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Sample records for fluorescent lifetime imaging

  1. Stroboscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Mark D; Silvestre, Oscar R; Errington, Rachel J; Smith, Paul J; Matthews, Daniel R; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D

    2009-03-30

    We report a fluorescence lifetime imaging technique that uses the time integrated response to a periodic optical excitation, eliminating the need for time resolution in detection. A Dirac pulse train of variable period is used to probe the frequency response of the total fluorescence per pulse leading to a frequency roll-off that is dependent on the relaxation rate of the fluorophores. The technique is validated by demonstrating wide-field, realtime, lifetime imaging of the endocytosis of inorganic quantum dots by a cancer cell line. Surface charging of the dots in the intra-cellular environment produces a switch in the fluorescence lifetime from approximately 40 ns to technique offers lifetime based imaging at video rates with standard CCD cameras and has application in probing millisecond cell dynamics and in high throughput imaging assays.

  2. High speed multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fereidouni, F.; Reitsma, K.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    We report a spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging system based on time gated single photon detection with a fixed gate width of 200 ps and 7 spectral channels. Time gated systems can operate at high count rates but usually have large gate widths and sample only part of the fluorescence d

  3. Cubosomes for in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Stefania; Andolfi, Laura; Caltagirone, Claudia; Garrovo, Chiara; Falchi, Angela M.; Lippolis, Vito; Lorenzon, Andrea; Macor, Paolo; Meli, Valeria; Monduzzi, Maura; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Rosa, Antonella; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Murgia, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Herein we provided the first proof of principle for in vivo fluorescence optical imaging application using monoolein-based cubosomes in a healthy mouse animal model. This formulation, administered at a non-cytotoxic concentration, was capable of providing both exogenous contrast for NIR fluorescence imaging with very high efficiency and chemospecific information upon lifetime analysis. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence after the intravenous injection of cubosomes revealed that the dye rapidly accumulated mainly in the liver, while lifetimes profiles obtained in vivo allowed for discriminating between free dye or dye embedded within the cubosome nanostructure after injection.

  4. Cubosomes for in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Stefania; Andolfi, Laura; Caltagirone, Claudia; Garrovo, Chiara; Falchi, Angela M; Lippolis, Vito; Lorenzon, Andrea; Macor, Paolo; Meli, Valeria; Monduzzi, Maura; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Rosa, Antonella; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Murgia, Sergio

    2017-02-03

    Herein we provided the first proof of principle for in vivo fluorescence optical imaging application using monoolein-based cubosomes in a healthy mouse animal model. This formulation, administered at a non-cytotoxic concentration, was capable of providing both exogenous contrast for NIR fluorescence imaging with very high efficiency and chemospecific information upon lifetime analysis. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence after the intravenous injection of cubosomes revealed that the dye rapidly accumulated mainly in the liver, while lifetimes profiles obtained in vivo allowed for discriminating between free dye or dye embedded within the cubosome nanostructure after injection.

  5. Increasing precision of lifetime determination in fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2010-02-01

    The interest in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is increasing, as commercial FLIM modules become available for confocal and multi-photon microscopy. In biological FLIM applications, low fluorescence signals from samples can be a challenge, and this causes poor precision in lifetime. In this study, for the first time, we applied wavelet-based denoising methods in time-domain FLIM, and compared them with our previously developed total variation (TV) denoising methods. They were first tested using artificial FLIM images. We then applied them to lowlight live-cell images. The results demonstrated that our TV methods could improve lifetime precision multi-fold in FLIM images and preserve the overall lifetime and pre-exponential term values when improving local lifetime fitting, while wavelet-based methods were faster. The results here can enhance the precision of FLIM, especially for low-light and / or fast video-rate imaging, to improve current and rapidly emerging new applications of FLIM such as live-cell, in vivo whole-animal, or endoscopic imaging.

  6. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Alexander; Riemann, Iris; Stark, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    In vivo and in vitro multiphoton imaging was used to perform high resolution optical sectioning of human hair by nonlinear excitation of endogenous as well as exogenous fluorophores. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) based on time-resolved single photon counting and near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse excitation was employed to analyze the various fluorescent hair components. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of intratissue pigments has the potential (i) to identify endogenous keratin and melanin, (ii) to obtain information on intrahair dye accumulation, (iii) to study bleaching effects, and (iv) to monitor the intratissue diffusion of pharmaceutical and cosmetical components along hair shafts.

  7. Imaging carious dental tissues with multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Yen; Lyu, Hong-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen; Chang, Chia-Seng; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, multiphoton excitation was utilized to image normal and carious dental tissues noninvasively. Unique structures in dental tissues were identified using the available multimodality (second harmonic, autofluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime analysis) without labeling. The collagen in dentin exhibits a strong second harmonic response. Both dentin and enamel emit strong autofluorescence that reveals in detail morphological features (such as dentinal tubules and enamel rods) and, despite their very similar spectral profiles, can be differentiated by lifetime analysis. Specifically, the carious dental tissue exhibits a greatly reduced autofluorescence lifetime, which result is consistent with the degree of demineralization, determined by micro-computed tomography. Our findings suggest that two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging may be a promising tool for diagnosing and monitoring dental caries. PMID:21326645

  8. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of oxygen in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, H.C.; Sanders, R.; Draaijer, A.; Ince, C.; Levine, Y.K.

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of the fluorescent probe ruthenium tris(2,2′-dipyridyl) dichloride hydrate (RTDP) for the quantitative imaging of oxygen in single cells was investigated utilizing fluorescence life-time imaging. The results indicate that the fluorescence behavior of RTDP in the presence of oxygen can

  9. Use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for latent fingerprints detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Chao, Zhi Xia; Seah, Leong K.; Murukeshan, Vadakke M.

    2005-04-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in frequency domain enables the mapping of the spatial distribution of fluorescence lifetimes of a specimen. FLIM can provide unique information about fluorophores and hence is widely used in biology and for medical diagnostics. In this paper, a theoretical analysis for the fluorescence lifetime determination of latent fingerprint samples is described, which is followed by the feasibility study of using FLIM in frequency domain for latent fingerprints detection. Experiments are carried out with fingerprint on green paper substrate and postcard substrate treated with certain fluorescent powder. The total phase lag and demodulation factor are calculated to determine the lifetimes pixel by pixel. The resulting fluorescence lifetime image of fingerprint revealed an improvement in the contrast, and was able to detect the latent fingerprint clearly.

  10. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Quantum Dot Labeled DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G. Terry

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot (QD labeling combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is proposed as a powerful transduction technique for the detection of DNA hybridization events. Fluorescence lifetime analysis of DNA microarray spots of hybridized QD labeled target indicated a characteristic lifetime value of 18.8 ns, compared to 13.3 ns obtained for spots of free QD solution, revealing that QD labels are sensitive to the spot microenvironment. Additionally, time gated detection was shown to improve the microarray image contrast ratio by 1.8, achieving femtomolar target sensitivity. Finally, lifetime multiplexing based on Qdot525 and Alexa430 was demonstrated using a single excitation-detection readout channel.

  11. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of oxygen in dental biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; de Grauw, Cees J.

    2000-12-01

    Dental biofilm consists of micro-colonies of bacteria embedded in a matrix of polysaccharides and salivary proteins. pH and oxygen concentration are of great importance in dental biofilm. Both can be measured using fluorescence techniques. The imaging of dental biofilm is complicated by the thickness of the biofilms that can be up to several hundred micrometers thick. Here, we employed a combination of two-photon excitation microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify the oxygen concentration in dental biofilm. Collisional quenching of fluorescent probes by molecular oxygen leads to a reduction of the fluorescence lifetime of the probe. We employed this mechanism to measure the oxygen concentration distribution in dental biofilm by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. Here, TRIS Ruthenium chloride hydrate was used as an oxygen probe. A calibration procedure on buffers was use to measure the lifetime response of this Ruthenium probe. The results are in agreement with the Stern-Volmer equation. A linear relation was found between the ratio of the unquenched and the quenched lifetime and the oxygen concentration. The biofilm fluorescence lifetime imaging results show a strong oxygen gradient at the buffer - biofilm interface and the average oxygen concentration in the biofilm amounted to 50 μM.

  12. Quasi-real-time fluorescence imaging with lifetime dependent contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pei-Chi; Grundfest, Warren S.; Stafsudd, Oscar M.

    2011-08-01

    Conventional fluorescence lifetime imaging requires complicated algorithms to extract lifetimes of fluorophores and acquisition of multiple data points at progressively longer delay times to characterize tissues. To address diminishing signal-to-noise ratios at these progressively longer time delays, we report a time-resolved fluorescence imaging method, normalized fluorescence yield imaging that does not require the extraction of lifetimes. The concept is to extract the ``contrast'' instead of the lifetime value of the fluorophores by using simple mathematical algorithms. This process converts differences in decay times directly to different intensities. The technique was verified experimentally using a gated iCCD camera and an ultraviolet light-emitting diode light source. It was shown that this method can distinguish between chemical dyes (Fluorescein and Rhodamine-B) and biomedical samples, such as powders of elastin and collagen. Good contrast was obtained between fluorophores that varied by less than 6% in lifetime. Additionally, it was shown that long gate times up to 16 ns achieve good contrast depending upon the samples to be studied. These results support the feasibility of time-resolved fluorescence imaging without lifetime extraction, which has a potential clinical role in noninvasive real-time imaging.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime to image epidermal ionic concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behne, Martin J.; Barry, Nicholas P.; Moll, Ingrid; Gratton, Enrico; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2004-09-01

    Measurements of ionic concentrations in skin have traditionally been performed with an array of methods which either did not reveal detailed localization information, or only provided qualitative, not quantitative information. FLIM combines a number of advantages into a method ideally suited to visualize concentrations of ions such as H+ in intact, unperturbed epidermis and stratum corneum (SC). Fluorescence lifetime is dye concentration-independent, the method requires only low light intensities and is therefore not prone to photobleaching or phototoxic artifacts, and because multiphoton lasers of IR wavelength are used, light penetrates deep into intact tissue. The standard method to measure SC pH is the flat pH electrode, which provides reliable information only about surface pH changes, without further vertical or subcellular spatial resolution; i.e., specific microdomains such as the corneocyte interstices are not resolved, and the deeper SC is inaccessible without resorting to inherently disruptive stripping methods. Furthermore, the concept of a gradient of pH through the SC stems from such stripping experiments, but other confirmation for this concept is lacking. Our investigations into the SC pH distribution so far have revealed the crucial role of the Sodium/Hydrogen Antiporter NHE1 in generation of SC acidity, the colocalization of enzymatic lipid processing activity in the SC with acidic domains of the SC, and the timing and localization of emerging acidity in the SC of newborns. Together, these results have led to an improved understanding of the SC pH, its distribution, origin, and regulation. Future uses for this method include measurements of other ions important for epidermal processes, such as Ca2+, and a quantitative approach to topical drug penetration.

  14. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging System for in Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinuddin Hassan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a fluorescence lifetime imaging system for small animals is presented. Data were collected by scanning a region of interest with a measurement head, a linear fiber array with fixed separations between a single source fiber and several detection fibers. The goal was to localize tumors and monitor their progression using specific fluorescent markers. We chose a near-infrared contrast agent, Alexa Fluor 750 (Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA. Preliminary results show that the fluorescence lifetime for this dye was sensitive to the immediate environment of the fluorophore (in particular, pH, making it a promising candidate for reporting physiologic changes around a fluorophore. To quantify the intrinsic lifetime of deeply embedded fluorophores, we performed phantom experiments to investigate the contribution of photon migration effects on observed lifetime by calculating the fluorescence intensity decay time. A previously proposed theoretical model of migration, based on random walk theory, is also substantiated by new experimental data. The developed experimental system has been used for in vivo mouse imaging with Alexa Fluor 750 contrast agent conjugated to tumor-specific antibodies (trastuzumab [Herceptin]. Three-dimensional mapping of the fluorescence lifetime indicates lower lifetime values in superficial breast cancer tumors in mice.

  15. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Free and Protein-Bound NADH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz; Johnson, Michael L.

    1992-02-01

    We introduce a methodology, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), in which the contrast depends on the fluorescence lifetime at each point in a two-dimensional image and not on the local concentration and/or intensity of the fluorophore. We used FLIM to create lifetime images of NADH when free in solution and when bound to malate dehydrogenase. This represents a challenging case for lifetime imaging because the NADH decay times are just 0.4 and 1.0 ns in the free and bound states, respectively. In the present apparatus, lifetime images are created from a series of phase-sensitive images obtained with a gain-modulated image intensifier and recorded with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The intensifier gain is modulated at the light-modulation frequency or a harmonic thereof. A series of stationary phase-sensitive images, each obtained with various phase shifts of the gain-modulation signal, is used to determine the phase angle or modulation of the emission at each pixel, which is in essence the lifetime image. We also describe an imaging procedure that allows specific decay times to be suppressed, allowing in this case suppression of the emission from either free or bound NADH. Since the fluorescence lifetimes of probes are known to be sensitive to numerous chemical and physical factors such as pH, oxygen, temperature, cations, polarity, and binding to macromolecules, this method allows imaging of the chemical or property of interest in macroscopic and microscopic samples. The concept of FLIM appears to have numerous potential applications in the biosciences.

  16. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Warren

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset. This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis

  17. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.; Schelen, B.; Schouten, R., et al.

    2012-01-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device des

  18. Photon budget analysis for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.; Young, I.T.; De Jong, J.G.S.

    2011-01-01

    We have constructed a mathematical model to analyze the photon efficiency of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The power of the light source needed for illumination in a FLIM system and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detector have led us to a photon “budget.” These

  19. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of nanodiamonds in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung; Hsu, Tsung-Yuan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Jui-Hung; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) center in bulk diamond is a photostable fluorophore with a radiative lifetime of 11.6 ns at room temperature. The lifetime substantially increases to ~20 ns for diamond nanoparticles (size ~ 100 nm) suspended in water due to the change in refractive index of the surrounding medium of the NV- centers. This fluorescence decay time is much longer than that (typically 1 - 4 ns) of endogenous and exogenous fluorophores commonly used in biological imaging, making it possible to detect NV--containing nanodiamonds in vivo at the single particle level by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as a model organism.

  20. Normalized fluorescence lifetime imaging for tumor identification and margin delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Adria J.; Papour, Asael; Bhargava, Siddharth; Taylor, Zach; Grundfest, Warren S.; Stafsudd, Oscar M.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a technique that has been proven to produce quantitative and qualitative differentiation and identification of substances with good specificity and sensitivity based on lifetime extracted information. This technique has shown the ability to also differentiate between a wide range of tissue types to identify malignant from benign tissue in vivo and ex vivo. However, the complexity, long duration and effort required to generate this information has limited the adoption of these techniques in a clinical setting. Our group has developed a time-resolved imaging system (patent pending) that does not require the extraction of lifetimes or use of complex curve fitting algorithms to display the needed information. The technique, entitled Lifetime Fluorescence Imaging (LFI, or NoFYI), converts fluorescence lifetime decay information directly into visual contrast. Initial studies using Fluorescein and Rhodamine-B demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. Subsequent studies demonstrated the ability to separate collagen and elastin powders. The technique uses nanosecond pulsed UV LEDs at 375 nm for average illumination intensities of ~4.5 μW on the tissue surface with detection by a gated CCD camera. To date, we have imaged 11 surgical head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and brain cancer biopsy specimens including 5 normal and 6 malignant samples. Images at multiple wavelengths clearly demonstrate differentiation between benign and malignant tissue, which was later confirmed by histology. Contrast was obtained between fluorophores with 35 μm spatial resolution and an SNR of ~30 dB allowing us to clearly define tumor margins in these highly invasive cancers. This method is capable of providing both anatomical and chemical information for the pathologist and the surgeon. These results suggest that this technology has a possible role in identifying tumors in tissue specimens and detecting tumor margins during procedures.

  1. Dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging based on acousto-optic deflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Peng, Xiao; Qi, Jing; Gao, Jian; Fan, Shunping; Wang, Qi; Qu, Junle; Niu, Hanben

    2014-11-01

    We report a dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging (D-FLIM) system that is based on a pair of acousto-optic deflectors for the random regions of interest (ROI) study in the sample. The two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector devices are used to rapidly scan the femtosecond excitation laser beam across the sample, providing specific random access to the ROI. Our experimental results using standard fluorescent dyes in live cancer cells demonstrate that the D-FLIM system can dynamically monitor the changing process of the microenvironment in the ROI in live biological samples.

  2. Nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging with a single diamond NV center

    CERN Document Server

    Beams, Ryan; Johnson, Timothy W; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Novotny, Lukas; Vamivakas, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state quantum emitters, such as artificially engineered quantum dots or naturally occurring defects in solids, are being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Recently, these same systems have also been studied from the perspective of nanoscale metrology. In this letter we study the near-field optical properties of a diamond nanocrystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy center. We find that the nitrogen vacancy center is a sensitive probe of the surrounding electromagnetic mode structure. We exploit this sensitivity to demonstrate nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with a single nitrogen vacancy center by imaging the local density of states of an optical antenna.

  3. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiaole; Schelen, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van den Oever, Rein; Leenen, René; van Kuijk, Harry; Peters, Inge; Polderdijk, Frank; Bosiers, Jan; Raspe, Marcel; Jalink, Kees; Geert Sander de Jong, Jan; van Geest, Bert; Stoop, Karel; Young, Ian Ted

    2012-12-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device design in a frequency-domain FLIM system. The first stage of evaluation for the camera has been carried out. Camera characteristics such as noise distribution, dark current influence, camera gain, sampling density, sensitivity, linearity of photometric response, and optical transfer function have been studied through experiments. We are able to do lifetime measurement using our modulated, electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (MEM-FLIM) camera for various objects, e.g., fluorescein solution, fixed green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells, and GFP-actin stained live cells. A detailed comparison of a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)-based FLIM system and the MEM-FLIM system is presented. The MEM-FLIM camera shows higher resolution and a better image quality. The MEM-FLIM camera provides a new opportunity for performing frequency-domain FLIM.

  4. Timing and Operating Mode Design for Time-Gated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Liu; Xinwei Wang; Yan Zhou; Yuliang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state fluorence imaging and time-resolved fluorescence imaging are two important areas in fluorescence imaging research. Fluorescence lifetime imaging is an absolute measurement method which is independent of excitation laser intensity, fluorophore concentration, and photobleaching compared to fluorescence intensity imaging techniques. Time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can provide high resolution and high imaging frame during mature FLIM methods. An abstract ti...

  5. Fluorescence lifetime imaging in biosciences: technologies and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raluca NIESNER; Karl-Heinz GERICKE

    2008-01-01

    The biosciences require the development of methods that allow a non-invasive and rapid investigation of biological systems. In this aspect, high-end imaging tech-niques allow intravital microscopy in real-time, providing information on a molecular basis. Far-field fluorescence imaging techniques are some of the most adequate methods for such investigations. However, there are great differences between the common fluorescence imaging techniques, i.e., wide-field, confocal one-photon and two-photon microscopy, as far as their applicability in diverse bioscientific research areas is concerned. In the first part of this work, we briefly compare these techniques. Standard methods used in the biosciences, i.e., steady-state techniques based on the analy-sis of the total fluorescence signal originating from the sam-ple, can successfully be employed in the study of cell, tissue and organ morphology as well as in monitoring the macro-scopic tissue function. However, they are mostly inadequate for the quantitative investigation of the cellular function at the molecular level. The intrinsic disadvantages of steady-state techniques are countered by using time-resolved tech-niques. Among these fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is currently the most common. Different FLIM principles as well as applications of particular relevance for the biosci-ences, especially for fast intravital studies are discussed in this work.

  6. Non-invasive imaging of skin cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging using two photon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) using two photon microscopy as a non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of skin lesions is described. Skin contains fluorophores including elastin, keratin, collagen, FAD and NADH. This endogenous contrast allows tissue to be imaged without the addition of exogenous agents and allows the in vivo state of cells and tissues to be studied. A modified DermaInspect® multiphoton tomography system was used to excite autofluorescence at 760 nm in vivo and on freshly excised ex vivo tissue. This instrument simultaneously acquires fluorescence lifetime images in four spectral channels between 360-655 nm using time-correlated single photon counting and can also provide hyperspectral images. The multispectral fluorescence lifetime images were spatially segmented and binned to determine lifetimes for each cell by fitting to a double exponential lifetime model. A comparative analysis between the cellular lifetimes from different diagnoses demonstrates significant diagnostic potential.

  7. Application of hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime imaging to tissue autofluorescence: arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, C. B.; Benninger, R. K. P.; de Beule, P.; Requejo-Isidro, J.; Elson, D. S.; Dunsby, C.; Munro, I.; Neil, M. A.; Sandison, A.; Sofat, N.; Nagase, H.; French, P. M. W.; Lever, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    Tissue contains many natural fluorophores and therefore by exploiting autofluorescence, we can obtain information from tissue with less interference than conventional histological techniques. However, conventional intensity imaging is prone to artifacts since it is an absolute measurement. Fluorescence lifetime and spectral measurements are relative measurements and therefore allow for better measurements. We have applied FLIM and hyperspectral FLIM to the study of articular cartilage and its disease arthritis. We have analyzed normal human articular cartilage and cartilage which was in the early stages of disease. In this case, it was found that FLIM was able to detect changes in the diseased tissue that were not detectable with the conventional diagnosis. Specifically, the fluorescence lifetimes (FL) of the cells were different between the two samples. We have also applied hyperspectral FLIM to degraded cartilage through treatment with interleukin-1. In this case, it was found that there was a shift in the emission spectrum with treatment and that the lifetime had also increased. We also showed that there was greater contrast between the cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) at longer wavelengths.

  8. Refractive Index Sensing of Green Fluorescent Proteins in Living Cells Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manen, van Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; Berg, van den Timo K.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91phox, which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase

  9. Breast cancer margin delineation with fluorescence lifetime imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Jennifer E.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Darrow, Morgan; Unger, Jakob; Bold, Richard; Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The current standard of care for early stages of breast cancer is breast-conserving surgery (BCS). BCS involves a lumpectomy procedure, during which the tumor is removed with a rim of normal tissue-if cancer cells found in that rim of tissue, it is called a positive margin and means part of the tumor remains in the breast. Currently there is no method to determine if cancer cells exist at the margins of lumpectomy specimens aside from time-intensive histology methods that result in reoperations in up to 38% of cases. We used fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) to measure time-resolved autofluorescence from N=13 ex vivo human breast cancer specimens (N=10 patients undergoing lumpectomy or mastectomy) and compared our results to histology. Tumor (both invasive and ductal carcinoma in situ), fibrous tissue, fat and fat necrosis have unique fluorescence signatures. For instance, between 500-580 nm, fluorescence lifetime of tumor was shortest (4.7 +/- 0.4 ns) compared to fibrous tissue (5.5 +/- 0.7 ns) and fat (7.0 +/- 0.1 ns), P<0.05 (ANOVA). These differences are due to the biochemical properties of lipid, nicotineamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and collagen fibers in the fat, tumor and fibrous tissue, respectively. Additionally, the FLIm data is augmented to video of the breast tissue with image processing algorithms that track a blue (450 nm) aiming beam used in parallel with the 355 nm excitation beam. This allows for accurate histologic co-registration and in the future will allow for three-dimensional lumpectomy surfaces to be imaged for cancer margin delineation.

  10. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-09-22

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution.

  11. A modified phasor approach for analyzing time-gated fluorescence lifetime images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fereidouni, F.; Esposito, A.; Blab, G.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging is a versatile tool that permits mapping the biochemical environment in the cell. Among various fluorescence lifetime imaging techniques, timecorrelated single photon counting and time-gating methods have been demonstrated to be very efficient and robust for the imaging

  12. Analysis of human aorta using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Damiani, Gislaine; Adur, J.; Ferro, D. P.; Adam, R. L.; Pelegati, V.; Thomáz, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Metze, K.

    2012-03-01

    The use of photonics has improved our understanding of biologic phenomena. For the study of the normal and pathologic architecture of the aorta the use of Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF) and Second Harmonic Generation showed interesting details of morphologic changes of the elastin-collagen architecture during aging or development of hypertension in previous studies. In this investigation we tried to apply fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for the morphologic analysis of human aortas. The aim of our study was to use FLIM in non-stained formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples of the aorta ascendants in hypertensive and normotensive patients of various ages, examining two different topographical regions. The FLIM-spectra of collagen and elastic fibers were clearly distinguishable, thus permitting an exact analysis of unstained material on the microscopic level. Moreover the FLIM spectrum of elastic fibers revealed variations between individual cases, which indicate modifications on a molecular level and might be related to FLIM age or diseases states and reflect modifications on a molecular level.

  13. Monitoring photosensitizer uptake using two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shu-Chi Allison; Diamond, Kevin R; Patterson, Michael S; Nie, Zhaojun; Hayward, Joseph E; Fang, Qiyin

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) provides an opportunity for treatment of various invasive tumors by the use of a cancer targeting photosensitizing agent and light of specific wavelengths. However, real-time monitoring of drug localization is desirable because the induction of the phototoxic effect relies on interplay between the dosage of localized drug and light. Fluorescence emission in PDT may be used to monitor the uptake process but fluorescence intensity is subject to variability due to scattering and absorption; the addition of fluorescence lifetime may be beneficial to probe site-specific drug-molecular interactions and cell damage. We investigated the fluorescence lifetime changes of Photofrin(®) at various intracellular components in the Mat-LyLu (MLL) cell line. The fluorescence decays were analyzed using a bi-exponential model, followed by segmentation analysis of lifetime parameters. When Photofrin(®) was localized at the cell membrane, the slow lifetime component was found to be significantly shorter (4.3 ± 0.5 ns) compared to those at other locations (cytoplasm: 7.3 ± 0.3 ns; mitochondria: 7.0 ± 0.2 ns, p < 0.05).

  14. Monitoring Photosensitizer Uptake Using Two Photon Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chi Allison Yeh, Kevin R. Diamond, Michael S. Patterson, Zhaojun Nie, Joseph E. Hayward, Qiyin Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic Therapy (PDT provides an opportunity for treatment of various invasive tumors by the use of a cancer targeting photosensitizing agent and light of specific wavelengths. However, real-time monitoring of drug localization is desirable because the induction of the phototoxic effect relies on interplay between the dosage of localized drug and light. Fluorescence emission in PDT may be used to monitor the uptake process but fluorescence intensity is subject to variability due to scattering and absorption; the addition of fluorescence lifetime may be beneficial to probe site-specific drug-molecular interactions and cell damage. We investigated the fluorescence lifetime changes of Photofrin® at various intracellular components in the Mat-LyLu (MLL cell line. The fluorescence decays were analyzed using a bi-exponential model, followed by segmentation analysis of lifetime parameters. When Photofrin® was localized at the cell membrane, the slow lifetime component was found to be significantly shorter (4.3 ± 0.5 ns compared to those at other locations (cytoplasm: 7.3 ± 0.3 ns; mitochondria: 7.0 ± 0.2 ns, p < 0.05.

  15. Applying two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study photosynthesis in plant leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, K.; Borst, J.W.; Amerongen, van H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates to which extent two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy can be applied to study picosecond fluorescence kinetics of individual chloroplasts in leaves. Using femtosecond 860 nm excitation pulses, fluorescence lifetimes can be measured in leaves of

  16. Combination of a spinning disc confocal unit with frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Goedhart, J.; Kremers, G.J.; Manders, E.M.M.; Gadella, Th.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is an established technique to determine fluorescence lifetimes. Disadvantage of wide-field imaging is that measurements are compromised by out-of-focus blur. Conventional scanning confocal typically means long

  17. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-04-15

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme, in human myeloid PLB-985 cells and showed by high-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy that GFP-Rac2 and GFP-gp91(phox) are targeted to the cytosol and to membranes, respectively. Frequency-domain FLIM experiments on these PLB-985 cells resulted in average fluorescence lifetimes of 2.70 ns for cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and 2.31 ns for membrane-bound GFP-gp91(phox). By comparing these lifetimes with a calibration curve obtained by measuring GFP lifetimes in PBS/glycerol mixtures of known refractive index, we found that the local refractive indices of cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and membrane-targeted GFP-gp91(phox) are approximately 1.38 and approximately 1.46, respectively, which is in good correspondence with reported values for the cytosol and plasma membrane measured by other techniques. The ability to measure the local refractive index of proteins in living cells by FLIM may be important in revealing intracellular spatial heterogeneities within organelles such as the plasma and phagosomal membrane.

  18. Applying fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to evaluate the efficacy of anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanabe, Satoshi; Araki, Yoshie; Uchimura, Tomohiro; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy was applied to evaluate the efficacy of anticancer drugs. A decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of the nucleus in apoptotic cancer cells stained by SYTO 13 dye was detected after treatment with antitumor antibiotics such as doxorubicin or epirubicin. It was confirmed that the change in fluorescence lifetime occurred earlier than morphological changes in the cells. We found that the fluorescence lifetime of the nucleus in the cells treated with epirubicin decreased more rapidly than that of the cells treated with doxorubicin. This implies that epirubicin was more efficacious than doxorubicin in the treatment of cancer cells. The change in fluorescence lifetime was, however, not indicated when the cells were treated with cyclophosphamide. The decrease in fluorescence lifetime was associated with the processes involving caspase activation and chromatin condensation. Therefore, this technique would provide useful information about apoptotic cells, particularly in the early stages.

  19. Fluorescence and fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to characterize yeast strains by autofluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, H.; Goldys, E. M.; Ma, J.

    2006-02-01

    We characterised populations of wild type baking and brewing yeast cells using intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence lifetime microscopy, in order to obtain quantitative identifiers of different strains. The cell autofluorescence was excited at 405 nm and observed within 440-540 nm range where strong cell to cell variability was observed. The images were analyzed using customised public domain software, which provided information on cell size, intensity and texture-related features. In light of significant diversity of the data, statistical methods were utilized to assess the validity of the proposed quantitative identifiers for strain differentiation. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was applied to confirm that empirical distribution functions for size, intensity and entropy for different strains were statistically different. These characteristics were followed with culture age of 24, 48 and 72 h, (the latter corresponding to a stationary growth phase) and size, and to some extent entropy, were found to be independent of age. The fluorescence intensity presented a distinctive evolution with age, different for each of the examined strains. The lifetime analysis revealed a short decay time component of 1.4 ns and a second, longer one with the average value of 3.5 ns and a broad distribution. High variability of lifetime values within cells was observed however a lifetime texture feature in the studied strains was statistically different.

  20. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining.

  1. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ɛ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  2. Intracellular temperature mapping with a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kohki; Inada, Noriko; Gota, Chie; Harada, Yoshie; Funatsu, Takashi; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2012-02-28

    Cellular functions are fundamentally regulated by intracellular temperature, which influences biochemical reactions inside a cell. Despite the important contributions to biological and medical applications that it would offer, intracellular temperature mapping has not been achieved. Here we demonstrate the first intracellular temperature mapping based on a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The spatial and temperature resolutions of our thermometry were at the diffraction limited level (200 nm) and 0.18-0.58 °C. The intracellular temperature distribution we observed indicated that the nucleus and centrosome of a COS7 cell, both showed a significantly higher temperature than the cytoplasm and that the temperature gap between the nucleus and the cytoplasm differed depending on the cell cycle. The heat production from mitochondria was also observed as a proximal local temperature increase. These results showed that our new intracellular thermometry could determine an intrinsic relationship between the temperature and organelle function.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of membrane lipid order with a ratiometric fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilin, Vasyl; Glushonkov, Oleksandr; Herdly, Lucas; Klymchenko, Andrey; Richert, Ludovic; Mely, Yves

    2015-05-19

    To monitor the lateral segregation of lipids into liquid-ordered (Lo) and -disordered (Ld) phases in lipid membranes, environment-sensitive dyes that partition in both phases but stain them differently have been developed. Of particular interest is the dual-color F2N12S probe, which can discriminate the two phases through the ratio of its two emission bands. These bands are associated with the normal (N(∗)) and tautomer (T(∗)) excited-state species that result from an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer. In this work, we investigated the potency of the time-resolved fluorescence parameters of F2N12S to discriminate lipid phases in model and cell membranes. Both the long and mean lifetime values of the T(∗) form of F2N12S were found to differ by twofold between Ld and Lo phases as a result of the restriction in the relative motions of the two aromatic moieties of F2N12S imposed by the highly packed Lo phase. This differed from the changes in the ratio of the two emission bands between the two phases, which mainly resulted from the decreased hydration of the N(∗) form in the Lo phase. Importantly, the strong difference in lifetimes between the two phases was preserved when cholesterol was added to the Ld phase. The two phases could be imaged with high contrast by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) on giant unilamellar vesicles. FLIM images of F2N12S-labeled live HeLa cells confirmed that the plasma membrane was mainly in the Lo-like phase. Furthermore, the two phases were found to be homogeneously distributed all over the plasma membrane, indicating that they are highly mixed at the spatiotemporal resolution of the FLIM setup. Finally, FLIM could also be used to sensitively monitor the change in lipid phase upon cholesterol depletion and apoptosis.

  4. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using a single photon avalanche diode array sensor (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargocki, Piotr M.; Spence, David J.; Goldys, Ewa M.; Charbon, Edoardo; Bruschini, Claudio E.; Antalović, Ivan Michel; Burri, Samuel

    2017-02-01

    Single photon detectors allows us work with the weakest fluorescence signals. Single photon arrays, combined with ps-controlled gating allow us to create image maps of fluorescence lifetimes, which can be used for in-vivo discrimination of tissue activity. Here we present fluorescence lifetime imaging using the `SwissSPAD' sensor, a 512-by-128-pixel array of gated single photon detectors, fabricated in a standard high-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS process. We present a protocol for spatially resolved lifetime measurements where the lifetime can be retrieved for each pixel. We demonstrate the system by imaging patterns of Fluorescein and Rhodamine B on test slides, as well as measuring mixed samples to retrieve both components of the decay lifetime. The single photon sensitivity of the sensor creates a valuable instrument to perform live cell or live animal (in vivo) measurements of the weak autofluorescent signals, for example distinguishing unlabelled free and bound NADH. Our ultimate goal is to create a real time fluorescence lifetime imaging system, possibly integrated into augmented reality goggles, which could allow immediate discrimination of in vivo tissues.

  5. High-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy by analog mean-delay method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Youngjae; Kim, Donguk; Yang, Wenzhong; Kim, Dug Y.

    2010-02-01

    We have demonstrated the high-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) by analog mean-delay (AMD) method. The AMD method is a new signal processing technique for calculation of fluorescence lifetime and it is very suitable for the high-speed confocal FLIM with good accuracy and photon economy. We achieved the acquisition speed of 7.7 frames per second for confocal FLIM imaging. Here, the highest photon detection rate for one pixel was larger than 125 MHz and averaged photon detection rate was more than 62.5 MHz. Based on our system, we successfully obtained a sequence of confocal fluorescence lifetime images of RBL-2H3 cell labeled with Fluo-3/AM and excited by 4αPDD (TRPV channel agonist) within one second.

  6. A CMOS image sensor with draining only modulation pixels for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Yasutomi, Keita; Takasawa, Taishi; Itoh, Shinya; Kawahito, Shoji

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging is becoming a powerful tool in biology. A charge-domain CMOS Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) chip using a pinned photo diode (PPD) and the pinned storage diode (PSD) with different depth of potential wells has been previously developed by the authors. However, a transfer gate between PPD and PSD causes charge transfer noise due to traps at the channel surface. This paper presents a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with draining only modulation pixels for fluorescence lifetime imaging, which removes the transfer gate between PPD and PSD. The time windowing is done by draining with a draining gate only, which is attached along the carrier path from PPD to PSD. This allows us to realize a trapping less charge transfer between PPD and PSD, leading to a very low-noise time-resolved signal detection. A video-rate CMOS FLIM chip has been fabricated using 0.18μm standard CMOS pinned diode image sensor process. The pixel consists of a PPD, a PSD, a charge draining gate (TD), a readout transfer gate (TX) between the PSD and the floating diffusion (FD), a reset transistor and a source follower amplifier transistor. The pixel array has 200(Row) x 256(Column) pixels and the pixel pitch is 7.5μm. Fundamental characteristics of the implemented CMOS FLIM chip are measured. The signal intensity of the PSD as a function of the TD gate voltage is also measured. The ratio of the signal for the TD off to the signal for the TD on is 212 : 1.

  7. Quantitative mapping of aqueous microfluidic temperature with sub-degree resolution using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Emmelyn M; Iwai, Kaoru; Uchiyama, Seiichi; de Silva, A Prasanna; Magennis, Steven W; Jones, Anita C

    2010-05-21

    The use of a water-soluble, thermo-responsive polymer as a highly sensitive fluorescence-lifetime probe of microfluidic temperature is demonstrated. The fluorescence lifetime of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) labelled with a benzofurazan fluorophore is shown to have a steep dependence on temperature around the polymer phase transition and the photophysical origin of this response is established. The use of this unusual fluorescent probe in conjunction with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) enables the spatial variation of temperature in a microfluidic device to be mapped, on the micron scale, with a resolution of less than 0.1 degrees C. This represents an increase in temperature resolution of an order of magnitude over that achieved previously by FLIM of temperature-sensitive dyes.

  8. Use of multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate skin pigmentation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancik, Yuri; Favre, Amandine; Loy, Chong Jin; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-02-01

    There is a growing body of literature showing the usefulness of multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in situ characterization of skin constituents and the ensuing development of noninvasive diagnostic tools against skin diseases. Melanin and pigmentation-associated skin cancers constitute some of the major applications. We show that MPT and fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used to measure changes in cutaneous melanin concentration and that these can be related to the visible skin color. Melanin in the skin of African, Indian, Caucasian, and Asian volunteers is detected on the basis of its emission wavelength and fluorescence lifetimes in solution and in a melanocyte-keratinocyte cell culture. Fluorescence intensity is used to characterize the melanin content and distribution as a function of skin type and depth into the skin (stratum granulosum and stratum basale). The measured fluorescence intensities in given skin types agree with melanin amounts reported by others using biopsies. Our results suggest that spatial distribution of melanin in skin can be studied using MPT and fluorescence lifetime imaging, but further studies are needed to ascertain that the method can resolve melanin amount in smaller depth intervals.

  9. The use of DAPI fluorescence lifetime imaging for investigating chromatin condensation in human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estandarte, Ana Katrina; Botchway, Stanley; Lynch, Christophe; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian

    2016-08-16

    Chromatin undergoes dramatic condensation and decondensation as cells transition between the different phases of the cell cycle. The organization of chromatin in chromosomes is still one of the key challenges in structural biology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), a technique which utilizes a fluorophore's fluorescence lifetime to probe changes in its environment, was used to investigate variations in chromatin compaction in fixed human chromosomes. Fixed human metaphase and interphase chromosomes were labeled with the DNA minor groove binder, DAPI, followed by measurement and imaging of the fluorescence lifetime using multiphoton excitation. DAPI lifetime variations in metaphase chromosome spreads allowed mapping of the differentially compacted regions of chromatin along the length of the chromosomes. The heteromorphic regions of chromosomes 1, 9, 15, 16, and Y, which consist of highly condensed constitutive heterochromatin, showed statistically significant shorter DAPI lifetime values than the rest of the chromosomes. Differences in the DAPI lifetimes for the heteromorphic regions suggest differences in the structures of these regions. DAPI lifetime variations across interphase nuclei showed variation in chromatin compaction in interphase and the formation of chromosome territories. The successful probing of differences in chromatin compaction suggests that FLIM has enormous potential for application in structural and diagnostic studies.

  10. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of metabolic status in mesenchymal stem cell during adipogenic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, A. V.; Dudenkova, V. V.; Shirmanova, M. V.; Bystrova, A. S.; Zagaynova, E. V.

    2016-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging of cell metabolism is a valuable approach to assess the efficacy of stem cell therapy and understand the tissue development. In this study we analyzed metabolic trajectory of the mesenchymal stem cells (MCSs) during differentiation into adipocytes by measuring fluorescence lifetimes of free and bound forms of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(P)H) and flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Undifferentiated MSCs and MSCs on the 5, 12, 19, 26 days of differentiation were imaged on a Zeiss 710 microscope with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system B&H (Germany). Fluorescence of NAD(P)H and FAD was excited at 750 nm and 900 nm, respectively, by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser and detected in a range 455-500 nm and 500-550 nm, correspondingly. We observed the changes in the NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence lifetimes and their relative contributions in the differentiated adipocytes compare to undifferentiated MSCs. Increase of fluorescence lifetimes of the free and bound forms of NAD(P)H and the contribution of protein-bound NAD(P)H was registered, that can be associated with a metabolic switch from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation and/or synthesis of lipids in adipogenically differentiated MSCs. We also found that the contribution of protein-bound FAD decreased during differentiation. After carrying out appropriate biochemical measurements, the observed changes in cellular metabolism can potentially serve to monitor stem cell differentiation by FLIM.

  11. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of the oxygen distribution in the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieslinger, Dietmar; Draxler, Sonja; Puzon, Janusz; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-05-01

    An instrument has been designed and implemented capable of mapping oxygen distribution in skin tissue over an area of several square centimeters with a spatial resolution of better than 1 mm and with a resolution in oxygen partial pressure of better than 5 torr. The measurement scheme is optical and is based on luminescence lifetime. It is non- invasive and avoids any patient contact with electrical parts. The instrument should be a valuable supplement to other clinical methods for monitoring microcirculation and peripheral oxygen supply.

  12. Visualizing heterogeneity of photosynthetic properties of plant leaves with two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iermak, Ievgeniia; Vink, Jochem; Bader, Arjen N.; Wientjes, Emilie; Amerongen, van Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was used to analyse the distribution and properties of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) in palisade and spongy chloroplasts of leaves from the C3 plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the C4 plant Miscanthus x giganteus. This was ac

  13. Exciton-polaron quenching in organic thin-film transistors studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Leißner, Till; Osadnik, Andreas

    Organic semiconductors show great potential in electronic and optical applications. However, a major challenge is the degradation of the semiconductor materials that cause a reduction in device performance. Here, we present our investigations of Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) based...... that correlates with the local charge density indicates a pronounced exciton quenching by the injected charges. Subsequent FLIM measurements on previously biased OTFT devices show a general decrease in fluorescence lifetime suggesting degradation of the organic semiconductor. This is correlated with the results...... on the material 5,5-bis(naphthyl)-2,20-bithiophene (NaT2). These types of OTFT have previously been shown to have light emitting properties. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been used to investigate the exciton-polaron quenching in biased OTFTs. A clear reduction in fluorescence lifetime...

  14. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of lipids during 3T3-L1 cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Sik; Won, Young Jae; Lee, Sang-Hak; Kim, Dug Young

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is becoming a big health problem in these days. Since increased body weight is due to increased number and size of the triglyceride-storing adipocytes, many researchers are working on differentiation conditions and processes of adipocytes. Adipocytes also work as regulators of whole-body energy homeostasis by secreting several proteins that regulate processes as diverse as haemostasis, blood pressure, immune function, angiogenesis and energy balance. 3T3-L1 cells are widely used cell line for studying adipogenesis because it can differentiate into an adipocyte-like phenotype under appropriate conditions. In this paper, we propose an effective fluorescence lifetime imaging technique which can easily distinguish lipids in membrane and those in lipid droplets. Nile red dyes are attached to lipids in 3T3-L1 cells. Fluorescence lifetime images were taken for 2 week during differentiation procedure of 3T3-L1 cells into adipocytes. We used 488 nm pulsed laser with 5MHz repetition rate and emission wavelength is 520 nm of Nile Red fluorescent dye. Results clearly show that the lifetime of Nile red in lipid droplets are smaller than those in cell membrane. Our results suggest that fluorescence lifetime imaging can be a very powerful tool to monitor lipid droplet formation in adipocytes from 3T3-L1 cells.

  15. Hardware-friendly bi-exponential fluorescence lifetime imaging algorithms and phasor approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, David; Chen, Yu

    2015-07-01

    A newly developed hardware-friendly non-iterative fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) analysis method was verified in an FPGA chip. Its performances were also demonstrated on two-photon FLIM images of gold nanorods (GNRs)-Cy5 labelled Hela cells. The results obtained by the proposed method can be presented in a polor plot to be compared to the widely used phasor (Phasor) approach. Combining our method with Phasor will be very useful in FLIM analysis.

  16. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  17. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  18. Using multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging to characterize liver damage and fluorescein disposition in liver in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Studier, Hauke; Crawford, Darrell; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Liver disease is the fifth most common cause of death and unlike many other major causes of mortality, liver disease rates are increasing rather than decreasing. There is no ideal measurement of liver disease and although biopsies are the gold standard, this only allows for a spot examination and cannot follow dynamic processes of the liver. Intravital imaging has the potential to extract detailed information over a larger sampling area continuously. The aim of this project was to investigate whether multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy could detect early liver damage and to assess whether it could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein in normal and diseased livers. Four experimental groups were used in this study: 1) control; 2) ischemia reperfusion injury; 3) steatosis and 4) steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. Results showed that multiphoton microscopy could visualize morphological changes such as decreased fluorescence of endogenous fluorophores and the presence of lipid droplets, characteristic of steatosis. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy showed increase in NADPH in steatosis with and without ischemia reperfusion injury and could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein to fluorescein monoglurcuronide, which was impaired in steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. These results concluded that the combination of multiphoton microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging is a promising method of assessing early stage liver damage and that it can be used to study changes in drug metabolism in the liver as an indication of liver disease and has the potential to replace the traditional static liver biopsy currently used.

  19. Advances in frequency-domain fluorometry, gigahertz instrumentation, time-dependent photomigration, and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Szmacinski, Henryk; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz; Johnson, Michael L.

    1992-02-01

    During the past seven years, there have been remarkable advances in the frequency-domain method for measurement of time-resolved emission or light scattering. In this presentation we describe the recent extension of the frequency range to 10 GHz using a specially designed microchannel plate PMT. Experimental data will be shown for measurement of picosecond rotational diffusion and for sub-picosecond resolution of time delays. The resolution of ps to ns timescale processes is not obtained at the expense of sensitivity or is it shown by measurements on the intrinsic tryptophan emission from hemoglobin. We also describe a time- resolved reflectance imaging experiment on a scattering medium containing an absorbing object. Time-resolved imaging of the back-scattered light is realized by means of a RF-phase- sensitive camera, synchronized to the laser pulses. By processing the stored images, a final image can be created, the contrast of which is based only on time differences of the back- scattered photons. This image reveals the presence and position of the absorber within the scattering medium. And finally, we describe a new methodology, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), in which the contrast depends on the fluorescence lifetime at each point in a two-dimensional image, and not the local concentration and/or intensity of the fluorophore. We used FLIM to create lifetime images of NADH when free in solution and when bound to malate dehydrogenase. FLIM has numerous potential applications in cell biology and imaging.

  20. Use of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) as a Timer of Cell Cycle S Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkelman, Irina A; Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Foley, Tara; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of thymidine analogues in replicating DNA, coupled with antibody and fluorophore staining, allows analysis of cell proliferation, but is currently limited to monolayer cultures, fixed cells and end-point assays. We describe a simple microscopy imaging method for live real-time analysis of cell proliferation, S phase progression over several division cycles, effects of anti-proliferative drugs and other applications. It is based on the prominent (~ 1.7-fold) quenching of fluorescence lifetime of a common cell-permeable nuclear stain, Hoechst 33342 upon the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in genomic DNA and detection by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We show that quantitative and accurate FLIM technique allows high-content, multi-parametric dynamic analyses, far superior to the intensity-based imaging. We demonstrate its uses with monolayer cell cultures, complex 3D tissue models of tumor cell spheroids and intestinal organoids, and in physiological study with metformin treatment.

  1. In vivo fluorescence lifetime tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, Ralph E.; Patwardhan, Sachin V.; Akers, Walter; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.

    2009-03-01

    Local molecular and physiological processes can be imaged in vivo through perturbations in the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) of optical imaging agents. In addition to providing functional information, FLT methods can quantify specific molecular events and multiplex diagnostic and prognostic information. We have developed a fluorescence lifetime diffuse optical tomography (DOT) system for in vivo preclinical imaging. Data is captured using a time-resolved intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) system to measure fluorescence excitation and emission in the time domain. Data is then converted to the frequency domain, and we simultaneously reconstruct images of yield and lifetime using an extension to the normalized Born approach. By using differential phase measurements, we demonstrate DOT imaging of short lifetimes (from 350 ps) with high precision (+/-5 ps). Furthermore, this system retains the efficiency, speed, and flexibility of transmission geometry DOT. We demonstrate feasibility of FLT-DOT through a progressive series of experiments. Lifetime range and repeatability are first measured in phantoms. Imaging of subcutaneous implants then verifies the FLT-DOT approach in vivo in the presence of inhomogeneous optical properties. Use in a common research scenario is ultimately demonstrated by imaging accumulation of a targeted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent-labeled peptide probe (cypate-RGD) in a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous molecules in live mouse cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svindrych, Zdenek; Wang, Tianxiong; Hu, Song; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2017-02-01

    NADH and FAD are important endogenous fluorescent coenzymes participating in key enzymatic reactions of cellular metabolism. While fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD have been used to determine the redox state of cells and tissues, this simple approach breaks down in the case of deep-tissue intravital imaging due to depth- and wavelength-dependent light absorption and scattering. To circumvent this limitation, our research focuses on fluorescence lifetimes of two-photon excited NADH and FAD emission to study the metabolic state of live tissues. In our custom-built scanning microscope we combine tunable femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (operating at 740 nm for NADH excitation and 890 nm for FAD excitation), two GaAsP hybrid detectors for registering individual fluorescence photons and two Becker and Hickl time correlator boards for high precision lifetime measurements. Together with our rigorous FLIM analysis approach (including image segmentation, multi-exponential decay fitting and detailed statistical analysis) we are able to detect metabolic changes in cancer xenografts (human pancreatic cancer MPanc96 cells injected subcutaneously into the ear of an immunodeficient nude mouse), relative to surrounding healthy tissue. Advantageously, with the same instrumentation we can also take high-resolution and high-contrast images of second harmonic signal (SHG) originating from collagen fibers of both the healthy skin and the growing tumor. The combination of metabolic measurements (NADH and FAD lifetime) and morphological information (collagen SHG) allows us to follow the tumor growth in live mouse model and the changes in tumor microenvironment.

  3. Dynamic noninvasive monitoring of renal function in vivo by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiffon, Reece J.; Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Lee, Hyeran; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    Kidneys normally filter the blood of excess salts and metabolic products, such as urea, while retaining plasma proteins. In diseases such as multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus, the renal function is compromised and protein escapes into the urine. In this study, we present the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) to image excess serum protein in urine (proteinuria). The near-infrared fluorescent dye LS-288 has distinct lifetimes when bound to protein versus free in solution, providing contrast between the protein-rich viscera and the mostly protein-free bladder. FLI with LS-288 in mice revealed that fluorescence lifetime (FLT) differences in the bladder relative to surrounding tissues was due to the fractional contributions of the bound and unbound dye molecules. The FLT of LS-288 decreased in the case of proteinuria while fluorescence intensity was unchanged. The results show that FLI can be useful for the dynamic imaging of protein-losing nephropathy due to diabetes mellitus and other renal diseases and suggest the potential use of the FLI to distinguish tumors from fluid-filled cysts in the body.

  4. High-Speed Fluorescence Microscopy: Lifetime Imaging in the Biomedical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Ammasi; Wang, Xue F.; Wodnick, Pawel; Gordon, Gerald W.; Kwon, Seongwook; Diliberto, Pamela A.; Herman, Brian

    1995-02-01

    The ability to observe the behavior of living cells and tissues provides unparalleled access to information regarding the organization and dynamics of complex cellular structures. While great strides have been made over the past 30 to 40 years in the design and application of a variety of novel optical microscopic techniques, until recently, it has not been possible to image biological phenomena that occur over very short time periods (nanosecond to millisecond) or over short distances (10 to 1000 [Angstrom capital A, ring]). However, the recent combination of (1) very rapidly gated and sensitive image intensifiers and (2) the ability to deliver fluorescence excitation energy to intact living biological specimens in a pulsed or sinusoidally modulated fashion has allowed such measurements to become a reality through the imaging of the lifetimes of fluorescent molecules. This capability has resulted in the ability to observe the dynamic organization and interaction of cellular components on a spatial and temporal scale previously not possible using other microscopic techniques. This paper discusses the implementation of a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (FLIM) and provides a review of some of the applications of such an instrument. These include measurements of receptor topography and subunit interactions using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence anisotropy of phospholipids in cell membranes, cytosolic free calcium (Ca2+)i and the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in clinical cervicovaginal smears.

  5. Compressive hyperspectral time-resolved wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Qi; Yao, Ruoyang; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2017-07-01

    Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging and spatial multiplexing have offered information content and collection-efficiency boosts in microscopy, but efficient implementations for macroscopic applications are still lacking. An imaging platform based on time-resolved structured light and hyperspectral single-pixel detection has been developed to perform quantitative macroscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging (MFLI) over a large field of view (FOV) and multiple spectral bands simultaneously. The system makes use of three digital micromirror device (DMD)-based spatial light modulators (SLMs) to generate spatial optical bases and reconstruct N by N images over 16 spectral channels with a time-resolved capability (∼40 ps temporal resolution) using fewer than N2 optical measurements. We demonstrate the potential of this new imaging platform by quantitatively imaging near-infrared (NIR) Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) both in vitro and in vivo. The technique is well suited for quantitative hyperspectral lifetime imaging with a high sensitivity and paves the way for many important biomedical applications.

  6. Diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma by two photon excited fluorescence combined with lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shunping; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Liu, Shaoxiong; Lu, Yuan; Qu, Junle

    2014-02-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of human skin cancer. The traditional diagnostic procedure of BCC is histological examination with haematoxylin and eosin staining of the tissue biopsy. In order to reduce complexity of the diagnosis procedure, a number of noninvasive optical methods have been applied in skin examination, for example, multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this study, we explored two-photon optical tomography of human skin specimens using two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging and FLIM. There are a number of naturally endogenous fluorophores in skin sample, such as keratin, melanin, collagen, elastin, flavin and porphyrin. Confocal microscopy was used to obtain structures of the sample. Properties of epidermic and cancer cells were characterized by fluorescence emission spectra, as well as fluorescence lifetime imaging. Our results show that two-photon autofluorescence lifetime imaging can provide accurate optical biopsies with subcellular resolution and is potentially a quantitative optical diagnostic method in skin cancer diagnosis.

  7. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  8. A Single-Photon Avalanche Diode Array for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Eric; Charbon, Edoardo; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2008-11-21

    We describe the design, characterization, and demonstration of a fully integrated single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) imager for use in time-resolved fluorescence imaging. The imager consists of a 64-by-64 array of active SPAD pixels and an on-chip time-to-digital converter (TDC) based on a delay-locked loop (DLL) and calibrated interpolators. The imager can perform both standard time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) and an alternative gated-window detection useful for avoiding pulse pile-up when measuring bright signal levels. To illustrate the use of the imager, we present measurements of the decay lifetimes of fluorescent dyes of several types with a timing resolution of 350 ps.

  9. Nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging of an optical antenna with a single diamond NV center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beams, Ryan; Smith, Dallas; Johnson, Timothy W; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Novotny, Lukas; Vamivakas, A Nick

    2013-08-14

    Solid-state quantum emitters, such as artificially engineered quantum dots or naturally occurring defects in solids, are being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Recently, these same systems have also been studied from the perspective of nanoscale metrology. In this letter, we study the near-field optical properties of a diamond nanocrystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy center. We find that the nitrogen vacancy center is a sensitive probe of the surrounding electromagnetic mode structure. We exploit this sensitivity to demonstrate nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with a single nitrogen vacancy center by imaging the local density of states of an optical antenna.

  10. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy against larvae of Aedes aegypti: confocal microscopy and fluorescence-lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, L. M.; Pratavieira, S.; Inada, N. M.; Kurachi, C.; Corbi, J.; Guimarães, F. E. G.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    Recently a few demonstration on the use of Photodynamic Reaction as possibility to eliminate larvae that transmit diseases for men has been successfully demonstrated. This promising tool cannot be vastly used due to many problems, including the lake of investigation concerning the mechanisms of larvae killing as well as security concerning the use of photosensitizers in open environment. In this study, we investigate some of the mechanisms in which porphyrin (Photogem) is incorporated on the Aedes aegypti larvae previously to illumination and killing. Larvae at second instar were exposed to the photosensitizer and after 30 minutes imaged by a confocal fluorescence microscope. It was observed the presence of photosensitizer in the gut and at the digestive tract of the larva. Fluorescence-Lifetime Imaging showed greater photosensitizer concentration in the intestinal wall of the samples, which produces a strong decrease of the Photogem fluorescence lifetime. For Photodynamic Therapy exposition to different light doses and concentrations of porphyrin were employed. Three different light sources (LED, Fluorescent lamp, Sun light) also were tested. Sun light and fluorescent lamp shows close to 100% of mortality after 24 hrs. of illumination. These results indicate the potential use of photodynamic effect against the LARVAE of Aedes aegypti.

  11. Two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging and spectroscopy of melanins in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Stringari, Chiara; Liu, Feng; Sun, Chung-Ho; Kong, Yu; Balu, Mihaela; Meyskens, Frank L.; Gratton, Enrico; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-03-01

    Changes in the amounts of cellular eumelanin and pheomelanin have been associated with carcinogenesis. The goal of this work is to develop methods based on two-photon-excited-fluorescence (TPEF) for measuring relative concentrations of these compounds. We acquire TPEF emission spectra (λex=1000 nm) of melanin in vitro from melanoma cells, hair specimens, and in vivo from healthy volunteers. We find that the pheomelanin emission peaks at approximately 615 to 625 nm and eumelanin exhibits a broad maximum at 640 to 680 nm. Based on these data we define an optical melanin index (OMI) as the ratio of fluorescence intensities at 645 and 615 nm. The measured OMI for the MNT-1 melanoma cell line is 1.6±0.22 while the Mc1R gene knockdown lines MNT-46 and MNT-62 show substantially greater pheomelanin production (OMI=0.5±0.05 and 0.17±0.03, respectively). The measured values are in good agreement with chemistry-based melanin extraction methods. In order to better separate melanin fluorescence from other intrinsic fluorophores, we perform fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of in vitro specimens. The relative concentrations of keratin, eumelanin, and pheomelanin components are resolved using a phasor approach for analyzing lifetime data. Our results suggest that a noninvasive TPEF index based on spectra and lifetime could potentially be used for rapid melanin ratio characterization both in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Differentiating quiescent cancer cell populations in heterogeneous samples with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaster, Tiffany M.; Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of relative fluorescence intensities of NAD(P)H and FAD with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) allows metabolic characterization of cancerous populations and correlation to treatment response. However, quiescent populations of cancer cells introduce heterogeneity to the tumor and exhibit resistance to standard therapies, requiring a better understanding of this influence on treatment outcome. Significant differences were observed between proliferating and quiescent cell populations upon comparison of respective redox ratios (pFAD lifetimes (p<0.05) across monolayers and in mixed samples. These results demonstrate that metabolic activity may function as a marker for separation and characterization of proliferating and quiescent cancer cells within mixed samples, contributing to comprehensive investigation of heterogeneity-dependent drug resistance.

  13. A chloride ion nanosensor for time-resolved fluorimetry and fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A H; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M; Talavera, Eva M

    2012-03-21

    In this work, the first CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence lifetime based chloride ion nanosensor is reported. The acridinium dication lucigenin was self-assembled on the surface of negatively charged mercaptopropionic acid capped QDs to achieve QD-lucigenin conjugates. Upon attachment, a drastic decrease of the photoluminescence lifetime of both QD nanoparticles and lucigenin is observed by virtue of a charge transfer mechanism. Since lucigenin is a chloride-sensitive indicator dye, the photoluminescence decay of QD-lucigenin conjugates changes by adding chloride ion. The photoluminescence lifetime of the QDs in the conjugate increases after reacting with Cl(-), but also shows a concomitant decrease in the lucigenin lifetime immobilized on the surface. The photoluminescence lifetime of QD-lucigenin nanosensors shows a linear response in the Cl(-) concentration range between 0.5 and 50 mM. Moreover, the ratio τ(ave)(QD)/τ(ave)(luc) can be used as an analytical signal since the lifetime ratio presents a linear response in the same Cl(-) concentration range. The system also shows good selectivity towards most of the main anions and molecules that can be found in biological fluids. These nanosensors have been satisfactorily applied for Cl(-) determination in simulated intracellular media with high sensitivity and high selectivity. Finally, we demonstrate the potential application of the proposed nanosensor in confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). These results show the promising application of the QD-lucigenin nanosensors in FLIM, particularly for intracellular sensing, with the invaluable advantages of the time-resolved fluorescence techniques.

  14. In vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging monitors binding of specific probes to cancer biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Ardeshirpour

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors in choosing a treatment strategy for cancer is characterization of biomarkers in cancer cells. Particularly, recent advances in Monoclonal Antibodies (MAB as primary-specific drugs targeting tumor receptors show that their efficacy depends strongly on characterization of tumor biomarkers. Assessment of their status in individual patients would facilitate selection of an optimal treatment strategy, and the continuous monitoring of those biomarkers and their binding process to the therapy would provide a means for early evaluation of the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. In this study we have demonstrated for the first time in live animals that the fluorescence lifetime can be used to detect the binding of targeted optical probes to the extracellular receptors on tumor cells in vivo. The rationale was that fluorescence lifetime of a specific probe is sensitive to local environment and/or affinity to other molecules. We attached Near-InfraRed (NIR fluorescent probes to Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 (HER2/neu-specific Affibody molecules and used our time-resolved optical system to compare the fluorescence lifetime of the optical probes that were bound and unbound to tumor cells in live mice. Our results show that the fluorescence lifetime changes in our model system delineate HER2 receptor bound from the unbound probe in vivo. Thus, this method is useful as a specific marker of the receptor binding process, which can open a new paradigm in the "image and treat" concept, especially for early evaluation of the efficacy of the therapy.

  15. Differentiation of ocular fundus fluorophores by fluorescence lifetime imaging using multiple excitation and emission wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M.; Schweitzer, D.; Schenke, S.; Becker, W.; Bergmann, A.

    2006-10-01

    Ocular fundus autofluorescence imaging has been introduced into clinical diagnostics recently. It is in use for the observation of the age pigment lipofuscin, a precursor of age - related macular degeneration (AMD). But other fluorophores may be of interest too: The redox pair FAD - FADH II provides information on the retinal energy metabolism, advanced glycation end products (AGE) indicate protein glycation associated with pathologic processes in diabetes as well as AMD, and alterations in the fluorescence of collagen and elastin in connective tissue give us the opportunity to observe fibrosis by fluorescence imaging. This, however, needs techniques able to differentiate particular fluorophores despite limited permissible ocular exposure as well as excitation wavelength (limited by the transmission of the human ocular lens to >400 nm). We present an ophthalmic laser scanning system (SLO), equipped with picosecond laser diodes (FWHM 100 ps, 446 nm or 468 nm respectively) and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) in two emission bands (500 - 560 nm and 560 - 700 nm). The decays were fitted by a bi-exponential model. Fluorescence spectra were measured by a fluorescence spectrometer fluorolog. Upon excitation at 446 nm, the fluorescence of AGE, FAD, and lipofuscin were found to peak at 503 nm, 525 nm, and 600 nm respectively. Accordingly, the statistical distribution of the fluorescence decay times was found to depend on the different excitation wavelengths and emission bands used. The use of multiple excitation and emission wavelengths in conjunction with fluorescence lifetime imaging allows us to discriminate between intrinsic fluorophores of the ocular fundus. Taken together with our knowledge on the anatomical structure of the fundus, these findings suggest an association of the short, middle and long fluorescence decay time to the retinal pigment epithelium, the retina, and connective tissue respectively.

  16. Fluorescence lifetime imaging for the characterization of the biochemical composition of atherosclerotic plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Jennifer; Sun, Yinghua; Saroufeem, Ramez; Hatami, Nisa; Fishbein, Michael C.; Marcu, Laura

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates the ability of a flexible fiberoptic-based fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) technique to resolve biochemical features in plaque fibrotic cap associated with plaque instability and based solely on fluorescence decay characteristics. Autofluorescence of atherosclerotic human aorta (11 autopsy samples) was measured at 48 locations through two filters, F377: 377/50 and F460: 460/60 nm (center wavelength/bandwidth). The fluorescence decay dynamic was described by average lifetime (τ) and four Laguerre coefficients (LECs) retrieved through a Laguerre deconvolution technique. FLIM-derived parameters discriminated between four groups [elastin-rich (ER), elastin and macrophage-rich (E+M), collagen-rich (CR), and lipid-rich (LR)]. For example, τF377 discriminated ER from CR (R = 0.84); τF460 discriminated E+M from CR and ER (R = 0.60 and 0.54, respectively); LEC-1F377 discriminated CR from LR and E+M (R = 0.69 and 0.77, respectively); P 87% (all cases) and sensitivity as high as 86%. Current results demonstrate for the first time that clinically relevant features (e.g., ratios of lipid versus collagen versus elastin) can be evaluated with a flexible-fiber based FLIM technique without the need for fluorescence intensity information or contrast agents.

  17. Photon efficiency optimization in time-correlated single photon counting technique for fluorescence lifetime imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeman, Lior; Fixler, Dror

    2013-06-01

    In time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) systems, the maximum signal throughput is limited by the occurrence of pile-up and other effects. In many biological applications that exhibit high levels of fluorescence intensity (FI), pile-up-related distortions yield serious distortions in the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) calculation as well as significant decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Recent developments that allow the use of high-repetition-rate light sources (in the range of 50-100 MHz) in fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) experiments enable minimization of pile-up-related distortions. However, modern TCSPC configurations that use high-repetition-rate excitation sources for FLIM suffer from dead-time-related distortions that cause unpredictable distortions of the FI signal. In this study, the loss of SNR is described by F- value as it is typically done in FLIM systems. This F-value describes the relation of the relative standard deviation in the estimated FLT to the relative standard deviation in FI measurements. Optimization of the F-value allows minimization of signal distortion, as well as shortening of the acquisition time for certain samples. We applied this method for Fluorescein, Rhodamine B, and Erythrosine fluorescent solutions that have different FLT values (4 ns, 1.67 ns, and 140 ps, respectively).

  18. CMOS image sensor with lateral electric field modulation pixels for fluorescence lifetime imaging with sub-nanosecond time response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with a high-speed lateral electric field modulation (LEFM) gating structure for time domain fluorescence lifetime measurement. Time-windowed signal charge can be transferred from a pinned photodiode (PPD) to a pinned storage diode (PSD) by turning on a pair of transfer gates, which are situated beside the channel. Unwanted signal charge can be drained from the PPD to the drain by turning on another pair of gates. The pixel array contains 512 (V) × 310 (H) pixels with 5.6 × 5.6 µm2 pixel size. The imager chip was fabricated using 0.11 µm CMOS image sensor process technology. The prototype sensor has a time response of 150 ps at 374 nm. The fill factor of the pixels is 5.6%. The usefulness of the prototype sensor is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime imaging through simulation and measurement results.

  19. Spectral and lifetime fluorescence imaging microscopies: new modalities of multiphoton microscopy applied to tissue or cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, D; Gaborit, N; Grossin, L; Riquelme, B; Gigant-Huselstein, C; De Isla, N; Gillet, P; Netter, P; Stoltz, J F

    2004-01-01

    Spectral and multiphoton imaging is the preferred approach for non-invasive study allowing deeper penetration to image molecular processes in living cells. But currently available fluorescence microscopic techniques based on fluorescence intensity, such as confocal or multiphoton excitation, cannot provide detailed quantitative information about the dynamic of complex cellular structure (molecular interaction). Due to the variation of the probe concentration, photostability, cross-talking, its effects cannot be distinguished in simple intensity images. Therefore, Time Resolved fluorescence image is required to investigate molecular interactions in biological systems. Fluorescence lifetimes are generally absolute, sensitive to environment, independent of the concentration of the probe and allow the use of probes with overlapping spectra but that not have the same fluorescence lifetime. In this work, we present the possibilities that are opened up by Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, firstly to collect images based on fluorescence lifetime contrast of GFP variants used as a reporter of gene expression in chondrocytes and secondly, to measure molecular proximity in erythrocyte (glycophorin/membrane) by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FLIM-FRET).

  20. A comparative study of metabolic state of stem cells during osteogenic and adipogenic differentiations via fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Chiou, Arthur

    2016-10-01

    Cellular metabolic state can serve as a biomarker to indicate the differentiation potential of stem cells into other specialized cell lineages. In this study, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) was applied to determine the fluorescence lifetime and the amounts of the auto-fluorescent metabolic co-factor reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to elucidate the cellular metabolism of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation processes. 2P-FLIM provides the free to protein-bound NADH ratio which can serve as the indicator of cellular metabolic state. We measured NADH fluorescence lifetime at 0, 7, and 14 days after hMSCs were induced for either osteogenesis or adipogenesis. In both cases, the average fluorescence lifetime increased significantly at day 14 (P stem cells into other specialized cell lineages.

  1. Time-resolved microspectrofluorometry and fluorescence lifetime imaging of photosensitizers using picosecond pulsed diode lasers in laser scanning microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Matthias; Meier, Thomas; Steiner, Rudolf; Dolp, Frank; Erdmann, Rainer; Ortmann, Uwe; Rück, Angelika

    2003-01-01

    This work describes the time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of two different photosensitizers in single cells, in detail mTHPC and 5-ALA induced PPIX, which are currently clinically used in photodynamic therapy. The fluorescence lifetime of the drugs was determined in the cells from time-gated spectra as well as single photon counting, using a picosecond pulsed diode laser for fluorescence excitation. The diode laser, which emits pulses at 398 nm with 70 ps full width at half maximum duration, was coupled to a confocal laser scanning microscope. For time-resolved spectroscopy a setup consisting of a Czerny Turner spectrometer and a MCP-gated and -intensified CCD camera was used. Time-gated spectra within the cells were acquired by placing the laser beam in "spot scan" mode. In addition, a time-correlated single photon counting module was used to determine the fluorescence lifetime from single spots and to record lifetime images. The fluorescence lifetime of mTHPC decreased from 7.5 to 5.5 ns during incubation from 1 to 6 h. This decrease was probably attributed to enhanced formation of aggregates during incubation. Fluorescence lifetime imaging showed that longer lifetimes were correlated with accumulation in the cytoplasm in the neighborhood of the cell nucleus, whereas shorter lifetimes were found in the outer cytoplasm. For cells that were incubated with 5-ALA, a fluorescence lifetime of 7.4 ns was found for PPIX; a shorter lifetime at 3.6 ns was probably attributed to photoproducts and aggregates of PPIX. In contrast from fluorescence intensity images alone, different fluorescence species could not be distinguished. However, in the lifetime image a structured fluorescence distribution in the cytoplasm was correlated with the longer lifetime and probably coincides with mitochondria. In conclusion, picosecond diode lasers coupled to a laser scanning microscope equipped with appropriate detection units allows time-resolved spectroscopy and lifetime imaging

  2. Fluorescence lifetime technique for surgical imaging, guidance and augmented reality (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The surgeon's limited ability to accurately delineate the tumor margin during surgical interventions is one key challenge in clinical management of cancer. New methods for guiding tumor resection decisions are needed. Numerous studies have shown that tissue autofluorescence properties have the potential to asses biochemical features associates with distinct pathologies in tissue and to distinguish various cancers from normal tissues. However, despite these promising reports, autofluorescence techniques were sparsely adopted in clinical settings. Moreover, when adopted they were primarily used for pre-operative diagnosis rather than guiding interventions. To address this need, we have researched and engineered instrumentation that utilizes label-free fluorescence lifetime contrast to characterize tissue biochemical features in vivo in patients and methodologies conducive to real-time (few seconds) diagnosis of tissue pathologies during surgical procedures. This presentation overviews clinically-compatible multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging techniques developed in our laboratory and their ability to operate as stand-alone tools, integrated in a biopsy needle and in conjunction with the da Vinci surgical robot. We present pre-clinical and clinical studies in patients that demonstrate the potential of these techniques for intraoperative assessment of brain tumors and head and neck cancer. Current results demonstrate that intrinsic fluorescence signals can provide useful contrast for delineation distinct types of tissues including tumors intraoperatively. Challenges and solutions in the clinical implementation of these techniques are discussed.

  3. Studying Biological Tissue with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging: Microscopy, Endoscopy, and Complex Decay Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jan; Elson, Daniel S.; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Lee, K. C. Benny; Vlandas, Alexis; Gambaruto, Giovanni L.; Léveque-Fort, Sandrine; Lever, M. John; Tadrous, Paul J.; Stamp, Gordon W. H.; Wallace, Andrew L.; Sandison, Ann; Watson, Tim F.; Alvarez, Fernando; French, Paul M. W.

    2003-06-01

    We have applied fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to the autofluorescence of different kinds of biological tissue in vitro , including animal tissue sections and knee joints as well as human teeth, obtaining two-dimensional maps with functional contrast. We find that fluorescence decay profiles of biological tissue are well described by the stretched exponential function (StrEF), which can represent the complex nature of tissue. The StrEF yields a continuous distribution of fluorescence lifetimes, which can be extracted with an inverse Laplace transformation, and additional information is provided by the width of the distribution. Our experimental results from FLIM microscopy in combination with the StrEF analysis indicate that this technique is ready for clinical deployment, including portability that is through the use of a compact picosecond diode laser as the excitation source. The results obtained with our FLIM endoscope successfully demonstrated the viability of this modality, though they need further optimization. We expect a custom-designed endoscope with optimized illumination and detection efficiencies to provide significantly improved performance.

  4. FPGA-based multi-channel fluorescence lifetime analysis of Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-09-22

    We report a fast non-iterative lifetime data analysis method for the Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping confocal FLIM (Fm-FLIM) system [Opt. Express 22, 10221 (2014)]. The new method, named R-method, allows fast multi-channel lifetime image analysis in the system's FPGA data processing board. Experimental tests proved that the performance of the R-method is equivalent to that of single-exponential iterative fitting, and its sensitivity is well suited for time-lapse FLIM-FRET imaging of live cells, for example cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level imaging with GFP-Epac-mCherry sensors. With the R-method and its FPGA implementation, multi-channel lifetime images can now be generated in real time on the multi-channel frequency-sweeping FLIM system, and live readout of FRET sensors can be performed during time-lapse imaging.

  5. A CTRW-based model of time-resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging in a turbid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomordik, Victor; Gandjbakhche, Amir H; Hassan, Moinuddin; Pajevic, Sinisa; Weiss, George H

    2010-12-01

    We develop an analytic model of time-resolved fluorescent imaging of photons migrating through a semi-infinite turbid medium bounded by an infinite plane in the presence of a single stationary point fluorophore embedded in the medium. In contrast to earlier models of fluorescent imaging in which photon motion is assumed to be some form of continuous diffusion process, the present analysis is based on a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) on a simple cubic lattice, the object being to estimate the position and lifetime of the fluorophore. Such information can provide information related to local variations in pH and temperature with potential medical significance. Aspects of the theory were tested using time-resolved measurements of the fluorescence from small inclusions inside tissue-like phantoms. The experimental results were found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions provided that the fluorophore was not located too close to the planar boundary, a common problem in many diffusive systems.

  6. Solid-State Camera System for Fluorescence Lifetime Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a well-established platform for biology and biomedical research (Chapter 2). Based on this platform, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been developed to measure fluorescence lifetimes, which are independent of fluorophore concentration and excitation inte

  7. In vivo wound healing diagnosis with second harmonic and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Wu, Wei-Wen; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-06-01

    Skin wounds heal when a series of cell lineages are triggered, followed by collagen deposition, to reconstruct damaged tissues. This study evaluates the regeneration of collagen and change in cellular metabolic rate in vivo during wound healing in rats, with second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy respectively. The metabolic rate of cells is reflected through the lifetime of the autofluorescence from the co-enzyme protein, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, due to its change in the relative concentration of bound and free forms. A higher than normal cellular metabolic rate is observed during the first week of healing, which decreases gradually after eight days of wound formation. SHG signal intensity change indicates the net degradation of collagen during the inflammatory phase, and net regeneration begins on day five. Eventually, the quantity of collagen increases gradually to form a scar tissue as the final product. Importantly, this work demonstrates the feasibility of an in vivo imaging approach for a normal wound on rat skin, which has the potential to supplement the noninvasive clinical diagnosis of wounds.

  8. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana eBurdikova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g. pH, redox potential due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM. In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  9. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D; Wilkinson, Martin G; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A E; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  10. Visualizing heterogeneity of photosynthetic properties of plant leaves with two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iermak, Ievgeniia; Vink, Jochem; Bader, Arjen N; Wientjes, Emilie; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was used to analyse the distribution and properties of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) in palisade and spongy chloroplasts of leaves from the C3 plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the C4 plant Miscanthus x giganteus. This was achieved by separating the time-resolved fluorescence of PSI and PSII in the leaf. It is found that the PSII antenna size is larger on the abaxial side of A. thaliana leaves, presumably because chloroplasts in the spongy mesophyll are "shaded" by the palisade cells. The number of chlorophylls in PSI on the adaxial side of the A. thaliana leaf is slightly higher. The C4 plant M. x giganteus contains both mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, which have a different PSI/PSII ratio. It is shown that the time-resolved fluorescence of bundle sheath and mesophyll cells can be analysed separately. The relative number of chlorophylls, which belong to PSI (as compared to PSII) in the bundle sheath cells is at least 2.5 times higher than in mesophyll cells. FLIM is thus demonstrated to be a useful technique to study the PSI/PSII ratio and PSII antenna size in well-defined regions of plant leaves without having to isolate pigment-protein complexes.

  11. Open Source High Content Analysis Utilizing Automated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görlitz, Frederik; Kelly, Douglas J; Warren, Sean C; Alibhai, Dominic; West, Lucien; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Garcia, Edwin; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Serwa, Remigiusz A; Thinon, Emmanuelle; da Paola, Vincenzo; Murray, Edward J; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A A; Tate, Edward W; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M W

    2017-01-18

    We present an open source high content analysis instrument utilizing automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for assaying protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based readouts of fixed or live cells in multiwell plates. This provides a means to screen for cell signaling processes read out using intramolecular FRET biosensors or intermolecular FRET of protein interactions such as oligomerization or heterodimerization, which can be used to identify binding partners. We describe here the functionality of this automated multiwell plate FLIM instrumentation and present exemplar data from our studies of HIV Gag protein oligomerization and a time course of a FRET biosensor in live cells. A detailed description of the practical implementation is then provided with reference to a list of hardware components and a description of the open source data acquisition software written in µManager. The application of FLIMfit, an open source MATLAB-based client for the OMERO platform, to analyze arrays of multiwell plate FLIM data is also presented. The protocols for imaging fixed and live cells are outlined and a demonstration of an automated multiwell plate FLIM experiment using cells expressing fluorescent protein-based FRET constructs is presented. This is complemented by a walk-through of the data analysis for this specific FLIM FRET data set.

  12. Persistent luminescence nanoprobe for biosensing and lifetime imaging of cell apoptosis via time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Lei, Jianping; Liu, Jintong; Ma, Fengjiao; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-10-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence technique can reduce the short-lived background luminescence and auto-fluorescence interference from cells and tissues by exerting the delay time between pulsed excitation light and signal acquisition. Here, we prepared persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) to design a universal time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) platform for biosensing, lifetime imaging of cell apoptosis and in situ lifetime quantification of intracellular caspase-3. Three kinds of PLNPs-based nanoprobes are assembled by covalently binding dye-labeled peptides or DNA to carboxyl-functionalized PLNPs for the efficient detection of caspase-3, microRNA and protein. The peptides-functionalized nanoprobe is also employed for fluorescence lifetime imaging to monitor cell apoptosis, which shows a dependence of cellular fluorescence lifetime on caspase-3 activity and thus leads to an in situ quantification method. This work provides a proof-of-concept for PLNPs-based TR-FRET analysis and demonstrates its potential in exploring dynamical information of life process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime biosensing with DNA microarrays and a CMOS-SPAD imager

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giraud, G.; Schulze, H.; Li, D.U.; Bachmann, T.T.; Crain, J.; Tyndall, D.; Richardson, J.; Walker, R.; Stoppa, D.; Charbon, E.; Henderson, R.; Arlt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime of dye molecules is a sensitive reporter on local microenvironment which is generally independent of fluorophores concentration and can be used as a means of discrimination between molecules with spectrally overlapping emission. It is therefore a potentially powerful multiplexe

  14. Support vector machine based classification and mapping of atherosclerotic plaques using fluorescence lifetime imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatakdawala, Hussain; Gorpas, Dimitris S.; Bec, Julien; Ma, Dinglong M.; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Bishop, John W.; Marcu, Laura

    2016-02-01

    The progression of atherosclerosis in coronary vessels involves distinct pathological changes in the vessel wall. These changes manifest in the formation of a variety of plaque sub-types. The ability to detect and distinguish these plaques, especially thin-cap fibroatheromas (TCFA) may be relevant for guiding percutaneous coronary intervention as well as investigating new therapeutics. In this work we demonstrate the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) derived parameters (lifetime values from sub-bands 390/40 nm, 452/45 nm and 542/50 nm respectively) for generating classification maps for identifying eight different atherosclerotic plaque sub-types in ex vivo human coronary vessels. The classification was performed using a support vector machine based classifier that was built from data gathered from sixteen coronary vessels in a previous study. This classifier was validated in the current study using an independent set of FLIm data acquired from four additional coronary vessels with a new rotational FLIm system. Classification maps were compared to co-registered histological data. Results show that the classification maps allow identification of the eight different plaque sub-types despite the fact that new data was gathered with a different FLIm system. Regions with diffuse intimal thickening (n=10), fibrotic tissue (n=2) and thick-cap fibroatheroma (n=1) were correctly identified on the classification map. The ability to identify different plaque types using FLIm data alone may serve as a powerful clinical and research tool for studying atherosclerosis in animal models as well as in humans.

  15. Fluorescence Characteristics and Lifetime Images of Photosensitizers of Talaporfin Sodium and Sodium Pheophorbide a in Normal and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Awasthi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime images of talaporfin sodium and sodium-pheophorbide a, which can be regarded as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, were measured in normal and cancer cells. The reduction of the fluorescence intensity by photoirradiation was observed for both photosensitizers in both cells, but the quenching rate was much faster in cancer cells than in normal cells. These results are explained in terms of the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species via photoexcitation of these photosensitizers in cancer cells. The fluorescence lifetimes of both photosensitizers in cancer cells are different from those in normal cells, which originates from the different intracellular environments around the photosensitizers between normal and cancer cells.

  16. Two-photon excitation with pico-second fluorescence lifetime imaging to detect nuclear association of flavanols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Harvey, Irene, E-mail: i.mueller-harvey@reading.ac.uk [Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory, Food Production and Quality Research Division, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, P O Box 236, Reading RG6 6AT (United Kingdom); Feucht, Walter, E-mail: walter.feucht@gmail.com [Department of Plant Sciences, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan (WZW), D-85354 Freising (Germany); Polster, Juergen, E-mail: j.polster@wzw.tum.de [Department of Physical Biochemistry, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan (WZW), D-85354 Freising (Germany); Trnkova, Lucie, E-mail: lucie.trnkova@uhk.cz [University of Hradec Kralove, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Rokitanskeho 62, 50003 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Burgos, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.burgos@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Parker, Anthony W., E-mail: tony.parker@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Botchway, Stanley W., E-mail: stan.botchway@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) technique for flavanols overcomes autofluorescence interference in cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plant flavanols differed in their lifetimes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dissolved and bound flavanols revealed contrasting lifetime changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique will allow studying of flavanol trafficking in live cells. - Abstract: Two-photon excitation enabled for the first time the observation and measurement of excited state fluorescence lifetimes from three flavanols in solution, which were {approx}1.0 ns for catechin and epicatechin, but <45 ps for epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The shorter lifetime for EGCG is in line with a lower fluorescence quantum yield of 0.003 compared to catechin (0.015) and epicatechin (0.018). In vivo experiments with onion cells demonstrated that tryptophan and quercetin, which tend to be major contributors of background fluorescence in plant cells, have sufficiently low cross sections for two-photon excitation at 630 nm and therefore do not interfere with detection of externally added or endogenous flavanols in Allium cepa or Taxus baccata cells. Applying two-photon excitation to flavanols enabled 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and showed that added EGCG penetrated the whole nucleus of onion cells. Interestingly, EGCG and catechin showed different lifetime behaviour when bound to the nucleus: EGCG lifetime increased from <45 to 200 ps, whilst catechin lifetime decreased from 1.0 ns to 500 ps. Semi-quantitative measurements revealed that the relative ratios of EGCG concentrations in nucleoli associated vesicles: nucleus: cytoplasm were ca. 100:10:1. Solution experiments with catechin, epicatechin and histone proteins provided preliminary evidence, via the appearance of a second lifetime ({tau}{sub 2} = 1.9-3.1 ns), that both flavanols may be interacting with histone proteins. We conclude that there

  17. Two-photon excitation with pico-second fluorescence lifetime imaging to detect nuclear association of flavanols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Feucht, Walter; Polster, Juergen; Trnková, Lucie; Burgos, Pierre; Parker, Anthony W; Botchway, Stanley W

    2012-03-16

    Two-photon excitation enabled for the first time the observation and measurement of excited state fluorescence lifetimes from three flavanols in solution, which were ~1.0 ns for catechin and epicatechin, but <45 ps for epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The shorter lifetime for EGCG is in line with a lower fluorescence quantum yield of 0.003 compared to catechin (0.015) and epicatechin (0.018). In vivo experiments with onion cells demonstrated that tryptophan and quercetin, which tend to be major contributors of background fluorescence in plant cells, have sufficiently low cross sections for two-photon excitation at 630 nm and therefore do not interfere with detection of externally added or endogenous flavanols in Allium cepa or Taxus baccata cells. Applying two-photon excitation to flavanols enabled 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and showed that added EGCG penetrated the whole nucleus of onion cells. Interestingly, EGCG and catechin showed different lifetime behaviour when bound to the nucleus: EGCG lifetime increased from <45 to 200 ps, whilst catechin lifetime decreased from 1.0 ns to 500 ps. Semi-quantitative measurements revealed that the relative ratios of EGCG concentrations in nucleoli associated vesicles: nucleus: cytoplasm were ca. 100:10:1. Solution experiments with catechin, epicatechin and histone proteins provided preliminary evidence, via the appearance of a second lifetime (τ(2)=1.9-3.1 ns), that both flavanols may be interacting with histone proteins. We conclude that there is significant nuclear absorption of flavanols. This advanced imaging using two-photon excitation and biophysical techniques described here will prove valuable for probing the intracellular trafficking and functions of flavanols, such as EGCG, which is the major flavanol of green tea.

  18. Direct Vpr-Vpr Interaction in Cells monitored by two Photon Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mély Yves

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes several regulatory proteins, notably Vpr which influences the survival of the infected cells by causing a G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Such an important role of Vpr in HIV-1 disease progression has fuelled a large number of studies, from its 3D structure to the characterization of specific cellular partners. However, no direct imaging and quantification of Vpr-Vpr interaction in living cells has yet been reported. To address this issue, eGFP- and mCherry proteins were tagged by Vpr, expressed in HeLa cells and their interaction was studied by two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Results Results show that Vpr forms homo-oligomers at or close to the nuclear envelope. Moreover, Vpr dimers and trimers were found in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Point mutations in the three α helices of Vpr drastically impaired Vpr oligomerization and localization at the nuclear envelope while point mutations outside the helical regions had no effect. Theoretical structures of Vpr mutants reveal that mutations within the α-helices could perturb the leucine zipper like motifs. The ΔQ44 mutation has the most drastic effect since it likely disrupts the second helix. Finally, all Vpr point mutants caused cell apoptosis suggesting that Vpr-mediated apoptosis functions independently from Vpr oligomerization. Conclusion We report that Vpr oligomerization in HeLa cells relies on the hydrophobic core formed by the three α helices. This oligomerization is required for Vpr localization at the nuclear envelope but not for Vpr-mediated apoptosis.

  19. Nuclear uptake of ultrasmall gold-doxorubicin conjugates imaged by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Shastry, Sathvik; Bradforth, Stephen E.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2014-11-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been used to image free and encapsulated doxorubicin (Dox) uptake into cells, since interaction of Dox with DNA leads to a characteristic lifetime change. However, none of the reported Dox conjugates were able to enter cell nuclei. In this work, we use FLIM to show nuclear uptake of 2.7 nm mean diameter Au nanoparticles conjugated to Dox. The pattern of labelling differed substantially from what was seen with free Dox, with slower nuclear entry and stronger cytoplasmic labelling at all time points. As the cells died, the pattern of labelling changed further as intracellular structures disintegrated, consistent with association of Au-Dox to membranes. The patterns of Au distribution and intracellular structure changes were confirmed using electron microscopy, and indicate different mechanisms of cytotoxicity with stable Au-Dox conjugates compared to Dox alone. Such conjugates are promising tools for overcoming resistance in Dox-resistant cancers.Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been used to image free and encapsulated doxorubicin (Dox) uptake into cells, since interaction of Dox with DNA leads to a characteristic lifetime change. However, none of the reported Dox conjugates were able to enter cell nuclei. In this work, we use FLIM to show nuclear uptake of 2.7 nm mean diameter Au nanoparticles conjugated to Dox. The pattern of labelling differed substantially from what was seen with free Dox, with slower nuclear entry and stronger cytoplasmic labelling at all time points. As the cells died, the pattern of labelling changed further as intracellular structures disintegrated, consistent with association of Au-Dox to membranes. The patterns of Au distribution and intracellular structure changes were confirmed using electron microscopy, and indicate different mechanisms of cytotoxicity with stable Au-Dox conjugates compared to Dox alone. Such conjugates are promising tools for overcoming resistance in

  20. Parallelized TCSPC for dynamic intravital fluorescence lifetime imaging: quantifying neuronal dysfunction in neuroinflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Leo Rinnenthal

    Full Text Available Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy has revolutionized our view on vital processes by revealing motility and interaction patterns of various cell subsets in hardly accessible organs (e.g. brain in living animals. However, current technology is still insufficient to elucidate the mechanisms of organ dysfunction as a prerequisite for developing new therapeutic strategies, since it renders only sparse information about the molecular basis of cellular response within tissues in health and disease. In the context of imaging, Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET is one of the most adequate tools to probe molecular mechanisms of cell function. As a calibration-free technique, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is superior for quantifying FRET in vivo. Currently, its main limitation is the acquisition speed in the context of deep-tissue 3D and 4D imaging. Here we present a parallelized time-correlated single-photon counting point detector (p-TCSPC (i for dynamic single-beam scanning FLIM of large 3D areas on the range of hundreds of milliseconds relevant in the context of immune-induced pathologies as well as (ii for ultrafast 2D FLIM in the range of tens of milliseconds, a scale relevant for cell physiology. We demonstrate its power in dynamic deep-tissue intravital imaging, as compared to multi-beam scanning time-gated FLIM suitable for fast data acquisition and compared to highly sensitive single-channel TCSPC adequate to detect low fluorescence signals. Using p-TCSPC, 256×256 pixel FLIM maps (300×300 µm(2 are acquired within 468 ms while 131×131 pixel FLIM maps (75×75 µm(2 can be acquired every 82 ms in 115 µm depth in the spinal cord of CerTN L15 mice. The CerTN L15 mice express a FRET-based Ca-biosensor in certain neuronal subsets. Our new technology allows us to perform time-lapse 3D intravital FLIM (4D FLIM in the brain stem of CerTN L15 mice affected by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and, thereby, to truly quantify

  1. Fluorescence lifetime FRET imaging of receptor-ligand complexes in tumor cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkouskaya, Alena; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E.; Barroso, Margarida

    2017-02-01

    To guide the development of targeted therapies with improved efficacy and accelerated clinical acceptance, novel imaging methodologies need to be established. Toward this goal, fluorescence lifetime Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET) imaging assays capitalize on the ability of antibodies or protein ligands to bind dimerized membrane bound receptors to measure their target engagement levels in cancer cells. Conventional FLIM FRET microscopy has been widely applied at visible wavelengths to detect protein-protein interactions in vitro. However, operation at these wavelengths restricts imaging quality and ability to quantitate lifetime changes in in vivo small animal optical imaging due to high auto-fluorescence and light scattering. Here, we have analyzed the uptake of iron-bound transferrin (Tf) probes into human breast cancer cells using FLIM-FRET microscopy in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) range. The development of NIR FLIM FRET microscopy allows for the use of quantitative lifetime-based molecular assays to measure drug-target engagement levels at multiple scales: from in vitro microscopy to in vivo small animal optical imaging (macroscopy). This novel approach can be extended to other receptors, currently targeted in oncology. Hence, lifetime-based molecular imaging can find numerous applications in drug delivery and targeted therapy assessment and optimization.

  2. Cytosolic NADH-NAD+ Redox Visualized in Brain Slices by Two-Photon Fluorescence Lifetime Biosensor Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongeon, Rebecca; Venkatachalam, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Cytosolic NADH-NAD+ redox state is central to cellular metabolism and a valuable indicator of glucose and lactate metabolism in living cells. Here we sought to quantitatively determine NADH-NAD+ redox in live cells and brain tissue using a fluorescence lifetime imaging of the genetically-encoded single-fluorophore biosensor Peredox. Results: We show that Peredox exhibits a substantial change in its fluorescence lifetime over its sensing range of NADH-NAD+ ratio. This allows changes in cytosolic NADH redox to be visualized in living cells using a two-photon scanning microscope with fluorescence lifetime imaging capabilities (2p-FLIM), using time-correlated single photon counting. Innovation: Because the lifetime readout is absolutely calibrated (in nanoseconds) and is independent of sensor concentration, we demonstrate that quantitative assessment of NADH redox is possible using a single fluorophore biosensor. Conclusion: Imaging of the sensor in mouse hippocampal brain slices reveals that astrocytes are typically much more reduced (with higher NADH:NAD+ ratio) than neurons under basal conditions, consistent with the hypothesis that astrocytes are more glycolytic than neurons. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 553–563. PMID:26857245

  3. FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DISTRIBUTIONS IN PROTEINS

    OpenAIRE

    ALCALA, JR; Gratton, E; PRENDERGAST, FG

    1987-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime value of tryptophan residues varies by more than a factor of 100 in different proteins and is determined by several factors, which include solvent exposure and interactions with other elements of the protein matrix. Because of the variety of different elements that can alter the lifetime value and the sensitivity to the particular environment of the tryptophan residue, it is likely that non-unique lifetime values result in protein systems. The emission decay of most ...

  4. Evaluation of the oxidative stress of psoriatic fibroblasts based on spectral two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Barygina, Victoria; Cicchi, Riccardo; Fiorillo, Claudia; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-02-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease of the skin characterized by hyperkeratosis, hyperproliferation of the epidermis, inflammatory cell accumulation and increased dilatation of dermal papillary blood vessels. Metabolic activity is increased in the epidermis and the dermis. Oxidative stress is high mainly due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) originating from the skin environment and cellular metabolism. We employed a custom multiphoton microscope coupled with a FLIM setup to image primary culture fibroblast cells from perilesional and lesional psoriatic skin in-vitro. Twophoton excited fluorescence images revealed the morphological differences between healthy and psoriatic fibroblasts. Based on the spectral analysis of the NADH and FAD components the oxidative stress was assessed and found to be higher in psoriatic cells. Furthermore the fluorescence lifetime properties were investigated with a TCSPC FLIM module. Mean fluorescence lifetime was found to be longer in psoriatic lesional cells. Analysis of the fast (τ1) and slow (τ2) decay lifetimes revealed a decrease of the ratio of the contribution of the fast (α1) parameter to the contribution of the slow (α2) parameter. The fluorescence in the examined part of the spectrum is attributed mainly to NADH. The decrease of the ratio (α1)/ (α2) is believed to correlate strongly with the anti-oxidant properties of NADH which can lead to the variation of its population in high ROS environment. This methodology could serve as an index of the oxidative status in cells and furthermore could be used to probe the oxidative stress of tissues in-vivo.

  5. From morphology to clinical pathophysiology: multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging at patients' bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mess, Christian; Zens, Katharina; Gorzelanny, Christian; Metze, Dieter; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of skin diseases. By means of multiphoton excitation, endogenous biomolecules like NADH, collagen or elastin show autofluorescence or second harmonic generation. Thus, these molecules provide information about the subcellular morphology, epidermal architecture and physiological condition of the skin. To gain a deeper understanding of the linkage between cellular structure and physiological processes, non-invasive multiphotonbased intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) were combined within the scopes of inflammatory skin, chronic wounds and drug delivery in clinical application. The optical biopsies generated via MPT were morphologically analyzed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed a perinuclear accumulation in lesional skin in contrast to an even distribution in healthy skin. Confirmatively, MPT-FLIM showed an obvious metabolic shift in lesions. Moreover, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. The feasibility of primary in vivo tracking of applied therapeutic agents further broadened our scope: We examined the permeation and subsequent distribution of agents directly visualized in patientś skin in short-term repetitive measurements. Furthermore, we performed MPT-FLIM follow-up investigations in the long-term course of therapy. Therefore, clinical MPT-FLIM application offers new insights into the pathophysiology and the individual therapeutic course of skin diseases, facilitating a better understanding of the processes of inflammation and wound healing.

  6. Actin cytoskeleton-dependent Rab GTPase-regulated angiotensin type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Sun, Yuansheng; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic regulation of the cellular trafficking of human angiotensin (Ang) type 1 receptor (AT1R) is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the cellular trafficking of AT1R-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (AT1R-EGFP) heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells by determining the change in donor lifetime (AT1R-EGFP) in the presence or absence of acceptor(s) using fluorescence lifetime imaging-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy. The average lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in our donor-alone samples was ~2.33 ns. The basal state lifetime was shortened slightly in the presence of Rab5 (2.01+/-0.10 ns) or Rab7 (2.11+/-0.11 ns) labeled with Alexa 555, as the acceptor fluorophore. A 5-min Ang II treatment markedly shortened the lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in the presence of Rab5-Alexa 555 (1.78+/-0.31 ns) but was affected minimally in the presence of Rab7-Alexa 555 (2.09+/-0.37 ns). A 30-min Ang II treatment further decreased the AT1R-EGFP lifetime in the presence of both Rab5- and Rab7-Alexa 555. Latrunculin A but not nocodazole pretreatment blocked the ability of Ang II to shorten the AT1R-EGFP lifetime. The occurrence of FRET between AT1R-EGFP (donor) and LAMP1-Alexa 555 (acceptor) with Ang II stimulation was impaired by photobleaching the acceptor. These studies demonstrate that Ang II-induced AT1R lysosomal degradation through its association with LAMP1 is regulated by Rab5/7 via mechanisms that are dependent on intact actin cytoskeletons.

  7. Multiphoton microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging and optical spectroscopy for the diagnosis of neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skala, Melissa Caroline

    2007-12-01

    Cancer morbidity and mortality is greatly reduced when the disease is diagnosed and treated early in its development. Tissue biopsies are the gold standard for cancer diagnosis, and an accurate diagnosis requires a biopsy from the malignant portion of an organ. Light, guided through a fiber optic probe, could be used to inspect regions of interest and provide real-time feedback to determine the optimal tissue site for biopsy. This approach could increase the diagnostic accuracy of current biopsy procedures. The studies in this thesis have characterized changes in tissue optical signals with carcinogenesis, increasing our understanding of the sensitivity of optical techniques for cancer detection. All in vivo studies were conducted on the dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene treated hamster cheek pouch model of epithelial carcinogenesis. Multiphoton microscopy studies in the near infrared wavelength region quantified changes in tissue morphology and fluorescence with carcinogenesis in vivo. Statistically significant morphological changes with precancer included increased epithelial thickness, loss of stratification in the epithelium, and increased nuclear diameter. Fluorescence changes included a statistically significant decrease in the epithelial fluorescence intensity per voxel at 780 nm excitation, a decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, an electron donor in oxidative phosphorylation), and an increase in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, an electron acceptor in oxidative phosphorylation) with precancer. The redox ratio (fluorescence intensity of FAD/NADH, a measure of the cellular oxidation-reduction state) did not significantly change with precancer. Cell culture experiments (MCF10A cells) indicated that the decrease in protein-bound NADH with precancer could be due to increased levels of glycolysis. Point measurements of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra in

  8. Combined nonlinear laser imaging (two-photon excitation fluorescence, second and third-harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopies) in ovarian tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, J.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Bottcher-Luiz, F.; Andrade, L. A. L. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    We applied Two-photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF), Second/Third Harmonic Generation (SHG and THG) and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) Non Linear Optics (NLO) Laser-Scanning Microscopy within the same imaging platform to evaluate their use as a diagnostic tool in ovarian tumors. We assess of applicability of this multimodal approach to perform a pathological evaluation of serous and mucinous tumors in human samples. The combination of TPEF-SHG-THG imaging provided complementary information about the interface epithelium/stromal, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillar tissue architecture (SHG). The fact that H&E staining is the standard method used in clinical pathology and that the stored samples are usually fixed makes it important a re-evaluation of these samples with NLO microscopy to compare new results with a library of already existing samples. FLIM, however, depends on the chemical environment around the fluorophors that was completely changed after fixation; therefore it only makes sense in unstained samples. Our FLIM results in unstained samples demonstrate that it is possible to discriminate healthy epithelia from serous or mucinous epithelia. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the different imaging modalities used showed that multimodal nonlinear microscopy has the potential to differentiate between cancerous and healthy ovarian tissue.

  9. Two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with sub-nanosecond pulses and a high analog bandwidth signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Hakert, Hubertus; Weng, Daniel; Huber, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) are powerful imaging techniques in bio-molecular science. The need for elaborate light sources for TPEF and speed limitations for FLIM, however, hinder an even wider application. We present a way to overcome this limitations by combining a robust and inexpensive fiber laser for nonlinear excitation with a fast analog digitization method for rapid FLIM imaging. The applied sub nanosecond pulsed laser source is synchronized to a high analog bandwidth signal detection for single shot TPEF- and single shot FLIM imaging. The actively modulated pulses at 1064nm from the fiber laser are adjustable from 50ps to 5ns with kW of peak power. At a typically applied pulse lengths and repetition rates, the duty cycle is comparable to typically used femtosecond pulses and thus the peak power is also comparable at same cw-power. Hence, both types of excitation should yield the same number of fluorescence photons per time on average when used for TPEF imaging. However, in the 100ps configuration, a thousand times more fluorescence photons are generated per pulse. In this paper, we now show that the higher number of fluorescence photons per pulse combined with a high analog bandwidth detection makes it possible to not only use a single pulse per pixel for TPEF imaging but also to resolve the exponential time decay for FLIM. To evaluate the performance of our system, we acquired FLIM images of a Convallaria sample with pixel rates of 1 MHz where the lifetime information is directly measured with a fast real time digitizer. With the presented results, we show that longer pulses in the many-10ps to nanosecond regime can be readily applied for TPEF imaging and enable new imaging modalities like single pulse FLIM.

  10. Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy: advanced studies of fluorescence dynamics, lifetime imaging, clinical sensing, two-photon excitation, and light quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Malak, Henryk M.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Szmacinski, Henryk; Kusba, Jozef; Akkaya, Engin; Terpetschnig, Ewald A.; Johnson, Michael L.

    1994-08-01

    The Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy (CFS) is a multi-user facility providing state of the art time-resolved fluorescence instrumentation and software for scientists, whose research can be enhanced by such experimental data. The CFS is a national center, supported by the National Center for Research Resources Division of the National Institutes of Health, and in part by the National Science Foundation. Both time-domain (TD) and frequency- domain (FD) measurements (10 MHz to 10 Ghz) are available, with a wide range of excitation and emission wavelengths (UV to NIR). The data can be used to recover distances and site-to-site diffusion in protein, interactions between macromolecules, accessibility of fluorophores to quenchers, and the dynamic properties of proteins, membranes and nucleic acids. Current software provides for analysis of multi-exponential intensity and anisotropy decays, lifetime distribution, distance distributions for independent observation of fluorescence donors and acceptors, transient effects in collisional quenching, phase-modulation spectra and time-resolved emission spectra. Most programs provide for global analysis of multiple data sets obtained under similar experimental conditions. Data can be analyzed on-site by connection with the CFS computers through the internet. During six years of operation we have established scientific collaborations with over 30 academic and industrial groups in the United States. These collaborations have resulted in 63 scientific papers.

  11. Development of a Multi-modal Tissue Diagnostic System Combining High Frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging with Lifetime Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Stephens, Douglas N.; Park, Jesung; Sun, Yinghua; Marcu, Laura; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    We report the development and validate a multi-modal tissue diagnostic technology, which combines three complementary techniques into one system including ultrasound backscatter microscopy (UBM), photoacoustic imaging (PAI), and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS). UBM enables the reconstruction of the tissue microanatomy. PAI maps the optical absorption heterogeneity of the tissue associated with structure information and has the potential to provide functional imaging of the tissue. Examination of the UBM and PAI images allows for localization of regions of interest for TR-LIFS evaluation of the tissue composition. The hybrid probe consists of a single element ring transducer with concentric fiber optics for multi-modal data acquisition. Validation and characterization of the multi-modal system and ultrasonic, photoacoustic, and spectroscopic data coregistration were conducted in a physical phantom with properties of ultrasound scattering, optical absorption, and fluorescence. The UBM system with the 41 MHz ring transducer can reach the axial and lateral resolution of 30 and 65 μm, respectively. The PAI system with 532 nm excitation light from a Nd:YAG laser shows great contrast for the distribution of optical absorbers. The TR-LIFS system records the fluorescence decay with the time resolution of ~300 ps and a high sensitivity of nM concentration range. Biological phantom constructed with different types of tissues (tendon and fat) was used to demonstrate the complementary information provided by the three modalities. Fluorescence spectra and lifetimes were compared to differentiate chemical composition of tissues at the regions of interest determined by the coregistered high resolution UBM and PAI image. Current results demonstrate that the fusion of these techniques enables sequentially detection of functional, morphological, and compositional features of biological tissue, suggesting potential applications in diagnosis of tumors

  12. Lifetime Resolved Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Berland, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has been widely used investigate molecular dynamics and interactions in biological systems. FCS typically resolves the component species of a sample either through differences in diffusion coefficient or molecular brightness. Diffusion based assays currently have a major limitation which requires that the diffusion coefficients of component species in a sample must be substantially different in order to be resolved. This criterion is not met in many important cases, such as when molecules of similar molecular weight bind to each other. This limitation can be overcome, and resolution of FCS measurements enhanced, by combining FCS measurements with measurements of fluorescence lifetimes. By using of global analysis on simultaneously acquired FCS and lifetime data we show that we can dramatically enhance resolution in FCS measurements, and accurately resolve the concentration and diffusion coefficients of multiple sample components even when their diffusion coefficients are identical provided there is a difference in the lifetime of the component species. We show examples of this technique using both simulations and experiments. It is expected that this method will be of significance for binding assays studying molecular interactions.

  13. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition.

  14. Signal peptide peptidase (SPP dimer formation as assessed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM in intact cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyborg Andrew C

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal peptide peptidase (SPP is an intramembrane cleaving protease identified by its cleavage of several type II membrane signal peptides. Conservation of intramembrane active site residues demonstrates that SPP, SPP family members, and presenilins (PSs make up a family of intramembrane cleaving proteases. Because SPP appears to function without additional protein cofactors, the study of SPP may provide structural insights into the mechanism of intramembrane proteolysis by this biomedically important family of proteins. Previous studies have shown that SPP isolated from cells appears to be a homodimer, but some evidence exists that in vitro SPP may be active as a monomer. We have conducted additional experiments to determine if SPP exists as a monomer or dimer in vivo. Results Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM can be is used to determine intra- or intermolecular interactions by fluorescently labeling epitopes on one or two different molecules. If the donor and acceptor fluorophores are less than 10 nm apart, the donor fluorophore lifetime shortens proportionally to the distance between the fluorophores. In this study, we used two types of fluorescence energy transfer (FRET pairs; cyan fluorescent protein (CFP with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP or Alexa 488 with Cy3 to differentially label the NH2- or COOH-termini of SPP molecules. A cell based SPP activity assay was used to show that all tagged SPP proteins are proteolytically active. Using FLIM we were able to show that the donor fluorophore lifetime of the CFP tagged SPP construct in living cells significantly decreases when either a NH2- or COOH-terminally YFP tagged SPP construct is co-transfected, indicating close proximity between two different SPP molecules. These data were then confirmed in cell lines stably co-expressing V5- and FLAG-tagged SPP constructs. Conclusion Our FLIM data strongly suggest dimer formation between two separate SPP proteins

  15. Asante Calcium Green and Asante Calcium Red--novel calcium indicators for two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Karolina; Hille, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and potential dysfunctions therein, an analysis of the ubiquitous intracellular second messenger calcium is of particular interest. This study examined the suitability of the novel Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dyes Asante Calcium Red (ACR) and Asante Calcium Green (ACG) for two-photon (2P)-excited time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Both dyes displayed sufficient 2P fluorescence excitation in a range of 720-900 nm. In vitro, ACR and ACG exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay behavior and the two decay time components in the ns-range could be attributed to the Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound dye species. The amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay time changed in a Ca(2+)-dependent way, unraveling in vitro dissociation constants K(D) of 114 nM and 15 nM for ACR and ACG, respectively. In the presence of bovine serum albumin, the absorption and steady-state fluorescence behavior of ACR was altered and its biexponential fluorescence decay showed about 5-times longer decay time components indicating dye-protein interactions. Since no ester derivative of ACG was commercially available, only ACR was evaluated for 2P-excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) in living cells of American cockroach salivary glands. In living cells, ACR also exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay with clearly resolvable short (0.56 ns) and long (2.44 ns) decay time components attributable to the Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound ACR species. From the amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay times, an in situ K(D) of 180 nM was determined. Thus, quantitative [Ca(2+)]i recordings were realized, unraveling a reversible dopamine-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation from 21 nM to 590 nM in salivary duct cells. It was concluded that ACR is a promising new Ca(2+) indicator dye for 2P-FLIM recordings applicable in diverse biological systems.

  16. Asante Calcium Green and Asante Calcium Red--novel calcium indicators for two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Jahn

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and potential dysfunctions therein, an analysis of the ubiquitous intracellular second messenger calcium is of particular interest. This study examined the suitability of the novel Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dyes Asante Calcium Red (ACR and Asante Calcium Green (ACG for two-photon (2P-excited time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Both dyes displayed sufficient 2P fluorescence excitation in a range of 720-900 nm. In vitro, ACR and ACG exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay behavior and the two decay time components in the ns-range could be attributed to the Ca(2+-free and Ca(2+-bound dye species. The amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay time changed in a Ca(2+-dependent way, unraveling in vitro dissociation constants K(D of 114 nM and 15 nM for ACR and ACG, respectively. In the presence of bovine serum albumin, the absorption and steady-state fluorescence behavior of ACR was altered and its biexponential fluorescence decay showed about 5-times longer decay time components indicating dye-protein interactions. Since no ester derivative of ACG was commercially available, only ACR was evaluated for 2P-excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM in living cells of American cockroach salivary glands. In living cells, ACR also exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay with clearly resolvable short (0.56 ns and long (2.44 ns decay time components attributable to the Ca(2+-free and Ca(2+-bound ACR species. From the amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay times, an in situ K(D of 180 nM was determined. Thus, quantitative [Ca(2+]i recordings were realized, unraveling a reversible dopamine-induced [Ca(2+]i elevation from 21 nM to 590 nM in salivary duct cells. It was concluded that ACR is a promising new Ca(2+ indicator dye for 2P-FLIM recordings applicable in diverse biological systems.

  17. In vivo and in vitro investigations of retinal fluorophores in age-related macular degeneration by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M.; Quick, S.; Klemm, M.; Schenke, S.; Mata, N.; Eitner, A.; Schweitzer, D.

    2009-02-01

    Ocular fundus autofluorescence imaging has been introduced into clinical diagnostics recently for the observation of the age pigment lipofuscin, a precursor of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, a deeper understanding of the generation of single compounds contributing to the lipofuscin as well as of the role of other fluorophores such as FAD, glycated proteins, and collagen needs their discrimination by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). FLIM at the ocular fundus is performed using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope equipped with a picosecond laser source (448nm or 468nm respectively, 100ps, 80 MHz repetition rate) and dual wavelength (490-560nm and 560-7600nm) time-correlated single photon counting. A three-exponential fit of the fluorescence decay revealed associations of decay times to anatomical structures. Disease-related features are identified from alterations in decay times and-amplitudes. The in-vivo investigations in patients were paralleled by experiments in an organ culture of the porcine ocular fundus. Photo-oxidative stress was induced by exposure to blue light (467nm, 0.41 mW/mm2). Subsequent analysis (fluorescence microscopy, HPLC, LC-MS) indicated the accumulation of the pyridinium bis-retinoid A2E and its oxidation products as well as oxidized phospholipids. These compounds contribute to the tissue auto-fluorescence and may play a key role in the pathogenesis of AMD. Thus, FLIM observation at the ocular fundus in vivo enhances our knowledge on the etiology of AMD and may become a diagnostic tool.

  18. A dual-modality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system for simultaneous morphological and biochemical tissue characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jesung; Jo, Javier A; Shrestha, Sebina; Pande, Paritosh; Wan, Qiujie; Applegate, Brian E

    2010-07-16

    Most pathological conditions elicit changes in the tissue optical response that may be interrogated by one or more optical imaging modalities. Any single modality typically only furnishes an incomplete picture of the tissue optical response, hence an approach that integrates complementary optical imaging modalities is needed for a more comprehensive non-destructive and minimally-invasive tissue characterization. We have developed a dual-modality system, incorporating optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), that is capable of simultaneously characterizing the 3-D tissue morphology and its biochemical composition. The Fourier domain OCT subsystem, at an 830 nm center wavelength, provided high-resolution morphological volumetric tissue images with an axial and lateral resolution of 7.3 and 13.4 µm, respectively. The multispectral FLIM subsystem, based on a direct pulse-recording approach (upon 355 nm laser excitation), provided two-dimensional superficial maps of the tissue autofluorescence intensity and lifetime at three customizable emission bands with 100 µm lateral resolution. Both subsystems share the same excitation/illumination optical path and are simultaneously raster scanned on the sample to generate coregistered OCT volumes and FLIM images. The developed OCT/FLIM system was capable of a maximum A-line rate of 59 KHz for OCT and a pixel rate of up to 30 KHz for FLIM. The dual-modality system was validated with standard fluorophore solutions and subsequently applied to the characterization of two biological tissue types: postmortem human coronary atherosclerotic plaques, and in vivo normal and cancerous hamster cheek pouch epithelial tissue.

  19. Label-free fluorescence lifetime and second harmonic generation imaging microscopy improves quantification of experimental renal fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjit, Suman; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Montford, John; Dvornikov, Alexander; Lehman, Allison; Orlicky, David J; Nemenoff, Raphael; Gratton, Enrico; Levi, Moshe; Furgeson, Seth

    2016-11-01

    All forms of progressive renal diseases develop a final pathway of tubulointerstitial fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis. Renal fibrosis is usually quantified using histological staining, a process that is time-consuming and pathologist dependent. Here we develop a fast and operator-independent method to measure fibrosis utilizing the murine unilateral ureteral obstruction model which manifests a time-dependent fibrotic increase in obstructed kidneys while the contralateral kidneys are used as controls. After ureteral obstruction, kidneys were analyzed at 7, 14, and 21 days. Fibrosis was quantified using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and second harmonic generation (SHG) in a Deep Imaging via Enhanced photon Recovery deep tissue imaging microscope. This microscope was developed for deep tissue along with second and third harmonic generation imaging and has extraordinary sensitivity toward harmonic generation. SHG data suggest the presence of more fibrillar collagen in the obstructed kidneys. The combination of short-wavelength FLIM and SHG analysis results in a robust assessment procedure independent of observer interpretation and let us create criteria to quantify the extent of fibrosis directly from the image. Thus, the FLIM-SHG technique shows remarkable improvement in quantification of renal fibrosis compared to standard histological techniques. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multimodal optical setup for nonlinear and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopies: improvement on a commercial confocal inverted microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegati, V. B.; Adur, J.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Baratti, M. O.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    In this work we proposed and built a multimodal optical setup that extends a commercially available confocal microscope (Olympus FV300) to include nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The NLO microscopies included two-photon fluorescence (TPFE), Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Third Harmonic Generation (THG). The whole system, including FLIM, used only one laser source composed of an 80 MHz femtosecond laser. The commercial Ti:sapphire lasers can be tuned up to 690-1040 nm bringing the THG signal to the 350 nm region where most microscope optics do not work. However, the third harmonic is only generated at the sample, meaning that we only have to take care of the collection optics. To do that we used a remote photomultiplier to acquire the THG signal at the 310-350 nm wavelength window. After performing the tests to guarantee that we are observing actually SHG/THG signals we than used this system to acquire multimodal images of several biological samples, from epithelial cancer to vegetables. The ability to see the collagen network together with the cell nuclei proved to be important for cancer tissues diagnosis. Moreover, FLIM provides information about the cell metabolism, also very important for cancer cell processes.

  1. Single Cell Assay for Molecular Diagnostics and Medicine: Monitoring Intracellular Concentrations of Macromolecules by Two-photon Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliss, Artem; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Kuzmin, Andrey; Wang, Yan; Qu, Junle; Li, Yuee; Prasad, Paras N

    2015-01-01

    Molecular organization of a cell is dynamically transformed along the course of cellular physiological processes, pathologic developments or derived from interactions with drugs. The capability to measure and monitor concentrations of macromolecules in a single cell would greatly enhance studies of cellular processes in heterogeneous populations. In this communication, we introduce and experimentally validate a bio-analytical single-cell assay, wherein the overall concentration of macromolecules is estimated in specific subcellular domains, such as structure-function compartments of the cell nucleus as well as in nucleoplasm. We describe quantitative mapping of local biomolecular concentrations, either intrinsic relating to the functional and physiological state of a cell, or altered by a therapeutic drug action, using two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). The proposed assay utilizes a correlation between the fluorescence lifetime of fluorophore and the refractive index of its microenvironment varying due to changes in the concentrations of macromolecules, mainly proteins. Two-photon excitation in Near-Infra Red biological transparency window reduced the photo-toxicity in live cells, as compared with a conventional single-photon approach. Using this new assay, we estimated average concentrations of proteins in the compartments of nuclear speckles and in the nucleoplasm at ~150 mg/ml, and in the nucleolus at ~284 mg/ml. Furthermore, we show a profound influence of pharmaceutical inhibitors of RNA synthesis on intracellular protein density. The approach proposed here will significantly advance theranostics, and studies of drug-cell interactions at the single-cell level, aiding development of personal molecular medicine.

  2. Frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging system (pco.flim) based on a in-pixel dual tap control CMOS image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Robert; Holst, Gerhard A.

    2015-03-01

    The luminescence lifetime as a beneficial analytical parameter is known for many years and is well described by a large variety of publications. Many instruments including 2D measuring systems with cameras have been developed and applied in the past years. However, since the current instrumentation to perform either time- or frequency-domain lifetime measurements is rather complex, new developments in CMOS image sensor technology have achieved to create new image sensors, which can efficiently be integrated into easier-to-handle luminescence lifetime measuring systems. The principle of these modulatable CMOS image sensors, while initially being designed for distance measurements, shows a clear analogy to frequency-domain FLIM measurements, which was proven by researchers [1, 2]. Based on this principle a new CMOS image sensor has been developed, integrated into a camera system and has been investigated within a research project. The image sensor has a resolution of 1024 × 1024 pixels with a 5.6 μm pitch and can be modulated up to 50 MHz. First measurements show an effective dynamic range of larger than 1:1024 (corresponding to 10 bit dynamic). The maximum frame rate is in the range of 90 frames/s in dual-tap mode, resulting in an effective lifetime image frame rate for realistic measurements of approximately 22 frames/s. The camera system pco.flim, featuring that image sensor, generates all required modulation signals from 5 kHz to 50 MHz (sinusoidal and rectangular). It performs advanced pixel correction to generate linear and high-quality images, while the basic lifetime image processing is done in the computer. The modulation frequency can be freely adjusted within the specified range. The characteristics of the camera systems are presented, and first results are discussed using different representations of the data like for example the phasor approach [3], which has been established to provide a more global view to pixelwise fluorescence lifetime data and

  3. Lifetime Fluorescence and Raman Imaging for Detection of Wound Failure and Heterotopic Ossification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    5–8]. HO also arises in spinal injuries, severe burns and in the surgical beds resulting from orthopedic surgery complications [1,6,9,10]. The...P. V. Butte, B. K. Pikul, A. Hever, W. H. Yong, K. L. Black, and L. Marcu, "Diagnosis of meningioma by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

  4. High-efficiency integrated readout circuit for single photon avalanche diode arrays in fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acconcia, G; Cominelli, A; Rech, I; Ghioni, M

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, lifetime measurements by means of the Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) technique have led to a significant breakthrough in medical and biological fields. Unfortunately, the many advantages of TCSPC-based approaches come along with the major drawback of a relatively long acquisition time. The exploitation of multiple channels in parallel could in principle mitigate this issue, and at the same time it opens the way to a multi-parameter analysis of the optical signals, e.g., as a function of wavelength or spatial coordinates. The TCSPC multichannel solutions proposed so far, though, suffer from a tradeoff between number of channels and performance, and the overall measurement speed has not been increased according to the number of channels, thus reducing the advantages of having a multichannel system. In this paper, we present a novel readout architecture for bi-dimensional, high-density Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) arrays, specifically designed to maximize the throughput of the whole system and able to guarantee an efficient use of resources. The core of the system is a routing logic that can provide a dynamic connection between a large number of SPAD detectors and a much lower number of high-performance acquisition channels. A key feature of our smart router is its ability to guarantee high efficiency under any operating condition.

  5. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy in type 2 diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Deutsch, Lydia; Klemm, Matthias; Jentsch, Susanne; Hammer, Martin; Peters, Sven; Haueisen, Jens; Müller, Ulrich A.; Dawczynski, Jens

    2015-06-01

    The time-resolved autofluorescence of the eye is used for the detection of metabolic alteration in diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy. One eye from 37 phakic and 11 pseudophakic patients with type 2 diabetes, and one eye from 25 phakic and 23 pseudophakic healthy subjects were included in the study. After a three-exponential fit of the decay of autofluorescence, histograms of lifetimes τi, amplitudes αi, and relative contributions Qi were statistically compared between corresponding groups in two spectral channels (490diabetic patients and age-matched controls (p450 ps, and the shift of τ3 from ˜3000 to 3700 ps in ch1 of diabetic patients when compared with healthy subjects indicate an increased production of free flavin adenine dinucleotide, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), and, probably, a change from free to protein-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide at the fundus. AGE also accumulated in the crystalline lens.

  6. High-efficiency integrated readout circuit for single photon avalanche diode arrays in fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acconcia, G.; Cominelli, A.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, lifetime measurements by means of the Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) technique have led to a significant breakthrough in medical and biological fields. Unfortunately, the many advantages of TCSPC-based approaches come along with the major drawback of a relatively long acquisition time. The exploitation of multiple channels in parallel could in principle mitigate this issue, and at the same time it opens the way to a multi-parameter analysis of the optical signals, e.g., as a function of wavelength or spatial coordinates. The TCSPC multichannel solutions proposed so far, though, suffer from a tradeoff between number of channels and performance, and the overall measurement speed has not been increased according to the number of channels, thus reducing the advantages of having a multichannel system. In this paper, we present a novel readout architecture for bi-dimensional, high-density Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) arrays, specifically designed to maximize the throughput of the whole system and able to guarantee an efficient use of resources. The core of the system is a routing logic that can provide a dynamic connection between a large number of SPAD detectors and a much lower number of high-performance acquisition channels. A key feature of our smart router is its ability to guarantee high efficiency under any operating condition.

  7. Fluorescence lifetime imaging by time-correlated single-photon counting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, W.; Bergmann, A.; Hink, M.A.; Konig, K.; Benndorf, K.; Biskup, C.

    2004-01-01

    We present a time-correlated single photon counting (TCPSC) technique that allows time-resolved multi-wavelength imaging in conjunction with a laser scanning microscope and a pulsed excitation source. The technique is based on a four-dimensional histogramming process that records the photon density

  8. Mean fluorescence lifetime and its error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiserova, Eva [Department of Mathematical Analysis and Applications of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kubala, Martin, E-mail: mkubala@prfnw.upol.cz [Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2012-08-15

    Mean excited-state lifetime is one of the fundamental fluorescence characteristics and enters as an important parameter into numerous calculations characterizing molecular interactions, such as e.g. FRET or fluorescence quenching. Our experiments demonstrated that the intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic, in contrast to the amplitude-weighted one, which value is dependent on the data quality and particularly on the used fitting model. For the first time, we also report the procedure for the error estimation for both the intensity- and amplitude-weighted mean fluorescence lifetimes. Furthermore, we present a method for estimation of the mean fluorescence lifetime directly from the fluorescence-decay curve recorded by TCSPC (Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting) method. For its simplicity and low computational demands, it could be a useful tool in the high-throughput applications, such as FACS, FLIM-FRET or HPLC detectors. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amplitude-weighted mean lifetime depends on the selection of fitting model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rigorous procedure for estimation of confidence intervals for mean lifetime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mean lifetime can be estimated directly from the TCSPC histogram.

  9. Real-time fluorescence lifetime imaging system with a 32 × 32 0.13μm CMOS low dark-count single-photon avalanche diode array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, D.U.; Arlt, J.; Richardson, J.; Walker, R.; Buts, A.; Stoppa, D.; Charbon, E.; Henderson, R.

    2010-01-01

    A compact real-time fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) system based on an array of low dark count 0.13μm CMOS singlephoton avalanche diodes (SPADs) is demonstrated. Fast background-insensitive fluorescence lifetime determination is achieved by use of a recently proposed algorithm called

  10. Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver to NASA an innovative, portable, and power efficient Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer...

  11. pH dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of FAD in solution and in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Serajul; Honma, Masato; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Kinjo, Masataka; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-18

    We have studied physiological parameters in a living cell using fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous chromophores. In this study, pH dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), that is a significant cofactor exhibiting autofluorescence, has been investigated in buffer solution and in cells. The fluorescence lifetime of FAD remained unchanged with pH 5 to 9 in solution. However, the fluorescence lifetime in HeLa cells was found to decrease with increasing intracellular pH, suggesting that pH in a single cell can be estimated from the fluorescence lifetime imaging of FAD without adding exogenous fluorescent probes.

  12. pH Dependence of the Fluorescence Lifetime of FAD in Solution and in Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nobuhiro Ohta; Takakazu Nakabayashi; Masataka Kinjo; Md. Serajul Islam; Masato Honma

    2013-01-01

    We have studied physiological parameters in a living cell using fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous chromophores. In this study, pH dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), that is a significant cofactor exhibiting autofluorescence, has been investigated in buffer solution and in cells. The fluorescence lifetime of FAD remained unchanged with pH 5 to 9 in solution. However, the fluorescence lifetime in HeLa cells was found to decrease with increasi...

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy analysis of defects in multi-tube physical vapor transport grown Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Andreas; Veale, Matthew C.; Wilson, Matthew D.; Seller, Paul; Botchway, Stanley W. [Science and Technology Facility Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Detector Development Group and Central Laser Facility, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bell, Steven J. [Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Duarte, Diana D. [Science and Technology Facility Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Detector Development Group and Central Laser Facility, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Choubey, Ashutosh; Halliday, Douglas [Department of Physics, Durham University, Rochester Building, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is the material of choice for high-energy room-temperature X-ray and γ-ray detectors. However, the performance of pixelated detectors is greatly influenced by the quality of CZT. Crystal defects and impurities are one source of shallow and deep level traps for charge carriers. Fluorescence lifetime of the recombination of optically excited charges may indicate the presence and type of defects and impurities in CZT. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is used to examine the excited-state lifetime in CZT fabricated by different growth methods and conditions. The FLIM set-up analyzes luminescence emitted from the sample following photo excitation. Samples were optically excited above band gap with a pulsed laser (590 nm) for raster scanning a 220 x 165 μm{sup 2} sample area. In-situ room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) and FLIM were recorded simultaneously. In order to analyze the FLIM data, two dominant charge carrier decay processes (τ{sub 1}, τ{sub 2}) were identified. The luminescence signal decays with a rapid lifetime of τ{sub 1} ∼ 50-200 ps, and a large variety of long-lifetime components τ{sub 2} were found in the range of 225-900 ps. CZT grown by multi-tube physical vapor transport (MTPVT) showed extremely long-lived recombination decay times up to 3.5 ns in the vicinity of the interface at growth start. Further away from this interface, the recombination lifetime was in the typical range of fast transitions similar to those found in detector-grade CZT fabricated by travelling heater method. Crystalline material quality strongly influences FLIM lifetime. Time-resolved transients of MTPVT-grown CZT compared with industry-leading detector grade CZT (dots: measured data; lines: fitted exponential decay curves). (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Fluorescence lifetimes: fundamentals and interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noomnarm, Ulai; Clegg, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements have been an established mainstay of photosynthesis experiments for many decades. Because in the photosynthesis literature the basics of excited states and their fates are not usually described, we have presented here an easily understandable text for biology students in the style of a chapter in a text book. In this review we give an educational overview of fundamental physical principles of fluorescence, with emphasis on the temporal response of emission. Escape from the excited state of a molecule is a dynamic event, and the fluorescence emission is in direct kinetic competition with several other pathways of de-excitation. It is essentially through a kinetic competition between all the pathways of de-excitation that we gain information about the fluorescent sample on the molecular scale. A simple probability allegory is presented that illustrates the basic ideas that are important for understanding and interpreting most fluorescence experiments. We also briefly point out challenges that confront the experimenter when interpreting time-resolved fluorescence responses.

  15. Two-photon spectral fluorescence lifetime and second-harmonic generation imaging of the porcine cornea with a 12-femtosecond laser microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Morgado, António Miguel; König, Karsten

    2016-03-01

    Five dimensional microscopy with a 12-fs laser scanning microscope based on spectrally resolved two-photon autofluorescence lifetime and second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging was used to characterize all layers of the porcine cornea. This setup allowed the simultaneous excitation of both metabolic cofactors, NAD(P)H and flavins, and their discrimination based on their spectral emission properties and fluorescence decay characteristics. Furthermore, the architecture of the stromal collagen fibrils was assessed by SHG imaging in both forward and backward directions. Information on the metabolic state and the tissue architecture of the porcine cornea were obtained with subcellular resolution, and high temporal and spectral resolutions.

  16. Study of plant fluorescence prop erties based on laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging technology%基于激光诱导叶绿素荧光寿命成像技术的植物荧光特性研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万文博; 华灯鑫; 乐静; 闫哲; 周春艳

    2015-01-01

    Plant fluorescence is a susceptible signal in plant fluorescence remote sensing detection. In order to solve this problem, a technique for plant chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging is presented to evaluate living status for plant growth and environmental monitoring. A concave lens is used to expand laser beam at a wavelength of 355 nm, and the living plant is exposed in this laser light source to excite chlorophyll fluorescence. And the chlorophyll fluorescence signals are detected by an intensification charge coupled device. Time resolved measurement method is used in this article, so that every time the same fluorescence signals can be excited by the same laser pulse. Meanwhile, the delay time needed for triggering intensification charge coupled device should be changed consecutively, and the whole discrete fluorescence signal can be obtained. The discrete fluorescence signals from the particular location points of the plant are fitted. An improved method of forward iterative deconvolution is used to retrieve the corresponding fluorescence lifetime, and the high-precision fluorescence lifetime can be obtained. Furthermore, the fluorescence lifetime values at all the location points are retrieved to obtain the distribution map of chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime. This method can give the chlorophyll fluorescence image efficiently. The distribution map of fluorescence lifetime can more effectively reflect the plant chlorophyll concentration than the fluorescence intensity image does. The physical property of chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime from living plants has been studied preliminarily, indicating that the plant physiological status is related to its fluorescence lifetime to a certain extent; and the chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime and plant environment have a subtle and complex correlation. In the future, the relationship between chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime and plant environment will be expected to study with the cooperation of biophysicist.

  17. Origin of tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes. Part 2: fluorescence lifetimes origin of tryptophan in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, J R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence intensity decays of L-tryptophan in proteins dissolved in pH 7 buffer, in ethanol and in 6 M guanidine pH 7.8 and in lyophilized proteins were measured. In all protein conditions, three lifetimes were obtained along the emission spectrum (310-410 nm). The two shortest lifetimes are in the same range of those obtained for L-Trp in water or in ethanol. Thus, these two lifetimes originate from specific two sub-structures existing in the excited state and are inherent to the tryptophan structure independently of the surrounding environment (amino acids residues, solvent, etc.) In proteins, the third lifetime originates from the interactions that are occurring between tryptophan residues and neighboring amino acids. Populations of these lifetimes are independent of the excitation wavelength and thus originate from pre-defined sub structures existing in the excited state and put into evidence after tryptophan excitation. Fluorescence decay studies of different tripeptides having a tryptophan residue in second position show that the best analysis is obtained with two fluorescence lifetimes. Consequently, this result seems to exclude the possibility that peptide bond induces the third fluorescence lifetimes. Indole dissolved in water and/or in ethanol emits with two fluorescence lifetimes that are completely different from those observed for L-Trp. Absence of the third lifetime in ethanol demonstrates that indole behaves differently when compared to tryptophan. Thus, it seems not adequate to attribute fluorescence lifetime or fluorescence properties of tryptophan to indole ring and to compare tryptophan fluorescence properties in proteins to molecules having close structures such as NATA which fluoresces with one lifetime.

  18. Study of intracellular delivery of doxorubicin from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging and confocal Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Gabriela; Qiu, Yuan; Murray, Richard A; Moya, Sergio E

    2013-02-01

    The intracellular delivery of Doxorubicin (Dox) from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles stabilised with bovine serum albumin, in HepG2 cells, is studied via flow cytometry, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and cell viability studies. Flow cytometry shows that the initial uptake of PLGA and Dox follow the same kinetics. However, following 8 h of incubation, the fluorescence intensity and cellular uptake of Dox decreases, while in the case of PLGA both parameters remain constant. FLIM shows the presence of a single-lifetime species, with a lifetime of 1.15 ns when measured inside the cells. Cell viability decreases by approximately 20% when incubated for 24 h with PLGA loaded with Dox, with a particle concentration of 100 µg · mL(-1). At the single-cell level, CRM shows changes in the bands from DNA and proteins in the cell nucleus when incubated with PLGA loaded with Dox. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Lifetime-weighted photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbrich, A.; Shao, P.; Shi, W.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-12-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been utilized to quantify the lifetime profile of exogenous agents using a series of pump-probe pulses with a varying time delay; however, current techniques typically lead to long acquisition times which are sensitive to motion and cause absorption or photobleaching. We introduce a technique called lifetime-weighted imaging, which uses only three laser pulses to preferentially weight signals from chromophores with long lifetimes (including exogenous contrast agents with triplet excited states such as methylene blue and porphyrins) while nulling chromophores with short picosecond- to nanosecond-scale lifetimes (including hemoglobin). This technique detects the PA signal from a probe pulse either with or without a pump pulse. By subtracting the probe-only signal from the pump-present probe signal, we effectively eliminate signals from chromophores with short lifetimes while preserving PA signals from chromophores with long-lifetimes. We demonstrate the oxygen-dependent lifetime of both methylene blue and porphyrin-lipids and demonstrate both ground-state recovery and excited-state lifetime-weighted imaging. Lifetime-weighted PA imaging may have applications in many molecular imaging application including: photodynamic therapy dosimetry guidance and oxygen sensing.

  20. Bessel beam fluorescence lifetime tomography of live embryos (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography allows isotropic 3D imaging of embryos. Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for fluorescence imaging of live embryos. We previously reported an imaging system that combines SLOT with a novel Fourier-multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) technique named FmFLIM-SLOT. FmFLIM-SLOT performs multiplexed FLIM-FRET readout of multiple FRET sensors in live embryos. Here we report a recent effort on improving the spatial resolution of the FmFLIM-SLOT system in order to image complex biochemical processes in live embryos at the cellular level. Optical tomography has to compromise between resolution and the depth of view. In SLOT, the commonly-used focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focal plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging in a large volume specimen. We thus introduce Bessel beam laser-scanning tomography, which illuminates the sample with a spatial-light-modulator-generated Bessel beam that has an extended focal depth. The Bessel beam is scanned across the whole specimen. Fluorescence projection images are acquired at equal angular intervals as the sample rotates. Reconstruction artifacts due to annular-rings of the Bessel beam are removed by a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm. Furthermore, in combination of Fourier-multiplexing fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) method, the Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT system is capable of perform 3D lifetime imaging of live embryos at cellular resolution. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove that Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT is a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  1. Developing and Testing a Bayesian Analysis of Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    FRET measurements can provide dynamic spatial information on length scales smaller than the diffraction limit of light. Several methods exist to measure FRET between fluorophores, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), which relies on the reduction of fluorescence lifetime when a fluorophore is undergoing FRET. FLIM measurements take the form of histograms of photon arrival times, containing contributions from a mixed population of fluorophores both undergoing and not undergoing FRET, with the measured distribution being a mixture of exponentials of different lifetimes. Here, we present an analysis method based on Bayesian inference that rigorously takes into account several experimental complications. We test the precision and accuracy of our analysis on controlled experimental data and verify that we can faithfully extract model parameters, both in the low-photon and low-fraction regimes. PMID:28060890

  2. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin George Abraham

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM.

  3. Effect of refractive index on the fluorescence lifetime of green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregidgo, Carolyn; Levitt, James A; Suhling, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    The average fluorescence lifetime of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in solution is a function of the refractive index of its environment. We report that this is also the case for GFP-tagged proteins in cells. Using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC)-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a confocal scanning microscope, images of GFP-tagged proteins in cells suspended in different refractive index media are obtained. It is found that the average fluorescence lifetime of GFP decreases on addition of glycerol or sucrose to the media in which the fixed cells are suspended. The inverse GFP lifetime is proportional to the refractive index squared. This is the case for GFP-tagged major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins with the GFP located inside the cytoplasm, and also for GPI-anchored GFP that is located outside the cell membrane. The implications of these findings are discussed with regard to total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) techniques where the change in refractive index is crucial in producing an evanescent wave to excite fluorophores near a glass interface. Our findings show that the GFP fluorescence lifetime is shortened in TIRF microscopy in comparison to confocal microscopy.

  4. Origin of tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes part 1. Fluorescence lifetimes origin of tryptophan free in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, J R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence intensity decays of L-tryptophan free in polar, hydrophobic and mixture of polar-hydrophobic solvents were recorded along the emission spectrum (310-410 nm). Analysis of the data show that emission of tryptophan occurs with two lifetimes in 100% polar and hydrophobic environments. The values of the two lifetimes are not the same in both environments while their populations (pre-exponentials values) are identical. Fluorescence lifetimes and pre-exponentials values do not change with the excitation wavelength and thus are independent of excitation energy. Our results indicate that tryptophan emission occurs from two specific sub-structures existing in the excited state. These sub-structures differ from those present in the ground states and characterize an internal property and/or organization of the tryptophan structure in the excited state. By sub-substructure, we mean here tryptophan backbone and its electronic cloud. In ethanol, three fluorescence lifetimes were measured; two lifetimes are very close to those observed in water (0.4-0.5 ns and 2-4 ns). Presence of a third lifetime for tryptophan in ethanol results from the interaction of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic dipoles or chemical functions of ethanol with the fluorophore.

  5. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of DAPI-stained nuclei as a novel diagnostic tool for the detection and classification of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahav, Gilad; Hirshberg, Abraham; Salomon, Ophira; Amariglio, Ninette; Trakhtenbrot, Luba; Fixler, Dror

    2016-07-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) and B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL) are the most common type of leukaemia in adults and children, respectively. Today, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the standard for detecting chromosomal aberrations that reflect adverse and favorable outcome. This study revealed a new, simple, and fast diagnostic tool to detect pathological cells by measuring and imaging the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) using FLT imaging microscopy (FLIM) of the peripheral blood (PB) cells of B-CLL samples that were labeled with the DNA binder, DAPI. The FLT of DAPI in healthy individuals was found to be 2.66 ± 0.12 ns. In contrast, PB cells of B-CLL and BM cells of B-ALL patients were characterized by a specific group distribution of the FLT values. The FLT of DAPI was divided into four subgroups, relative to 2.66 ns: short+, normal, prolonged, and prolonged+. These alterations could be related to different chromatin arrangements of B-CLL and B-ALL interphase nuclei. Notably, extremely long FLT of nuclear DAPI correlate with the presence of extra chromosome 12, while moderate increases compared to normal characterize the deletion of p53. Such correlations potentially enable a FLT-based rapid automatic diagnosis and classification of B-CLL even when the frequency of genetic and chromosomal abnormalities is low. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  6. Note: Rapid measurement of fluorescence lifetimes using SiPM detection and waveform sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, H.-M.; Souris, J. S.; Kim, H.-J.; Cheng, S.-H.; Chen, L.; Lo, L.-W.; Chen, C.-T.; Kao, C.-M.

    2017-09-01

    In fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging, fluorescence lifetime measurement—assessing the average time fluorophores spend in their excited state before returning to their ground state—offers a number of advantages over quantifying fluorescence intensities that include resistance to photo-bleaching and independence from fluorophore concentration, excitation intensity, and measurement methodology. Despite growing interest, fluorescence lifetime techniques frequently mandate relatively complex instrumentation, slow data acquisition rates, and significant data analyses. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring fluorescence lifetimes using off-the-shelf analog silicon photomultipliers and switched-capacitor array waveform sampling techniques, with precision matching that of much larger and more elaborate commercial instruments.

  7. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Physiological Free Cu(II) Levels in Live Cells with a Cu(II)-Selective Carbonic Anhydrase-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCranor, Bryan J.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Zeng, Hui Hui; Stoddard, A.K.; Hurst, Tamiika; Fierke, Carol A.; Lakowicz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a required trace element that plays key roles in a number of human enzymes, such that copper deficiency or genetic defects in copper transport lead to serious or fatal disease. Rae, et al., had famously predicted that free copper ion levels in the cell cytoplasm were extremely low, typically too low to be observable. We recently developed a variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase II for sensing metal ions that exhibits 25-fold better selectivity for Cu(II) over Zn(II) than the wild type protein, enabling us to accurately measure Cu(II) in the presence of ordinary cellular (picomolar) concentrations of free zinc. We inserted a fluorescent labeled Cu(II)-specific variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase into PC-12 cells and found that the levels are indeed extremely low (in the femtomolar range). We imaged the free Cu(II) levels in living cells by means of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy. Implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:24671220

  8. Interaction of poxvirus intracellular mature virion proteins with the TPR domain of kinesin light chain in live infected cells revealed by two-photon-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeshtadi, Ananya; Burgos, Pierre; Stubbs, Christopher D; Parker, Anthony W; King, Linda A; Skinner, Michael A; Botchway, Stanley W

    2010-12-01

    Using two-photon-induced fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we corroborate an interaction (previously demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid domain analysis) of full-length vaccinia virus (VACV; an orthopoxvirus) A36 protein with the cellular microtubule motor protein kinesin. Quenching of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), fused to the C terminus of VACV A36, by monomeric red fluorescent protein (mDsRed), fused to the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain of kinesin, was observed in live chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with either modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) or wild-type fowlpox virus (FWPV; an avipoxvirus), and the excited-state fluorescence lifetime of EGFP was reduced from 2.5 ± 0.1 ns to 2.1 ± 0.1 ns due to resonance energy transfer to mDsRed. FWPV does not encode an equivalent of intracellular enveloped virion surface protein A36, yet it is likely that this virus too must interact with kinesin to facilitate intracellular virion transport. To investigate possible interactions between innate FWPV proteins and kinesin, recombinant FWPVs expressing EGFP fused to the N termini of FWPV structural proteins Fpv140, Fpv168, Fpv191, and Fpv198 (equivalent to VACV H3, A4, p4c, and A34, respectively) were generated. EGFP fusions of intracellular mature virion (IMV) surface protein Fpv140 and type II membrane protein Fpv198 were quenched by mDsRed-TPR in recombinant FWPV-infected cells, indicating that these virion proteins are found within 10 nm of mDsRed-TPR. In contrast, and as expected, EGFP fusions of the IMV core protein Fpv168 did not show any quenching. Interestingly, the p4c-like protein Fpv191, which demonstrates late association with preassembled IMV, also did not show any quenching.

  9. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-05

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

  10. Fluorescence optimisation and lifetime studies of fingerprints treated with magnetic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, L K; Dinish, U S; Phang, W F; Chao, Z X; Murukeshan, V M

    2005-09-10

    Fluorescence study plays a significant role in fingerprint detection when conventional chemical enhancement methods fail. The basic properties of fluorescence emission such as colour, intensity and lifetime could be well exploited in the detection of latent fingerprints under steady state and in dynamic methods. This paper describes a systematic study of fluorescence emission intensity from fingerprint samples treated with different magnetic powders. Understanding of suitable excitation wavelength required for getting maximum fluorescence emission intensity could be beneficial when selecting the appropriate fluorescent powders for the fingerprint detection. Lifetime study of fingerprints treated with various magnetic powders was also carried out. The importance of lifetime study is well explained through the time-resolved (TR) imaging of fingerprints with nanosecond resolution. Results from the TR imaging study revealed an improvement in the fingerprint image contrast. This is significant when the print is deposited on fluorescing background and its emission wavelength is close to that of treated fingerprint.

  11. Fluorescence lifetime multiplexing with nanocrystals and organic labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabolle, Markus; Kapusta, Peter; Nann, Thomas; Shu, Xu; Ziegler, Jan; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2009-09-15

    The potential of semiconducting nanocrystals or so-called quantum dots (QDs) for lifetime multiplexing has not been investigated yet, despite the increasing use of QDs in (bio)analytical detection, biosensing, and fluorescence imaging and the obvious need for simple and cost-effective tools and strategies for the simultaneous detection of multiple analytes or events. This is most likely related to their multiexponential decay behavior as for multiplex chromophores, typically monoexponential decay kinetics are requested. The fluorescence decay kinetics of various mixtures of a long-lived, multiexponentially decaying CdSe QD and a short-lived organic dye were analyzed, and a model was developed for the quantification of these labels from the measured complex decay kinetics as a first proof-of-concept for the huge potential of these labels for lifetime multiplexing. In a second step, we evaluated the potential of mixtures of two types of QDs, varying in constituent material to realize distinguishable, yet multiexponential decay kinetics and similar absorption and emission spectra. Strategies for lifetime multiplexing with nanocrystalline labels were derived on the basis of these measurements.

  12. Flow cytometric fluorescence lifetime analysis of DNA binding fluorochromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crissman, Harry A.; Cui, H. H. (H. Helen); Steinkamp, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Most flow cytometry (FCM) applications monitor fluorescence intensity to quantitate the various cellular parameters; however, the fluorescence emission also contains information relative to the fluorescence lifetime. Recent developments in FCM (Pinsky et al., 1993; Steinkamp & Crissman, 1993; Steinkamp et al., 1993), provide for the measurement of fluorescence lifetime which is also commonly referred to as fluorescence decay, or the time interval in which a fluorochrome remains in the excited state. Many unbound fluorochromes have characteristic lifetime values that are determined by their molecular structure; however, when the probe becomes bound, the lifetime value is influenced by a number of factors that affect the probe interaction with a target molecule. Monitoring the changes in the lifetime of the probe yields information relating to the molecular conformation, the functional state or activity of the molecular target. In addition, the lifetime values can be used as signatures to resolve the emissions of multiple fluorochrome labels with overlapping emission spectra that cannot be resolved by conventional FCM methodology. Such strategies can increase the number of fluorochrome combinations used in a flow cytometer with a single excitation source. Our studies demonstrate various applications of lifetime measurements for the analysis of the binding of different fluorochromes to DNA in single cells. Data presented in this session will show the utility of lifetime measurements for monitoring changes in chromatin structure associated with cell cycle progression, cellular differentiation, or DNA damage, such as induced during apoptosis. Several studies show that dyes with specificity for nucleic acids display different lifetime values when bound to DNA or to dsRNA. The Phase Sensitive Flow Cytometer is a multiparameter instrument, capable of performing lifetime measurements in conjunction with all the conventional FCM measurements. Future modifications of this

  13. Expanding the potential of standard flow cytometry by extracting fluorescence lifetimes from cytometric pulse shifts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cao, Ruofan; Naivar, Mark A; Wilder, Mark; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide information about the fluorescence relaxation, or intensity decay, of organic fluorophores, fluorescent proteins, and other inorganic molecules that fluoresce...

  14. Digital analysis and sorting of fluorescence lifetime by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Jessica P; Naivar, Mark A; Freyer, James P

    2010-09-01

    Frequency-domain flow cytometry techniques are combined with modifications to the digital signal-processing capabilities of the open reconfigurable cytometric acquisition system (ORCAS) to analyze fluorescence decay lifetimes and control sorting. Real-time fluorescence lifetime analysis is accomplished by rapidly digitizing correlated, radiofrequency (RF)-modulated detector signals, implementing Fourier analysis programming with ORCAS' digital signal processor (DSP) and converting the processed data into standard cytometric list mode data. To systematically test the capabilities of the ORCAS 50 MS/sec analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and our DSP programming, an error analysis was performed using simulated light scatter and fluorescence waveforms (0.5-25 ns simulated lifetime), pulse widths ranging from 2 to 15 micros, and modulation frequencies from 2.5 to 16.667 MHz. The standard deviations of digitally acquired lifetime values ranged from 0.112 to >2 ns, corresponding to errors in actual phase shifts from 0.0142 degrees to 1.6 degrees. The lowest coefficients of variation (digital analysis system to a previous analog phase-sensitive flow cytometer demonstrated similar precision and accuracy on measurements of a range of fluorescent microspheres, unstained cells, and cells stained with three common fluorophores. Sorting based on fluorescence lifetime was accomplished by adding analog outputs to ORCAS and interfacing with a commercial cell sorter with a RF-modulated solid-state laser. Two populations of fluorescent microspheres with overlapping fluorescence intensities but different lifetimes (2 and 7 ns) were separated to approximately 98% purity. Overall, the digital signal acquisition and processing methods we introduce present a simple yet robust approach to phase-sensitive measurements in flow cytometry. The ability to simply and inexpensively implement this system on a commercial flow sorter will allow both better dissemination of this technology and better

  15. Finding of Optimal Calcium Ion Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiki, Keisuke; Azuma, Hiroki; Yoshioka, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Araki, Tsutomu

    We have investigated the fluorescence lifetime properties of 8 calcium ion probes, calcium-green-1, calcium green-2, calcium green-5N, calcium orange, oregon green 488 BAPTA-6F, fluo-3, fluo-4, and fluo-5N. We found that the decay time of calcium green-5N varied more sensitively with calcium concentration than calcium green-1 which was known to be a highly sensitive probe. We have also found that the center of observable range of calcium concentration by fluorescence lifetime measurement is lower than that by fluorescence intensity measurement.

  16. Time-domain microfluidic fluorescence lifetime flow cytometry for high-throughput Förster resonance energy transfer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedbal, Jakub; Visitkul, Viput; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Weitsman, Gregory; Chana, Prabhjoat; Matthews, Daniel R; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M

    2015-02-01

    Sensing ion or ligand concentrations, physico-chemical conditions, and molecular dimerization or conformation change is possible by assays involving fluorescent lifetime imaging. The inherent low throughput of imaging impedes rigorous statistical data analysis on large cell numbers. We address this limitation by developing a fluorescence lifetime-measuring flow cytometer for fast fluorescence lifetime quantification in living or fixed cell populations. The instrument combines a time-correlated single photon counting epifluorescent microscope with microfluidics cell-handling system. The associated computer software performs burst integrated fluorescence lifetime analysis to assign fluorescence lifetime, intensity, and burst duration to each passing cell. The maximum safe throughput of the instrument reaches 3,000 particles per minute. Living cells expressing spectroscopic rulers of varying peptide lengths were distinguishable by Förster resonant energy transfer measured by donor fluorescence lifetime. An epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulation assay demonstrated the technique's capacity to selectively quantify EGF receptor phosphorylation in cells, which was impossible by measuring sensitized emission on a standard flow cytometer. Dual-color fluorescence lifetime detection and cell-specific chemical environment sensing were exemplified using di-4-ANEPPDHQ, a lipophilic environmentally sensitive dye that exhibits changes in its fluorescence lifetime as a function of membrane lipid order. To our knowledge, this instrument opens new applications in flow cytometry which were unavailable due to technological limitations of previously reported fluorescent lifetime flow cytometers. The presented technique is sensitive to lifetimes of most popular fluorophores in the 0.5-5 ns range including fluorescent proteins and is capable of detecting multi-exponential fluorescence lifetime decays. This instrument vastly enhances the throughput of experiments involving fluorescence

  17. Fluorescence-lifetime-based sensors for anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Maria; Draxler, Sonja; Kieslinger, Dietmar; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-05-01

    Sensing of anions has been investigated using the fluorescence decaytime as the information carrier. The sensing mechanism is based on the coextraction of an anion and a proton, and the presence of a fluorophore with a rather long fluorescence decaytime inside the membrane to act as a pH indicator. The relevant theory is discussed shortly. As an example a sensor for nitrate is shown, and the influence of ionic additives on the working function has been investigated.

  18. Improved Fluorescent Protein Contrast and Discrimination by Optically Controlling Dark State Lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Cheng; Dickson, Robert M

    2017-02-16

    Modulation and optical control of photoswitchable fluorescent protein (PS-FP) dark state lifetimes drastically improves sensitivity and selectivity in fluorescence imaging. The dark state population of PS-FPs generates an out-of-phase fluorescence component relative to the sinusoidally modulated 488 nm laser excitation. Because this apparent phase advanced emission results from slow recovery to the fluorescent manifold, we hasten recovery and, therefore, modulation frequency by varying coillumination intensity at 405 nm. As 405 nm illumination regenerates the fluorescent ground state more rapidly than via thermal recovery, we experimentally demonstrate that secondary illumination can control PS-FPs dark state lifetime to act as an additional dimension for discriminating spatially and spectrally overlapping emitters. This experimental combination of out of phase imaging after optical modulation (OPIOM) and synchronously amplified fluorescence image recovery (SAFIRe) optically controls the fluorescent protein dark state lifetimes for improved time resolution, with the resulting modulation-based selective signal recovery being quantitatively modeled. The combined experimental results and quantitative numerical simulations further demonstrate the potential of SAFIRe-OPIOM for wide-field biological imaging with improved speed, sensitivity, and optical resolution over other modulation-based fluorescence microscopies.

  19. MMP-2/9-Specific Activatable Lifetime Imaging Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus T.M. Rood

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Optical (molecular imaging can benefit from a combination of the high signal-to-background ratio of activatable fluorescence imaging with the high specificity of luminescence lifetime imaging. To allow for this combination, both imaging techniques were integrated in a single imaging agent, a so-called activatable lifetime imaging agent. Important in the design of this imaging agent is the use of two luminophores that are tethered by a specific peptide with a hairpin-motive that ensured close proximity of the two while also having a specific amino acid sequence available for enzymatic cleavage by tumor-related MMP-2/9. Ir(ppy3 and Cy5 were used because in close proximity the emission intensities of both luminophores were quenched and the influence of Cy5 shortens the Ir(ppy3 luminescence lifetime from 98 ns to 30 ns. Upon cleavage in vitro, both effects are undone, yielding an increase in Ir(ppy3 and Cy5 luminescence and a restoration of Ir(ppy3 luminescence lifetime to 94 ns. As a reference for the luminescence activation, a similar imaging agent with the more common Cy3-Cy5 fluorophore pair was used. Our findings underline that the combination of enzymatic signal activation with lifetime imaging is possible and that it provides a promising method in the design of future disease specific imaging agents.

  20. Measuring and sorting cell populations expressing isospectral fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Sands

    Full Text Available Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼ 1.5 ns vs ∼ 3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a "pseudophasor" that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of boronate derivatives to determine glucose concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gable, J H

    2000-06-01

    A novel investigation into the fluorescence lifetimes of molecules, both established and newly designed, was performed. These molecules are the basis of a continuous, minimally invasive, glucose sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. This sensor, if coupled with an automated insulin delivery device, would effectively create an artificial pancreas allowing for the constant monitoring and control of glucose levels in a person with diabetes. The proposed sensor includes a fluorescent molecule that changes its' fluorescence properties upon binding selectively and reversibly to glucose. One possible sensor molecule is N-methyl-N-(9-methylene anthryl)-2-methylenephenylboronic acid (AB). The fluorescence intensity of AB was shown to change in response to changing glucose concentrations. (James, 1994) James proposed that when glucose binds to AB the fluorescence intensity increases due to an enhancement of the N{yields}B dative bond which prevents photoinduced electron transfer (PET). PET from the amine (N) to the fluorophore (anthracene) quenches the fluorescence. The dative bond between the boron and the amine can prevent PET by involving the lone pair of electrons on the amine in interactions with the boron rather than allowing them to be transferred to the fluorophore. Results of this research show the average fluorescence lifetime of AB also changes with glucose concentration. It is proposed that fluorescence is due to two components: (1) AB with an enhanced N{yields}B interaction, and no PET, and (2) AB with a weak N{yields}B interaction, resulting in fluorescence quenching by PET. Lifetime measurements of AB as a function of both the pH of the solvent and glucose concentration in the solution were made to characterize this two component system and investigate the nature of the N{yields}B bond. Measurements of molecules similar to AB were also performed in order to isolate behavior of specific AB constituents. These molecules are 9

  2. Fluorescence-lifetime-based sensors using inhomogeneous waveguiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Sonja; Kieslinger, Dietmar; Trznadel, Karolina; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1996-12-01

    Most intrinsic fiberoptic sensors are based on the evanescent-wave scheme, where the evanescent field of modes guided in a fiber reaches out into a chemically sensitive coating. In the commonly used multimode waveguides, the evanescent field contains only a small part of the total energy, however, thus making evanescent-wave sensors rather insensitive. Combining a transparent substrate and a transparent sensing layer of rather similar refractive index into a common waveguiding structure produces an inhomogeneous waveguide, where a large portion of the total energy transverses the sensing layer. This yields much superior sensor performance. The transmission through a waveguide is subject to various disturbing influences. Thus it is advantageous to combine the inhomogeneous waveguiding approach with a measuring scheme that is not prone to those disturbances. Such a scheme is available with fluorescence lifetime-based sensors. The fluorescence lifetime of an indicator incorporated into the sensing layer is changed by the presence of the respective analyte. This lifetime is independent of the transmission through the waveguide. Thus inhomogeneous waveguiding together with fluorescence lifetime measurement paves the way for optical chemical sensors with high analyte sensitivity and immunity to external disturbances.

  3. Investigations on exponential lifetime measurements for fluorescence thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernicola, V. C.; Rosso, L.; Galleano, R.; Sun, T.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2000-07-01

    Lifetime-based methods have been, on the whole, one of the most successful schemes for fiber optic temperature sensing, using fluorescent materials whose response is intensity independent. Several approaches for determining the fluorescence lifetime, and with that the measurand, have been investigated. An experimental comparison of direct and indirect measurement methods, i.e., involving actual signals from representative optical media instead of simply using Monte Carlo simulations, has been carried out. Direct fitting methods, including Marquardt, log-fit and Prony, were used to estimate the fluorescence lifetime of a Cr3+:YAG-based sensor system and the results were compared. An agreement to better than 0.5% between Marquardt and log-fit algorithms and an agreement of about 1.5% between Marquardt and Prony approaches was found. Thus, a temperature reproducibility, of 0.5 and 1.2 °C, respectively, can be obtained with the Cr3+:YAG sensor system. An indirect measurement approach based on a phase-locked (analog-to-digital signal processor) (A-DSP) was also tested. It was found that when the A-DSP output is used to estimate the lifetime, it performs only slightly better than using direct fitting methods. On the contrary, when the whole A-DSP sensor system was directly calibrated against temperature, the measurement accuracy improves by at least a factor of 10.

  4. UV fluorescence lifetime modification by aluminum and magnesium nanoapertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunshan; Jiao, Xiaojin; Peterson, Eric M.; Harris, Joel M.; Appusamy, Kanagasundar; Guruswamy, Sivaraman; Blair, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Ultra-violet (UV) fluorescence lifetime modification by aluminum (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanoapertures are reported in this manuscript. Nanoapertures with diameter ranging from 30nm to 90nm are fabricated using focused ion beam (FIB). Largest lifetime reduction are observed for apertures with smallest diameters and undercuts into glass substrate. For Al nanoapertures, largest lifetime reduction is 5.30×, larger than perviously reported 3.50×.1 For Mg nanoapertures, largest lifetime reduction is 6.90×, which is the largest lifetime reduction of UV fluorescence dye reported so far in literature. The dependence of count rate per molecule (CRM) on aperture size and undercut is also investigated, revealing that CRM increases with increasing undercut, however, the CRM is small (less than 2) for the entire range of aperture size and undercut we investigated. FDTD simulation were conducted and in order to favorably compare experimental results with simulated results, it is critical to take into account the exact shape and material properties of the nano aperture. Simulation results revealed the fundamental difference between Al and Mg nano aperture under 266nm illumination-Mg nano aperture presents a waveguide mode in which the maximum field enhancement and Purcell factor is within the nano aperture instead of on the surface which is the case for Al nano aperture.

  5. The Number of Accumulated Photons and the Quality of Stimulated Emission Depletion Lifetime Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Aleem [Ames Laboratory; Lesoine, Michael D [Ames Laboratory; Bhattacharjee, Ujjal [Ames Laboratory; Petrich, Jacob W [Ames Laboratory; Smith, Emily A [Ames Laboratory

    2014-03-03

    Time binning is used to increase the number of photon counts in the peak channel of stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime decay curves to determine how it affects the resulting lifetime image. The fluorescence lifetime of the fluorophore, Alexa Fluor 594 phalloidin, bound to F-actin is probed in cultured S2 cells at a spatial resolution of ~40 nm. This corresponds to a tenfold smaller probe volume compared to confocal imaging, and a reduced number of photons contributing to the signal. Pixel-by-pixel fluorescence lifetime measurements and error analysis show that an average of 40 ± 30 photon counts in the peak channel with a signal-to-noise ratio of 20 is enough to calculate a reliable fluorescence lifetime from a single exponential fluorescence decay. No heterogeneity in the actin cytoskeleton in different regions of the cultured cells was measured in the 40- to 400-nm spatial regime.

  6. Photochromicity and fluorescence lifetimes of green fluorescent protein

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea and its mutants have gained widespread usage as an indicator of structure and function within cells. Proton transfer has been implicated in the complex photophysics of the wild-type molecule, exhibiting a protonated A species excited at 400 nm, and two deprotonated excited-state species I* and B* with red-shifted excitation similar to 475 nm. Photochromicity between the protonated and deprotonated species has been re...

  7. Family of fluorescence lifetime sensors for environmental purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1995-09-01

    A family of indicators has been developed for measuring different analytes, all the indicators being derivatives of the same chemical compound and having identical spectral and lifetime properties. The indicators show an absorption accessible to low-cost light sources, a large Stokes shift, and a long fluorescence decay time. All indicators can be excited at the same excitation wavelength, monitored at the same emission wavelength, and measured within the same time range. This opens the possibility for a compact lifetime-based instrument for water monitoring.

  8. Multiphoton autofluorescence lifetime imaging of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada

    2017-06-01

    The multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging tomograph MPTflex with its flexible 360-deg scan head, articulated arm, and tunable femtosecond laser source was employed to study induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) cultures. Autofluorescence (AF) lifetime imaging was performed with 250-ps temporal resolution and submicron spatial resolution using time-correlated single-photon counting. The two-photon excited AF was based on the metabolic coenzymes NAD(P)H and flavin adenine dinucleotide/flavoproteins. iPS cells generated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and cocultured with growth-arrested MEFs as feeder cells have been studied. Significant differences on AF lifetime signatures were identified between iPS and feeder cells as well as between their differentiating counterparts.

  9. Evaluation of actinic cheilitis using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Cosci, Alessandro; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Takahama, Ademar; Souza Azevedo, Rebeca; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially malignant disorder that mostly affects the vermilion border of the lower lip and can lead to squamous cell carcinoma. Because of its heterogeneous clinical aspect, it is difficult to indicate representative biopsy area. Late diagnosis is a limiting factor of therapeutic possibilities available to treat oral cancer. The diagnosis of actinic cheilitis is mainly based on clinical and histopathological analysis and it is a time consuming procedure to get the results. Information about the organization and chemical composition of the tissues can be obtained using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy techniques without the need for biopsy. The main targeted fluorophores are NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), which have free and bound states, each one with different average lifetimes. The average lifetimes for free and bound NADH and FAD change according to tissue metabolic alterations and allow a quick and non-invasive clinical investigation of injuries and to help clinicians with the early diagnosis of actinic cheilitis. This study aims to evaluate the fluorescence lifetime parameters at the discrimination of three degrees of epithelial dysplasia, the most important predictor of malignant development, described in up to 100% of actinic cheilitis cases.

  10. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  11. Online multispectral fluorescence lifetime values estimation and overlay onto tissue white-light video frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Marcu, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging has been shown to be a robust technique for biochemical and functional characterization of tissues and to present great potential for intraoperative tissue diagnosis and guidance of surgical procedures. We report a technique for real-time mapping of fluorescence parameters (i.e. lifetime values) onto the location from where the fluorescence measurements were taken. This is achieved by merging a 450 nm aiming beam generated by a diode laser with the excitation light in a single delivery/collection fiber and by continuously imaging the region of interest with a color CMOS camera. The interrogated locations are then extracted from the acquired frames via color-based segmentation of the aiming beam. Assuming a Gaussian profile of the imaged aiming beam, the segmentation results are fitted to ellipses that are dynamically scaled at the full width of three automatically estimated thresholds (50%, 75%, 90%) of the Gaussian distribution's maximum value. This enables the dynamic augmentation of the white-light video frames with the corresponding fluorescence decay parameters. A fluorescence phantom and fresh tissue samples were used to evaluate this method with motorized and hand-held scanning measurements. At 640x512 pixels resolution the area of interest augmented with fluorescence decay parameters can be imaged at an average 34 frames per second. The developed method has the potential to become a valuable tool for real-time display of optical spectroscopy data during continuous scanning applications that subsequently can be used for tissue characterization and diagnosis.

  12. A hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime probe for skin cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beule, P. A. A.; Dunsby, C.; Galletly, N. P.; Stamp, G. W.; Chu, A. C.; Anand, U.; Anand, P.; Benham, C. D.; Naylor, A.; French, P. M. W.

    2007-12-01

    The autofluorescence of biological tissue can be exploited for the detection and diagnosis of disease but, to date, its complex nature and relatively weak signal levels have impeded its widespread application in biology and medicine. We present here a portable instrument designed for the in situ simultaneous measurement of autofluorescence emission spectra and temporal decay profiles, permitting the analysis of complex fluorescence signals. This hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime probe utilizes two ultrafast lasers operating at 355 and 440nm that can excite autofluorescence from many different biomolecules present in skin tissue including keratin, collagen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), and flavins. The instrument incorporates an optical fiber probe to provide sample illumination and fluorescence collection over a millimeter-sized area. We present a description of the system, including spectral and temporal characterizations, and report the preliminary application of this instrument to a study of recently resected (skin lesions, illustrating its potential for skin cancer detection and diagnosis.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime measurement with confocal endomicroscopy for direct analysis of tissue biochemistry in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjae Won

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Confocal endomicroscopy is a powerful tool for in vivo real-time imaging at cellular resolution inside a living body without tissue resection. Microscopic fluorescence lifetime measurement can provide information about localized biochemical conditions such as pH and the concentrations of oxygen and calcium. We hypothesized that combining these techniques could assist accurate cancer discrimination by providing both biochemical and morphological information. We designed a dual-mode experimental setup for confocal endomicroscopic imaging and fluorescence lifetime measurement and applied it to a mouse xenograft model of activated human pancreatic cancer generated by subcutaneous injection of AsPC-1 tumor cells. Using this method with pH-sensitive sodium fluorescein injection, we demonstrated discrimination between normal and cancerous tissues in a living mouse. With further development, this method may be useful for clinical cancer detection.

  14. Bloodstain age analysis: toward solid state fluorescent lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kevin; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-03-01

    One of the most pressing unsolved challenges in forensic science is the determination of time since deposition (TSD) of bloodstains at crime scenes. Despite a number of high profile cases over the past couple hundred years involving controversy over TSD methods, no reliable quantitative method has been established. We present here an approach that has yet to be explored by forensic scientist: measuring the fluorescence lifetime of solid-state blood. Such a method would allow for on-site measurements of bloodstains utilizing the appropriate device, and would allow for rapid results returned in real-time to investigators.

  15. Real-Time Visualization of Tissue Surface Biochemical Features Derived From Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R; Marcu, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Fiber based fluorescence lifetime imaging has shown great potential for intraoperative diagnosis and guidance of surgical procedures. Here we describe a novel method addressing a significant challenge for the practical implementation of this technique, i.e., the real-time display of the quantified biochemical or functional tissue properties superimposed on the interrogated area. Specifically, an aiming beam (450 nm) generated by a continuous-wave laser beam was merged with the pulsed fluorescence excitation light in a single delivery/collection fiber and then imaged and segmented using a color-based algorithm. We demonstrate that this approach enables continuous delineation of the interrogated location and dynamic augmentation of the acquired frames with the corresponding fluorescence decay parameters. The method was evaluated on a fluorescence phantom and fresh tissue samples. Current results demonstrate that 34 frames per second can be achieved for augmenting videos of 640 × 512 pixels resolution. Also we show that the spatial resolution of the fluorescence lifetime map depends on the tissue optical properties, the scanning speed, and the frame rate. The dice similarity coefficient between the fluorescence phantom and the reconstructed maps was estimated to be as high as 93%. The reported method could become a valuable tool for augmenting the surgeon's field of view with diagnostic information derived from the analysis of fluorescence lifetime data in real-time using handheld, automated, or endoscopic scanning systems. Current method provides also a means for maintaining the tissue light exposure within safety limits. This study provides a framework for using an aiming beam with other point spectroscopy applications.

  16. Effect of surface modification on semiconductor nanocrystal fluorescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A H; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M; Talavera, Eva M

    2011-04-04

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, namely, quantum dots (QDs), present a set of unique photoluminescence properties, which has led to increased interest in using them as advantageous alternatives to conventional organic dyes. Many applications of QDs involve surface modification to enhance the solubility or biocompatibility of the QDs. One of the least exploited properties of QDs is the very long photoluminescence lifetime that usually has complex kinetics owing to the effect of quantum confinement. Herein, we describe the effect of different surface modifications on the photoluminescence decay kinetics of QDs. The different surface modifications were carefully chosen to provide lipophilic or water-soluble QDs with either positive or negative surface net charges. We also survey the effect on the QD lifetime of several ligands that interact with the QD surface, such as organic chromophores or fluorescent proteins. The results obtained demonstrate that time-resolved fluorescence is a useful tool for QD-based sensing to set the basis for the development of time-resolved-based nanosensors.

  17. One- and two-photon excited fluorescence lifetimes and anisotropy decays of green fluorescent proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We have used one- (OPE) and two-photon (TPE) excitation with time-correlated single-photon counting techniques to determine time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decays of the wild-type Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and two red-shifted mutants, S65T-GFP and RSGFP. WT-GFP and S65T-GFP exhibited a predominant approximately 3 ns monoexponential fluorescence decay, whereas for RSGFP the main lifetimes were approximately 1.1 ns (main component) and approximately 3.3 ns. The anisotr...

  18. Dual Lifetimes for Complexes between Glutathione-S-transferase (hGSTA1-1) and Product-like Ligands Detected by Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, John R; Lanni, Frederick; Rule, Gordon S

    2017-08-08

    Single-molecule fluorescence techniques were used to characterize the binding of products and inhibitors to human glutathione S-transferase A1-1 (hGSTA1-1). The identification of at least two different bound states for the wild-type enzyme suggests that there are at least two conformations of the protein, consistent with the model that ligand binding promotes closure of the carboxy-terminal helix over the active site. Ligand induced changes in ensemble fluorescence energy transfer support this proposed structural change. The more predominant state in the ensemble of single molecules shows a significantly faster off-rate, suggesting that the carboxy-terminal helix is delocalized in this state, permitting faster exit of the bound ligand. A point mutation (I219A), which is known to interfere with the association of the carboxy-terminal helix with the enzyme, shows increased rates of interconversion between the open and closed state. Kinematic traces of fluorescence from single molecules show that a single molecule readily samples a number of different conformations, each with a characteristic off-rate.

  19. Multiphoton fluorescence spectra and lifetimes of biliverdins and their protein-associated complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chin-Jie; Wu, Cheng-Ham; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2012-03-01

    To investigate whether endogenous biliverdins can serve as a fluorescence metabolic marker in cancer diagnosis, we measured their multiphoton fluorescence spectra and lifetimes with femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser. Excited at 1230nm, the two-photon fluorescence of biliverdins peaks around 670nm. The corresponding lifetime (catabolism in human cells or tissues.

  20. Oxygen imaging at the sediment-water interface using lifetime-based laser induced fluorescence (tau LIF) of nano-sized particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murniati, E.; Gross, D.; Herlina, H.

    2016-01-01

    Most applications of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) for dissolved oxygen (DO) imaging in flowing water are based on luminescence intensity measurements of a dissolved indicator. A major limitation for applying the technique in the bottom boundary layer (BBL) is the sorption of the luminescent dye...

  1. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy for breast cancer margins assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Zhang, Yanhong; Bold, Richard; Marcu, Laura

    2015-03-01

    During breast conserving surgery (BCS), which is the preferred approach to treat most early stage breast cancers, the surgeon attempts to excise the tumor volume, surrounded by thin margin of normal tissue. The intra-operative assessment of cancerous areas is a challenging procedure, with the surgeon usually relying on visual or tactile guidance. This study evaluates whether time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) presents the potential to address this problem. Point TRFS measurements were obtained from 19 fresh tissue slices (7 patients) and parameters that characterize the transient signals were quantified via constrained least squares deconvolution scheme. Fibrotic tissue (FT, n=69), adipose tissue (AT, n=76), and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC, n=27) were identified in histology and univariate statistical analysis, followed by multi-comparison test, was applied to the corresponding lifetime data. Significant differentiation between the three tissue types exists at 390 nm and 500 nm bands. The average lifetime is 3.23+/-0.74 ns for AT, 4.21+/-0.83 ns for FT and 4.71+/-0.35 ns (ptissue in real-time and assess tumor margins.

  2. Fluorescein Derivatives in Intravital Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Roberts

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intravital fluorescence microscopy enables the direct imaging of fluorophores in vivo and advanced techniques such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM enable the simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores. Consequently, it is now possible to record distribution and metabolism of a chemical in vivo and to optimise the delivery of fluorophores in vivo. Recent clinical applications with fluorescein and other intravital fluorescent stains have occurred in neurosurgery, dermatology [including photodynamic therapy (PDT] and endomicroscopy. Potential uses have been identified in periodontal disease, skin graft and cancer surgery. Animal studies have demonstrated that diseased tissue can be specifically stained with fluorophore conjugates. This review focuses on the fluorescein derived fluorophores in common clinical use and provides examples of novel applications from studies in tissue samples.

  3. Early-photon guided reconstruction method for time-domain fluorescence lifetime tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Zhang; Chuangjian Cai; Yanlu Lv; Jianwen Luo

    2016-01-01

    A reconstruction method guided by early-photon fluorescence yield tomography is proposed for time-domain fluorescence lifetime tomography (FLT) in this study.The method employs the early-arriving photons to reconstruct a fluorescence yield map,which is utilized as a priori information to reconstruct the FLT via all the photons along the temporal-point spread functions.Phantom experiments demonstrate that,compared with the method using all the photons for reconstruction of fluorescence yield and lifetime maps,the proposed method can achieve higher spatial resolution and reduced crosstalk between different targets without sacrificing the quantification accuracy of lifetime and contrast between heterogeneous targets.

  4. Study on the effect of deposition rate and concentration of Eu on the fluorescent lifetime of CsI: Tl thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yijun; Guo, Lina; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Qianfeng; Zhang, Shangjian; Liu, Yong; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2017-06-01

    Although there are many new scintillators being developed recently, CsI: Tl is still very efficient among them. The fluorescent lifetime is a very important parameter of CsI: Tl thin film and two series of experiments have been conducted to learn about it. Our experiments, however, have demonstrated that the deposition rate and the codoping of Eu2+ will significantly influence its fluorescent lifetime. In order to increase the efficiency of the imaging system, we intend to obtain a higher fluorescent lifetime for CsI: Tl thin film by controlling these two conditions.

  5. Fluorescence lifetime-based biosensing of zinc: Origin of the broad dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R B; Patchan, M W

    1995-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime-based chemical sensors have recently been described for applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and bioprocess control. These sensors transduce the level of the analyte as a change in the apparent fluorescence lifetime of an indicator phase. We have previously developed a wavelength-ratiometric fluorescence biosensor for zinc based on binding of zinc and dansylamide to apo-carbonic anhydrase which exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity. We demonstrate that the apo-carbonic anhydrase/dansylamide indicator system is very well suited for lifetime-based sensing, with a subnanomolar detection limit and greater than 1000-fold dynamic range. The theoretical basis for the wide dynamic range is discussed.

  6. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of intrinsically unstructured proteins: application to α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Sarah; Kluba, Malgorzata; Meuvis, Jessika; Engelborghs, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Lifetimes of fluorescent states and their fluorescence intensities are strictly coupled and very sensitive to the environment of the fluorophores. The advantage of measuring lifetimes, next to intensities, comes from the fact that it can reveal heterogeneity and dynamic properties of this environment. In this way lifetime analysis can be used to characterize static and dynamic conformational properties and heterogeneity of fluorescent groups in different areas of a protein and as a function of time for an evolving protein. The phenomena that determine the lifetime of a label are its intrinsic properties, dynamic quenching by neighboring groups, exposure to the solvent, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between different groups. The basic principles of these fluorescence phenomena can be found extensively described in the excellent book of Lakowicz (Principles of fluorescence spectroscopy, 3rd edn. Springer, New York, 2006). The fluorescent groups involved are either natural amino acid side chains like tryptophan (Trp) or tyrosine (Tyr), or fluorescent labels covalently engineered into the protein. Even a single fluorescent group can show indications of heterogeneity in the local environment. If several natural fluorescent groups are present, the properties of the individual groups can be separated using site-directed mutagenesis, and additivity of their contributions can be analyzed (Engelborghs, Spectrochim Acta A Mol Biomol Spectrosc 57(11):2255-2270, 2001). If no fluorescent group is naturally present, site-directed mutagenesis can be used to introduce either a fluorescent amino acid or a cysteine allowing chemical labeling.

  7. Tomographic lifetime imaging using combined early- and late-arriving photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Steven S; Rice, William L; Bacskai, Brian J; Kumar, Anand T N

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel, hybrid approach for time domain fluorescence tomography that efficiently combines lifetime multiplexing using late-arriving or asymptotic photons, with the high spatial resolution capability of early photon tomography. We also show that a decay amplitude-based asymptotic approach is superior to direct inversion of late-arriving photons for tomographic lifetime imaging within turbid media. The hybrid reconstruction approach is experimentally shown to recover fluorescent inclusions separated as close as 1.4 mm, with improved resolution and reduced cross talk compared to just using early photons or the asymptotic approach alone.

  8. FLIMX: A Software Package to Determine and Analyze the Fluorescence Lifetime in Time-Resolved Fluorescence Data from the Human Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Matthias; Schweitzer, Dietrich; Peters, Sven; Sauer, Lydia; Hammer, Martin; Haueisen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) is a new technique for measuring the in vivo autofluorescence intensity decays generated by endogenous fluorophores in the ocular fundus. Here, we present a software package called FLIM eXplorer (FLIMX) for analyzing FLIO data. Specifically, we introduce a new adaptive binning approach as an optimal tradeoff between the spatial resolution and the number of photons required per pixel. We also expand existing decay models (multi-exponential, stretched exponential, spectral global analysis, incomplete decay) to account for the layered structure of the eye and present a method to correct for the influence of the crystalline lens fluorescence on the retina fluorescence. Subsequently, the Holm-Bonferroni method is applied to FLIO measurements to allow for group comparisons between patients and controls on the basis of fluorescence lifetime parameters. The performance of the new approaches was evaluated in five experiments. Specifically, we evaluated static and adaptive binning in a diabetes mellitus patient, we compared the different decay models in a healthy volunteer and performed a group comparison between diabetes patients and controls. An overview of the visualization capabilities and a comparison of static and adaptive binning is shown for a patient with macular hole. FLIMX’s applicability to fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is shown in the ganglion cell layer of a porcine retina sample, obtained by a laser scanning microscope using two-photon excitation. PMID:26192624

  9. Alterations in cerebral metabolism observed in living rodents using fluorescence lifetime microscopy of intrinsic NADH (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Sakadžić, Sava; Sutin, Jason; Wu, Weicheng; Fu, Buyin; Boas, David A.

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring cerebral energy metabolism at a cellular level is essential to improve our understanding of healthy brain function and its pathological alterations. In this study, we resolve specific alterations in cerebral metabolism utilizing minimally-invasive 2-Photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (2P-FLIM) measurements of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence, collected in vivo from anesthetized rats and mice. Time-resolved lifetime measurements enables distinction of different components contributing to NADH autofluorescence. These components reportedly represent different enzyme-bound formulations of NADH. Our observations from this study confirm the hypothesis that NADH FLIM can identify specific alterations in cerebral metabolism. Using time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) equipment and a custom-built multimodal imaging system, 2-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) was performed in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. Multi-exponential fits for NADH fluorescence lifetimes indicate 4 distinct components, or 'species.' We observed distinct variations in the relative proportions of these components before and after pharmacological-induced impairments to several reactions involved in anaerobic glycolysis and aerobic oxidative metabolism. Classification models developed with experimental data correctly predict the metabolic impairments associated with bicuculline-induced focal seizures in separate experiments. Compared to traditional intensity-based NADH measurements, lifetime imaging of NADH is less susceptible to the adverse effects of overlying blood vessels. Evaluating NADH measurements will ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of cerebral energetics and its pathology-related alterations. Such knowledge will likely aid development of therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's disease, and stroke.

  10. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  11. Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime microwell-plate platform for respirometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatni, M. R.; Yale, G.; Van Ryckeghem, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally micro-well plate based platforms used in biology utilize fluorescence intensity based methods to measure processes of biological relevance. However, fluorescence intensity measurements suffer from calibration drift due to a variety of factors. Photobleaching and self-quenching of the fluorescent dyes cause the intensity signal to drop over the lifetime of sensor immobilized inside the well. Variation in turbidity of the sample during the course of the measurement affects the measured fluorescence intensity. In comparison, fluorescence lifetime measurements are not significantly affected by these factors because fluorescence lifetime is a physico-chemical property of the fluorescent dye. Reliable and inexpensive frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instrumentation platforms are possible because the greater tolerance for optical alignment, and because they can be performed using inexpensive light sources such as LEDs. In this paper we report the development of a frequency domain fluorescence lifetime well-plate platform utilizing an oxygen sensitive transition-metal ligand complex fluorophore with a lifetime in the microsecond range. The fluorescence lifetime dye is incorporated in a polymer matrix and immobilized on the base of micro-well of a 60 well micro-well plate. Respiration measurements are performed in both aqueous and non-aqueous environment. Respirometry measurements were recorded from single Daphnia magna egg in hard water. Daphnia is an aquatic organism, important in environmental toxicology as a standard bioassay and early warning indicator for water quality monitoring. Also respirometry measurements were recorded from Tribolium castaneum eggs, which are common pests in the processed flour industry. These eggs were subjected to mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor such as potassium cyanide (KCN) and its effects on egg respiration were measured in real-time.

  12. Molecular Fluorescence Lifetime Fluctuations: On the Possible Role of Conformational Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallée, R.A.L.; Vancso, G.J.; Hulst, van N.F.; Calbert, J.-P.; Cornil, J.; Brédas, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The radiative lifetime of single 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'- etramethylindodicarbocyanine molecules, embedded in a polymer thin film, has been characterized. At room temperature the chemically identical molecules exhibit strong fluctuations in their fluorescence lifetime. The possible conformational

  13. Fluorescence lifetime plate reader: resolution and precision meet high-throughput.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Karl J; Peterson, Kurt C; Muretta, Joseph M; Higgins, Sutton E; Gillispie, Gregory D; Thomas, David D

    2014-11-01

    We describe a nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectrometer that acquires fluorescence decay waveforms from each well of a 384-well microplate in 3 min with signal-to-noise exceeding 400 using direct waveform recording. The instrument combines high-energy pulsed laser sources (5-10 kHz repetition rate) with a photomultiplier and high-speed digitizer (1 GHz) to record a fluorescence decay waveform after each pulse. Waveforms acquired from rhodamine or 5-((2-aminoethyl)amino) naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid dyes in a 384-well plate gave lifetime measurements 5- to 25-fold more precise than the simultaneous intensity measurements. Lifetimes as short as 0.04 ns were acquired by interleaving with an effective sample rate of 5 GHz. Lifetime measurements resolved mixtures of single-exponential dyes with better than 1% accuracy. The fluorescence lifetime plate reader enables multiple-well fluorescence lifetime measurements with an acquisition time of 0.5 s per well, suitable for high-throughput fluorescence lifetime screening applications.

  14. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  15. DBD dyes as fluorescence lifetime probes to study conformational changes in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzinek, Robert; Ziomkowska, Joanna; Heuveling, Johanna; Mertens, Monique; Herrmann, Andreas; Schneider, Erwin; Wessig, Pablo

    2013-12-16

    Previously, [1,3]dioxolo[4,5-f][1,3]benzodioxole (DBD)-based fluorophores used as highly sensitive fluorescence lifetime probes reporting on their microenvironmental polarity have been described. Now, a new generation of DBD dyes has been developed. Although they are still sensitive to polarity, in contrast to the former DBD dyes, they have extraordinary spectroscopic properties even in aqueous surroundings. They are characterized by long fluorescence lifetimes (10-20 ns), large Stokes shifts (≈100 nm), high photostabilities, and high quantum yields (>0.56). Here, the spectroscopic properties and synthesis of functionalized derivatives for labeling biological targets are described. Furthermore, thio-reactive maleimido derivatives of both DBD generations show strong intramolecular fluorescence quenching. This mechanism has been investigated and is found to undergo a photoelectron transfer (PET) process. After reaction with a thiol group, this fluorescence quenching is prevented, indicating successful bonding. Being sensitive to their environmental polarity, these compounds have been used as powerful fluorescence lifetime probes for the investigation of conformational changes in the maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter through fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy. The differing tendencies of the fluorescence lifetime change for both DBD dye generations promote their combination as a powerful toolkit for studying microenvironments in proteins.

  16. Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, R. M.; Drachev, V. P.; Liu, Z.;

    2008-01-01

    Enhanced fluorescence is observed from dye molecules interacting with optical nanoantenna arrays. Elliptical gold dimers form individual nanoantennae with tunable plasmon resonances depending upon the geometry of the two particles and the size of the gap between them. A fluorescent dye, Rhodamine...

  17. 利用基于扫描相机的荧光寿命成像显微技术研究细胞周期%Study on Cell Cycle Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopic System Based on a Streak Camera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王岩; 赵羚伶; 陈同生; 许改霞; Artem Pliss; Tymish Y.Ohulchanskyy; Paras N.Prasad; 屈军乐; 牛憨笨

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime of the HeLa cells which are transfected with green fluorescent proteins during the cell cycle is investigated using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopic system based on a streak camera.Experimental results show that fluorescence lifetime of HeLa cells is between 2.50 ns and 3.00 ns during different processes of cell cycle. The fluorescence lifetime of the mitosis cell drops to 2.82 ns from 2.86 ns within one hour,and it further drops to 2.78 ns from 2.82 ns during the roughly eight hours of the pre-DNA-synthetic phase (Glphase). The difference of the fluorescence lifetime implies that the macromolecular concentration in the nucleoplasm of the cell nucleus changes throughout the cell cycle, the study of which is significant to the understanding of macromolecular processes, kinetics and concentrations in the nucleoplasm of the cell nucleus throughout the cell cycle, as well as the regulation of cell cycles.%利用基于扫描相机的荧光寿命成像显微系统,以细胞周期为模型,研究转染绿色荧光蛋白的HeLa细胞的荧光寿命.结果表明,处于周期内不同进程的细胞的荧光寿命为2.50~3.00 ns.处于分裂期的细胞的荧光寿命在1 h内从2.86 ns下降到2.82 ns;在DNA合成前期的8 h内,荧光寿命从2.82 ns下降到2.78 ns.荧光寿命的差异反映了细胞周期中核浆内大分子浓度的变化,对了解细胞周期的分子机制有一定的意义.

  18. Time-domain measurement of fluorescence lifetime variation with pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Alan G.; Power, Sarah; Glynn, Thomas J.; Morrison, John J.

    2001-07-01

    Advances in the design and miniaturization of the lasers and electronics required for Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) measurement of fluorescence lifetime have simplified the use of the time domain method. We have assembled a compact portable system that is capable of measuring lifetimes down to approximately 200 ps (with deconvolution) and that can operate at a range of excitation and emission wavelengths. The excitation sources are pulsed LEDs and laser diodes with a maximum pulse rate of 40 MHz and are easily interchanged. Furthermore, the development of violet and blue GaN LEDs and laser diodes is expanding the range of fluorophores available for fluorescence lifetime measurement of ion concentrations. pH sensitive fluorophores have a wide range of biological and clinical applications. The use of fluorescence lifetime rather than intensity to measure pH has a number of advantages including the reduction of effects due to the photobleaching, scattering, and intensity variations in the excitation source. Using our compact TCSPC instrumentation we have measured the dependence of fluorescence lifetimes on pH for a range of dyes in phosphate buffer over the physiologically important range of 6.0 to 8.0. Most dyes exhibit only a small variation in lifetime (pH range; however, acridine exhibits a large variation in lifetime and hence shows promise as a pH indicator.

  19. Assessing the photoaging process at sun exposed and non-exposed skin using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Photoaging is the skin premature aging due to exposure to ultraviolet light, which damage the collagen, elastin and can induce alterations on the skin cells DNA, and, then, it may evolve to precancerous lesions, which are widely investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime. The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime analysis has been presented as a technique of great potential for biological tissue characterization at optical diagnostics. The main targeted fluorophores are NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), which have free and bound states, each one with different average lifetimes. The average lifetimes for free and bound NADH and FAD change according to tissue metabolic alterations and may contribute to a non-invasive clinical investigation of injuries such as skin lesions. These lesions and the possible areas where they may develop can be interrogated using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy taking into account the variability of skin phototypes and the changes related to melanin, collagen and elastin, endogenous fluorophores which have emissions that spectrally overlap to the NADH and FAD emission. The objective of this study is to assess the variation on fluorescence lifetimes of normal skin at sun exposed and non-exposed areas and associate this variation to the photoaging process.

  20. Ruby fluorescence lifetime measurements for temperature determinations at high (p, T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Johannes D.; Bayarjargal, Lkhamsuren; Winkler, Björn

    2012-06-01

    The lifetime of the ruby R1 fluorescence line was measured as a function of pressure (up to about 20 GPa) and temperature (550 K) in an externally heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). At constant temperatures, the lifetime is increasing linearly with increasing pressure. The slope of the pressure dependence is constant up to a temperature of 450 K and it is decreasing at higher temperatures. At constant pressure, the lifetime is exponentially decreasing with increasing temperature. The (p, T)-dependence can be parametrized by the combination of a linear and an exponential function. This allows an accurate p, T-determination by the combination of fluorescence spectroscopy using Sm2+-doped strontium tetraborate and lifetime measurements of ruby, as the energy of the Sm2+ fluorescence is nearly temperature-independent.

  1. Monitoring of labeled antisense oligonucleotides within living cells by using a multifrequency phase/modulation approach for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocisova, E.; Sureau, F.; Praus, P.; Rosenberg, I.; Stepanek, J.; Turpin, P.-Y.

    2003-06-01

    A multifrequency phase/modulation method has been developed for our UV confocal laser microspectrofluorimeter (modulation frequency 1-200 MHz) for fluorescence lifetime measurements. This technique enables excited state lifetimes of mixed fluorescent components to be resolved and the fluorescence spectral contribution of each species to be determined without using any model spectra. This approach is very efficient for analyzing intracellular multicomponent fluorescence signals. Our effort is focused on the elucidation of the intracellular behavior of synthetic modified oligonucleotides - potential drugs for antisense and/or antigene strategies of curing viral and malignant diseases. A novel type single stranded dT 15 oligomer analogue containing isopolar, non-isosteric, phosphonate-based internucleotide linkages (3'-O-P-CH 2-O-5'), labeled with tetramethylrhodamine dye at the 3'-end, has been utilized. This method, along with fluorescence micro-imaging, was used to monitor uptake, distribution and stability of our modified oligonucleotide inside living cells. Binding to Escort™ vector leads to an homogeneous intracellular distribution of fluorescent labeled oligonucleotide, including nucleus staining, while point distribution only is achieved for its free form.

  2. Low-pressure effective fluorescence lifetimes and photo-physical rate constants of one- and two-ring aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzler, Thorsten; Faust, Stephan; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2015-12-01

    One- and two-ring aromatics such as toluene and naphthalene are frequently used molecular tracer species in laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging diagnostics. Quantifying LIF signal intensities requires knowledge of the photo-physical processes that determine the fluorescence quantum yield. Collision-induced and intramolecular energy transfer processes in the excited electronic state closely interact under practical conditions. They can be separated through experiments at variable low pressures. Effective fluorescence lifetimes of gaseous toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, anisole, naphthalene, and 1-methylnaphthalene diluted in CO2 were measured after picosecond laser excitation at 266 nm and time-resolved detection of fluorescence intensities. Measurements in an optically accessible externally heated cell between 296 and 475 K and 0.010-1 bar showed that effective fluorescence lifetimes generally decrease with temperature, while the influence of the bath-gas pressure depends on the respective target species and temperature. The results provide non-radiative and fluorescence rate constants and experimentally validate the effect of photo-induced cooling.

  3. Investigation of the Co-Dependence of Morphology and Fluorescence Lifetime in a Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpf, Waldemar; Ossato, Giulia; Hirschle, Patrick; Wuttke, Stefan; Lamb, Don C

    2016-07-01

    Porous materials, due to their large surface-to-volume ratio, are important for a broad range of applications and are the subject of intense research. Most studies investigate the bulk properties of these materials, which are not sensitive to the effect of heterogeneities within the sample. Herein, a new strategy based on correlative fluorescence lifetime imaging and scanning electron microscopy is presented that allows the detection and localization of those heterogeneities, and connects them to morphological and structural features of the material. By applying this method to a dye-modified metal-organic framework (MOF), two independent fluorescence quenching mechanisms in the MOF scaffold are identified and quantified. The first mechanism is based on quenching via amino groups, while the second mechanism is influenced by morphology. Furthermore, a similar correlation between the inherent luminescence lifetime and the morphology of the unmodified MOF structure is demonstrated.

  4. 3D printed miniaturized spectral system for tissue fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Luwei; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe F.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g. type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes like wound healing and fibrosis. Collagens exhibit autofluorescence when excited by ultra-violet light, distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Therefore, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system for collagens as a non-invasive probe for monitoring tissue in wound healing and scarring applications. A sine modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain (FD) fluorescence lifetime measurements under different wavelengths bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387nm, 409nm and 435nm. To achieve the minute scale of optomechanics, we employed a stereolithography based 3D printer with types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes.

  5. Temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetime of a fluorescent polymeric thermometer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), labeled by polarity and hydrogen bonding sensitive 4-sulfamoyl-7-aminobenzofurazan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, Chie; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2008-03-13

    Fluorescent molecular thermometers showing temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetimes enable thermal mapping of small spaces such as a microchannel and a living cell. We report the temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetimes of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA), which is a random copolymer of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and an environment-sensitive fluorescent monomer (DBD-AA) containing a 4-sulfamoyl-7-aminobenzofurazan structure. The average fluorescence lifetime of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) in aqueous solution increased from 4.22 to 14.1 ns with increasing temperature from 30 to 35 degrees C. This drastic change in fluorescence lifetime (27% increase per 1 degrees C) is the sharpest ever reported. Concentration independency, one of the advantages of fluorescence lifetime measurements, was seen in average fluorescence lifetime (13.7 +/- 0.18 ns) of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) at 33 degrees C over a wide concentration range (0.005-1 w/v%). With increasing temperature, polyNIPAM units in poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) change their structure from an extended form to a globular form, providing apolar and aprotic environments to the fluorescent DBD-AA units. Consequently, the environment-sensitive DBD-AA units translate the local environmental changes into the extension of the fluorescence lifetime. This role of the DBD-AA units was revealed by a study of solvent effects on fluorescence lifetime of a model environment-sensitive fluorophore.

  6. Fluorescence-lifetime identification of biological agents using deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitta, P.; Kurilcik, N.; Jursenas, S.; Zukauskas, A.; Bakienė, E.; Zhang, J.; Katona, T.; Bilenko, Y.; Lunev, A.; Hu, X.; Deng, J.; Gaska, R.

    2005-10-01

    Recently developed deep-UV light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are already used in prototype fluorescence sensors for detection of hazardous biological agents. However, increasing of the sensor ability of discrimination against common interferents requires further development of measurement technique. In particular, LED-based fluorescence lifetime measurements are to be considered as a technique supplementary to fluorescence spectral and excitation measurements. Here we report on application of UVTOP® series deep-UV LEDs developed by Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc. for real-time measurements of fluorescence lifetime in the frequency domain. LEDs with the wavelengths of 280 nm (targeted to protein excitation) and 340 nm (for excitation of coenzymes NADH and flavins) were used. The output of the LEDs was harmonically modulated at frequencies up to 100 MHz and fluorescence lifetime on the nanosecond and subnanosecond scale was estimated by measuring the phase angle of the fluorescence signal in respect of the LED output. Dual-wavelength LED-based phase-resolved measurement technique was tested for discrimination of B. globigii against a variety of interferents such as diesel fuel, paper, cotton, dust, etc. We conclude that fluorescence phase measurements have potential to improve the discrimination ability of the "detect-to-warn" optical bioparticle sensors.

  7. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of native and glycated human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Joshi, Virgina O. d.; Contreras, Silvia; Gil, Herminia; Medina, Honorio; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, plays an important role in the secondary complications of the diabetic pathology and aging, therefore, human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated by a conventional method in our laboratory using glucose as the glycating agent. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out with a laser strobe fluorometer equipped with a nitrogen/dye laser and a frequency doubler as a pulsed excitation source. The samples were excited at 295 nm and the emission spectra were recorded at 345 nm. The obtained decay curves were tried for double and triple exponential functions. It has been found that the shorter lifetime increases for glycated proteins as compared with that of the native ones. For example, in the case of glycated BSA the lifetime increased from 1.36 ns to 2.30 ns. Similarly, for HSA, the lifetime increases from 1.58 ns to 2.26 ns. Meanwhile, the longer lifetime changed very slightly for both proteins (from 6.52 ns to 6.72 ns). The increase in the lifetime can be associated with the environmental effect; originated from the attachment of glucose to some lysine residues. A good example is Trp 214 which is in the cage of Lys 225, Lys 212, Lys 233, Lys 205, Lys 500, Lys 199 and Lys 195. If fluorescence lifetime technique is calibrated and properly used it could be employed for assessing glycation of proteins.

  8. Multi Spectral Fluorescence Imager (MSFI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation with in vivo reporter genes for fluorescent proteins can be performed on a variety of organisms to address fundamental biological questions. Model organisms that may utilize an ISS imager include unicellular organisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), and invertebrates (Caenorhabditis elegans). The multispectral fluorescence imager (MSFI) will have the capability to accommodate 10 cm x 10 cm Petri plates, various sized multi-well culture plates, and other custom culture containers. Features will include programmable temperature and light cycles, ethylene scrubbing (less than 25 ppb), CO2 control (between 400 ppm and ISS-ambient levels in units of 100 ppm) and sufficient airflow to prevent condensation that would interfere with imaging.

  9. Polyacrylamide based ICG nanocarriers for enhanced fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Yoon, Hyung Ki; Ryu, HeeJu; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Kim, Gwangseong; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2013-02-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG) is an FDA approved tricarbocyanine dye. This dye, with a strong absorbance in the near infrared (NIR) region, has been extensively used for fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging in vivo. ICG in its free form, however, has a few drawbacks that limit its in vivo applications, such as non-targetability, tendency to form aggregates which changes its optical properties, fast degradation, short plasma lifetime and reduced fluorescence at body temperature. In order to bypass these inherent drawbacks, we demonstrate a polyacrylamide based nanocarrier that was particularly designed to carry the negatively charged ICG molecules. These nanocarriers are biodegradable, biocompatible and can be specifically targeted to any cell or tissue. Using these nanocarriers we avoid all the problems associated with free ICG, such as degradation, aggregation and short plasma lifetime, and also enhance demonstrate its ability towards photoacoustics and fluorescence imaging.

  10. [The analysis of sinusoidal modulated method used for measuring fluorescence lifetime].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ying; Huang, Shi-hua

    2007-12-01

    This paper has built a system with a sinusoidal modulated LED as the excitation source. Such exciter was used upon the sample Eu2 L'3 x nH2O (L' = C4H4O4). Both the excitation light and the 5Do-7F2 emission of Eu3+ ion were measured. Fluorescence lifetime, which approximate to 0.680 ms, can then be obtained from the measured excitation and fluorescence waveforms by non-linear least square curve fitting based on the principle of phase-shift measurement of fluorescence lifetime. Data processing methods considering respectively the high order harmonics in the modulation and multi-exponential decay of the fluorescence were discussed. A method of utilizing Fourier series expandedness to amendatory the result was put forward. Accordingly, the applicability for phase-shift method was expanded as well as a more exact result was acquired.

  11. The Gray Institute 'open' high-content, fluorescence lifetime microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, P R; Tullis, I D C; Pierce, G P; Newman, R G; Prentice, J; Rowley, M I; Matthews, D R; Ameer-Beg, S M; Vojnovic, B

    2013-08-01

    We describe a microscopy design methodology and details of microscopes built to this 'open' design approach. These demonstrate the first implementation of time-domain fluorescence microscopy in a flexible automated platform with the ability to ease the transition of this and other advanced microscopy techniques from development to use in routine biology applications. This approach allows easy expansion and modification of the platform capabilities, as it moves away from the use of a commercial, monolithic, microscope body to small, commercial off-the-shelf and custom made modular components. Drawings and diagrams of our microscopes have been made available under an open license for noncommercial use at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~atdgroup. Several automated high-content fluorescence microscope implementations have been constructed with this design framework and optimized for specific applications with multiwell plates and tissue microarrays. In particular, three platforms incorporate time-domain FLIM via time-correlated single photon counting in an automated fashion. We also present data from experiments performed on these platforms highlighting their automated wide-field and laser scanning capabilities designed for high-content microscopy. Devices using these designs also form radiation-beam 'end-stations' at Oxford and Surrey Universities, showing the versatility and extendibility of this approach. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  12. Microscopic imaging of intracellular calcium in live cells using lifetime-based ratiometric measurements of Oregon Green BAPTA-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattarulo, Carli; Thyssen, Diana; Kuchibholta, Kishore V; Hyman, Bradley T; Bacskaiq, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger that has important functions in normal neuronal function. The pathology of Alzheimer's disease has been shown to alter calcium homeostasis in neurons and astrocytes. Several calcium dye indicators are available to measure intracellular calcium within cells, including Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (OGB-1). Using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we adapted this single wavelength calcium dye into a ratiometric dye to allow quantitative imaging of cellular calcium. We used this approach for in vitro calibrations, single-cell microscopy, high-throughput imaging in automated plate readers, and in single cells in the intact living brain. While OGB is a commonly used fluorescent dye for imaging calcium qualitatively, there are distinct advantages to using a ratiometric approach, which allows quantitative determinations of calcium that are independent of dye concentration. Taking advantage of the distinct lifetime contrast of the calcium-free and calcium-bound forms of OGB, we used time-domain lifetime measurements to generate calibration curves for OGB lifetime ratios as a function of calcium concentration. In summary, we demonstrate approaches using commercially available tools to measure calcium concentrations in live cells at multiple scales using lifetime contrast. These approaches are broadly applicable to other fluorescent readouts that exhibit lifetime contrast and serve as powerful alternatives to spectral or intensity readouts in multiplexing experiments.

  13. Real-time fluorescence lifetime actuation for cell sorting using a CMOS SPAD silicon photomultiplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Francescopaolo Mattioli Della; Nedbal, Jakub; Tyndall, David; Krstajić, Nikola; Li, David Day-Uei; Ameer-Beg, Simon M; Henderson, Robert K

    2016-02-15

    Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) is a fundamental fluorescence lifetime measurement technique offering high signal to noise ratio (SNR). However, its requirement for complex software algorithms for histogram processing restricts throughput in flow cytometers and prevents on-the-fly sorting of cells. We present a single-point digital silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) detector accomplishing real-time fluorescence lifetime-activated actuation targeting cell sorting applications in flow cytometry. The sensor also achieves burst-integrated fluorescence lifetime (BIFL) detection by TCSPC. The SiPM is a single-chip complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) sensor employing a 32×32 single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) array and eight pairs of time-interleaved time to digital converters (TI-TDCs) with a 50 ps minimum timing resolution. The sensor's pile-up resistant embedded center of mass method (CMM) processor accomplishes low-latency measurement and thresholding of fluorescence lifetime. A digital control signal is generated with a 16.6 μs latency for cell sorter actuation allowing a maximum cell throughput of 60,000 cells per second and an error rate of 0.6%.

  14. The Use of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Lifetime to Assess Phytoplankton Physiology within a River-Dominated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Callie M.; Miller, Richard L.; Redalje, Donald G.; Fernandez, Salvador M.

    2002-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence lifetime was measured for phytoplankton populations inhabiting the three physical zones surrounding the Mississippi River's terminus in the Gulf of Mexico. Observations of river discharge volume, nitrate + nitrite, silicate, phosphate, PAR (Photosynthetically Active Radiation) diffuse attenuation within the water column, salinity, temperature, SPM, and chl a concentration were used to characterize the distribution of chl fluorescence lifetime within a given region within restricted periods of time. 33 stations extending from the Mississippi River plume to the shelf break of the Louisiana coast were surveyed for analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime during two cruises conducted March 31 - April 6, 2000, and October 24 - November 1, 2000. At each station, two to three depths were chosen for fluorescence lifetime measurement to represent the vertical characteristics of the water column. Where possible, samples were taken from just below the surface and from just above and below the pycnocline. All samples collected were within the 1% light level of the water column (the euphotic zone). Upon collection, samples were transferred to amber Nalgene bottles and left in the dark for at least 15 minutes to reduce the effects of non-photochemical quenching and to insure that photosynthetic reaction centers were open. Before measurements within the phase fluorometer were begun, the instrument was allowed to warm up for no less than one hour.

  15. Fluorescence lifetime of emitters with broad homogeneous linewidths modified in opal photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of spontaneous emission from dye molecules embedded in opal photonic crystals. Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye were measured as a function of both optical frequency and crystal lattice parameter of the polystyrene opals. Due to the broad homogene...

  16. Towards sensitive, high-throughput, biomolecular assays based on fluorescence lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioanna Skilitsi, Anastasia; Turko, Timothé; Cianfarani, Damien; Barre, Sophie; Uhring, Wilfried; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Léonard, Jérémie

    2017-09-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence detection for robust sensing of biomolecular interactions is developed by implementing time-correlated single photon counting in high-throughput conditions. Droplet microfluidics is used as a promising platform for the very fast handling of low-volume samples. We illustrate the potential of this very sensitive and cost-effective technology in the context of an enzymatic activity assay based on fluorescently-labeled biomolecules. Fluorescence lifetime detection by time-correlated single photon counting is shown to enable reliable discrimination between positive and negative control samples at a throughput as high as several hundred samples per second.

  17. Evidence for covalent binding of epicocconone with proteins from synchronous fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetimes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debashis Panda; Anindya Datta

    2007-03-01

    Synchronous fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic studies that reveal the interaction of epicocconone with human serum albumin is significantly different from its interaction with surfactant assemblies. This observation, along with steady-state fluorescence data, indicates groundstate interaction between the fluorophore epicocconone and the protein. Similarity in fluorescence properties with the adduct of the fluorophore with -butylamine indicates that bonding occurs at the Nterminus of the protein.

  18. Lifetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚祎

    2004-01-01

    @@ 继ESPN刊出同名杂志之后,2003年赫斯特公司(Hearst Corp.)和迪斯尼(Walt Disney Co.)的合作促成了一本新杂志的诞生:(Lifetime),其目标读者是成百万收看同名有线电视网节目的妇女们.

  19. Two-photon autofluorescence lifetime and SHG imaging of healthy and diseased human corneas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Seitz, Berthold; Morgado, António Miguel; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    Corneal function can be drastically affected by several degenerations and dystrophies, leading to blindness. Early diagnosis of corneal disease is of major importance and it may be accomplished by monitoring changes of the metabolic state and structural organization, the first detectable pathological signs, by two-photon excitation autofluorescence lifetime and second-harmonic generation imaging. In this study, we propose to use these imaging techniques to differentiate between healthy and pathological corneas. Images were acquired using a laser-scanning microscope with a broadband sub-15 femtosecond near-infrared pulsed laser and a 16-channel photomultiplier tube detector for signal collection. This setup allows the simultaneous excitation of metabolic co-factors and to identify them based on their fluorescence spectra. We were able to discriminate between healthy and pathological corneas using two-photon excitation autofluorescence lifetime and second-harmonic generation imaging from corneal epithelium and stroma. Furthermore, differences between different pathologies were observed. Alterations in the metabolic state of corneal epithelial cells were observed using the autofluorescence lifetime of the metabolic co-factors. In the corneal stroma, we observed not only alterations in the collagen fibril structural organization but also alterations in the autofluorescence lifetime. Further tests are required as the number of pathological samples must be increased. In the future, we intend to establish a correlation between the metabolic and structural changes and the disease stage. This can be a step forward in achieving early diagnosis.

  20. Constraining the lifetime and opening angle of quasars using fluorescent Ly a emission: the case of Q0420-388

    CERN Document Server

    Borisova, Elena; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J Xavier; Rakic, Olivera; Worseck, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    A toy model is developed to understand how the spatial distribution of fluorescent emitters in the vicinity of bright quasars could be affected by the geometry of the quasar bi-conical radiation field and by the quasar lifetime. We then compare the predictions of this model to a sample of high equivalent width Ly a emitters (EW0 > 100 A) that were identified in a deep narrow-band 36x36 arcmin2 image centered on the luminous quasar Q0420-388. These are identified to the edge of the field and show some evidence of an azimuthal asymmetry on the sky of the type expected if the quasar is radiating in a bipolar cone. If these sources are being fluorescently illuminated by the quasar, then the two most distant sources require a lifetime of at least 15 Myr for an opening angle of 60 degrees or more, increasing to more than 40 Myr if the opening angle is reduced to a minimum 30 degrees. The overall distribution of all of the sources across the field gives best fit lifetimes in the range 20 < t < 50 Myr for openi...

  1. Protein-protein interaction analysis in single microfluidic droplets using FRET and fluorescence lifetime detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Christian; Retzbach, Heiko; Nagl, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2013-07-21

    Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility of a protein-protein interaction analysis and reaction progress monitoring in microfluidic droplets using FRET and microscopic fluorescence lifetime measurements. The fabrication of microdroplet chips using soft- and photolithographic techniques is demonstrated and the resulting chips reliably generate microdroplets of 630 pL and 6.71 nL at frequencies of 7.9 and 0.75 Hz, respectively. They were used for detection of protein-protein interactions in microdroplets using a model system of Alexa Fluor 488 labelled biotinylated BSA, Alexa Fluor 594 labelled streptavidin and unlabelled chicken egg white avidin. These microchips could be used for quantitative detection of avidin and streptavidin in microdroplets in direct and competitive assay formats with nanomolar detection limits, corresponding to attomole protein amounts. Four droplets were found to be sufficient for analytical determination. Fluorescence intensity ratio and fluorescence lifetime measurements were performed and compared for microdroplet FRET determination. A competitive on-chip binding assay for determination of unlabelled avidin using fluorescence lifetime detection could be performed within 135 s only.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in multiple-scattering environments: an application to biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio

    1999-07-01

    Over the past few years, there has been significant research activity devoted to the application of fluorescence spectroscopy to strongly scattering media, where photons propagate diffusely. Much of this activity focused on fluorescence as a source of contrast enhancement in optical tomography. Our efforts have emphasized the quantitative recovery of fluorescence parameters for spectroscopy. Using a frequency-domain diffusion-based model, we have successfully recovered the lifetime, the absolute quantum yield, the fluorophore concentration, and the emission spectrum of the fluorophore, as well as the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients at the emission wavelength of the medium in different measurements. In this contribution, we present a sensitive monitor of the binding between ethidium bromide and bovine cells in fresh milk. The spectroscopic contrast was the approximately tenfold increase in the ethidium bromide lifetime upon binding to DNA. The measurement clearly demonstrated that we could quantitatively measure the density of cells in the milk, which is an application vital to the tremendous economic burden of bovine subclinical mastitis detection. Furthermore, we may in principle use the spirit of this technique as a quantitative monitor of the binding of fluorescent drugs inside tissues. This is a first step towards lifetime spectroscopy in tissues.

  3. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  4. Quantitative imaging with fluorescent biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumoto, Sakiko; Jones, Alexander; Frommer, Wolf B

    2012-01-01

    Molecular activities are highly dynamic and can occur locally in subcellular domains or compartments. Neighboring cells in the same tissue can exist in different states. Therefore, quantitative information on the cellular and subcellular dynamics of ions, signaling molecules, and metabolites is critical for functional understanding of organisms. Mass spectrometry is generally used for monitoring ions and metabolites; however, its temporal and spatial resolution are limited. Fluorescent proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology-e.g., fluorescent proteins can report on gene expression or protein localization in real time-yet promoter-based reporters are often slow to report physiologically relevant changes such as calcium oscillations. Therefore, novel tools are required that can be deployed in specific cells and targeted to subcellular compartments in order to quantify target molecule dynamics directly. We require tools that can measure enzyme activities, protein dynamics, and biophysical processes (e.g., membrane potential or molecular tension) with subcellular resolution. Today, we have an extensive suite of tools at our disposal to address these challenges, including translocation sensors, fluorescence-intensity sensors, and Förster resonance energy transfer sensors. This review summarizes sensor design principles, provides a database of sensors for more than 70 different analytes/processes, and gives examples of applications in quantitative live cell imaging.

  5. Three-dimensional printed miniaturized spectral system for collagen fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Luwei; Koslakiewicz, Ronald; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-07-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g., type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes such as wound healing and fibrosis. When excited by ultraviolet light, collagens exhibit autofluorescence distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Here, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system as a noninvasive probe for monitoring tissue collagen compositions. A sine-modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain fluorescence lifetime measurements under three wavelength bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387, 409, and 435 nm. We employed a lithography-based three-dimensional (3-D) printer with modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (from LED) and mechanical (from handling) strain on the optical system. The geometry was further optimized with ray tracing to form the final 3-D printed structure. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes. This system represents a low cost, handheld probe for clinical tissue monitoring applications.

  6. Temperature and bath gas composition dependence of effective fluorescence lifetimes of toluene excited at 266 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, S.; Dreier, T.; Schulz, C.

    2011-05-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of gas-phase toluene upon picosecond excitation at 266 nm were investigated as a function of temperature (296-1074 K) and bath gas composition (varying amounts of N 2, O 2, and CO 2) at 1 bar total pressure with a temporal resolution of 50 ps. In the investigated temperature range the effective fluorescence lifetime drops with increasing temperature from 46 ± 3 ns to 0.05 ± 0.01 ns in N 2 and CO 2. In the presence of O 2 at constant temperature the lifetimes also decrease significantly (e.g., from 46 ± 3 ns without O 2 to 0.63 ± 0.05 ns in air at room temperature), whereas lifetimes are independent on the CO 2 concentration. The implications of the results for the existing phenomenological model of predicting temporally integrated fluorescence intensities in toluene [W. Koban, J.D. Koch, R.K. Hanson, C. Schulz, Appl. Phys. B 80 (2005) 777] are discussed.

  7. Shifts in the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP during bacterial phagocytosis measured by phase-sensitive flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Houston, Kevin D.; Houston, Jessica P.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-sensitive flow cytometry (PSFC) is a technique in which fluorescence excited state decay times are measured as fluorescently labeled cells rapidly transit a finely focused, frequency-modulated laser beam. With PSFC the fluorescence lifetime is taken as a cytometric parameter to differentiate intracellular events that are challenging to distinguish with standard flow cytometry. For example PSFC can report changes in protein conformation, expression, interactions, and movement, as well as differences in intracellular microenvironments. This contribution focuses on the latter case by taking PSFC measurements of macrophage cells when inoculated with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing E. coli. During progressive internalization of EGFP-E. coli, fluorescence lifetimes were acquired and compared to control groups. It was hypothesized that fluorescence lifetimes would correlate well with phagocytosis because phagosomes become acidified and the average fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is known to be affected by pH. We confirmed that average EGFP lifetimes consistently decreased (3 to 2 ns) with inoculation time. The broad significance of this work is the demonstration of how high-throughput fluorescence lifetime measurements correlate well to changes that are not easily tracked by intensity-only cytometry, which is affected by heterogeneous protein expression, cell-to-cell differences in phagosome formation, and number of bacterium engulfed.

  8. A fast multiple shutter for luminescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Reinhard

    2017-09-01

    A new fast readout mode for off-the-shelf CCD image sensors is presented. It provides the capability to record two consecutive frames of short exposure time with multiple exposure cycles in fast succession. This is advantageous for measurements of recurrent low light events. A main application is the lifetime measurement of luminescence emissions such as those used for temperature- or pressure-sensitive paint measurements.

  9. Silica nanodisks as platforms for fluorescence lifetime-based sensing of pH

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhasree Banerjee; Anjali Dhir; Tuseeta Banerjee; Avinash Kumar Singh; Anindya Datta

    2011-11-01

    Core-shell conjugates of silica nanodisks and fluorescent dyes have been prepared. Rhodamine B, the reference, has been attached to the core, by surface functionalization of the pristine SNDs. Then, a layer of silica has been deposited on the composite nanodisks. Finally, the surface has been functionalized with fluorescein in one case and protoporphyrin IX in the other. These dyes exhibit pH-dependent fluorescence properties. The nanoconjugates are found to sense the pH of the medium, through systematic variation of the fluorescence intensity ratios of the reporter dye at the surface and the reference dye at the core. Moreover, the fluorescence lifetimes and corresponding amplitudes of the reporter dyes have been found to be reliable parameters for assessing the pH of the medium, even though the variation in lifetimes of fluorescein is rather small. In case of protoporphyrin, however, this variation is significantly large. Besides, the change in amplitudes is prominent in acidic as well as alkaline solutions. The temporal parameters can thus be used to ascertain the pH of the medium, when used in conjunction with each other.

  10. Spectral phasor analysis allows rapid and reliable unmixing of fluorescence microscopy spectral images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fereidouni, F.; Bader, A.N.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    A new global analysis algorithm to analyse (hyper-) spectral images is presented. It is based on the phasor representation that has been demonstrated to be very powerful for the analysis of lifetime imaging data. In spectral phasor analysis the fluorescence spectrum of each pixel in the image is Fou

  11. Segmenting Intracellular Distribution Images Derived by Fluorescent Dyes Using a Potts Model Hamiltonian

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Dandan; Ronhovde, Peter; Bloch, Sharon; Achilefu, Samuel; Nussinov, Zohar

    2012-01-01

    We apply a multiresolution community detection algorithm to perform unsupervised segmentation of complex intracellular signals derived using fluorescent dyes. In our earlier work, when applying our method to benchmarks, our algorithm was shown to be one of the best and to be especially suited to the detection of camouflage images. In the current manuscript, we have explored this algorithm in a more complex scenario. The current image processing problem is framed as identifying clusters with respective average fluorescent lifetimes (FLTs) against a background or "solvent" in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) images derived using NIR fluorescent dyes. We have identified significant multiresolution structures using replica correlations in these images, where such correlations are manifested by information theoretic overlaps of the independent solutions ("replicas") attained using the proposed algorithm from different starting points. Our method is more efficient than a well-known image segmentation...

  12. Fluorescence intensity and lifetime-based cyanide sensitive probes for physiological safeguard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badugu, Ramachandram [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical Biotechnology Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Lakowicz, Joseph R. [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical Biotechnology Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)]. E-mail: lakowicz@cfs.umbi.umd.edu; Geddes, Chris D. [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical Biotechnology Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) and Institute of Fluorescence and Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Medical Biotechnology Center, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)]. E-mail: chris@cfs.umbi.umd.edu

    2004-09-20

    We characterize six new fluorescent probes that show both intensity and lifetime changes in the presence of free uncomplexed aqueous cyanide, allowing for fluorescence based cyanide sensing up to physiological safeguard levels, i.e. <30 {mu}M. One of the probes, m-BMQBA, shows a {approx}15-fold reduction in intensity and a {approx}10% change in mean lifetime at this level. The response of the new probes is based on their ability to bind the cyanide anion through a boronic acid functional group, changing from the neutral form of the boronic acid group R-B(OH){sub 2} to the anionic R-B{sup -}(CN){sub 3} form, a new cyanide binding mechanism which we have recently reported. The presence of an electron deficient quaternary heterocyclic nitrogen nucleus, and the electron rich cyanide bound form, provides for the intensity changes observed. We have determined the disassociation constants of the probes to be in the range {approx}15-84 {mu}M{sup 3}. In addition we have synthesized control compounds which do not contain the boronic acid moiety, allowing for a rationale of the cyanide responses between the probe isomers to be made. The lifetime of the cyanide bound probes are significantly shorter than the free R-B(OH){sub 2} probe forms, providing for the opportunity of lifetime based cyanide sensing up to physiologically lethal levels. Finally, while fluorescent probes containing the boronic acid moiety have earned a well-deserved reputation for monosaccharide sensing, we show that strong bases such as CN{sup -} and OH{sup -} preferentially bind as compared to glucose, enabling the potential use of these probes for cyanide safeguard and determination in physiological fluids, especially given that physiologies do not experience any notable changes in pH.

  13. Photoacoustic lifetime imaging of dissolved oxygen using methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Shai

    2010-07-01

    Measuring distribution of dissolved oxygen in biological tissue is of prime interest for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy optimization. Tumor hypoxia indicates poor prognosis and resistance to radiotherapy. Despite its major clinical significance, no current imaging modality provides direct imaging of tissue oxygen. We present preliminary results demonstrating the potential of photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) for noninvasive, 3-D imaging of tissue oxygen. The technique is based on photoacoustic probing of the excited state lifetime of methylene blue (MB) dye. MB is an FDA-approved water soluble dye with a peak absorption at 660 nm. A double pulse laser system (pump probe) is used to excite the dye and probe its transient absorption by detecting photoacoustic emission. The relaxation rate of MB depends linearly on oxygen concentration. Our measurements show high photoacoustic signal contrast at a probe wavelength of 810 nm, where the excited state absorption is more than four times higher than the ground state absorption. Imaging of a simple phantom is demonstrated. We conclude by discussing possible implementations of the technique in clinical settings and combining it with photodynamic therapy (PDT) for real-time therapy monitoring.

  14. Relationship between the Fluorescence Lifetime of Chlorophyll 'a' and Primary Productivity within the Mississippi River Plume and Adjacent Shelf Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Callie; Miller, Richard L.; Fernandez, Salvador M.; McKee, Brent A.

    2000-01-01

    In situ measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence intensity have been widely used to estimate phytoplankton biomass. However, because the fluorescence quantum yield of chlorophyll a in vivo can be highly variable, measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence intensity cannot be directly correlated with phytoplankton biomass and do not provide information on the physiological state of the phytoplankton under study. Conversely, lifetime-based measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence provide a framework in which photosynthetic rates of phytoplankton can be analyzed according to phytoplankton physiology. Along with the measurement of primary production and ambient nutrient concentrations within the Mississippi River plume in the northern Gulf of Mexico, phytoplankton fluorescence lifetimes were measured using a Fluorescence Lifetime Phytoplankton Analyzer (developed under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research contract to Ciencia, Inc.). Variability of fluorescence lifetimes within the plume can be used as a background from which to interpret variations in the maximum quantum yield of photochemistry. The extent to which nutrient and effluent loading in this dynamic coastal area affect the photosynthetic performance of phytoplankton will be presented as a function of phytoplankton fluorescence lifetimes.

  15. Relationship between the Fluorescence Lifetime of Chlorophyll 'a' and Primary Productivity within the Mississippi River Plume and Adjacent Shelf Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Callie; Miller, Richard L.; Fernandez, Salvador M.; McKee, Brent A.

    2000-01-01

    In situ measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence intensity have been widely used to estimate phytoplankton biomass. However, because the fluorescence quantum yield of chlorophyll a in vivo can be highly variable, measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence intensity cannot be directly correlated with phytoplankton biomass and do not provide information on the physiological state of the phytoplankton under study. Conversely, lifetime-based measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence provide a framework in which photosynthetic rates of phytoplankton can be analyzed according to phytoplankton physiology. Along with the measurement of primary production and ambient nutrient concentrations within the Mississippi River plume in the northern Gulf of Mexico, phytoplankton fluorescence lifetimes were measured using a Fluorescence Lifetime Phytoplankton Analyzer (developed under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research contract to Ciencia, Inc.). Variability of fluorescence lifetimes within the plume can be used as a background from which to interpret variations in the maximum quantum yield of photochemistry. The extent to which nutrient and effluent loading in this dynamic coastal area affect the photosynthetic performance of phytoplankton will be presented as a function of phytoplankton fluorescence lifetimes.

  16. Photon counting phosphorescence lifetime imaging with TimepixCam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Fisher-Levine, Merlin; Suhling, Klaus; Nomerotski, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    TimepixCam is a novel fast optical imager based on an optimized silicon pixel sensor with a thin entrance window and read out by a Timepix Application Specific Integrated Circuit. The 256 × 256 pixel sensor has a time resolution of 15 ns at a sustained frame rate of 10 Hz. We used this sensor in combination with an image intensifier for wide-field time-correlated single photon counting imaging. We have characterised the photon detection capabilities of this detector system and employed it on a wide-field epifluorescence microscope to map phosphorescence decays of various iridium complexes with lifetimes of about 1 μs in 200 μm diameter polystyrene beads.

  17. Free electron lifetime achievements in liquid Argon imaging TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baibussinov, B; Ceolin, M Baldo; Centro, S; Cieslik, K; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, A; Meng, G; Pietropaolo, F; Varanini, F; Ventura, S [INFN, Sezione di Padova via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Calligarich, E [INFN, Sezione di Pavia via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Rubbia, C, E-mail: Carlo.Rubbia@cern.c [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell' INFN I-67010 Assergi (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    A key feature for the success of the liquid Argon imaging TPC (LAr-TPC) technology is the industrial purification against electro-negative impurities, especially Oxygen and Nitrogen remnants, which have to be continuously kept at an exceptionally low level by filtering and recirculating liquid Argon. Improved purification techniques have been applied to a 120 liters LAr-TPC test facility in the INFN-LNL laboratory. Through-going muon tracks have been used to determine the free electron lifetime in liquid Argon against electro-negative impurities. The short path length here observed (30 cm) is compensated by the high accuracy in the observation of the specific ionization of cosmic ray muons at sea level as a function of the drift distance. A free electron lifetime of tau {approx} (21.4{sup +7.3}{sub -4.3}) ms, namely > 15.8 ms at 90% C.L. has been observed over several weeks under stable conditions, corresponding to a residual Oxygen equivalent of {approx} 15 ppt (part per trillion). At 500 V/cm, the free electron speed is 1.5 mm/mus. In a LAr-TPC a free electron lifetime in excess of 15 ms corresponds for instance to an attenuation of less than 20% after a drift path of 5 m, opening the way to the operation of the LAr-TPC with exceptionally long drift distances.

  18. Enhanced speed in fluorescence imaging using beat frequency multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Wang, Yisen; Hamad, Syed; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence imaging using radiofrequency-tagged emission (FIRE) is an emerging technique that enables higher imaging speed (namely, temporal resolution) in fluorescence microscopy compared to conventional fluorescence imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy and wide-field microscopy. It works based on the principle that it uses multiple intensity-modulated fields in an interferometric setup as excitation fields and applies frequency-division multiplexing to fluorescence signals. Unfortunately, despite its high potential, FIRE has limited imaging speed due to two practical limitations: signal bandwidth and signal detection efficiency. The signal bandwidth is limited by that of an acousto-optic deflector (AOD) employed in the setup, which is typically 100-200 MHz for the spectral range of fluorescence excitation (400-600 nm). The signal detection efficiency is limited by poor spatial mode-matching between two interfering fields to produce a modulated excitation field. Here we present a method to overcome these limitations and thus to achieve higher imaging speed than the prior version of FIRE. Our method achieves an increase in signal bandwidth by a factor of two and nearly optimal mode matching, which enables the imaging speed limited by the lifetime of the target fluorophore rather than the imaging system itself. The higher bandwidth and better signal detection efficiency work synergistically because higher bandwidth requires higher signal levels to avoid the contribution of shot noise and amplifier noise to the fluorescence signal. Due to its unprecedentedly high-speed performance, our method has a wide variety of applications in cancer detection, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine.

  19. Enhanced 3D fluorescence live cell imaging on nanoplasmonic substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartia, Manas Ranjan [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hsiao, Austin; Logan Liu, G [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sivaguru, Mayandi [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chen Yi, E-mail: loganliu@illinois.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    We have created a randomly distributed nanocone substrate on silicon coated with silver for surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence detection and 3D cell imaging. Optical characterization of the nanocone substrate showed it can support several plasmonic modes (in the 300-800 nm wavelength range) that can be coupled to a fluorophore on the surface of the substrate, which gives rise to the enhanced fluorescence. Spectral analysis suggests that a nanocone substrate can create more excitons and shorter lifetime in the model fluorophore Rhodamine 6G (R6G) due to plasmon resonance energy transfer from the nanocone substrate to the nearby fluorophore. We observed three-dimensional fluorescence enhancement on our substrate shown from the confocal fluorescence imaging of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown on the substrate. The fluorescence intensity from the fluorophores bound on the cell membrane was amplified more than 100-fold as compared to that on a glass substrate. We believe that strong scattering within the nanostructured area coupled with random scattering inside the cell resulted in the observed three-dimensional enhancement in fluorescence with higher photostability on the substrate surface.

  20. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  1. Determining a fluorophore's transition dipole moment from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solvents of varying refractive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Pei-Hua; Tregidgo, Carolyn; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-11-11

    The transition dipole moment of organic dyes PM546 and rhodamine 123 is calculated from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solutions of different refractive index. A model proposed by Toptygin et al (2002 J. Phys. Chem. B 106 3724-34) provides a relationship between the radiative rate constant and refractive index of the solvent, and allows the electronic transition dipole moments to be found: it is (7.1  ±  1.1) D for PM546 which matches that found in the literature, and (8.1  ±  0.1) D for rhodamine 123. Toptygin's model goes further in predicting the shape of the fluorescent dye and here we predict the shape of PM546 and rhodamine 123 to be ellipsoidal.

  2. New insights in the interpretation of tryptophan fluorescence : origin of the fluorescence lifetime and characterization of a new fluorescence parameter in proteins: the emission to excitation ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, J R

    2007-07-01

    Origin of tryptophan fluorescence is still up to these days a quiz which is not completely solved. Fluorescence emission properties of tryptophan within proteins are in general considered as the result of fluorophore interaction within its environment. For example, a low fluorescence quantum yield is supposed to be the consequence of an important fluorophore-environment interaction. However, are we sure that the fluorophore has been excited upon light absorption? What if fluorophore excitation did not occur as the result of internal conformation specific to the fluorophore environment? Are we sure that all absorbed energy is used for the excitation process? Fluorescence lifetimes of Trp residues are considered to originate from rotamers or conformers resulting from the rotation of the indole ring within the peptide bonds. However, how can we explain the fact that in most of the proteins, the two lifetimes 0.5 and 3 ns, attributed to the conformers, are also observed for free tryptophan in solution? The present work, performed on free tryptophan and tyrosine in solution and on different proteins, shows that absorption and excitation spectra overlap but their intensities at the different excitation wavelengths are not necessarily equal. Also, we found that fluorescence emission intensities recorded at different excitation wavelengths depend on the intensities at these excitation wavelengths and not on the optical densities. Thus, excitation is not equal to absorption. In our interpretation of the data, we consider that absorbed photons are not necessary used only for the excitation, part of them are used to reorganize fluorophore molecules in a new state (excited structure) and another part is used for the excitation process. A new parameter that characterizes the ratio of the number of emitted photons over the real number of photons used to excite the fluorophore can be defined. We call this parameter, the emission to excitation ratio. Since our results were

  3. Fluorescence goggle for intraoperative breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Bauer, Adam Q.; Akers, Walter; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Charanya, Tauseef; Mondal, Suman; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a fluorescence goggle device for intraoperative oncologic imaging. With our system design, the surgeon can directly visualize the fluorescence information from the eyepieces in real time without any additional monitor, which can improve one's coordination and surgical accuracy. In conjunction with targeting fluorescent dyes, the goggle device can successfully detect tumor margins and small nodules that are not obvious to naked eye. This can potentially decrease the incidence of incomplete resection.

  4. Determination of the modulation transfer function for a time-gated fluorescence imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundy, Sarah; Van der Putten, Wil; Shearer, Andy; Buckton, Daniel; Ryder, Alan G

    2004-01-01

    The use of fluorescence for cancer detection is currently under investigation. Presently, steady-state fluorescence detection methods are in use, but have limitations due to poor contrast between the fluorescence of the tumor and background autofluorescence. Improved contrast can be obtained with time-resolved techniques because of the differing lifetimes between autofluorescence and exogenous photosensitizers that selectively accumulate within tumor tissue. An imaging system is constructed using a fast-gated (200-ps) charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and a pulsed 635-nm laser diode. To characterize the ability of the system to transfer object contrast to an image, the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system is acquired by employing an extended knife-edge technique. A knife-edge target is assembled by drilling a rectangular well into a block of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The imaging system records images of the photosensitizer, chloroaluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcTS), within the well. AlPcTS was chosen to test the system because of its strong absorption of 635-nm, high fluorescence yield, and relatively long fluorescence lifetime (approximately 7.5 ns). The results show that the system is capable of resolving 10(-4) M AlPcTS fluorescence as small as 1 mm. The findings of this study contribute to the development of a time-gated imaging system using fluorescence lifetimes. Copyright 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  5. Novel fluorescent carbonic nanomaterials for sensing and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, Alexander P.; Dekaliuk, Mariia O.

    2013-12-01

    Small brightly fluorescent carbon nanoparticles have emerged as a new class of materials important for sensing and imaging applications. We analyze comparatively the properties of nanodiamonds, graphene and graphene oxide ‘dots’, of modified carbon nanotubes and of diverse carbon nanoparticles known as ‘C-dots’ obtained by different methods. The mechanisms of their light absorption and luminescence emission are still unresolved and the arguments are presented for their common origin. Regarding present and potential applications, we provide critical comparison with the other types of fluorescence reporters, such as organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots. Their most prospective applications in sensing (based on the changes of intensity, FRET and lifetime) and in imaging technologies on the level of living cells and whole bodies are overviewed. The possibilities for design on their basis of multifunctional nanocomposites on a broader scale of theranostics are outlined.

  6. Imaging an atomic beam using fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming He(何明); Jin Wang(王谨); Mingsheng Zhan(詹明生)

    2003-01-01

    A fluorescence detection scheme is applied to image an atomic beam. Using two laser diodes as the sources of detection light and pumping light respectively, the fluorescence image of the atomic beam is then observed by a commercial CCD-camera, which is corresponding to the atomic state and velocity distribution. The detection scheme has a great utilization in the experiments of cold atoms and atomic optics.

  7. Fluorescence lifetimes of tryptophan: structural origin and relation with So --> 1Lb and So --> 1La transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, Jihad René

    2009-11-01

    We measured fluorescence lifetimes of L-Tryptophan dissolved in de-ionized water and in ethanol in the absence and the presence of high progesterone concentrations. The hormone absorbs between 220 and 280 with a peak around 250 nm, while its absorption is equal to zero beyond 280 nm. Tryptophan excitation spectrum recorded in presence of progesterone shows that the S(o) --> 1L(a) transition is completely abolished while the S(o) --> 1L(b) transition is not affected. Emission of L-tryptophan in water occurs with two fluorescence lifetimes, 0.40 and 2.8 ns. In ethanol, three fluorescence lifetimes equal to around 0.2, 1.8 and 4.8 ns were observed. Addition of progesterone to the medium does not affect any of the fluorescence lifetimes indicating clearly that both transitions could induce tryptophan excitation and that recorded fluorescence lifetimes could be assigned to sub-structures generated in the excited state.

  8. Cancer detection by quantitative fluorescence image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, W L; Hemstreet, G P

    1988-02-01

    Quantitative fluorescence image analysis is a rapidly evolving biophysical cytochemical technology with the potential for multiple clinical and basic research applications. We report the application of this technique for bladder cancer detection and discuss its potential usefulness as an adjunct to methods used currently by urologists for the diagnosis and management of bladder cancer. Quantitative fluorescence image analysis is a cytological method that incorporates 2 diagnostic techniques, quantitation of nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid and morphometric analysis, in a single semiautomated system to facilitate the identification of rare events, that is individual cancer cells. When compared to routine cytopathology for detection of bladder cancer in symptomatic patients, quantitative fluorescence image analysis demonstrated greater sensitivity (76 versus 33 per cent) for the detection of low grade transitional cell carcinoma. The specificity of quantitative fluorescence image analysis in a small control group was 94 per cent and with the manual method for quantitation of absolute nuclear fluorescence intensity in the screening of high risk asymptomatic subjects the specificity was 96.7 per cent. The more familiar flow cytometry is another fluorescence technique for measurement of nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid. However, rather than identifying individual cancer cells, flow cytometry identifies cellular pattern distributions, that is the ratio of normal to abnormal cells. Numerous studies by others have shown that flow cytometry is a sensitive method to monitor patients with diagnosed urological disease. Based upon results in separate quantitative fluorescence image analysis and flow cytometry studies, it appears that these 2 fluorescence techniques may be complementary tools for urological screening, diagnosis and management, and that they also may be useful separately or in combination to elucidate the oncogenic process, determine the biological potential of tumors

  9. Label-free separation of human embryonic stem cells and their differentiating progenies by phasor fluorescence lifetime microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringari, Chiara; Sierra, Robert; Donovan, Peter J.; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-04-01

    We develop a label-free optical technique to image and discriminate undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) from their differentiating progenies in vitro. Using intrinsic cellular fluorophores, we perform fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) and phasor analysis to obtain hESC metabolic signatures. We identify two optical biomarkers to define the differentiation status of hESCs: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and lipid droplet-associated granules (LDAGs). These granules have a unique lifetime signature and could be formed by the interaction of reactive oxygen species and unsaturated metabolic precursor that are known to be abundant in hESC. Changes in the relative concentrations of these two intrinsic biomarkers allow for the discrimination of undifferentiated hESCs from differentiating hESCs. During early hESC differentiation we show that NADH concentrations increase, while the concentration of LDAGs decrease. These results are in agreement with a decrease in oxidative phosphorylation rate. Single-cell phasor FLIM signatures reveal an increased heterogeneity in the metabolic states of differentiating H9 and H1 hESC colonies. This technique is a promising noninvasive tool to monitor hESC metabolism during differentiation, which can have applications in high throughput analysis, drug screening, functional metabolomics and induced pluripotent stem cell generation.

  10. Steam-sterilizable, fluorescence lifetime-based sensing film for dissolved carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Q; Randers-Eichhorn, L; Lakowicz, J R; Rao, G

    1998-01-01

    An autoclavable sensing film was developed for monitoring dissolved CO2. The sensing film, based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), consisted of a fluorescent donor, an acceptor, and a quaternary ammonium hydroxide, which were doped in a two-component silicone film. As no aqueous solution was used in the sensing film matrix, the sensing film was unaffected by osmotic pressure. Fluorescence lifetime was selected as the sensing parameter, and measured in frequency domain using phase fluorometry. Upon exposure to 20% CO2-saturated water, a 43 degrees increase in phase angle was observed at 100 MHz. The process was fully reversible when the sensing film was exposed to nitrogen-saturated water. The estimated response and recovery times for 90% signal change were 1 min (for a step change from 0 to 6.7% CO2-saturated water) and 1.5 min (for a step change from 6.7 to 3.3% CO2-saturated water). When used for on-line monitoring of dissolved CO2 produced by a culture of Escherichia coli, the sensing film showed a similar trend to that obtained from off-line measurements using a wet chemistry analyzer.

  11. Time-domain imaging with quench-based fluorescent contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Walter J.; Solomon, Metasebya; Sudlow, Gail P.; Berezin, Mikhail; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Quench-based probes utilize unique characteristics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to enhance contrast upon de-quenching. This mechanism has been used in a variety of molecular probes for imaging of cancer related enzyme activity such as matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins and caspases. While non-fluorescent upon administration, fluorescence can be restored by separation of donor and acceptor, resulting in higher intensity in the presence of activator. Along with decreased quantum yield, FRET also results in altered fluorescence lifetime. Time-domain imaging can further enhance contrast and information yield from quench-based probes. We present in vivo time-domain imaging for detecting activation of quench-based probes. Quench-based probes utilize unique characteristics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to enhance contrast upon de-quenching. This mechanism has been used in a variety of molecular probes for imaging of cancer related enzyme activity such as matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins and caspases. While non-fluorescent upon administration, fluorescence can be restored by separation of donor and acceptor, resulting in higher intensity in the presence of activator. Along with decreased quantum yield, FRET also results in altered fluorescence lifetime. Time-domain imaging can further enhance contrast and information yield from quench-based probes. We present in vivo time-domain imaging for detecting activation of quench-based probes. Time-domain diffuse optical imaging was performed to assess the FRET and quenching in living mice with orthotopic breast cancer. Tumor contrast enhancement was accompanied by increased fluorescence lifetime after administration of quenched probes selective for matrix metalloproteinases while no significant change was observed for non-quenched probes for integrin receptors. These results demonstrate the utility of timedomain imaging for detection of cancer-related enzyme activity in vivo.

  12. Multiparameter fluorescence spectroscopic imaging of cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Gary R.

    1994-08-01

    The ability to quantitate physiological parameters in single living cells using fluorescence spectroscopic imaging has expanded our understanding of many cell regulatory processes. Previous studies have focussed on the measurement of single parameters, such as the concentration of calcium, and more recently two parameters, such as calcium and pH using fluorescence ratio imaging. The complexity of the interrelationships among cell biochemical reactions suggests a need to extend the measurement scheme to several parameters. Expansion of the number of parameters involves several complexities associated with fluorescent probe selection and instrumentation design as well as the processing and management of the data. A system has been assembled which provides maximum flexibility in multiparameter fluorescence imaging measurements. The system provides multiple combinations of excitation, dichroic mirror, and emission wavelengths. It has automatic acquisition of any number of parameters. The number of parameters is primarily limited by the selection of fluorescent probes with nonoverlapping spectra. We demonstrate the utility of the system by the coordinated monitoring of stimulated changes in the concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and pH using fluorescence ratio imaging coupled with a conventional transmitted light image of single smooth muscle cells. The results demonstrate coordinated changes in some instances but uncoordinated changes in others.

  13. Hyperspectral Fluorescence and Reflectance Imaging Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Robert E.; O'Neal, S. Duane; Lanoue, Mark; Russell, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    The system is a single hyperspectral imaging instrument that has the unique capability to acquire both fluorescence and reflectance high-spatial-resolution data that is inherently spatially and spectrally registered. Potential uses of this instrument include plant stress monitoring, counterfeit document detection, biomedical imaging, forensic imaging, and general materials identification. Until now, reflectance and fluorescence spectral imaging have been performed by separate instruments. Neither a reflectance spectral image nor a fluorescence spectral image alone yields as much information about a target surface as does a combination of the two modalities. Before this system was developed, to benefit from this combination, analysts needed to perform time-consuming post-processing efforts to co-register the reflective and fluorescence information. With this instrument, the inherent spatial and spectral registration of the reflectance and fluorescence images minimizes the need for this post-processing step. The main challenge for this technology is to detect the fluorescence signal in the presence of a much stronger reflectance signal. To meet this challenge, the instrument modulates artificial light sources from ultraviolet through the visible to the near-infrared part of the spectrum; in this way, both the reflective and fluorescence signals can be measured through differencing processes to optimize fluorescence and reflectance spectra as needed. The main functional components of the instrument are a hyperspectral imager, an illumination system, and an image-plane scanner. The hyperspectral imager is a one-dimensional (line) imaging spectrometer that includes a spectrally dispersive element and a two-dimensional focal plane detector array. The spectral range of the current imaging spectrometer is between 400 to 1,000 nm, and the wavelength resolution is approximately 3 nm. The illumination system consists of narrowband blue, ultraviolet, and other discrete

  14. Carrier Lifetimes in Fluorescent 6H-SiC for LEDs Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivickas, Vytautas; Gulbinas, Karolis; Jokubavičius, Valdas

    Recently it was shown a new approach based on all-semiconductor material technology which is composed with a near ultra-violet GaN LED excitation source and fluorescent silicon carbide (f-6H-SiC) substrate which generates a visible broad spectral light by N and B dopants and an efficient donor...... to acceptor pair recombination [1,2]. This combination can achieve higher electric-light conversion efficiency and high color rendering in comparison with today’s used blue GaN LED based and phosphors. The devices are promising candidates for general lightning applications and may obtain stability....../reproducibility, and potentially low cost in high performance LEDs. However, there are still many problems to obtain best optimization for f-6H-SiC material since neither carrier transport, nor the carrier recombination is known in such co-doped carbides. From the existing data of carrier lifetimes in the SiC materials...

  15. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-02-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  16. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime and acrylamide quenching studies of the interactions between troponin subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavis, P C; Gowell, E; Tao, T

    1984-08-28

    Fluorescence lifetime and acrylamide quenching studies were carried out to characterize the interactions between the subunits of troponin under various conditions of metal ion binding. Troponin C was labeled at Cys-98 with N-(iodoacetyl)-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine. In the presence of Ca2+, the fluorescence decay of labeled troponin C (TnC*) was monoexponential, lifetime tau = 15.5 ns and quenching rate constant kq = 2.97 X 10(8) M-1 s-1. In the absence of Ca2+, the decay was resolvable into a major component with tau = 11.9 ns and a minor component with tau = 20.5 ns, with corresponding values of kq = 4.80 X 10(8) and 0.66 X 10(8) M-1 s-1, respectively. Upon the binding of either troponin I (TnI) or troponin T (TnT) in the presence of Ca2+, tau increased to approximately 18 ns, and kq decreased to approximately 0.8 X 10(8) M-1 s-1. For the Ca2+ form of the TnC*-TnI-TnT ternary complex, values of tau = 17.6 ns and kq = 1.73 X 10(8) M-1 s-1 were obtained. These values did not vary significantly when Ca2+ was removed, or when Mg2+ replaced Ca2+. These findings were interpreted as follows: the region around Cys-98 of TnC* adopts a looser conformation upon the removal of Ca2+ from the high-affinity sites. Both TnI and TnT bind to TnC* in the region containing Cys-98. The probe is shielded from the solvent to a greater extent in the binary complexes than in the ternary complex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Fluorescence liftime imaging (FLIM) using ps-pulsed diode lasers in laser scanning microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruck, Angelika C.; Dolp, Frank; Happ, Claudia; Steiner, Rudolf; Beil, Michael

    2003-06-01

    A setup consisting on a laser scanning microscope equipped with appropriate detection units was developed for time-resolved intracellular fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for on-line detection of structural changes of various biomolecules. Short-pulsed excitation was performed with a diode laser which emits pulses at 398 nm with 70 ps duration. The laser was coupled to the laser scanning microscope. For time resolved spectroscopy a setup consisting of an Czerny Turner spectrometer and a MCP-gated and -intensified CCD camera was used. Time-gated spectra within the cells were acquired by placing the laser beam in "spot scan" mode. In addition, a time-correlated single photon counting module was used to determine the fluorescence lifetime from single spots and to record lifetime images (τ-mapping). The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of 5-ALA (5-aminolevulinic-acid), as well as 5-ALAhe (5-aminolevulinic-acid-hexylester)- induced protoporphyrine IX (PPIX) were investigated before and during PDT with subcellular resolution. For cells which were incubated with 5-ALA, a component with a fluorescence lifetime of about 7 ns was correlated with a structured fluorescence, which probably coincides with mitochondria, whereas a shorter lifetime was found in the cytoplasm. In the case of 5-ALAhe the lifetime of PPIX was longer, which could be due to different localization. During PDT the component with the longer lifetime completely vanished, whereas the shorter liftime was retained. It seems that FLIM is a valuable method to selectively identify and localize the photodynamically active photosensitizer.

  19. Fluorescence imaging of soybean flavonol isolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Edward H.; Mulchi, Charles L.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Rowland, Randy A.

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize the fluorescence emission of leaves from four soybean ('Harosoy') plants containing different concentrations of flavonols (kaempferol glycosides). The investigation utilized genetically mutated soybean flavonol isolines grown in a constant environment, thus limiting factors known to affect fluorescence emission characteristics other than different kaempferol glycosides concentrations. Flavonol isolines included OX922, OX941, OX942, OX944. The first two isolines contain kaempferol (K) glycosides; K3, K6, and K9, and the latter two did not have K3, K6, and K9. A fluorescence imaging system (FIS) was used to characterize steady state florescence images of the sample leaves measured at wavelengths centered at 450, 550, 680, and 740 nm with an excitation at 360 nm. Images taken with FIS greatly complement non-imaging fluorescence measurements by characterizing the spatial variation of fluorescence within leaves. We also acquired fluorescence emission spectra to characterize spectral features of the soybean flavonol isolines. The emission spectral shape of the fluorescence emission characteristics were not significantly different between the soybeans that contain kaempferol glycosides and the ones that do not contain kaempferol glycosides. Typical emission maxima of green vegetation in the blue, green, red, and far-red bands were noticed in all four soybean isolines. However, plants containing kaempferol glycosides, OX922 and OX941 had significantly lower intensities throughout the wavelength regions. These results imply that fluorescence emission intensities in the fluorescence emission bands studied are significantly affected by the presence and absence of kaempferol glycosides concentrations (UV radiation screening compounds). Pure kaempferol glycoside dissolved in solution show minimal fluorescence emission when excited with the absorption maximum radiation at 365 nm. However, a broad band emission can be seen in the green

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  1. Measurement of radiative lifetime in atomic samarium using simultaneous detection of laser-induced fluorescence and photoionization signals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A C Sahoo; M L Shah; P K Mandal; A K Pulhani; G P Gupta; Vas Dev; B M Suri

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we report the investigations of lifetime measurement of odd-parity energy level 19009.52 cm-1 of Sm I using simultaneous detection of laser-induced fluorescence and laserinduced photoionization signals employing pump–probe technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is for the first time that the results obtained using laser-induced fluorescence and photoionization techniques have been compared with each other. The obtained results match well with those reported in the literature.

  2. In vivo time-gated fluorescence imaging with biodegradable luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Luo; Hall, David J; Qin, Zhengtao; Anglin, Emily; Joo, Jinmyoung; Mooney, David J; Howell, Stephen B; Sailor, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is one of the most versatile and widely used visualization methods in biomedical research. However, tissue autofluorescence is a major obstacle confounding interpretation of in vivo fluorescence images. The unusually long emission lifetime (5-13 μs) of photoluminescent porous silicon nanoparticles can allow the time-gated imaging of tissues in vivo, completely eliminating shorter-lived (50-fold in vitro and by >20-fold in vivo when imaging porous silicon nanoparticles. Time-gated imaging of porous silicon nanoparticles accumulated in a human ovarian cancer xenograft following intravenous injection is demonstrated in a live mouse. The potential for multiplexing of images in the time domain by using separate porous silicon nanoparticles engineered with different excited state lifetimes is discussed.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2014-02-01

    The multiphoton FLIM tomograph MPTflex with its flexible scan head, articulated arm, and the tunable femtosecond laser source was employed to study cell monolayers and 3D cell clusters. FLIM was performed with 250 ps temporal resolution and submicron special resolution using time-correlated single photon counting. The autofluorescence based on NAD(P)H and flavins/flavoproteins has been measured in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) originated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts and non-proliferative mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

  4. Charge carrier Density Imaging / IR lifetime mapping of Si wafers by Lock-In Thermography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Tempel, L.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Minority carrier lifetime imaging by lock-in thermography of passivated silicon wafers for photovoltaic cells has been developed for the public Pieken in de Delta project geZONd. CONCLUSIONS Minority carrier lifetime imaging by lock-in thermography of passivatedsilicon wafers is released

  5. Charge carrier Density Imaging / IR lifetime mapping of Si wafers by Lock-In Thermography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Tempel, L.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Minority carrier lifetime imaging by lock-in thermography of passivated silicon wafers for photovoltaic cells has been developed for the public Pieken in de Delta project geZONd. CONCLUSIONS Minority carrier lifetime imaging by lock-in thermography of passivatedsilicon wafers is released t

  6. Noninvasive tumor oxygen imaging by photoacoustic lifetime imaging integrated with photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qi; Biel, Merrill A.; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-03-01

    Oxygen plays a major role in cancer biology and tumor progression. In PDT, the reduction in efficacy is directly related to lack of oxygen because its molecular mechanism relies on oxygen as an energy mediator. Measuring tumor oxygenation can provide physicians with better diagnosis and optimization of treatment plans. However, clinical tools for directly assessing tissue oxygenation are limited. The gold standard is oxygen needle electrode, which is invasive and measures oxygen level at a single location. We present our work on developing a combined treatment-imaging modality that integrates PDT and photoacoustic oxygen imaging. We propose a system designed for clinical treatments of cancer of the oral cavity. Tissue oxygen imaging is performed by applying Photoacoustic Lifetime Imaging (PALI). This technology relies on photoacoustic probing of oxygen-dependent excitation lifetime of Methylene Blue. The dye is excited by the same wavelength of illumination source for PDT. Once excited, the population of photosensitizer molecules at triplet state has a lifetime depending on the oxygen level. The transition from excited triplet state to ground state can be probe by another laser, which generate photoacoustic signal that is used to map the lifetime. The lifetime map is then converted to pO2 distribution. We expect that PDT efficacy can be improved by applying PALI imaging feedback in real-time to determine, and individually optimize, O2-enriched gas breathing parameters and PDT light-dose during treatment. Successful implementation of PALI in PDT can also drive its application in guiding other cancer treatments that are affected by hypoxia.

  7. Two photon fluorescence imaging of lipid membrane domains and potentials using advanced fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilin, Vasyl; Darwich, Zeinab; Richert, Ludovic; Didier, Pascal; Klymchenko, Andrey; Mély, Yves

    2013-02-01

    Biomembranes are ordered and dynamic nanoscale structures critical for cell functions. The biological functions of the membranes strongly depend on their physicochemical properties, such as electrostatics, phase state, viscosity, polarity and hydration. These properties are essential for the membrane structure and the proper folding and function of membrane proteins. To monitor these properties, fluorescence techniques and notably, two-photon microscopy appear highly suited due to their exquisite sensitivity and their capability to operate in complex biological systems, such as living cells and tissues. In this context, we have developed multiparametric environment-sensitive fluorescent probes tailored for precise location in the membrane bilayer. We notably developed probes of the 3-hydroxychromone family, characterized by an excited state intramolecular proton transfer reaction, which generates two tautomeric emissive species with well-separated emission bands. As a consequence, the response of these probes to changes in their environment could be monitored through changes in the ratios of the two bands, as well as through changes in the fluorescence lifetimes. Using two-photon ratiometric imaging and FLIM, these probes were used to monitor the surface membrane potential, and were applied to detect apoptotic cells and image membrane domains.

  8. Technique of Hadamard transform microscope fluorescence image analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅二文; 顾文芳; 曾晓斌; 陈观铨; 曾云鹗

    1995-01-01

    Hadamard transform spatial multiplexed imaging technique is combined with fluorescence microscope and an instrument of Hadamard transform microscope fluorescence image analysis is developed. Images acquired by this instrument can provide a lot of useful information simultaneously, including three-dimensional Hadamard transform microscope cell fluorescence image, the fluorescence intensity and fluorescence distribution of a cell, the background signal intensity and the signal/noise ratio, etc.

  9. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yankelevich, Diego R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, 3101 Kemper Hall, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura, E-mail: lmarcu@ucdavis.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Elson, Daniel S. [Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence

  10. Nanoparticles and nanocomposites for fluorescence sensing and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, Alexander P.

    2013-06-01

    The assortment of fluorescence reporters is changing dramatically. Traditionally explored intrinsic fluorescence of biological macromolecules and cellular pigments and of externally introduced organic dyes are presently in strong competition with new nanomaterials. Among them are conjugated polymers, semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots), up-converting nanocrystals, magic-size clusters of silver and gold, nanodiamonds and carbon dots. They demonstrate diverse photophysical behavior and allow one to obtain diverse information when used in analytical tools or when they form images in biological systems. Based on them, functional nanocomposites displaying a variety of useful features, thus extending dramatically the information content of output data, can be constructed. We describe their properties and compare them with those of small-molecular emitters, such as organic dyes. With their aid, one can modulate over a wide range the wavelengths of excitation and emission, the lifetimes and anisotropies and design the systems with ‘superenhancement’ and ‘superquenching’. Such unlimited possibilities are offered by combining different types of luminophores based on electronic conjugation, plasmonic effects or excited-state resonance energy transfer. This tutorial review provides a comparative analysis of the properties of new nanoscale materials and of their hybrid nanocomposites for applications in fluorescence sensing and imaging.

  11. Confirmation of temperature independence in the fluorescence lifetime of the 3P 0 → 3F 2 transition in praseodymium-doped fluoride glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thinh B.; Vella, Vince; Baxter, Greg W.; Collins, Stephen F.; Newman, Peter J.; MacFarlane, Douglas R.

    2006-05-01

    The dependence of the fluorescence lifetime from the 3P0 → 3F2 transition in praseodymium-doped fluoride glass as a function of dopant concentration and temperature was investigated. It was found that the fluorescence lifetime at the concentration of 7000 ppm was constant with temperature, confirming the prediction of temperature independence in the lifetime for this transition in Pr3+-doped ZBLAN glass.

  12. Intracellular Monitoring of AS1411 Aptamer by Time-Resolved Microspectrofluorimetry and Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočišová, Eva; Praus, Petr; Bok, Jiří; Bonneau, Stéphanie; Sureau, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Time-resolved microspectrofluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy imaging-two complementary fluorescence techniques-provide important information about the intracellular distribution, level of uptake and binding/interactions inside living cell of the labeled molecule of interest. They were employed to monitor the "fate" of AS1411 aptamer labeled by ATTO 425 in human living cells. Confocal microspectrofluorimeter adapted for time-resolved intracellular fluorescence measurements by using a phase-modulation principle with homodyne data acquisition was employed to obtain emission spectra and to determine fluorescence lifetimes in U-87 MG tumor brain cells and Hs68 non-tumor foreskin cells. Acquired spectra from both the intracellular space and the reference solutions were treated to observe the aptamer localization and its interaction with biological structures inside the living cell. The emission spectra and the maximum emission wavelengths coming from the cells are practically identical, however significant lifetime lengthening was observed for tumor cell line in comparison to non-tumor one.

  13. Improved maximum entropy method for the analysis of fluorescence spectroscopy data: evaluating zero-time shift and assessing its effect on the determination of fluorescence lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Rosario; Mensitieri, Giuseppe; de Nicola, Sergio

    2015-12-21

    A new algorithm based on the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) is proposed for recovering both the lifetime distribution and the zero-time shift from time-resolved fluorescence decay intensities. The developed algorithm allows the analysis of complex time decays through an iterative scheme based on entropy maximization and the Brent method to determine the minimum of the reduced chi-squared value as a function of the zero-time shift. The accuracy of this algorithm has been assessed through comparisons with simulated fluorescence decays both of multi-exponential and broad lifetime distributions for different values of the zero-time shift. The method is capable of recovering the zero-time shift with an accuracy greater than 0.2% over a time range of 2000 ps. The center and the width of the lifetime distributions are retrieved with relative discrepancies that are lower than 0.1% and 1% for the multi-exponential and continuous lifetime distributions, respectively. The MEM algorithm is experimentally validated by applying the method to fluorescence measurements of the time decays of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD).

  14. Cyanine-loaded lipid nanoparticles for improved in vivo fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texier, Isabelle; Goutayer, Mathieu; da Silva, Anabela; Guyon, Laurent; Djaker, Nadia; Josserand, Véronique; Neumann, Emmanuelle; Bibette, Jérôme; Vinet, Françoise

    2009-09-01

    Fluorescence is a very promising radioactive-free technique for functional imaging in small animals and, in the future, in humans. However, most commercial near-infrared dyes display poor optical properties, such as low fluorescence quantum yields and short fluorescence lifetimes. In this paper, we explore whether the encapsulation of infrared cyanine dyes within the core of lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) could improve their optical properties. Lipophilic dialkylcarbocyanines DiD and DiR are loaded very efficiently in 30-35-nm-diam lipid droplets stabilized in water by surfactants. No significant fluorescence autoquenching is observed up to 53 dyes per particle. Encapsulated in LNP, which are stable for more than one year at room temperature in HBS buffer (HEPES 0.02 M, EDTA 0.01 M, pH 5.5), DiD and DiR display far improved fluorescence quantum yields Φ (respectively, 0.38 and 0.25) and longer fluorescence lifetimes τ (respectively, 1.8 and 1.1 ns) in comparison to their hydrophilic counterparts Cy5 (φ=0.28, τ=1.0 ns) and Cy7 (φ=0.13, τ=0.57 ns). Moreover, dye-loaded LNPs are able to accumulate passively in various subcutaneous tumors in mice, thanks to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. These new fluorescent nanoparticles therefore appear as very promising labels for in vivo fluorescence imaging.

  15. Developing an imaging bi-spectrometer for fluorescent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mahnaz

    Fluorescent effects have been observed for thousands of years. Stokes, in 1852, began the science of fluorescence culminating in his law of fluorescence, which explained that fluorescence emission occurs at longer wavelengths than the excitation wavelength. This phenomenon is observed extensively in the art world. Daylight fluorescent colors known as Day-GloRTM have become an artistic medium since the 1960s. Modern artists exploit these saturated and brilliant colors to glitter their painting. Multipsectral imaging as a noninvasive technique has been used for archiving by museums and cultural-heritage institutions for about a decade. The complex fluorescence phenomenon has been often ignored in the multispectral projects. The ignored fluorescence results in errors in digital imaging of artwork containing fluorescent colors. The illuminant-dependency of the fluorescence radiance makes the fluorescence colorimetry and consequently spectral imaging more complex. In this dissertation an abridged imaging bi-spectrometer for artwork containing both fluorescent and non-fluorescent colors was developed. The method developed included two stages of reconstruction of the spectral reflected radiance factor and prediction of the fluorescent radiance factor. The estimation of the reflected radiance factor as a light source independent component was achieved by imaging with a series of short-wavelength cutoff filters placed in the illumination path. The fluorescent radiance factor, a light source dependent component, was estimated based on a proposed model, the abridged two-monochromator method. The abridged two-monochromator method was developed for reconstructing the bi-spectral matrix of a fluorescent color based on a calibrated UV-fluorescence imaging. In this way, one could predict the fluorescence radiance factor under any desired illuminant and consequently a better color evaluation and rendering could be obtained. Furthermore, this method easily fitted in a general system

  16. Fluorescent metal nanoshell and CK19 detection on single cell image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jian, E-mail: jian@cfs.biomet.umaryland.edu [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Fu, Yi [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Li, Ge [Division of Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Lakowicz, Joseph R. [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zhao, Richard Y., E-mail: rzhao@som.umaryland.edu [Division of Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Microbiology-Immunology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} Novel metal nanoshell as fluorescence imaging agent. {yields} Fluorescent mAb-metal complex with enhanced intensity and shortened lifetime. {yields} Immuno-interactions of mAb-metal complexes with CK19 molecules on CNCAP and HeLa cell surfaces. {yields} Isolation of conjugated mAb-metal complexes from cellular autofluorescence on cell image. -- Abstract: In this article, we report the synthesis strategy and optical properties of a novel type of fluorescence metal nanoshell when it was used as imaging agent for fluorescence cell imaging. The metal nanoshells were made with 40 nm silica cores and 10 nm silver shells. Unlike typical fluorescence metal nanoshells which contain the organic dyes in the cores, novel metal nanoshells were composed of Cy5-labelled monoclonal anti-CK19 antibodies (mAbs) on the external surfaces of shells. Optical measurements to the single nanoparticles showed that in comparison with the metal free labelled mAbs, the mAb-Ag complexes displayed significantly enhanced emission intensity and dramatically shortened lifetime due to near-field interactions of fluorophores with metal. These metal nanoshells were found to be able to immunoreact with target cytokeratin 19 (CK19) molecules on the surfaces of LNCAP and HeLa cells. Fluorescence cell images were recorded on a time-resolved confocal microscope. The emissions from the metal nanoprobes could be clearly isolated from the cellular autofluorescence backgrounds on the cell images as either individuals or small clusters due to their stronger emission intensities and shorter lifetimes. These emission signals could also be precisely counted on single cell images. The count number may provide an approach for quantifying the target molecules in the cells.

  17. Room-temperature fluorescence lifetime of pseudoisocyanine (PIC) J excitons with various aggregate morphologies in relation to microcavity polariton formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Yuki; Saitoh, Keita; Oda, Masaru; Tani, Toshiro

    2012-01-01

    The results of room-temperature fluorescence lifetime measurements are reported for the excitation of J aggregates (Js) of pseudoisocyanine chloride (PIC-Cl) prepared in potassium polyvinyl sulfate (PVS) polymer thin films, their aqueous solutions, and NaCl aqueous solutions. Variations of the microscopic morphologies of the aggregates were investigated. The results show that fluorescence decay features correlated to the morphology change. The observed fluorescence lifetime and quantum efficiency of PIC J aggregates (PIC-Js) in a NaCl aqueous solution were 310 ps and 28%, respectively. The lifetime of the fibril-shaped macroaggregates prepared in PVS thin films was below the instrumental time resolution of 5 ps, and the efficiency decreased to below 3%. The results indicate that PIC-Js prepared with PVS polymers have an increased nonradiative contribution to the excitation deactivation process. In particular, macro-Js with isolated fibril-shaped structures revealed nonradiative pathway(s) that are closely associated to the specific packaging morphology of the constituent meso-Js. The possibility of a destructive effect on the formation of cavity-polaritons is also discussed.

  18. Fluorescence confocal endomicroscopy in biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Peter; Thomas, Steven; Allen, John; McLaren, Wendy; Murr, Elise; Harris, Martin

    2007-02-01

    In vivo fluorescence microscopic imaging of biological systems in human disease states and animal models is possible with high optical resolution and mega pixel point-scanning performance using optimised off-the-shelf turn-key devices. There are however various trade-offs between tissue access and instrument performance when miniaturising in vivo microscopy systems. A miniature confocal scanning technology that was developed for clinical human endoscopy has been configured into a portable device for direct hand-held interrogation of living tissue in whole animal models (Optiscan FIVE-1 system). Scanning probes of 6.3mm diameter with a distal tip diameter of 5.0mm were constructed either in a 150mm length for accessible tissue, or a 300mm probe for laparoscopic interrogation of internal tissues in larger animal models. Both devices collect fluorescence confocal images (excitation 488 nm; emission >505 or >550 nm) comprised of 1024 x 1204 sampling points/image frame, with lateral resolution 0.7um; axial resolution 7um; FOV 475 x 475um. The operator can dynamically control imaging depth from the tissue surface to approx 250um in 4um steps via an internally integrated zaxis actuator. Further miniaturisation is achieved using an imaging contact probe based on scanning the proximal end of a high-density optical fibre bundle (~30,000 fibres) of sheep and pigs was fluorescently stained with calcein-AM or fluorescein. Surface and sub-surface cellular and sub-cellular details could be readily visualised in vivo at high resolution. In rodent disease models, in vivo endomicroscopy with appropriate fluorescent agents allowed examination of thrombosis formation, tumour microvasculature and liver metastases, diagnosis and staging of ulcerative colitis, liver necrosis and glomerulonephritis. Miniaturised confocal endomicroscopy allows rapid in vivo molecular and subsurface microscopy of normal and pathologic tissue at high resolution in small and large whole animal models

  19. A corrected likelihood approach for the nonlinear transformation model with application to fluorescence lifetime measurements using exponential mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebafka, Tabea; Roueff, François; Souloumiac, Antoine

    2010-01-01

    A fast and efficient estimation method is proposed that compensates the distortion in nonlinear transformation models. A likelihood-based estimator is developed that can be computed by an EM-type algorithm. The consistency of the estimator is shown and its limit distribution is provided. The new estimator is particularly well suited for fluorescence lifetime measurements, where only the shortest arrival time of a random number of emitted fluorescence photons can be detected and where arrival times are often modeled by a mixture of exponential distributions. The method is evaluated on real and synthetic data. Compared to currently used methods in fluorescence, the new estimator should allow a reduction of the acquisition time of an order of magnitude.

  20. Absorption, steady-state fluorescence, fluorescence lifetime, and 2D self-assembly properties of engineered fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, Birgit; Steiner, Kerstin; Möller, Marco; Pum, Dietmar; Schäffer, Christina; Sleytr, Uwe B; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2010-01-11

    S-layer fusion protein technology was used to design four different fluorescent fusion proteins with three different GFP mutants and the red fluorescent protein mRFP1. Their absorption spectra, steady-state fluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime were investigated as a function of pH. It was found that fluorescence intensities and lifetime of the GFP mutant S-layer fusion proteins decreased about 50% between pH 6 and pH 5. The spectral properties of the red S-layer fusion protein were minimally affected by pH variations. These results were compared with His-tagged reference fluorescent proteins, demonstrating that the S-layer protein did not change the general spectral properties of the whole fusion protein. In addition, the pK(a) values of the fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins were calculated. Finally, it was shown that the S-layer fusion proteins were able to self-assemble forming 2D nanostructures of oblique p2 symmetry with lattice parameters of about a = 11 nm, b = 14 nm, and gamma = 80 degrees . The fluorescence tag did not hinder the natural self-assembly process of the S-layer protein. The combination of the fluorescence properties and the self-assembly ability of the engineered fusion proteins make them a promising tool to generate biomimetic surfaces for future applications in nanobiotechnology at a wide range of pH.

  1. Fluorescent metal nanoshell and CK19 detection on single cell image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Zhao, Richard Y

    2011-09-16

    In this article, we report the synthesis strategy and optical properties of a novel type of fluorescence metal nanoshell when it was used as imaging agent for fluorescence cell imaging. The metal nanoshells were made with 40 nm silica cores and 10nm silver shells. Unlike typical fluorescence metal nanoshells which contain the organic dyes in the cores, novel metal nanoshells were composed of Cy5-labelled monoclonal anti-CK19 antibodies (mAbs) on the external surfaces of shells. Optical measurements to the single nanoparticles showed that in comparison with the metal free labelled mAbs, the mAb-Ag complexes displayed significantly enhanced emission intensity and dramatically shortened lifetime due to near-field interactions of fluorophores with metal. These metal nanoshells were found to be able to immunoreact with target cytokeratin 19 (CK19) molecules on the surfaces of LNCAP and HeLa cells. Fluorescence cell images were recorded on a time-resolved confocal microscope. The emissions from the metal nanoprobes could be clearly isolated from the cellular autofluorescence backgrounds on the cell images as either individuals or small clusters due to their stronger emission intensities and shorter lifetimes. These emission signals could also be precisely counted on single cell images. The count number may provide an approach for quantifying the target molecules in the cells.

  2. Free electron lifetime achievements in Liquid Argon Imaging TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Baibussinov, B; Calligarich, E; Centro, S; Cieslik, K; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, A; Meng, G; Pietropaolo, F; Rubbia, C; Varanini, F; Ventura, S

    2010-01-01

    A key feature for the success of the Liquid Argon TPC technology is the industrial purification against electro-negative impurities, especially Oxygen and Nitrogen remnants, which have to be initially and continuously kept at an exceptional purity. New purification techniques have been applied to a 120 litres LAr-TPC test facility in the INFN-LNL laboratory. Through-going muon tracks have been used to monitor the LAr purity. The short path length used (30 cm) is compensated by the high accuracy in the observation of the specific ionization of cosmic rays muons at sea level. A free electron lifetime of (21.4+7.3-4.3) ms, namely > 15.8 ms at 90 % C.L. has been observed under stable conditions over several weeks, corresponding to about 15 ppt (part per trillion) of Oxygen equivalent. At 500 V/cm, where the electron speed is approximately of 1.5 mm/us, the free electron lifetime >15 ms corresponds to an attenuation <15 % for a drift path of 5 m, opening the way to reliable operation of LAr TPC for exceptionall...

  3. Creating Panoramic Images for Bladder Fluorescence Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Behrens

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The medical diagnostic analysis and therapy of urinary bladder cancer based on endoscopes are state of the art in urological medicine. Due to the limited field of view of endoscopes, the physician can examine only a small part of the whole operating field at once. This constraint makes visual control and navigation difficult, especially in hollow organs. A panoramic image, covering a larger field of view, can overcome this difficulty. Directly motivated by a physician we developed an image mosaicing algorithm for endoscopic bladder fluorescence video sequences. In this paper, we present an approach which is capable of stitching single endoscopic video images to a combined panoramic image. Based on SIFT features we estimate a 2-D homography for each image pair, using an affine model and an iterative model-fitting algorithm. We then apply the stitching process and perform a mutual linear interpolation. Our panoramic image results show a correct stitching and lead to a better overview and understanding of the operation field. 

  4. Performance evaluation of spot detection algorithms in fluorescence microscopy images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Detection of messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) spots in fluorescence microscopy images is of great importance for biologists seeking better understanding of cell functionality. Fluorescence microscopy and specific staining methods make biological...

  5. 32-channel time-correlated-single-photon-counting system for high-throughput lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peronio, P.; Labanca, I.; Acconcia, G.; Ruggeri, A.; Lavdas, A. A.; Hicks, A. A.; Pramstaller, P. P.; Ghioni, M.; Rech, I.

    2017-08-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) is a very efficient technique for measuring weak and fast optical signals, but it is mainly limited by the relatively "long" measurement time. Multichannel systems have been developed in recent years aiming to overcome this limitation by managing several detectors or TCSPC devices in parallel. Nevertheless, if we look at state-of-the-art systems, there is still a strong trade-off between the parallelism level and performance: the higher the number of channels, the poorer the performance. In 2013, we presented a complete and compact 32 × 1 TCSPC system, composed of an array of 32 single-photon avalanche diodes connected to 32 time-to-amplitude converters, which showed that it was possible to overcome the existing trade-off. In this paper, we present an evolution of the previous work that is conceived for high-throughput fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. This application can be addressed by the new system thanks to a centralized logic, fast data management and an interface to a microscope. The new conceived hardware structure is presented, as well as the firmware developed to manage the operation of the module. Finally, preliminary results, obtained from the practical application of the technology, are shown to validate the developed system.

  6. Fluorescence lifetime and UV-Vis spectroscopy to evaluate the interactions between quercetin and its yeast microcapsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham-Hoang, Bao-Ngoc; Winckler, Pascale; Waché, Yves

    2017-09-09

    Quercetin is a fragile bioactive compound. Several works have tried to preserve it by encapsulation but the form of encapsulation (mono- or supra-molecular structure, tautomeric form), though important for stability and bioavailability, remains unknown. The present work aims at developing a fluorescence lifetime technique to evaluate the structure of quercetin during encapsulation in a vector capsule that has already proven efficiency, yeast cells. Molecular stabilization was observed during a four-month storage period. The time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique was used to evaluate the interaction between quercetin molecules and the yeast capsule. The various tautomeric forms, as identified by UV-Vis spectroscopy, resulted in various lifetimes in TCSPC, although they varied also with the buffer environment. Quercetin in buffer exhibited a three-to-four longer long time after 24 h (changing from 6-7 to 18-23 ns), suggesting an aggregation of molecules. In yeast microcapsules, the long-time population exhibited a longer lifetime (around 27 ns) from the beginning and concerned about 20% of molecules compared to dispersed quercetin. This shows that lifetime analysis can show the monomolecular instability of quercetin in buffer and the presence of interactions between quercetin molecules and their microcapsules. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. A Rotational BODIPY Nucleotide: An Environment-Sensitive Fluorescence-Lifetime Probe for DNA Interactions and Applications in Live-Cell Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, Dmytro; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Cebecauer, Marek; Hof, Martin; Hocek, Michal

    2016-01-04

    Fluorescent probes for detecting the physical properties of cellular structures have become valuable tools in life sciences. The fluorescence lifetime of molecular rotors can be used to report on variations in local molecular packing or viscosity. We used a nucleoside linked to a meso-substituted BODIPY fluorescent molecular rotor (dC(bdp)) to sense changes in DNA microenvironment both in vitro and in living cells. DNA incorporating dC(bdp) can respond to interactions with DNA-binding proteins and lipids by changes in the fluorescence lifetimes in the range 0.5-2.2 ns. We can directly visualize changes in the local environment of exogenous DNA during transfection of living cells. Relatively long fluorescence lifetimes and extensive contrast for detecting changes in the microenvironment together with good photostability and versatility for DNA synthesis make this probe suitable for analysis of DNA-associated processes, cellular structures, and also DNA-based nanomaterials.

  8. Smartphone microendoscopy for high resolution fluorescence imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Xiangqian; Mugler, Dale H; Yu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    High resolution optical endoscopes are increasingly used in diagnosis of various medical conditions of internal organs, such as the gastrointestinal tracts, but they are too expensive for use in resource-poor settings. On the other hand, smartphones with high resolution cameras and Internet access have become more affordable, enabling them to diffuse into most rural areas and developing countries in the past decade. In this letter we describe a smartphone microendoscope that can take fluorescence images with a spatial resolution of 3.1 {\\mu}m. Images collected from ex vivo, in vitro and in vivo samples using the device are also presented. The compact and cost-effective smartphone microendoscope may be envisaged as a powerful tool for detecting pre-cancerous lesions of internal organs in low and middle income countries.

  9. A novel multiwavelength fluorescence image-guided surgery imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, D.; Tullis, I. D. C.; Laios, A.; Pathiraja, P. N. J.; Haldar, K.; Ahmed, A. A.; Vojnovic, B.

    2014-02-01

    We describe the development and performance analysis of two clinical near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) devices that aim to overcome some of the limitations of current FIGS systems. The devices operate in a widefield-imaging mode and can work (1) in conjunction with a laparoscope, during minimally invasive surgery, and (2) as a hand-held, open surgery imaging system. In both cases, narrow-band excitation light, delivered at multiple wavelengths, is efficiently combined with white reflectance light. Light is delivered to ~100 cm2 surgical field at 1-2 mW/cm2 for white light and 3-7 mW/cm2 (depending on wavelength) of red - near infrared excitation, at a typical working distance of 350 mm for the hand-held device and 100 mm for the laparoscope. A single, sensitive, miniaturized color camera collects both fluorescence and white reflectance light. The use of a single imager eliminates image alignment and software overlay complexity. A novel filtering and illumination arrangement allows simultaneous detection of white reflectance and fluorescence emission from multiple dyes in real-time. We will present both fluorescence detection sensitivity modeling and practical performance data. We have demonstrated the efficiency and the advantages of the devices both pre-clinically and during live surgery on humans. Both the hand-held and the laparoscopic systems have proved to be reliable and beneficial in an ongoing clinical trial involving sentinel lymph node detection in gynecological cancers. We will show preliminary results using two clinically approved dyes, Methylene blue and indocyanine green. We anticipate that this technology can be integrated and routinely used in a larger variety of surgical procedures.

  10. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model.

  11. An activatable, polarity dependent, dual-luminescent imaging agent with a long luminescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Marcus T M; Oikonomou, Maria; Buckle, Tessa; Raspe, Marcel; Urano, Yasuteru; Jalink, Kees; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2014-09-04

    In this proof-of-concept study, a new activatable imaging agent based on two luminophores and two different quenching mechanisms is reported. Both partial and total activation of the luminescence signal can be achieved, either in solution or in vitro. Bond cleavage makes the compound suitable for luminescence lifetime imaging.

  12. Metabolic Mapping of Breast Cancer with Multiphoton Spectral and Lifetime Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    intermediates, such as reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH). NADH plays a key role as a carrier of electrons and is involved in many important...approximately 1.0ns) while free NADH has been shown to have a short fluorescent lifetime of 0.4ns due to quenching of the fluorescent nicotinamide group by...Z. 341(357-377 (1965) 10. D. J. Pappajohn, R. Penneys and B. Chance, "NADH spectrofluorometry of rat skin ," J Appl Physiol 33(5), 684-687 (1972

  13. Determining a fluorophore’s transition dipole moment from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solvents of varying refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Pei-Hua; Tregidgo, Carolyn; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-12-01

    The transition dipole moment of organic dyes PM546 and rhodamine 123 is calculated from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solutions of different refractive index. A model proposed by Toptygin et al (2002 J. Phys. Chem. B 106 3724-34) provides a relationship between the radiative rate constant and refractive index of the solvent, and allows the electronic transition dipole moments to be found: it is (7.1  ±  1.1) D for PM546 which matches that found in the literature, and (8.1  ±  0.1) D for rhodamine 123. Toptygin’s model goes further in predicting the shape of the fluorescent dye and here we predict the shape of PM546 and rhodamine 123 to be ellipsoidal.

  14. Incorporating a piperidinyl group in the fluorophore extends the fluorescence lifetime of click-derived cyclam-naphthalimide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingfeng; Ast, Sandra; Yu, Qun; Lo, Anthony T S; Flehr, Roman; Todd, Matthew H; Rutledge, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Ligands incorporating a tetraazamacrocycle receptor, a 'click'-derived triazole and a 1,8-naphthalimide fluorophore have proven utility as probes for metal ions. Three new cyclam-based molecular probes are reported, in which a piperidinyl group has been introduced at the 4-position of the naphthalimide fluorophore. These compounds have been synthesized using the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition and their photophysical properties studied in detail. The alkylamino group induces the expected red-shift in absorption and emission spectra relative to the simple naphthalimide derivatives and gives rise to extended fluorescence lifetimes in aqueous buffer. The photophysical properties of these systems are shown to be highly solvent-dependent. Screening the fluorescence responses of the new conjugates to a wide variety of metal ions reveals significant and selective fluorescence quenching in the presence of copper(II), yet no fluorescence enhancement with zinc(II) as observed previously for the simple naphthalimide derivatives. Reasons for this different behaviour are proposed. Cytotoxicity testing shows that these new cyclam-triazole-dye conjugates display little or no toxicity against either DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells or MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, suggesting a potential role for these and related systems in biological sensing applications.

  15. Incorporating a piperidinyl group in the fluorophore extends the fluorescence lifetime of click-derived cyclam-naphthalimide conjugates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfeng Yu

    Full Text Available Ligands incorporating a tetraazamacrocycle receptor, a 'click'-derived triazole and a 1,8-naphthalimide fluorophore have proven utility as probes for metal ions. Three new cyclam-based molecular probes are reported, in which a piperidinyl group has been introduced at the 4-position of the naphthalimide fluorophore. These compounds have been synthesized using the copper(I-catalyzed azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition and their photophysical properties studied in detail. The alkylamino group induces the expected red-shift in absorption and emission spectra relative to the simple naphthalimide derivatives and gives rise to extended fluorescence lifetimes in aqueous buffer. The photophysical properties of these systems are shown to be highly solvent-dependent. Screening the fluorescence responses of the new conjugates to a wide variety of metal ions reveals significant and selective fluorescence quenching in the presence of copper(II, yet no fluorescence enhancement with zinc(II as observed previously for the simple naphthalimide derivatives. Reasons for this different behaviour are proposed. Cytotoxicity testing shows that these new cyclam-triazole-dye conjugates display little or no toxicity against either DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells or MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, suggesting a potential role for these and related systems in biological sensing applications.

  16. Study of thioflavin-T immobilized in porous silicon and the effect of different organic vapors on the fluorescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Tanya; Amdursky, Nadav; Gepshtein, Rinat; Elliott, Stephen R; Huppert, Dan

    2011-06-21

    Steady-state and time-resolved emission techniques have been employed to study the fluorescence properties of thioflavin-T (ThT) adsorbed on oxidized porous silicon (PSi) surfaces, with an average pore size of ∼10 nm. We found that the average fluorescence decay time of ThT, when it is adsorbed on the PSi surface, is rather long, τ(av) = 1.3 ns. We attribute this relatively long emission lifetime to the effect of the immobilization of ThT on the PSi surface, which inhibit the rotation of the aniline with respect to the benzothiazole moieties of ThT. We also measured the fluorescence properties of ThT in PSi samples in equilibrium with vapors of several liquids, such as methanol, acetonitrile, and water. We found that the fluorescence intensity drops by a factor of 10, and the average decay time, measured by a time-correlated single-photon counting technique, decreases by a factor of 3. We explain these results in terms of liquid condensation of the vapors in the PSi pores, which leads to partial dissolution of the ThT molecules in the liquid pools.

  17. Novel aspects of fluorescence lifetime for molecules positioned close to metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussenegg, F. R.; Leitner, A.; Lippitsch, M. E.; Reinisch, H.; Riegler, M.

    1987-10-01

    On metal surfaces with submicroscopic corrugations, surface-enhanced optical processes can be observed. Results obtained by picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for dye molecules in the proximity (0-50 nm) of silver islands films are reported. It is demonstrated how the rather complex dependence of the integral fluorescence intensity on the distance dye-islands, can be resolved in the contributions of different mechanisms by analysing the fluorescence decay curves at various distances. It turns out, that the enhancement of absorption influences only the peak fluorescence intensity without changing the decay time, while the enhancement of emission and dissipative losses reduces the decay time. Thus time-resolved spectroscopy opens the possibility to test theoretical concepts on surface enhancement and provides basic data for tailoring molecule-metal structures with well-defined surface-enhancement properties.

  18. Nanoprobes for super-resolution fluorescence imaging at the nanoscale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU ShangGuo; LIANG Le; DENG SuHui; CHEN JianFang; HUANG Qing; CHENG Ya; FAN ChunHai

    2014-01-01

    Compared with other imaging techniques,fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool to study cell biology due to its high compatibility with living cells.Owing to the resolution limit set by the diffraction of light,fluorescence microscopy could not resolve the nanostructures in the range of〈200 nm.Recently,many techniques have been emerged to overcome the diffraction barrier,providing nanometer spatial resolution.In the course of development,the progress in fluorescent probes has helped to promote the development of the high-resolution fluorescence nanoscopy.Here,we describe the contributions of the fluorescent probes to far-field super resolution imaging,focusing on concepts of the existing super-resolution nanoscopy based on the photophysics of fluorescent nanoprobes,like photoswitching,bleaching and blinking.Fluorescent probe technology is crucial in the design and implementation of super-resolution imaging methods.

  19. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  20. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankelevich, Diego R; Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Elson, Daniel S; Marcu, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements of low quantum efficiency sub-nanosecond fluorophores.

  1. Advances in Contactless Silicon Defect and Impurity Diagnostics Based on Lifetime Spectroscopy and Infrared Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Schmidt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a review of some recent developments in the field of contactless silicon wafer characterization techniques based on lifetime spectroscopy and infrared imaging. In the first part of the contribution, we outline the status of different lifetime spectroscopy approaches suitable for the identification of impurities in silicon and discuss—in more detail—the technique of temperature- and injection-dependent lifetime spectroscopy. The second part of the paper focuses on the application of infrared cameras to analyze spatial inhomogeneities in silicon wafers. By measuring the infrared signal absorbed or emitted from light-generated free excess carriers, high-resolution recombination lifetime mappings can be generated within seconds to minutes. In addition, mappings of non-recombination-active trapping centers can be deduced from injection-dependent infrared lifetime images. The trap density has been demonstrated to be an important additional parameter in the characterization and assessment of solar-grade multicrystalline silicon wafers, as areas of increased trap density tend to deteriorate during solar cell processing.

  2. A low cost fluorescence lifetime measurement system based on SPAD detectors and FPGA processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franch, N.; Alonso, O.; Canals, J.; Vilà, A.; Dieguez, A.

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a low cost fluorescence life time measurement system, aimed at carrying out fast diagnostic tests through label detection in a portable system so it can be used in a medical consultation, within a short time span. The system uses Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC), measuring the arrival time of individual photons and building a histogram of those times, showing the fluorescence decay of the label which is characteristic of each fluorescent substance. The system is implemented using a Xilinx FPGA which controls the experiment and includes a Time to Digital Converter (TDC) to perform measurements with a resolution in the order of tenths of picoseconds. Also included are a laser diode and the driving electronics to generate short pulses as well as a HV-CMOS implemented Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) as a high gain sensor. The system is entirely configurable so it can easily be adapted to the target label molecule and measurement needs. The histogram is constructed within the FPGA and can then be read as convenient. Various performance parameters are also shown, as well as experimental measurements of a quantum dot fluorescence decay as a proof of concept.

  3. Phase-sensitive fluorescent imaging with coherent reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Field, Jeffrey J; Bartels, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    Optical imaging plays a critical role in advancing our understanding of three dimensional dynamics of biological systems. Coherent imaging (CI) methods exploit spatial phase information, encoded through propagation of coherent signal light emerging from a specimen, to extract a three-dimensional representation of the object from a single high-speed measurement. Until now, CI methods could not be applied to incoherent light, severely limiting their ability to image the most powerful biological probes available - fluorescent molecules - with sufficient speed and volume to observe important processes, such as neural processing in live specimens. We introduce a new imaging technique that transfers the spatial propagation phase of coherent illumination light to incoherent fluorescent light emission. The transfer of propagation phase allows CI techniques to be applied to fluorescent light imaging, and leads to large increases in imaging speed and depth of field. With this advance, biological imaging of fluorescent ...

  4. A fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe using photonic crystal fiber for nanoscale thermometry based on fluorescence-lifetime measurement of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takuro; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Saiki, Toshiharu; Nagasaka, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel nanoscale temperature-measurement method using fluorescence in the near-field called fluorescence near-field optics thermal nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN). Fluor-NOTN enables the temperature distributions of nanoscale materials to be measured in vivo/in situ. The proposed method measures temperature by detecting the temperature dependent fluorescence lifetimes of Cd/Se quantum dots (QDs). For a high-sensitivity temperature measurement, the auto-fluorescence generated from a fiber probe should be reduced. In order to decrease the noise, we have fabricated a novel near-field optical-fiber probe by fusion-splicing a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF). The validity of the novel fiber probe was assessed experimentally by evaluating the auto-fluorescence spectra of the PCF. Due to the decrease of auto-fluorescence, a six- to ten-fold increase of S/N in the near-field fluorescence lifetime detection was achieved with the newly fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe. Additionally, the near-field fluorescence lifetime of the quantum dots was successfully measured by the fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe at room temperature, and was estimated to be 10.0 ns.

  5. A Fusion-Spliced Near-Field Optical Fiber Probe Using Photonic Crystal Fiber for Nanoscale Thermometry Based on Fluorescence-Lifetime Measurement of Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiharu Saiki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel nanoscale temperature-measurement method using fluorescence in the near-field called Fluorescence Near-field Optics Thermal Nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN. Fluor-NOTN enables the temperature distributions of nanoscale materials to be measured in vivo/in situ. The proposed method measures temperature by detecting the temperature dependent fluorescence lifetimes of Cd/Se Quantum Dots (QDs. For a high-sensitivity temperature measurement, the auto-fluorescence generated from a fiber probe should be reduced. In order to decrease the noise, we have fabricated a novel near-field optical-fiber probe by fusion-splicing a photonic crystal fiber (PCF and a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF. The validity of the novel fiber probe was assessed experimentally by evaluating the auto-fluorescence spectra of the PCF. Due to the decrease of auto-fluorescence, a six- to ten-fold increase of S/N in the near-field fluorescence lifetime detection was achieved with the newly fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe. Additionally, the near-field fluorescence lifetime of the quantum dots was successfully measured by the fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe at room temperature, and was estimated to be 10.0 ns.

  6. Tissue oxygen monitoring by photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) and its application to image-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qi; Morgounova, Ekaterina; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2015-03-01

    The oxygen partial pressure (pO2), which results from the balance between oxygen delivery and its consumption, is a key component of the physiological state of a tissue. Images of oxygen distribution can provide essential information for identifying hypoxic tissue and optimizing cancer treatment. Previously, we have reported a noninvasive in vivo imaging modality based on photoacoustic lifetime. The technique maps the excited triplet state of oxygen-sensitive dye, thus reflects the spatial and temporal distribution of tissue oxygen. We have applied PALI on tumor on small animals to identify hypoxia area. We also showed that PALI is able monitor changes of tissue oxygen, in an acute ischemia and breathing modulation model. Here we present our work on developing a treatment/imaging modality (PDT-PALI) that integrates PDT and a combined ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging system. The system provides real-time feedback of three essential parameters namely: tissue oxygen, light penetration in tumor location, and distribution of photosensitizer. Tissue oxygen imaging is performed by applying PALI, which relies on photoacoustic probing of oxygen-dependent, excitation lifetime of Methylene Blue (MB) photosensitizer. Lifetime information can also be used to generate image showing the distribution of photosensitizer. The level and penetration depth of PDT illumination can be deduced from photoacoustic imaging at the same wavelength. All images will be combined with ultrasound B-mode images for anatomical reference.

  7. The Gray Institute ‘open’ high-content, fluorescence lifetime microscopes

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, PR; TULLIS, IDC; PIERCE, GP; Newman, RG; PRENTICE, J; Rowley, MI; Matthews, DR; AMEER-BEG, SM; Vojnovic, B

    2013-01-01

    Summary We describe a microscopy design methodology and details of microscopes built to this ‘open’ design approach. These demonstrate the first implementation of time-domain fluorescence microscopy in a flexible automated platform with the ability to ease the transition of this and other advanced microscopy techniques from development to use in routine biology applications. This approach allows easy expansion and modification of the platform capabilities, as it moves away from the use of a c...

  8. Fluorescent amino acid undergoing excited state intramolecular proton transfer for site-specific probing and imaging of peptide interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholokh, Marianna; Zamotaiev, Oleksandr M; Das, Ranjan; Postupalenko, Viktoriia Y; Richert, Ludovic; Dujardin, Denis; Zaporozhets, Olga A; Pivovarenko, Vasyl G; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Mély, Yves

    2015-02-12

    Fluorescent amino acids bearing environment-sensitive fluorophores are highly valuable tools for site-selective probing of peptide/ligand interactions. Herein, we synthesized a fluorescent l-amino acid bearing the 4'-methoxy-3-hydroxyflavone fluorophore (M3HFaa) that shows dual emission, as a result of an excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The dual emission of M3HFaa was found to be substantially more sensitive to hydration as compared to previous analogues. By replacing the Ala30 and Trp37 residues of a HIV-1 nucleocapsid peptide, M3HFaa was observed to preserve the peptide structure and functions. Interaction of the labeled peptides with nucleic acids and lipid vesicles produced a strong switch in their dual emission, favoring the emission of the ESIPT product. This switch was associated with the appearance of long-lived fluorescence lifetimes for the ESIPT product, as a consequence of the rigid environment in the complexes that restricted the relative motions of the M3HFaa aromatic moieties. The strongest restriction and thus the longest fluorescence lifetimes were observed at position 37 in complexes with nucleic acids, where the probe likely stacks with the nucleobases. Based on the dependence of the lifetime values on the nature of the ligand and the labeled position, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging was used to identify the binding partners of the labeled peptides microinjected into living cells. Thus, M3HFaa appears as a sensitive tool for monitoring site selectively peptide interactions in solution and living cells.

  9. Multispectral fluorescence imaging techniques for nondestructive food safety inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2004-03-01

    The use of spectral sensing has gained acceptance as a rapid means for nondestructive inspection of postharvest food produce. Current technologies generally use color or a single wavelength camera technology. The applicability and sensitivity of these techniques can be expanded through the use of multiple wavelengths. Reflectance in the Vis/NIR is the prevalent spectral technique. Fluorescence, compared to reflectance, is regarded as a more sensitive technique due to its dynamic responses to subtle changes in biological entities. Our laboratory has been exploring fluorescence as a potential means for detection of quality and wholesomeness of food products. Applications of fluorescence sensing require an understanding of the spectral characteristics emanating from constituents and potential contaminants. A number of factors affecting fluorescence emission characteristics are discussed. Because of relatively low fluorescence quantum yield from biological samples, a system with a powerful pulse light source such as a laser coupled with a gated detection device is used to harvest fluorescence, in the presence of ambient light. Several fluorescence sensor platforms developed in our laboratory, including hyperspectral imaging, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and steady-state fluorescence imaging systems with multispectral capabilities are presented. We demonstrate the potential uses of recently developed fluorescence imaging platforms in food safety inspection of apples contaminated with animal feces.

  10. Lifetime Autler-Townes Splitting of Dressed Multi-order Fluorescence in Pr3+:YSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ali

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available For first time, we study primary and secondary Autler-Townes (AT splitting of multi-order fluorescence (FL in time domain. The AT-splitting of multi-order FL signals are controlled by changing power, detuning, and polarization of single and double dressing in a heteronuclear-like molecule system of Pr+3:YSO. The primary and secondary AT-splitting is caused by double cascaded dressing in time domain. The AT-splitting of multi-order FL in time domain is more sensitive than that of in spectral domain. Such results have potential applications in quantum communication and optical information processing on photonic chip.

  11. Lifetime Autler-Townes Splitting of Dressed Multi-order Fluorescence in Pr3+:YSO

    OpenAIRE

    Imran Ali; Changbiao Li; Abdulkhaleq Hasan; Garuma Abdisa; Zongchen Liu; Feng Ma; Yanpeng Zhang

    2016-01-01

    For first time, we study primary and secondary Autler-Townes (AT) splitting of multi-order fluorescence (FL) in time domain. The AT-splitting of multi-order FL signals are controlled by changing power, detuning, and polarization of single and double dressing in a heteronuclear-like molecule system of Pr+3:YSO. The primary and secondary AT-splitting is caused by double cascaded dressing in time domain. The AT-splitting of multi-order FL in time domain is more sensitive than that of in spectral...

  12. The Gray Institute ‘open’ high-content, fluorescence lifetime microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARBER, PR; TULLIS, IDC; PIERCE, GP; NEWMAN, RG; PRENTICE, J; ROWLEY, MI; MATTHEWS, DR; AMEER-BEG, SM; VOJNOVIC, B

    2013-01-01

    Summary We describe a microscopy design methodology and details of microscopes built to this ‘open’ design approach. These demonstrate the first implementation of time-domain fluorescence microscopy in a flexible automated platform with the ability to ease the transition of this and other advanced microscopy techniques from development to use in routine biology applications. This approach allows easy expansion and modification of the platform capabilities, as it moves away from the use of a commercial, monolithic, microscope body to small, commercial off-the-shelf and custom made modular components. Drawings and diagrams of our microscopes have been made available under an open license for noncommercial use at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~atdgroup. Several automated high-content fluorescence microscope implementations have been constructed with this design framework and optimized for specific applications with multiwell plates and tissue microarrays. In particular, three platforms incorporate time-domain FLIM via time-correlated single photon counting in an automated fashion. We also present data from experiments performed on these platforms highlighting their automated wide-field and laser scanning capabilities designed for high-content microscopy. Devices using these designs also form radiation-beam ‘end-stations’ at Oxford and Surrey Universities, showing the versatility and extendibility of this approach. PMID:23772985

  13. Analysis of energy metabolism of HeLa cancer cells in vitro and in vivo using fluorescence lifetime microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, Maria; Shirmanova, Marina; Dudenkova, Varvara; Druzhkova, Irina; Shumilova, Anastasia; Zagaynova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to study energy metabolism in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells in vitro and in vivo using two-photon FLIM. Cellular metabolism was examined by monitoring of the fluorescence lifetimes of free and protein-bound forms of NAD(P)H and FAD and their relative contributions. Two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy as well as standard histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin were used to characterize tissue structure. Cellular metabolism was analyzed in cancer cells co-cultured with human fibroblasts and in tumor xenografts transplanted to nude mice. In the HeLa-huFB co-culture we observed a metabolic shift from OXPHOS toward glycolysis in cancer cells, and from glycolysis to OXPHOS in fibroblasts, starting from Day 2 of co-culturing. In the tumor tissue we detected metabolic heterogeneity with more glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells in the stroma-rich zones. The results of the study are of a great importance for understanding metabolic behavior of tumors and for development of anticancer drugs targeted to metabolic pathways.

  14. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis in humans by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Bernd; Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Bauer, Daniel; Voigt, Jan; Berliner, Michael; Bahner, Malte L.; Macdonald, Rainer

    2010-02-01

    The blood pool agent indo-cyanine green (ICG) has been investigated in a prospective clinical study for detection of rheumatoid arthritis using fluorescence imaging. Temporal behavior as well as spatial distribution of fluorescence intensity are suited to differentiate healthy and inflamed finger joints after i.v. injection of an ICG bolus.

  15. Hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning for colon cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Walters, Mikayla; Lopez, Carmen; Baker, Thomas; Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Rider, Paul F.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2016-10-01

    Optical spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging have shown the potential to discriminate between cancerous and noncancerous tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. However, to date, these techniques have not been effectively translated to real-time endoscope platforms. Hyperspectral imaging of the fluorescence excitation spectrum represents new technology that may be well suited for endoscopic implementation. However, the feasibility of detecting differences between normal and cancerous mucosa using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging has not been evaluated. The goal of this study was to evaluate the initial feasibility of using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging for measuring changes in fluorescence excitation spectrum concurrent with colonic adenocarcinoma using a small pre-pilot-scale sample size. Ex vivo analysis was performed using resected pairs of colorectal adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa. Adenocarcinoma was confirmed by histologic evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) permanent sections. Specimens were imaged using a custom hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation-scanning microscope system. Results demonstrated consistent spectral differences between normal and cancerous tissues over the fluorescence excitation range of 390 to 450 nm that could be the basis for wavelength-dependent detection of colorectal cancers. Hence, excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging may offer an alternative approach for discriminating adenocarcinoma from surrounding normal colonic mucosa, but further studies will be required to evaluate the accuracy of this approach using a larger patient cohort.

  16. A framework for creating realistic synthetic fluorescence microscopy image sequences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available of the 9th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies, Rome, Italy. 21-23 February, 2016 A Framework for Creating Realistic Synthetic Fluorescence Microscopy Image Sequences Matsilele Mabaso1, Daniel Withey1...

  17. Fluorescence lifetimes of tyrosine residues in cytochrome c'' as local probes to study protein unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Melinda; Santos, Raquel; Paci, Emanuele; Santos, Helena; Maçanita, António L

    2009-04-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to show that multiple tyrosine residues of a protein can serve as localized probes of structural changes during thermal unfolding. Cytochrome c'' from Methylophilus methylotrophus, which has four tyrosine residues, was chosen as a model protein. The procedure involved, first, the assignment of the experimental decay times to the tyrosine residues, followed by the interpretation of the changes in the decay times and pre-exponential coefficients with temperature. We found that the fluorescence decays of cytochrome c'' are double-exponential from 23 to 80 degrees C, with decay times much shorter than those of the parent compound N-acetyl-tyrosinamide; this quenching was ascribed to dipole-dipole energy transfer from the tyrosine residues to the heme. The tyrosine-heme distances (R) and theoretical decay times, tau(comp), were estimated for each tyrosine residue. The analysis of the simulated decay generated with tau(comp), showed that a double-exponential fit is sufficient to describe the four decay times with two pre-exponential coefficients close to values observed from the experimental decay. Therefore, the decay times at 23 degrees C could be assigned to the individual tyrosine residues as tau(1) to Tyr-10 and Tyr-23 (at 20.3 A) and tau(2) to Tyr-12 and Tyr-115 (at 12-14 A). On the basis of this assignment and MD simulations, the temperature dependence of the decay times and pre-exponential coefficients suggest that upon unfolding, Tyr-12 is displaced from the heme, with loss of the structure of alpha-helix I. Moreover, Tyr-115 remains close to the heme and the structure in this region of the protein is not altered significantly. Altogether the data support the view that the protein core, comprising the heme and the four alpha-helices II to V, is clearly more stable than the remaining region that includes alpha-helix I and the loop between residues 19-27.

  18. Photoluminescence Lifetime Imaging of Newly Synthesized Proteins in Living Cells with Iridium-alkyne Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinrong; Wang, Jinyu; Xue, Jie; Yan, Zihe; Zhang, Sichun; Qiao, Juan

    2017-09-23

    Designing probes for real-time imaging of dynamic processes in living cells is a continual challenge. Herein, a novel near-infrared photoluminescence probe with long lifetime was exploited for photoluminescence lifetime imaging (PLIM) based on an Iridium-alkyne complex. This probe offers benefits of desirable deep-red to NIR emission, long stokes shift, excellent cell penetration, low cytotoxicity and good resistance to photobleaching. To the best of our knowledge this is the first PLIM probe applicable to click reaction of Cu(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition with remarkable lifetime shifts of 414 ns before and after click reaction. The approach fully eliminates the background interference and well distinguishes the reacted probes from the unreacted probes, thus enabling the wash-free imaging of the newly synthesized proteins in single living cells. Based on the unique properties of the Iridium complexes, it is anticipated to be applied in more important issues in living cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Image processing for drift compensation in fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Coutinho, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is characterized by low background noise, thus a fluorescent object appears as an area of high signal/noise. Thermal gradients may result in apparent motion of the object, leading to a blurred image. Here, we have developed an image processing methodology that may remove....../reduce blur significantly for any type of microscopy. A total of ~100 images were acquired with a pixel size of 30 nm. The acquisition time for each image was approximately 1second. We can quantity the drift in X and Y using the sub pixel accuracy computed centroid location of an image object in each frame....... We can measure drifts down to approximately 10 nm in size and a drift-compensated image can therefore be reconstructed on a grid of the same size using the “Shift and Add” approach leading to an image of identical size asthe individual image. We have also reconstructed the image using a 3 fold larger...

  20. Fluorogen-based reporters for fluorescence imaging: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescence bioimaging has recently jumped into a new area of spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity thanks to synergistic advances in both optical physics and probe/biosensor design. This review focuses on the recent development of genetically encodable fluorescent reporters that bind endogenously present or exogenously applied fluorogenic chromophores (so-called fluorogens) and activate their fluorescence. We highlight the innovative engineering and design that gave rise to these new natural and synthetic fluorescent reporters, and describe some of the emerging applications in imaging and biosensing.

  1. Preparation and properties of Nd{sup 3+}:SrAlF{sub 5} nanocrystals embedded fluorophosphate transparent glass-ceramic with long fluorescence lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruilin; Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Liaolin; Liu, Chunxiao; Wei, Wei [Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, School of Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2016-07-15

    Nd{sup 3+}:SrAlF{sub 5} nanocrystals embedded fluorophosphate glass-ceramics were prepared by the melt quenching and subsequent thermal treatment method. The formation of SrAlF{sub 5} nanocrystals in the glass was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the glass-ceramics increased with the increase of size of nanocrystals. Importantly, by controlling growth of nanocrystals, an obvious enhancement of lifetime (725 μs) emerged in the glass-ceramics heat-treated at 510 C and the transmittance can reach to 72.2 % at 1049 nm. The enhanced fluorescence intensity and lifetime were ascribed to the comfortable local environment to the Nd{sup 3+} ion and scattering of the nanoparticle embedded into the glass matrix. (orig.)

  2. Fluorescence Image Analyzer - FLIMA: software for quantitative analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, H C M; Martins-Júnior, M M C; Ribeiro, L B; Matoso, D A

    2017-03-30

    The Fluorescence Image Analyzer (FLIMA) software was developed for the quantitative analysis of images generated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Currently, the images of FISH are examined without a coefficient that enables a comparison between them. Through GD Graphics Library, the FLIMA software calculates the amount of pixels on image and recognizes each present color. The coefficient generated by the algorithm shows the percentage of marks (probes) hybridized on the chromosomes. This software can be used for any type of image generated by a fluorescence microscope and is able to quantify digoxigenin probes exhibiting a red color, biotin probes exhibiting a green color, and double-FISH probes (digoxigenin and biotin used together), where the white color is displayed.

  3. Measurement of drug-target engagement in live cells by two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Brand, Christian; Lee, Sungon; Nibbs, Antoinette E; Stapleton, Shawn; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-07-01

    The ability to directly image and quantify drug-target engagement and drug distribution with subcellular resolution in live cells and whole organisms is a prerequisite to establishing accurate models of the kinetics and dynamics of drug action. Such methods would thus have far-reaching applications in drug development and molecular pharmacology. We recently presented one such technique based on fluorescence anisotropy, a spectroscopic method based on polarization light analysis and capable of measuring the binding interaction between molecules. Our technique allows the direct characterization of target engagement of fluorescently labeled drugs, using fluorophores with a fluorescence lifetime larger than the rotational correlation of the bound complex. Here we describe an optimized protocol for simultaneous dual-channel two-photon fluorescence anisotropy microscopy acquisition to perform drug-target measurements. We also provide the necessary software to implement stream processing to visualize images and to calculate quantitative parameters. The assembly and characterization part of the protocol can be implemented in 1 d. Sample preparation, characterization and imaging of drug binding can be completed in 2 d. Although currently adapted to an Olympus FV1000MPE microscope, the protocol can be extended to other commercial or custom-built microscopes.

  4. Latest advancements in fluorescence hyperspectral lidar imaging of the cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, V.; Conti, C.; Lognoli, D.; Palombi, L.

    2013-11-01

    Fluorescence lidar imaging can be regarded as an effective tool for early diagnostics and documentation of the outdoor cultural heritage, with the aim of a correct planning of conservation and restoration of monuments. In this paper we present the latest advancements on fluorescence hyperspectral lidar imaging recently achieved at IFAC-CNR in terms of instrumentation and novel applications. In particular, the paper focuses on the upgrading of some key technical features, such as: the scan speed of the sensor, spatial resolution at the surface and field of view of the instrument. The upgrading of these technical characteristics has also made it possible to successfully extend the applicability of the technique to the diagnostics on wall paintings, which requires an improved spatial resolution. Finally, we outline the potential of a new concept of fluorescence lidar imaging system, based on the integration of hyperspectral and fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy, which enhances the capabilities of the technique for the characterization of the materials to be investigated in cultural heritage assets.

  5. Fluorescence polarization imaging for delineating nonmelanoma skin cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavsky, A. N.; Neel, V.; Anderson, R. R.

    2004-09-01

    We present a method for detecting nonmelanoma skin cancers using exogenous fluorescence polarization. We built an automated system that permits exogenous fluorescence polarization imaging. It includes a tunable linearly polarized monochromatic light source and a CCD camera equipped with a rotating linear polarizer and a filter to reject excitation light. Two fluorophores that are retained in tumors, toluidine blue and methylene blue, are employed. We demonstrate that fluorescence polarization imaging can be used for accurate delineation of nonmelanoma cancers. The results suggest that this optical technique may be suitable for real-time noninvasive demarcation of epithelial cancers.

  6. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging Uncovers Photosynthetic Fingerprint of Citrus Huanglongbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Cen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus, which has posed a serious threat to the global citrus production. This research was aimed to explore the use of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging combined with feature selection to characterize and detect the HLB disease. Chlorophyll fluorescence images of citrus leaf samples were measured by an in-house chlorophyll fluorescence imaging system. The commonly used chlorophyll fluorescence parameters provided the first screening of HLB disease. To further explore the photosynthetic fingerprint of HLB infected leaves, three feature selection methods combined with the supervised classifiers were employed to identify the unique fluorescence signature of HLB and perform the three-class classification (i.e., healthy, HLB infected, and nutrient deficient leaves. Unlike the commonly used fluorescence parameters, this novel data-driven approach by using the combination of the mean fluorescence parameters and image features gave the best classification performance with the accuracy of 97%, and presented a better interpretation for the spatial heterogeneity of photochemical and non-photochemical components in HLB infected citrus leaves. These results imply the potential of the proposed approach for the citrus HLB disease diagnosis, and also provide a valuable insight for the photosynthetic response to the HLB disease.

  7. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging Uncovers Photosynthetic Fingerprint of Citrus Huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Haiyan; Weng, Haiyong; Yao, Jieni; He, Mubin; Lv, Jingwen; Hua, Shijia; Li, Hongye; He, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus, which has posed a serious threat to the global citrus production. This research was aimed to explore the use of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging combined with feature selection to characterize and detect the HLB disease. Chlorophyll fluorescence images of citrus leaf samples were measured by an in-house chlorophyll fluorescence imaging system. The commonly used chlorophyll fluorescence parameters provided the first screening of HLB disease. To further explore the photosynthetic fingerprint of HLB infected leaves, three feature selection methods combined with the supervised classifiers were employed to identify the unique fluorescence signature of HLB and perform the three-class classification (i.e., healthy, HLB infected, and nutrient deficient leaves). Unlike the commonly used fluorescence parameters, this novel data-driven approach by using the combination of the mean fluorescence parameters and image features gave the best classification performance with the accuracy of 97%, and presented a better interpretation for the spatial heterogeneity of photochemical and non-photochemical components in HLB infected citrus leaves. These results imply the potential of the proposed approach for the citrus HLB disease diagnosis, and also provide a valuable insight for the photosynthetic response to the HLB disease.

  8. Multiplexed Spectral Imaging of 120 Different Fluorescent Labels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex M Valm

    Full Text Available The number of fluorescent labels that can unambiguously be distinguished in a single image when acquired through band pass filters is severely limited by the spectral overlap of available fluorophores. The recent development of spectral microscopy and the application of linear unmixing algorithms to spectrally recorded image data have allowed simultaneous imaging of fluorophores with highly overlapping spectra. However, the number of distinguishable fluorophores is still limited by the unavoidable decrease in signal to noise ratio when fluorescence signals are fractionated over multiple wavelength bins. Here we present a spectral image analysis algorithm to greatly expand the number of distinguishable objects labeled with binary combinations of fluorophores. Our algorithm utilizes a priori knowledge about labeled specimens and imposes a binary label constraint on the unmixing solution. We have applied our labeling and analysis strategy to identify microbes labeled by fluorescence in situ hybridization and here demonstrate the ability to distinguish 120 differently labeled microbes in a single image.

  9. Photobleaching correction in fluorescence microscopy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, Nathalie B; Diaz Zamboni, Javier E; Adur, Javier F; Paravani, Enrique V; Casco, Victor H [Microscopy Laboratory, School of Engineering - Bioengineering, National University of Entre Rios (UNER), Ruta 11, Km 10 (3101), Oro Verde, Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Fluorophores are used to detect molecular expression by highly specific antigen-antibody reactions in fluorescence microscopy techniques. A portion of the fluorophore emits fluorescence when irradiated with electromagnetic waves of particular wavelengths, enabling its detection. Photobleaching irreversibly destroys fluorophores stimulated by radiation within the excitation spectrum, thus eliminating potentially useful information. Since this process may not be completely prevented, techniques have been developed to slow it down or to correct resulting alterations (mainly, the decrease in fluorescent signal). In the present work, the correction by photobleaching curve was studied using E-cadherin (a cell-cell adhesion molecule) expression in Bufo arenarum embryos. Significant improvements were observed when applying this simple, inexpensive and fast technique.

  10. Wide field-of-view fluorescence imaging of coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P; Kline, David I; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L D; Mitchell, B Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-13

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys.

  11. Identification of lifetime limiting defects by temperature- and injection-dependent photoluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Jonas; Youssef, Amanda; Park, Sungeun; Mundt, Laura E.; Niewelt, Tim; Mack, Sebastian; Nakajima, Kazuo; Morishita, Kohei; Murai, Ryota; Jensen, Mallory A.; Buonassisi, Tonio; Schubert, Martin C.

    2016-09-01

    Identification of the lifetime limiting defects in silicon plays a key role in systematically optimizing the efficiency potential of material for solar cells. We present a technique based on temperature and injection dependent photoluminescence imaging to determine the energy levels and capture cross section ratios of Shockley-Read-Hall defects. This allows us to identify homogeneously and inhomogeneously distributed defects limiting the charge carrier lifetime in any silicon wafer. The technique is demonstrated on an n-type wafer grown with the non-contact crucible (NOC) method and an industrial Czochralski (Cz) wafer prone to defect formation during high temperature processing. We find that the energy levels for the circular distributed defects in the Cz wafer are in good agreement with literature data for homogeneously grown oxide precipitates. In contrast, the circular distributed defects found in NOC Si have significantly deeper trap levels, despite their similar appearance.

  12. Fluorescence and Bioluminescence Imaging of Orthotopic Brain Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Emilie; Moore, Alfred; Dixit, Suraj; Zhu, Yun; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Optical imaging strategies, such as fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging, are non-invasive, in vivo whole body imaging techniques utilized to study cancer. Optical imaging is widely used in preclinical work because of its ease of use and cost-friendliness. It also provides the opportunity to study animals and biological responses longitudinally over time. Important considerations include depth of tissue penetration, photon scattering, absorption and the choice of light emitting probe, all of which affect the resolution (image quality and data information) and the signal to noise ratio of the image. We describe how to use bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging to track a chemotherapeutic delivery nanocarrier conjugated with a fluorophore to determine its localization in vivo.

  13. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging with multi wavelength LED excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthman, A. Siri; Dumitru, Sebastian; Quirós-Gonzalez, Isabel; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) can combine morphological and molecular information, yielding potential for real-time and high throughput multiplexed fluorescent contrast agent imaging. Multiplexed readout from targets, such as cell surface receptors overexpressed in cancer cells, could improve both sensitivity and specificity of tumor identification. There remains, however, a need for compact and cost effective implementations of the technology. We have implemented a low-cost wide-field multiplexed fluorescence imaging system, which combines LED excitation at 590, 655 and 740 nm with a compact commercial solid state HSI system operating in the range 600 - 1000 nm. A key challenge for using reflectance-based HSI is the separation of contrast agent fluorescence from the reflectance of the excitation light. Here, we illustrate how it is possible to address this challenge in software, using two offline reflectance removal methods, prior to least-squares spectral unmixing. We made a quantitative comparison of the methods using data acquired from dilutions of contrast agents prepared in well-plates. We then established the capability of our HSI system for non-invasive in vivo fluorescence imaging in small animals using the optimal reflectance removal method. The HSI presented here enables quantitative unmixing of at least four fluorescent contrast agents (Alexa Fluor 610, 647, 700 and 750) simultaneously in living mice. A successful unmixing of the four fluorescent contrast agents was possible both using the pure contrast agents and with mixtures. The system could in principle also be applied to imaging of ex vivo tissue or intraoperative imaging in a clinical setting. These data suggest a promising approach for developing clinical applications of HSI based on multiplexed fluorescence contrast agent imaging.

  14. The modifier effects of chymotrypsin and trypsin enzymes on fluorescence lifetime distribution of "N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide-bovine serum albumin" complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyiğit, İbrahim Ethem; Karakuş, Emine; Pekcan, Önder

    2016-02-01

    Chymotrypsin and trypsin are the well known proteolytic enzymes, both of which are synthesized in the pancreas as their precursors - the inactive forms; chymotrypsinogen and trypsinogen - and then are released into the duodenum to cut proteins into smaller peptides. In this paper, the effects of activities of chymotrypsin and trypsin enzymes on fluorescence lifetime distributions of the substrat bovine serum albumin (BSA) modified with N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide (PM) were examined. In the labeling study of BSA with PM, it is aimed to attach PM to the single free thiol (Cys34) and to all the free amine groups in accessible positions in order to produce excimers of pyrene planes of the possible highest amount to form the lifetime distributions in the widest range, that may show specifically distinguishing changes resulting from the activities of the proteases. The time resolved spectrofluorometer was used to monitor fluorescence decays, which were analyzed by using the exponential series method (ESM) to obtain the changes of lifetime distributions. After the exposure of the synthesized substrat PM-BSA to the enzymes, the fluorescence lifetime distributions exhibited different structures which were attributed to the different activities of the proteases.

  15. A dual oxygenation and fluorescence imaging platform for reconstructive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Nguyen, John N.; Venugopal, Vivek; Stockdale, Alan; Neacsu, Florin; Kettenring, Frank; Lee, Bernard T.; Frangioni, John V.; Gioux, Sylvain

    2013-03-01

    There is a pressing clinical need to provide image guidance during surgery. Currently, assessment of tissue that needs to be resected or avoided is performed subjectively, leading to a large number of failures, patient morbidity, and increased healthcare costs. Because near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging is safe, noncontact, inexpensive, and can provide relatively deep information (several mm), it offers unparalleled capabilities for providing image guidance during surgery. These capabilities are well illustrated through the clinical translation of fluorescence imaging during oncologic surgery. In this work, we introduce a novel imaging platform that combines two complementary NIR optical modalities: oxygenation imaging and fluorescence imaging. We validated this platform during facial reconstructive surgery on large animals approaching the size of humans. We demonstrate that NIR fluorescence imaging provides identification of perforator arteries, assesses arterial perfusion, and can detect thrombosis, while oxygenation imaging permits the passive monitoring of tissue vital status, as well as the detection and origin of vascular compromise simultaneously. Together, the two methods provide a comprehensive approach to identifying problems and intervening in real time during surgery before irreparable damage occurs. Taken together, this novel platform provides fully integrated and clinically friendly endogenous and exogenous NIR optical imaging for improved image-guided intervention during surgery.

  16. In vivo cellular imaging using fluorescent proteins - Methods and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Monti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and genetic engineering of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cell biology. What was previously invisible to the cell often can be made visible with the use of fluorescent proteins. With this words, Robert M. Hoffman introduces In vivo Cellular Imaging Using Fluorescent proteins, the eighteen chapters book dedicated to the description of how fluorescence proteins have changed the way to analyze cellular processes in vivo. Modern researches aim to study new and less invasive methods able to follow the behavior of different cell types in different biological contexts: for example, how cancer cells migrate or how they respond to different therapies. Also, in vivo systems can help researchers to better understand animal embryonic development so as how fluorescence proteins may be used to monitor different processes in living organisms at the molecular and cellular level.

  17. Fluorescent Dendrimer Nanoconjugates as Advanced Probes for Biological Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Daniel; Kim, Sung Hoon; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have enabled improvements in spatial resolution for biological imaging. However, there is a strong need for development of advanced fluorescent probes to enable a molecular-scale understanding of biological events. In this work, we report the development of a new class of probes for fluorescence imaging based on dye-conjugated dendrimer nanoconjugates. We utilize molecular-scale dendritic scaffolds as fluorescent probes, thereby enabling conjugation of multiple dyes and linkers to the scaffold periphery. In particular, we use polyamidoamine dendrimers as molecular scaffolds, wherein dye conjugation can be varied over a wide range. Single molecule fluorescence imaging shows that dendrimer nanoconjugates are far brighter than single fluorophores, resulting in increased localization precision. In addition, we further developed a new set of remarkably photostable probes by conjugating photoprotective triplet state quenchers directly onto the dendritic scaffold. We observe large increases in the photobleaching times compared to single dyes and reduced transient dark states (blinking). Overall, we believe that these new probes will allow for single molecule imaging over long time scales, enabling new vistas in biological imaging.

  18. Imaging of a targeted PDT drug with fluorescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffoletto, Dan; Gupta, Anurag; Xu, Zhiqiang; Mahrer, Chris; Bauer, Gretchen; Galas, Scott; Pandey, Ravindra K.; Sunar, Ulas

    2009-02-01

    We constructed a whole-body fluorescence tomography instrument to monitor novel bifunctional phototherapeutic drugs (e.g., HPPH-Cyanine dye conjugate) in small animals. The instrument allows dense source and detector sampling with a fast galvo scanner and a CCD detector for improved resolution and sensitivity (Patwardhan et al., 2005). Here we report tissue phantom measurements to evaluate the imaging performance with a newly constructed tomography instrument. Phantom measurements showed that strong fluorescence generated by HPPH-Cyanine dye (HPPH-CD), having high fluorescence quantum yield and long wavelength fluorescence emission, allowed deep tissue imaging. We also report in vivo fluorescence measurements of the conjugate in Nude mice bearing A549 human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors at 24 hr post injection to evaluate tumor detection ability of the conjugate. Our results indicate that the HPPH-CD shows preferential uptake in tumors compared to surrounding normal tissue at 24 hr post injection. This study demonstrates a potential use of HPPH-CD in detection (fluorescence imaging) and treatment (PDT) of deeply seated tumors.

  19. A portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system for cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Yang, Chaoyu; Gan, Qi; Ma, Rong; Zhang, Zeshu; Chang, Shufang; Shao, Pengfei; Zhang, Shiwu; Liu, Chenhai; Xu, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we proposed a portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system to prevent iatrogenic biliary injuries from occurring during cholecystectomy due to misidentification of the cystic structures. The system consisted of a light source module, a CMOS camera, a Raspberry Pi computer and a 5 inch HDMI LCD. Specifically, the light source module was composed of 690 nm and 850 nm LEDs, allowing the CMOS camera to simultaneously acquire both fluorescence and background images. The system was controlled by Raspberry Pi using Python programming with the OpenCV library under Linux. We chose Indocyanine green(ICG) as a fluorescent contrast agent and then tested fluorescence intensities of the ICG aqueous solution at different concentration levels by our fluorescence microscopic system compared with the commercial Xenogen IVIS system. The spatial resolution of the proposed fluorescence microscopic imaging system was measured by a 1951 USAF resolution target and the dynamic response was evaluated quantitatively with an automatic displacement platform. Finally, we verified the technical feasibility of the proposed system in mouse models of bile duct, performing both correct and incorrect gallbladder resection. Our experiments showed that the proposed system can provide clear visualization of the confluence between the cystic duct and common bile duct or common hepatic duct, suggesting that this is a potential method for guiding cholecystectomy. The proposed portable system only cost a total of $300, potentially promoting its use in resource-limited settings.

  20. Multimodal fluorescence molecular imaging for in vivo characterization of skin cancer using endogenous and exogenous fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica P.; Habimana-Griffin, LeMoyne; Edwards, Tracy S.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Similarity of skin cancer with many benign skin pathologies requires reliable methods to detect and differentiate the different types of these lesions. Previous studies have explored the use of disparate optical techniques to identify and estimate the invasive nature of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma with varying outcomes. Here, we used a concerted approach that provides complementary information for rapid screening and characterization of tumors, focusing on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Assessment of in vivo autofluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging of endogenous fluorophores that are excitable at longer wavelengths (480 nm) than conventional NADH and FAD revealed a decrease in the short FLT component for SCC compared to normal skin, with mean values of 0.57±0.026 ns and 0.61±0.021 ns, respectively (p=0.004). Subsequent systemic administration of a near-infrared fluorescent molecular probe in SCC bearing mice, followed by the implementation of image processing methods on data acquired from two-dimensional and three-dimensional fluorescence molecular imaging, allowed us to estimate the tumor volume and depth, as well as quantify the fluorescent probe in the tumor. The result suggests the involvement of lipofuscin-like lipopigments and riboflavin in SCC metabolism and serves as a model for staging SCC.

  1. Compressive Fluorescence Microscopy for Biological and Hyperspectral Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Studer, Vincent; Chahid, Makhlad; Moussavi, Hamed; Candes, Emmanuel; Dahan, Maxime

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical theory of compressed sensing (CS) asserts that one can acquire signals from measurements whose rate is much lower than the total bandwidth. Whereas the CS theory is now well developed, challenges concerning hardware implementations of CS-based acquisition devices---especially in optics---have only started being addressed. This paper presents an implementation of compressive sensing in fluorescence microscopy and its applications to biomedical imaging. Our CS microscope combines a dynamic structured wide-field illumination and a fast and sensitive single-point fluorescence detection to enable reconstructions of images of fluorescent beads, cells and tissues with undersampling ratios (between the number of pixels and number of measurements) up to 32. We further demonstrate a hyperspectral mode and record images with 128 spectral channels and undersampling ratios up to 64, illustrating the potential benefits of CS acquisition for higher dimensional signals which typically exhibits extreme redund...

  2. Fluorescence Imaging of Fast Retrograde Axonal Transport in Living Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Schellingerhout

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to enable an in vivo imaging technology that can assess the anatomy and function of peripheral nerve tissue (neurography. To do this, we designed and tested a fluorescently labeled molecular probe based on the nontoxic C fragment of tetanus toxin (TTc. TTc was purified, labeled, and subjected to immunoassays and cell uptake assays. The compound was then injected into C57BL/6 mice (N = 60 for in vivo imaging and histologic studies. Image analysis and immunohistochemistry were performed. We found that TTc could be labeled with fluorescent moieties without loss of immunoreactivity or biologic potency in cell uptake assays. In vivo fluorescent imaging experiments demonstrated uptake and retrograde transport of the compound along the course of the sciatic nerve and in the spinal cord. Ex vivo imaging and immunohistochemical studies confirmed the presence of TTc in the sciatic nerve and spinal cord, whereas control animals injected with human serum albumin did not exhibit these features. We have demonstrated neurography with a fluorescently labeled molecular imaging contrast agent based on the TTc.

  3. 3-D Image Analysis of Fluorescent Drug Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raquel Miquel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent ligands provide the means of studying receptors in whole tissues using confocal laser scanning microscopy and have advantages over antibody- or non-fluorescence-based method. Confocal microscopy provides large volumes of images to be measured. Histogram analysis of 3-D image volumes is proposed as a method of graphically displaying large amounts of volumetric image data to be quickly analyzed and compared. The fluorescent ligand BODIPY FL-prazosin (QAPB was used in mouse aorta. Histogram analysis reports the amount of ligand-receptor binding under different conditions and the technique is sensitive enough to detect changes in receptor availability after antagonist incubation or genetic manipulations. QAPB binding was concentration dependent, causing concentration-related rightward shifts in the histogram. In the presence of 10 μM phenoxybenzamine (blocking agent, the QAPB (50 nM histogram overlaps the autofluorescence curve. The histogram obtained for the 1D knockout aorta lay to the left of that of control and 1B knockout aorta, indicating a reduction in 1D receptors. We have shown, for the first time, that it is possible to graphically display binding of a fluorescent drug to a biological tissue. Although our application is specific to adrenergic receptors, the general method could be applied to any volumetric, fluorescence-image-based assay.

  4. Snapshot imaging Fraunhofer line discriminator for detection of plant fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta Roy, S.; Kudenov, M. W.

    2015-05-01

    Non-invasive quantification of plant health is traditionally accomplished using reflectance based metrics, such as the normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI). However, measuring plant fluorescence (both active and passive) to determine photochemistry of plants has gained importance. Due to better cost efficiency, lower power requirements, and simpler scanning synchronization, detecting passive fluorescence is preferred over active fluorescence. In this paper, we propose a high speed imaging approach for measuring passive plant fluorescence, within the hydrogen alpha Fraunhofer line at ~656 nm, using a Snapshot Imaging Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (SIFOLD). For the first time, the advantage of snapshot imaging for high throughput Fraunhofer Line Discrimination (FLD) is cultivated by our system, which is based on a multiple-image Fourier transform spectrometer and a spatial heterodyne interferometer (SHI). The SHI is a Sagnac interferometer, which is dispersion compensated using blazed diffraction gratings. We present data and techniques for calibrating the SIFOLD to any particular wavelength. This technique can be applied to quantify plant fluorescence at low cost and reduced complexity of data collection.

  5. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  6. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  7. Whole mount nuclear fluorescent imaging: convenient documentation of embryo morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Lisa L; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Trainor, Paul A

    2012-11-01

    Here, we describe a relatively inexpensive and easy method to produce high quality images that reveal fine topological details of vertebrate embryonic structures. The method relies on nuclear staining of whole mount embryos in combination with confocal microscopy or conventional wide field fluorescent microscopy. In cases where confocal microscopy is used in combination with whole mount nuclear staining, the resulting embryo images can rival the clarity and resolution of images produced by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fluorescent nuclear staining may be performed with a variety of cell permeable nuclear dyes, enabling the technique to be performed with multiple standard microscope/illumination or confocal/laser systems. The method may be used to document morphology of embryos of a variety of organisms, as well as individual organs and tissues. Nuclear stain imaging imposes minimal impact on embryonic specimens, enabling imaged specimens to be utilized for additional assays.

  8. APPLICATION OF MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE AND MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING IN STUDYING ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guidi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll (Chl a fluorescence is a widely used tool to monitor the photosynthetic process in plants subjected to environmental stresses.this review reports the theoretical bases of Chl fluorescence, and the significance of the most important Chl fluorescence parameters. it also reportshow these parameters can be utilised to estimate changes in photosystem ii (PSII photochemistry, linear electron flux and energy dissipationmechanisms. the relation between actual PSII photochemistry and CO2 assimilation is discussed, as is the role of photochemical andnon-photochemical quenching in inducing changes in PSII activity. the application of Chl fluorescence imaging to study heterogeneity on leaflamina is also considered. this review summarises only some of the results obtained by this methodology to study the effects of differentenvironmental stresses, namely water and nutrients availability, pollutants, temperature and salinity.

  9. New solutions for standardization, monitoring and quality management of fluorescence-based imaging systems (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royon, Arnaud; Papon, Gautier

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopes have become ubiquitous in life sciences laboratories, including those focused on pharmaceuticals, diagnosis, and forensics. For the past few years, the need for both performance guarantees and quantifiable results has driven development in this area. However, the lack of appropriate standards and reference materials makes it difficult or impossible to compare the results of two fluorescence microscopes, or to measure performance fluctuations of one microscope over time. Therefore, the operation of fluorescence microscopes is not monitored as often as their use warrants - an issue that is recognized by both systems manufacturers and national metrology institutes. We have developed a new process that enables the etching of long-term stable fluorescent patterns with sub-micrometer sizes in three dimensions inside glass. In this paper, we present, based on this new process, a fluorescent multi-dimensional ruler and a dedicated software that are suitable for monitoring and quality management of fluorescence-based imaging systems (wide-field, confocal, multiphoton, high content machines). In addition to fluorescence, the same patterns exhibit bright- and dark-field contrast, DIC, and phase contrast, which make them also relevant to monitor these types of microscopes. Non-exhaustively, this new solution enables the measurement of: The stage repositioning accuracy; The illumination and detection homogeneities; The field flatness; The detectors' characteristics; The lateral and axial spatial resolutions; The spectral response (spectrum, intensity and lifetime) of the system. Thanks to the stability of the patterns, microscope performance assessment can be carried out as well in a daily basis as in the long term.

  10. Color-matched esophagus phantom for fluorescent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenying; Hou, Vivian; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-02-01

    We developed a stable, reproducible three-dimensional optical phantom for the evaluation of a wide-field endoscopic molecular imaging system. This phantom mimicked a human esophagus structure with flexibility to demonstrate body movements. At the same time, realistic visual appearance and diffuse spectral reflectance properties of the tissue were simulated by a color matching methodology. A photostable dye-in-polymer technology was applied to represent biomarker probed "hot-spot" locations. Furthermore, fluorescent target quantification of the phantom was demonstrated using a 1.2mm ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope with concurrent fluorescence-reflectance imaging.

  11. 3D Beam Reconstruction by Fluorescence Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Radwell, Neal; Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    We present a technique for mapping the complete 3D spatial intensity profile of a laser beam from its fluorescence in an atomic vapour. We propagate shaped light through a rubidium vapour cell and record the resonant scattering from the side. From a single measurement we obtain a camera limited resolution of 200 x 200 transverse points and 659 longitudinal points. In constrast to invasive methods in which the camera is placed in the beam path, our method is capable of measuring patterns formed by counterpropagating laser beams. It has high resolution in all 3 dimensions, is fast and can be completely automated. The technique has applications in areas which require complex beam shapes, such as optical tweezers, atom trapping and pattern formation.

  12. Inherently fluorescent polystyrene microspheres for coating, sensing and cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jian-Bo; Xu, Yu-Liang; Liu, Yu; Wang, Yanan; Sui, Yuanhong; Liu, Jian-Guo; Wang, Xiaojuan

    2017-04-01

    Commercially available polystyrene (PS) fluorescent microspheres are widely used in biological field for tracing, in vivo imaging and calibration of flow cytometry, among other applications. However, these particles do suffer from some drawbacks such as the leakage and photobleaching of organic dyes within them. In the present study, inherently fluorescent properties of PS based microspheres have been explored for the first time. Here we find that a simple chloromethylation reaction endows the polystyrene particles with inherent fluorescence without any subsequent conjugation of an external fluorophore. A possible mechanism for fluorescence is elucidated by synthesizing and investigating p-ethylbenzyl chloride, a compound with similar structure. Significantly, no photobleaching or leaking issues were observed owing to the stable structure of the microspheres. Chloromethylated PS (CMPS) microspheres can keep their perpetual blue fluorescence even in dry powder state making them attractive as a potential coating material. Furthermore, the chloromethyl groups on CMPS microspheres make them very convenient for further functionalization. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted microspheres showed good biocompatibility and negligible cytotoxicity, and could be used to image intracellular Fe(3+) due to the selective fluorescence quenching effect of aqueous Fe(3+) in cytoplasm.

  13. Synthesis and Characterisation of Photo-Cross-Linkable Liquid Crystalline Poly(n-[n′-flurobenzoylstyryloxy]alkylmethacrylates and Their Fluorescence Lifetime Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study on photo-cross-linkable polymer containing pendant chalcone moiety exhibiting liquid crystalline as well as fluorescence lifetime properties in detail. The photoresponsive polymers were prepared, and their structure has been characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The photo-cross-linking behavior of polymers has been studied by UV-Visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. UV spectral studies revealed that the polymers follow 2π+2π cyclo addition reactions when they undergo photo-cross-linking under the influence of UV-light. Number and weight average molecular weight of the polymers were determined by Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC and polydispersity index value near to 1.5. The thermal and thermooxidative stability of the polymers were determined by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA. Thermal transitions were studied by DSC, and presence of mesophases was identified at 147 and 126∘C by hot stage polarized light optical microscopy (HPOM. Fluorescence lifetime measurements using the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC method reveal that the average lifetime values decrease from 5.94 ns to 5.32 ns on UV-irradiation were discussed in detail.

  14. Photophysics of cyanine dyes adsorbed onto surfaces. Sub-nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements of 3,3'-diethyloxadicarbocyanine iodide and photoisomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira Ferreira, L.; Oliveira, A.; Henbest, K. [and others

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the experiment entitled 'Photophysics of Cyanine dyes on Surfaces'; carried out at the Central Laser Facility (CLF) from the 6th to the 20th January 1997. The experiment, funded by the Framework IV Large-Scale Facilities Access Scheme, was proposed by Prof. L.F. Vieira Ferreira, Centro de Quimica-Fisica Molecular, Complexo 1, IST, 1096 Lisboa Codex, Portugal, and carried out by visiting researchers from the Institute. They were supported by researchers from the Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Experimental results: The photo physics of 3,3'-Diethyloxadicarbocyanine iodide (DODCI) adsorbed onto swollen microcrystalline cellulose was investigated. Two fluorescence emissions band have been observed and assigned. One was due to singlet excited momers and a second new emission, seen at high laser fluences, was due to the formation of a photoisomer. The DODCI stays entrapped between the polymer chains and nonradiative pathways for deactivation are reduced, the lifetimes of the excited states were measured using time resolved fluorescence lifetimes techniques. The fluorescence lifetimes of the excited states are longer lived in a swollen cellulose matrix. The photoisomer emission especially lives an order of magnitude longer than in homogeneous media.

  15. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal based fluorescent cellular imaging probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Palmal, Sharbari; Basiruddin, S K; Karan, Niladri Sekhar; Sarkar, Suresh; Pradhan, Narayan; Jana, Nikhil R

    2013-06-21

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals such as Mn doped ZnS, Mn doped ZnSe and Cu doped InZnS, are considered as new classes of fluorescent biological probes with low toxicity. Although the synthesis in high quality of such nanomaterials is now well established, transforming them into functional fluorescent probes remains a challenge. Here we report a fluorescent cellular imaging probe made of high quality doped semiconductor nanocrystals. We have identified two different coating approaches suitable for transforming the as synthesized hydrophobic doped semiconductor nanocrystals into water-soluble functional nanoparticles. Following these approaches we have synthesized TAT-peptide- and folate-functionalized nanoparticles of 10-80 nm hydrodynamic diameter and used them as a fluorescent cell label. The results shows that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can be an attractive alternative for conventional cadmium based quantum dots with low toxicity.

  16. Optimization of microsatellite DNA Gelred fluorescence imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    2012-10-11

    Oct 11, 2012 ... In order to explore the best microsatellite DNA Gelred imaging technology, this study .... The cycling parameters were: 4 min at 94°C, followed by 35 cycles of ..... double-strand breaks in mammalian cells. Nucleic Acids Res.

  17. Frequency domain phosphorescence lifetime Imaging measurements and applications by ISS FastFLIM and multi pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Ulas C.; Lam, Sandra; Sun, Yuansheng; Liao, Shih-Chu Jeff; George, Steven C.; Barbieri, Beniamino

    2017-02-01

    Phosphorescence probes can have significantly long lifetimes, on the order of micro- to milli-seconds or longer. In addition, environmental changes can affect the lifetimes of these phosphorescence probes. Thus, Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (PLIM) is a very useful tool to localize the phosphorescence probes based on their lifetimes to study the variance in the lifetimes due to the micro environmental changes. Since the probes respond to the biologically relevant parameters like oxygen concentration, they can be used to study various biologically relevant processes like cellular metabolism, protein interaction etc. In this case, we study the effects of oxygen on Oxyphor G4 with PLIM. Since The Oxyphor G4 can be quenched by O2, it is a good example of such a probe and has a lifetime around 250us. Here we present the digital frequency domain PLIM technique and study the lifetime of the Oxyphor G4 as a function of the O2 concentration. The lifetime data are successfully presented in a phasor plot for various O2 concentrations and are consistent with the time domain data. Overall, we can analyze the oxygen consumption of varying cells using this technique.

  18. Deep UV Native Fluorescence Imaging of Antarctic Cryptoendolithic Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Douglas, S.; Sun, H.; McDonald, G. D.; Bhartia, R.; Nealson, K. H.; Hug, W. F.

    2001-01-01

    An interdisciplinary team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Life Detection has embarked on a project to provide in situ chemical and morphological characterization of Antarctic cryptoendolithic microbial communities. We present here in situ deep ultraviolet (UV) native fluorescence and environmental scanning electron microscopy images transiting 8.5 mm into a sandstone sample from the Antarctic Dry Valleys. The deep ultraviolet imaging system employs 224.3, 248.6, and 325 nm lasers to elicit differential fluorescence and resonance Raman responses from biomolecules and minerals. The 224.3 and 248.6 nm lasers elicit a fluorescence response from the aromatic amino and nucleic acids. Excitation at 325 nm may elicit activity from a variety of biomolecules, but is more likely to elicit mineral fluorescence. The resultant fluorescence images provide in situ chemical and morphological maps of microorganisms and the associated organic matrix. Visible broadband reflectance images provide orientation against the mineral background. Environmental scanning electron micrographs provided detailed morphological information. The technique has made possible the construction of detailed fluorescent maps extending from the surface of an Antarctic sandstone sample to a depth of 8.5 mm. The images detect no evidence of microbial life in the superficial 0.2 mm crustal layer. The black lichen component between 0.3 and 0.5 mm deep absorbs all wavelengths of both laser and broadband illumination. Filamentous deep ultraviolet native fluorescent activity dominates in the white layer between 0.6 mm and 5.0 mm from the surface. These filamentous forms are fungi that continue into the red (iron-rich) region of the sample extending from 5.0 to 8.5 mm. Using differential image subtraction techniques it is possible to identify fungal nuclei. The ultraviolet response is markedly attenuated in this region, apparently from the absorption of ultraviolet light by iron-rich particles coating

  19. The Cyan Fluorescent Protein (CFP) Transgenic Mouse as a Model for Imaging Pancreatic Exocrine Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hop S Tran; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Snyder, Cynthia S; Reynoso, Jose; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Context The use of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging has opened many new areas of research. Among the important advances in the field have been the development of transgenic mice expressing various fluorescent proteins. Objective To report whole-body and organ-specific fluorescence imaging to characterize the transgenic cyan fluorescent protein mouse. Design Mice were imaged using two devices. Brightfield images were obtained with the OV100 Small Animal Imaging System (Olympus Corp., Tokyo, Japan). Fluorescence imaging was performed under the cyan fluorescent protein filter using the iBox Small Animal Imaging System (UVP, Upland, CA, USA). Intervention All animals were sacrificed immediately before imaging. They were imaged before and throughout multiple steps of a complete necropsy. Harvested organs were also imaged with both devices. Selected organs were then frozen and processed for histology, fluorescence microscopy, and H&E staining. Fluorescence microscopy was performed with an Olympus IMT-2 inverted fluorescence microscope. Main outcome measure Determination of fluorescence intensity of different organs. Results Surprisingly, we found that there is differential enhancement of fluorescence among organs; most notably, the pancreas stands out from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, displaying the strongest fluorescence of all organs in the mouse. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the cyan fluorescent protein fluorescence resided in the acinar cells of the pancreas and not the islet cells. Conclusions The cyan fluorescent protein mouse should lead to a deeper understanding of pancreatic function and pathology, including cancer. PMID:19287108

  20. The Cyan Fluorescent Protein (CFP Transgenic Mouse as a Model for Imaging Pancreatic Exocrine Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hop S Tran Cao

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging has opened many new areas of research. Among the important advances in the field have been the development of transgenic mice expressing various fluorescent proteins. Objective To report whole-body and organ-specific fluorescence imaging to characterize the transgenic cyan fluorescent protein mouse. Design Mice were imaged using two devices. Brightfield images were obtained with the OV100 Small Animal Imaging System (Olympus Corp., Tokyo, Japan. Fluorescence imaging was performed under the cyan fluorescent protein filter using the iBox Small Animal Imaging System (UVP, Upland, CA, USA. Intervention All animals were sacrificed immediately before imaging. They were imaged before and throughout multiple steps of a complete necropsy. Harvested organs were also imaged with both devices. Selected organs were then frozen and processed for histology, fluorescence microscopy, and H&E staining. Fluorescence microscopy was performed with an Olympus IMT-2 inverted fluorescence microscope. Main outcome measure Determination of fluorescence intensity of different organs. Results Surprisingly, we found that there is differential enhancement of fluorescence among organs; most notably, the pancreas stands out from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, displaying the strongest fluorescence of all organs in the mouse. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the cyan fluorescent protein fluorescence resided in the acinar cells of the pancreas and not the islet cells. Conclusions The cyan fluorescent protein mouse should lead to a deeper understanding of pancreatic function and pathology, including cancer.

  1. Image reconstruction for diagnosis and prognosis of breast cancer using fluorescence measurements: phantom studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R.; Godavarty, A.; Thompson, A. B., Jr.; Sevick-Muraca, E. M.

    2005-04-01

    Fluorescence-enhance optical tomography is performed using (i) point illumination and point collection and (ii) area illumination and area collection geometrics in 3D. In both measurement techniques, an image-intensified charge-coupled (ICCD) imaging system is used in the frequency-domain to image near-infrared contrast agents. The experimental measurements are compared to diffusion model predictions in least squares form in the inverse problem. For image recovery for both area and point illumination geometries, an efficient gradient-based optimization technique based on the Penalty/modified barrier function (PMBF) method and the constrained truncated Newton with trust region (CONTN) method is developed. Targets in 3D were reconstructed from experimental data under two conditions of (i) perfect uptake (1:0, target to background ratio) and (ii) imperfect uptake (100:1, target to background ratio). Parameters of absorption cross section due to fluorophore and lifetimes are reconstructed. The present work demonstrates that 3D fluorescence enhanced optical tomography reconstructions can be successfully performed from both point/area illumination and collection experimental measurements of the time-dependent light propagation on clinically relevant tissue phantoms using a gain-modulated ICCD camera.

  2. Polyester Fabric's Fluorescent Dyeing in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and its Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoqing; Xu, Yanyan; Zheng, Laijiu; Yan, Jun; Zhao, Hongjuan; Zhang, Juan; Sun, Yanfeng

    2017-03-01

    As one of the most important coumarin-like dyes, disperse fluorescent Yellow 82 exhibits exceptionally large two-photon effects. Here, it was firstly introduced into the supercritical CO2 dyeing polyester fabrics in this work. Results of the present work showed that the dyeing parameters such as the dyeing time, pressure and temperature had remarkable influences on the color strength of fabrics. The optimized dyeing condition in supercritical CO2 dyeing has been proposed that the dyeing time was 60 min; the pressure was 25 MPa and the temperature was 120 °C. As a result, acceptable products were obtained with the wash and rub fastness rating at 5 or 4-5. The polyester fabrics dyed with fluorescent dyes can be satisfied for the requirement of manufacturing warning clothing. Importantly, the confocal microscopy imaging technology was successfully introduced into textile fields to observe the distribution and fluorescence intensity of disperse fluorescent Yellow 82 on polyester fabrics. As far as we know, this is the first report about supercritical CO2 dyeing polyester fabrics based on disperse fluorescent dyes. It will be very helpful for the further design of new fluorescent functional dyes suitable for supercritical CO2 dyeing technique.

  3. Two-photon fluorescence and fluorescence imaging of two styryl heterocyclic dyes combined with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-yao; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Ying-kai; Qiao, Cong-de; Liu, Zhao-e

    2016-03-01

    Two new styryl heterocyclic two-photon (TP) materials, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (probe-1) and 4,4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-benzene iodated salt (probe-2) were successfully synthesized and studied as potential fluorescent probes of DNA detection. The linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of two compounds in different solvents were investigated. The absorption, one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra of the free dye and dye-DNA complex were also examined to evaluate their photophysical properties. The binding constants of dye-DNA were obtained according to Scatchard equation with good values. The results showed that two probes could be used as fluorescent DNA probes by two-photon excitation, and TP fluorescent properties of probe-1 are superior to that of probe-2. The fluorescent method date indicated that the mechanisms of dye-DNA complex interaction may be groove binding for probe-1 and electrostatic interaction for probe-2, respectively. The MTT assay experiments showed two probes are low toxicity. Moreover, the TP fluorescence imaging of DNA detection in living cells at 800 nm indicated that the ability to locate in cell nuclei of probe-1 is better than that of probe-2.

  4. Colorful protein-based fluorescent probes for collagen imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn J A Aper

    Full Text Available Real-time visualization of collagen is important in studies on tissue formation and remodeling in the research fields of developmental biology and tissue engineering. Our group has previously reported on a fluorescent probe for the specific imaging of collagen in live tissue in situ, consisting of the native collagen binding protein CNA35 labeled with fluorescent dye Oregon Green 488 (CNA35-OG488. The CNA35-OG488 probe has become widely used for collagen imaging. To allow for the use of CNA35-based probes in a broader range of applications, we here present a toolbox of six genetically-encoded collagen probes which are fusions of CNA35 to fluorescent proteins that span the visible spectrum: mTurquoise2, EGFP, mAmetrine, LSSmOrange, tdTomato and mCherry. While CNA35-OG488 requires a chemical conjugation step for labeling with the fluorescent dye, these protein-based probes can be easily produced in high yields by expression in E. coli and purified in one step using Ni2+-affinity chromatography. The probes all bind specifically to collagen, both in vitro and in porcine pericardial tissue. Some first applications of the probes are shown in multicolor imaging of engineered tissue and two-photon imaging of collagen in human skin. The fully-genetic encoding of the new probes makes them easily accessible to all scientists interested in collagen formation and remodeling.

  5. A Review of Indocyanine Green Fluorescent Imaging in Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmo T. Alander

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the recent surgical intraoperational applications of indocyanine green fluorescence imaging methods, the basics of the technology, and instrumentation used. Well over 200 papers describing this technique in clinical setting are reviewed. In addition to the surgical applications, other recent medical applications of ICG are briefly examined.

  6. Ratiometric fluorescence imaging of free Zn2+ in brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard B.; Suh, Sang W.; Frederickson, Christopher J.

    2001-05-01

    Recently, the function of zinc in the axonal boutons of hippocampal neurons has come under increased scrutiny as evidence has emerged of a putative role for this metal ion in neural damage following insults such as ischemia, blunt force trauma, and seizure. Indeed, the nonpathological role of free zinc in the brain remains cryptic after more than 40 years. We have used a biosensing approach to determine free zinc ion concentrations by fluorescence lifetime, intensity, intensity ratio, or anisotropy changes caused by binding of zinc to variants of a protein, apocarbonic anhydrase II (apo-CA). This approach permits real time measurement of zinc down to picomolar levels, with no perceptible interference from other divalent metal ions abundant in serum and tissue, such as calcium and magnesium. Recently, we used apo-CA together with a fluorescent ligand whose binding is metal-dependent to obtain the first fluorescence micrographs of zinc release from a rat hippocampus model in response to electrical stimulus. In our view, elucidation of the zinc fluxes in neural tissue ultimately requires quantitation, as in the case of calcium. Recent results will be shown.

  7. A simple protocol for attenuating the auto-fluorescence of cyanobacteria for optimized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Perrine; Ploux, Olivier; Méjean, Annick

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria contain pigments, which generate auto-fluorescence that interferes with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging of cyanobacteria. We describe simple chemical treatments using CuSO4 or H2O2 that significantly reduce the auto-fluorescence of Microcystis strains. These protocols were successfully applied in FISH experiments using 16S rRNA specific probes and filamentous cyanobacteria.

  8. Novel fluorescence molecular imaging of chemotherapy-induced intestinal apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Galit; Shirvan, Anat; Grimberg, Hagit; Reshef, Ayelet; Yogev-Falach, Merav; Cohen, Avi; Ziv, Ilan

    2009-09-01

    Chemotherapy-induced enteropathy (CIE) is one of the most serious complications of anticancer therapy, and tools for its early detection and monitoring are highly needed. We report on a novel fluorescence method for detection of CIE, based on molecular imaging of the related apoptotic process. The method comprises systemic intravenous administration of the ApoSense fluorescent biomarker (N,N'-didansyl-L-cystine DDC) in vivo and subsequent fluorescence imaging of the intestinal mucosa. In the reported proof-of-concept studies, mice were treated with either taxol+cyclophosphamide or doxil. DDC was administered in vivo at various time points after drug administration, and tracer uptake by ileum tissue was subsequently evaluated by ex vivo fluorescent microscopy. Chemotherapy caused marked and selective uptake of DDC in ileal epithelial cells, in correlation with other hallmarks of apoptosis (i.e., DNA fragmentation and Annexin-V binding). Induction of DDC uptake occurred early after chemotherapy, and its temporal profile was parallel to that of the apoptotic process, as assessed histologically. DDC may therefore serve as a useful tool for detection of CIE. Future potential integration of this method with fluorescent endoscopic techniques, or development of radio-labeled derivatives of DDC for emission tomography, may advance early diagnosis and monitoring of this severe adverse effect of chemotherapy.

  9. A new fluorescent imaging of renal inflammation with RCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2010-12-20

    The objective of this study is to design a fluorescent imaging agent with R-Gel, one of the recombinant polymers (RCP), for renal inflammation. The R-Gel based on human type I collagen has multiple Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motifs which are ligands for some types of integrin receptors on the cell surface. After intravenous administration of R-Gel labeled by Cy7 of a fluorescent dye to three animal models of nephritis mousse, interstitial nephritis (by using UUO model mice), glomerulonephritis (HIGA mice), and ischemia-reperfusion injured kidney (I/R mice), the extent of fluorescent imaging at the renal inflammation was assessed. The Cy7-labeled R-Gel was accumulated in the inflammation site to a significantly greater extent than in the normal one at 24h after administration. The renal pattern of fluorescent imaging was similar to that of administration anti-Mac1 antibody. Taken together, it is conceivable that the R-Gel was targeted to macrophages infiltrated into the inflammation site of kidney. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Infrared imaging of LED lighting tubes and fluorescent tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siikanen, Sami; Kivi, Sini; Kauppinen, Timo; Juuti, Mikko

    2011-05-01

    The low energy efficiency of conventional light sources is mainly caused by generation of waste heat. We used infrared (IR) imaging in order to monitor the heating of both LED tube luminaires and ordinary T8 fluorescent tubes. The IR images showed clearly how the surface temperatures of the fluorescent tube ends quickly rose up to about +50...+70°C, whereas the highest surface temperatures seen on the LED tubes were only about +30...+40°C. The IR images demonstrated how the heat produced by the individual LED chips can be efficiently guided to the supporting structure in order to keep the LED emitters cool and hence maintain efficient operation. The consumed electrical power and produced illuminance were also recorded during 24 hour measurements. In order to assess the total luminous efficacy of the luminaires, separate luminous flux measurements were made in a large integrating sphere. The currently available LED tubes showed efficacies of up to 88 lm/W, whereas a standard "cool white" T8 fluorescent tube produced ca. 75 lm/W. Both lamp types gave ca. 110 - 130 lx right below the ceiling-mounted luminaire, but the LED tubes consume only 40 - 55% of the electric power compared to fluorescent tubes.

  11. Mueller matrix signature in advanced fluorescence microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Qiu, Jianjun; Kao, Fu-Jen; Diaspro, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated the measurement and characterization of the polarization properties of a fluorescence signal using four-channel photon counting based Stokes-Mueller polarization microscopy. Thus, Lu-Chipman decomposition was applied to extract the critical polarization properties such as depolarization, linear retardance and the optical rotation of collagen type I fiber. We observed the spatial distribution of anisotropic and helical molecules of collagen from the reconstructed 2D Mueller images based on the fluorescence signal in a pixel-by-pixel manner.

  12. Highly stable organic fluorescent nanorods for living- cell imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minhuan Lan[1,3; Jinfeng Zhang[1,3; Xiaoyue Zhu[1; Pengfei Wang[2; Xianfeng Chen[1; Chun-Sing Lee[1; Wenjun Zhang[1

    2015-01-01

    Metal-free, organic-dye-based fluorescent nanorods were fabricated through a simple solvent-exchange procedure. The as-prepared nanorods exhibit low toxicity to living cells and excellent photostability. Furthermore, they are stable in solutions of various pHs and high ionic strength and in solutions with interfering metal ions. Compared with the free DPP-Br molecules in THF, these nanorods exhibit larger Stokes shift, broader absorption spectra, and greatly improved photostability. We successfully demonstrated the application of the nanorods, including their aforementioned beneficial characteristics, as a good fluorescence probe for bio-imaging.

  13. The study of blue LED to induce fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging for oral carcinoma detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Longjiang; Hu, Yuanting

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging diagnosis of malignant lesions provides us with a new method to diagnose diseases in precancerous stage. Early diagnosis of disease has significant importance in cancer treatment, because most cancers can be cured well in precancerous, especially when the diffusion of cancer is limited in a restricted region. In this study, Golden hamster models were applied to 5% 9, 10 dimethyl-1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA) to induce hamster buccal cheek pouch carcinoma three times a week. Rose Bengal, which has been used in clinican for years and avoids visible side-effect to human was chosen as photosensitizer. 405 nm blue LED was used to induce the fluorescence of photosensitizer. After topical application of photosensitizer, characteristic red emission fluorescence peak was observed around 600nm. Similar, normal oral cavity has special luminescence around 480nm. Fluorescence spectroscopy technology is based on analysing emission peaks of photosensitizer in the areas of oral carcinoma, moreover, red-to-green (IR/IG) intensity ratio is also applied as a diagnostic algorithm. A CCD which is connected with a computer is used to take pictures at carcinoma areas through different filters. Fluorescence images from normal hamster buccal cheek pouch are compared with those from carcinogen-induced models of carcinoma, and morphological differences between normal and lesion tissue can be distinguished. The pictures are analyzed by Matlab and shown on the screen of computer. This paper demonstrates that Rose Bengal could be used as photosensitizer to detect oral carcinoma, and blue LED as excitation source could not only have a good effect to diagnose oral carcinoma, but also decrease cost greatly.

  14. A Pico Projector Source for Confocal Fluorescence and Ophthalmic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Matthew S

    2012-09-02

    A Pico digital light projector has been implemented as an integrated illumination source and spatial light modulator for confocal imaging. The target is illuminated with a series of rapidly projected lines or points to simulate scanning. Light returning from the target is imaged onto a 2D rolling shutter CMOS sensor. By controlling the spatio-temporal relationship between the rolling shutter and illumination pattern, light returning from the target is spatially filtered. Confocal retinal, fluorescence, and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography implementations of this novel imaging technique are presented.

  15. In Vivo Metal Ion Imaging Using Fluorescent Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Hirayama, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    In vivo imaging in living animals provides the ability to monitor alterations of signaling molecules, ions, and other biological components during various life stages and in disease. The data gained from in vivo imaging can be used for biological discovery or to determine elements of disease progression and can inform the development and translation of therapeutics. Herein, we present theories behind small-molecule, fluorescent, metal ion sensors as well as the methods for their successful application to in vivo metal ion imaging, including ex vivo validation.

  16. Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of cadmium-treated white cabbage plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borek M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The chlorophyll fluorescence imaging technique is a valuable tool to study the impact of heavy metal stress in plants. The aim of this paper was to investigate the influence of Cd on photosynthetic apparatus of white cabbage (Brassica oleracea subsp. capitata f. alba plants. Two cabbage cultivars ‘Ditmarska Najwcześniejsza’ (‘DN’; early and ‘Amager Polana’ (‘AP’; late were used. Cd was applied before planting seedlings (10 mg Cd kg−1 DM of soil.. Measurements were performed at the 3rd leaf after 2 weeks of planting. The level of Cd-induced stress to plants was estimated by chlorophyll (Chl content (photometrically and analyses of images and numeric values of the major fluorescence parameters of Chl (Chl fluorescence imaging system FluorCam. Cd negatively affected the chlorophyll content and Fv/Fm, Fv’/Fm’, Φ PSII and qP in leaves of early cultivar of white cabbage. However, in the case of late cv. we did not observe such distinct changes. It suggests that late cultivars. are more resistant to Cd than the early ones. Considering methodological aspect of the study, Chl fluorescence imaging can better reveal some alterations within the leaf, because numeric values of specific parameters, which are the averaged data collected from the whole leaf, cannot reflect the tissue specificity. Abbreviations: HM – heavy metal, Cd – cadmium, Chl – chlorophyll, Fv/Fm – photochemical efficiency of PSII in the dark-adapted state, F‘v’/F‘m’ – PSII maximum efficiency, Φ PSII – quantum efficiency of PSII electron transport, NPQ – nonphotochemical quenching of maximal Chl fluorescence, qP – photochemical quenching coefficient.

  17. Time-gated FRET nanoassemblies for rapid and sensitive intra- and extracellular fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsari, Hamid Samareh; Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Lindén, Stina; Chen, Ting; Qiu, Xue; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Jennings, Travis L; Susumu, Kimihiro; Medintz, Igor L; Hildebrandt, Niko; Miller, Lawrence W

    2016-06-01

    Time-gated Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using the unique material combination of long-lifetime terbium complexes (Tb) and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) provides many advantages for highly sensitive and multiplexed biosensing. Although time-gated detection can efficiently suppress sample autofluorescence and background fluorescence from directly excited FRET acceptors, Tb-to-QD FRET has rarely been exploited for biomolecular imaging. We demonstrate Tb-to-QD time-gated FRET nanoassemblies that can be applied for intra- and extracellular imaging. Immunostaining of different epitopes of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with Tb- and QD-conjugated antibodies and nanobodies allowed for efficient Tb-to-QD FRET on A431 cell membranes. The broad usability of Tb-to-QD FRET was further demonstrated by intracellular Tb-to-QD FRET and Tb-to-QD-to-dye FRET using microinjection as well as cell-penetrating peptide-mediated endocytosis with HeLa cells. Effective brightness enhancement by FRET from several Tb to the same QD, the use of low nanomolar concentrations, and the quick and sensitive detection void of FRET acceptor background fluorescence are important advantages for advanced intra- and extracellular imaging of biomolecular interactions.

  18. Fluorescent ligand for human progesterone receptor imaging in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstain, Roy; Kanter, Joan; Friedman, Beth; Ellies, Lesley G; Baker, Michael E; Tsien, Roger Y

    2013-05-15

    We employed molecular modeling to design and then synthesize fluorescent ligands for the human progesterone receptor. Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) or tetramethylrhodamine were conjugated to the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (Mifepristone) through an extended hydrophilic linker. The fluorescent ligands demonstrated comparable bioactivity to the parent antagonist in live cells and triggered nuclear translocation of the receptor in a specific manner. The BODIPY labeled ligand was applied to investigate the dependency of progesterone receptor nuclear translocation on partner proteins and to show that functional heat shock protein 90 but not immunophilin FKBP52 activity is essential. A tissue distribution study indicated that the fluorescent ligand preferentially accumulates in tissues that express high levels of the receptor in vivo. The design and properties of the BODIPY-labeled RU486 make it a potential candidate for in vivo imaging of PR by positron emission tomography through incorporation of (18)F into the BODIPY core.

  19. Fluorescence imaging to study cancer burden on lymph nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Alisha V.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Gunn, Jason R.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-03-01

    Morbidity and complexity involved in lymph node staging via surgical resection and biopsy calls for staging techniques that are less invasive. While visible blue dyes are commonly used in locating sentinel lymph nodes, since they follow tumor-draining lymphatic vessels, they do not provide a metric to evaluate presence of cancer. An area of active research is to use fluorescent dyes to assess tumor burden of sentinel and secondary lymph nodes. The goal of this work was to successfully deploy and test an intra-nodal cancer-cell injection model to enable planar fluorescence imaging of a clinically relevant blue dye, specifically methylene blue along with a cancer targeting tracer, Affibody labeled with IRDYE800CW and subsequently segregate tumor-bearing from normal lymph nodes. This direct-injection based tumor model was employed in athymic rats (6 normal, 4 controls, 6 cancer-bearing), where luciferase-expressing breast cancer cells were injected into axillary lymph nodes. Tumor presence in nodes was confirmed by bioluminescence imaging before and after fluorescence imaging. Lymphatic uptake from the injection site (intradermal on forepaw) to lymph node was imaged at approximately 2 frames/minute. Large variability was observed within each cohort.

  20. Cellular uptake of modified oligonucleotides enhanced by porphyrins studied by time-resolved microspectrofluorimetry and fluorescence imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praus, P.; Kočišová, E.; Mojzeš, P.; Štěpánek, J.; Turpin, P.-Y.; Sureau, F.

    2011-05-01

    Fluorescence microimaging and homodyne phase-resolved confocal microspectrofluorimetry were used to monitor the transport of antisense oligonucleotide into 3T3 living cells and its subsequent intracellular distribution. Phosphorothioate analog of 15-mer oligothymidylate labeled by ATTO 425 was complexed with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (H 2TMPyP4) as an uptake-mediating agent. High frequency (up to 180 MHz) analog modulation of both exciting diode laser and the detector image intensifier gain was used to record time-resolved fluorescence spectra. Fluorescence lifetime data within a broad spectral range have revealed preservation of oligonucleotide/porphyrin complex integrity and binding properties of both components inside the cell.

  1. [Intraoperative graft assessment using fluorescent imaging system (SPY)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, T; Naraoka, S; Kakizaki, T

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the efficacy of intraoperative fluorescent imaging system for the assessment of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We used SPY imaging system in 100 CABG (57 off-pump and 43 on-pump CABG), totalling 287 distal anastomoses. The total graft patency rate on postoperative angiography in this series was 96.2% (276/287). Graft revision was done in 10 cases (10.0%) and 13 anastomoses (4.5%) by SPY imaging, which all resulted in good patency at postoperative angiography. On the other hand, 7 distal anastomoses and 1 mammary graft (2.8%) appeared to be successful on intraoperative SPY imaging, but were revealed to be occluded by postoperative angiography. SPY imaging system is useful for graft validation, and may contribute to improvement of coronary bypass graft patency.

  2. Size-effects on energy relaxation and excited-species desorption in krypton clusters: Fluorescence lifetime measurements with 10 eV laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaev, A. V.; Museur, L.; Castex, M. C.

    1997-09-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements of KrN clusters (N¯=2-2000) have been carried out using intense 10 eV laser excitation near 3P2 metastable atomic energy level. Two principal groups of electronically excited dimers Kr2* have been found in desorption: dimers, loosely bound near the (3P2+1S0) dissociation limit, ejected from cooled clusters and dimers undergoing vibrational relaxation from hot clusters. The desorption is principally terminated when N¯⩾50 at./cluster. The relaxation kinetics seems to converge to the properties of a solid state for 102⩽N¯⩽103 at./cluster. A variation of the Kr2*(1u/0u-) radiative lifetime, from 264 ns (in gas phase) to 440 ns (N¯=102), has been found. An equilibrium cluster temperature of 57 K has been calculated from this τ(N) dependence.

  3. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%-5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm(2) CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%-5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R(2) > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%-5% gold solutions in a small animal sized water phantom has been demonstrated

  4. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena, E-mail: bazalova@stanford.edu; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5847 and Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8648 (Japan); Ahmad, Moiz [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States); Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo [Department of Medical Physics, Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo 060-8648, Japan and Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8648 (Japan); Matsuo, Yuto [Department of Medical Physics, Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo 060-8648 (Japan); Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm{sup 2} CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R{sup 2} > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a

  5. Directional bilateral filters for smoothing fluorescence microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasij Venkatesh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Images obtained through fluorescence microscopy at low numerical aperture (NA are noisy and have poor resolution. Images of specimens such as F-actin filaments obtained using confocal or widefield fluorescence microscopes contain directional information and it is important that an image smoothing or filtering technique preserve the directionality. F-actin filaments are widely studied in pathology because the abnormalities in actin dynamics play a key role in diagnosis of cancer, cardiac diseases, vascular diseases, myofibrillar myopathies, neurological disorders, etc. We develop the directional bilateral filter as a means of filtering out the noise in the image without significantly altering the directionality of the F-actin filaments. The bilateral filter is anisotropic to start with, but we add an additional degree of anisotropy by employing an oriented domain kernel for smoothing. The orientation is locally adapted using a structure tensor and the parameters of the bilateral filter are optimized for within the framework of statistical risk minimization. We show that the directional bilateral filter has better denoising performance than the traditional Gaussian bilateral filter and other denoising techniques such as SURE-LET, non-local means, and guided image filtering at various noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR. We also show quantitative improvements in low NA images of F-actin filaments.

  6. Fluorescence imaging of dendritic spines of Golgi-Cox-stained neurons using brightening background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Min; Xiong, Hanqing; Yang, Tao; Shang, Zhenhua; Chen, Muqing; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel fluorescence imaging approach to imaging nonfluorescence-labeled biological tissue samples. The method was demonstrated by imaging neurons in Golgi-Cox-stained and epoxy-resin-embedded samples through the excitation of the background fluorescence of the specimens. The dark neurons stood out clearly against background fluorescence in the images, enabling the tracing of a single dendritic spine using both confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy. The results suggest that the reported fluorescence imaging method would provide an effective alternative solution to image nonfluorescence-labeled samples, and it allows tracing the dendritic spine structure of neurons.

  7. Relation between proteins tertiary structure, tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes and tryptophan S(o)→(1)L(b) and S(o)→(1)L(a) transitions. Studies on α1-acid glycoprotein and β-lactoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, Jihad René

    2011-05-01

    We measured fluorescence lifetimes and fluorescence spectra (excitation and emission) of tryptophan residues of α(1)-acid glycoprotein (three Trp residues) and β-lactoglobulin (two Trp residues) in absence and presence of 450 μM progesterone. Progesterone binds only to α(1)-acid glycoprotein. In absence of progesterone, each of the two proteins displays three fluorescence lifetimes. Addition of progesterone induces a partial inhibition of the S(o) → (1)L(a) transition without affecting fluorescence lifetimes. The same experiments performed in presence of denatured proteins in 6 M guanidine show that addition of progesterone inhibits partially the S(o) → (1)L(a) transition and its peak is 15 nm shifted to the red compared to that obtained for native proteins. However, the S(o) → (1)L(b) transition position peak is not affected by protein denaturation. Thus, the tertiary structure of the protein plays an important role by modulating the tryptophan electronic transitions. Fluorescence emission decay recorded in absence and presence of progesterone yields three fluorescence lifetimes whether proteins are denatured or not. Thus, protein tertiary structure is not responsible for the presence of three fluorescence lifetimes. These characterize tryptophan substructures reached at the excited states and which population (pre-exponential values) depend on the tryptophan residues interaction with their microenvironment(s) and thus on the global conformation of the protein.

  8. 基于荧光寿命机理的光纤温度传感器研究%Fiber Temperature Sensor Based on Fluorescent Lifetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江小峰; 李亚东; 李欣; 夏添艺; 林春

    2015-01-01

    为了实现恶劣环境下温度的测量,设计了一种基于荧光寿命机理的光纤温度传感系统.温度传感系统选用415 nm LED作为光源,以稀土荧光材料Y2 O2 S:Eu作为温度敏感材料,通过探测放大器和信号采集模块测量了敏感材料的荧光寿命,并由荧光寿命与温度的单调关系最终实现了温度的测量.采用油浴加热的方法进行温度实验,实验结果表明,温度传感系统在25~80℃实现了温度的测量,分辨率为0.5℃.%In order to achieve the measurement of temperature in harsh environments, a fiber temperature sensor system based on the fluorescent lifetime was designed. 415 nm LED was selected as the light source and a rare earth material Y2 O2 S:Eu was selected as the sensitive material. Finally, the fluorescence lifetime of sensitive material was measured by a probe amplifier and signal acquisition module and temperature measurements were realized due to the monotonic relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and temperature. Temperature experiments were carried out using an oil bath heating method, and the experimental results showed that: the temperature measurement can be realized in the range of 25 ~80 ℃ and the temperature sensor has an average resolution of 0 . 5 ℃.

  9. Neural imaging in songbirds using fiber optic fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Hearn, Gentry; Lints, Thierry; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-02-01

    The song control system of juvenile songbirds is an important model for studying the developmental acquisition and generation of complex learned vocal motor sequences, two processes that are fundamental to human speech and language. To understand the neural mechanisms underlying song production, it is critical to characterize the activity of identified neurons in the song control system when the bird is singing. Neural imaging in unrestrained singing birds, although technically challenging, will advance our understanding of neural ensemble coding mechanisms in this system. We are exploring the use of a fiber optic microscope for functional imaging in the brain of behaving and singing birds in order to better understand the contribution of a key brain nucleus (high vocal center nucleus; HVC) to temporal aspects of song motor control. We have constructed a fluorescence microscope with LED illumination, a fiber bundle for transmission of fluorescence excitation and emission light, a ~2x GRIN lens, and a CCD for image acquisition. The system has 2 μm resolution, 375 μm field of view, 200 μm working distance, and 1 mm outer diameter. As an initial characterization of this setup, neurons in HVC were imaged using the fiber optic microscope after injection of quantum dots or fluorescent retrograde tracers into different song nuclei. A Lucid Vivascope confocal microscope was used to confirm the imaging results. Long-term imaging of the activity of these neurons in juvenile birds during singing may lead us to a better understanding of the central motor codes for song and the central mechanism by which auditory experience modifies song motor commands to enable vocal learning and imitation.

  10. In Vivo Dual Fluorescence Imaging to Detect Joint Destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hongsik; Bhatti, Fazal-Ur-Rehman; Lee, Sangmin; Brand, David D; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Hasty, Karen A

    2016-10-01

    Diagnosis of cartilage damage in early stages of arthritis is vital to impede the progression of disease. In this regard, considerable progress has been made in near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) optical imaging technique. Arthritis can develop due to various mechanisms but one of the main contributors is the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), enzymes that can degrade components of the extracellular matrix. Especially, MMP-1 and MMP-13 have main roles in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis because they enhance collagen degradation in the process of arthritis. We present here a novel NIRF imaging strategy that can be used to determine the activity of MMPs and cartilage damage simultaneously by detection of exposed type II collagen in cartilage tissue. In this study, retro-orbital injection of mixed fluorescent dyes, MMPSense 750 FAST (MMP750) dye and Alexa Fluor 680 conjugated monoclonal mouse antibody immune-reactive to type II collagen, was administered in the arthritic mice. Both dyes were detected with different intensity according to degree of joint destruction in the animal. Thus, our dual fluorescence imaging method can be used to detect cartilage damage as well as MMP activity simultaneously in early stage arthritis.

  11. Fluorescent quantum dots: synthesis, biomedical optical imaging, and biosafety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoyuan; Peng, Fei; Zhong, Yiling; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2014-12-01

    The marriage of nanomaterials with biology has significantly promoted advancement of biological techniques, profoundly facilitating basic research and practical applications in biological and biomedical fields. Taking advantages of unique optical properties (e.g., strong fluorescence, robust photostability, size-tunable emission wavelengths, etc.), fluorescent quantum dots (QDs), appearing as high-performance biological fluorescent nanoprobes, have been extensively explored for a variety of biomedical optical imaging applications. In this review, we present representative synthetic strategies for preparation of QDs and their applications in biomedical optical imaging, as well as risk assessments in vitro and in vivo. Briefly, we first summarize recent progress in fabrication of QDs via two rudimentary approaches, i.e., organometallic route and aqueous synthesis. Next we present representative achievement in QDs-based in vitro and in vivo biomedical optical imaging applications. We further discuss the toxicity assessment of QDs, ranging from cell studies to animal models. In the final section, we discuss challenges and perspectives for the QDs-relative bioapplications in the future.

  12. All-optically integrated multimodality imaging system: combined photoacoustic microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongjiang; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a multimodality imaging system by optically integrating all-optical photoacoustic microscopy (AOPAM), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence microscopy (FLM) to provide complementary information including optical absorption, optical back-scattering and fluorescence contrast of biological tissue. By sharing the same low-coherence Michelson interferometer, AOPAM and OCT could be organically optically combined to obtain the absorption and scattering information of the biological tissues. Also, owing to using the same laser source and objective lens, intrinsically registered photoacoustic and fluorescence signals are obtained to present the radiative and nonradiative transition process of absorption. Simultaneously photoacoustic angiography, tissue structure and fluorescence molecular in vivo images of mouse ear were acquired to demonstrate the capabilities of the optically integrated trimodality imaging system, which can present more information to study tumor angiogenesis, vasculature, anatomical structure and microenvironments in vivo.

  13. Polymer-encapsulated organic nanoparticles for fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Liu, Bin

    2014-09-21

    Polymer encapsulated organic nanoparticles have recently attracted increasing attention in the biomedical field because of their unique optical properties, easy fabrication and outstanding performance as imaging and therapeutic agents. Of particular importance is the polymer encapsulated nanoparticles containing conjugated polymers (CP) or fluorogens with aggregation induced emission (AIE) characteristics as the core, which have shown significant advantages in terms of tunable brightness, superb photo- and physical stability, good biocompatibility, potential biodegradability and facile surface functionalization. In this review, we summarize the latest advances in the development of polymer encapsulated CP and AIE fluorogen nanoparticles, including preparation methods, material design and matrix selection, nanoparticle fabrication and surface functionalization for fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging. We also discuss their specific applications in cell labeling, targeted in vitro and in vivo imaging, blood vessel imaging, cell tracing, inflammation monitoring and molecular imaging. We specially focus on strategies to fine-tune the nanoparticle property (e.g. size and fluorescence quantum yield) through precise engineering of the organic cores and careful selection of polymer matrices. The review also highlights the merits and limitations of these nanoparticles as well as strategies used to overcome the limitations. The challenges and perspectives for the future development of polymer encapsulated organic nanoparticles are also discussed.

  14. Easy synthesis of highly fluorescent carbon dots from albumin and their photoluminescent mechanism and biological imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaohua; An, Xueqin; Li, Lielie

    2016-01-01

    A simple and green approach was developed to synthesize highly fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) using albumin as a carbon source in aqueous solution at room temperature. The CDs were characterized by excellent monodispersion, superior photostability, pH-independent emission, long fluorescence lifetime and high quantum yield (QY). The photoluminescent (PL) mechanism of CDs was explored by means of time-resolved PL decay, and the results revealed that PL originated from the emission of both defect state and intrinsic state. In addition, biological imaging with the application of CDs was carried out in human breast cancer Bcap-37 cell, which demonstrated that CDs were provided with an excellent biocompatibility, low cytotoxicity and good transmembrane ability. Besides, CDs could be considered as a potential substitute for organic dyes or semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in biological imaging.

  15. Investigation on the Influence of the Brand Image of Higher Educational Institutions on Satisfaction and Customer Lifetime Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Chin-Tsu; Chen, Chun-Fu

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to discuss the relationships among the brand image of universities (external variables), university satisfaction (mediating variables) and customer lifetime value (internal variables). The findings can serve as a reference for higher educational institutions in strengthening their advantages and overcoming their shortcomings, as…

  16. Ultrabright planar optodes for luminescence life-time based microscopic imaging of O2 dynamics in biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staal, Marc Jaap; Borisov, S M; Rickelt, L F

    2011-01-01

    New transparent optodes for life-time based microscopic imaging of O2 were developed by spin-coating a µm-thin layer of a highly luminescent cyclometalated iridium(III) coumarin complex in polystyrene onto glass cover slips. Compared to similar thin-film O2 optodes based on a ruthenium(II) polypy...

  17. Investigation on the Influence of the Brand Image of Higher Educational Institutions on Satisfaction and Customer Lifetime Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Chin-Tsu; Chen, Chun-Fu

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to discuss the relationships among the brand image of universities (external variables), university satisfaction (mediating variables) and customer lifetime value (internal variables). The findings can serve as a reference for higher educational institutions in strengthening their advantages and overcoming their shortcomings, as…

  18. Assessing solvent effects on the singlet excited state lifetime of uracil derivatives: A femtosecond fluorescence upconversion study in alcohols and D{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Thomas [Laboratoire Francis Perrin, CEA/DSM/DRECAM/SPAM - CNRS URA 2453, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)], E-mail: thomas.gustavsson@cea.fr; Banyasz, Akos [Laboratoire Francis Perrin, CEA/DSM/DRECAM/SPAM - CNRS URA 2453, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sarkar, Nilmoni [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, WB (India); Markovitsi, Dimitra [Laboratoire Francis Perrin, CEA/DSM/DRECAM/SPAM - CNRS URA 2453, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Improta, Roberto [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Istituto Biostrutture e Bioimmagini/CNR, V. Mezzocannone 6 - 80134 Napoli (Italy)

    2008-06-23

    The excited state lifetimes of uracil, thymine and 5-fluorouracil have been measured using femtosecond UV fluorescence upconversion in various protic and aprotic polar solvents. The fastest decays are observed in acetonitrile and the slowest in aqueous solution while those observed in alcohols are intermediate. No direct correlation with macroscopic solvent parameters such as polarity or viscosity is found, but hydrogen bonding is one key factor affecting the fluorescence decay. It is proposed that the solvent modulates the relative energy of two close-lying electronically excited states, the bright {pi}{pi}* and the dark n{pi}* states. This relative energy gap controls the non-radiative relaxation of the {pi}{pi}* state through a conical intersection close to the Franck-Condon region competing with the ultrafast internal conversion to the ground state. In addition, an inverse isotope effect is observed in D{sub 2}O where the decays are faster than in H{sub 2}O.

  19. Speckle lifetime in XAO coronagraphic images: temporal evolution of SPHERE coronagraphic images

    CERN Document Server

    Milli, J; Mouill, D; Mawet, D; Girard, J G; Vigan, A; Boccaletti, A; Kasper, M; Wahhaj, Z; Lagrange, A -M; Beuzit, J -L; Fusco, T; Sauvage, J -F; Galicher, R

    2016-01-01

    The major source of noise in high-contrast imaging is the presence of slowly evolving speckles that do not average with time. The temporal stability of the point-spread-function (PSF) is therefore critical to reach a high contrast with extreme adaptive optics (xAO) instruments. Understanding on which timescales the PSF evolves and what are the critical parameters driving the speckle variability allow to design an optimal observing strategy and data reduction technique to calibrate instrumental aberrations and reveal faint astrophysical sources. We have obtained a series of 52 min, AO-corrected, coronagraphically occulted, high-cadence (1.6Hz), H-band images of the star HR 3484 with the SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimeter High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch instrument on the VLT. This is a unique data set from an xAO instrument to study its stability on timescales as short as one second and as long as several tens of minutes. We find different temporal regimes of decorrelation. We show that residuals from the atmospheric...

  20. Red Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticle-Based Cell Imaging Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Haydar; Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Dalal, Chumki; Jana, Nikhil R

    2016-04-13

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based probes with tunable visible emission are biocompatible, environment friendly and most suitable for various biomedical applications. However, synthesis of red fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and their transformation into functional nanoparticles are very challenging. Here we report red fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based nanobioconjugates of nanoparticles are synthesized via high temperature colloid-chemical approach and transformed into water-soluble functional nanoparticles via coating with amphiphilic polymer followed by covalent linking with desired biomolecules. Following this approach, carbon nanoparticles are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, primary amine, glucose, arginine, histidine, biotin and folic acid. These functional nanoparticles can be excited with blue/green light (i.e., 400-550 nm) to capture their emission spanning from 550 to 750 nm. Arginine and folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have been demonstrated as fluorescent cell labels where blue and green excitation has been used for imaging of labeled cells. The presented method can be extended for the development of carbon nanoparticle-based other bioimaging probes.

  1. Development of Fluorescence Imaging Lidar for Boat-Based Coral Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasano Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescence imaging lidar system installed in a boat-towable buoy has been developed for the observation of reef-building corals. Long-range fluorescent images of the sea bed can be recorded in the daytime with this system. The viability of corals is clear in these fluorescent images because of the innate fluorescent proteins. In this study, the specifications and performance of the system are shown.

  2. FISHji: New ImageJ macros for the quantification of fluorescence in epifluorescence images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Carvalho, Daniel R; Lourenço, Anália

    2016-01-01

    and tools has been trying to overcome this problem, however, the determination of fluorescent intensity in microscopy images still has issues due to the lack of precision in the results and the complexity of existing software. This work presents FISHji, a set of new ImageJ methods for automated...

  3. Single camera imaging system for color and near-infrared fluorescence image guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenyue; Zhu, Nan; Pacheco, Shaun; Wang, Xia; Liang, Rongguang

    2014-08-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging systems have been developed for image guided surgery in recent years. However, current systems are typically bulky and work only when surgical light in the operating room (OR) is off. We propose a single camera imaging system that is capable of capturing NIR fluorescence and color images under normal surgical lighting illumination. Using a new RGB-NIR sensor and synchronized NIR excitation illumination, we have demonstrated that the system can acquire both color information and fluorescence signal with high sensitivity under normal surgical lighting illumination. The experimental results show that ICG sample with concentration of 0.13 μM can be detected when the excitation irradiance is 3.92 mW/cm(2) at an exposure time of 10 ms.

  4. Ultrafast superresolution fluorescence imaging with spinning disk confocal microscope optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Okada, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Most current superresolution (SR) microscope techniques surpass the diffraction limit at the expense of temporal resolution, compromising their applications to live-cell imaging. Here we describe a new SR fluorescence microscope based on confocal microscope optics, which we name the spinning disk superresolution microscope (SDSRM). Theoretically, the SDSRM is equivalent to a structured illumination microscope (SIM) and achieves a spatial resolution of 120 nm, double that of the diffraction limit of wide-field fluorescence microscopy. However, the SDSRM is 10 times faster than a conventional SIM because SR signals are recovered by optical demodulation through the stripe pattern of the disk. Therefore a single SR image requires only a single averaged image through the rotating disk. On the basis of this theory, we modified a commercial spinning disk confocal microscope. The improved resolution around 120 nm was confirmed with biological samples. The rapid dynamics of micro-tubules, mitochondria, lysosomes, and endosomes were observed with temporal resolutions of 30-100 frames/s. Because our method requires only small optical modifications, it will enable an easy upgrade from an existing spinning disk confocal to a SR microscope for live-cell imaging. © 2015 Hayashi and Okada. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Selective Detection of Neurotransmitters by Fluorescence and Chemiluminescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziqiang Wang; Edward S. Yeung

    2001-08-06

    In recent years, luminescence imaging has been widely employed in neurochemical analysis. It has a number of advantages for the study of neuronal and other biological cells: (1) a particular molecular species or cellular constituent can be selectively visualized in the presence of a large excess of other species in a heterogeneous environment; (2) low concentration detection limits can be achieved because of the inherent sensitivity associated with fluorescence and chemiluminescence; (3) low excitation intensities can be used so that long-term observation can be realized while the viability of the specimen is preserved; and (4) excellent spatial resolution can be obtained with the light microscope so subcellular compartments can be identified. With good sensitivity, temporal and spatial resolution, the flux of ions and molecules and the distribution and dynamics of intracellular species can be measured in real time with specific luminescence probes, substrates, or with native fluorescence. A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with CCD imaging is down to {micro}M levels of glutamate with reasonable response time. They also found that chemiluminescence associated with the ATP-dependent reaction between luciferase and luciferin can be used to image ATP at levels down to 10 nM in the millisecond time scale. Similar imaging experiments should be feasible in a broad spectrum of biological systems.

  6. Photostable and photoswitching fluorescent dyes for super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoshima, Masafumi; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2017-01-12

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is a recently developed imaging tool for biological researches. Several methods have been developed for detection of fluorescence signals from molecules in a subdiffraction-limited area, breaking the diffraction limit of the conventional optical microscopies and allowing visualization of detailed macromolecular structures in cells. As objectives are exposed to intense laser in the optical systems, fluorophores for super-resolution microscopy must be tolerated even under severe light irradiation conditions. The fluorophores must also be photoactivatable and photoswitchable for single-molecule localization-based super-resolution microscopy, because the number of active fluorophores must be controlled by light irradiation. This has led to growing interest in these properties in the development of fluorophores. In this mini-review, we focus on the development of photostable and photoswitching fluorescent dyes for super-resolution microscopy. We introduce recent efforts, including improvement of fluorophore photostability and control of photoswitching behaviors of fluorophores based on photochemical and photophysical processes. Understanding and manipulation of chemical reactions in excited fluorophores can develop highly photostable and efficiently photoswitchable fluorophores that are suitable for super-resolution imaging applications.

  7. Portable multispectral fluorescence imaging system for food safety applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefcourt, Alan M.; Kim, Moon S.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2004-03-01

    Fluorescence can be a sensitive method for detecting food contaminants. Of particular interest is detection of fecal contamination as feces is the source of many pathogenic organisms. Feces generally contain chlorophyll a and related compounds due to ingestion of plant materials, and these compounds can readily be detected using fluorescence techniques. Described is a fluorescence-imaging system consisting primarily of a UV light source, an intensified camera with a six-position filter wheel, and software for controlling the system and automatically analyzing the resulting images. To validate the system, orchard apples artificially contaminated with dairy feces were used in a "hands-on" public demonstration. The contamination sites were easily identified using automated edge detection and threshold detection algorithms. In addition, by applying feces to apples and then washing sets of apples at hourly intervals, it was determined that five h was the minimum contact time that allowed identification of the contamination site after the apples were washed. There are many potential uses for this system, including studying the efficacy of apple washing systems.

  8. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single-cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (smFISH)—an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context—provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here we describe Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves. PMID:27241748

  9. Fluorescence and image guided resection in high grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panciani, Pier Paolo; Fontanella, Marco; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Garbossa, Diego; Agnoletti, Alessandro; Ducati, Alessandro; Lanotte, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The extent of resection in high grade glioma is increasingly been shown to positively effect survival. Nevertheless, heterogeneity and migratory behavior of glioma cells make gross total resection very challenging. Several techniques were used in order to improve the detection of residual tumor. Aim of this study was to analyze advantages and limitations of fluorescence and image guided resection. A multicentric prospective study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of each method. Furthermore, the role of 5-aminolevulinc acid and neuronavigation were reviewed. Twenty-three patients harboring suspected high grade glioma, amenable to complete resection, were enrolled. Fluorescence and image guides were used to perform surgery. Multiple samples were obtained from the resection cavity of each lesion according to 5-ALA staining positivity and boundaries as delineated by neuronavigation. All samples were analyzed by a pathologist blinded to the intra-operative labeling. Decision-making based on fluorescence showed a sensitivity of 91.1% and a specificity of 89.4% (pimage-guided resection accuracy was low (sensitivity: 57.8%; specificity: 57.4%; p=0.346). We observed that the sensitivity of 5-ALA can be improved by the combined use of neuronavigation, but this leads to a significant reduction in specificity. Thus, the use of auxiliary techniques should always be subject to critical skills of the surgeon. We advocate a large-scale study to further improve the assessment of multimodal approaches.

  10. Photoacoustic imaging of a near-infrared fluorescent marker based on dual wavelength pump-probe excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märk, Julia; Theiss, Christoph; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Laufer, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has been used to determine the spatial distribution of fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, from images acquired in phantoms and in vivo. Most methods involve the acquisition of multiwavelength images and rely on differences in the absorption spectra of the tissue chromophores to estimate the spatial distribution and abundance of the latter using spectral decomposition techniques, such as model based inversion schemes. However, the inversion of 3-D images can be computationally expensive. Experimental approaches to localising contrast agents may therefore be useful, especially if quantification is not essential. This work aims to develop a method for determining the spatial distribution of a near-infrared fluorescent cell marker from images acquired using dual wavelength excitation. The excitation wavelengths coincided with the absorption and emission spectrum of the fluorophore. The contrast mechanism relies on reducing the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore by inducing stimulated emission. This changes the amount of energy thermalized by the fluorophore, and hence the photoacoustic signal amplitude. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the background may be removed by subtracting two images acquired with and without pulse delay between the pump and probe pulses. To characterise the fluorophore, the signal amplitude is measured in a cuvette as a function of pulse delay, concentration, and fluence. The spatial distribution of the fluorophore is determined from images acquired in realistic tissue phantoms. This method may be suitable for in vivo applications, such as imaging of exogenous or genetically expressed fluorescent cell markers.

  11. Image registration and averaging of low laser power two-photon fluorescence images of mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Nathan S; Palczewska, Grazyna; Stremplewski, Patrycjusz; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Kern, Timothy S; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-07-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) is now being used routinely to image live cells for extended periods deep within tissues, including the retina and other structures within the eye . However, very low laser power is a requirement to obtain TPM images of the retina safely. Unfortunately, a reduction in laser power also reduces the signal-to-noise ratio of collected images, making it difficult to visualize structural details. Here, image registration and averaging methods applied to TPM images of the eye in living animals (without the need for auxiliary hardware) demonstrate the structural information obtained with laser power down to 1 mW. Image registration provided between 1.4% and 13.0% improvement in image quality compared to averaging images without registrations when using a high-fluorescence template, and between 0.2% and 12.0% when employing the average of collected images as the template. Also, a diminishing return on image quality when more images were used to obtain the averaged image is shown. This work provides a foundation for obtaining informative TPM images with laser powers of 1 mW, compared to previous levels for imaging mice ranging between 6.3 mW [Palczewska G., Nat Med.20, 785 (2014) Sharma R., Biomed. Opt. Express4, 1285 (2013)].

  12. Fluorescence Imaging In Vivo up to 1700 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Diao, Shuo; Hong, Guosong; Antaris, Alexander L; Chang, Junlei; Wu, Justin Z; Zhang, Bo; Kuo, Calvin J; Dai, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Compared to visible and near-infrared regions below ~ 900 nm, imaging in the second near-infrared window beyond 1000 nm (NIR-II, 1000-1700 nm) is promising for deep-tissue high-resolution optical imaging in vivo owing to reduced scattering of photons traversing through tissues. Here, we succeeded fluorescence imaging in vivo in the long 1500-1700 nm (NIR-IIb) region using a novel, chemical separation enriched large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube material. Imaging in the 1500-1700 nm window resolved 3-4 um wide capillary blood vessels at ~ 3 millimeters depth through the intact body and brain of mice with the ability of blood-flow speed mapping in individual capillary vessels. Further, non-invasive single fluorophore imaging inside the tumor of a live mouse was achieved in the 1500-1700 nm window. NIR-IIb imaging can be generalized to a wide range of fluorophores emitting up to 1700 nm for a new paradigm of high performance in vivo optical imaging.

  13. Near-Infrared Fluorescent NanoGUMBOS for Biomedical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bwambok, David [Louisiana State University; El-Zahab, Bilal [Lousianna State University; Challa, Santhosh [Louisiana State University; Li, Min [Lousianna State University; Chandler, Lin [Horiba Jobin Yvon Inc.; Baker, Gary A [ORNL; Warner, Isiah M [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Herein, we report on near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent nanoparticles generated from an emergent class of materials we refer to as a Group of Uniform Materials Based on Organic Salts (GUMBOS). GUMBOS are largely frozen ionic liquids, although the concept is more general and is also easily applied to solid ionic materials with melting points in excess of 100 C. Nanoparticles based on GUMBOS (nanoGUMBOS) derived from a NIR fluorophore are prepared using a reprecipitation method and evaluated for in vivo fluorescence imaging. Due to their uniformity, single-step preparation, and composite nature, nanoGUMBOS help to resolve issues with dye leakage problems innate to alternate cellular stains and unlock a myriad of applications for these materials, highlighting exciting possibilities for multifunctional nanoGUMBOS.

  14. Development of temperature imaging using two-line atomic fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medwell, Paul R; Chan, Qing N; Kalt, Peter A M; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dally, Bassam B; Nathan, Graham J

    2009-02-20

    This work aims to advance understanding of the coupling between temperature and soot. The ability to image temperature using the two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) technique is demonstrated. Previous TLAF theory is extended from linear excitation into the nonlinear fluence regime. Nonlinear regime two-line atomic fluorescence (NTLAF) provides superior signal and reduces single-shot uncertainty from 250 K for conventional TLAF down to 100 K. NTLAF is shown to resolve the temperature profile across the stoichiometric envelope for hydrogen, ethylene, and natural gas flames, with deviation from thermocouple measurements not exceeding 100 K, and typically ≲30 K. Measurements in flames containing soot demonstrate good capacity of NTLAF to exclude interferences that hamper most two-dimensional thermometry techniques.

  15. Defining a superlens operating regime for imaging fluorescent molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Elsayad

    Full Text Available It has been shown that thin metal-based films can at certain frequencies act as planar near-field lenses for certain polarization components. A desirable property of such "lenses" is that they can also enhance and focus some large transverse spatial frequency components which contain sub-diffraction limit details. Over the last decade there has been much work in optimizing designs to reduce effects (such as material losses and surface roughness that are detrimental to image reconstruction. One design that can reduce some of these undesirable effects, and which has received a fair amount of attention recently, is the stacked metal-dielectric superlens. Here we theoretically explore the imaging ability of such a design for the specific purpose of imaging a fluorescent dye (the common bio-marker GFP in the vicinity of the superlens surface. Our calculations take into consideration the interaction (damping of an oscillating electric dipole with the metallic layers in the superlens. We also assume a Gaussian frequency distribution spectrum for the dipole. We treat the metallic-alloy and dielectric-alloy layers separately using an appropriate effective medium theory. The transmission properties are evaluated via Transfer matrix (-matrix calculations that were performed in the MatLab and MathCad environments. Our study shows that it is in principle possible to image fluorescent molecules using a simple bilayer planar superlens. We find that optimal parameters for such a superlens occur when the peak dipole emission-frequency is slightly offset from the Surface Plasmon resonance frequency of the metal-dielectric interfaces. The best resolution is obtained when the fluorescent molecules are not too close (>/ approximately 10 nm or too far (>/approximately 30 nm from the superlens surface. The realization and application of a superlens with the specified design is possible using current nanofabrication techniques. When combined with e.g. a sub

  16. Materials characterization using micro-x-ray fluorescence elemental imaging.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, G. J. (George J.); Miller, T. C. (Thomasin C.); Joseph, M. R. (Martha R.)

    2002-01-01

    Materials characterization continues to be a key challenge in a variety of programs. Although bulk elemental composition provides overall concentration of both major and trace elements, the distribution of these elements both on micro and macro scales can determine the performance and ultimately the physical properties of the materials. Hence elemental imaging can provide a new level of information for major and in some cases bulk trace concentrations of elements. Micro X-ray fluorescence (MXRF) offers unique capabilities in terms of elemental imaging. This approach is based on a meso scale level of resolution around 50 micrometer X-ray spot size. When coupled with a moveable stage, specimens several inches on a side can be imaged with surprising detail. In most instances, qualitative images are sufficient to illustrate the elemental heterogeneity. This information can then be used to determine if the material meets the desired physical characteristics and whether this is due to the observed heterogeneity or in spite of it. Several examples of elemental imaging will be presented. These will include the aging of polymers and the effects of residual organotin catalyst. The tin can be imaged using MXRF and has been show to be mobile within the polymeric material over time. Corrosion is a serious issue throughout the industrial world. A specific example of chloride attack on a metal, which creates problems in waste storage. Finally, MXRF used in high throughput screening in the development of novel peptide receptors will be shown. The advantage of MXRF is that no fluorescent tags need be added to the target molecules. This insures the unhindered interaction of the target molecules and allows for additional characterization using molecular spectroscopic techniques.

  17. Multispectral fluorescence imaging technique for discrimination of cucumber (Cucumis Sativus) seed viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we developed a nondestructive method for discriminating viable cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seeds based on hyperspectral fluorescence imaging. The fluorescence spectra of cucumber seeds in the 420–700 nm range were extracted from hyperspectral fluorescence images obtained using 365 nm u...

  18. Estrogen receptor-targeted optical imaging of breast cancer cells with near-infrared fluorescent dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Iven; Deodhar, Kodand; Chiplunkar, Shuba V.; Patkar, Meena

    2010-02-01

    Molecular imaging provides the in vivo characterization of cellular molecular events involved in normal and pathologic processes. With the advent of optical molecular imaging, specific molecules, proteins and genes may be tagged with a luminescent reporter and visualized in small animals. This powerful new tool has pushed in vivo optical imaging to the forefront as it allows for direct determination of drug bio-distribution and uptake kinetics as well as an indicator of biochemical activity and drug efficacy. Although optical imaging encompasses diverse techniques and makes use of various wavelengths of light, a great deal of excitement in molecular research lies in the use of tomographic and fluorescence techniques to image living tissues with near-infrared (NIR) light. Nonionizing, noninvasive near-infrared optical imaging has great potential to become promising alternative for breast cancer detection. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies of human tissue suggest that a variety of lesions show distinct fluorescence spectra compared to those of normal tissue. It has also been shown that exogenous dyes exhibit selective uptake in neoplastic lesions and may offer the best contrast for optical imaging. Use of exogenous agents would provide fluorescent markers, which could serve to detect embedded tumors in the breast. In particular, the ability to monitor the fluorescent yield and lifetime may also enable biochemical specificity if the fluorophore is sensitive to a specific metabolite, such as oxygen. As a first step, we have synthesized and characterized one such NIR fluorescent dye conjugate, which could potentially be used to detect estrogen receptors (ER)[2] . The conjugate was synthesized by ester formation between 17-β estradiol and a hydrophilic derivative of indocyanine green (ICG) cyanine dye, bis-1, 1-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5- carboxylic acid, sodium salt. The ester formed was found to have an extra binding ability with the receptor cites as

  19. SIMA: Python software for analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eKaifosh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence imaging is a powerful method for monitoring dynamic signals in the nervous system. However, analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data remains burdensome, in part due to the shortage of available software tools. To address this need, we have developed SIMA, an open source Python package that facilitates common analysis tasks related to fluorescence imaging. Functionality of this package includes correction of motion artifacts occurring during in vivo imaging with laser-scanning microscopy, segmentation of imaged fields into regions of interest (ROIs, and extraction of signals from the segmented ROIs. We have also developed a graphical user interface (GUI for manual editing of the automatically segmented ROIs and automated registration of ROIs across multiple imaging datasets. This software has been designed with flexibility in mind to allow for future extension with different analysis methods and potential integration with other packages. Software, documentation, and source code for the SIMA package and ROI Buddy GUI are freely available at http://www.losonczylab.org/sima/.

  20. FIZICS: fluorescent imaging zone identification system, a novel macro imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwish, Stephen; Asensio, Francisco; King, Greg; Clarke, Glenn; Kath, Gary; Salvatore, Michael J; Dufresne, Claude

    2004-12-01

    Constantly improving biological assay development continues to drive technological requirements. Recently, a specification was defined for capturing white light and fluorescent images of agar plates ranging in size from the NUNC Omni tray (96-well footprint, 128 x 85 mm) to the NUNC Bio Assay Dish (245 x 245 mm). An evaluation of commercially available products failed to identify any system capable of fluorescent macroimaging with discrete wavelength selection. To address the lack of a commercially available system, a custom imaging system was designed and constructed. This system provides the same capabilities of many commercially available systems with the added ability to fluorescently image up to a 245 x 245 mm area using wavelengths in the visible light spectrum.

  1. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  2. Modelling of microcracks image treated with fluorescent dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebov, Victor; Lashmanov, Oleg U.

    2015-06-01

    The main reasons of catastrophes and accidents are high level of wear of equipment and violation of the production technology. The methods of nondestructive testing are designed to find out defects timely and to prevent break down of aggregates. These methods allow determining compliance of object parameters with technical requirements without destroying it. This work will discuss dye penetrant inspection or liquid penetrant inspection (DPI or LPI) methods and computer model of microcracks image treated with fluorescent dye. Usually cracks on image look like broken extended lines with small width (about 1 to 10 pixels) and ragged edges. The used method of inspection allows to detect microcracks with depth about 10 or more micrometers. During the work the mathematical model of image of randomly located microcracks treated with fluorescent dye was created in MATLAB environment. Background noises and distortions introduced by the optical systems are considered in the model. The factors that have influence on the image are listed below: 1. Background noise. Background noise is caused by the bright light from external sources and it reduces contrast on the objects edges. 2. Noises on the image sensor. Digital noise manifests itself in the form of randomly located points that are differing in their brightness and color. 3. Distortions caused by aberrations of optical system. After passing through the real optical system the homocentricity of the bundle of rays is violated or homocentricity remains but rays intersect at the point that doesn't coincide with the point of the ideal image. The stronger the influence of the above-listed factors, the worse the image quality and therefore the analysis of the image for control of the item finds difficulty. The mathematical model is created using the following algorithm: at the beginning the number of cracks that will be modeled is entered from keyboard. Then the point with random position is choosing on the matrix whose size is

  3. Single molecule fluorescence imaging as a technique for barium tagging in neutrinoless double beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. J. P.; McDonald, A. D.; Nygren, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    Background rejection is key to success for future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. To achieve sensitivity to effective Majorana lifetimes of ~ 1028 years, backgrounds must be controlled to better than 0.1 count per ton per year, beyond the reach of any present technology. In this paper we propose a new method to identify the birth of the barium daughter ion in the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe. The method adapts Single Molecule Fluorescent Imaging, a technique from biochemistry research with demonstrated single ion sensitivity. We explore possible SMFI dyes suitable for the problem of barium ion detection in high pressure xenon gas, and develop a fiber-coupled sensing system with which we can detect the presence of bulk Ba++ ions remotely. We show that our sensor produces signal-to-background ratios as high as 85 in response to Ba++ ions when operated in aqueous solution. We then describe the next stage of this R&D program, which will be to demonstrate chelation and fluorescence in xenon gas. If a successful barium ion tag can be developed using SMFI adapted for high pressure xenon gas detectors, the first essentially zero background, ton-scale neutrinoless double beta decay technology could be realized.

  4. Fluorescence-Doped Particles for Simultaneous Temperature and Velocity Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Tiemsin, Pacita I.; Wohl, Chrostopher J.; Verkamp, Max; Lowe, T.; Maisto, P.; Byun, G.; Simpson, R.

    2012-01-01

    Polystyrene latex microspheres (PSLs) have been used for particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements for several decades. With advances in laser technologies, instrumentation, and data processing, the capability to collect more information about fluid flow beyond velocity is possible using new seed materials. To provide additional measurement capability, PSLs were synthesized with temperature-sensitive fluorescent dyes incorporated within the particle. These multifunctional PSLs would have the greatest impact if they could be used in large scale facilities with minimal modification to the facilities or the existing instrumentation. Consequently, several potential dyes were identified that were amenable to existing laser systems currently utilized in wind tunnels at NASA Langley Research Center as well as other wind and fluid (water) tunnels. PSLs incorporated with Rhodamine B, dichlorofluorescein (DCF, also known as fluorescein 548 or fluorescein 27) and other dyes were synthesized and characterized for morphology and spectral properties. The resulting particles were demonstrated to exhibit fluorescent emission, which would enable determination of both fluid velocity and temperature. They also would allow near-wall velocity measurements whereas laser scatter from surfaces currently prevents near-wall measurements using undoped seed materials. Preliminary results in a wind tunnel facility located at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) have verified fluorescent signal detection and temperature sensitivity of fluorophore-doped PSLs.

  5. Red emitting neutral fluorescent glycoconjugates for membrane optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redon, Sébastien; Massin, Julien; Pouvreau, Sandrine; De Meulenaere, Evelien; Clays, Koen; Queneau, Yves; Andraud, Chantal; Girard-Egrot, Agnès; Bretonnière, Yann; Chambert, Stéphane

    2014-04-16

    A family of neutral fluorescent probes was developed, mimicking the overall structure of natural glycolipids in order to optimize their membrane affinity. Nonreducing commercially available di- or trisaccharidic structures were connected to a push-pull chromophore based on dicyanoisophorone electron-accepting group, which proved to fluoresce in the red region with a very large Stokes shift. This straightforward synthetic strategy brought structural variations to a series of probes, which were studied for their optical, biophysical, and biological properties. The insertion properties of the different probes into membranes were evaluated on a model system using the Langmuir monolayer balance technique. Confocal fluorescence microscopy performed on muscle cells showed completely different localizations and loading efficiencies depending on the structure of the probes. When compared to the commercially available ANEPPS, a family of commonly used membrane imaging dyes, the most efficient probes showed a similar brightness, but a sharper pattern was observed. According to this study, compounds bearing one chromophore, a limited size of the carbohydrate moiety, and an overall rod-like shape gave the best results.

  6. Fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA using click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Takumi; Liu, Hong Shan; Ito, Kenichiro; Xu, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome visualization is essential for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. Here, we developed a click chemistry approach for multicolor imaging of chromosomal DNA instead of the traditional dye method. We first demonstrated that the commercially available reagents allow for the multicolor staining of chromosomes. We then prepared two pro-fluorophore moieties that served as light-up reporters to stain chromosomal DNA based on click reaction and visualized the clear chromosomes in multicolor. We applied this strategy in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, telomere DNA at the end of the chromosome. We further extended this approach to observe several basic stages of cell division. We found that the click reaction enables direct visualization of the chromosome behavior in cell division. These results suggest that the technique can be broadly used for imaging chromosomes and may serve as a new approach for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics.

  7. Fluorescent cyanine probe for DNA detection and cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Chao; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2014-03-01

    In our study, two carbazole-based cyanines, 3,6-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-9-methyl carbazole diiodide (A) and 6,6'-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-bis(9-methyl-carbazol-3yl)methane diiodide (B) were synthesized and employed as light-up probes for DNA and cell imaging. Both of the cyanine probes possess a symmetric structure and bis-cationic center. The obvious induced circular dichroism signals in circular dichroism spectra reveal that the molecules can specifically interact with DNA. Strong fluorescence enhancement is observed when these two cyanines are bound to DNA. These cyanine probes show high binding affinity to oligonucleotides but different binding preferences to various secondary structures. Confocal microscopy images of fixed cell stained by the probes exhibit strong brightness and high contrast in nucleus with a very low cytoplasmic background.

  8. Fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA using click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Takumi; Liu, Hong Shan; Ito, Kenichiro; Xu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome visualization is essential for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. Here, we developed a click chemistry approach for multicolor imaging of chromosomal DNA instead of the traditional dye method. We first demonstrated that the commercially available reagents allow for the multicolor staining of chromosomes. We then prepared two pro-fluorophore moieties that served as light-up reporters to stain chromosomal DNA based on click reaction and visualized the clear chromosomes in multicolor. We applied this strategy in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, telomere DNA at the end of the chromosome. We further extended this approach to observe several basic stages of cell division. We found that the click reaction enables direct visualization of the chromosome behavior in cell division. These results suggest that the technique can be broadly used for imaging chromosomes and may serve as a new approach for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. PMID:27620982

  9. Dynamic fluorescence imaging for multiparametric measurement of tumor vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Choi, Kyungsun; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Lee, Jungwhoi; Choi, Chulhee

    2011-04-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth and a promising target for cancer therapy. Blood vessel monitoring is an indispensable tool for evaluation and development of anti-angiogenic drugs. Here, we report a new noninvasive in vivo imaging tool, named dynamic fluorescence imaging (DyFI), for the simultaneous measurement of multiple vascular parameters including vascular density, perfusion rate, and permeability using spatiotemporal profiles of indocyanine green. Using DyFI in a tumor xenograft model, we quantitatively measured multiple vascular parameters in tumors and normal tissues with high spatial resolution. The multimodality of this method allowed us to find negative spatial correlations between perfusion and permeability. Moreover, DyFI was effective for revealing the early effects of an anti-angiogenic drug. We suggest that DyFI could be a useful tool for the preclinical development of anti-angiogenic drugs.

  10. Sentinel lymph node imaging by a fluorescently labeled DNA tetrahedron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ran; Lee, Yong-Deok; Lee, Taemin; Kim, Byeong-Su; Kim, Sehoon; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2013-07-01

    Sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) are the first lymph nodes which cancer cells reach after traveling through lymphatic vessels from the primary tumor. Evaluating the nodal status is crucial in accurate staging of human cancers and accordingly determines prognosis and the most appropriate treatment. The commonly used methods for SLN identification in clinics are based on employment of a colloid of radionuclide or injection of a small dye. Although these methods have certainly contributed to improve surgical practice, new imaging materials are still required to overcome drawbacks of the techniques such as inconvenience of handling radioactive materials and short retention time of small dyes in SLNs. Here, we prepare a fluorescence-labeled DNA tetrahedron and perform SLN imaging by using the DNA nanoconstruct. With a successful identification of SLNs by the DNA nanoconstruct, we suggest that DNA tetrahedron hold great promises for clinical applications.

  11. IRDye78 Conjugates for Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atif Zaheer

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The detection of human malignancies by near-infrared (NIR fluorescence will require the conjugation of cancer-specific ligands to NIR fluorophores that have optimal photoproperties and pharmacokinetics. IRDye78, a tetra-sulfonated heptamethine indocyanine NIR fluorophore, meets most of the criteria for an in vivo imaging agent, and is available as an N-hydroxysuccinimide ester for conjugation to low-molecular-weight ligands. However, IRDye78 has a high charge-to-mass ratio, complicating purification of conjugates. It also has a potentially labile linkage between fluorophore and ligand. We have developed an ion-pairing purification strategy for IRDye78 that can be performed with a standard C18 column under neutral conditions, thus preserving the stability of fluorophore, ligand, and conjugate. By employing parallel evaporative light scatter and absorbance detectors, all reactants and products are identified, and conjugate purity is maximized. We describe reversible and irreversible conversions of IRDye78 that can occur during sample purification, and describe methods for preserving conjugate stability. Using seven ligands, spanning several classes of small molecules and peptides (neutral, charged, and/or hydrophobic, we illustrate the robustness of these methods, and confirm that IRDye78 conjugates so purified retain bioactivity and permit NIR fluorescence imaging of specific targets.

  12. A Quantitative Method for Microtubule Analysis in Fluorescence Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xiaodong; Li, Lingfei; Hu, Jiongyu; Zhang, Qiong; Dang, Yongming; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-12-01

    Microtubule analysis is of significant value for a better understanding of normal and pathological cellular processes. Although immunofluorescence microscopic techniques have proven useful in the study of microtubules, comparative results commonly rely on a descriptive and subjective visual analysis. We developed an objective and quantitative method based on image processing and analysis of fluorescently labeled microtubular patterns in cultured cells. We used a multi-parameter approach by analyzing four quantifiable characteristics to compose our quantitative feature set. Then we interpreted specific changes in the parameters and revealed the contribution of each feature set using principal component analysis. In addition, we verified that different treatment groups could be clearly discriminated using principal components of the multi-parameter model. High predictive accuracy of four commonly used multi-classification methods confirmed our method. These results demonstrated the effectiveness and efficiency of our method in the analysis of microtubules in fluorescence images. Application of the analytical methods presented here provides information concerning the organization and modification of microtubules, and could aid in the further understanding of structural and functional aspects of microtubules under normal and pathological conditions.

  13. Technical Testing of Deep-UV Solid-State Sources for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements in the Frequency Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    circuits. Depending on the level of fluorescence signal, either standard color -glass optical filters or more expensive custom-designed interference...acids (derivatives of tyrosine and tryptophan), coenzymes NADH and riboflavin as well as dipicolinic acid (DPA) were used for the analysis of the...Roth GmbH, Karlsruhe, Germany), N- acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATA), ovalbumin, collagen and elastin (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO), riboflavin (Reanal

  14. Lifetime Fluorescence and Raman Imaging for Detection of Wound Failure and Heterotopic Ossification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    regular debridement of wounds, prophylactic antibiotics , special dressings, and wound drainage systems [1, 4]. Histopathologic testing of excised... antibiotics , special dressings, and wound drainage systems [1, 4]. Histopathologic testing of excised tissue from wounds for abnormal collagens...the experiment showing the tissue sample with 2 pieces of bone on top. Adipose tissue and cortical bone fragments were taken from bovine samples

  15. Improved detection of fluorescently labeled microspheres and vessel architecture with an imaging cryomicrotome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. van Horssen; M. Siebes; I. Hoefer; J.A.E. Spaan; J.P.H.M. van den Wijngaard

    2010-01-01

    Due to spectral overlap, the number of fluorescent labels for imaging cryomicrotome detection was limited to 4. The aim of this study was to increase the separation of fluorescent labels. In the new imaging cryomicrotome, the sample is cut in slices of 40 mu m. Six images are taken for each cutting

  16. Formation of Gel-like Nanodomains in Cholesterol-Containing Sphingomyelin or Phosphatidylcholine Binary Membrane As Examined by Fluorescence Lifetimes and (2)H NMR Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomokazu; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Tsuchikawa, Hiroshi; Lönnfors, Max; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Slotte, J Peter; Murata, Michio

    2015-12-29

    In this study, we measured the time-resolved fluorescence of trans-parinaric acid (tPA), steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene (DPH), and (2)H NMR of 10,10-d2-stearoyl lipids in stearoyl sphingomyelin with cholesterol (SSM/Chol) and l-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine with Chol (PSPC/Chol) binary membranes. The results suggest that the membrane order obtained from the fluorescence experiments shows a similar temperature dependency as those of the (2)H NMR data. More importantly, the time-resolved fluorescence data implied the presence of at least two types of domains, cholesterol-poor gel-like domains (CPGLD) and cholesterol-enriched liquid-ordered (Lo) domains. These domains appear on a nano-to-micro second time scale for both SSM-Chol and PSPC-Chol membranes. The relative size of the gel-like domain was also estimated from the temperature-dependent lifetime measurements and (2)H NMR spectral changes. The results imply that the size of the gel-like domains is very small, probably on the nanometer scale, and smaller in SSM-Chol membrane than those in PSPC-Chol bilayers, which could account for the higher thermal stability of SM-Chol membranes. The present study demonstrates that gel-like nanodomains occur in SM-Chol binary membrane even with Chol content of over 33 mol %, which has been thought to consist exclusively of Lo phase, implying that not only Lo domains but also gel-like nanodomains are important for formation of lipid-ordered phase in SM-Chol and PC-Chol membranes.

  17. Fluorescence imaging and chlorophyll fluorescence to evaluate the role of EDU in UV-B protection in cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Ravinder K.; Kim, Moon S.; Krizek, Donald T.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    1997-07-01

    A fluorescence imaging system and chlorophyll fluorescence emissions were used to evaluate whether EDU, N-[2-(2-oxo-1- imidazolidinyl) ethyl]-N'-phenylurea, provided protection against ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation (290 - 320 nm) in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) leaves. Plants were grown in growth chambers illuminated for 14 h per day with 400 W high pressure sodium and metal halide lamps. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for 1 hr at the beginning and end of each cycle was provided at 270 micrometers ol m-2 s-1 PAR; during the other 12 hr of the photoperiod, the plants received 840 micrometers ol m-2 s-1 PAR. Beginning on the twelfth day, the plants were exposed to UV-B radiation (0.2 & 18.0 kJ m-2d-1) for 2 days at 8 h per day centered in the photoperiod. Rapidly acquired (less than 1 s), high spatial resolution (less than 1 mm2) images were obtained for whole adaxial leaf surfaces using a fluorescence imaging system. The steady-state fluorescence images were acquired in four spectral regions: blue (F450 nm), green (F550 nm), red (F680 nm), and far-red (F740 nm). Fluorescence emission spectra for leaf pigments extracted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were obtained by excitation at 280 and 380 nm (280EX 300 - 530 nm; 380EX 400 - 800 nm). Both UV-B and EDU induced stress responses in cucumber leaves that altered the fluorescence emissions obtained from extracts. In the fluorescence images only UV-B induced stress responses were observed but this damage was detected before it was visually apparent. There was no evidence that EDU afforded protection against UV-B irradiation. Use of fluorescence imaging may provide an early stress detection capability for helping to assess damage to the photosynthetic apparatus of plants.

  18. Fluorescence Imaging of the Cytoskeleton in Plant Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachok, Julia; Paez-Garcia, Ana; Yoo, Cheol-Min; Palanichelvam, Karuppaiah; Blancaflor, Elison B

    2016-01-01

    During the past two decades the use of live cytoskeletal probes has increased dramatically due to the introduction of the green fluorescent protein. However, to make full use of these live cell reporters it is necessary to implement simple methods to maintain plant specimens in optimal growing conditions during imaging. To image the cytoskeleton in living Arabidopsis roots, we rely on a system involving coverslips coated with nutrient supplemented agar where the seeds are directly germinated. This coverslip system can be conveniently transferred to the stage of a confocal microscope with minimal disturbance to the growth of the seedling. For roots with a larger diameter such as Medicago truncatula, seeds are first germinated in moist paper, grown vertically in between plastic trays, and roots mounted on glass slides for confocal imaging. Parallel with our live cell imaging approaches, we routinely process fixed plant material via indirect immunofluorescence. For these methods we typically use non-embedded vibratome-sectioned and whole mount permeabilized root tissue. The clearly defined developmental regions of the root provide us with an elegant system to further understand the cytoskeletal basis of plant development.

  19. Nonnegative matrix factorization: a blind spectra separation method for in vivo fluorescent optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montcuquet, Anne-Sophie; Hervé, Lionel; Navarro, Fabrice; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Mars, Jérôme I

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging in diffusive media is an emerging imaging modality for medical applications that uses injected fluorescent markers that bind to specific targets, e.g., carcinoma. The region of interest is illuminated with near-IR light and the emitted back fluorescence is analyzed to localize the fluorescence sources. To investigate a thick medium, as the fluorescence signal decreases with the light travel distance, any disturbing signal, such as biological tissues intrinsic fluorescence (called autofluorescence) is a limiting factor. Several specific markers may also be simultaneously injected to bind to different molecules, and one may want to isolate each specific fluorescent signal from the others. To remove the unwanted fluorescence contributions or separate different specific markers, a spectroscopic approach is explored. The nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) is the blind positive source separation method we chose. We run an original regularized NMF algorithm we developed on experimental data, and successfully obtain separated in vivo fluorescence spectra.

  20. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent imaging during robotic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Antonio Luiz de Vasconcellos; Schraibman, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The intraoperative identification of certain anatomical structures because they are small or visually occult may be challenging. The development of minimally invasive surgery brought additional difficulties to identify these structures due to the lack of complete tactile sensitivity. A number of different forms of intraoperative mapping have been tried. Recently, the near-infrared fluorescence imaging technology with indocyanine green has been added to robotic platforms. In addition, this technology has been tested in several types of operations, and has advantages such as safety, low cost and good results. Disadvantages are linked to contrast distribution in certain clinical scenarios. The intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent imaging is new and promising addition to robotic surgery. Several reports show the utility of this technology in several different procedures. The ideal dose, time and site for dye injection are not well defined. No high quality evidence-based comparative studies and long-term follow-up outcomes have been published so far. Initial results, however, are good and safe. RESUMO A identificação intraoperatória de certas estruturas anatômicas, por seu tamanho ou por elas serem ocultas à visão, pode ser desafiadora. O desenvolvimento da cirurgia minimamente invasiva trouxe dificuldades adicionais, pela falta da sensibilidade tátil completa. Diversas formas de detecção intraoperatória destas estruturas têm sido tentadas. Recentemente, a tecnologia de fluorescência infravermelha com verde de indocianina foi associada às plataformas robóticas. Além disso, essa tecnologia tem sido testada em uma variedade de cirurgias, e suas vantagens parecem estar ligadas a baixo custo, segurança e bons resultados. As desvantagens estão associadas à má distribuição do contraste em determinados cenários. A imagem intraoperatória por fluorescência infravermelha é uma nova e promissora adição à cirurgia robótica. Diversas séries mostram

  1. Ideal Molecular Design of Blue Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Emitter for High Efficiency, Small Singlet-Triplet Energy Splitting, Low Efficiency Roll-Off, and Long Lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Ryun; Choi, Jeong Min; Lee, Chil Won; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2016-09-07

    Highly efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) emitters, 5-(2-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)phenyl)-5H-benzofuro[3,2-c]carbazole (oBFCzTrz), 5-(3-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)phenyl)-5H-benzofuro[3,2-c]carbazole (mBFCzTrz), and 5-(4-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)phenyl)-5H-benzofuro[3,2-c]carbazole (pBFCzTrz), were synthesized to study the effects of ortho-, meta-, and para- linkages between donor and acceptor moieties. oBFCzTrz having ortho- linked donor and acceptor moieties showed smaller singlet-triplet energy gap, shorter excited state lifetime, and higher photoluminescence quantum yield than mBFCzTrz and pBFCzTrz which are interconnected by meta- and para- positions. The TADF device using oBFCzTrz as a blue emitter exhibited high external quantum efficiency over 20%, little efficiency roll-off, and long device lifetime.

  2. Exploiting p-Type Delayed Fluorescence in Hybrid White OLEDs: Breaking the Trade-off between High Device Efficiency and Long Lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Deqiang; Duan, Lian

    2016-09-01

    Despite that the majority of practical organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) still rely on blue fluorophors with low triplet (T1) for creating blue light, hybrid white OLEDs based on low T1 blue fluorophors are still much lagged behind in power efficiency. Here, "ideal" hybrid WOLEDs with recorded efficiency as well as low roll-off, good color-stability and long lifetime were realized by utilizing the bipolar mixed materials as the host of green phosphor as well as the spacer to reduce T1 trap, while blue fluorophors with p-type delayed fluorescence to recycle the trapped T1. An electron transport material with both high electron mobility and good exciton confinement ability was used to boost the TTA efficiency. Hybrid WOLEDs with maximum current efficiency, external quantum efficiency and power efficiency of 49.6 cd/A, 19.1%, and 49.3 lm/W, respectively, together with a high color rendering index of 80 and a half lifetime of over 7000 h at an initial luminescence of 1000 cd/m(2) were realized, manifesting the high potential of the strategy.

  3. High resolution fluorescent bio-imaging with electron beam excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yoshimasa; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru

    2014-11-01

    We have developed electron beam excitation assisted (EXA) optical microscope[1-3], and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.Figure 1(a) shows schematic diagram of the proposed EXA microscope. An electron beam is focused on a luminescent film. A specimen is put on the luminescent film directly. The inset in Fig. 1(a) shows magnified image of the luminescent film and the specimen. Nanometric light source is excited in the luminescent film by the focused electron beam. The nanometric light source illuminates the specimen, and the scattered or transmitted radiation is detected with a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The light source is scanned by scanning of the focused electron beam in order to construct on image. Figure 1(b) shows a luminescence image of the cells acquired with the EXA microscope, and Fig. 1(c) shows a phase contrast microscope image. Cells were observed in culture solution without any treatments, such as fixation and drying. The shape of each cell was clearly recognized and some bright spots were observed in cells. We believe that the bright spots indicated with arrows were auto-fluorescence of intracellular granules and light- grey regions were auto-fluorescence of cell membranes. It is clearly demonstrated that the EXA microscope is useful tool for observation of living biological cells in physiological conditions.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i

  4. Robust overlay schemes for the fusion of fluorescence and color channels in biological imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Jürgen; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Garcia-Allende, P Beatriz; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-04-01

    Molecular fluorescence imaging is a commonly used method in various biomedical fields and is undergoing rapid translation toward clinical applications. Color images are commonly superimposed with fluorescence measurements to provide orientation, anatomical information, and molecular tissue properties in a single image. New adaptive methods that produce a more robust composite image than conventional lime green alpha blending are presented and demonstrated herein. Moreover, visualization through temporal changes is showcased as an alternative for real-time imaging systems.

  5. In Vivo Follow-up of Brain Tumor Growth via Bioluminescence Imaging and Fluorescence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Genevois

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Reporter gene-based strategies are widely used in experimental oncology. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI using the firefly luciferase (Fluc as a reporter gene and d-luciferin as a substrate is currently the most widely employed technique. The present paper compares the performances of BLI imaging with fluorescence imaging using the near infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP to monitor brain tumor growth in mice. Fluorescence imaging includes fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI, fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT, and fluorescence molecular Imaging (FMT®. A U87 cell line was genetically modified for constitutive expression of both the encoding Fluc and iRFP reporter genes and assayed for cell, subcutaneous tumor and brain tumor imaging. On cultured cells, BLI was more sensitive than FRI; in vivo, tumors were first detected by BLI. Fluorescence of iRFP provided convenient tools such as flux cytometry, direct detection of the fluorescent protein on histological slices, and fluorescent tomography that allowed for 3D localization and absolute quantification of the fluorescent signal in brain tumors.

  6. Enhanced live cell imaging via photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weili; Long, Kenneth D; Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-11-21

    We demonstrate photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) microscopy as a surface-specific fluorescence imaging technique to study the adhesion of live cells by visualizing variations in cell-substrate gap distance. This approach utilizes a photonic crystal surface incorporated into a standard microscope slide as the substrate for cell adhesion, and a microscope integrated with a custom illumination source as the detection instrument. When illuminated with a monochromatic light source, angle-specific optical resonances supported by the photonic crystal enable efficient excitation of surface-confined and amplified electromagnetic fields when excited at an on-resonance condition, while no field enhancement occurs when the same photonic crystal is illuminated in an off-resonance state. By mapping the fluorescence enhancement factor for fluorophore-tagged cellular components between on- and off-resonance states and comparing the results to numerical calculations, the vertical distance of labelled cellular components from the photonic crystal substrate can be estimated, providing critical and quantitative information regarding the spatial distribution of the specific components of cells attaching to a surface. As an initial demonstration of the concept, 3T3 fibroblast cells were grown on fibronectin-coated photonic crystals with fluorophore-labelled plasma membrane or nucleus. We demonstrate that PCEF microscopy is capable of providing information about the spatial distribution of cell-surface interactions at the single-cell level that is not available from other existing forms of microscopy, and that the approach is amenable to large fields of view, without the need for coupling prisms, coupling fluids, or special microscope objectives.

  7. Fluorescent Cy5 silica nanoparticles for cancer cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Claire; Nooney, Robert I.; Glynn, MacDara; Ducree, Jens; McDonagh, Colette

    2015-08-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, with metastasis responsible for the majority of cancer-related deaths. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) play a central role in metastasis. Fluorescent silica particles (NPs), of diameter ~50 nm which contain a large concentration of Cy5 dye molecules and are extremely bright, have been developed to detect these rare CTCs. Due to this brightness, the particles have superior performance compared to single Cy5 dye molecule labels, for detecting cancer cells. Fluorescence measurements show that the NPs are almost 100 times brighter than the free dye. They do not photo bleach as readily and, due to the biocompatible silica surface, they can be chemically modified, layer-by-layer, in order to bind to cells. The choice of these chemical layers, in particular the NP to antibody linker, along with the incubation period and type of media used in the incubation, has a strong influence on the specific binding abilities of the NPs. In this work, NPs have been shown to selectively bind to the MCF-7 cell line by targeting epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (EpCAM) present on the MCF-7 cell membrane by conjugating anti-EpCAM antibody to the NP surface. Results have shown a high signal to noise ratio for this cell line in comparison to a HeLa control line. NP attachment to cells was verified qualitatively with the use of fluorescence microscopy and quantitatively using image analysis methods. Once the system has been optimised, other dyes will be doped into the silica NPs and their use in multiplexing will be investigated.

  8. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for fluorescence-guided surgery (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lindsay; Warram, Jason M.; de Boer, Esther; Carroll, William R.; Morlandt, Anthony; Withrow, Kirk P.; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2016-03-01

    During fluorescence-guided surgery, a cancer-specific optical probe is injected and visualized using a compatible device intraoperatively to provide visual contrast between diseased and normal tissues to maximize resection of cancer and minimize the resection of precious adjacent normal tissues. Six patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region (oral cavity (n=4) or cutaneous (n=2)) were injected with an EGFR-targeting antibody (Cetuximab) conjugated to a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye (IRDye800) 3, 4, or 7 days prior to surgical resection of the cancer. Each patient's tumor was then imaged using a commercially available, open-field NIR fluorescence imaging device each day prior to surgery, intraoperatively, and post-operatively. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of the tumor was calculated for each specimen at each imaging time point. Adjacent normal tissue served as an internal anatomic control for each patient to establish a patient-matched "background" fluorescence. Resected tissues were also imaged using a closed-field NIR imaging device. Tumor to background ratios (TBRs) were calculated for each patient using both devices. Fluorescence histology was correlated with traditional pathology assessment to verify the specificity of antibody-dye conjugate binding. Peak TBRs using the open-field device ranged from 2.2 to 11.3, with an average TBR of 4.9. Peak TBRs were achieved between days 1 and 4. This study demonstrated that a commercially available NIR imaging device suited for intraoperative and clinical use can successfully be used with a fluorescently-labeled dye to delineate between diseased and normal tissue in this single cohort human study, illuminated the potential for its use in fluoresence-guided surgery.

  9. Single aflatoxin contaminated corn kernel analysis with fluorescence hyperspectral image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Ononye, Ambrose; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2010-04-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, among others. Aflatoxin contaminated corn is toxic to domestic animals when ingested in feed and is a known carcinogen associated with liver and lung cancer in humans. Consequently, aflatoxin levels in food and feed are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US, allowing 20 ppb (parts per billion) limits in food and 100 ppb in feed for interstate commerce. Currently, aflatoxin detection and quantification methods are based on analytical tests including thin-layer chromatography (TCL) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These analytical tests require the destruction of samples, and are costly and time consuming. Thus, the ability to detect aflatoxin in a rapid, nondestructive way is crucial to the grain industry, particularly to corn industry. Hyperspectral imaging technology offers a non-invasive approach toward screening for food safety inspection and quality control based on its spectral signature. The focus of this paper is to classify aflatoxin contaminated single corn kernels using fluorescence hyperspectral imagery. Field inoculated corn kernels were used in the study. Contaminated and control kernels under long wavelength ultraviolet excitation were imaged using a visible near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral camera. The imaged kernels were chemically analyzed to provide reference information for image analysis. This paper describes a procedure to process corn kernels located in different images for statistical training and classification. Two classification algorithms, Maximum Likelihood and Binary Encoding, were used to classify each corn kernel into "control" or "contaminated" through pixel classification. The Binary Encoding approach had a slightly better performance with accuracy equals to 87% or 88% when 20 ppb or 100 ppb was used as classification threshold, respectively.

  10. A 3-D fluorescence imaging system incorporating structured illumination technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antos, L.; Emord, P.; Luquette, B.; McGee, B.; Nguyen, D.; Phipps, A.; Phillips, D.; Helguera, M.

    2010-02-01

    A currently available 2-D high-resolution, optical molecular imaging system was modified by the addition of a structured illumination source, OptigridTM, to investigate the feasibility of providing depth resolution along the optical axis. The modification involved the insertion of the OptigridTM and a lens in the path between the light source and the image plane, as well as control and signal processing software. Projection of the OptigridTM onto the imaging surface at an angle, was resolved applying the Scheimpflug principle. The illumination system implements modulation of the light source and provides a framework for capturing depth resolved mages. The system is capable of in-focus projection of the OptigridTM at different spatial frequencies, and supports the use of different lenses. A calibration process was developed for the system to achieve consistent phase shifts of the OptigridTM. Post-processing extracted depth information using depth modulation analysis using a phantom block with fluorescent sheets at different depths. An important aspect of this effort was that it was carried out by a multidisciplinary team of engineering and science students as part of a capstone senior design program. The disciplines represented are mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and imaging science. The project was sponsored by a financial grant from New York State with equipment support from two industrial concerns. The students were provided with a basic imaging concept and charged with developing, implementing, testing and validating a feasible proof-of-concept prototype system that was returned to the originator of the concept for further evaluation and characterization.

  11. Monomeric red fluorescent protein variants used for imaging studies in different species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller-Taubenberger, Annette; Vos, Michel J.; Boettger, Angelika; Lasi, Margherita; Lai, Frank P. L.; Fischer, Markus; Rottner, Klemens

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have proven to be excellent tools for live-cell imaging studies. In addition to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants, recent progress was achieved in the development of monomeric red fluorescent proteins (mRFPs) that show improved properties in respect to maturation

  12. Inspection of fecal contamination on strawberries using fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yung-Kun; Yang, Chun-Chieh; Kim, Moon S.; Delwiche, Stephen R.; Lo, Y. Martin; Chen, Suming; Chan, Diane E.

    2013-05-01

    Fecal contamination of produce is a food safety issue associated with pathogens such as Escherichia coli that can easily pollute agricultural products via animal and human fecal matters. Outbreaks of foodborne illnesses associated with consuming raw fruits and vegetables have occurred more frequently in recent years in the United States. Among fruits, strawberry is one high-potential vector of fecal contamination and foodborne illnesses since the fruit is often consumed raw and with minimal processing. In the present study, line-scan LED-induced fluorescence imaging techniques were applied for inspection of fecal material on strawberries, and the spectral characteristics and specific wavebands of strawberries were determined by detection algorithms. The results would improve the safety and quality of produce consumed by the public.

  13. Aptamer-assembled nanomaterials for fluorescent sensing and imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Danqing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers, which are selected in vitro by a technology known as the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX, represent a crucial recognition element in molecular sensing. With advantages such as good biocompatibility, facile functionalization, and special optical and physical properties, various nanomaterials can protect aptamers from enzymatic degradation and nonspecific binding in living systems and thus provide a preeminent platform for biochemical applications. Coupling aptamers with various nanomaterials offers many opportunities for developing highly sensitive and selective sensing systems. Here, we focus on the recent applications of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials in fluorescent sensing and imaging. Different types of nanomaterials are examined along with their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we look toward the future of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials.

  14. Aptamer-assembled nanomaterials for fluorescent sensing and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Danqing; He, Lei; Zhang, Ge; Lv, Aiping; Wang, Ruowen; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    Aptamers, which are selected in vitro by a technology known as the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), represent a crucial recognition element in molecular sensing. With advantages such as good biocompatibility, facile functionalization, and special optical and physical properties, various nanomaterials can protect aptamers from enzymatic degradation and nonspecific binding in living systems and thus provide a preeminent platform for biochemical applications. Coupling aptamers with various nanomaterials offers many opportunities for developing highly sensitive and selective sensing systems. Here, we focus on the recent applications of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials in fluorescent sensing and imaging. Different types of nanomaterials are examined along with their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we look toward the future of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials.

  15. Dual-modality, fluorescent, PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles for molecular and cellular fluorescence imaging and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swy, Eric R.; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S.; Shuboni, Dorela D.; Latourette, Matthew T.; Mallet, Christiane L.; Parys, Maciej; Cormode, David P.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2014-10-01

    Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using computed tomography (CT) are rapidly increasing. Many of these reports use gold nanoparticles. Bismuth has similar CT contrast properties to gold while being approximately 1000-fold less expensive. Herein we report the design, fabrication, characterization, and CT and fluorescence imaging properties of a novel, dual modality, fluorescent, polymer encapsulated bismuth nanoparticle construct for computed tomography and fluorescence imaging. We also report on cellular internalization and preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity effects of these constructs. 40 nm bismuth(0) nanocrystals were synthesized and encapsulated within 120 nm Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by oil-in-water emulsion methodologies. Coumarin-6 was co-encapsulated to impart fluorescence. High encapsulation efficiency was achieved ~70% bismuth w/w. Particles were shown to internalize within cells following incubation in culture. Bismuth nanocrystals and PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles exhibited >90% and >70% degradation, respectively, within 24 hours in acidic, lysosomal environment mimicking media and both remained nearly 100% stable in cytosolic/extracellular fluid mimicking media. μCT and clinical CT imaging was performed at multiple X-ray tube voltages to measure concentration dependent attenuation rates as well as to establish the ability to detect the nanoparticles in an ex vivo biological sample. Dual fluorescence and CT imaging is demonstrated as well. In vivo toxicity studies in rats revealed neither clinically apparent side effects nor major alterations in serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Calculations on minimal detection requirements for in vivo targeted imaging using these nanoparticles are presented. Indeed, our results indicate that these nanoparticles may serve as a platform for sensitive and specific targeted molecular CT and fluorescence imaging.Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using

  16. DBD dyes as fluorescent probes for sensing lipophilic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzinek, Robert; Wessig, Pablo; Möllnitz, Kristian; Nikolaus, Jörg; Schwarzer, Roland; Müller, Peter; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Small fluorescent organic molecules based on [1,3]dioxolo[4,5-f][1,3]benzodioxole (DBD) could be used as probes for lipophillic microenvironments in aqueous solutions by indicating the critical micelles concentration of detergents and staining cell organelles. Their fluorescence lifetime decreases drastically by the amount of water in their direct environment. Therefore they are potential probes for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

  17. Integrated Lymphography using Fluorescence Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Intact Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Inoue

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We assessed lymph drainage in living mice by an integrated imaging method using fluorescence imaging (FLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Mice were subcutaneously injected with quantum dots and gadofluorine 8 into the right rear footpad. They were fixed on a transparent flat plate and underwent FLI and MRI successively. Small markers were attached to the mouse surface for spatial coregistration, and image fusion of FLIs and MRIs was performed. Two-dimensional fluorescence reflectance imaging was used for FLI. FLI and MRI provided generally consistent results and demonstrated lymphatic flow to the popliteal, sacral, and iliac lymph nodes in most mice and to the renal, inguinal, and lumbar-aortic lymph nodes in some mice. On the fusion images, the locations of the lymph nodes in the mouse trunk were in good agreement between FLI and MRI, indicating successful spatial registration even for the deep structures. The popliteal node tended to be visualized a little farther caudally in FLI than in MRI, presumably because the overlying tissues were thicker in the cranial portion. Integrated FLI/MRI lymphography with image fusion appears to be a useful tool for analysis of the murine lymphatic system.

  18. A tunable fluorescent timer method for imaging spatial-temporal protein dynamics using light-driven photoconvertible protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinxin; Zhang, Luyuan; Kao, Ya-Ting; Xu, Fang; Min, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Cellular function is largely determined by protein behaviors occurring in both space and time. While regular fluorescent proteins can only report spatial locations of the target inside cells, fluorescent timers have emerged as an invaluable tool for revealing coupled spatial-temporal protein dynamics. Existing fluorescent timers are all based on chemical maturation. Herein we propose a light-driven timer concept that could report relative protein ages at specific sub-cellular locations, by weakly but chronically illuminating photoconvertible fluorescent proteins inside cells. This new method exploits light, instead of oxygen, as the driving force. Therefore its timing speed is optically tunable by adjusting the photoconverting laser intensity. We characterized this light-driven timer method both in vitro and in vivo and applied it to image spatiotemporal distributions of several proteins with different lifetimes. This novel timer method thus offers a flexible "ruler" for studying temporal hierarchy of spatially ordered processes with exquisite spatial-temporal resolution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Semiautomatic Landmark-Based Two-Dimensional—Three-Dimensional Image Fusion in Living Mice: Correlation of Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Cy5.5-Labeled Antibodies with Flat-Panel Volume Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dullin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Connecting fluorescence signals with anatomic structures enhances our ability to monitor biologic processes in mice. Here, we present a semiautomated approach to correlate two-dimensional (2D noninvasive near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF imaging with three-dimensional (3D, high-resolution, flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT. We developed an algorithm to colocalize fluorescence signals of NIRF-labeled antibodies directed against matriptase and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR to orthotopic carcinomas in mice visualized by fpVCT. For this purpose, mice were anesthetized and fixed on a multimodality animal bed containing fiducial markers filled with iodine-containing contrast agent and fluorescent dye. After intravenous administration of contrast agent and Cy5.5-labeled antibodies, NIRF and fpVCT images were obtained, without repositioning the mice. Binding of Cy5.5-labeled matriptase-specific antibody to pancreatic tumors and Cy5.5-labeled uPAR-specific antibody to mammary carcinomas was assessed by time-domain NIRF imaging measuring the location of fluorescence intensity and its lifetime. In summary, we developed a novel 2D-3D registration technique for image fusion with NIRF imaging and fpVCT to provide complementary information in tumor models on the in vivo association of functional information with anatomic structures. The combination of fpVCT with NIRF imaging will now allow targeted and effective monitoring of preclinical tumor therapies.

  20. Segmentation of fluorescence microscopy cell images using unsupervised mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xian; Dua, Sumeet

    2010-05-28

    The accurate measurement of cell and nuclei contours are critical for the sensitive and specific detection of changes in normal cells in several medical informatics disciplines. Within microscopy, this task is facilitated using fluorescence cell stains, and segmentation is often the first step in such approaches. Due to the complex nature of cell issues and problems inherent to microscopy, unsupervised mining approaches of clustering can be incorporated in the segmentation of cells. In this study, we have developed and evaluated the performance of multiple unsupervised data mining techniques in cell image segmentation. We adapt four distinctive, yet complementary, methods for unsupervised learning, including those based on k-means clustering, EM, Otsu's threshold, and GMAC. Validation measures are defined, and the performance of the techniques is evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively using synthetic and recently published real data. Experimental results demonstrate that k-means, Otsu's threshold, and GMAC perform similarly, and have more precise segmentation results than EM. We report that EM has higher recall values and lower precision results from under-segmentation due to its Gaussian model assumption. We also demonstrate that these methods need spatial information to segment complex real cell images with a high degree of efficacy, as expected in many medical informatics applications.

  1. In vivo imaging of Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum and Escherichiacoli expressing infrared fluorescent protein in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Berlec, Aleš; Štrukelj, Borut; Završnik, Janja; Turk, Boris; Butinar, Miha

    2016-01-01

    Background In vivo imaging of orally administered lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and commensal bacteria in mice is shown to provide information on the spatial and temporal distribution of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. The bacteria can be detected and monitored using bioluminescence or near-infrared fluorescence. Results Fluorescence imaging of bacteria was established by expressing the infrared fluorescent protein IRFP713 in Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum and Escherichia co...

  2. Statistical image segmentation for the detection of skin lesion borders in UV fluorescence excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Padilla-Martinez, Juan Pablo; Franco, Walfre

    2016-04-01

    The skin contains several fluorescent molecules or fluorophores that serve as markers of structure, function and composition. UV fluorescence excitation photography is a simple and effective way to image specific intrinsic fluorophores, such as the one ascribed to tryptophan which emits at a wavelength of 345 nm upon excitation at 295 nm, and is a marker of cellular proliferation. Earlier, we built a clinical UV photography system to image cellular proliferation. In some samples, the naturally low intensity of the fluorescence can make it difficult to separate the fluorescence of cells in higher proliferation states from background fluorescence and other imaging artifacts -- like electronic noise. In this work, we describe a statistical image segmentation method to separate the fluorescence of interest. Statistical image segmentation is based on image averaging, background subtraction and pixel statistics. This method allows to better quantify the intensity and surface distributions of fluorescence, which in turn simplify the detection of borders. Using this method we delineated the borders of highly-proliferative skin conditions and diseases, in particular, allergic contact dermatitis, psoriatic lesions and basal cell carcinoma. Segmented images clearly define lesion borders. UV fluorescence excitation photography along with statistical image segmentation may serve as a quick and simple diagnostic tool for clinicians.

  3. Multimodality Imaging Probe for Positron Emission Tomography and Fluorescence Imaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K. Pandey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to develop multimodality imaging agents for use in cell tracking studies by positron emission tomography (PET and optical imaging (OI. For this purpose, bovine serum albumin (BSA was complexed with biotin (histologic studies, 5(6- carboxyfluorescein, succinimidyl ester (FAM SE (OI studies, and diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA for chelating gallium 68 (PET studies. For synthesis of BSA-biotin-FAM-DTPA, BSA was coupled to (+-biotin N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (biotin-NHSI. BSA- biotin was treated with DTPA-anhydride and biotin-BSA-DTPA was reacted with FAM. The biotin-BSA-DTPA-FAM was reacted with gallium chloride 3 to 5 mCi eluted from the generator using 0.1 N HCl and was passed through basic resin (AG 11 A8 and 150 mCi (100 μL, pH 7–8 was incubated with 0.1 mg of FAM conjugate (100 μL at room temperature for 15 minutes to give 66Ga-BSA-biotin-DTPA-FAM. A shaved C57 black mouse was injected with FAM conjugate (50 μL at one flank and FAM-68Ga (50 μL, 30 mCi at the other. Immediately after injection, the mouse was placed in a fluorescence imaging system (Kodak In-Vivo F, Bruker Biospin Co., Woodbridge, CT and imaged (Λex: 465 nm, Λem: 535 nm, time: 8 seconds, Xenon Light Source, Kodak. The same mouse was then placed under an Inveon microPET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions, Knoxville, TN injected (intravenously with 25 μCi of 18F and after a half-hour (to allow sufficient bone uptake was imaged for 30 minutes. Molecular weight determined using matrix-associated laser desorption ionization (MALDI for the BSA sample was 66,485 Da and for biotin-BSA was 67,116 Da, indicating two biotin moieties per BSA molecule; for biotin-BSA-DTPA was 81,584 Da, indicating an average of 30 DTPA moieties per BSA molecule; and for FAM conjugate was 82,383 Da, indicating an average of 1.7 fluorescent moieties per BSA molecule. Fluorescence imaging clearly showed localization of FAM conjugate and FAM-68Ga at respective flanks of the mouse

  4. Accurate study of FosPeg® distribution in a mouse model using fluorescence imaging technique and fluorescence white monte carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Haiyan; Liu, Haichun; Svenmarker, Pontus

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is used for quantitative in vivo assessment of drug concentration. Light attenuation in tissue is compensated for through Monte-Carlo simulations. The intrinsic fluorescence intensity, directly proportional to the drug concentration, could be obtained....

  5. Hyperspectral instrumentation to image and characterize the fluorescence of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, Frédéric; Walter, Philippe; Pedetti, Silvia; Faye, Delphine; Spezzigu, Piero; Infante, Fulvio; Le Nouy, Patrice; Zedda, Edoardo

    2016-09-01

    Optical instruments for space applications with improved performances (smaller pixels and spectral range extension) are becoming more and more sensitive to chemical contamination and particle sedimentation. Outgassing under vacuum conditions causes dramatic flux losses, especially in the UV bandwidth. Furthermore, it is difficult to perform physicochemical analyses of contaminated surfaces on flight models, in a clean room. Conventional analytical techniques such as FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared interferometer) need the tool to be in contact with the studied area, which is forbidden when working on satellites. In addition, it does not give any information about the distribution of the contaminants in the field of view. The probed area is large, mono-pixel, and the sensitivity of the instrument is too low for hundred nanometer thin film deposits. A first study has shown that we could benefit from using the UV/visible fluorescence spectra to partially identify contaminants and polymer materials. The shape of the fluorescence spectra of adhesives, paints and varnishes have specific signatures that could be recorded into a designated reference database. The location of the presence of these contaminants on such sensitive optics is also relevant. To acquire both these parameters, we designed a specific compact hyperspectral instrument to remotely acquire cube images (500x500 pixels) in a 5 degree field of view, and on a wide range of continuous wavelengths from UV at 320 nm up to the near infrared at 1000 nm. This paper will present the chosen trade-off between different critical optics for a new portable version of this instrument. It is dedicated to space and cultural heritage applications and the first results on an engineering prototype will be shown.

  6. Fluorescence guided lymph node biopsy in large animals using direct image projection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringhausen, Elizabeth; Wang, Tylon; Pitts, Jonathan; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    The use of fluorescence imaging for aiding oncologic surgery is a fast growing field in biomedical imaging, revolutionizing open and minimally invasive surgery practices. We have designed, constructed, and tested a system for fluorescence image acquisition and direct display on the surgical field for fluorescence guided surgery. The system uses a near-infrared sensitive CMOS camera for image acquisition, a near-infra LED light source for excitation, and DLP digital projector for projection of fluorescence image data onto the operating field in real time. Instrument control was implemented in Matlab for image capture, processing of acquired data and alignment of image parameters with the projected pattern. Accuracy of alignment was evaluated statistically to demonstrate sensitivity to small objects and alignment throughout the imaging field. After verification of accurate alignment, feasibility for clinical application was demonstrated in large animal models of sentinel lymph node biopsy. Indocyanine green was injected subcutaneously in Yorkshire pigs at various locations to model sentinel lymph node biopsy in gynecologic cancers, head and neck cancer, and melanoma. Fluorescence was detected by the camera system during operations and projected onto the imaging field, accurately identifying tissues containing the fluorescent tracer at up to 15 frames per second. Fluorescence information was projected as binary green regions after thresholding and denoising raw intensity data. Promising results with this initial clinical scale prototype provided encouraging results for the feasibility of optical projection of acquired luminescence during open oncologic surgeries.

  7. Single Molecule Fluorescence Imaging as a Technique for Barium Tagging in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, B J P; Nygren, D R

    2016-01-01

    Background rejection is key to success for future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. To achieve sensitivity to effective Majorana lifetimes of $\\sim10^{28}$ years, backgrounds must be controlled to better than 0.1 count per ton per year, beyond the reach of any present technology. In this paper we propose a new method to identify the birth of the barium daughter ion in the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe. The method adapts Single Molecule Fluorescent Imaging, a technique from biochemistry research with demonstrated single ion sensitivity. We explore possible SMFI dyes suitable for the problem of barium ion detection in high pressure xenon gas, and develop a fiber-coupled sensing system with which we can detect the presence of bulk Ba$^{++}$ ions remotely. We show that our sensor produces signal-to-background ratios as high as 85 in response to Ba$^{++}$ ions when operated in aqueous solution. We then describe the next stage of this R\\&D program, which will be to demonstrate chelation...

  8. Enhancing contrast and quantitation by spatial frequency domain fluorescence molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jessica; Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging with fluorescent contrast agents is highly sensitive for molecular imaging but is limited in depth to a few centimeters below the skin. Planar fluorescence imaging with full-field, uniform illumination and scientific camera image capture provides a portable and robust configuration for real-time, sensitive fluorescence detection with scalable resolution, but is inherently surface weighted and therefore limited in depth to a few millimeters. At the NIR region (700-1000 nm), tissue absorption and autofluorescence are relatively reduced, increasing depth penetration and reducing background signal, respectively. Optical imaging resolution scales with depth, limiting microscopic resolution with multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography to skin and peri-tumoral tissues are not uniform, varying in thickness and color, complicating subsurface fluorescence measurements. Diffuse optical imaging methods have been developed that better quantify optical signals relative to faster full-field planar reflectance imaging, but require long scan times, complex instrumentation, and reconstruction algorithms. Here we report a novel strategy for rapid measurement of subsurface fluorescence using structured light illumination to improve quantitation of deep-seated fluorescence molecular probe accumulation. This technique, in combination with highly specific, tumor-avid fluorescent molecular probes, will easily integrate noninvasive diagnostics for superficial cancers and fluorescence guided surgery.

  9. NADH fluorescence imaging of isolated biventricular working rabbit hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfour, Huda; Wengrowski, Anastasia M; Jaimes, Rafael; Swift, Luther M; Kay, Matthew W

    2012-07-24

    Since its inception by Langendorff(1), the isolated perfused heart remains a prominent tool for studying cardiac physiology(2). However, it is not well-suited for studies of cardiac metabolism, which require the heart to perform work within the context of physiologic preload and afterload pressures. Neely introduced modifications to the Langendorff technique to establish appropriate left ventricular (LV) preload and afterload pressures(3). The model is known as the isolated LV working heart model and has been used extensively to study LV performance and metabolism(4-6). This model, however, does not provide a properly loaded right ventricle (RV). Demmy et al. first reported a biventricular model as a modification of the LV working heart model(7, 8). They found that stroke volume, cardiac output, and pressure development improved in hearts converted from working LV mode to biventricular working mode(8). A properly loaded RV also diminishes abnormal pressure gradients across the septum to improve septal function. Biventricular working hearts have been shown to maintain aortic output, pulmonary flow, mean aortic pressure, heart rate, and myocardial ATP levels for up to 3 hours(8). When studying the metabolic effects of myocardial injury, such as ischemia, it is often necessary to identify the location of the affected tissue. This can be done by imaging the fluorescence of NADH (the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide)(9-11), a coenzyme found in large quantities in the mitochondria. NADH fluorescence (fNADH) displays a near linearly inverse relationship with local oxygen concentration(12) and provides a measure of mitochondrial redox state(13). fNADH imaging during hypoxic and ischemic conditions has been used as a dye-free method to identify hypoxic regions(14, 15) and to monitor the progression of hypoxic conditions over time(10). The objective of the method is to monitor the mitochondrial redox state of biventricular working hearts during protocols

  10. [Studies on laticifers and milk of greater celandine (Chelidonium majus L.) with fluorescence imaging and fluorescence spectroscopic methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Póczi, Dorottya; Böddi, Béla

    2010-01-01

    Using fluorescence imaging and fluorescence spectroscopic methods, the localisation of the laticifers and the native spectral properties of the milk were studied in various organs of greater celandine (Chelidonium majus L.). Direct measurements on tissue pieces (without the extraction and the separation of the components) provided information about the complexity of the milk and the various ratios of the alkaloid contents in the tissues. Whole plant were studied in a gel documentation system using ultraviolet light source, while the localisation of the laticifers was observed along the leaf veins in fluorescence microscope, using blue excitation light. Measuring different tissue pieces, fluorescence spectroscopic studies showed that the greater celandine alkaloids have emission bands at 469, 530-531, 553, 572-575 and 592 nm and excitation bands at 365, 370, 386 is 400 nm. These results give a possibility for conclusions about the alkaloid contents and composition or ratios of the alkaloid components in various tissue pieces directly, via comparisons with alkaloid standards.

  11. Fluorescence imaging of experimental rheumatoid arthritis in vivo using a fast flying-spot scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, J.; Voigt, J.; Seifert, F.; Ebert, B.; Macdonald, R.; Gemeinhardt, I.; Gemeinhardt, O.; Schnorr, J.; Taupitz, M.; Vater, A.; Vollmer, S.; Licha, K.; Schirner, M.

    2007-07-01

    We have developed a flying-spot scanner for fluorescence imaging of rheumatoid arthritis in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range following intravenous administration of contrast agents. The new imaging system has been characterized with respect to linearity, dynamic range and spatial resolution with the help of fluorescent phantoms. In vivo experiments were performed on an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis. Finally, NIR-fluorescence images of early stages of joint inflammation have been compared with findings from contrast enhanced MR imaging and histology.

  12. Cryo-imaging of fluorescently labeled single cells in a mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyer, Grant J.; Roy, Debashish; Salvado, Olivier; Stone, Meredith E.; Wilson, David L.

    2009-02-01

    We developed a cryo-imaging system to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse, with particular applicability to stem cells and metastatic cancer. The Case cryoimaging system consists of a fluorescence microscope, robotic imaging positioner, customized cryostat, PC-based control system, and visualization/analysis software. The system alternates between sectioning (10-40 μm) and imaging, collecting color brightfield and fluorescent blockface image volumes >60GB. In mouse experiments, we imaged quantum-dot labeled stem cells, GFP-labeled cancer and stem cells, and cell-size fluorescent microspheres. To remove subsurface fluorescence, we used a simplified model of light-tissue interaction whereby the next image was scaled, blurred, and subtracted from the current image. We estimated scaling and blurring parameters by minimizing entropy of subtracted images. Tissue specific attenuation parameters were found [uT : heart (267 +/- 47.6 μm), liver (218 +/- 27.1 μm), brain (161 +/- 27.4 μm)] to be within the range of estimates in the literature. "Next image" processing removed subsurface fluorescence equally well across multiple tissues (brain, kidney, liver, adipose tissue, etc.), and analysis of 200 microsphere images in the brain gave 97+/-2% reduction of subsurface fluorescence. Fluorescent signals were determined to arise from single cells based upon geometric and integrated intensity measurements. Next image processing greatly improved axial resolution, enabled high quality 3D volume renderings, and improved enumeration of single cells with connected component analysis by up to 24%. Analysis of image volumes identified metastatic cancer sites, found homing of stem cells to injury sites, and showed microsphere distribution correlated with blood flow patterns. We developed and evaluated cryo-imaging to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse. Our cryo-imaging system provides extreme (>60GB), micron

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously.

  14. Iodinated oil-loaded, fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography/fluorescence trimodal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Sihan; Wang, Yao; Wang, Mengxing; Zhang, Lu; Du, Xiaoxia; Gu, Hongchen; Zhang, Chunfu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/computed tomography (CT)/fluorescence trifunctional probe was prepared by