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of selected plant extracts on lipid accumulation in C. elegans. Currently no report could be found regarding lipid accumulation in C.elegans treated with ethanolic leaf extracts of jabon merah (Anthocephalus macrophyllus), jati belanda (Guazuma ulmifolia), and Mindi (Melia Azedarach) plants. Lipid accumulation was determined qualitatively using lipid staining method and quantitatively by colorimetry using sulpho-phospho-vanillin reagent. Data showed that lipid accumulation was inhibited up to 72% by extract of M. azedarach, about 35% by both of A. macrophyllus and G. ulmifolia extracts, and up to 25% by orlistat (a synthetic slimming drug). Ethanolic extract of A. macrophyllus, G. ulmifolia, and M. azedarach leaves were shown to inhibit lipid accumulation in C. elegans and M. azedarach leaves extracts was the most effective inhibitor. C.elegans were shown to be an effective model for in vivo lipid accumulation mechanism and potential to be used as a rapid screening assay for bioactive compounds with lipid accumulation inhibitory activity.

  10. In Vivo Enhancer Analysis Chromosome 16 Conserved NoncodingSequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Ahituv, Nadav; Moses, Alan M.; Nobrega,Marcelo; Prabhakar, Shyam; Shoukry, Malak; Minovitsky, Simon; Visel,Axel; Dubchak, Inna; Holt, Amy; Lewis, Keith D.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Akiyama, Jennifer; De Val, Sarah; Afzal, Veena; Black, Brian L.; Couronne, Olivier; Eisen, Michael B.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-02-01

    The identification of enhancers with predicted specificitiesin vertebrate genomes remains a significant challenge that is hampered bya lack of experimentally validated training sets. In this study, weleveraged extreme evolutionary sequence conservation as a filter toidentify putative gene regulatory elements and characterized the in vivoenhancer activity of human-fish conserved and ultraconserved1 noncodingelements on human chromosome 16 as well as such elements from elsewherein the genome. We initially tested 165 of these extremely conservedsequences in a transgenic mouse enhancer assay and observed that 48percent (79/165) functioned reproducibly as tissue-specific enhancers ofgene expression at embryonic day 11.5. While driving expression in abroad range of anatomical structures in the embryo, the majority of the79 enhancers drove expression in various regions of the developingnervous system. Studying a set of DNA elements that specifically droveforebrain expression, we identified DNA signatures specifically enrichedin these elements and used these parameters to rank all ~;3,400human-fugu conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. The testingof the top predictions in transgenic mice resulted in a three-foldenrichment for sequences with forebrain enhancer activity. These datadramatically expand the catalogue of in vivo-characterized human geneenhancers and illustrate the future utility of such training sets for avariety of iological applications including decoding the regulatoryvocabulary of the human genome.

  11. A genetically encoded biosensor for visualising hypoxia responses in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tvisha Misra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cells experience different oxygen concentrations depending on location, organismal developmental stage, and physiological or pathological conditions. Responses to reduced oxygen levels (hypoxia rely on the conserved hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1. Understanding the developmental and tissue-specific responses to changing oxygen levels has been limited by the lack of adequate tools for monitoring HIF-1 in vivo. To visualise and analyse HIF-1 dynamics in Drosophila, we used a hypoxia biosensor consisting of GFP fused to the oxygen-dependent degradation domain (ODD of the HIF-1 homologue Sima. GFP-ODD responds to changing oxygen levels and to genetic manipulations of the hypoxia pathway, reflecting oxygen-dependent regulation of HIF-1 at the single-cell level. Ratiometric imaging of GFP-ODD and a red-fluorescent reference protein reveals tissue-specific differences in the cellular hypoxic status at ambient normoxia. Strikingly, cells in the larval brain show distinct hypoxic states that correlate with the distribution and relative densities of respiratory tubes. We present a set of genetic and image analysis tools that enable new approaches to map hypoxic microenvironments, to probe effects of perturbations on hypoxic signalling, and to identify new regulators of the hypoxia response.

  12. Measurements, in vivo, of parameters of the dopamine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.M.; DeJesus, O.T.; Dinerstein, R.; Revenaugh, J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses methods of measuring important parameters of the dopamine system in the living animal by use of PET techniques. One primary concern is the density and binding affinity of post-synaptic neuroreceptors. A second concern is the activity of neurons. In vivo, this is generally related to the turnover of neurotransmitter and can also be related to the uptake of precursor compounds by the neurons. If the transmitter and neuroleptic compound compete for the same binding sites (on the receptor molecule) these two effects are interwoven and are not easily isolated. It appears that the movement of neuroleptic drugs from the brain is slow enough to allow equilibrium to be maintained between ligand and receptor, especially after some time for the initial washout and translocation in the brain. To test the consequences of equilibrium binding and the possible use of the model for measurement of receptor densities by emission tomography we have modified Clark's equilibrium model of ligand binding. In this note we will describe the solutions of the equations and some comparisons of the predictions of the model with data, as well as its application to tomographic measurements

  13. Visualizing radiofrequency-skin interaction using multiphoton microscopy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Wang, Chun-Chin; Hsu, Chih-Ting; Chu, Thomas; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Redundant skin laxity is a major feature of aging. Recently, radiofrequency has been introduced for nonablative tissue tightening by volumetric heating of the deep dermis. Despite the wide range of application based on this therapy, the effect of this technique on tissue and the subsequent tissue remodeling have not been investigated in detail. Our objective is to evaluate the potential of non-linear optics, including multiphoton autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, as a non-invasive imaging modality for the real-time study of radiofrequency-tissue interaction. Electro-optical synergy device (ELOS) was used as the radiofrequency source in this study. The back skin of nude mouse was irradiated with radiofrequency at different passes. We evaluated the effect on skin immediately and 1 month after treatment with multiphoton microscopy. Corresponding histology was performed for comparison. We found that SHG is negatively correlated to radiofrequency passes, which means that collagen structural disruption happens immediately after thermal damage. After 1 month of collagen remodeling, SHG signals increased above baseline, indicating that collagen regeneration has occurred. Our findings may explain mechanism of nonablative skin tightening and were supported by histological examinations. Our work showed that monitoring the dermal heating status of RF and following up the detailed process of tissue reaction can be imaged and quantified with multiphoton microscopy non-invasively in vivo. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. In Vivo Thyroid 125I Monitoring with Radioluminography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, K.; Saze, T.; Yamashita, H.; Etoh, M.

    1999-01-01

    The counting features of an in vivo thyroid monitoring system with an imaging plate (IP) were investigated by using an anthropomorphic thyroid-neck phantom. The realistic thyroid phantoms loaded with 125 I solution were embedded in a neck phantom. The IP was fixed on the neck phantom and exposed to 125 I photons emitted from the thyroid phantom by changing the pre-thyroid tissue thickness at the front of the thyroid. A clear thyroid image was obtained at short tissue thicknesses. A region of interest (ROI) was set so that the ROI contained the thyroid image. The count within the ROI was regarded as the number of 125 I photons detected by the IP. The IP counting efficiency was about 0.6% at maximum. Monitoring with IP has the advantage of allowing the worker to move freely during the monitoring period by wearing the IP on his neck. Radioluminography with IP has shown itself to be useful when monitoring thyroid 125 I. (author)

  15. In vivo measurements of nitrogen using a neutron activation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, L.; Alpsten, M.; Toelli, J.; Drugge, N.; Mattsson, S.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of body composition is essential for understanding of many diseases such as obesity, anorexia, cancer, kidney and heart diseases. For many years, total body potassium (TBK) has been used as an estimate of the intracellular protein. In some diseases intracellular- and extracellular protein may vary significantly. Together with TBK, total body nitrogen (TBN) should in these cases be measured to estimate the total protein content. The nitrogen content can be measured by in vivo neutron activation. In this work the authors have used the prompt gamma technique: Thermalized neutrons from a Cf-252-source are captured in (n, δ)-reactions. Prompt 10.8 MeV photons are emitted and can be detected during irradiation. The source is contained in a polyethylene block which forms a collimator surrounded by a phi 1.40 m x 0.80 m water tank. The patient is irradiated from below by a 15 cm x 50 cm neutron field. It is possible to scan the whole patient or to measure a part of the body. A phi 15 cm x 15 cm NaI(T1)-detector is used for detection of the 10.8 MeV photons. The detector is mounted above the patient outside the neutron field

  16. In Vivo Characterization of Human APOA5 Haplotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahituv, Nadav; Akiyama, Jennifer; Chapman-Helleboid, Audrey; Fruchart, Jamila; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2006-10-01

    Increased plasma triglycerides concentrations are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies support a reproducible genetic association between two minor haplotypes in the human apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) and increased plasma triglyceride concentrations. We thus sought to investigate the effect of these minor haplotypes (APOA5*2 and APOA5*3) on ApoAV plasma levels through the precise insertion of single-copy intact APOA5 haplotypes at a targeted location in the mouse genome. While we found no difference in the amount of human plasma ApoAV in mice containing the common APOA5*1 and minor APOA5*2 haplotype, the introduction of the single APOA5*3 defining allele (19W) resulted in 3-fold lower ApoAV plasma levels consistent with existing genetic association studies. These results indicate that S19W polymorphism is likely to be functional and explain the strong association of this variant with plasma triglycerides supporting the value of sensitive in vivo assays to define the functional nature of human haplotypes.

  17. In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

  18. Formulation and In vitro/In vivo Evaluation of Sustained Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: A fair correlation between in vitro dissolution and in vivo data was found. The results obtained indicate successful development of a sustained release formulation of diltiazem. Keywords: Diltiazem, Matrix tablet, Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose Eudragit, In vitro/in vivo correlation, Optimization ...

  19. Transcriptional control by G-quadruplexes: In vivo roles and perspectives for specific intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Pablo; David, Aldana; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2017-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are non-canonical DNA secondary structures involved in several genomic and molecular processes. Here, we summarize the main G-quadruplex features and evidences proving the in vivo role on the transcriptional regulation of genes required for zebrafish embryonic development. We also discuss alternative strategies for specifically interfering G-quadruplex in vivo.

  20. IN VIVO EVIDENCE OF FREE RADICAL FORMATION AFTER ASBESTOS INSTILLATION: AN ESR SPIN TRAPPING INVESTIGATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been postulated that the in vivo toxicity of asbestos results from its catalysis of free radical generation. We examined in vivo radical production using electron spin resonance (ESR) coupled with the spin trap alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (4-POBN); 180 d...