WorldWideScience

Sample records for fluorescence yield measurement

  1. Measurement of K fluorescence yields in actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Sjoblom, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    The K fluorescence yields (ω/sub K/) for several actinide elements have been determined from the K Auger electron and K x-ray intensities. The electron spectra were measured with a cooled Si(Li) spectrometer and the K x-ray intensities were measured with a Ge(Li) diode. From our present measurements the following values of K fluorescence yield have been obtained: Np, 97.1 +- 0.5 percent; Pu, 97.3 +- 0.5 percent; Cm, 97.2 +- 0.7 percent; Cf, 97.2 +- 0.5 percent; and Es, 97.1 +- 0.5 percent. These numbers indicate that the K fluorescence yield in the Z = 93 to Z = 99 region remains constant within the experimental error

  2. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum. © 2014 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  3. AIRFLY: Measurement of the fluorescence yield in atmospheric gases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arciprete, F.; Boháčová, Martina; Buonomo, B.; Caruso, R.; Di Carlo, P.; Doubrava, M.; Esposito, A.; Facal, P.; Fauth, A.C.; Goletti, C.; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Klages, H.O.; Kleifges, M.; Klepser, S.; Mazzitelli, G.; Morozov, L.; Nožka, Libor; Palatka, Miroslav; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Řídký, Jan; Schovánek, Petr; Vacek, V.; Waldenmaier, T.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, Suppl. A (2006), A361-A367 ISSN 0011-4626. [From Colliders to Cosmic Rays. Prague, 07.09.2005-13.09.2005] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LA 134; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/05/2470 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : cosmic rays * air fluorescence * linear accelerators Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2006

  4. Energy dependence of air fluorescence yield measured by AIRFLY

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ave, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Buonomo, B.; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Nožka, Libor; Palatka, Miroslav; Řídký, Jan; Schovánek, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 597, č. 1 (2008), 46-49 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527; GA MŠk(CZ) LA08016; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : air fluorescence * cosmic rays Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.019, year: 2008

  5. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  6. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm band in atmospheric gases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ave, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Curry, E.; Di Carlo, P.; Di Giulio, C.; Facal San Luis, P.; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J.; Hrabovský, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Li, S.; Monasor, M.; Nožka, Libor; Palatka, Miroslav; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Řídký, Jan; Rizi, V.; Rouille D’Orfeuil, B.; Salamida, F.; Schovánek, Petr; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 42, Feb (2013), 90-102 ISSN 0927-6505 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LA08016 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nitrogen fluorescence yield * air fluorescence detection * ultra-high energy cosmic rays Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.450, year: 2013

  7. Temperature chamber for measurement of fluorescence yield and nitrogen spectrum in the project AIRFLY

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nožka, Libor; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Řídký, Jan; Boháčová, Martina; Schovánek, Petr; Palatka, Miroslav; Pech, Miroslav; Mandát, Dušan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 12 (2009), s. 619-622 ISSN 0030-4026 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : AIRFLY project, * temperature chamber * atmospheric fluorescence yield, * nitrogen spectrum Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.378, year: 2009

  8. Measurements of fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields for 66Dy using synchrotron radiation induced selective photoionization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rajnish; Kumar, Anil; Czyzycki, M.; Migliori, A.; Karydas, A. G.; Puri, Sanjiv

    2017-09-01

    The L shell fluorescence (ω1, ω2, ω3) and Coster-Kronig (f12, f13, f23) yields for 66Dy have been deduced from the Li (i = 1-3) sub-shell X-ray intensities measured at different incident photon energies across its Li absorption edge energies. Three sets of photoionization cross sections used for determination of these yields include two sets of theoretical values based on the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater model and the self-consistent Dirac-Hartree-Fock model, and the third one is that deduced from independently measured mass attenuation coefficients of 66Dy. The present experimental fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields deduced using the self-consistent Dirac-Hartree-Fock model based photoionization cross sections have been found to be in good agreement with the semi-empirical values tabulated by Krause [1] and the Dirac-Hartree-Slater model based values.

  9. Improved Method of Fluorescence Quantum Yield Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawara, Krzysztof; Waluk, Jacek

    2017-09-05

    In the most widely used procedure for luminescence quantum yield determination, absorption and emission spectra are measured on two different instruments. This leads to errors caused by wavelength misalignment and different monochromator characteristics of the spectrophotometer and the spectrofluorometer. These errors can be avoided using a method for fluorescence quantum yield determination that relies on simultaneous absorption and fluorescence emission (SAFE) measurement using a single commercial spectrofluorometer. The method's performance is compared with the standard routinely used procedure for the relative quantum yield determination. The advantages of SAFE measurement are discussed. The proposed novel approach eliminates a number of potential errors in quantum yield determination protocol and provides higher accuracy.

  10. A novel method for the absolute fluorescence yield measurement by AIRFLY

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ave, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Buonomo, B.; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Nožka, Libor; Palatka, Miroslav; Řídký, Jan; Schovánek, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 597, č. 1 (2008), s. 55-60 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527; GA MŠk(CZ) LA08016; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : fluorescence * cosmic rays Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.019, year: 2008

  11. Temperature and humidity dependence of air fluorescence yield measured by AIRFLY

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ave, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Buonomo, B.; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Nožka, Libor; Palatka, Miroslav; Řídký, Jan; Schovánek, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 597, č. 1 (2008), s. 50-54 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527; GA MŠk(CZ) LA08016; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : fluorescence * cosmic rays Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.019, year: 2008

  12. Precise measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons in atmospheric gases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ave, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Daumiller, K.; Di Carlo, P.; Di Giulio, C.; San Luis, P.F.; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J.R.; Hrabovský, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Monasor, M.; Nožka, Libor; Palatka, Miroslav; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Řídký, Jan; Rizi, V.; d´Orfeuil, B.R.; Salamida, F.; Schovánek, Petr; Šmída, Radomír; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    212-213, - (2011), s. 356-361 ISSN 0920-5632 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002; GA MŠk(CZ) LA08016; GA AV ČR KJB100100904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : airfly * fluorescence photons * ultra-high energy cosmic rays Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics http://particle.astro.ru.nl/pub/NuclPhysB212-356.pdf

  13. High yield fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick A [Structure and Activity of Normal and Pathological Biomolecules-INSERM/UEVE U829, Universite d' Evry-Val d' Essonne, Batiment Maupertuis, Rue du pere Andre Jarlan, F-91025 Evry (France); Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrischnan; Reuter, Rolf [3.Physikalisches Institut, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Aubert, Pascal [Nanometric Media Laboratory, Universite d' Evry-Val d' Essonne, Batiment Maupertuis, Rue du pere Andre Jarlan, F-91025 Evry (France); Sennour, Mohamed; Thorel, Alain [Centre des Materiaux, Mines Paris, ParisTech, BP 87, F-91000 Evry (France); Gaffet, Eric [Nanomaterials Research Group-UMR 5060, CNRS, UTBM, Site de Sevenans, F-90010 Belfort (France)], E-mail: jpb.cnrs@free.fr, E-mail: pcurmi@univ-evry.fr, E-mail: f.jelezko@physik.uni-stuttgart.de

    2009-06-10

    A new fabrication method to produce homogeneously fluorescent nanodiamonds with high yields is described. The powder obtained by high energy ball milling of fluorescent high pressure, high temperature diamond microcrystals was converted in a pure concentrated aqueous colloidal dispersion of highly crystalline ultrasmall nanoparticles with a mean size less than or equal to 10 nm. The whole fabrication yield of colloidal quasi-spherical nanodiamonds was several orders of magnitude higher than those previously reported starting from microdiamonds. The results open up avenues for the industrial cost-effective production of fluorescent nanodiamonds with well-controlled properties.

  14. High yield fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick A; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrischnan; Reuter, Rolf; Aubert, Pascal; Sennour, Mohamed; Thorel, Alain; Gaffet, Eric

    2009-01-01

    A new fabrication method to produce homogeneously fluorescent nanodiamonds with high yields is described. The powder obtained by high energy ball milling of fluorescent high pressure, high temperature diamond microcrystals was converted in a pure concentrated aqueous colloidal dispersion of highly crystalline ultrasmall nanoparticles with a mean size less than or equal to 10 nm. The whole fabrication yield of colloidal quasi-spherical nanodiamonds was several orders of magnitude higher than those previously reported starting from microdiamonds. The results open up avenues for the industrial cost-effective production of fluorescent nanodiamonds with well-controlled properties.

  15. Versatile spectrophotometer for photosynthesis (light-induced changes in absorbance and fluorescence yield, circular and linear dichroism) and other biophysical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Bacon; Breeze, Robert H.; Dolan, Edward; Vore, Duane

    1985-01-01

    The construction of a versatile, single-beam spectrophotometer expanded from a previously reported circular dichrometer utilizing an elasto-optic modulator (EOM) for producing circular polarization, is described. The new spectrophotometer is capable of measuring circular dichroism as well as linear dichroism and light-induced changes in absorbance and fluorescence yield, the latter being two of the most commonly measured properties in photosynthesis research. The use of an EOM, along with a phase-sensitive detector, affords high sensitivity and at the same time, in conjuction with a mechanical phosphoroscopic device, a high degree of immunity from artifacts in studies employing actinic light. A description is given of the generation and use of timing signals essential for control and signal processing. Its performance is illustrated by examples drawn from light-induced absorbance and fluorescence-yield changes associated with photosynthetic electron transport and changes in redox state of electron carriers. This photometer, with very little modification, may also be used to perform a host of other types of measurements.

  16. Theoretical lifetimes and fluorescence yields for multiply-ionized fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnell, T.W.; Can, C.; Bhalla, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical lifetimes and multiplet partial fluorescence yields for various fluorine ions with a single K-shell vacancy were calculated. For few-electron systems, the lifetimes and line fluorescence yields were computed in the intermediate coupling scheme with the inclusion of the effects arising from configuration interactions. 6 references

  17. Determination of experimental K-shell fluorescence yield for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K-shell fluorescence yields were experimentally determined for potassium and calcium compounds using a Si(Li) X-ray detector system (FWHM=5.96 keV at 160 eV). The samples were excited by 5.96 keV photons produced by a 55Fe radioisotope source. The experimental values are systematically lower than the ...

  18. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  19. Annual energy yield of the fluorescent solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Hellenbrand, G.F.M.G. [Department of Science, Technology and Society, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Bende, E.E.; Burgers, A.R.; Slooff, L.H. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15

    Fluorescent solar concentrators are but one candidate for lowering the costs of photovoltaic technology. State-of-the-art device conversion efficiencies are around 4%, and the device configuration can be optimized in terms of Euro per Watt. This paper aims to estimate the annual energy yield of such an optimized device configuration, using a detailed minutely spectral irradiance data set, describing a full year in the Netherlands, in combination with a ray-tracing model of the fluorescent solar concentrator. The spectral dataset is modeled using experimentally determined global, direct, and diffuse irradiation data on a minutely basis. Performance variations during the day for a number of typical days are investigated, i.e., for a clear summer day, a cloudy summer day, a clear winter day, and a cloudy winter day, using a ray-trace model of the fluorescent solar concentrator. Also, monthly aggregated spectra are used, as well as an annually aggregated spectrum to determine monthly and annual energy yields, respectively. As a result of a cost-per-unit-of-power optimization study, an optimum size of 23x23x0.1 cm{sup 3} was used, and an annual energy yield of 41.3 kWh/m{sup 2} could be estimated; this is 4.7 times lower than the annual energy yield of a state-of-the-art silicon solar cell.

  20. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of nitrogen in air. Consequences on the detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays; Mesure precise du rendement absolu de la fluorescence de l'azote dans l'air. Consequences sur la detection des rayons cosmiques d'ultra-haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefeuvre, G

    2006-07-15

    The study of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (E > 10{sup 20} eV) requires to determine the energy with much more precision than what is currently achieved. The shower of particles created in the atmosphere can be detected either by sampling particle on the ground, or by detecting the fluorescence induced by the excitation of nitrogen by shower electrons. At present, the measurement of the fluorescence is the simplest and the most reliable method, since it does not call upon hadronic physics laws at extreme energies, a field still inaccessible to accelerators. The precise knowledge of the conversion factor between deposited energy and the number of fluorescence photons produced (the yield) is thus essential. Up to now, it has been determined with an accuracy of 15 % only. This main goal of this work is to measure this yield to better than 5 per cent. To do this, 1 MeV electrons from a radioactive source excite nitrogen of the air. The accuracy has been reached thanks to the implementation of a new method for the absolute calibration of the photomultipliers detecting the photons, to better than 2 per cent. The fluorescence yield, measured and normalized to 0.85 MeV, 760 mmHg and 15 Celsius degrees, is (4.23 {+-} 0.20) photons per meter, or (20.46 {+-} 0.98) photons per deposited MeV. In addition, and for the first time, the absolute fluorescence spectrum of nitrogen excited by a source has been measured with an optical grating spectrometer. (author)

  1. Size effects in the quantum yield of Cd Te quantum dots for optimum fluorescence bioimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacinto, C.; Rocha, U.S.; Maestro, L.M.; Garcia-Sole, J.; Jaque, D.

    2011-01-01

    those achievable when using CdSe-QDs. In this work, the size dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield of CdTe Quantum dots has been systematically investigated by Thermal Lens Spectroscopy. It has been found that optimum quantum yield is reached for 3.7 nm quantum dots. The presence of this optimum size has been corroborated by fluorescence experiments. Combination of quantum yield and fluorescence decay time measurements have concluded that the appearance of this optimum size emerges from the interplay between the frequency dependent radiative emission rate and the size dependent coupling strength between bulk exciton and surface trapping states. Our results open a new avenue in the search for new fluorescent 'multifunctional nanoprobes' for high resolution fluorescence imaging at the nanoscale. (author)

  2. Models of fluorescence and photosynthesis for interpreting measurements of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Tol, C.; Berry, J. A.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Rascher, U.

    2014-12-01

    We have extended a conventional photosynthesis model to simulate field and laboratory measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf scale. The fluorescence paramaterization is based on a close nonlinear relationship between the relative light saturation of photosynthesis and nonradiative energy dissipation in plants of different species. This relationship diverged only among examined data sets under stressed (strongly light saturated) conditions, possibly caused by differences in xanthophyll pigment concentrations. The relationship was quantified after analyzing data sets of pulse amplitude modulated measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange of leaves of different species exposed to different levels of light, CO2, temperature, nitrogen fertilization treatments, and drought. We used this relationship in a photosynthesis model. The coupled model enabled us to quantify the relationships between steady state chlorophyll fluorescence yield, electron transport rate, and photosynthesis in leaves under different environmental conditions.

  3. Measurements of beryllium sputtering yields at JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jet-Efda Contributors Stamp, M. F.; Krieger, K.; Brezinsek, S.

    2011-08-01

    The lifetime of the beryllium first wall in ITER will depend on erosion and redeposition processes. The physical sputtering yields for beryllium (both deuterium on beryllium (Be) and Be on Be) are of crucial importance since they drive the erosion process. Literature values of experimental sputtering yields show an order of magnitude variation so predictive modelling of ITER wall lifetimes has large uncertainty. We have reviewed the old beryllium yield experiments on JET and used current beryllium atomic data to produce revised beryllium sputtering yields. These experimental measurements have been compared with a simple physical sputtering model based on TRIM.SP beryllium yield data. Fair agreement is seen for beryllium yields from a clean beryllium limiter. However the yield on a beryllium divertor tile (with C/Be co-deposits) shows poor agreement at low electron temperatures indicating that the effect of the higher sputtering threshold for beryllium carbide is important.

  4. Chemical effect on the K shell fluorescence yield of Fe, Mn, Co, Cr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The fluorescence yield of an atomic shell or subshell is defined as a probability that a vacancy in that shell or subshell is filled through a radiative transition. The fluorescence yield of a shell is equal to the number of photons emitted when the vacancies in the shell are filled, divided by the number of primary vacancies in the.

  5. Chemical effect on the K shell fluorescence yield of Fe, Mn, Co, Cr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical effects on the K shell fluorescence yields. (ωK) for Fe, Mn, Co, Cr and Cu compounds were observed. The values are compared with theoretical, semiempirical fit and experimental ones for the pure elements. Keywords. Fluorescence yield; 3d elements; chemical effect. PACS Nos 32.10.-f; 32.80.-t; 32.80.Fb. 1.

  6. Sputtering yield measurements on single crystal cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernysh, V.S.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.

    1981-01-01

    Single crystals of cobalt have been bombarded with 80 keV A + ions in the direction of the h.c.p. structure and in the direction of the f.c.c. structure. The sputtering yields, measured by the weight loss method, depend on the crystal structure, and damage, introduced by the ion bombardment, is shown to play a significant role in the explanation of the measured sputtering yields. (Auth.)

  7. Carbon sputtering yield measurements at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolasinski, Robert D.; Polk, James E.; Goebel, Dan; Johnson, Lee K.

    2008-01-01

    In this investigation, carbon sputtering yields were measured experimentally at varying angles of incidence under Xe + bombardment. The measurements were obtained by etching a coated quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with a low energy ion beam. The material properties of the carbon targets were characterized with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. C sputtering yields measured under Ar + and Xe + bombardment at normal incidence displayed satisfactory agreement with previously published data over an energy range of 200 eV-1 keV. For Xe + ions, the dependence of the yields on angle of incidence θ was determined for 0 o ≤ θ ≤ 80 deg. Over this range, an increase in C sputtering yield by a factor of 4.8 was observed, with the peak in yield occurring at 70 o . This is a much higher variation compared to Xe + → Mo yields under similar conditions, a difference that may be attributed to higher scattering of the incident particles transverse to the beam direction than in the case of Xe + → C. In addition, the variation of the yields with θ was not strongly energy dependent. Trapping of Xe in the surface was observed, in contrast to observations using the QCM technique with metallic target materials. Finally, target surface roughness was characterized using atomic force microscope measurements to distinguish between the effects of local and overall angle of incidence of the target

  8. Closing in on maximum yield of chlorophyll fluorescence using a single multiphase flash of sub-saturating intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriaux, S D; Avenson, T J; Welles, J M; McDermitt, D K; Eckles, R D; Riensche, B; Genty, B

    2013-10-01

    Estimation of the maximum chlorophyll fluorescence yield under illumination, or Fm', by traditional single saturation pulse (SP) methodology is prone to underestimation error because of rapid turnover within photosystem (PS) II. However, measurements of fluorescence yield during several single pulses of variable intensity describes the irradiance dependence of apparent Fm', from which estimates of Fm' at infinite irradiance can be derived. While such estimates have been shown to result in valid approximations of Fm', the need to apply several single pulses limits its applicability. We introduce a novel approach that determines the relationship between apparent Fm' and variable irradiance within a single ∼1 s multiphase flash (MPF). Through experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that the rate of variation in irradiance during an MPF is critical for achieving quasi-steady-state changes in the proportions of PSII acceptor side redox intermediates and the corresponding fluorescence yields, which are prerequisites for accurately estimating Fm' at infinite irradiance. The MPF methodology is discussed in the context of improving the accuracy of various parameters derived from chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, such as photochemical and non-photochemical quenchings and efficiencies. The importance of using MPF methodology for interpreting chlorophyll fluorescence, in particular for integrating fluorescence and gas exchange measurements, is emphasized. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Microwave heating of arginine yields highly fluorescent nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippidis, Aggelos; Stefanakis, Dimitrios; Anglos, Demetrios; Ghanotakis, Demetrios

    2013-01-01

    Brightly fluorescent nanoparticles were produced via a single-step, single-precursor procedure based on microwave heating of an aqueous solution of the amino acid arginine. Key structural and optical properties of the resulting Arg nanoparticles, Arg-dots, are reported and discussed with emphasis on the pH dependence of their fluorescence emission. The surface of the Arg-dots was functionalised through coupling to folic acid, opening up ways for connecting fluorescent nanoparticles to cancer cells. The generality and versatility of the microwave heating procedure was further demonstrated by the synthesis of different types of carbon nanoparticles, such as CE-dots, that were produced by use of citric acid and ethanolamine as precursors and compared to the Arg-dots.

  10. OCO-2 Solar-induced Fluorescence Data Portal and Applications to Crop Yield Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, A. J.; Jiang, J. H.; Frankenberg, C.; Yung, Y. L.; Choi, Y. S.

    2016-12-01

    Solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) is a direct byproduct of photosynthesis and is an index that can represent overall plant productivity level of any region around the globe. Recently, in 2014, NASA launched the Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) satellite, which collects SIF measurements at a higher spatial resolution than any previous instrument has. We have first assembled a web-based data portal, which can be easily utilized by both farmers and researchers, to allow convenient access to the SIF data from OCO-2. One possible use of SIF is to estimate agricultural status of crop fields anywhere in the world. We are using OCO-2 level 2 measurements in conjunction with the USDA's Cropland Data Layer and reported crop yield data to study how effectively SIF can estimate agricultural yield on various types of landscape and various species of crops. Results, methods, and future implications will be presented.

  11. Modulating fluorescence quantum yield of highly concentrated fluorescein using differently shaped green synthesized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Jisha; Thomas, Lincy; Kurian, Achamma; George, Sajan D.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of dye molecules with differently shaped nanoparticles is of great interest owing to the potential applications in areas of bioimaging, sensing and photodynamic therapy (biology) as well as solar cells (photonics) applications. For such applications, noble metallic nanoparticles are commonly employed to either enhance or quench the luminescence of a nearby fluorophore. However, in most of the studies, the dye concentration is limited to avoid self-quenching. This paper reports the influence of differently shaped gold nanoparticles (spherical, bean and star), prepared via green synthesis, on the emission behavior as well as on the fluorescence quantum yield of fluorescein dye at concentrations for which self-quenching occurs. The emission behavior is probed via laser based steady state fluorescence whereas quantum yield is measured using a dual beam laser based thermal lens technique. The experimentally observed fluorescence quenching with a concomitant increase in thermal lens signal in the vicinity of nanoparticles are explained in terms of nonradiative energy transfer between the donor and the acceptor. Further, the influence of pH of the prepared gold nanofluid on the absorption, emission as well as quantum yield are also accounted. These studies elucidate that even at high concentrations of dye, the gold nanoparticle and its shape clearly influences the optical properties of nearby dye molecules and thus can be exploited for future applications. - Highlights: • Green synthesis of differently shaped gold nanoparticles. • Tailoring emission properties of fluorescein with respect to nanoparticle concentration and shape. • Tailoring the quantum yield of highly concentrated fluorescein with nanoparticles.

  12. Determination of experimental K-shell fluorescence yield for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    atom with an inner K shell vacancy can proceed by either the emission of X-ray photons or the ejection of ... fields such as atomic, molecular and radiation physics, X-ray fluorescence analysis, cancer therapy, medical .... of lines of different energies and intensities, the absorption correction coefficient is. Pramana – J. Phys.

  13. Determination of experimental K-shell fluorescence yield for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (1) were σK(E) is the K-shell photoionization cross-section for the given element at excitation energy E, σKi (i = α, β) is the K X-ray fluorescence cross-section. In the present calculations, the values of σK(E) were taken from Scofield calculations based on the Hartree–Slater potential theory [15]. The K X-ray production cross-.

  14. Predicting fluorescence quantum yield for anisole at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Tran, K. H.; Morin, C.; Bonnety, J.; Legros, G.; Guibert, P.

    2017-07-01

    Aromatic molecules are promising candidates for using as a fluorescent tracer for gas-phase scalar parameter diagnostics in a drastic environment like engines. Along with anisole turning out an excellent temperature tracer by Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostics in Rapid Compression Machine (RCM), its fluorescence signal evolution versus pressure and temperature variation in a high-pressure and high-temperature cell have been reported in our recent paper on Applied Phys. B by Tran et al. Parallel to this experimental study, a photophysical model to determine anisole Fluorescence Quantum Yield (FQY) is delivered in this paper. The key to development of the model is the identification of pressure, temperature, and ambient gases, where the FQY is dominated by certain processes of the model (quenching effect, vibrational relaxation, etc.). In addition to optimization of the vibrational relaxation energy cascade coefficient and the collision probability with oxygen, the non-radiative pathways are mainly discussed. The common non-radiative rate (intersystem crossing and internal conversion) is simulated in parametric form as a function of excess vibrational energy, derived from the data acquired at different pressures and temperatures from the literature. A new non-radiative rate, namely, the equivalent Intramolecular Vibrational Redistribution or Randomization (IVR) rate, is proposed to characterize anisole deactivated processes. The new model exhibits satisfactory results which are validated against experimental measurements of fluorescence signal induced at a wavelength of 266 nm in a cell with different bath gases (N2, CO2, Ar and O2), a pressure range from 0.2 to 4 MPa, and a temperature range from 473 to 873 K.

  15. K-shell fluorescence yields for elements with 6≤Z≤99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahoul, A.; Abassi, A.; Deghfel, B.; Nekkab, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, empirical K-shell fluorescence yields (ω K ) from the available experimental data for elements with 6≤Z≤99 were calculated. The experimental data are fitted using the quantity (ω K /(1-ω K )) 1/q (where q=3, 3.5 and 4) vs. Z to deduce the empirical fluorescence yields. A comparison is made between the results of the procedures followed here and the literature theoretical and empirical values.

  16. Optimizing the fluorescent yield in two-photon laser scanning microscopy with dispersion compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Carriles, Ramón; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Chandler, Eric V.; Hoover, Erich E.; Tillo, Shane E.; Hughes, Thom E.; Sylvester, Anne W.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeff A.

    2014-01-01

    A challenge for nonlinear imaging in living tissue is to maximize the total fluorescent yield from each fluorophore. We investigated the emission rates of three fluorophores – rhodamine B, a red fluorescent protein, and CdSe quantum dots – while manipulating the phase of the laser excitation pulse at the focus. In all cases a transform-limited pulse maximized the total yield to insure the highest signal-to-noise ratio. Further, we find evidence of fluorescence anti-bleaching in quantum dot samples. PMID:20588500

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of the oil film thickness in an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroski, Greg M.; Ghandhi, Jaal B.

    1997-11-01

    The use of a fluorescent dopant molecule to enhance the natural fluorescence of motor oils, and allow quantitative determination of temperature and film thickens in internal combustion engines has been investigated. Measurement of the fluorescence as a function of temperature were made with neat Mobil 1, and solutions of the dopant BTBP in mineral oil and Mobil 1. The fluorescence yield of neat Mobil 1 was found to vary by 30 percent over the temperature range explored, but the spectral characteristics, as measured with bandpass filters, were unaffected by temperature. The BTBP fluorescence was found to increase significantly with temperature, and it was found the narrower regions in the spectrum increased proportionally more than the fluorescence collected over the entire spectrum, allowing a determination of temperature to be made which can then be used to correct for the change in fluorescence yield. Solutions in Mobil 1 showed a smaller increase than that observed in mineral oil.

  18. Measurement of the {gamma}-anisotropy in n{yields}+p{yields}{yields}d+{gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, T.M.; Dubbers, D.; Hautle, P.; Bunyatova, E.I.; Korobkina, E.I.; Zimmer, O

    2000-02-11

    The study of the radiative neutron capture by protons, n+p{yields}d+{gamma}, provides valuable information about the nucleon-nucleon interaction. So far, no experimental value has existed for the {gamma}-anisotropy which may appear if neutrons and protons both are polarised. A non-vanishing {gamma}-anisotropy {eta} is a clear-cut signal for the existence of transitions {sup 3}S{sub 1}{yields} {sup 3}d{sub 1} from the triplet initial state to the ground state of the deuteron. We report the first measurement of this observable. The result is {eta}=(1.0{+-}2.5)x10{sup -4} at 50.5% polarisation of neutrons and protons.

  19. Determination of $L_{3}$ subshell X-ray production cross-sections and fluorescence yields of Pb, Th and U

    CERN Document Server

    Simsek, O

    2000-01-01

    A study of L/sub 3/ subshell X-ray production cross-sections and fluorescence yields by using characteristic K X-rays as the exciting radiation is described. Only the L/sub 3/ subshells of Pb, Th and U were excited by the characteristic K X-rays of the elements used as secondary sources. The cross-sections for the production of L/sub l/, L/sub alpha / and L/sub beta / groups of L/sub 3/ subshell X-rays of Pb, Th and U have been measured using photoionization by Rb, Nb and Mo K X-rays. The measured L/sub 3/ X-ray production cross-section values for Pb, Th and U are in good agreement with the theoretical ones evaluated using L/sub 3/ subshell fluorescence yield omega /sub 3/, fractions of the radiative width F/sub 3i/ and L/sub 3/ subshell photoionization cross-section sigma /sub 3/. The L/sub 3/ subshell fluorescence yields ( omega /sub 3/) have also been computed using the presently measured cross-section values and the theoretical L/sub 3/ subshell photoionization cross-section values. These results are comp...

  20. [Fluorescence lifetime measurement based on different pump waveform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiu-jun; Chen, Jian-guo; Feng, Guo-ying; Yang, Li-ling; Deng, Guo-liang; Tang, Xiao-jun; Zhou, Shou-huan

    2010-11-01

    The present paper analyzes the different pump wave theory under the fluorescence decay law, and presents a different pump wave measured fluorescence lifetime of the new method-double-pulse detection method, namely the use of pump pulse and probe pulse for the fluorescence decay methods to measure fluorescence lifetime. By measuring the sample neodymium glass and Cr:ZnSe crystal fluorescence lifetime, results showed that: using this method can be achieved under different pump wave in visible and near-infrared to the mid-infrared laser medium of the fluorescence lifetime measurement. Therefore, using the measurement method can be convenient and effective to avoid seeking samples by deconvolution for fluorescence lifetime with the cumbersome process of measuring laser medium at different pump wave under the fluorescence lifetime with a reference value.

  1. Chemical effect on the K shell fluorescence yield of Fe, Mn, Co, Cr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical effects on the K shell fluorescence yields of Fe, Mn, Co, Cr and Cu compounds were investigated. Samples were excited using 59.5 keV energy photons from a 241Am radioisotope source. K X-rays emitted by samples were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Chemical effects on the K ...

  2. Towards a Solid Foundation of Using Remotely Sensed Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence for Crop Monitoring and Yield Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Sun, Y.; You, L.; Liu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The growing demand for food production due to population increase coupled with high vulnerability to volatile environmental changes poses a paramount challenge for mankind in the coming century. Real-time crop monitoring and yield forecasting must be a key part of any solution to this challenge as these activities provide vital information needed for effective and efficient crop management and for decision making. However, traditional methods of crop growth monitoring (e.g., remotely sensed vegetation indices) do not directly relate to the most important function of plants - photosynthesis and therefore crop yield. The recent advance in the satellite remote sensing of Solar-Induced chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF), an integrative photosynthetic signal from molecular origin and a direct measure of plant functions holds great promise for real-time monitoring of crop growth conditions and forecasting yields. In this study, we use satellite measurements of SIF from both the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) onboard MetOp-A and the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellites to estimate crop yield using both process-based and statistical models. We find that SIF-based crop yield well correlates with the global yield product Spatial Production Allocation Model (SPAM) derived from ground surveys for all major crops including maize, soybean, wheat, sorghum, and rice. The potential and challenges of using upcoming SIF satellite missions for crop monitoring and prediction will also be discussed.

  3. Fluorescence quantum yields of natural organic matter and organic compounds: Implications for the fluorescence-based interpretation of organic matter composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wünsch, Urban; Murphy, Kathleen R.; Stedmon, Colin

    2015-01-01

    the likelihood that chromophores emit fluorescence after absorbing light. Compared to the number of studies investigating CDOM and FDOM, few studies have systematically investigated AQY spectra for DOM, and linked them to fluorescence quantum yields (Φ) of organic compounds. To offer a standardized approach......Absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy are economical tools for tracing the supply, turnover and fate of dissolved organic matter (DOM). The colored and fluorescent fractions of DOM (CDOM and FDOM, respectively) are linked by the apparent fluorescence quantum yield (AQY) of DOM, which reflects......, a MATLAB toolbox for the determination of apparent quantum yields of DOM (aquaDOM), featuring two calculation approaches, was developed and used to derive AQYs for samples from the Norwegian Sea. Φ of the organic compounds varied between 0.00079 and 0.35, whereas the average AQY for DOM samples at 350 nm...

  4. Simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes, anisotropy, and FRAP recovery curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Alibhai, Dominic R.; Suhling, Klaus

    2011-02-01

    We present fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and fluorescence anisotropy imaging along with translational diffusion measurements of living cells labelled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) recorded in a single experiment. The experimental set-up allows for time and polarization-resolved fluorescence images to be measured in every frame of a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) series. We have validated the method using rhodamine 123 in homogeneous solution prior to measurements of living A431 cells labelled with cdc42-GFP, for which the FRAP recovery exhibits an immobile fraction and the rotational mobility of the protein is hindered while the fluorescence lifetime fairly homogeneous across the cell. By eliminating the need for sequential measurements to extract fluorescence lifetimes and molecular diffusion coefficients we remove artefacts arising from changes in sample morphology and excessive photobleaching during sequential experiments.

  5. A novel method of identification of high-yield crop cultivars using correlation between delayed fluorescence and photosynthesis capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junsheng; Xu, Wenhai; Li, Ying; Zhang, Lingrui

    2008-12-01

    Crop breeding and variety analysis play the important role in the national economy. A lot of sample data and typical probability distribution are needed in the conventional methods to evaluate the high-yield crop cultivars such as correlation analysis, regression analysis and grey relational grade analysis etc, which are difficult to be realized. Delayed fluorescence (DF) can be used to evaluate plant photosynthesis. The current investigation has revealed that there is a good linear correlation between DF and photosynthesis capacity. More importantly, the slopes of linear fit of the correlationship for different yield varieties are different. Four known yield crop cultivars from each of the two different species (Maize and Soybean) are selected as samples to be analyzed. The statistical results show that the slope of high-yield variety is smaller than that of low-yield. We thus conclude that the slope of linear fit of correlation between DF and photosynthesis capacity is an excellent marker for high-yield crop cultivars identification. Compared with the conventional methods, the presented method needs less samples and it's fast and easy to be measured.

  6. Fluorescence yield in N sub 2 from quantum efficiency to atmospheric conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, D

    2002-01-01

    The detection of cosmic Extensive Air Shower via light emission in atmosphere needs a good knowledge of the primary luminescence yield of air molecules under the impact of charged particles and the transmission of the produced light through the atmosphere as well. In the EUSO Simulation Working Group the handling of the Atmospheric Profile properties was partly devoted to the Grenoble group. It concerns mainly the radiative transfer treatment from the shower site to the ISS, but also it is concerned by the identification of atmospheric parameters whose influence on the EAS profile could be significant. Apart from usual thermodynamical variables ( pressure and temperature), several parameters, such as water vapor and/or aerosols and clouds, can have a severe influence not only on the radiative transfer of light but also on the light production itself. Two main effects are clearly identified: the Cerenkov light yield dependence upon the index of air, and the Fluorescence Yield dependence on meteorological condi...

  7. Comparison of Air Fluorescence and Ionization Measurements of E.M. Shower Depth Profiles: Test of a UHECR Detector Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belz, J.; Cao, Z.; Huentemeyer, P.; Jui, C.C.H.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J.; Maestas, M.; Smith, J.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R.W.; Thomas, J.; Thomas, S.; /Utah U.; Chen,; Field, Clive; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Ng, J.S.T.; Odian, A.; Reil, K.; Vincke, H.; Walz, D.; /SLAC /Montana U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2005-10-07

    Measurements are reported on the fluorescence of air as a function of depth in electromagnetic showers initiated by bunches of 28.5 GeV electrons. The light yield is compared with the expected and observed depth profiles of ionization in the showers. It validates the use of atmospheric fluorescence profiles in measuring ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  8. Effect of capsid proteins to ICG mass ratio on fluorescent quantum yield of virus-resembling optical nano-materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Ico, Gerardo; Matsumura, Paul; Rao, A. L. N.; Vullev, Valentine; Anvari, Bahman

    2012-03-01

    We recently reported construction of a new type of optical nano-construct composed of genome-depleted plant infecting brome mosaic virus (BMV) doped with Indocyanine green (ICG), an FDA-approved chromophore. We refer to these constructs as optical viral ghosts (OVGs) since only the capsid protein (CP) subunits of BMV remain to encapsulate ICG. To utilize OVGs as effective nano-probes in fluorescence imaging applications, their fluorescence quantum yield needs to be maximized. In this study, we investigate the effect of altering the CP to ICG mass ratio on the fluorescent quantum yield of OVGs. Results of this study provide the basis for construction of OVGs with optimal amounts of CP and ICG to yield maximal fluorescence quantum yield.

  9. Absolute quantum yield measurements for the formation of oxygen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... under collision-free conditions by vacuum ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence. The use of narrow-band probe laser radiation, generated via resonant third-order sum-difference frequency conversion of dye laser radiation in Krypton, allowed the measurement of the nascent O(3P=2,1,0) fine-structure state distribution: ...

  10. System and method for measuring fluorescence of a sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riot, Vincent J

    2015-03-24

    The present disclosure provides a system and a method for measuring fluorescence of a sample. The sample may be a polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) array, a loop-mediated-isothermal amplification array, etc. LEDs are used to excite the sample, and a photodiode is used to collect the sample's fluorescence. An electronic offset signal is used to reduce the effects of background fluorescence and the noises from the measurement system. An integrator integrates the difference between the output of the photodiode and the electronic offset signal over a given period of time. The resulting integral is then converted into digital domain for further processing and storage.

  11. System and method for measuring fluorescence of a sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riot, Vincent J.

    2017-06-27

    The present disclosure provides a system and a method for measuring fluorescence of a sample. The sample may be a polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) array, a loop-mediated-isothermal amplification array, etc. LEDs are used to excite the sample, and a photodiode is used to collect the sample's fluorescence. An electronic offset signal is used to reduce the effects of background fluorescence and the noises from the measurement system. An integrator integrates the difference between the output of the photodiode and the electronic offset signal over a given period of time. The resulting integral is then converted into digital domain for further processing and storage.

  12. Measurement of diffusion of fluorescent molecules in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatarkova, S A; Lloyd, C; Khaira, S K; Berk, D

    2003-01-01

    The possibilities of the method of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for studying the molecular dynamics in living cells are demonstrated. The method provides point measurements of extremely low concentrations of fluorescent molecules and their diffusion coefficients with a high time resolution in a microscopic volume, which is especially important in pharmacological investigations. A biological model of the interaction of liposomes with a cellular membrane is considered. The diffusion coefficients of fluorescent molecules are measured directly in the living cell cytoplasm. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  13. Integrated optical measurement system for fluorescence spectroscopy in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2001-01-01

    A transportable miniaturized fiber-pigtailed measurement system is presented which allows quantitative fluorescence detection in microliquid handling systems. The microliquid handling chips are made in silica on silicon technology and the optical functionality is monolithically integrated...... with the microfluidic channel system. This results in inherent stability and photolithographic alignment precision. Permanently attached optical fibers provide a rugged connection to the light source, detection, and data processing unit, which potentially allows field use of such systems. Fluorescence measurements...

  14. Fluorescence yields and Coster-Kronig probabilities for the atomic L subshells. Part II: The L1 subshell revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Our recently recommended values for the L1 subshell fluorescence yield ω 1 and Coster-Kronig probabilities f 13 and f 12 in the atomic number range 64 ≤ Z ≤ 92 are re-assessed in the light of new experimental data. Special attention is paid to the regions of atomic number in which discontinuities arise due to the onset of L1L2N1, L1L3M4, and L1L3M5 transitions. Attention is drawn to large scatter and to systematic differences in the data from different experimental techniques, both of which result in large uncertainties being attached to the recommended values. The urgent need for additional refined measurements is emphasized

  15. Single atom spectroscopy: Decreased scattering delocalization at high energy losses, effects of atomic movement and X-ray fluorescence yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizei, Luiz H G; Iizumi, Yoko; Okazaki, Toshiya; Nakanishi, Ryo; Kitaura, Ryo; Shinohara, Hisanori; Suenaga, Kazu

    2016-01-01

    Single atom localization and identification is crucial in understanding effects which depend on the specific local environment of atoms. In advanced nanometer scale materials, the characteristics of individual atoms may play an important role. Here, we describe spectroscopic experiments (electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS, and Energy Dispersed X-ray spectroscopy, EDX) using a low voltage transmission electron microscope designed towards single atom analysis. For EELS, we discuss the advantages of using lower primary electron energy (30 keV and 60 keV) and higher energy losses (above 800 eV). The effect of atomic movement is considered. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using atomically resolved EELS and EDX data to measure the fluorescence yield for X-ray emission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Measuring and sorting cell populations expressing isospectral fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Sands

    Full Text Available Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼ 1.5 ns vs ∼ 3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a "pseudophasor" that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation.

  17. Measurement of Sun Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Using Hyperspectral Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irteza, S. M.; Nichol, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF), can be used as an indicator of stress in vegetation. Several scientific approaches have been made and there is considerable evidence that steady state Chlorophyll fluorescence is an accurate indicator of plant stress hence a reliable tool to monitor vegetation health status. Retrieval of Chlorophyll fluorescence provides an insight into photochemical and carbon sequestration processes within vegetation. Detection of Chlorophyll fluorescence has been well understood in the laboratory and field measurement. Fluorescence retrieval methods were applied in and around the atmospheric absorption bands 02B (Red wavelength) approximately 690 nm and 02A (Far red wavelengths) 740 nm. Hyperion satellite images were acquired for the years 2012 to 2015 in different seasons. Atmospheric corrections were applied using the 6S Model. The Fraunhofer Line Discrimanator (FLD) method was applied for retrieval of SIF from the Hyperion images by measuring the signal around the absorption bands in both vegetated and non vegetated land cover types. Absorption values were extracted in all the selected bands and the fluorescence signal was detected. The relationships between NDVI and Fluorescence derived from the satellite images are investigated to understand vegetation response within the absorption bands.

  18. Optimum values of average L-shell fluorescence yields for the elements 40 ≤ Z ≤ 95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, Raj; Singh, N.; Allawadhi, K.L.; Sood, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    The optimum values of average L-shell fluorescence yields W L , for elements 40 ≤ Z ≤ 95 have been determined using seven sets of experimental and theoretical values of W L reported by various workers. The first and second sets comprise of values of W L evaluated from L X-ray emission cross-sections measured for 22 elements by Mann and for 27 elements by Singh et al respectively. The third set contains most reliable experimental values compiled by Bombynek et al. In the remaining four sets the values of W L calculated from the semi empirical and theoretical values of L-subshell fluorescence yields W 1 and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities (f ij ) and photoionisation and proton induced ionisation cross sections are reported. All the values of W L for a given element reported in different sets are not same and for some elements the values differ from one another by more than 15%. The optimum value of W L for each element amongst the seven values is taken as a mean of group of those values whose standard deviation is almost less than 3% of the mean value. The optimum values are further fitted to the standard cubic form and the coefficients of the fit are a 0 = 0.3542371, a 1 =-0.489949E-02, a 2 0.2052273E-03 and a 3 =-0.8144938E-06. The values thus generated agree with optimum values within nearly 2%. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab

  19. Herbicide impact on Hormosira banksii gametes measured by fluorescence and germination bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seery, Cliff R. [Institute for Water and Environmental Resource Management, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Westbourne Street, Gore Hill, 2065 NSW (Australia); Gunthorpe, Leanne [Primary Industries Research Victoria (PIRVic), VIC (Australia); Ralph, Peter J. [Institute for Water and Environmental Resource Management, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Westbourne Street, Gore Hill, 2065 NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: peter.ralph@uts.edu.au

    2006-03-15

    The innovative bioassay described here involves chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements of gametes from the macroalgae, Hormosira banksii, where gametes (eggs) were exposed to Diuron, Irgarol and Bromacil. Response was assessed as percent inhibition from control of effective quantum yield ({delta}F/Fm') of photosystem II, herein referred to as % PSII Inhibition. This was measured with the dual-channelled pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer, ToxY-PAM. The fluorescence bioassay was run simultaneously with an established H. banksii germination bioassay to compare sensitivity, precision, and time-to-result. The fluorescence bioassay gave highly sensitive results evidenced by EC{sub 5}s (% PSII Inhibition) for Diuron, Irgarol and Bromacil being three, four and three orders of magnitude (respectively) lower than EC{sub 5}s generated from the germination bioassays. Precision of the fluorescence bioassay was demonstrated with low coefficient of variations (<30%) for all three toxicants. With regard to time, the fluorescence bioassay gave results within 6 h, as opposed to more than 50 h for the germination bioassay. - Chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements form the basis of a macroalgal bioassay with many advantages over germination-based methods.

  20. Herbicide impact on Hormosira banksii gametes measured by fluorescence and germination bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seery, Cliff R.; Gunthorpe, Leanne; Ralph, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    The innovative bioassay described here involves chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements of gametes from the macroalgae, Hormosira banksii, where gametes (eggs) were exposed to Diuron, Irgarol and Bromacil. Response was assessed as percent inhibition from control of effective quantum yield (ΔF/Fm') of photosystem II, herein referred to as % PSII Inhibition. This was measured with the dual-channelled pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer, ToxY-PAM. The fluorescence bioassay was run simultaneously with an established H. banksii germination bioassay to compare sensitivity, precision, and time-to-result. The fluorescence bioassay gave highly sensitive results evidenced by EC 5 s (% PSII Inhibition) for Diuron, Irgarol and Bromacil being three, four and three orders of magnitude (respectively) lower than EC 5 s generated from the germination bioassays. Precision of the fluorescence bioassay was demonstrated with low coefficient of variations (<30%) for all three toxicants. With regard to time, the fluorescence bioassay gave results within 6 h, as opposed to more than 50 h for the germination bioassay. - Chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements form the basis of a macroalgal bioassay with many advantages over germination-based methods

  1. [Study on High-yield Cultivation Measures for Arctii Fructus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi-yong; Jiang, Xiao-bo; Wang, Tao; Sun, Ji-ye; Hu, Shang-qin; Zhang, Li

    2015-02-01

    To find out the high yield cultivation measures for Arctii Fructus. Completely randomized block experiment design method was used in the field planting, to analyze the effect of different cultivation way on agronomic characters, phenological phase,quality and quantity of Arctii Fructus. Arctium lappa planted on August 28 had the best results of plant height, thousand seeds weight and yield. The highest yield of Arctii Fructus was got at the density of 1,482 plants/667 m2. Arctiin content was in an increase trend with the planting time delay and planting density increasing. The plant height, thousand seeds weight, yield and arctiin content by split application of fertilizer were significantly higher than that by one-time fertilization. Compared with open field Arctium lappa, plant height, yield, arctiin content and relative water content of plastic film mulching Arctium lappa was higher by 7.74%, 10.87%, 6.38% and 24.20%, respectively. In the topping Arctium lappa, the yield was increased by 11.09%, with 39. 89% less branching number. Early planting time and topping shortened the growth cycle of Arctium lappa plant. The high-yield cultivation measures of Arctii Fructus are: around August 28 to sowing, planting density of 1 482 plants/667 m2, split application of fertilizer for four times, covering film on surface of the soil and topping in bolting.

  2. Changes in chlorophyll content and fluorescence and fruit yield contributing traits in different genotypes of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa DUCH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Kaczmarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of changes in chlorophyll fluorescence parameters in strawberry leaves was based on a field experiment performed in the years 2009–2010. Ten genotypes including 5 cultivars: ‘Kent’, ‘Teresa’, ‘Senga Sengana’, ‘Chandler’ and the breeding clone 1387 as well as their inbred progeny, were the object of the study. During the experiment the following indicators were evaluated: chlorophyll a and b content in fresh leaf mass as well as fluorescence parameters: minimum (F0 and maximum fluorescence yield (Fm, photochemical efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm, actual quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (Y, minimum (F0’ and maximum efficiency of fluorescence (Fm’ in the light, coefficient of photochemical (qP and non-photo- chemical (qN fluorescence quenching. In this work, we also examined the effect of repeated inbreeding on strawberry fruit yield and yield components. The analysis of changes of these parameters showed that inbreeding caused a reaction in all tested cultivars. In all inbred progeny, chlorophyll a and b content decreased compared to the cultivars. Generally, the photoche- mical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm and the parameter ΔF/ Fm’ were not affected by strong inbreeding. In analyzing the values of the coefficients qP and qN, it has been observed that changes in their values depend on the sensitivity of the examined genotypes to self-pollination. The functioning of PS II is the most sensitive indicator of the effect of various factors on plants and is useful, among others, in breeding to select plants with a required genotype. The yield – determining features such as: fruit yield per plant, weight of single fruit, number of fruit per plant and weight of leaves per plant in S3 generation, were lower as compared with parental forms.

  3. On the chlorophill a fluorescence yield in chloroplasts upon excitation with twin turnover flashes (TTF) and high frequency flash trains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenberg, W.J.; Prasil, O.; Durchan, M.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence is routinely taken as a quantifiable measure of the redox state of the primary quinone acceptor QA of PSII. The variable fluorescence in thylakoids increases in a single turnover flash (STF) from its low dark level F o towards a maximum F mSTF when QA becomes reduced. We

  4. A pH dependence study of CdTe quantum dots fluorescence quantum yields using eclipsing thermal lens spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estupiñán-López, C.; Dominguez, C. Tolentino; Filho, P.E. Cabral; Santos, B.S.; Fontes, A.; Araujo, R.E. de

    2016-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the absolute fluorescence quantum yield (Φ) of hydrophilic CdTe QDs in function of different pHs, modified from the alkaline to acid, by using two different chemicals compounds, the mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA-the stabilizing agent of the QDs synthesis) or hydrochloric acid (HCl). The pH control of QDs suspensions is essential for the use of fluorescent nanoparticles in biological systems. We used the eclipsing thermal lens spectroscopy technique to determine the absolute fluorescence quantum yield values. The results showed variations on the Φ values as a function of the pH, which allowed a better understanding of QDs emission characteristics, establishing parameters for their use in biomedical applications such as optical images of biological systems, immunoassays, flow cytometry, biosensors and others.

  5. Dips and peaks in fluorescence yield X-ray absorption are due to state-dependent decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.

    2012-01-01

    In a 2010 paper Aziz, Chergui and colleagues observe fluorescence yield (FY) detected X-ray absorption spectra that are concentration-dependent and show both dips and peaks. In this comment I will show that all observed spectral features are a consequence of the relative ratio of background and edge

  6. Breast cancer: in vitro measurements of native fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Wolfgang; Bohle, Rainer M.; Dreyer, Thomas; Haas, Sabine; Wallenfels, Heike; Schwemmle, Konrad; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard

    1996-12-01

    Unfixed, HE stained cryosections of breast tissue obtained from 67 patients during surgery were illuminated with 395 - 440 nm and their fluorescence response as well as the 2- dimensional fluorophore distribution were measured. The histological evaluation of the same cryosection, illuminated as usual with a transmitted light obtained from a halogen lamp, revealed 9 patients with healthy tissue, 11 with benign epithelial hyperplasia, 4 with ductal carcinoma in situ, 35 with invasive ductal carcinoma, 7 with invasive lobular carcinoma, and one with invasive tubular carcinoma. A comparison between the fluorescence and the HE images shows that both match very nicely and that the fluorescence images are also characteristic for the different pathological condition of the biopsy sample. Moreover, benign tumors e.g. fibroadenomas, exhibit a fluorescence response different from cancer and healthy tissue.

  7. Measuring and interpreting X-ray fluorescence from planetary surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Alan; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fraser, George; Kolbe, Michael; Krumrey, Michael; Mantero, Alfonso; Mantler, Michael; Peacock, Anthony; Pia, Maria-Grazia; Pullan, Derek; Schneider, Uwe G; Ulm, Gerhard

    2008-11-15

    As part of a comprehensive study of X-ray emission from planetary surfaces and in particular the planet Mercury, we have measured fluorescent radiation from a number of planetary analog rock samples using monochromatized synchrotron radiation provided by the BESSY II electron storage ring. The experiments were carried out using a purpose built X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer chamber developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute. The XRF instrumentation is absolutely calibrated and allows for reference-free quantitation of rock sample composition, taking into account secondary photon- and electron-induced enhancement effects. The fluorescence data, in turn, have been used to validate a planetary fluorescence simulation tool based on the GEANT4 transport code. This simulation can be used as a mission analysis tool to predict the time-dependent orbital XRF spectral distributions from planetary surfaces throughout the mapping phase.

  8. Silicon dioxide etching yield measurements with inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Heeyeop; Vitale, Steven A.; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2003-01-01

    Oxide etching yield has been measured directly with inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas. The yields measurement technique of this work can provide useful information for feature profile evolution modeling, which is essential to understand various issues in oxide etching such as reactive ion etching (RIE) lag, inverse RIE lag, etch stop, microtrenching, bowing, etc. Etching and deposition yields per ion were measured using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as a function of ion bombardment energy, ion-to-neutral flux ratio, and ion-impinging angle. C 2 HF 5 , C 2 F 6 , C 2 H 4 F 2 , and C 4 F 8 were used for the oxide etching. Oxide etching mechanism with those gases is complex because etching and deposition are involved at the same time. In highly selective processes fluorocarbon deposition plays important role in determining etching characteristics. Two fluorocarbon deposition mechanisms are identified in this work: neutral deposition and ion-enhanced deposition. The low-energy ions are believed to enhance the deposition rates by creating active sites and fluorocarbon neutrals deposit on the active sites with higher sticking probability. A surface kinetic model is suggested to explain the ion-enhanced mechanism and shows good agreement with experimental data. Angular yield measurement shows that when fluorocarbon deposition is relatively severe, etching yield decreases significantly as the incident angle increases and deposit fluorocarbon at a high incident angle above 60 deg. C

  9. Novel calibration method for flow cytometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements between visible fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Peter; Bene, László; Hyun, William C; Vereb, György; Braun, Manuela; Antz, Christof; Paysan, Jacques; Damjanovich, Sándor; Park, John W; Szöllősi, János

    2005-10-01

    The combination of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and flow cytometry offers a statistically firm approach to study protein associations. Fusing green fluorescent protein (GFP) to a studied protein usually does not disturb the normal function of a protein, but quantitation of FRET efficiency calculated between GFP derivatives poses a problem in flow cytometry. We generated chimeras in which cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) was separated by amino acid linkers of different sizes from yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and used them to calibrate the cell-by-cell flow cytometric FRET measurements carried out on two different dual-laser flow cytometers. Then, CFP-Kip1 was coexpressed in yeast cells with YFP and cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (Cdk2) and served as a positive control for FRET measurements, and CFP-Kip1 coexpressed with a random peptide fused to YFP was the negative control. We measured donor, direct, and sensitized acceptor fluorescence intensities and developed a novel way to calculate a factor (alpha) that characterized the fluorescence intensity of acceptor molecules relative to the same number of excited donor molecules, which is essential for quantifying FRET efficiency. This was achieved by calculating FRET efficiency in two different ways and minimizing the squared difference between the two results by changing alpha. Our method reliably detected the association of Cdk2 with its inhibitor, Kip1, whereas the nonspecific FRET efficiency between Cdk2 and a random peptide was negligible. We identified and sorted subpopulations of yeast cells showing interaction between the studied proteins. We have described a straightforward novel calibration method to accurately quantitate FRET efficiency between GFP derivatives in flow cytometry.

  10. Measuring the effects of extreme weather events on yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Powell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Extreme weather events are expected to increase worldwide, therefore, anticipating and calculating their effects on crop yields is important for topics ranging from food security to the economic viability of biomass products. Given the local nature of weather, particularly precipitation, effects are best measured at a local level. This paper analyzes weather events at the level of the farm for a specific crop, winter wheat. Once it has been established that extreme events are expected to continue occurring at historically high levels for farming locations throughout the Netherlands, the effects of those events on wheat yields are estimated while controlling for the other major input factors affecting yields. Econometric techniques are applied to an unbalanced panel data set of 334 farms for a period of up to 12 years. Analyzes show that the number of days with extreme high temperatures in Dutch wheat growing regions has significantly increased since the early 1900s, while the number of extreme low temperature events has fallen over that same period. The effects of weather events on wheat yields were found to be time specific in that the week in which an event occurred determined its effect on yields. High temperature events and precipitation events were found to significantly decrease yields.

  11. Simultaneous one-dimensional fluorescence lifetime measurements of OH and CO in premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Malin; Ehn, Andreas; Christensen, Moah; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-04-01

    A method for simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of two species along a line is described. The experimental setup is based on picosecond laser pulses from two tunable optical parametric generator/optical parametric amplifier systems together with a streak camera. With an appropriate optical time delay between the two laser pulses, whose wavelengths are tuned to excite two different species, laser-induced fluorescence can be both detected temporally and spatially resolved by the streak camera. Hence, our method enables one-dimensional imaging of fluorescence lifetimes of two species in the same streak camera recording. The concept is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime measurements of CO and OH in a laminar methane/air flame on a Bunsen-type burner. Measurements were taken in flames with four different equivalence ratios, namely ϕ = 0.9, 1.0, 1.15, and 1.25. The measured one-dimensional lifetime profiles generally agree well with lifetimes calculated from quenching cross sections found in the literature and quencher concentrations predicted by the GRI 3.0 mechanism. For OH, there is a systematic deviation of approximately 30 % between calculated and measured lifetimes. It is found that this is mainly due to the adiabatic assumption regarding the flame and uncertainty in H2O quenching cross section. This emphasizes the strength of measuring the quenching rates rather than relying on models. The measurement concept might be useful for single-shot measurements of fluorescence lifetimes of several species pairs of vital importance in combustion processes, hence allowing fluorescence signals to be corrected for quenching and ultimately yield quantitative concentration profiles.

  12. Breast meat yield, muscle linear measurements and meat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast meat yield, chemical composition, mineral profile and linear measurement of the resultant breast meat Supracoracoides and Pectoralis thoracicus of one hundred and eighty (28 days old BUT) male turkeys fed diet containing wheat or sorghum as sole cereal source were studied. One hundred and eighty 28-days old ...

  13. Measurement of cell volume changes by fluorescence self-quenching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Kiilgaard, J.F.; Litman, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    At high concentrations, certain fluorophores undergo self-quenching, i.e., fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing fluorophore concentration. Accordingly, the self-quenching properties can be used for measuring water volume changes in lipid vesicles. In cells, quantitative determination...... of water transport using fluorescence self-quenching has been complicated by the requirement of relatively high (mM) and often toxic loading concentrations. Here we report a simple method that uses low (muM) loading concentrations of calcein-acetoxymethyl ester (calcein-AM) to obtain intracellular...... concentrations of the fluorophore calcein suitable for measurement of changes in cell water volume by self-quenching. The relationship between calcein fluorescence intensity, when excited at 490 nm (its excitation maximum), and calcein concentration was investigated in vitro and in various cultured cell types...

  14. Decay time and light yield measurements for plastic scintillating fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, C.M.; Kuhlen, M.; Milliken, B.; Stroynowski, R.; Wicklung, E.; Shimizu, T.; Shinji, O.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied light production and propagation in three different samples of plastic scintillating fibers manufactured by Kyowa Gas Co.: SCSF-81, SCSF-38 and SCSF-38 with a quenching additive. The emission time distribution is described phenomenologically by a fast two-step scintillation process and an additional slow component, the time constants of which are determined. The light yield from the fibers is measured as a function of distance for the two light components which propagate by total internal reflection from the core-clad interface and from the clad-air interface. We obtain the absolute light yield and attenuation lengths for the different fibers. (orig.)

  15. Ion range measurements using fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimpki, G.; Osinga, J.-M.; Herrmann, R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) show excellent detection properties for heavy charged particles and have, therefore, been investigated in this study in terms of their potential for in-vivo range measurements. We irradiated FNTDs with protons as well as with C, Mg, S, Fe and Xe ion beams...

  16. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, W A; Azarnia, G M; Nakles, M R

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d(4)D(7/2) to the 5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d(4)D(7/2)-5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  17. Mercury mass measurement in fluorescent lamps via neutron activation analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viererbl, L.; Vinš, M.; Lahodová, Z.; Fuksa, A.; Kučera, Jan; Koleska, M.; Voljanskij, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 116, NOV (2015), s. 56-59 ISSN 0969-806X R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010237; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : fluorescent lamp * mercury measurement * neutron activation analysis * research reactor Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2015

  18. How to Measure Separations and Angles Between Intramolecular Fluorescent Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kim; Sung, J.; Spudich, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    firmly; (b) we established how to map with super-resolution between color-separated channels, which should be useful for all dual-color colocalization measurements with either fixed or freely rotating fluorescent molecules. Throughout, we use only simple means: from each color-separated microscope image......Structure and function of an individual biomolecule can be explored with minimum two fluorescent markers of different colors. Since the light of such markers can be spectrally separated and imaged simultaneously, the markers can be colocalized. Here, we describe the method used for such two-color...

  19. Application of torsion vacuum microbalance to sputtering yield measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaishi, Kenya; Miyahara, Akira; Sukenobu, Satoru; Komizo, Mutsuo.

    1977-01-01

    The torsion vacuum microbalance technique useful for the determination of the sputtering yield of wall materials for fusion reactors was developed. In order to measure the rate of weight change of the samples during sputtering continuously, it is very important to keep the null point drift of the microbalance as small as possible. The deflection angle of the balance beam was detected and amplified by optical lever, and was transformed to electrical output by linear photopotentiometer. The null point drift wave mainly caused by temperature change in the laboratory, which induced relative displacement by thermal expansion between the balance system and the optical measuring system. The drift was reduced less than the equivalent weight of 4 x 10 -7 g/hr when the balance system wosset in the thermostat kept at 20 +- 0.5 0 C. The sensitivity of the balance was 8.3 x 10 -7 g/mV. The microbalance technique developed was applied to the measurement of sputtering yield of Cu by Ar + . The measurement was carried out with Ar + ion energy of 0.2 -- 2 keV, beam current of 0.5 -- 1.5 μA, and sputtering time of 2 hrs. The initial weight of Cu sample was 0.4g (15 mm x 15 mm sheet) and the sample temperature during sputtering was about 120 0 C. The sputtering yields obtained show good agreement with the results reported by Wehner et al. (auth.)

  20. Ultrastable green fluorescence carbon dots with a high quantum yield for bioimaging and use as theranostic carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Chuanxu; Thomsen, Rasmus Peter; Ogaki, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    to widely used semiconductor quantum dots. However, it remains a great challenge to prepare highly stable, water-soluble green luminescent Cdots with a high quantum yield. Herein we report a new synthesis route for green luminescent Cdots imbuing these desirable properties and demonstrate their potential......Carbon dots (Cdots) have recently emerged as a novel platform of fluorescent nanomaterials. These carbon nanoparticles have great potential in biomedical applications such as bioimaging as they exhibit excellent photoluminescence properties, chemical inertness and low cytotoxicity in comparison...... in biomedical applications. Oligoethylenimine (OEI)–β-cyclodextrin (βCD) Cdots were synthesised using a simple and fast heating method in phosphoric acid. The synthesised Cdots showed strong green fluorescence under UV excitation with a 30% quantum yield and exhibited superior stability over a wide pH range. We...

  1. First steps in photophysics. I. Fluorescence yield and radiative rate coefficient of 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene in paraffins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeter, Attila

    2014-10-30

    The fluorescence quantum yield of 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene (BPEA) is almost unity in every examined solvent. Using different hydrocarbons, one can make a convenient and sufficiently accurate experimental test for determination of the extent of the refractive index correction needed in fluorescence quantum yield determination on a given fluorometer. By comparison of the measurements in n-pentane-cis-decaline or n-hexane-toluene solvent pairs, the requirement of the n(2) correction is confirmed for most of the fluorometers; however, for one of the examined pieces of equipment the necessary correction proved to be slightly lower. By excited state's lifetime measurements, the refractive index dependence of the fluorescence rate coefficient was reexamined. At 25 °C for BPEA the relationship is in agreement with Bakhshiev's prediction: the experimentally determined exponent of n in the rate coefficient deriving equation is around 1.32 using different paraffins as solvents. The negative temperature coefficient of the radiative rate in part originates from the temperature dependence of the refractive index, while also a small intrinsic contribution has been found.

  2. L1 and L2 sub-shell fluorescence yields for elements with 64 ≤ Z ≤ 70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Anil; Puri, Sanjiv

    2010-01-01

    The L 1 and L 2 sub-shell fluorescence yields have been deduced for elements with 64 ≤ Z ≤ 70 from the L k (k = l, α, β 1,4 , β 3,6 , β 2,15,9,10,7 , γ 1,5 and γ 2,3,4 ) X-ray production cross sections measured at 22.6 keV incident photon energy using a spectrometer involving a disc type radioisotope of Cd 109 as a photon source and a Peltier cooled X-ray detector. The incident photon intensity, detector efficiency and geometrical factor have been determined from the K X-ray yields emitted from elemental targets with 20 ≤ Z ≤ 42 in the same geometrical setup and from knowledge of the K shell cross sections. The present deduced ω 1 (exp) values, for elements with 64 ≤ Z ≤ 70, are found to be in good agreement with those tabulated by Campbell (J.L. Campbell, Atom. Data Nucl. Data Tables 95 (2009) 115), where as these are, on an average, higher by 19% and 24% than those based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater model (S. Puri et al., X-ray Spectrometry 22 (1993) 358) and the semi-empirical values compiled by Krause (M.O. Krause, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8 (1979) 307), respectively. The present deduced ω 2 (exp) values are found to be in good agreement with those based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater model and are higher by up to ∼13% than the semi-empirical values for the elements under investigation.

  3. L 1 and L 2 sub-shell fluorescence yields for elements with 64 ⩽ Z ⩽ 70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Puri, Sanjiv

    2010-05-01

    The L 1 and L 2 sub-shell fluorescence yields have been deduced for elements with 64 ⩽ Z ⩽ 70 from the L k( k = l, α, β1,4, β3,6, β2,15,9,10,7, γ1,5 and γ2,3,4) X-ray production cross sections measured at 22.6 keV incident photon energy using a spectrometer involving a disc type radioisotope of Cd 109 as a photon source and a Peltier cooled X-ray detector. The incident photon intensity, detector efficiency and geometrical factor have been determined from the K X-ray yields emitted from elemental targets with 20 ⩽ Z ⩽ 42 in the same geometrical setup and from knowledge of the K shell cross sections. The present deduced ω1(exp) values, for elements with 64 ⩽ Z ⩽ 70, are found to be in good agreement with those tabulated by Campbell (J.L. Campbell, Atom. Data Nucl. Data Tables 95 (2009) 115), where as these are, on an average, higher by 19% and 24% than those based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater model (S. Puri et al., X-ray Spectrometry 22 (1993) 358) and the semi-empirical values compiled by Krause (M.O. Krause, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8 (1979) 307), respectively. The present deduced ω2(exp) values are found to be in good agreement with those based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater model and are higher by up to ˜13% than the semi-empirical values for the elements under investigation.

  4. Measuring Exocytosis Rate Using Corrected Fluorescence Recovery After Photoconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Nan; Yan, An; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2016-05-01

    Exocytosis plays crucial roles in regulating the distribution and function of plasma membrane (PM) and extracellular matrix proteins. However, measuring the exocytosis rate of a specific protein by conventional methods is very difficult because of exocytosis-independent trafficking such as endocytosis, which also affects membrane protein distribution. Here, we describe a novel method, corrected fluorescence recovery after photoconversion, in which exocytosis-dependent and -independent trafficking events are measured simultaneously to accurately determine exocytosis rate. In this method, the protein-of-interest is tagged with Dendra2, a green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent protein. Following the photoconversion of PM-localized Dendra2, both the recovery of the green signal and the changes in the photoconverted red signal are measured, and the rate of exocytosis is calculated from the changing rates of these two signals. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A Transformer Partial Discharge Measurement System Based on Fluorescent Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Liu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on the physical phenomena of optical effects produced by the partial discharge (PD and on the characteristics of fluorescent fiber sensing of weak fluorescent signals, a PD measurement system using a fluorescent fiber sensor was designed. The main parameters of the sensing system were calculated, an experimental testing platform for PD simulation in the lab was established, and PD signals were then detected through ultra-high frequency (UHF and optical methods under a needle-plate discharge model. PD optical pulses in transformer oil contained signal-peak and multi-peak pulse waveforms. Compared with UHF detection results, the number of PD pulses and the elapsed PD pulse phase time revealed a good corresponding relationship. However, PD signal amplitudes presented the opposite, thus indicating that PD UHF signals reflected pulse amplitude value, whereas PD optical signals reflected pulse energy magnitude. The n-u-φ three-dimensional distributions indicated that most of the PD signals concentrated in the nearby industrial frequency voltage peak value. Overall, the proposed fluorescent fiber sensing system design can be used successfully in transformer PD signal detection.

  6. Application of Σ-ΔADC in fluorescence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Yan; Chen Ziyu; Shen Ji

    2011-01-01

    It introduces the measurement system of fluorescence intensity, the Σ-ΔADC used as its core components. The system consisted of ADS1255, microcontrollers LPC2368 devices, etc. LPC2368 is used as the control, data process and communication interface. Diagram of the system is given. The linear response experiments, frequency response experiments, measurement accuracy experiments and long-time stability experiments were carried out. Experiments show that the system reaches a good linear response, and the measurement accuracy reaches up to 0.01%. (authors)

  7. Measurement of sewage COD and BOD using fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Seung; Lee, Yong Sik; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally the biodegradable component of wastewater is measured by a series of wet chemical methods, of which the most important is considered to be the Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) TEST. The BOD test is inadequate for effective and efficient process control because of the time required to complete the test (5 days) and the difficulty in achieving consistently accurate measurements. Other chemical tests such as the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), despite being more rapid the the Bod test, do not distinguish between 'biodegradable' and 'non-biodegradable' organic matter. We designed fluorescence instrument that was excited by UV-lamp. The biodegradable chromophoric constant species are considered to be the major contributors to the overall fluorescence within 300-600 nm (using 244 nm excitation). The total intensity of this band has been found to have a good linear correlation (r=0.99) with the COD and BOD parameters. CCD and PMT are used as the fluorescence detectors and the experimental results of correlation were compared.

  8. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence techniques were developed for the containerless study of high temperature processes, material properties, levitation, and heating techniques for containerless earth-based experimentation. Experiments were performed in which fluorescence of atomic aluminum, mercury, or tungsten were studied. These experiments include measurements of: (1) Al atom evaporation from CW CO2 laser heated and aerodynamically levitated sapphire and alumina spheres, and self-supported sapphire filaments, (2) Al atom reaction with ambient oxygen in the wake of a levitated specimen, (3) Hg atom concentrations in the wake of levitated alumina and sapphire spheres, relative to the ambient Hg atom concentration, (4) Hg atom concentrations in supersonic levitation jets, and (5) metastable, electronically excited W atom concentrations produced by evaporation of an electrically heated tungsten filament.

  9. Bloodstain age analysis: toward solid state fluorescent lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kevin; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-03-01

    One of the most pressing unsolved challenges in forensic science is the determination of time since deposition (TSD) of bloodstains at crime scenes. Despite a number of high profile cases over the past couple hundred years involving controversy over TSD methods, no reliable quantitative method has been established. We present here an approach that has yet to be explored by forensic scientist: measuring the fluorescence lifetime of solid-state blood. Such a method would allow for on-site measurements of bloodstains utilizing the appropriate device, and would allow for rapid results returned in real-time to investigators.

  10. Fluorescent ester dye-based assays for the in vitro measurement of Neospora caninum proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Caroline M; Ferreira, Marcela D; Costa, Lourenço F; Barros, Patrício S C; Silva, Murilo V; Santiago, Fernanda M; Mineo, José R; Mineo, Tiago W P

    2014-09-15

    Techniques for the measurement of parasite loads in different experimental models have evolved throughout the years. The quantification of stained slides using regular cytological stains is currently the most common technique. However, this modality of evaluation is labor-intensive, and the interpretation of the results is subjective because the successes of the assays mainly rely on the abilities of the professionals involved. Moreover, the novel genetic manipulation techniques that are commonly applied for closely related Toxoplasma gondii have not yet been developed for Neospora caninum. Thus, we aimed to develop a simple protocol for parasite quantification using pre-stained N. caninum tachyzoites and fluorescent probes based on ester compounds (i.e., CFSE and DDAO). For this purpose, we employed a quantification procedure based on flow cytometry analysis. Pre-stained parasites were also examined with a fluorescent microscope, which revealed that both dyes were detectable. Direct comparison of the numbers of CFSE+ and DDAO+ cells to the values obtained with classical cytology techniques yielded statistically comparable results that also accorded with genomic DNA amplification results. Although the fluorescence emitted by DDAO was more intense and provided better discrimination between the populations of parasitized cells, CFSE+ tachyzoites were detected for several days. In conclusion, this study describes a simple, fast, low-cost and reproducible protocol for N. caninum quantification that is based on parasite pre-staining with fluorescent ester-based probes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Layer thickness measurement using the X-ray fluorescence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengelkamp, B.

    1980-01-01

    Curium 244 having a gamma energy of about 15.5 keV is used as excitation emitter for contactless and continuous measuring of the thickness of metallic layers on iron strip. Soft gamma radiation is absorbed in matter according to the photo effect, so that X-ray fluorescence radiation is generated in the matter, which depends on the element and is radiated to all sides. For instance, it amounts for iron 6.4 keV and is measured with a specific ionisation chamber for this energy range. With increasing atomic number of the elements, the energy of fluorescence radiation increases and hence also the emission signal of the detector. The prerequisite for a usable measuring effect is an element distance of at least two and the thickness of the layer to be measured being in an optimum range. A signal dependent on the thickness of the layer is produced either by absorption of iron radiation (absorption method - aluminium and tin) or by build-up radiation of the material of the layer (emission method - zinc and lead). (orig./GSCH) [de

  12. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, R. A.; Walker, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties was studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. Included are the development of an apparatus and its use in the studies of (1) chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, tungsten and LaB6 specimens, (2) methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, (3) levitation jet properties and (4) radiative lifetime and collisional energy transfer rates for electronically excited atoms.

  13. Can we Predict Quantum Yields Using Excited State Density Functional Theory for New Families of Fluorescent Dyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Alexander W.; Lin, Zhou; Shepherd, James J.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-06-01

    For a fluorescent dye, the quantum yield characterizes the efficiency of energy transfer from the absorbed light to the emitted fluorescence. In the screening among potential families of dyes, those with higher quantum yields are expected to have more advantages. From the perspective of theoreticians, an efficient prediction of the quantum yield using a universal excited state electronic structure theory is in demand but still challenging. The most representative examples for such excited state theory include time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS). In the present study, we explore the possibility of predicting the quantum yields for conventional and new families of organic dyes using a combination of TDDFT and ROKS. We focus on radiative (kr) and nonradiative (knr) rates for the decay of the first singlet excited state (S_1) into the ground state (S_0) in accordance with Kasha's rule. M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950). For each dye compound, kr is calculated with the S_1-S_0 energy gap and transition dipole moment obtained using ROKS and TDDFT respectively at the relaxed S_1 geometry. Our predicted kr agrees well with the experimental value, so long as the order of energy levels is correctly predicted. Evaluation of knr is less straightforward as multiple processes are involved. Our study focuses on the S_1-T_1 intersystem crossing (ISC) and the S_1-S_0 internal conversion (IC): we investigate the properties that allow us to model the knr value using a Marcus-like expression, such as the Stokes shift, the reorganization energy, and the S_1-T_1 and S_1-S_0 energy gaps. Taking these factors into consideration, we compare our results with those obtained using the actual Marcus theory and provide explanation for discrepancy. T. Kowalczyk, T. Tsuchimochi, L. Top, P.-T. Chen, and T. Van Voorhis, J. Chem. Phys., 138, 164101 (2013). M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950).

  14. FLEX: an imaging spectrometer for measurement of vegetation fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorenburg, Kees; Visser, Huib; Court, Andrew; Stoll, Marc Ph.

    2017-11-01

    Detection of vegetation fluorescence gives information about plant functioning, stress and vitality. During the past decades several ground based laser fluorosensors have been developed to investigate these processes and to demonstrate the value of this technique. FLEX (= FLuorescense EXplorer) is a space mission to measure the fluorescence of vegetation on earth over large areas from space. Such a mission would greatly improve the understanding and enhance the capability to quantify e.g. the role of terrestrial vegetation in global carbon sequestration. Because the fluorescence signal, which is excited by solar irradiation is low with respect to the reflected sunlight the signal from a satellite is proposed to be measured in the solar Fraunhofer lines, where the reflection signal is much reduced. The heart of FLEX is a high resolution imaging spectrometer with 2 channels: channel 1 around the Fraunhofer lines at ‡ = 397 nm, ‡= 423 nm and/or ‡ = 434 nm and channel 2 around the Fraunhofer line at ‡ = 656 nm. The required spectral resolution will depend on the linewidth (0.02-0.3 nm). A first definition of the field of view is 8.4 degrees, leading from an 800 km satellite altitude to a swath of about 120 km. For detection a 1024x1024 pixel frame transfer CCD detector is proposed, with a pixel dimension of 13 x 13 ‡ mm2. The maximum footprint is about 500x500m2. The optical configuration contains a scan mirror for solar calibration, for pointing the FOV in swath direction and for freezing the observed ground scene up to a few seconds to increase the signal to noise performance. At this moment the concept of FLEX is elaborated in a feasibility study. Both the scientific and instrument requirements are updated and the concept is studied in detail. Besides a development plan for FLEX is made. In this paper the idea and the headlines of FLEX are described.

  15. Radio Telescopes' Precise Measurements Yield Rich Scientific Payoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Having the sharpest pictures always is a big advantage, and a sophisticated radio-astronomy technique using continent-wide and even intercontinental arrays of telescopes is yielding extremely valuable scientific results in a wide range of specialties. That's the message delivered to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Austin, Texas, by Mark Reid of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, a leading researcher in the field of ultra-precise astronomical position measurements. Very Long Baseline Interferometry provides extremely high precision that can extend use of the parallax technique to many more celestial objects. Parallax is a direct means of measuring cosmic distances by detecting the slight shift in an object’s apparent position in the sky caused by Earth’s orbital motion. Credit: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF "Using radio telescopes, we are measuring distances and motions of celestial bodies with unprecedented accuracy. That's helping us better understand many processes ranging from star formation to the scale of the entire Universe," Reid said. The observing technique, called Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), was pioneered in 1967, but has come into continuous use only in the past 10-15 years. The National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system of 10 radio-telescope antennas ranging from Hawaii to the Caribbean, was dedicated in 1993. There are other VLBI systems in Europe and Asia, and large radio telescopes around the world cooperate regularly to increase sensitivity. VLBI observations routinely produce images hundreds of times more detailed than those made at visible-light wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope. Several groups of researchers from across the globe use the VLBA to study stellar nurseries in our own Milky Way Galaxy and measure distances to regions where new stars are forming. The key has been to improve measurement accuracy to a factor of a hundred times better than that produced by the

  16. Residual Gas Fluorescence for Profile Measurements at the GSI UNILAC

    CERN Document Server

    Forck, P

    2002-01-01

    The high beam currents, delivered at the LINAC at GSI (UNILAC) can destroy intercepting diagnostics within one macro-pulse. As an alternative for a non-destructive profile measurement the methode for residual-gas-fluorescence is investigated. The fluorescence light is emitted by the N2 molecules of the residual gas at the blue wavelength range and can be monitored with a modern CCD-camera. The images are transferred via digital bus (IEEE 1394 'FireWire') and the profiles are generated by analysis of the images with a modern software tool (National Instruments 'LabView'). Due to the short beam pulses (about 0.2 ms) the light intensities emitted by the residual gas are low and require a high amplification (gain >106) which is realized with an image intensifier with double MCP (multi channel plate), connected with a fiber taper to the CCD-chip. The design parameters of the optics and electronics are discussed as well as the advantages of the digital data transmission. Measurements with heavy ion beams of several...

  17. Quantitative laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbiezen, K.; Klein-Douwel, R. J. H.; van Viet, A. P.; Donkerbroek, A. J.; Meerts, W. L.; Dam, N. J.; ter Meulen, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    We present quantitative, in-cylinder, UV-laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine. Processing of the raw fluorescence signals includes a detailed correction, based on additional measurements, for the effect of laser beam and fluorescence attenuation, and

  18. K-shell Fluorescence Yields of Li- to F-like Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, S. T.; Hasoglu, M. F.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Badnell, N. R.; Savin, D. W.

    2007-06-01

    We have investigated the accuracy of the commonly-used fluorescence/Auger database. These data were determined from configuration average, LS, singly-charged atomic physics calculations and were then scaled up through Z=30 for all isoelectronic sequences through the iron peak elements. We have carried out new calculations, using the AUTOSTRUCTURE package, and demonstrate the significance of including properly such physical effects as correct configuration averaging (CA), semi-relativistic (i.e., spin-orbit) effects, and the previously-overlooked need to tailor the CA itself to the specific physical process of interest, showing that the extant database includes significant inaccuracies. Finally, we have completed an investigation of the isoelectronic sequences of all second-row ions. This work was supported in part by NASA APRA and SHP SR&T programs.

  19. Absolute Density Calibration Cell for Laser Induced Fluorescence Erosion Rate Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Stevens, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. This work examines the suitability of the density cell as an absolute calibration source for LIF measurements, and the intrinsic error was evaluated.

  20. submitter Measurement of LYSO Intrinsic Light Yield Using Electron Excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez Turtos, Rosana; Pizzichemi, Marco; Ghezzi, Alessio; Pauwels, Kristof; Auffray, Etiennette; Lecoq, Paul; Paganoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the intrinsic light yield $(LY_{int})$ of scintillating crystals, i.e. number of optical photons created per amount of energy deposited, constitutes a key factor in order to characterize and optimize their energy and time resolution. However, until now measurements of this quantity are affected by large uncertainties and often rely on corrections for bulk absorption and surface/edge state. The novel idea presented in this contribution is based on the confinement of the scintillation emission in the central upper part of a 10 mm cubic crystal using a 1.5 MeV electron beam with diameter of 1 mm. A black non-reflective pinhole aligned with the excitation point is used to fix the light extraction solid angle (narrower than total reflection angle), which then sets a light cone travel path through the crystal. The final number of photoelectrons detected using a Hamamatsu R2059 photomultiplier tube (PMT) was corrected for the extraction solid angle, the Fresnel reflection coefficient and quantum...

  1. Measurement and quantification of fluorescent changes in ocular tissue using a novel confocal instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttenschoen, Kim K.; Girkin, John M.; Daly, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    Our sight is a major contributor to our quality of life. The treatment of diseases like macular degeneration and glaucoma, however, presents a challenge as the delivery of medication to ocular tissue is not well understood. The instrument described here will help quantify targeted delivery by non-invasively and simultaneously measuring light reflected from and fluorescence excited in the eye, used as position marker and to track compounds respectively. The measurement concept has been proven by monitoring the diffusion of fluorescein and a pharmaceutical compound for treating open angle glaucoma in vitro in a cuvette and in ex vivo porcine eyes. To obtain a baseline of natural fluorescence we measured the change in corneal and crystalline lens autofluorescence in volunteers over a week. We furthermore present data on 3D ocular autofluorescence. Our results demonstrate the capability to measure the location and concentration of the compound of interest with high axial and temporal resolution of 178 μm and 0.6 s respectively. The current detection limit is 2 nM for fluorescein, and compounds with a quantum yield as low as 0.01 were measured to concentrations below 1 μM. The instrument has many applications in assessing the diffusion of fluorescent compounds through the eye and skin in vitro and in vivo, measuring autofluorescence of ocular tissues and reducing the number of animals needed for research. The instrument has the capability of being used both in the clinical and home care environment opening up the possibility of measuring controlled drug release in a patient friendly manner.

  2. A Fluorescent Probe to Measure DNA Damage and Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison G Condie

    Full Text Available DNA damage and repair is a fundamental process that plays an important role in cancer treatment. Base excision repair (BER is a major repair pathway that often leads to drug resistance in DNA-targeted cancer chemotherapy. In order to measure BER, we have developed a near infrared (NIR fluorescent probe. This probe binds to a key intermediate, termed apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP site, in the BER pathway where DNA damage and repair occurs. We have developed an assay to show the efficacy of the probe binding to AP sites and have shown that it can distinguish AP sites in DNA extract from chemotherapy treated cells. This probe has potential application in monitoring patient response to chemotherapy and evaluating new drugs in development.

  3. Precise measurement of {gamma}(K{yields}e {nu}({gamma}))/{gamma}(K{yields}{mu} {nu}({gamma})) and study of K{yields}e {nu} {gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosino, F.; Massarotti, P.; Meola, S.; Napolitano, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Capussela, T.; Ciambrone, P.; De Lucia, E.; De Simone, P.; Dreucci, M.; Felici, G.; Gatti, C.; Giovannella, S.; Jacewicz, M.; Lanfranchi, G.; Miscetti, S.; Moulson, M.; Murtas, F.; Palutan, M.; Santangelo, P.; Sciascia, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Spadaro, T.; Venanzoni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Archilli, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Beltrame, P.; Denig, A.; Mueller, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Bini, C.; De Santis, A.; De Zorzi, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Fiore, S.; Franzini, P.; Gauzzi, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Bocchetta, S.; Ceradini, F.; Di Micco, B.; Nguyen, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' ' Roma Tre' ' , Rome (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Branchini, P.; Graziani, E.; Passeri, A.; Tortora, L. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Capriotti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' ' Roma Tre' ' , Rome (Italy); Di Donato, C. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Kulikov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lee-Franzini, J. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); State University of New York, Physics Department, Stony Brook (United States); Martini, M.; Patera, V.; Versaci, R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica dell' Universita ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); Valente, P. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    We present a precise measurement of the ratio R{sub K}={gamma}(K{yields}e{nu}({gamma}))/{gamma}(K{yields}{mu}{nu}({gamma})) and a study of the radiative process K{yields}e{nu}{gamma}, performed with the KLOE detector. The results are based on data collected at the Frascati e{sup +}e{sup -} collider DA {phi}NE for an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1}. We find R{sub K}=(2.493{+-}0.025{sub stat}{+-}0.019{sub syst}) x 10{sup -5}, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. This result is used to improve constraints on parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with lepton flavor violation. We also measured the differential decay rate d {gamma}(K{yields}e{nu}{gamma})/dE{sub {gamma}} for photon energies 10

  4. The use of fluorescent Nile red and BODIPY for lipid measurement in microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumin, Judith; Bonnefond, Hubert; Saint-Jean, Bruno; Rouxel, Catherine; Sciandra, Antoine; Bernard, Olivier; Cadoret, Jean-Paul; Bougaran, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are currently emerging as one of the most promising alternative sources for the next generation of food, feed, cosmetics and renewable energy in the form of biofuel. Microalgae constitute a diverse group of microorganisms with advantages like fast and efficient growth. In addition, they do not compete for arable land and offer very high lipid yield potential. Major challenges for the development of this resource are to select lipid-rich strains using high-throughput staining for neutral lipid content in microalgae species. For this purpose, the fluorescent dyes most commonly used to quantify lipids are Nile red and BODIPY 505/515. Their fluorescent staining for lipids offers a rapid and inexpensive analysis tool to measure neutral lipid content, avoiding time-consuming and costly gravimetric analysis. This review collates and presents recent advances in algal lipid staining and focuses on Nile red and BODIPY 505/515 staining characteristics. The available literature addresses the limitations of fluorescent dyes under certain conditions, such as spectral properties, dye concentrations, cell concentrations, temperature and incubation duration. Moreover, the overall conclusion of the present review study gives limitations on the use of fluorochrome for screening of lipid-rich microalgae species and suggests improved protocols for staining recalcitrant microalgae and recommendations for the staining quantification.

  5. Measurements of NN yields d. pi. very near threshold. Pt. 1; The np yields d. pi. sup 0 cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutcheon, D.A.; Abegg, R.; Greeniaus, L.G.; Miller, C.A. (TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada) Nuclear Research Centre, Univ. Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)); Korkmaz, E.; Moss, G.A.; Edwards, G.W.R.; Mack, D.; Olsen, W.C.; Yanlin, Ye. (Nuclear Research Centre, Univ. Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)); Davison, N.E. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada)); Van Heerden, I.J. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Western Cape, Bellville (South Africa))

    1991-12-30

    We have measured cross sections for the reaction np{yields}d{pi}{sup 0} at beam energies very near the pion-production threshold. The yield near threshold is 23% lower than the previously accepted value based on {pi}{sup +}d{yields}pp data. P-wave pion production was observed at energies as low as 1.5 MeV (c.m.) above threshold. There was no evidence of narrow {pi}NN resonances in the energy range surveyed -275 to 291 MeV, corresponding to pion c.m. momenta between 2 and 43 MeV/c. (orig.).

  6. Measurement uncertainty in Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floor, G. H.; Queralt, I.; Hidalgo, M.; Marguí, E.

    2015-09-01

    Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is a multi-elemental technique using micro-volumes of sample. This work assessed the components contributing to the combined uncertainty budget associated with TXRF measurements using Cu and Fe concentrations in different spiked and natural water samples as an example. The results showed that an uncertainty estimation based solely on the count statistics of the analyte is not a realistic estimation of the overall uncertainty, since the depositional repeatability and the relative sensitivity between the analyte and the internal standard are important contributions to the uncertainty budget. The uncertainty on the instrumental repeatability and sensitivity factor could be estimated and as such, potentially relatively straightforward implemented in the TXRF instrument software. However, the depositional repeatability varied significantly from sample to sample and between elemental ratios and the controlling factors are not well understood. By a lack of theoretical prediction of the depositional repeatability, the uncertainty budget can be based on repeat measurements using different reflectors. A simple approach to estimate the uncertainty was presented. The measurement procedure implemented and the uncertainty estimation processes developed were validated from the agreement with results obtained by inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and/or reference/calculated values.

  7. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence lifetime measurements of the macula using the fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysli, Chantal; Quellec, Gwénolé; Abegg, Mathias; Menke, Marcel N; Wolf-Schnurrbusch, Ute; Kowal, Jens; Blatz, Johannes; La Schiazza, Olivier; Leichtle, Alexander B; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2014-04-03

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) cannot only be characterized by the intensity or the emission spectrum, but also by its lifetime. As the lifetime of a fluorescent molecule is sensitive to its local microenvironment, this technique may provide more information than fundus autofluorescence imaging. We report here the characteristics and repeatability of FAF lifetime measurements of the human macula using a new fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope (FLIO). A total of 31 healthy phakic subjects were included in this study with an age range from 22 to 61 years. For image acquisition, a fluorescence lifetime ophthalmoscope based on a Heidelberg Engineering Spectralis system was used. Fluorescence lifetime maps of the retina were recorded in a short- (498-560 nm) and a long- (560-720 nm) spectral channel. For quantification of fluorescence lifetimes a standard ETDRS grid was used. Mean fluorescence lifetimes were shortest in the fovea, with 208 picoseconds for the short-spectral channel and 239 picoseconds for the long-spectral channel, respectively. Fluorescence lifetimes increased from the central area to the outer ring of the ETDRS grid. The test-retest reliability of FLIO was very high for all ETDRS areas (Spearman's ρ = 0.80 for the short- and 0.97 for the long-spectral channel, P macula in healthy subjects. By using a custom-built software, we were able to quantify fluorescence lifetimes within the ETDRS grid. Establishing a clinically accessible standard against which to measure FAF lifetimes within the retina is a prerequisite for future studies in retinal disease.

  8. Measurement of [Gamma](Z[sup 0][yields]banti b)/[Gamma](Z[sup 0][yields] hadrons) using leptons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acton, P.D.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Allport, P.P.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Astbury, A.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bahan, G.A.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Banks, J.; Barlow, R.J.; Barnett, S.; Batley, J.R.; Beaudoin, G.; Beck, A.; Beck, G.A.; Becker, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bella, G.; Bentkowski, P.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Binder, U.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Boden, B.; Bosch, H.H.; Breuker, H.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R.M.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Chu, S.L.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Clayton, J.C.; Collins, W.J.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooper, M.; Coupland, M.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.M.; De Jong, S.; Del Pozo, L.A.; Deng, H.; Dieckmann, A.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M.S.; Do Couto e Silva, E.; Duboscq, J.E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Dumas, D.J.P.; Elcombe, P.A.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fierro, M.; Finck; OPAL Collaboration

    1993-06-01

    The fraction of banti b events in hadronic Z[sup 0] decays has been measured from the yield of leptons in the data samples collected by OPAL in 1990 and 1991. A sample enriched in events containing Z[sup 0][yields]banti b decays was obtained by requiring the presence of an electron or muon with high momentum and high momentum component transverse to the associated hadronic jet. After accounting for backgrounds and acceptances, a value of [Gamma](Z[sup 0][yields]banti b)/[Gamma](Z[sup 0][yields]hadons)=0.220[+-]0.002[+-]0.006[+-]0.011 was obtained. The first two errors reflect the data statistics and the systematic uncertainties arising from detector modelling uncertainties, respectively. The third error includes systematic effects from b and c fragmentation and decay uncertainties. (orig.).

  9. Measurement of cellulose content, Kraft pulp yield and basic density ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous descriptions of multisite and multispecies near infra-red (NIR) spectroscopic calibrations for predicting cellulose content (CC) and Kraft pulp yield (KPY) in eucalypt woodmeal demonstrated that large, single calibrations provide precise predictions for a wide range of sites and species. These have since been used ...

  10. Measuring the effect of field viability on wheat yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jakob Vesterlund; Schou, Jesper Sølver

    showing a significant effect on yields. Further research may involve estimating the effect of field characteristics on the aggregated economic farm performance. The field viability index has multiple applications in e.g. benchmarking, leasing or buying arrangements, and for identifying potential land...

  11. Measuring the effects of extreme weather events on yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, J.P.; Reinhard, S.

    2016-01-01

    Extreme weather events are expected to increase worldwide, therefore, anticipating and calculating their effects on crop yields is important for topics ranging from food security to the economic viability of biomass products. Given the local nature of weather, particularly precipitation, effects

  12. Determination of the yield locus by means of temperature measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banabic, D.; Huetink, Han

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical background of the thermo-graphical method of determining the yield locus. The analytical expression of the temperature variation of the specimen deformed in the elastic state is determined starting from the first law of thermodynamics. The experimental method for

  13. Slifers revisited: a method for determining yields independent of radiochemical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambo, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    It would be very desirable if an independent method other than radiochemical measurement were available to determine the yields of low-yield events in the alluviums and tuffs of areas 2, 9, and 10 at the Nevada Test Site. The successful application of slifers to the measurement of yields from high-yield events suggests that under some conditions they may also be usable with low-yield events. This view is supported by the evidence discussed here, which is based on direct experience with slifer yield measurements for low-yield events in porous media. Suggested methods for improving slifer yield determinations and a method for determining yields independent of radiochemical measurements are offered

  14. Novel Instrument to Measure Aerosol Fluorescence, Absorption, and Scattering, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Picarro, Inc proposes to develop the first cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) system to measure fluorescence, absorption, and scattering properties of atmospheric...

  15. Measuring of the Chlorophyll a Fluorescence in Calcium Alginate-Encapsulated Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibeth Paola Delgadillo Rodríguez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immobilization of algae has many applications, such as water bioremediation and production of metabolites. One of the variables that can be determined in the immobilized algae is chlorophyll a fluorescence, because this parameter is related to the physiological response of these organisms. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore a method for measuring the chlorophyll a fluorescence in calcium alginate-encapsulated algae. To do this, two species of microalgae (Scenedesmus ovalternus LAUN 001 and Parachlorella kessleri LAUN 002 were grown in monocultures in both free culture conditions (10 mL of algae preparation in 250 mL of Basal Bold Medium and encapsulated (250 spheres in 250 mL of Basal Bold Medium. Different measurement protocols of chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PSII were performed by varying a the preadaptation time to darkness (10, 15 and 30 min, b the light intensity of the non-modulated fluorometer (between 1000 and 3500 μmoles m-2s-1, and c the time of exposure to actinic light (1, 2 and 5 s. The optimal conditions for the measurement of the maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm in encapsulated algae were established as follow: a 30 min of preadaptation time; b 3000 μmoles m-2s-1 of the fluorometer light intensity; and c 1 to 2 s of exposure to actinic light. The following values in the photochemical activity of algae in non-stressful conditions were found: 0.760 – 0.764 for S. ovalternus, and 0.732 – 0.748 for P. kessleri. This methodology allows to observe some changes in the photochemical activity related with variations in the factors under which are the immobilized algae.

  16. Measurement uncertainty in Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floor, G.H., E-mail: geerke.floor@gfz-potsdam.de [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences Section 3.4. Earth Surface Geochemistry, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Postdam (Germany); Queralt, I. [Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera ICTJA-CSIC, Solé Sabaris s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hidalgo, M.; Marguí, E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi s/n, 17071 Girona (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is a multi-elemental technique using micro-volumes of sample. This work assessed the components contributing to the combined uncertainty budget associated with TXRF measurements using Cu and Fe concentrations in different spiked and natural water samples as an example. The results showed that an uncertainty estimation based solely on the count statistics of the analyte is not a realistic estimation of the overall uncertainty, since the depositional repeatability and the relative sensitivity between the analyte and the internal standard are important contributions to the uncertainty budget. The uncertainty on the instrumental repeatability and sensitivity factor could be estimated and as such, potentially relatively straightforward implemented in the TXRF instrument software. However, the depositional repeatability varied significantly from sample to sample and between elemental ratios and the controlling factors are not well understood. By a lack of theoretical prediction of the depositional repeatability, the uncertainty budget can be based on repeat measurements using different reflectors. A simple approach to estimate the uncertainty was presented. The measurement procedure implemented and the uncertainty estimation processes developed were validated from the agreement with results obtained by inductively coupled plasma — optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and/or reference/calculated values. - Highlights: • The uncertainty of TXRF cannot be realistically described by the counting statistics. • The depositional repeatability is an important contribution to the uncertainty. • Total combined uncertainties for Fe and Cu in waste/mine water samples were 4–8%. • Obtained concentrations agree within uncertainty with reference values.

  17. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana L. Wright

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger.

  18. Measurements of NN yields d. pi. very near threshold. Pt. 2; The pp yields d. pi. sup + analyzing power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkmaz, E.; Li, Jin; Elliott, J.B.; Mack, D.J.; Rodning, N.L. (Nuclear Research Centre, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)); Hutcheon, D.A.; Abegg, R.; Greeniaus, L.G.; Miller, C.A. (Nuclear Research Centre, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada) TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada))

    1991-12-30

    We have measured analyzing powers for the reaction pp{yields}d{pi}{sup +} at beam energies 3 and 7 MeV above pion-production threshold. With the use of Watson's theorem to fix phases and effective range estimates of pion d-wave strength, we have been able to determine the NN{yields}d{pi} s-wave amplitude and the major p-wave amplitude at these energies. The results are compared to the Faddeev model predictions of Blankleider. (orig.).

  19. Measuring solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) in the Amazon rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfeld, A.; Stutz, J.; Berry, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Measurement of solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) has, in our hands, been fraught with missteps and puzzling problems. Here we describe lessons we have learned and the resulting novel system recently installed in the Amazon rainforest near Manaus, Brazil. The system is designed to measure light from 740 - 780 nm, enabling us to compare SIF computed from Fraunhofer lines in an optically transparent band of the atmosphere (745 - 759 nm) with SIF computed using the telluric O2A band (760 - 770 nm). Fraunhofer line analysis requires high optical resolution (better than 0.2 nm) to detect the relatively narrow lines, but we discovered that fiber-optic diffraction-grating spectrometers are sensitive to very small inhomogeneities in the lighting. Errors resulting from this autocorrelated but random noise were similar in magnitude to the SIF signal itself. Optical diffusers reduce this problem, leading to our final design: a sealed cylinder, dubbed Rotaprism, in which a rotatable prism selects whether light from upward- or downward-looking windows enters an axially-placed optical fiber. Cosine-correcting opal glass covering the windows not only solves the noise issue but also makes the measurements correspond to photon flux. Rotaprism also maximizes the amount of light reaching the spectrometer - maximizing the signal:noise ratio - by avoiding the need for lossy optical switches and fiber splitters. Rotaprism is driven by a pneumatic actuator that is controlled by electronic valves attached to a pressurized N2 source. The gas exhausts into the temperature-controlled spectrometer enclosure to help purge the optics. Finally, custom software provides fault-tolerant control and data acquisition, ensuring that measurements continue with little or no intervention at the remote field site despite unreliable power. Analysis of initial data demonstrates the advantage of Fraunhofer line SIF analysis: due to the atmosphere transparency in this band, the results are more

  20. On the sub-maximal yield and photo-electric stimulation of chlorophyll a fluorescence in single turnover excitations in plant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenberg, W.J.; Rensen, van J.J.S.; Rodrigues, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    A set of expressions is derived which quantifies the chlorophyll fluorescence yield in terms of rate constants of primary light reactions of PSII, the fraction of open and semi-open RCs and of the electric field sensed by the RC in the thylakoid membrane. The decay kinetics of the chlorophyll

  1. Intrinsic deviations in fluorescence yield detected x-ray absorption spectroscopy : the case of the transition metal L-2,L-3 edges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurian, Reshmi; Kunnus, Kristjan; Wernet, Philippe; Butorin, Sergei M.; Glatzel, Pieter; de Groot, Frank M. F.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence yield (FY) detected x-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of 3d transition metal ions are calculated from the integrated 2p3d resonant x-ray emission spectra. The resulting FY-XAS spectra are compared with the normal XAS spectra corresponding to the absorption cross section and significant

  2. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  3. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the mixing of fuel oil with air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, A.; Bombach, R.; Hubschmid, W.; Kaeppeli, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    We report on measurements of the mixing of fuel oil with air at atmospheric pressure in an industrial premixed gas turbine burner. The concentration of the vaporized fuel oil was measured with laser induced fluorescence. We reason that the fuel oil concentration can be considered with good accuracy as proportional to the fluorescence intensity. (author) 6 fig., 3 refs.

  4. A dark green fluorescent protein as an acceptor for measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Hideji; Shibata, Akihiro C E; Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Nabekura, Junichi

    2015-10-15

    Measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM-FRET) is a powerful method for visualization of intracellular signaling activities such as protein-protein interactions and conformational changes of proteins. Here, we developed a dark green fluorescent protein (ShadowG) that can serve as an acceptor for FLIM-FRET. ShadowG is spectrally similar to monomeric enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) and has a 120-fold smaller quantum yield. When FRET from mEGFP to ShadowG was measured using an mEGFP-ShadowG tandem construct with 2-photon FLIM-FRET, we observed a strong FRET signal with low cell-to-cell variability. Furthermore, ShadowG was applied to a single-molecule FRET sensor to monitor a conformational change of CaMKII and of the light oxygen voltage (LOV) domain in HeLa cells. These sensors showed reduced cell-to-cell variability of both the basal fluorescence lifetime and response signal. In contrast to mCherry- or dark-YFP-based sensors, our sensor allowed for precise measurement of individual cell responses. When ShadowG was applied to a separate-type Ras FRET sensor, it showed a greater response signal than did the mCherry-based sensor. Furthermore, Ras activation and translocation of its effector ERK2 into the nucleus could be observed simultaneously. Thus, ShadowG is a promising FLIM-FRET acceptor.

  5. The measurement of X-rays radiation temperature with a new developed filter-fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chuanfei; Lin Libin; Lou Fuhong; Peng Taiping

    2001-01-01

    The author introduces how to measure the energy spectra of X-rays by filter-fluorescence spectroscopy. The design principle and structure of new-developed double diaphragms and filter-fluorescence spectroscopy with 5 channels are depicted. The parameters of optimized spectroscopy by numerical method are given. The filter-fluorescence spectroscopy designed according as Rousseau balance principle improves signal-noises ratio

  6. Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime microwell-plate platform for respirometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatni, M. R.; Yale, G.; Van Ryckeghem, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally micro-well plate based platforms used in biology utilize fluorescence intensity based methods to measure processes of biological relevance. However, fluorescence intensity measurements suffer from calibration drift due to a variety of factors. Photobleaching and self-quenching of the fluorescent dyes cause the intensity signal to drop over the lifetime of sensor immobilized inside the well. Variation in turbidity of the sample during the course of the measurement affects the measured fluorescence intensity. In comparison, fluorescence lifetime measurements are not significantly affected by these factors because fluorescence lifetime is a physico-chemical property of the fluorescent dye. Reliable and inexpensive frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instrumentation platforms are possible because the greater tolerance for optical alignment, and because they can be performed using inexpensive light sources such as LEDs. In this paper we report the development of a frequency domain fluorescence lifetime well-plate platform utilizing an oxygen sensitive transition-metal ligand complex fluorophore with a lifetime in the microsecond range. The fluorescence lifetime dye is incorporated in a polymer matrix and immobilized on the base of micro-well of a 60 well micro-well plate. Respiration measurements are performed in both aqueous and non-aqueous environment. Respirometry measurements were recorded from single Daphnia magna egg in hard water. Daphnia is an aquatic organism, important in environmental toxicology as a standard bioassay and early warning indicator for water quality monitoring. Also respirometry measurements were recorded from Tribolium castaneum eggs, which are common pests in the processed flour industry. These eggs were subjected to mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor such as potassium cyanide (KCN) and its effects on egg respiration were measured in real-time.

  7. Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Measuring Uranium Isotopes in Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-05-30

    We present the first two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plasmas. A new method of signal normalization is presented to reduce noise in absorption-based measurements of laser ablation.

  8. Absolute quantum yield measurements for the formation of oxygen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ment TOF apparatus, Felder et al12,13 obtained a SO vibrational state distribution which was found to be in good agreement with the distribution measured by Kanamori et al in the gas-phase photodissociation study using diode laser spectroscopy for SO detection.14. The latter SO vibrational distributions, however, were ...

  9. Measurement of protein-like fluorescence in river and waste water using a handheld spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Andy; Ward, David; Lieten, Shakti H; Periera, Ryan; Simpson, Ellie C; Slater, Malcolm

    2004-07-01

    Protein-like fluorescence intensity in rivers increases with increasing anthropogenic DOM inputs from sewerage and farm wastes. Here, a portable luminescence spectrophotometer was used to investigate if this technology could be used to provide both field scientists with a rapid pollution monitoring tool and process control engineers with a portable waste water monitoring device, through the measurement of river and waste water tryptophan-like fluorescence from a range of rivers in NE England and from effluents from within two waste water treatment plants. The portable spectrophotometer determined that waste waters and sewerage effluents had the highest tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity, urban streams had an intermediate tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity, and the upstream river samples of good water quality the lowest tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity. Replicate samples demonstrated that fluorescence intensity is reproducible to +/- 20% for low fluorescence, 'clean' river water samples and +/- 5% for urban water and waste waters. Correlations between fluorescence measured by the portable spectrophotometer with a conventional bench machine were 0.91; (Spearman's rho, n = 143), demonstrating that the portable spectrophotometer does correlate with tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity measured using the bench spectrophotometer.

  10. A new technique for ultrafast velocity distribution measurements of atomic species by post-ionization laser induced fluorescent (PILIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F.L.

    1992-07-01

    A new method for single shot velocity distribution measurement of metallic impurities of relevance for studies involving continuous sources, such as limiter experiments in fusion devices or sputtering experiments, based in the combination of Resonant Enhanced Multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is proposed. High ionization yield and good time resolution are expected according to the numerical simulation of the experiment that has been run for several atomic species. Other possible applications of REMPI to plasma edge physics and to conventional techniques for velocity distribution measurements are briefly addressed. (Author) 8 refs.

  11. A new technique for ultrafast velocity distribution measurements of atomic species by post-ionization laser induced fluorescent (PILIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabares, F.L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for single shot velocity distribution measurement of metallic impurities of relevance for studies involving continuous sources, such as limiter experiments in fusion devices or sputtering experiments, based in the combination of Resonant Enhanced Multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is proposed. High ionization yield and good time resolution are expected according to the numerical simulation of the experiment that has been run for several atomic species. Other possible applications of REMPI to plasma edge physics and to conventional techniques for velocity distribution measurements are briefly addressed. (Author) 8 refs

  12. A new Technique for ultrafast velocity distribution measurements of atomic species by post-ionization laser induced fluorescence (PILIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabares, F.L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for single shot velocity distribution measurement of metallic impurities of relevance for studies involving continuous sources, such as limiter experiments in fusion devices or sputtering experiments, based in the combination of Resonant Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is proposed. High ionization yield and good time resolution are expected according to the numerical simulation of the experiment that has been run for several atomic species. Other possible applications of REMPI to plasma edge physics and to conventional techniques for velocity distribution measurements are briefly addressed. (author)

  13. [Effects of plastic film mulching and rain harvesting modes on chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, yield and water use efficiency of dryland maize].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shang-Zhong; Fan, Ting-Lu; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Lei; Tang, Xiao-Ming; Dang, Yi; Zhao, Hui

    2014-02-01

    The differences on chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, yield and water use efficiency of dryland maize were compared among full plastic film mulching on double ridges and planting in catchment furrows (FFDRF), half plastic film mulching on double ridges and planting in catchment furrows (HFDRF), plastic film mulching on ridge and planting in film-side (FS), and flat planting with no plastic film mulching (NM) under field conditions in dry highland of Loess Plateau in 2007-2012. The results showed that fluorescence yield (Fo), the maximum fluorescence yield (Fm), light-adapted fluorescence yield when PS II reaction centers were totally open (F), light-adapted fluorescence yield when PS II reaction centers closed (Fm'), the maximal photochemical efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm), the actual photochemical efficiency of PS II in the light (Phi PS II), the relative electron transport rate (ETR), photochemical quenching (qP) and non-photochemical quenching (qN) in maize leaves of FFDRF were higher than that of control (NM), and the value of 1-qP was lower than that of control, at 13:00, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters values of FFDRF was significantly higher than control, which were increased by 5.3%, 56.8%, 10.7%, 36.3%, 23.6%, 56.7%, 64.4%, 45.5%, 23.6% and -55.6%, respectively, compared with the control. Yield and water use efficiency of FFDRF were the highest in every year no matter dry year, normal year, humid year and hail disaster year. Average yield and water use efficiency of FFDRF were 12,650 kg x hm(-2) and 40.4 kg x mm(-1) x hm(-2) during 2007-2012, increased by 57.8% and 61.6% compared with the control, respectively, and also significantly higher compared with HFDRF and PS. Therefore, it was concluded that FFDRF had significantly increased the efficiency of light energy conversion and improved the production capacity of dryland maize.

  14. Influence of dental materials used for sealing caries lesions on laser fluorescence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiberti, Paula; Carvalho, Thiago S; Raggio, Daniela P; Mendes, Fausto M

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of thickness and aging on the intrinsic fluorescence of sealing materials and their ability to block fluorescence from the underlying surface as assessed using a laser fluorescence device. Cavities of 0.5 mm and 1 mm depth were drilled into acrylic boards which were placed over two surfaces with different fluorescence properties: a low-fluorescence surface, to assess the intrinsic fluorescence of the sealing materials, and a high-fluorescence surface, to assess the fluorescence-blocking ability of the sealing materials. Ten cavities of each depth were filled with different sealing materials: Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, Adper Single Bond 2, FluroShield, Conseal f and UltraSeal XT Plus. Fluorescence was measured with a DIAGNOdent pen at five different time points: empty cavity, after polymerization, and 1 day, 1 week and 1 month after filling. The individual values after polymerization, as well as the area under the curve for the different periods were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey test (p caries by laser fluorescence.

  15. Measurements of OH and HO2 yields from the gas phase ozonolysis of isoprene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. Seakins

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of ozone with alkenes are an important source of hydroxyl (OH radicals; however, quantification of their importance is hindered by uncertainties in the absolute OH yield. Hydroxyl radical yields for the gas-phase ozonolysis of isoprene are determined in this paper by four different methods: (1 The use of cyclohexane as an OH scavenger, and the production of cyclohexanone, (2 The use of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene as an OH tracer, and the diminution in its concentration, (3 A kinetic method in which the OH yield was obtained by performing a series of pseudo-first-order experiments in the presence or absence of an OH scavenger (cyclohexane, (4 The OH and HO2 yields were determined by fitting the temporal OH and HO2 profiles following direct detection of absolute OH and HO2 concentrations by laser induced fluorescence at low pressure (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion- FAGE. The following OH yields for the ozonolysis of isoprene were obtained, relative to alkene consumed, for each method: (1 Scavenger (0.25±0.04, (2 Tracer (0.25±0.03, (3 Kinetic study (0.27±0.02, and (4 Direct observation (0.26±0.02, the error being one standard deviation. An averaged OH yield of 0.26±0.02 is recommended at room temperature and atmospheric pressure and this result is compared with recent literature determinations. The HO2 yield was directly determined for the first time using FAGE to be 0.26±0.03.

  16. Light Quality Affects Chloroplast Electron Transport Rates Estimated from Chl Fluorescence Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John R; Morgan, Patrick B; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2017-10-01

    Chl fluorescence has been used widely to calculate photosynthetic electron transport rates. Portable photosynthesis instruments allow for combined measurements of gas exchange and Chl fluorescence. We analyzed the influence of spectral quality of actinic light on Chl fluorescence and the calculated electron transport rate, and compared this with photosynthetic rates measured by gas exchange in the absence of photorespiration. In blue actinic light, the electron transport rate calculated from Chl fluorescence overestimated the true rate by nearly a factor of two, whereas there was closer agreement under red light. This was consistent with the prediction made with a multilayer leaf model using profiles of light absorption and photosynthetic capacity. Caution is needed when interpreting combined measurements of Chl fluorescence and gas exchange, such as the calculation of CO2 partial pressure in leaf chloroplasts. © Crown copyright 2017.

  17. Ultrafast polarized fluorescence measurements on tryptophan and a tryptophan-containing peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, O.F.A.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Pandit, A.; van Grondelle, R.; van Amerongen, H.

    2003-01-01

    In this work polarized picosecond fluorescence measurements were performed on isolated tryptophan and tryptophan in a small 22-mer peptide using a streak camera coupled to a spectrograph as a detection system. In both cases the fluorescence decay was multiexponential with decay times of ∼500 ps and

  18. Ultrafast polarized fluorescence measurements on Tryptophan and a Tryptophan-containing peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, O.F.A.; Stokkum, van I.H.M.; Pandit, A.; Grondelle, van R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    In this work polarized picosecond fluorescence measurements were performed on isolated tryptophan and tryptophan in a small 22-mer peptide using a streak camera coupled to a spectrograph as a detection system. In both cases the fluorescence decay was multiexponential with decay times of similar

  19. Measurement of fluorescence emission spectrum of few strongly driven atoms using an optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manoj; Shirasaki, A; Nayak, K P; Morinaga, M; Le Kien, Fam; Hakuta, K

    2010-08-02

    We show that the fluorescence emission spectrum of few atoms can be measured by using an optical nanofiber combined with the optical heterodyne and photon correlation spectroscopy. The observed fluorescence spectrum of the atoms near the nanofiber shows negligible effects of the atom-surface interaction and agrees well with the Mollow triplet spectrum of free-space atoms at high excitation intensity.

  20. Use of Fluorescently Labeled Algae to Measure the Clearance Rate of the Rotifer Keratella-Cochlearis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telesh, I.V.; Ooms-Wilms, A.L.; Gulati, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    1. Fluorescently labelled algae (FLA) were used to measure clearance rates of the rotifer Keratella cochlearis. The freshwater algae Chlorella vulgaris and Stichococcus bacillaris were labelled with a fluorescent dye, 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazin-2- yl) aminofluorescein (DTAF), following a modified

  1. Measurement of chemical sputtering yields of various types of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, R.; Nakamura, K.; Sone, K.; Saidoh, M.

    1980-01-01

    The methane formation from carbon due to the bombardment with hydrogen ions has been studied. The influences of the dose of incident ions and the types of carbon on methane production rate under the careful pretreatment of carbon are described in this paper. The incident energy of the hydrogen ions used was in the range from 0.1 to 6 keV for the purpose of filling the lack of the chemical sputtering coefficient for low energy hydrogen ions. The samples used were two kinds of pyrolytic graphite. Both basal and edge planes which were cut perpendicularly and in parallel to c-axis, respectively, were used as the surfaces of targets for the bombardment with H + ions. Other kinds of carbon used were isotropic atomic grade graphite and glassy carbon. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was used for the measurement of the methane formation. The methane production rate increased with dose, and gradually reached a constant value. The samples which were pre-bombarded with hydrogen ions showed the very different dose dependence of methane production rate. The anomalous rate can be explained by the particle-induced desorption of super-saturated hydrogen concentration in the target. The energy and temperature dependences of the methane production rate were almost same for the various carbon materials. (Kato, T.)

  2. Absolute measurement of the DT primary neutron yield on the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeper R.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the absolute neutron yield produced in inertial confinement fusion target experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF is essential in benchmarking progress towards the goal of achieving ignition on this facility. This paper describes three independent diagnostic techniques that have been developed to make accurate and precise DT neutron yield measurements on the NIF.

  3. Fluorescence measurement of calcium transients in perfused rabbit heart using rhod 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Nido, P J; Glynn, P; Buenaventura, P; Salama, G; Koretsky, A P

    1998-02-01

    Surface fluorescence spectroscopy of the beating heart to measure cytosolic calcium has been limited by the need to use ultraviolet excitation light for many of the commonly used calcium indicators. Ultraviolet light in the heart produces a high level of background fluorescence and is highly absorbed, limiting tissue penetration. Visible wave-length fluorescence dyes such as rhod 2 are available; however, the lack of spectral shift with calcium binding precludes the use of ratio techniques to account for changes in cytosolic dye concentration. We have developed a method for in vivo quantitation of cytosolic rhod 2 concentration that in conjunction with calcium-dependent fluorescence measurements permits estimation of cytosolic calcium levels in perfused rabbit hearts. Reflective absorbance of excitation light by rhod 2 loaded into myocardium was used as an index of dye concentration and the ratio of fluorescence intensity to absorbance as a measure of cytosolic calcium concentration. Endothelial cell loading of rhod 2 was found to be minimal (calcium was measured in vitro to be 500 nM, and this value increased to 710 nM in the presence of 0.5 mM myoglobin. On the basis of this value and in vivo fluorescence measurements, cytosolic calcium concentration in the rabbit heart was found to be 229 +/- 90 nM at end diastole and 930 +/- 130 nM at peak systole, with peak fluorescence preceding peak ventricular pressure by approximately 40 ms. This technique should facilitate detailed analysis of calcium transients from the whole heart.

  4. Measurements of the Ultraviolet Fluorescence Cross Sections and Spectra of Bacillus Anthracis Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, J.R.

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of the ultraviolet autofluorescence spectra and absolute cross sections of the Bacillus anthracis (Ba) simulants Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Bacillus cereus (Bc) were measured. Fluorescence spectra and cross sections of pine pollen (Pina echinata) were measured for comparison. Both dried vegetative cells and spores separated from the sporulated vegetative material were studied. The spectra were obtained by suspending a small number (<10) of particles in air in our Single Particle Spectroscopy Apparatus (SPSA), illuminating the particles with light from a spectrally filtered arc lamp, and measuring the fluorescence spectra of the particles. The illumination was 280 nm (20 nm FWHM) and the fluorescence spectra was measured between 300 and 450 nm. The fluorescence cross section of vegetative Bg peaks at 320 nm with a maximum cross section of 5 X 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle while the Bg spore fluorescence peaks at 310 nm with peak fluorescence of 8 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Pine pollen particles showed a higher fluorescence peaking at 355 nm with a cross section of 1.7 X 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Integrated cross sections ranged from 3.0 X 10{sup -13} for the Bg spores through 2.25 X 10{sup -12} (cm{sup 2}/sr-particle) for the vegetative cells.

  5. Decomposition of complex fluorescence spectra containing components with close emission maxima positions and similar quantum yields. Application to fluorescence spectra of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, Aleksandar; Kardos, Roland; Nyitrai, Miklós; Radotić, Ksenija

    2013-05-01

    Despite of widely application of multivariate analysis in chemometrics, problem of resolving closely positioned components in the fluorescence spectra remained unsolved, thus limiting the usage of fluorescence spectroscopy in analytical purpose. In this paper we have described a novel procedure, adapted especially for the analysis of complex fluorescence spectra with multiple, closely positioned components' maxima. The method was first tested on the simulated spectra and then applied on the spectra of proteins whose fluorophores have similar properties of both the excitation and the emission spectra. In this paper, simple but efficient modification of the method was applied. Instead of analyzing full size emission matrix (12 spectra), 9 spectra wide windows were analyzed, and 4 factors (greatest possible number of factors with physical meaning both for actin and simulated spectra) were extracted in each pass. Obtained factor scores were grouped by using the K-means algorithm. Groups of factor scores obtained from K-means algorithm were passed through the one more factor analysis (FA) in order to find one factor that represents each group. Our approach provides resolution of extremely closed spectral components, which is a vital data for protein conformation analysis based on fluorescence spectroscopy.

  6. Quantum yield measurements of photocathodes illuminated by pulsed ultraviolet laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.T.; Chen, P.; Kunkel, W.B.; Leung, K.N.; Li, C.Y.; Watson, J.M.

    1991-05-01

    The electron quantum yields from polycrystalline lanthanum hexaboride and barium irradiated by near ultraviolet laser excitation have been determined. These measurements show that the quantum yields from these materials are dependent on the processing and previous history of the photocathode material. For lanthanum hexaboride, a yield of 7 x 10 -6 with 337 nm irradiation has been achieved. For barium, a yield of 1 x 10 -6 has been measured with excitation at 308 nm. These results are discussed and future plans are outlined. 4 refs., 4 figs

  7. Biliary fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs) measured by fixed wavelength fluorescence (FF) in several marine fish species from the NW Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insausti, David; Carrasson, Maite; Maynou, Francesc; Cartes, Joan E; Solé, Montserrat

    2009-11-01

    The fixed wavelength fluoresce (FF) method was used to estimate the levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs) in the bile of fourteen fish species of commercial and/or ecological interest. Sampling was carried out in the NW Mediterranean at depths ranging from 50 to 1000 m during four seasonal cruises. During the summer sampling period, some species were also collected from another site (Vilanova fishing grounds) for comparison. Baseline levels of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene were measured. Some seasonality was observed, with reduced FF levels in summer and no differences among sites, consistent with sediment PAH levels. We discuss our results in relation to fish phylogeny, season, depth, diet, trophic level and swimming capacity. Overall FF levels indicated differences among species; the suprabenthic feeders from shallow and deep communities, and Mullus barbatus in particular, displayed elevated FF values and are potential candidates for additional monitoring studies.

  8. A new non-resonant laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the airborne in situ measurement of formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. St. Clair

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A new in situ instrument for gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO, COmpact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE, is presented. COFFEE utilizes non-resonant laser-induced fluorescence (NR-LIF to measure HCHO, with 300 mW of 40 kHz 355 nm laser output exciting multiple HCHO absorption features. The resulting HCHO fluorescence is collected at 5 ns resolution, and the fluorescence time profile is fit to yield the ambient HCHO mixing ratio. Typical 1σ precision at  ∼  0 pptv HCHO is 150 pptv for 1 s data. The compact instrument was designed to operate with minimal in-flight operator interaction and infrequent maintenance (1–2 times per year. COFFEE fits in the wing pod of the Alpha Jet stationed at the NASA Ames Research Center and has successfully collected HCHO data on 27 flights through 2017 March. The frequent flights, combined with a potentially long-term data set, makes the Alpha Jet a promising platform for validation of satellite-based column HCHO.

  9. A new non-resonant laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the airborne in situ measurement of formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, Jason M.; Swanson, Andrew K.; Bailey, Steven A.; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Marrero, Josette E.; Iraci, Laura T.; Hagopian, John G.; Hanisco, Thomas F.

    2017-12-01

    A new in situ instrument for gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO), COmpact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE), is presented. COFFEE utilizes non-resonant laser-induced fluorescence (NR-LIF) to measure HCHO, with 300 mW of 40 kHz 355 nm laser output exciting multiple HCHO absorption features. The resulting HCHO fluorescence is collected at 5 ns resolution, and the fluorescence time profile is fit to yield the ambient HCHO mixing ratio. Typical 1σ precision at ˜ 0 pptv HCHO is 150 pptv for 1 s data. The compact instrument was designed to operate with minimal in-flight operator interaction and infrequent maintenance (1-2 times per year). COFFEE fits in the wing pod of the Alpha Jet stationed at the NASA Ames Research Center and has successfully collected HCHO data on 27 flights through 2017 March. The frequent flights, combined with a potentially long-term data set, makes the Alpha Jet a promising platform for validation of satellite-based column HCHO.

  10. Real-Time Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra From Single Airborne Biological Particles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Steven

    1999-01-01

    ... (total and spectrally dispersed) of individual airborne particles, and describe our present system, which can measure fluorescence spectra or single micrometer-sized bioaerosol particles with good signal-to-noise ratios...

  11. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  12. On the Uncertainty in Single Molecule Fluorescent Lifetime and Energy Emission Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Emery N.; Zhang, Zhenhua; McCollom, Alex D.

    1996-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting has recently been combined with mode-locked picosecond pulsed excitation to measure the fluorescent lifetimes and energy emissions of single molecules in a flow stream. Maximum likelihood (ML) and least squares methods agree and are optimal when the number of detected photons is large, however, in single molecule fluorescence experiments the number of detected photons can be less than 20, 67 percent of those can be noise, and the detection time is restricted to 10 nanoseconds. Under the assumption that the photon signal and background noise are two independent inhomogeneous Poisson processes, we derive the exact joint arrival time probability density of the photons collected in a single counting experiment performed in the presence of background noise. The model obviates the need to bin experimental data for analysis, and makes it possible to analyze formally the effect of background noise on the photon detection experiment using both ML or Bayesian methods. For both methods we derive the joint and marginal probability densities of the fluorescent lifetime and fluorescent emission. The ML and Bayesian methods are compared in an analysis of simulated single molecule fluorescence experiments of Rhodamine 110 using different combinations of expected background noise and expected fluorescence emission. While both the ML or Bayesian procedures perform well for analyzing fluorescence emissions, the Bayesian methods provide more realistic measures of uncertainty in the fluorescent lifetimes. The Bayesian methods would be especially useful for measuring uncertainty in fluorescent lifetime estimates in current single molecule flow stream experiments where the expected fluorescence emission is low. Both the ML and Bayesian algorithms can be automated for applications in molecular biology.

  13. Quartz crystal microbalance-based system for high-sensitivity differential sputter yield measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, B.; Topper, J. L.; Farnell, C. C.; Yalin, A. P.

    2009-01-01

    We present a quartz crystal microbalance-based system for high sensitivity differential sputter yield measurements of different target materials due to ion bombardment. The differential sputter yields can be integrated to find total yields. Possible ion beam conditions include ion energies in the range of 30-350 eV and incidence angles of 0 deg. - 70 deg. from normal. A four-grid ion optics system is used to achieve a collimated ion beam at low energy (<100 eV) and a two-grid ion optics is used for higher energies (up to 750 eV). A complementary weight loss approach is also used to measure total sputter yields. Validation experiments are presented that confirm high sensitivity and accuracy of sputter yield measurements.

  14. Effect of Seed Inoculation with Pseudomonas fluorescence and Glomus esculentum on Quantitative and Qualitative Yield ofTwo Forage Corn Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pourebrahimi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of Pseudomonas fluorescence strain 93 bacteria and Glomus esculentum fungus on quantitative and qualitative yield of two forage corn cultivars, an RCBD based factorial field experiment with three replications was conducted at the Agricultural Research Station of the University of Guilan in 2008. Treatments were considered as phosphorus chemical fertilizer, seed inoculation with Glomus esculentum mycorrhiza fungus, seed inoculation with Pseudomonas fluorescence strain 93 bacteria, seed inoculation with Pseudomonas fluorescence strain 93 bacteria and Glomus esculentum mycorrhiza fungus, and two corn cultivars (SC704 and SC647. No application of chemical fertilizer and microorganisms was considered as control. Results of ANOVA showed that plant height and leaf area, plant SPAD value, and plant biological yield were affected by cultivar × fertilizer interaction, significantly. The highest plant height (249.30 cm, SPAD value (52.30, and biological yield (251.51 g/plant were related to cultivar SC704 which treated with chemical phosphorous fertilizer or inoculated with bacteria-fungus combination. The maximum plant leaf area was achieved in chemical phosphorous fertilizer followed by application of both bacteria and fungus treatments. Inoculation with both bacteria and fungus also resulted to highest dry matter digestibility (77.37 % and crude protein (12.61 %. However, the highest (54.41 % and lowest (34.38 % crude fiber was related to control and bacteria-fungus combination treatments, respectively. Among two cultivars used in the experiment, SC704 was superior according to examine crop traits. Therefore, it could be expected that inoculating the seeds of SC704 corn cultivar with Pseudomonas fluorescence- Glomus esculentum combination resulted to reduce the use of phosphorus fertilizers and increase in the quality and quantity of forage corn.

  15. Standardization and quality assurance in fluorescence measurements I state-of-the art and future challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Resch-Genger, Ute

    2008-01-01

    The validation and standardization of fluorescence methods is still in its infancy as compared to other prominent analytical and bioanalytical methods. Appropriate quality assurance standards are however a prerequisite for applications in highly regulated fields such as medical diagnostics, drug development, or food analysis. For the first time, a team of recognized international experts has documented the present status of quality assurance in fluorescence measurements, and outlines concepts for establishing standards in this field. This first of two volumes covers basic aspects and various techniques such as steady-state and time-resolved fluorometry, polarization techniques, and fluorescent chemical sensors

  16. Chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo as a probe for rapid measurement of tolerance to ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smillie, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo was progressively lost in pea leaves irradiated with either short or long-wave light. The changes were consistent with the development in the intact leaves of an inhibitory site on the photooxidizing side of photosystem II. In contrast, leaves of two species of Agave, plants regarded as more resistant to UV radiation, showed only minor changes in chlorophyll fluorescence. Agave americana was affected less than A. attenuata. The application of measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo to screening for tolerance to UV radiation is discussed. (author)

  17. Handheld Device Adapted to Smartphone Cameras for the Measurement of Sodium Ion Concentrations at Saliva-Relevant Levels via Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipowicz, Michelle; Garcia, Antonio

    2015-06-02

    The use of saliva sampling as a minimally-invasive means for drug testing and monitoring physiology is a subject of great interest to researchers and clinicians. This study describes a new optical method based on non-axially symmetric focusing of light using an oblate spheroid sample chamber. The device is simple, lightweight, low cost and is easily attached to several different brands/models of smartphones (Apple, Samsung, HTC and Nokia) for the measurement of sodium ion levels at physiologically-relevant saliva concentrations. The sample and fluorescent reagent solutions are placed in a specially-designed, lightweight device that excludes ambient light and concentrates 470-nm excitation light, from a low-power photodiode, within the sample through non-axially-symmetric refraction. The study found that smartphone cameras and post-image processing quantitated sodium ion concentration in water over the range of 0.5-10 mM, yielding best-fit regressions of the data that agree well with a data regression of microplate luminometer results. The data suggest that fluorescence can be used for the measurement of salivary sodium ion concentrations in low-resource or point-of-care settings. With further fluorescent assay testing, the device may find application in a variety of enzymatic or chemical assays.

  18. Handheld Device Adapted to Smartphone Cameras for the Measurement of Sodium Ion Concentrations at Saliva-Relevant Levels via Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lipowicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of saliva sampling as a minimally-invasive means for drug testing and monitoring physiology is a subject of great interest to researchers and clinicians. This study describes a new optical method based on non-axially symmetric focusing of light using an oblate spheroid sample chamber. The device is simple, lightweight, low cost and is easily attached to several different brands/models of smartphones (Apple, Samsung, HTC and Nokia for the measurement of sodium ion levels at physiologically-relevant saliva concentrations. The sample and fluorescent reagent solutions are placed in a specially-designed, lightweight device that excludes ambient light and concentrates 470-nm excitation light, from a low-power photodiode, within the sample through non-axially-symmetric refraction. The study found that smartphone cameras and post-image processing quantitated sodium ion concentration in water over the range of 0.5–10 mM, yielding best-fit regressions of the data that agree well with a data regression of microplate luminometer results. The data suggest that fluorescence can be used for the measurement of salivary sodium ion concentrations in low-resource or point-of-care settings. With further fluorescent assay testing, the device may find application in a variety of enzymatic or chemical assays.

  19. A non-Gaussian distribution quantifies distances measured with fluorescence localization techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Churchman, L.S.; Flyvbjerg, H.; Spudich, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    When single-molecule fluorescence localization techniques are pushed to their lower limits in attempts to measure ever-shorter distances, measurement errors become important to understand. Here we describe the non-Gaussian distribution of measured distances that is the key to proper interpretation...

  20. Soft X-ray fluorescence measurements of irradiated polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarski, R. P.; Ederer, D. L.; Pivin, J.-C.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Shamin, S. N.; Moewes, A.; Chang, G. S.; Whang, C. N.; Endo, K.; Ida, T.

    1998-11-01

    Fluorescent soft X-ray carbon Kα emission spectra (XES) have been used to characterize the bonding of carbon atoms in polyimide (PI) and polycarbosilane (PCS) films. The PI films have been irradiated with 40 keV nitrogen or argon ions, at fluences ranging from 1 × 10 14 to 1 × 10 16 cm -2. The PCS films have been irradiated with 5 × 10 15 carbon ions cm -2 of 500 keV and/or annealed at 1000°C. We find that the fine structure of the carbon XES of the PI films changes with implanted ion fluence above 1 × 10 14 cm -2 which we believe is due to the degradation of the PI into amorphous C:N:O. The width of the forbidden band as determined from the high-energy cut-off of the C Kα X-ray excitation decreases with the ion fluence. The bonding configuration of free carbon precipitates embedded in amorphous SiC which are formed in PCS after irradiation with C ions or combined treatments (irradiation and subsequent annealing) is close to either to that in diamond-like films or in silicidated graphite, respectively.

  1. Renal function measured by X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boijsen, M.; Jacobsson, L.; Tylen, U.; Sahlgrenska Sjukhuset, Goeteborg

    1987-01-01

    In twenty-six patients injected with metrizoate during urography, plasma was analyzed for iodine concentration using X-ray fluorescence analysis, and total plasma clearance of contrast medium was calculated. Total plasma clearance of 51 Cr-EDTA was also determined, but not simultaneously, in order to find out if the urographic procedure would influence the kidneys to such an extent that the contrast medium clearance value would differ much from the 51 Cr-EDTA clearance value. The errors in the method were assessed and the total error of the contrast medium clearance determination was calculated. When comparing 51 Cr-EDTA and metrizoate clearance a correlation of 0.94 and a mean ratio of 1.046 (SD 0.138) was found. The assessable errors cannot fully explain the standard deviation, which might indicate a transient change in kidney function related to elements of the urographic procedure such as laxation with possible dehydration and/or the contrast medium dose. (orig.)

  2. Calibration transfer for excitation-emission fluorescence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thygesen, Jonas; van den Berg, Frans

    2011-10-31

    The main part of the wide array of different calibration transfer methods found in literature is dedicated to two-way data arrangements (m×n matrices). Less work has been done within the area of calibration transfer for three-way data structures (m×n×l tensors) such as calibrations made for excitation-emission-matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra. There are two possible ways to attack the problem for EEM transfer. Either the tensors are unfolded to two-way data, whereby the existing methods can be applied, or new methods dedicated to three-way calibration transfer have to be developed. This paper presents and compares both. It was possible to make a local linear pixel-based model that could be used for transfer of EEM's. This new method has a similar performance to the classical methods found in literature, direct- and piecewise direct standardization. The three-way advantages made it possible to use as few as four samples to build useable transfer models. Care has to be taken though when choosing the samples. When subset recalibration of the systems is compared to calibration transfer, better performance is seen for the transferred calibrations. Overall the three-way calibration transfer methods have a slightly better performance than the two-way methods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental and theoretical comparison of the precision of flame atomic absorption, fluorescence, and emission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, N.W.; Ingle, J.D. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical equations and experimental evaluation procedures for the determination of the precision of flame atomic absorption, emission, and fluorescence measurements are presented. These procedures and noise power spectra are used to evaluate the precision and noise characteristics of atomic copper measurements with all three techniques under the same experimental conditions in a H 2 -air flame. At the detection limit, emission and fluorescence measurements are limited by background emission shot and flicker noise whereas absorption measurements are limited by flame transmission lamp flicker noise. Analyte flicker noise limits precision at higher analyte concentrations for all three techniques. Fluctutations in self-absorption and the inner filter effect are shown to contribute to the noise in atomic emission and fluorescence measurements

  4. Laser Induced Fluorescence For Measurement Of Lignin Concentrations In Pulping Liquors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.; Biasca, K. L.; Attala, R.

    1988-11-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of pulping liquors was investigated for use in the pulp and paper industry for process measurement and control applications. Liquors from both mill and laboratory cooks were studied. A Nd-YAG pumped dye laser was used to generate the excitation wavelength of 280 nm; measurements were also performed using a commercially available fluorometer. Measurements on mill pulping liquors gave strong signals and showed changes in the fluorescence intensity during the cook. Absorption spectra of diluted mill liquor samples showed large changes during the cook. Samples from well controlled and characterized laboratory cooks showed fluorescence to be linear with concentration over two decades with an upper limit of approximately 1000 ppm dissolved lignin. At the end of these cooks a possible chemical change was indicated by an increase in the observed fluorescence intensity. Results indicate that lignin concentrations in pulping liquors can be accurately determined with fluorescence in the linear optical region over a greater dynamic range than absorption spectroscopy. Laser induced fluorescence may also provide an indication of chemical changes occurring in the lignin structure during a cook.

  5. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  6. Fluorescence Spectrum and Decay Measurement for Hsil VS Normal Cytology Differentiation in Liquid Pap Smear Supernatant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gegzna, V.; Juodkazis, S.; Jursenas, S.; Miasojedovas, S.; Kurtinaitiene, R.; Rimiene, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    2009-06-01

    Cervical smear material contains endo and exocervical cells, mucus and inflammative, immune cells in cases of pathology. Just not destroyed keratinocytes lay on the glass for microscopy. Liquid cytology supernatant apart other diagnostics could be used for photodiagnostic. The spectroscopic parameters suitable for Normal and HSIL cytology groups supernatant differentiation are demonstrated. The dried liquid PAP supernatant fractions—sediment and liquid were investigated. Excitation and emission matrices (EEM), supernatant fluorescence decay measured under 280 nm diode short pulse excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy by excitation with 355 nm laser light were analyzed. The differences between Normal and HSIL groups were statistically proven in the certain spectral regions. Fluorescence decay peculiarities show spectral regions consisting of few fluorophores. Obtained results on fluorescence differences in Normal and HSIL groups' supernatant shows the potency of photodiagnosis application in cervical screening.

  7. Effects of iron on efficiency and map of photosystem II photochemical yield of rose flower using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Sh. Kiani

    2012-01-01

    Interveinal chlorosis induced by iron deficiency is considered to be one of the problems in rose production in greenhouses all over the world. This experiment was conducted to elucidate the capability of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging technique to recognize early iron deficiency and also determination of relationship between leaf iron concentration and leaf chlorophyll content index and photosystem II photochemical efficiency of rose flower (Rosa hybrida L., cv. First Red). Rose plants were...

  8. Measurement of the hydrogen yield in the radiolysis of water by dissolved fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, M.C. Jr.; Hart, E.J.; Flynn, K.F.; Gindler, J.E.

    1976-04-01

    Hydrogen from the radiolysis of water by dissolved fission products is stripped from the solution and collected by bubbling CO 2 through the solution. Quantitative measurements of the G value for hydrogen show that the yield is essentially the same as would be obtained by external gamma radiolysis of nonradioactive solutions of the same chemical composition. The hydrogen yield can be enhanced by addition of a hydrogen-atom donor, such as formic acid, to the solution. The yield of hydrogen from fission-waste solutions is discussed with respect to the question of whether it represents a significant energy source

  9. The SOFIA experiment: Measurement of 236U fission fragment yields in inverse kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grente L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The SOFIA (Studies On FIssion with Aladin experiment aims at measuring fission-fragments isotopic yields with high accuracy using inverse kinematics at relativistic energies. This experimental technique allows to fully identify the fission fragments in nuclear charge and mass number, thus providing very accurate isotopic yields for low energy fission of a large variety of fissioning systems. This report focuses on the latest results obtained with this set-up concerning electromagnetic-induced fission of 236U.

  10. Latent manganese deficiency in barley can be diagnosed and remediated on the basis of chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Pedas, Pai; Laursen, Kristian Holst

    2013-01-01

    chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence as a tool for diagnosis of latent Mn deficiency. Methods: Barley plants grown under controlled greenhouse conditions or in the field were exposed to different intensities of Mn deficiency. The responses were characterised by analysis of Chl a fluorescence, photosystem II (PSII....... Chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements constitute a powerful and valuable tool for diagnosis and remediation of latent Mn deficiency....

  11. Simultaneous measurement of quantum yield ratio and absorption ratio between acceptor and donor by linearly unmixing excitation-emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Lin, F; DU, M; Qu, W; Mai, Z; Qu, J; Chen, T

    2018-02-13

    Quantum yield ratio (Q A /Q D ) and absorption ratio (K A /K D ) in all excitation wavelengths used between acceptor and donor are indispensable to quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurement based on linearly unmixing excitation-emission spectra (ExEm-spFRET). We here describe an approach to simultaneously measure Q A /Q D and K A /K D values by linearly unmixing the excitation-emission spectra of at least two different donor-acceptor tandem constructs with unknown FRET efficiency. To measure the Q A /Q D and K A /K D values of Venus (V) to Cerulean (C), we used a wide-field fluorescence microscope to image living HepG2 cells separately expressing each of four different C-V tandem constructs at different emission wavelengths with 435 nm and 470 nm excitation respectively to obtain the corresponding excitation-emission spectrum (S DA ). Every S DA was linearly unmixed into the contributions (weights) of three excitation-emission spectra of donor (W D ) and acceptor (W A ) as well as donor-acceptor sensitisation (W S ). Plot of W S /W D versus W A /W D for the four C-V plasmids from at least 40 cells indicated a linear relationship with 1.865 of absolute intercept (Q A /Q D ) and 0.273 of the reciprocal of slope (K A /K D ), which was validated by quantitative FRET measurements adopting 1.865 of Q A /Q D and 0.273 of K A /K D for C32V, C5V, CVC and VCV constructs respectively in living HepG2 cells. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  12. Minimum number of measurements for evaluating soursop (Annona muricata L.) yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, C F B; Teodoro, P E; Londoño, S; Silva, L A; Peixoto, L A; Bhering, L L

    2017-05-31

    Repeatability studies on fruit species are of great importance to identify the minimum number of measurements necessary to accurately select superior genotypes. This study aimed to identify the most efficient method to estimate the repeatability coefficient (r) and predict the minimum number of measurements needed for a more accurate evaluation of soursop (Annona muricata L.) genotypes based on fruit yield. Sixteen measurements of fruit yield from 71 soursop genotypes were carried out between 2000 and 2016. In order to estimate r with the best accuracy, four procedures were used: analysis of variance, principal component analysis based on the correlation matrix, principal component analysis based on the phenotypic variance and covariance matrix, and structural analysis based on the correlation matrix. The minimum number of measurements needed to predict the actual value of individuals was estimated. Principal component analysis using the phenotypic variance and covariance matrix provided the most accurate estimates of both r and the number of measurements required for accurate evaluation of fruit yield in soursop. Our results indicate that selection of soursop genotypes with high fruit yield can be performed based on the third and fourth measurements in the early years and/or based on the eighth and ninth measurements at more advanced stages.

  13. Direct spectrometry: a new alternative for measuring the fluorescence of composite resins and dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Tm; de Oliveira, Hpm; Severino, D; Balducci, I; Huhtala, Mfrl; Gonçalves, Sep

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluorescence intensity of different composite resins and compare those values with the fluorescence intensity of dental tissues. Different composite resins were used to make 10 discs (2 mm in depth and 4 mm in diameter) of each brand, divided into groups: 1) Z (Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE), 2) ES (Esthet-X, Dentsply), 3) A (Amelogen Plus, Ultradent), 4) DVS (Durafill-VS, Heraeus Kulzer) with 2 mm composite resin for enamel (A2), 5) OES ([Esthet-X] opaque-OA [1 mm] + enamel-A2 [1 mm]); 6) ODVSI ([Charisma-Opal/Durafill-VSI], opaque-OM (1 mm) + translucent [1mm]), and 7) DVSI ([Durafill- VSI] translucent [2 mm]). Dental tissue specimens were obtained from human anterior teeth cut in a mesiodistal direction to obtain enamel, dentin, and enamel/dentin samples (2 mm). The fluorescence intensity of specimens was directly measured using an optic fiber associated with a spectrometer (Ocean Optics USB 4000) and recorded in graphic form (Origin 8.0 program). Data were submitted to statistical analysis using Dunnet, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests. Light absorption of the composite resins was obtained in a spectral range from 250 to 450 nm, and that of dental tissues was between 250 and 300 nm. All composite resins were excited at 398 nm and exhibited maximum emissions of around 485 nm. Fluorescence intensity values for all of the resins showed statistically significant differences (measured in arbitrary units [AUs]), with the exception of groups Z and DVS. Group DVSI had the highest fluorescence intensity values (13539 AU), followed by ODVS (10440 AU), DVS (10146 AU), ES (3946 AU), OES (3841 AU), A (3540 AU), and Z (1146 AU). The fluorescence intensity values for the composite resins differed statistically from those of dental tissues (E=1380 AU; D=6262 AU; E/D=3251 AU). The opacity interfered with fluorescence intensity, and group Z demonstrated fluorescence intensity values closest to that of tooth enamel. It is concluded that the

  14. o-Fluorination of aromatic azides yields improved azido-based fluorescent probes for hydrogen sulfide: synthesis, spectra, and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Wang, Runyu; Wei, Lv; Cheng, Longhuai; Li, Zhifei; Xi, Zhen; Yi, Long

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gaseous signaling molecule with multiple biological functions. To visualize the endogenous in situ production of H2S in real time, new coumarin- and boron-dipyrromethene-based fluorescent turn-on probes were developed for fast sensing of H2S in aqueous buffer and in living cells. Introduction of a fluoro group in the ortho position of the aromatic azide can lead to a greater than twofold increase in the rate of reaction with H2S. On the basis of o-fluorinated aromatic azides, fluorescent probes with high sensitivity and selectivity toward H2S over other biologically relevant species were designed and synthesized. The probes can be used to in situ to visualize exogenous H2S and D-cysteine-dependent endogenously produced H2S in living cells, which makes them promising tools for potential applications in H2S biology. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. The shared and unique values of optical, fluorescence, thermal and microwave satellite data for estimating large-scale crop yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large-scale crop monitoring and yield estimation are important for both scientific research and practical applications. Satellite remote sensing provides an effective means for regional and global cropland monitoring, particularly in data-sparse regions that lack reliable ground observations and rep...

  16. Photochemical properties in flag leaves of a super-high-yielding hybrid rice and a traditional hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) probed by chlorophyll a fluorescence transient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meiping; Shan, YongJie; Kochian, Leon; Strasser, Reto J; Chen, GuoXiang

    2015-12-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence of flag leaves in a super-high-yielding hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) LYPJ, and a traditional hybrid rice SY63 cultivar with lower grain yield, which were grown in the field, were investigated from emergence through senescence of flag leaves. As the flag leaf matured, there was an increasing trend in photosynthetic parameters such as quantum efficiency of primary photochemistry ([Formula: see text] Po) and efficiency of electron transport from PS II to PS I (Ψ Eo). The overall photosynthetic performance index (PIABS) was significantly higher in the high-yielding LYPJ compared to SY63 during the entire reproductive stage of the plant, the same to MDA content. However, [Formula: see text] Po(=F V/F M), an indicator of the primary photochemistry of the flag leaf, did not display significant changes with leaf age and was not significantly different between the two cultivars, suggesting that PIABS is a more sensitive parameter than [Formula: see text] Po (=F V/F M) during leaf age for distinguishing between cultivars differing in yield.

  17. Anisole fluorescence spectroscopy for temperature measurements with a Hg (Xe) arc lamp excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibert, P.; Kanumuri, S. S.; Bonnety, J.; Tran, K.-H.; Serio, B.; Bonnet, D.; Luc, J.; Lavayssiere, M.

    2017-04-01

    The main contribution of this study is to propose time-resolved measurements to determine temperature with a novel source of continuous excitation for an induced fluorescence technique with laser diagnosis based on tracer-induced fluorescence, which has become a major tool for experimental studies of fluid dynamics in reaction flows. We use a Hg (Xe) arc lamp as a continuous light source that has a wide range of emissions in wavelength. With this setup, one can reach high spatial and temporal resolution (temperature, pressure, species concentration, and velocity) to acquire quantitative data for the control of fluid thermal systems, such as engines, combustion chambers, furnaces, and reactors. A fluorescence study was performed on various tracers and their configurations. We focus on an anisole tracer using a broad wavelength of excitations. We propose a calibration to achieve temperature measurements in the range of 493-773 K and from 0.2 to 3.5 MPa of pressure. The temperature-dependent fluorescence is based on a two-line technique. The results give a better understanding of the influence of temperature and pressure in a nitrogen bath gas on the fluorescence photophysics in the UV domain. High temporal resolution was acquired using a high-speed intensified camera setup. The application of the photomultipliers manages the time-scale evolution of the flow in continuous emission and this eliminates the signal-to-noise ratio impact.

  18. Measurement of mass and isotopic fission yields for heavy fission products with the LOHENGRIN mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bail, A.

    2009-05-01

    In spite of the huge amount of fission yield data available in different libraries, more accurate values are still needed for nuclear energy applications and to improve our understanding of the fission process. Thus measurements of fission yields were performed at the mass spectrometer Lohengrin at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. The mass separator Lohengrin is situated at the research reactor of the institute and permits the placement of an actinide layer in a high thermal neutron flux. It separates fragments according to their atomic mass, kinetic energy and ionic charge state by the action of magnetic and electric fields. Coupled to a high resolution ionization chamber the experiment was used to investigate the mass and isotopic yields of the light mass region. Almost all fission yields of isotopes from Th to Cf have been measured at Lohengrin with this method. To complete and improve the nuclear data libraries, these measurements have been extended in this work to the heavy mass region for the reactions 235 U(n th ,f), 239 Pu(n th ,f) and 241 Pu(n th ,f). For these higher masses an isotopic separation is no longer possible. So, a new method was undertaken with the reaction 239 Pu(n th ,f) to determine the isotopic yields by spectrometry. These experiments have allowed to reduce considerably the uncertainties. Moreover the ionic charge state and kinetic energy distributions were specifically studied and have shown, among others, nanosecond isomers for some masses. (author)

  19. Calculated /alpha/-induced thick target neutron yields and spectra, with comparison to measured data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.B.; Bozoian, M.; Perry, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    One component of the neutron source associated with the decay of actinide nuclides in many environments is due to the interaction of decay /alpha/ particles in (/alpha/,n) reactions on low Z nuclides. Measurements of (/alpha/,n) thick target neutron yields and associated neutron spectra have been made for only a few combinations of /alpha/ energy and target nuclide or mixtures of actinide and target nuclides. Calculations of thick target neutron yields and spectra with the SOURCES code require /alpha/-energy-dependent cross sections for (/alpha/,n) reactions, as well as branching fractions leading to the energetically possible levels of the product nuclides. A library of these data has been accumulated for target nuclides of Z /le/ 15 using that available from measurements and from recent GNASH code calculations. SOURCES, assuming neutrons to be emitted isotopically in the center-of-mass system, uses libraries of /alpha/ stopping cross sections, (/alpha/,n) reaction cross reactions, product nuclide level branching fractions, and actinide decay /alpha/ spectra to calculate thick target (/alpha/,n) yields and neutron spectra for homogeneous combinations of nuclides. The code also calculates the thick target yield and angle intergrated neutron spectrum produced by /alpha/-particle beams on targets of homogeneous mixtures of nuclides. Illustrative calculated results are given and comparisons are made with measured thick target yields and spectra. 50 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  20. Measurements of Strontium Levels in Human Bone In Vivo Using Portable X-ray Fluorescence (XRF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Aaron J; Mostafaei, Farshad; Lin, Yanfen; Xu, Jian; Nie, Linda H

    2017-08-01

    Measurement of bone strontium (Sr) is vital to determining the effectiveness of Sr supplementation, which is commonly used for the treatment of osteoporosis. Previous technology uses radioisotope sources and bulky equipment to measure bone Sr. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) for bone Sr measurement and validates it using data from a population of 238 children. We identified correlations between bone Sr and age in our participants.

  1. Winter wheat GPC estimation with fluorescence-based sensor measurements of canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jihua; Gu, Xiaohe; Xu, Xingang

    2015-10-01

    This study focused on the wheat grain protein content (GPC) estimation based on wheat canopy chlorophyll parameters which acquired by hand-held instrument, Multiplex 3. Nine fluorescence spectral indices from Multiplex sensor were used in this study. The wheat GPC estimation experiment was conducted in 2012 at the National Experiment Station for Precision Agriculture in Changping district, Beijing. A square with area of 1.1 ha was selected and divided to 110 small plots by 10×10m in this study. In each plot, four 1-m2 area distributed in the square were selected for canopy fluorescence spectral measurements, physiological and biochemical analyses. Measurements were performed five times at wheat raising, jointing, heading stage, milking and ripening stage, respectively. The wheat plant samples for each plot were then collected after the measurement and sent to Lab for leaf N concentration (LNC) and canopy nitrogen density (CND) analyzed. GPC sampling for each plot was collected manually during the harvested season. Then, statistical analysis were performed to detect the correlation between fluorescence spectral indices and wheat CND for each growth stage, as well as GPC. The results indicate that two Nitrogen Balance Indices, NBI_G and NBI_R were more sensitive to wheat GPC than other fluorescence spectral indices at milking stage and ripening stage. Five linear regression models with GPC and fluorescence indices at different winter wheat growth stages were then established. The R2 of GPC estimated model increased form 0.312 at raising stage to 0.686 at ripening stage. The study reveals that canopy-level fluorescence spectral parameters were better indicators for the wheat group activity and could be demonstrated to be good indicators for winter wheat GPC estimation.

  2. SmartFluo: A Method and Affordable Adapter to Measure Chlorophyll a Fluorescence with Smartphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrichs, Anna; Busch, Julia; van der Woerd, H.J.; Zielinski, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    In order to increase the monitoring capabilities of inland and coastal waters, there is a need for new, affordable, sensitive and mobile instruments that could be operated semi-automatically in the field. This paper presents a prototype device to measure chlorophyll a fluorescence: the SmartFluo.

  3. Formation of nitric oxide in an industrial burner measured by 2-D laser induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, A.; Bombach, R.; Kaeppeli, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    We have performed two-dimensional Laser Induced Fluorescence (2-D LIF) measurements of nitric oxide and hydroxyl radical distributions in an industrial burner at atmospheric pressure. The relative 2-D LIF data of NO were set to an absolute scale by calibration with probe sampling combined with gas analysis. (author) 3 figs., 7 refs.

  4. In-situ spectroscopic erosion yield measurement with applications to sputtering and surface morphology alterations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, W.K.; Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; Labombard, B.; Nygren, R.

    1988-01-01

    An in-situ spectroscopic erosion yield measurement is developed and used to monitor material surface erosion during bombardment by a plasma. The experiments are performed in a plasma that has the characteristics of a fusion tokamak boundary plasma but the technique is applicable to many processes where plasma erosion is important. Erosion yield of materials bombarded in a high flux (up to 10 18 ion/cm 2 /s) plasma environment has been previously studies using weight loss measurements. In the present study, the sputtered flux from a material is monitored by the line emission intensities of atoms eroded from the surface. The line intensities can be used to infer erosion yields after proper calibration. The method agrees well with results from weight loss measurements. Earlier work established that the material surface structure can substantially influence the erosion yield. When a change of surface morphology (e.g., cone formation) occurs, weight loss methods cannot be used to determine the erosion yield. However, the in-situ erosion measurement is suitable and is used to investigate the relation between the on-set of morphology changes and alternations in erosion yield during plasma bombardment. Experiments are reported for copper, as an example of a pure material, and stainless steel, as an example of an alloy system. The formation of surface cones is observed only when both the sample temperature is above a critical value and surface impurities exist. If the source of impurities is removed, or the sample temperature is lowered below the critical value, a surface rough with cones will be returned to a smooth state

  5. An in-situ spectroscopic erosion yield measurement with applications to sputtering and surface morphology alterations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, W.K.; Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Nygren, R.

    1988-07-01

    An in-situ spectroscopic erosion yield measurement is developed and used to monitor material surface erosion during bombardment by a plasma. The experiments are performed in a plasma that has the characteristics of a fusion tokamak boundary plasma but the technique is applicable to many processes where plasma erosion is important. Erosion yield of materials bombarded in a high flux (up to 10 18 ion/cm 2 /s) plasma environment has been previously studied using weight loss measurements. In the present study, the sputtered flux from a material is monitored by the line emission intensities of atoms eroded from the surface. The line intensities can be used to infer erosion yields after proper calibration. The method agrees well with results from weight loss measurements. Earlier work established that the material surface structure can substantially influence the erosion yield. When a change of surface morphology (e.g. cone formation) occurs, weight loss methods cannot be used to determine the erosion yield. However, the in-situ erosion measurement is suitable and is used to investigate the relation between the on-set of morphology changes and alternations in erosion yield during plasma bombardment. Experiments are reported for copper, as an example of pure material, and stainless steel, as a example of an alloy system. The formation of surface cones is observed only when both the sample temperature is above a critical value and surface impurities exist. If the source of impurities is removed, or the sample temperature is lowered below the critical values, a surface rough with cones will be returned to smooth state. 20 refs., 10 figs

  6. In situ spectroscopic erosion yield measurement with applications to sputtering and surface morphology alterations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, W.K.; Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; Labombard, B.; Nygren, R.

    1989-01-01

    An in situ spectroscopic erosion yield measurement is developed and used to monitor material surface erosion during bombardment by a plasma. The experiments are performed in a plasma that has the characteristics of a fusion tokamak boundary plasma but the technique is applicable to many processes where plasma erosion is important. Erosion yield of materials bombarded in a high flux (up to 10 18 ion/cm 2 s) plasma environment has been previously studied using weight loss measurements. In the present study, the sputtered flux from a material is monitored by the line emission intensities of atoms eroded from the surface. The line intensities can be used to infer erosion yields after proper calibration. The method agrees well with results from weight loss measurements. Earlier work established that the material surface structure can substantially influence the erosion yield. When a change of surface morphology (e.g., cone formation) occurs, weight loss methods cannot be used to determine the erosion yield. However, the in situ erosion measurement is suitable and is used to investigate the relation between the onset of morphology changes and alternations in erosion yield during plasma bombardment. Experiments are reported for copper, as an example of a pure material, and stainless steel, as an example of an alloy system. The formation of surface cones is observed only when both the sample temperature is above a critical value and surface impurities exist. If the source of impurities is removed, or the sample temperature is lowered below the critical value, a surface rough with cones will be returned to a smooth state

  7. [Studies on the formation of cyclodextrin nanotube by fluorescence and anisotropy measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-fen; Shen, Xing-hai; Gao, Hong-cheng

    2003-04-01

    Steady-state fluorescence and anisotropy measurements have been used to investigate the interaction of 2,2'-biquinoline (BQ) and 1,1'-(methylenedi-1,4-phenylene)bismaleimide (MDP-BMI) with alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins (CDs). It was found that the reaction patterns between fluorescence molecules and CDs are remarkably different. They can form a simple inclusion complex with alpha-CD, while nanotubes can be formed in the presence of gamma-CD. Moreover, MDP-BMI can form nanotube with beta-CD at higher concentration.

  8. Remote sensing of chlorophyll a fluorescence of vegetation canopies. 1. Near and far field measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchi, G.; Mazzinghi, P.; Pantani, L.; Valentini, R.; Tirelli, D.; De Angelis, P.

    1994-01-01

    This article presents instruments and techniques, used in several vegetation monitoring experiments. Simultaneous monitoring was performed with different approaches, including fluorescence lidar and passive remote sensing, leaf level reflectance, and laser fluorimetry, and compared with physiological measurements. Most of the instrumentation described was designed and built for this application. Experiments were carried out in the laboratory and in the field, to investigate the relationship between chlorophyll fluorescence spectra and plant ecophysiology. Remote sensing, spectroscopy, and ecophysiology data were then collected by an intensive research team, joining different experiences and working in national and international projects

  9. Positronium Yields in Liquids Determined by Lifetime and Angular Correlation Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Jacobsen, F. M.

    1982-01-01

    Positron lifetime and angular correlation spectra were measured for 36 pure liquids, CCl4 mixtures with hexane and diethylether, and C6F6 mixtures with hexane. Apparent ortho-Ps yields, I'3, were determined as the intensity of the long-lived component in the lifetime spectra, while the apparent...

  10. Total and differential sputter yields of boron nitride measured by quartz crystal microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, B; Topper, J L; Yalin, A P

    2009-01-01

    We present differential sputter yield measurements of boron nitride due to bombardment by xenon ions. A four-grid ion optics system is used to achieve a collimated ion beam at low energy ( 0 , 15 0 , 30 0 and 45 0 from the normal. Comparisons with published values are made where possible.

  11. Reaction rate constant of HO2+O3 measured by detecting HO2 from photofragment fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares, E. R.; Suto, Masako; Lee, Long C.; Coffey, Dewitt, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A room-temperature discharge-flow system investigation of the rate constant for the reaction 'HO2 + O3 yields OH + 2O2' has detected HO2 through the OH(A-X) fluorescence produced by photodissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm. A reaction rate constant of 1.9 + or - 0.3 x 10 to the -15th cu cm/molecule per sec is obtained from first-order decay of HO2 in excess O3; this agrees well with published data.

  12. Measurement of fluorescent probes concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, begins years before the clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a novel method which may detect AD up to nine years earlier than current exams, minimally invasive, with minimal risk, pain and side effects. The method is based on previous reports which relate the concentrations of biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) (Aβ and Tau proteins) to the future development of AD in mild cognitive impairment patients. Our method, which uses fluorescence measurements of the relative concentrations of the CSF biomarkers, replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing. The process uses a miniature needle coupled trough an optical fiber to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites fluorescent probes which were prior injected and bond to the CSF biomarkers. Using the ratio between the fluorescence intensities emitted from the two biomarkers, which is correlated to their concentration ratio, the patient's risk of developing AD is estimated. A theoretical model was developed and validated using Monte Carlo simulations, demonstrating the relation between fluorescence emission and biomarker concentration. The method was tested using multi-layered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, the CSF in the sub-arachnoid space and the bone. These phantoms were prepared with different scattering and absorption coefficients, thicknesses and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate variations in human anatomy and in the needle location. The theoretical and in-vitro results are compared and the method's accuracy is discussed.

  13. Measurement of [Gamma](Z[sup 0] [yields] b anti b)/[Gamma](Z[sup 0] [yields] hadrons) using a double tagging method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, R. (Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics); Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Astbury, A.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Beaudoin, G.; Beck, A.; Beck, G.A.; Becker, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bella, G.; Bentkowski, P.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bosch, H.M.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R.M.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlesworth, C.; Charlton, D.G.; Chu, S.L.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clayton, J.C.; Clowes, S.G.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Coupland, M.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Darling, C.; Dallavalle, G.M.; Jong, S. de; Deng, H.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M.S.; Couto e Silva, E. do; Duchovni, E.; Duboscq, J.E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Dunwoody, U.C.; Elcombe, P.A.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Et; OPAL Collaboration

    1995-01-01

    The fraction of Z[sup 0] [yields] b anti b events in hadronic Z[sup 0] decays has been measured using the data collected by OPAL in 1992 and 1993. The presence of electrons or muons from semileptonic decays of bottom hadrons and the detection of bottom hadron decay vertices were used together to obtain an event sample enriched in Z[sup 0] [yields] b anti b decays. To reduce the systematic error on the measurement of the Z[sup 0] [yields] b anti b fraction, the efficiency of the bb event tagging was obtained from the data by comparing the numbers of events having a bottom signature in either one or both thrust hemispheres. A value of [Gamma](Z[sup 0] [yields] b anti b)/[Gamma](Z[sup 0] [yields] hadrons)=0.2171[+-]0.0021[+-]0.0021 was obtained, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The uncertainty on the decay width [Gamma](Z[sup 0] [yields] c anti c) is not included in these errors. A fractional variation of this width by [+-]8% about its Standard Model prediction would result in a variation of the measured Z[sup 0] [yields] b anti b fraction of -+ 0.0015. (orig.)

  14. Determination of the cathode fall voltage in fluorescent lamps by measurement of the operating voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilscher, A.

    2002-01-01

    A new method for the determination of the cathode fall voltage of fluorescent lamps is shown. The cathode fall voltage can be determined by measurement of the lamp operating voltage at constant lamp wall temperature, constant discharge current and variation of the electrode heating current. Commercial lamps, which do not need to be specially prepared, can be used for the measurement. The results show good correlation to other measurements of the cathode fall voltage at various discharge currents by means of capacitive coupling. The measured values of the cathode fall voltage are used for determining the minimum, target and maximum setting of the sum of the squares of the pin currents of one electrode (the so-called SOS value) as a function of the discharge current in fluorescent lamp dimming. (author)

  15. Setting-up of the Laser Induced Fluorescence diagnostic. Measurements of Cr density in a neon glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tafalla, D.; Cal, E. de la; Tabares, F. L.

    1994-01-01

    A plasma diagnostic based on the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique has been set up in the Fusion Division at the CIEMAT. In a preliminary experiment, the density of sputtered chromium atoms produced in a neon glow discharge was measured. Firstly, the laser beam was characterized by calibration of its wavelength, bandwidth and energy profile and Rayleigh scattering in N2 was used for the optical system calibration. An absolute density of Cr atoms of n ∼ 5x10 cm was obtained in discharges at 100 mA and pressure of 15 mTorr and a linear dependence of the LIF signal us. current was found. These values are in agreement with those expected from the tabulated sputtering yields and the thermalization and diffusion of the sputtered atoms into the Ne plasma. (Author) 19 refs

  16. Setting-up of the Laser Induced Fluorescence diagnostic. Measurements of Cr density in a neon glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tafalla, D.; Cal, E. de la; Tabares, F.L.

    1994-01-01

    A plasma diagnostic based on the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique has been set up in the Fusion Division at the CIEMAT. In a preliminary experiment, The density of sputtered chromium atoms produced in a neon glow discharge was measured. Firstly, the laser beam was characterized by calibration of its wavelength bandwidth and energy profile and Rayleigh scattering in N 2 was used for the optical system calibration. An absolute density of Cr atoms of n= 5x10''9 cm''-3 was obtained in discharges at 100 mA and pressure of 15 mTorr and a linear dependence of the LIF signal US. current was found. These values are in agreement with those expected from the tabulated sputtering yields and the thermalization and diffusion of the sputtered atoms into the Ne plasma

  17. Surface studies and implanted helium measurements following NOVA high-yield DT experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, M.A.; Hudson, G.B.

    1997-02-18

    This paper presents the results of three March 6, 1996 direct-drive high-yield DT NOVA experiments and provides `proof-of-principal` results for the quantitative measurement of energetic He ions. Semiconductor quality Si wafers and an amorphous carbon wafer were exposed to NOVA high-yield implosions. Surface damage was sub-micron in general, although the surface ablation was slightly greater for the carbon wafer than for the Si wafers. Melting of a thin ({approx} 0.1{mu}) layer of Si was evident from microscopic investigation. Electron microscopy indicated melted blobs of many different metals (e.g. Al, Au, Ta, Fe alloys, Cu and even Cd) on the surfaces. The yield measured by determining the numbers of atoms of implanted {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He indicate the number of DT fusions to be 9.1({plus_minus}2.3) X 10{sup 12} and DD fusions to be 4.8({plus_minus}1.0) x 10{sup 10}, respectively. The helium DT fusion yield is slightly lower than that of the Cu activation measurement, which was 1.3({plus_minus}0.l) x 10{sup 13} DT fusions.

  18. Measurement of Flow Velocity and Inference of Liquid Viscosity in a Microfluidic Channel by Fluorescence Photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, Nick J.; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Parsa, Shima

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple, noninvasive method for simultaneous measurement of flow velocity and inference of liquid viscosity in a microfluidic channel. We track the dynamics of a sharp front of photobleached fluorescent dye using a confocal microscope and measure the intensity at a single point...... theological properties of the liquid. This technique provides a simple method for simultaneous elucidation of flow velocity and liquid viscosity in microchannels....

  19. X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Turbulent Methane-Oxygen Shear Coaxial Flames (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    techniques to increasingly complex flames Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 3 X-Ray Diagnostics • X-ray...required • Two types of X-ray diagnostics radiography and fluorescence – Radiography has been widely used in sprays to obtain mass density measurements... Radiography - Radial EPL Profiles • Near-injector EPL profiles have elliptical shape expected from a solid liquid jet • Closest measurements were

  20. Measurements of barium photocathode quantum yields at four excimer laser wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Loy, M.D.; Young, A.T.; Leung, K.N.

    1992-06-01

    The electron quantum yields from barium cathodes excited by excimer laser radiation at 193, 248, 308, and 351 nm have been determined. Experiments with different cathode surface preparation techniques reveal that deposition of barium film a few microns thick on a clean copper surface under moderate vacuum conditions achieves relatively high quantum efficiencies. Quantum yields measured from surfaces prepared in this manner are 2.3 x 10 -3 at 193 nm, 7.6 x 10 - 4 at 248 nm, 6.1 x 10 -4 at 308 nm, and 4.0 x 10 -4 at 351 nm. Other preparation techniques, such as laser cleaning of a solid barium surface, produced quantum yields that were at least an order of magnitude lower than these values

  1. Measurements of periods, relative abundances and absolute yields of delayed neutrons from fast neutron induced fission of {sup 237}Np

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piksaikine, V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The experimental method for measurements of the delayed neutron yields and period is presented. The preliminary results of the total yield, relative abundances and periods are shown comparing with the previously reported values. (J.P.N.)

  2. Calibration methodology for proportional counters applied to yield measurements of a neutron burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarifeño-Saldivia, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo; Mayer, Roberto E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a methodology for the yield measurement of a neutron burst using neutron proportional counters. This methodology is to be applied when single neutron events cannot be resolved in time by nuclear standard electronics, or when a continuous current cannot be measured at the output of the counter. The methodology is based on the calibration of the counter in pulse mode, and the use of a statistical model to estimate the number of detected events from the accumulated charge resulting from the detection of the burst of neutrons. The model is developed and presented in full detail. For the measurement of fast neutron yields generated from plasma focus experiments using a moderated proportional counter, the implementation of the methodology is herein discussed. An experimental verification of the accuracy of the methodology is presented. An improvement of more than one order of magnitude in the accuracy of the detection system is obtained by using this methodology with respect to previous calibration methods

  3. Measurement of neutron yield by 62 MeV proton beam on a thick beryllium target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipenko, M., E-mail: osipenko@ge.infn.it [INFN, sezione di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Ripani, M. [INFN, sezione di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Alba, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, 95123 Catania (Italy); Ricco, G. [INFN, sezione di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Schillaci, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, 95123 Catania (Italy); Barbagallo, M. [INFN, sezione di Bari, 70126 Bari (Italy); Boccaccio, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Celentano, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Colonna, N. [INFN, sezione di Bari, 70126 Bari (Italy); Cosentino, L.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Pietro, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, 95123 Catania (Italy); Esposito, J. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Figuera, P.; Finocchiaro, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, 95123 Catania (Italy); Kostyukov, A. [Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Scuderi, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, 95123 Catania (Italy); Viberti, C.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy)

    2013-09-21

    The design of a low-power prototype of neutron amplifier recently proposed within the INFN-E project indicated the need for more accurate data on the neutron yield produced by a proton beam with energy of about 70 MeV impinging on a thick beryllium target. Such measurement was performed at the LNS superconducting cyclotron, covering a wide angular range from 0° to 150° and a complete neutron energy interval from thermal to beam energy. Neutrons with energy above 0.5 MeV were measured by liquid scintillators exploiting their time of flight to determine the kinetic energy. For lower energy neutrons, down to thermal energy, a {sup 3}He detector was used. The obtained data are in good agreement with previous measurements at 0° using 66 MeV proton beam, covering neutron energies >10MeV, as well as with measurements at few selected angles using protons of 46, 55 and 113 MeV energy. The present results extend the neutron yield data in the 60–70 MeV beam energy range. A comparison of measured yields to MCNP, FLUKA and Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations was performed.

  4. Measurement of neutron yield by 62 MeV proton beam on a thick beryllium target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipenko, M.; Ripani, M.; Alba, R.; Ricco, G.; Schillaci, M.; Barbagallo, M.; Boccaccio, P.; Celentano, A.; Colonna, N.; Cosentino, L.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Pietro, A.; Esposito, J.; Figuera, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Kostyukov, A.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Scuderi, V.; Viberti, C. M.

    2013-09-01

    The design of a low-power prototype of neutron amplifier recently proposed within the INFN-E project indicated the need for more accurate data on the neutron yield produced by a proton beam with energy of about 70 MeV impinging on a thick beryllium target. Such measurement was performed at the LNS superconducting cyclotron, covering a wide angular range from 0° to 150° and a complete neutron energy interval from thermal to beam energy. Neutrons with energy above 0.5 MeV were measured by liquid scintillators exploiting their time of flight to determine the kinetic energy. For lower energy neutrons, down to thermal energy, a 3He detector was used. The obtained data are in good agreement with previous measurements at 0° using 66 MeV proton beam, covering neutron energies >10 MeV, as well as with measurements at few selected angles using protons of 46, 55 and 113 MeV energy. The present results extend the neutron yield data in the 60-70 MeV beam energy range. A comparison of measured yields to MCNP, FLUKA and Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations was performed.

  5. Measurement of neutron yield by 62 MeV proton beam on a thick beryllium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipenko, M.; Ripani, M.; Alba, R.; Ricco, G.; Schillaci, M.; Barbagallo, M.; Boccaccio, P.; Celentano, A.; Colonna, N.; Cosentino, L.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Pietro, A.; Esposito, J.; Figuera, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Kostyukov, A.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Scuderi, V.; Viberti, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    The design of a low-power prototype of neutron amplifier recently proposed within the INFN-E project indicated the need for more accurate data on the neutron yield produced by a proton beam with energy of about 70 MeV impinging on a thick beryllium target. Such measurement was performed at the LNS superconducting cyclotron, covering a wide angular range from 0° to 150° and a complete neutron energy interval from thermal to beam energy. Neutrons with energy above 0.5 MeV were measured by liquid scintillators exploiting their time of flight to determine the kinetic energy. For lower energy neutrons, down to thermal energy, a 3 He detector was used. The obtained data are in good agreement with previous measurements at 0° using 66 MeV proton beam, covering neutron energies >10MeV, as well as with measurements at few selected angles using protons of 46, 55 and 113 MeV energy. The present results extend the neutron yield data in the 60–70 MeV beam energy range. A comparison of measured yields to MCNP, FLUKA and Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations was performed

  6. Measuring Photosynthetic Response to Drought Stress using Active and Passive Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, L.; Lerdau, M.; Wang, W.; Yang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Photosynthesis, the endothermic reactions involving the absorption of light and fixation and reduction of carbon dioxide by plants, plays important roles in carbon and water cycles, food security, and even weather and climate patterns. Solar radiation provides the energy for photosynthesis, but often plants absorb more solar energy than they can use to reduce carbon dioxide. This excess energy, which is briefly stored as high-energy electrons in the chloroplast, must be removed or damage to the leaf's photosynthetic machinery will occur. One important energy dissipation pathway is for the high energy electrons to return to their lower valance state and, in doing so, release radiation (fluorescence). This fluorescence (known as solar induced fluorescence (SIF) has been found to strongly correlate with gross photosynthesis. Recent advances in the remote sensing of SIF allow for large-scale real-time estimation of photosynthesis. In a warming climate with more frequent stress, remote sensing is necessary for measuring the spatial and temporal variability of photosynthesis. However, the mechanisms that link SIF and photosynthesis are unclear, particularly how the relationship may or may not change under stress. We present data from leaf-level measurements of gas exchange, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorescence, and SIF in two major tree species in North America. Water-stressed and well-watered plants were compared to determine how SIF and carbon dioxide exchange are modulated by drought diurnally and seasonally. Secondly, photosynthesis and fluorescence under high and low oxygen concentrations were compared to determine how photorespiration alters the relationship between SIF and gross photosynthesis. We find a strong correlation between SIF and steady-state fluorescence measured with conventional PAM fluorometry. Our results also indicate that drought-stress modulates the SIF-photosynthesis relationship, and this may be driven by drought-induced changes in

  7. Measurement of drug-target engagement in live cells by two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Brand, Christian; Lee, Sungon; Nibbs, Antoinette E; Stapleton, Shawn; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-07-01

    The ability to directly image and quantify drug-target engagement and drug distribution with subcellular resolution in live cells and whole organisms is a prerequisite to establishing accurate models of the kinetics and dynamics of drug action. Such methods would thus have far-reaching applications in drug development and molecular pharmacology. We recently presented one such technique based on fluorescence anisotropy, a spectroscopic method based on polarization light analysis and capable of measuring the binding interaction between molecules. Our technique allows the direct characterization of target engagement of fluorescently labeled drugs, using fluorophores with a fluorescence lifetime larger than the rotational correlation of the bound complex. Here we describe an optimized protocol for simultaneous dual-channel two-photon fluorescence anisotropy microscopy acquisition to perform drug-target measurements. We also provide the necessary software to implement stream processing to visualize images and to calculate quantitative parameters. The assembly and characterization part of the protocol can be implemented in 1 d. Sample preparation, characterization and imaging of drug binding can be completed in 2 d. Although currently adapted to an Olympus FV1000MPE microscope, the protocol can be extended to other commercial or custom-built microscopes.

  8. Polarized fluorescence measurements of orientational order in a uniaxial liquid crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapoy, L. Lawrence; DuPré, Donald B.

    1979-01-01

    The second and fourth orientational order parameters and , have been measured throughout the liquid crystalline phase of p-methoxybenzylidene-p[prime]-n-butylaniline (MBBA) using small quantities of a fluorescent probe. Complications of rotational Brownian motion and the intramolecular transfer o...... of excitation energy were considered in the analysis. The results are in agreement with previous Raman measurements on the doped liquid crystal. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics.......The second and fourth orientational order parameters and , have been measured throughout the liquid crystalline phase of p-methoxybenzylidene-p[prime]-n-butylaniline (MBBA) using small quantities of a fluorescent probe. Complications of rotational Brownian motion and the intramolecular transfer...

  9. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-28

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer obtained spatially resolved measurements of Ti K-α emission. Density profiles were measured from K-α intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-α spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This work shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  10. DAC Measurement of High-Pressure Yield Strength of Vanadium using In-Situ Thickness Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepeis, J P; Cynn, H; Evans, W J; Rudd, R E; Yang, L H; Liermann, H P; Yang, W

    2009-07-16

    The pressure-dependence of the quasi-static yield strength of vanadium in polycrystalline foils and powders has been measured up to 80 GPa at room temperature using an implementation of a non-hydrostatic diamond anvil cell technique [C. Meade and R. Jeanloz, J. Geophys. Res. 93, 3261 (1988)]. A new feature of this work is the use of an in-situ determination of the sample thickness. Following an initial increase in the strength with pressure, a decrease in the strength of vanadium was observed beginning at 40-50 GPa. We have measured the yield strength of vanadium up to 80 GPa under nonhydrostatic conditions. In this study, we used x-ray diffraction and absorption techniques to make in-situ measurements of the pressure gradient and the sample thickness. These measurements were used to evaluate the pressure-dependence of the material strength. We observed a decease in the yield strength of vanadium over the pressure range of 40-50 GPa. We propose that this change in the yieldstrength pressure-dependence is an indicator of the phase transition from bcc to rhombohedral.

  11. Measuring neutron yield and ρR anisotropies with activation foils at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bleuel D.L.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutron yields at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are measured with a suite of diagnostics, including activation of ∼20–200 g samples of materials undergoing a variety of energy-dependent neutron reactions. Indium samples were mounted on the end of a Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM, 25–50 cm from the implosion, to measure 2.45 MeV D-D fusion neutron yield. The 336.2 keV gamma rays from the 4.5 hour isomer of 115mIn produced by (n,n′ reactions are counted in high-purity germanium detectors. For capsules producing D-T fusion reactions, zirconium and copper are activated via (n,2n reactions at various locations around the target chamber and bay, measuring the 14 MeV neutron yield to accuracies on order of 7%. By mounting zirconium samples on ports at nine locations around the NIF chamber, anisotropies in the primary neutron emission due to fuel areal density asymmetries can be measured to a relative precision of 3%.

  12. Relaxation of cellular K+gradients by valinomycin induces diatoxanthin accumulation in Cyclotella meneghiniana cells and alters FCPa fluorescence yield in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rana A; Dietzel, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting involves all major thylakoid membrane complexes. One important factor is the proton motive force (pmf) driving ATP production. Its proton gradient (ΔpH) component regulates the high energy quenching. Potassium ions largely contribute to the formation of the electric field (ΔΨ). ΔΨ and ΔpH partially compensate each other to form pmf. Whilst in plants considerable progress has been made in analyzing the interplay of H + and K + gradients, in diatoms knowledge in this field is still scarce. We relaxed cellular K + gradients by valinomycin in Cyclotella meneghiniana. We observed a slow decrease of PSII maximum quantum yield in the dark upon valinomycin addition correlating with diatoxanthin accumulation which we attribute to the breakdown of organellar K + gradients (either plastid or mitochondria) which might compensate for the loss of the K + gradient by adjustment of the thylakoid pH in a secondary step. This response is reversible when ΔpH is relaxed. Similarly, we found higher non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) caused by higher DT accumulation in the steady state in valinomycin-treated cells. In vitro fucoxanthin chlorophyll a (FCPa) antenna complexes in liposomes with natural lipid composition showed a decrease in fluorescence yield if a K + gradient is built up. The effect reversed by relaxing the gradient. We interpret these fluorescence changes with surface charge dynamics and FCPa organization in the membrane rather than a direct influence of K + gradients on FCPa complexes. Both experiments reveal that K + gradients might contribute to fine tuning of light harvesting capacity in relation to pmf in diatoms. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  13. An Intelligent Optical Dissolved Oxygen Measurement Method Based on a Fluorescent Quenching Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengmei Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved oxygen (DO is a key factor that influences the healthy growth of fishes in aquaculture. The DO content changes with the aquatic environment and should therefore be monitored online. However, traditional measurement methods, such as iodometry and other chemical analysis methods, are not suitable for online monitoring. The Clark method is not stable enough for extended periods of monitoring. To solve these problems, this paper proposes an intelligent DO measurement method based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism. The measurement system is composed of fluorescent quenching detection, signal conditioning, intelligent processing, and power supply modules. The optical probe adopts the fluorescent quenching mechanism to detect the DO content and solves the problem, whereas traditional chemical methods are easily influenced by the environment. The optical probe contains a thermistor and dual excitation sources to isolate visible parasitic light and execute a compensation strategy. The intelligent processing module adopts the IEEE 1451.2 standard and realizes intelligent compensation. Experimental results show that the optical measurement method is stable, accurate, and suitable for online DO monitoring in aquaculture applications.

  14. An Intelligent Optical Dissolved Oxygen Measurement Method Based on a Fluorescent Quenching Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengmei; Wei, Yaoguang; Chen, Yingyi; Li, Daoliang; Zhang, Xu

    2015-12-09

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is a key factor that influences the healthy growth of fishes in aquaculture. The DO content changes with the aquatic environment and should therefore be monitored online. However, traditional measurement methods, such as iodometry and other chemical analysis methods, are not suitable for online monitoring. The Clark method is not stable enough for extended periods of monitoring. To solve these problems, this paper proposes an intelligent DO measurement method based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism. The measurement system is composed of fluorescent quenching detection, signal conditioning, intelligent processing, and power supply modules. The optical probe adopts the fluorescent quenching mechanism to detect the DO content and solves the problem, whereas traditional chemical methods are easily influenced by the environment. The optical probe contains a thermistor and dual excitation sources to isolate visible parasitic light and execute a compensation strategy. The intelligent processing module adopts the IEEE 1451.2 standard and realizes intelligent compensation. Experimental results show that the optical measurement method is stable, accurate, and suitable for online DO monitoring in aquaculture applications.

  15. Application of x-ray fluorescence to the measurement of additives in paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchnea, A.; McNelles, L.A.; Sinclair, A.H.; Hewitt, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    Titanium dioxide content in paper was measured by x-ray fluorescence analysis using an 55 Fe source and an x-ray proportional counter to determine the feasibility of an on-line instrument. X-ray calibration curves for 60- and 100-g/m 2 paper samples were obtained using neutron activation to measure the titanium dioxide concentration. The predictions of a simple model were in good agreement with the experimental calibration curves. The measurements and calculations were extended to investigate the effects of clay and moisture. The presence of clay has a significant effect on the x-ray fluorescence determination of the titanium dioxide concentration; however, this can be well accounted for by the model. The calculations indicated that the effect of typical moisture levels on the titanium dioxide determination was small and can be ignored. It is not possible to measure the clay content by x-ray fluorescence; however, preliminary results for the determination of calcium carbonate concentration are promising

  16. Controllable synthesis of dual emissive Ag:InP/ZnS quantum dots with high fluorescence quantum yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wu; He, Guoxing; Mei, Shiliang; Zhu, Jiatao; Zhang, Wanlu; Chen, Qiuhang; Zhang, Guilin; Guo, Ruiqian

    2017-11-01

    Dual emissive Cd-free quantum dots (QDs) are in great demand for various applications. However, their synthesis has been faced with challenges. Here, we demonstrate the dual emissive Ag:InP/ZnS core/shell QDs with the excellent photoluminescence quantum yield (PL QY) up to 75% and their PL dependence on the reaction temperature, reaction time, the different ZnX2 (X = I, Cl, and Br) precursors, the ratio of In/Zn and the Ag dopant concentration. The as-prepared Ag:InP/ZnS QDs exhibit dual emission with one peak position of about 492 nm owing to the intrinsic emission, and the other peak position of about 575 nm resulting from Ag-doped emission. These dual emissive QDs are integrated with the commercial GaN-based blue LEDs, and the simulation results show that the Ag:InP/ZnS QDs-based white LEDs could realize bright natural white-lights with the luminous efficacy (LE) of 94.2-98.4 lm/W, the color rendering index (CRI) of 82-83 and the color quality scale (CQS) of 82-83 at different correlated color temperatures (CCT). This unique combination of the above properties makes this new class of dual emissive QDs attractive for white LED applications.

  17. Assessment of penetrometry technique for measuring the yield stress of muds and granular pastes

    OpenAIRE

    TIKMANI, Mayur; BOUJLEL, Jalila; COUSSOT, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of using penetrometry technique for measuring the yield stress of concentrations made of grains immersed in a colloidal phase, such as concrete or muds. In that aim we used model materials made by suspending glass beads at different concentrations in a kaolin-water paste. We then show that a uniform shear stress develops along the object (plate or cylinder) beyond the entrance length. This shear stress plotted versus the object velocity exhibits a shape similar to t...

  18. SOFIA: An innovative setup to measure complete isotopic yield of fission fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellereau E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed an experiment dedicated to the accurate isotopic yield measurement of fission fragments over the whole range. SOFIA exploits the inverse kinematics technique: using heavy ion beams at relativistic energies, fission is induced by Coulomb excitation in a high-Z target. The fragments are emitted forward and both of them are identified in charge and mass. The setup will be presented, as well as preliminary spectra.

  19. Error in interpreting field chlorophyll fluorescence measurements: heat gain from solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marler, T.E.; Lawton, P.D.

    1994-01-01

    Temperature and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics were determined on leaves of various horticultural species following a dark adaptation period where dark adaptation cuvettes were shielded from or exposed to solar radiation. In one study, temperature of Swietenia mahagoni (L.) Jacq. leaflets within cuvettes increased from approximately 36C to approximately 50C during a 30-minute exposure to solar radiation. Alternatively, when the leaflets and cuvettes were shielded from solar radiation, leaflet temperature declined to 33C in 10 to 15 minutes. In a second study, 16 horticultural species exhibited a lower variable: maximum fluorescence (F v :F m ) when cuvettes were exposed to solar radiation during the 30-minute dark adaptation than when cuvettes were shielded. In a third study with S. mahagoni, the influence of self-shielding the cuvettes by wrapping them with white tape, white paper, or aluminum foil on temperature and fluorescence was compared to exposing or shielding the entire leaflet and cuvette. All of the shielding methods reduced leaflet temperature and increased the F v :F m ratio compared to leaving cuvettes exposed. These results indicate that heat stress from direct exposure to solar radiation is a potential source of error when interpreting chlorophyll fluorescence measurements on intact leaves. Methods for moderating or minimizing radiation interception during dark adaptation are recommended. (author)

  20. A Method to Reconstruct the Solar-Induced Canopy Fluorescence Spectrum from Hyperspectral Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A method for canopy Fluorescence Spectrum Reconstruction (FSR is proposed in this study, which can be used to retrieve the solar-induced canopy fluorescence spectrum over the whole chlorophyll fluorescence emission region from 640–850 nm. Firstly, the radiance of the solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (Fs at five absorption lines of the solar spectrum was retrieved by a Spectral Fitting Method (SFM. The Singular Vector Decomposition (SVD technique was then used to extract three basis spectra from a training dataset simulated by the model SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes. Finally, these basis spectra were linearly combined to reconstruct the Fs spectrum, and the coefficients of them were determined by Weighted Linear Least Squares (WLLS fitting with the five retrieved Fs values. Results for simulated datasets indicate that the FSR method could accurately reconstruct the Fs spectra from hyperspectral measurements acquired by instruments of high Spectral Resolution (SR and Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR. The FSR method was also applied to an experimental dataset acquired in a diurnal experiment. The diurnal change of the reconstructed Fs spectra shows that the Fs radiance around noon was higher than that in the morning and afternoon, which is consistent with former studies. Finally, the potential and limitations of this method are discussed.

  1. Measurement of light and charge yield of low-energy electronic recoils in liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzke, L. W.; Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; Plante, G.; Weber, M.

    2017-11-01

    The dependence of the light and charge yield of liquid xenon on the applied electric field and recoil energy is important for dark matter detectors using liquid xenon time projections chambers. Few measurements have been made of this field dependence at recoil energies less than 10 keV. In this paper, we present results of such measurements using a specialized detector. Recoil energies are determined via the Compton coincidence technique at four drift fields relevant for liquid xenon dark matter detectors: 0.19, 0.48, 1.02, and 2.32 kV /cm . Mean recoil energies down to 1 keV were measured with unprecedented precision. We find that the charge and light yield are anticorrelated above ˜3 keV and that the field dependence becomes negligible below ˜6 keV . However, below 3 keV, we find a charge yield significantly higher than expectation and a reconstructed energy deviating from linearity.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime measurement with confocal endomicroscopy for direct analysis of tissue biochemistry in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjae Won

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Confocal endomicroscopy is a powerful tool for in vivo real-time imaging at cellular resolution inside a living body without tissue resection. Microscopic fluorescence lifetime measurement can provide information about localized biochemical conditions such as pH and the concentrations of oxygen and calcium. We hypothesized that combining these techniques could assist accurate cancer discrimination by providing both biochemical and morphological information. We designed a dual-mode experimental setup for confocal endomicroscopic imaging and fluorescence lifetime measurement and applied it to a mouse xenograft model of activated human pancreatic cancer generated by subcutaneous injection of AsPC-1 tumor cells. Using this method with pH-sensitive sodium fluorescein injection, we demonstrated discrimination between normal and cancerous tissues in a living mouse. With further development, this method may be useful for clinical cancer detection.

  3. Fast, versatile x-ray fluorescence method for measuring tin in impregnated wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drabæk, I.; Christensen, Leif Højslet

    1985-01-01

    The present paper describes an energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence method for measuring tin in bis(tri-n-butyl)tin-oxide impregnated wood. The proposed method is of the backscatter/fundamental parameter type. Its versatility, precision, and accuracy is demonstrated by analyses of eleven samples...... of sapwood of Baltic Redwood. The results obtained are compared with those from neutron activation analysis....

  4. Composition measurement of bicomponent droplets using laser-induced fluorescence of acetone

    OpenAIRE

    Maqua , C.; Depredurand , V.; Castanet , G.; Wolff , M.; Lemoine , F.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Commercial fuels are complex mixtures, the evaporation of which remains particularly difficult to model. Experimental characterization of the differential vaporization of the components is a problem that is seldom addressed. In this paper, the evaporation of binary droplets made of ethyl-alcohol and acetone is investigated using a technique of measurement of the droplet composition developed in purpose. This technique exploits the laser induced fluorescence of acetone ...

  5. Measurement of isotope shift of recycled uranium by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oba, Masaki; Wakaida, Ikuo; Akaoka, Katsuaki; Miyabe, Masabumi

    1999-07-01

    Isotope shift of the recycled uranium atoms including the 236 U was measured by laser induced fluorescence method. Eight even levels at 2 eV and three odd levels at 4 eV were measured with isotope shifts among 238 U, 236 U and 235 U obtained. As for the measurement of the 4 eV levels, the Doppler free two photon absorption method was used, and the hyperfine structure of the 235 U was analyzed simultaneously. The isotope shift of 234 U was also observed in the three transition. (J.P.N.)

  6. In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2014-09-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

  7. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  8. An experimental set-up to measure Light Yield of Scintillating Fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Alfieri, C; Joram, C; Kenzie, M W

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the LHCb SciFi Tracker project, an experimental set up was designed and built to provide reliable and reproducible measurements of the light yield of scintillating fibres. This document describes the principle and technical realisation of the set-up. A few examples illustrate the operation and data analysis. In the first implementation of the set-up a photomultiplier tube with bialkali photocathode was used for the reading of the light from the fibres under test. In order to measure also green emitting fibres, the photomultiplier was replaced in January 2016 by a SiPM with higher sensitivity and larger spectral coverage1.

  9. Analysis and computation of statistic fluctuations in ICF neutron yield measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhongjie; Zheng Zhijian; Yi Rongqing; Liu Shenye; Ding Yongkun; Deng Caibo

    2011-01-01

    The plastic scintillation detector is used to measure the yield of DD neutrons or DT neutrons. Fast neutrons incident on the scintillator give rise to recoil protons. Because the range of the recoil protons is usually small compared with the dimensions of the scintillator, their full energy is deposited in the scintillator. The statistic fluctuation of the protons' number and that of the protons' total energy are two sources of the measurement uncertainty. Based on DT neutrons, this paper presents the algorithms to compute the probability density functions of the two statistic fluctuations. The algorithms are applicable to the related computation for other fast monoenergetic neutrons in the plastic scintillator. (authors)

  10. A fluorescence anisotropy method for measuring protein concentration in complex cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Radu Constantin; Calvet, Amandine; Ryder, Alan G

    2014-04-22

    The rapid, quantitative analysis of the complex cell culture media used in biopharmaceutical manufacturing is of critical importance. Requirements for cell culture media composition profiling, or changes in specific analyte concentrations (e.g. amino acids in the media or product protein in the bioprocess broth) often necessitate the use of complicated analytical methods and extensive sample handling. Rapid spectroscopic methods like multi-dimensional fluorescence (MDF) spectroscopy have been successfully applied for the routine determination of compositional changes in cell culture media and bioprocess broths. Quantifying macromolecules in cell culture media is a specific challenge as there is a need to implement measurements rapidly on the prepared media. However, the use of standard fluorescence spectroscopy is complicated by the emission overlap from many media components. Here, we demonstrate how combining anisotropy measurements with standard total synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (TSFS) provides a rapid, accurate quantitation method for cell culture media. Anisotropy provides emission resolution between large and small fluorophores while TSFS provides a robust measurement space. Model cell culture media was prepared using yeastolate (2.5 mg mL(-1)) spiked with bovine serum albumin (0 to 5 mg mL(-1)). Using this method, protein emission is clearly discriminated from background yeastolate emission, allowing for accurate bovine serum albumin (BSA) quantification over a 0.1 to 4.0 mg mL(-1) range with a limit of detection (LOD) of 13.8 μg mL(-1). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  12. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-02-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  13. SmartFluo: A Method and Affordable Adapter to Measure Chlorophyll a Fluorescence with Smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichs, Anna; Busch, Julia Anke; van der Woerd, Hendrik Jan; Zielinski, Oliver

    2017-03-25

    In order to increase the monitoring capabilities of inland and coastal waters, there is a need for new, affordable, sensitive and mobile instruments that could be operated semi-automatically in the field. This paper presents a prototype device to measure chlorophyll a fluorescence: the SmartFluo. The device is a combination of a smartphone offering an intuitive operation interface and an adapter implying a cuvette holder, as well as a suitable illumination source. SmartFluo is based on stimulated fluorescence of water constituents such as chlorophyll a . The red band of the digital smartphone camera is sensitive enough to detect quantitatively the characteristic red fluorescence emission. The adapter contains a light source, a strong light emitting diode and additional filters to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and to suppress the impact of scattering. A novel algorithm utilizing the red band of the camera is provided. Laboratory experiments of the SmartFluo show a linear correlation (R 2 = 0.98) to the chlorophyll a concentrations measured by reference instruments, such as a high-performance benchtop laboratory fluorometer (LS 55, PerkinElmer).

  14. Comprehensive Measurement of Neutron Yield Produced by 62 MeV Protons on Beryllium Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipenko, M.; Ripani, M.; Ricco, G.; Alba, R.; Schillaci, M.; Cosentino, L.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Scuderi, V.; Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Boccaccio, P.; Esposito, J.; Celentano, A.; Viberti, C.M.; Kostyukov, A.

    2013-06-01

    A low-power prototype of neutron amplifier, based on a 70 MeV, high current proton cyclotron being installed at LNL for the SPES RIB facility, was recently proposed within INFN-E project. This prototype uses a thick Beryllium converter to produce a fast neutron spectrum feeding a sub-critical reactor core. To complete the design of such facility the new measurement of neutron yield from a thick Beryllium target was performed at LNS. This measurement used liquid scintillator detectors to identify produced neutrons by Pulse Shape Discrimination and Time of Flight technique to measure neutron energy in the range 0.5-62 MeV. To extend the covered neutron energy range 3 He detector was used to measure neutrons below 0.5 MeV. The obtained yields were normalized to the charge deposited by the proton beam on the metallic Beryllium target. These techniques allowed to achieve a wide angular coverage from 0 to 150 degrees and to explore almost complete neutron energy interval. (authors)

  15. Quantitative analysis and metallic coating thickness measurements by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrea, Denis; Ducu, Catalin; Malinovschi, Viorel; Moga, Sorin; Boicea, Niculae

    2009-01-01

    Full text: This paperwork covers the use of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) for determining the concentration and the coating thickness on metallic samples. The analysis method presented here may also be applicable to other coatings, providing that the elemental nature of the coating and substrate are compatible with the technical aspects of XRF, such as the absorption coefficient of the system, primary radiation, fluorescent radiation and type of detection. For the coating thickness measurement it was used the substrate-line attenuation method and a computing algorithm was developed. Its advantage relies in the fact that no special calibration with standard samples having different layer thickness is needed. The samples used for evaluation were metallic pieces of iron with zinc-nickel coatings of different thickness obtained by electrochemical deposition. (authors)

  16. Quantitative analysis and metallic coating thickness measurements by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrea, Denis; Ducu, Catalin; Malinovschi, Viorel; Moga, Sorin; Boicea, Niculae

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with the use of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) for determining the concentration and the coating thickness on metallic samples. The analysis method presented here may also be applicable to other coatings, providing that the elemental nature of the coating and substrate are compatible with the technical aspects of XRF, such as the absorption coefficient of the system, primary radiation, fluorescent radiation and type of detection. For the coating thickness measurement it was used the substrate-line attenuation method and an algorithm was developed. Its advantage relies in the fact that no special calibration with standard samples having different layer thickness is needed. The samples used for evaluation were metallic pieces of iron with zinc-nickel coatings of different thickness obtained by electrochemical deposition. (authors)

  17. Measurement of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel by self-induced x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, Andrew S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rudy, Cliff R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Steve J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Charlton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stafford, A [TEXAS A& M; Strohmeyer, D [TEXAS A& M; Saavadra, S [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Direct measurement of the plutonium content in spent nuclear fuel is a challenging problem in non-destructive assay. The very high gamma-ray flux from fission product isotopes overwhelms the weaker gamma-ray emissions from plutonium and uranium, making passive gamma-ray measurements impossible. However, the intense fission product radiation is effective at exciting plutonium and uranium atoms, resulting in subsequent fluorescence X-ray emission. K-shell X-rays in the 100 keV energy range can escape the fuel and cladding, providing a direct signal from uranium and plutonium that can be measured with a standard germanium detector. The measured plutonium to uranium elemental ratio can be used to compute the plutonium content of the fuel. The technique can potentially provide a passive, non-destructive assay tool for determining plutonium content in spent fuel. In this paper, we discuss recent non-destructive measurements of plutonium X-ray fluorescence (XRF) signatures from pressurized water reactor spent fuel rods. We also discuss how emerging new technologies, like very high energy resolution microcalorimeter detectors, might be applied to XRF measurements.

  18. Fluorescent real-time quantitative measurements of intracellular peroxynitrite generation and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhen; Zhao, Qin; Liu, Jixiang; Liao, Jinfang; Peng, Ruogu; Xi, Yunting; Diwu, Zhenjun

    2017-03-01

    Peroxynitrite (ONOO - ), a strong oxidant species, is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O 2 .- ) radicals. It plays an important role as a biological regulator in numbers of physiological and pathological processes. In this study, we developed fluorescence-based real-time quantitative measurements to detect intracellular ONOO - . The probe DAX-J2 PON Green showed high selectivity toward ONOO - over other competing species, and has been successfully applied in microplate reader and flow cytometer to quantitatively measure endogenous ONOO - production. Moreover, the results demonstrated the inhibitory effects of curcumin on intracellular ONOO - generation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Shifts in the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP during bacterial phagocytosis measured by phase-sensitive flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Houston, Kevin D.; Houston, Jessica P.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-sensitive flow cytometry (PSFC) is a technique in which fluorescence excited state decay times are measured as fluorescently labeled cells rapidly transit a finely focused, frequency-modulated laser beam. With PSFC the fluorescence lifetime is taken as a cytometric parameter to differentiate intracellular events that are challenging to distinguish with standard flow cytometry. For example PSFC can report changes in protein conformation, expression, interactions, and movement, as well as differences in intracellular microenvironments. This contribution focuses on the latter case by taking PSFC measurements of macrophage cells when inoculated with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing E. coli. During progressive internalization of EGFP-E. coli, fluorescence lifetimes were acquired and compared to control groups. It was hypothesized that fluorescence lifetimes would correlate well with phagocytosis because phagosomes become acidified and the average fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is known to be affected by pH. We confirmed that average EGFP lifetimes consistently decreased (3 to 2 ns) with inoculation time. The broad significance of this work is the demonstration of how high-throughput fluorescence lifetime measurements correlate well to changes that are not easily tracked by intensity-only cytometry, which is affected by heterogeneous protein expression, cell-to-cell differences in phagosome formation, and number of bacterium engulfed.

  20. Measurements of DT and DD neutron yields by neutron activation on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.W.; Larson, A.R.; LeMunyan, G.

    1995-03-01

    A variety of elemental foils have been activated by neutron fluence from TFTR under conditions with the DT neutron yield per shot ranging from 10 12 to over 10 18 , and with the DT/(DD+DT) neutron ratio varying from 0.5% (from triton burnup) to unity. Linear response over this large dynamic range is obtained by reducing the mass of the foils and increasing the cooling time, all while accepting greatly improved counting statistics. Effects on background gamma-ray lines from foil-capsule-material contaminants, and the resulting lower limits on activation foil mass, have been determined. DT neutron yields from dosimetry standard reactions on aluminum, chromium, iron, nickel, zirconium, and indium are in agreement within the ±9% (one-sigma) accuracy of the measurements; also agreeing are yields from silicon foils using the ACTL library cross-section, while the ENDF/B-V library has too low a cross-section. Preliminary results from a variety of other threshold reactions are presented. Use of the 115 In(n.n') 115m In reaction (0.42 times as sensitive to DT neutrons as DD neutrons) in conjunction with pure-DT reactions allows a determination of the DT/(DD+DT) ratio in trace tritium or low-power tritium beam experiments

  1. First measurement of the helicity dependence for the {gamma}p{yields}p{pi} reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Arends, H.J.; Beck, R.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Jennewein, P.; Lang, M.; Martinez-Fabregate, M.; Rost, M.; Tamas, G.; Thomas, A. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Altieri, S.; Panzeri, A.; Pinelli, T. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Universita di Pavia, Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Pavia (Italy); Annand, J.R.M.; McGeorge, J.C.; Rosner, G. [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Blackston, M.A.; Weller, H.R. [Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham (United States); Bradtke, C.; Dutz, H.; Klein, F.; Rohlof, C. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Hose, N. d' [CEA Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Fix, A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Laboratory of Mathematical Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Goertz, S.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Insitut fuer Experimentalphysik, Bochum (Germany); Grabmayr, P. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Hasegawa, S.; Iwata, T. [Nagoya University, Department of Physics, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Holvoet, H.; Lannoy, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Van de Vyver, R. [Universiteit Gent, Subatomaire en Stralingsfysica, Gent (Belgium); Horikawa, N. [Nagoya University, CIRSE, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Kondratiev, R.; Lisin, V. [Academy of Science, INR, Moscow (Russian Federation); Preobrajenski, I. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Academy of Science, INR, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rostomyan, T. [Universiteit Gent, Subatomaire en Stralingsfysica, Gent (Belgium); INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Schumacher, M.; Seitz, B.; Zapadtka, F. [Universitaet Goettingen, II.Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    The helicity dependence of the total cross-section and the invariant-mass distributions in the (p{pi}{sup {+-}}) and ({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) final states for the {gamma}p{yields}p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} reaction have been measured for the first time at incident photon energies from 400 to 800 MeV. The measurement was performed with the large-acceptance detector DAPHNE at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI accelerator in Mainz. Although this channel is found to be predominantly excited by the intermediate production of a {delta}{pi} state, both the measured unpolarized and the helicity-dependent observables are generally not well described by the existing theoretical models. (orig.)

  2. First measurement of the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sangiorgio, Samuele [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foxe, Michael P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering; Hagmann, Chris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jovanovic, Igor [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering; Kazkaz, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Norman, E. B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pereverzev, S. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rebassoo, Finn O. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sorensen, Peter F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Liquid phase argon has long been used as a target medium for particle detection via scintillation light. Recently there has been considerable interest in direct detection of both hypothetical darkmatter particles and coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. These as-yet unobserved neutral particle interactions are expected to result in a recoiling argon atom O(keV), generally referred to in the literature as a nuclear recoil. This prompts the question of the available electromagnetic signal in a liquid argon detector. In this Letter we report the first measurement of the ionization yield (Qy), detected electrons per unit energy, resulting from nuclear recoils in liquid argon, measured at 6.7 keV. This is also the lowest energy measurement of nuclear recoils in liquid argon.

  3. 3D ion velocity distribution function measurement in an electric thruster using laser induced fluorescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, P. Q.; Jarrige, J.; Cucchetti, E.; Cannat, F.; Packan, D.

    2017-09-01

    Measuring the full ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) by non-intrusive techniques can improve our understanding of the ionization processes and beam dynamics at work in electric thrusters. In this paper, a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) tomographic reconstruction technique is applied to the measurement of the IVDF in the plume of a miniature Hall effect thruster. A setup is developed to move the laser axis along two rotation axes around the measurement volume. The fluorescence spectra taken from different viewing angles are combined using a tomographic reconstruction algorithm to build the complete 3D (in phase space) time-averaged distribution function. For the first time, this technique is used in the plume of a miniature Hall effect thruster to measure the full distribution function of the xenon ions. Two examples of reconstructions are provided, in front of the thruster nose-cone and in front of the anode channel. The reconstruction reveals the features of the ion beam, in particular on the thruster axis where a toroidal distribution function is observed. These findings are consistent with the thruster shape and operation. This technique, which can be used with other LIF schemes, could be helpful in revealing the details of the ion production regions and the beam dynamics. Using a more powerful laser source, the current implementation of the technique could be improved to reduce the measurement time and also to reconstruct the temporal evolution of the distribution function.

  4. Measurement of the isomeric yield ratios of fission products with JYFLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelov, D; Hakala, J; Jokinen, A; Kolhinen, V S; Koponen, J; Lantz, M; Matteram, A; Moore, I; Penttilä, H; Pohjalainen, I; Pomp, S; Rakopoulos, V; Reponen, M; Rinta-Antilav, S; Schonnenschein, V; Simutkin, V; Solders, A; Voss, A; Äystö, J

    2014-01-01

    Several isomeric yield ratios of fission products in 25 MeV pr oton-induced fis- sion of 238 U were measured recently at the JYFLTRAP facility. The ion-g uide separator on-line method was utilized to produce radioacti ve ions. The dou- ble Penning-trap mass spectrometer was used to separate iso meric and ground states by their masses. To verify the new experimental techn ique γ -spectro- scopy method was used to obtain the same isomeric ratios.

  5. Measurement of neutron yield by 62 MeV proton beam on a thick Beryllium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba, R; Cosentino, G; Zoppo, A Del; Pietro, A Di; Figuera, P; Finocchiaro, P; Maiolino, C; Santonocito, D; Schillaci, M; Barbagallo, M; Colonna, N; Boccaccio, P; Esposito, J; Celentano, A; Osipenko, M; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Viberti, C M; Kostyukov, A

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of research on IVth generation reactors and high intensity neutron sources a low-power prototype neutron amplifier was recently proposed by INFN. It is based on a low-energy, high current proton cyclotron, whose beam, impinging on a thick Beryllium converter, produces a fast neutron spectrum. The world database on the neutron yield from thick Beryllium target in the 70 MeV proton energy domain is rather scarce. The new measurement was performed at LNS, covering a wide angular range from 0 to 150 degrees and an almost complete neutron energy interval. In this contribution the preliminary data are discussed together with the proposed ADS facility.

  6. Measurement of the parity violating asymmetry A{sub {gamma}} in n{yields}+p{yields}d+{gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, W.M. E-mail: snow@iucf.indiana.edu; Bazhenov, A.; Blessinger, C.S.; Bowman, J.D.; Chupp, T.E.; Coulter, K.P.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Gentile, T.R.; Greene, G.L.; Hansen, G.; Hogan, G.E.; Ishimoto, S.; Jones, G.L.; Knudson, J.N.; Kolomenski, E.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Leuschner, M.B.; Masaike, A.; Masuda, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Morgan, G.L.; Morimoto, K.; Morris, C.L.; Nann, H.; Penttilae, S.I.; Pirozhkov, A.; Pomeroy, V.R.; Rich, D.R.; Serebrov, A.; Sharapov, E.I.; Smith, D.A.; Smith, T.B.; Welsh, R.C.; Wietfeldt, F.E.; Wilburn, W.S.; Yuan, V.W.; Zerger, J

    2000-02-11

    The weak interaction between neutrons and protons has never been resolved experimentally. In analogy with the strong NN interaction, the weak NN interaction at low energy can be parametrized in terms of a meson exchange model with parity violating meson-nucleon couplings. Unlike the measured proton-proton weak interaction, the neutron-proton weak interaction is sensitive to the weak pion-nucleon coupling constant H{sub {pi}}{sup 1}. This coupling, which is responsible for the longest-ranged part of the weak NN interaction and is therefore an essential part of any description of weak interactions in nuclei, remains undetermined despite many years of effort. A measurement of the gamma ray directional asymmetry A{sub {gamma}} in the capture of polarized neutrons by parahydrogen has been proposed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The goal of this experiment is to determine A{sub {gamma}} with a relative standard uncertainty of <5x10{sup -9}, which is smaller than all modern predictions for the size of the asymmetry. The design of the experiment is presented, with an emphasis on the techniques used for controlling systematic errors.

  7. Simple, fast, and low-cost camera-based water content measurement with colorimetric fluorescent indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seok-Jeong; Kim, Tae-Il; Kim, Youngmi; Nam, Hyoungsik

    2018-05-01

    Recently, a simple, sensitive, and low-cost fluorescent indicator has been proposed to determine water contents in organic solvents, drugs, and foodstuffs. The change of water content leads to the change of the indicator's fluorescence color under the ultra-violet (UV) light. Whereas the water content values could be estimated from the spectrum obtained by a bulky and expensive spectrometer in the previous research, this paper demonstrates a simple and low-cost camera-based water content measurement scheme with the same fluorescent water indicator. Water content is calculated over the range of 0-30% by quadratic polynomial regression models with color information extracted from the captured images of samples. Especially, several color spaces such as RGB, xyY, L∗a∗b∗, u‧v‧, HSV, and YCBCR have been investigated to establish the optimal color information features over both linear and nonlinear RGB data given by a camera before and after gamma correction. In the end, a 2nd order polynomial regression model along with HSV in a linear domain achieves the minimum mean square error of 1.06% for a 3-fold cross validation method. Additionally, the resultant water content estimation model is implemented and evaluated in an off-the-shelf Android-based smartphone.

  8. High resolution measurements of solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence in the Fraunhofer oxigen bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, M.; Agati, G.; Cecchi, G.; Toci, G.; Mazzinghi, P.

    2017-11-01

    Spectra of solar radiance reflected by leaves close to the Fraunhofer bands show the net contribution of chlorophyll fluorescence emission which adds to the reflected solar spectra. In a laboratory experiment, a low stray light, high resolution, 0.85 m double monochromator was used to filter radiation living leaves still attached to the plant in correspondence of the 687 nm and 760 nm O2 absorption bands. Reference spectra from a non fluorescent white reference were also acquired. Acquisition was performed by a Microchannel plate (MCP) intensified diode array with 512 elements. A fit of the spectral data outside the absorption lines allowed to retrieve the spectral base-line as a function of wavelength for the reference panel and the leaf. Reflectance functions were determined extending the Plascyck equation system to all the resolved lines of the oxygen absorption bands and using the base-lines for the continuum values. Fluorescence was deduced from the same equation system, using both the measured leaf and reference radiance spectra and the leaf reflectance fitting function.

  9. A Practical Solution for 77 K Fluorescence Measurements Based on LED Excitation and CCD Array Detector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Lamb

    Full Text Available The fluorescence emission spectrum of photosynthetic microorganisms at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K provides important insights into the organization of the photosynthetic machinery of bacteria and eukaryotes, which cannot be observed at room temperature. Conventionally, to obtain such spectra, a large and costly table-top fluorometer is required. Recently portable, reliable, and largely maintenance-free instruments have become available that can be utilized to accomplish a wide variety of spectroscopy-based measurements in photosynthesis research. In this report, we show how to build such an instrument in order to record 77K fluorescence spectra. This instrument consists of a low power monochromatic light-emitting diode (LED, and a portable CCD array based spectrometer. The optical components are coupled together using a fiber optic cable, and a custom made housing that also supports a dewar flask. We demonstrate that this instrument facilitates the reliable determination of chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra for the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  10. Tracking diurnal changes of photosynthesis and evapotranspiration using fluorescence, gas exchange and hyperspectral remote sensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Zhang, L.; Guanter, L.; Huang, C.

    2017-12-01

    Photosynthesis and evapotranspiration (ET) are the two most important activities of vegetation and make a great contribution to carbon, water and energy exchanges. Remote sensing provides opportunities for monitoring these processes across time and space. This study focuses on tracking diurnal changes of photosynthesis and evapotranspiration over soybean using multiple measurement techniques. Diurnal changes of both remote sensing-based indicators, including active and passive chlorophyll fluorescence and biophysical-related parameters, including photosynthesis rate (photo) and leaf stomatal conductance (cond), were observed. Results showed that both leaf-level steady-state fluorescence (Fs) and canopy-level solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence were linearly correlated to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) during the daytime. A double-peak diurnal change curve was observed for leaf-level photo and cond but not for Fs or SIF. Photo and cond showed a strong nonlinear (second-order) correlation, indicating that photosynthesis, which might be remotely sensed by SIF, has the opportunity to track short-term changes of ET. Results presented in this report will be helpful for better understanding the relationship between remote-sensing-based indices and vegetation's biophysical processes.

  11. Sizing protein-templated gold nanoclusters by time resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleilhac, Antonin; Bertorelle, Franck; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2018-03-01

    Protein-templated gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are very attractive due to their unique fluorescence properties. A major problem however may arise due to protein structure changes upon the nucleation of an AuNC within the protein for any future use as in vivo probes, for instance. In this work, we propose a simple and reliable fluorescence based technique measuring the hydrodynamic size of protein-templated gold nanoclusters. This technique uses the relation between the time resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and the hydrodynamic volume, through the rotational correlation time. We determine the molecular size of protein-directed AuNCs, with protein templates of increasing sizes, e.g. insulin, lysozyme, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The comparison of sizes obtained by other techniques (e.g. dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering) between bare and gold clusters containing proteins allows us to address the volume changes induced either by conformational changes (for BSA) or the formation of protein dimers (for insulin and lysozyme) during cluster formation and incorporation.

  12. Measuring iron in the brain using quantitative susceptibility mapping and X-ray fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weili; Nichol, Helen; Liu, Saifeng; Cheng, Yu-Chung N; Haacke, E Mark

    2013-09-01

    Measuring iron content in the brain has important implications for a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), derived from magnetic resonance images, has been used to measure total iron content in vivo and in post mortem brain. In this paper, we show how magnetic susceptibility from QSM correlates with total iron content measured by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The relationship between susceptibility and ferritin iron was estimated at 1.10±0.08 ppb susceptibility per μg iron/g wet tissue, similar to that of iron in fixed (frozen/thawed) cadaveric brain and previously published data from unfixed brains. We conclude that magnetic susceptibility can provide a direct and reliable quantitative measurement of iron content and that it can be used clinically at least in regions with high iron content. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. L subshell fluorescent X-ray measurements to study CK transitions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For Z s above/below these rises/falls, f L 1 3 and f L 1 2 values are almost constants. f L 23 values involving no break at Z s follow the general photoionization behaviour that ionization probability is highest at the edge energy and decreases with photon energy. Yield measurements with synchrotron radiation for Dy, Ho, Lu, ...

  14. Rational perturbation of the fluorescence quantum yield in emission-tunable and predictable fluorophores (Seoul-Fluors) by a facile synthetic method involving C-H activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Joung; Kim, Eunha; Lee, Youngjun; Jo, Ala; Park, Seung Bum

    2014-01-27

    Fluorescence imaging enables the uniquely sensitive observation of functional- and molecular-recognition events in living cells. However, only a limited range of biological processes have been subjected to imaging because of the lack of a design strategy and difficulties in the synthesis of biosensors. Herein, we report a facile synthesis of emission-tunable and predictable Seoul-Fluors, 9-aryl-1,2-dihydrolopyrrolo[3,4-b]indolizin-3-ones, with various R(1) and R(2) substituents by coinage-metal-catalyzed intramolecular 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and subsequent palladium-mediated CH activation. We also showed that the quantum yields of Seoul-Fluors are controlled by the electronic nature of the substituents, which influences the extent of photoinduced electron transfer. On the basis of this understanding, we demonstrated our design strategy by the development of a Seoul-Fluor-based chemosensor 20 for reactive oxygen species that was not accessible by a previous synthetic route. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of Creative Commons the Attribution Non-Commercial NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

  15. Hyperviscous airway periciliary and mucous liquid layers in cystic fibrosis measured by confocal fluorescence photobleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derichs, Nico; Jin, Byung-Ju; Song, Yuanlin; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Verkman, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    Airway surface liquid (ASL) volume depletion and mucus accumulation occur in cystic fibrosis (CF). The ASL comprises a superficial mucus layer (ML) overlying a periciliary fluid layer (PCL) that contacts surface epithelial cells. We measured viscosity of the ML and PCL from the diffusion of FITC-dextran dissolved in the ASL of unperturbed, well-differentiated primary cultures of human bronchial epithelia grown at an air-liquid interface. Diffusion was measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, using a perfluorocarbon immersion lens and confocal fluorescence detection. Bleaching of an in-plane 6-μm-wide region was done in which diffusion coefficients were computed using solution standards of specified viscosity and finite-element computations of 2-layer dye diffusion in 3 dimensions. We found remarkably elevated viscosity in both ML and PCL of CF vs. non-CF bronchial epithelial cell cultures. Relative viscosities (with saline=1) were in the range 7–10 in the non-CF ML and PCL, and 25–30 in both ML and PCL in CF, and greatly reduced by amiloride treatment or mucin washout. These data indicate that the CF airway surface epithelium, even without hyperviscous secretions from submucosal glands, produces an intrinsically hyperviscous PCL and ML, which likely contributes to CF lung disease by impairment of mucociliary clearance. Our results challenge the view that the PCL is a relatively watery, nonviscous fluid layer in contact with a more viscous ML, and offer an explanation for CF lung disease in the gland-free lower airways.—Derichs, N., Jin, B. -J., Song, Y., Finkbeiner, W. E., Verkman, A. S. Hyperviscous airway periciliary and mucous liquid layers in cystic fibrosis measured by confocal fluorescence photobleaching. PMID:21427214

  16. Non-invasive tryptophan fluorescence measurements as a novel method of grading cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erichsen, Jesper Høiberg; Mensah, Aurore; Kessel, Line

    2017-12-01

    Development of non-invasive treatments for cataract calls for a sensitive diagnostic assay. We conducted a study to test whether the ratio of folded tryptophan to non-tryptophan fluorescence emission (F-factor) may be used for grading cataracts in human lenses. The F-factor was measured on aspirated lens material from eyes undergoing femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) and was compared to a preoperative optical grading of cataract using Scheimpflug imaging. The preoperative optical grading allocated the cataracts to 1 of 4 categories according to the density of the cataract. All cataracts were age-related. Lens material from 16 eyes of 14 patients was included in the study. Cataracts were preoperatively graded in categories 1, 2 and 3. No lenses were category 4. For nuclear cataracts mean values of F-factor were 52.9 (SD 12.2), 61.7 (SD 5.3) and 75.7 (SD 8.9) for categories 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Linear regression on F-factor as a function of preoperative grading category showed increasing values of F-factor with increasing preoperative grading category, R 2  = 0.515. Our experiment showed that preoperative optical grading of cataracts by Scheimpflug imaging may correlate to measures of tryptophan and non-tryptophan fluorescence in human lenses. Based on our results we find that measuring the ratio between tryptophan- and non-tryptophan fluorescence may be a future tool for grading cataracts, but further research is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana eBurdikova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g. pH, redox potential due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM. In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  18. SU-C-303-05: Photosensitizer Determination for PDT Using Interstitial and Surface Measurements of Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M; Finlay, J; Zhu, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Photosensitizer concentration during photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an important parameter for accurate dosimetry. Fluorescence signal can be used as a measure of photosensitizer concentration. Two methods of data acquisition were compared to an ex vivo study both for in vivo and phantom models. Methods: Fluorescence signal of commonly used photosensitizer benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) was obtained in phantoms and mouse tumors using an excitation light of 405 nm. Interstitial fluorescence signal was obtained using a side-cut fiber inserted into the tumor tissue of interest. Using a previously developed multi-fiber probe, tumor surface fluorescence measurements were also collected. Signals were calibrated according to optical phantoms with known sensitizer fluorescence. Optical properties for each sample were determined and the influence of different absorption and scattering properties on the fluorescence signals was investigated. Using single value decomposition of the spectra, the sensitizer concentration was determined using the two different measurement geometries. An ex vivo analysis was also performed for tumor samples to determine the sensitizer concentration. Results: The two fluorescence signals obtained from the surface multi-fiber probe and the interstitial measurements were compared and were corresponding for both phantoms and mouse models. The values obtained were comparable to the ex vivo measurements as well. Despite the difference in geometry, the surface probe measurements can still be used as a metric for determining the presence of sensitizer in small volume tumors. Conclusion: The multi-fiber contact probe can be used as a tool to measure fluorescence at the surface of the treatment area for PDT and predict sensitizer concentration throughout the tumor. This is advantageous in that the measurement does not damage any tissue. Future work will include investigating the dependence of these results on intratumor sensitizer

  19. Development of a fluorescent method for simultaneous measurement of glucose concentrations in interstitial fluid and blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Ting; Li, Dachao; Li, Guoqing; Xu, Kexin; Chen, Limin; Lin, Yuan; Lu, Luo

    2013-01-01

    Continuous blood glucose monitoring is of great clinical significance to patients with diabetes. One of the effective methods to monitor blood glucose is to measure glucose concentrations of interstitial fluid (ISF). However, a time-delay problem exists between ISF and blood glucose concentrations, which results in difficulty in indicating real-time blood glucose concentrations. Therefore, we developed a fluorescent method to verify the accuracy and reliability of simultaneous ISF and blood glucose measurement, especially incorporating it into research on the delay relationship between blood and ISF glucose changes. This method is based on a competitive reaction among borate polymer, alizarin and glucose. When glucose molecules combine with borate polymers in alizarin–borate polymer competitively, changes in fluorescence intensity demonstrate changes in glucose concentrations. By applying the measured results to the blood and ISF glucose delay relationship, we were able to calculate the time delay as an average of 2.16 ± 2.05 min for ISF glucose changes with reference to blood glucose concentrations. (paper)

  20. Measurement of titanium and molybdenum in special steels and alloys using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasany, S.M.; Khan, A.A.; Rehman, H.

    1998-01-01

    An X-ray fluorescence spectrometric multivariable regression procedure is described for the determination of titanium and molybdenum in special steels and alloys in the concentration range from 9.41% down to 120 μg/g using Ti Kα 1,2 and Mo Kα 1,2 analyte lines. In general, better results have been achieved in first order base curve polynomials using LiF (200) crystal in combination with scintillation counter (SC) or krypton proportional counter (KPC). However, LiF (220) + SC combination also yields favorable results for Mo. The measured concentrations of Ti and Mo for BAS alloy steel standards agree very well with their certified values. The automated XRFS method for the determination of Ti and Mo appears to be free from matrix effects and is suitable for their measurement in special steels and alloys down to 120 μg/g concentration of Ti with a precision of 3.2% and an accuracy of ±2.5% and for Mo down to 350 μg/g with a precision of <1% and an accuracy of ±1.1%. The sensitivities for these lowest concentrations are calculated to be 5960 counts/mass %/s and 8000 count/mass %/s for Ti and Mo, respectively. (author)

  1. Development of a 2D temperature measurement technique for combustion diagnostics using 2-line atomic fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstroem, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the development and application of a novel planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for temperature measurements in a variety of combusting flows. Accurate measurement of temperature is an essential task in combustion diagnostics, since temperature is one of the most fundamental quantities for the characterization of combustion processes. The technique is based on two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) from small quantities of atomic indium (In) seeded into the fuel. It has been developed from small-scale experiments in laboratory flames to the point where practical combustion systems can be studied. The technique is conceptually simple and reveals temperature information in the post-flame regions. The viability of the technique has been tested in three extreme measurement situations: in spark ignition engine combustion, in ultra-lean combustion situations such as lean burning aero-engine concepts and, finally, in fuel-rich combustion. TLAF was successfully applied in an optical Sl engine using isooctane as fuel. The wide temperature sensitivity, 700 - 3000 K, of the technique using indium atoms allowed measurements over the entire combustion cycle in the engine to be performed. In applications in lean combustion a potential problem caused by the strong oxidation processes of indium atoms was encountered. This limits measurement times due to deposits of absorbing indium oxide on measurement windows. The seeding requirement is a disadvantage of the technique and can be a limitation in some applications. The results from experiments performed in sooting flames are very promising for thermometry measurements in such environments. Absorption by hydrocarbons and other native species was found to be negligible. Since low laser energies and low seeding concentrations could be used, the technique did not, unlike most other incoherent optical thermometry techniques, suffer interferences from LII of soot particles or LIF from PAH

  2. Measurements of a potential interference with laser-induced fluorescence measurements of ambient OH from the ozonolysis of biogenic alkenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickly, Pamela; Stevens, Philip S.

    2018-01-01

    Reactions of the hydroxyl radical (OH) play a central role in the chemistry of the atmosphere, and measurements of its concentration can provide a rigorous test of our understanding of atmospheric oxidation. Several recent studies have shown large discrepancies between measured and modeled OH concentrations in forested areas impacted by emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), where modeled concentrations were significantly lower than measurements. A potential reason for some of these discrepancies involves interferences associated with the measurement of OH using the laser-induced fluorescence-fluorescence assay by gas expansion (LIF-FAGE) technique in these environments. In this study, a turbulent flow reactor operating at atmospheric pressure was coupled to a LIF-FAGE cell and the OH signal produced from the ozonolysis of α-pinene, β-pinene, ocimene, isoprene, and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) was measured. To distinguish between OH produced from the ozonolysis reactions and any OH artifact produced inside the LIF-FAGE cell, an external chemical scrubbing technique was used, allowing for the direct measurement of any interference. An interference under high ozone (between 2 × 1013 and 10 × 1013 cm-3) and BVOC concentrations (between approximately 0.1 × 1012 and 40 × 1012 cm-3) was observed that was not laser generated and was independent of the ozonolysis reaction time. For the ozonolysis of α- and β-pinene, the observed interference accounted for approximately 40 % of the total OH signal, while for the ozonolysis of ocimene the observed interference accounted for approximately 70 % of the total OH signal. Addition of acetic acid to the reactor eliminated the interference, suggesting that the source of the interference in these experiments involved the decomposition of stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCIs) inside the FAGE detection cell. Extrapolation of these measurements to ambient concentrations suggests that these interferences

  3. The neutron-proton charge-exchange amplitudes measured in the dp {yields} ppn reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Chiladze, D. [Tbilisi State University, High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi (Georgia); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Centre for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Barsov, S.; Dzyuba, A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, High Energy Physics Department, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Carbonell, J. [Universite Paris-Sud, IN2P3-CNRS, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay Cedex (France); Dymov, S. [JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Dubna (Russian Federation); Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut II, Erlangen (Germany); Engels, R.; Gebel, R.; Hartmann, M.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Lehrach, A.; Lorentz, B.; Maier, R.; Ohm, H.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Serdyuk, V.; Seyfarth, H.; Stein, H.J.; Stockhorst, H.; Stroeher, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Centre for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Glagolev, V. [JINR, Laboratory of High Energies, Dubna (Russian Federation); Grigoryev, K.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Mikirtychyants, S.; Valdau, Yu. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Centre for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, High Energy Physics Department, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Goslawski, P.; Khoukaz, A.; Mielke, M.; Papenbrock, M. [Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Keshelashvili, I. [Tbilisi State University, High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi (Georgia); University of Basel, Department of Physics, Basel (Switzerland); Komarov, V.; Kulikov, A. [JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kulessa, P. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Krakow (Poland); Lomidze, N.; Nioradze, M.; Tabidze, M. [Tbilisi State University, High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi (Georgia); Macharashvili, G. [Tbilisi State University, High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi (Georgia); JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Dubna (Russian Federation); Merzliakov, S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Centre for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Dubna (Russian Federation); Steffens, E. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut II, Erlangen (Germany); Trusov, S. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Institut fuer Kern- und Hadronenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Uzikov, Yu. [JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Dubna (Russian Federation); M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wilkin, C. [UCL, Physics and Astronomy Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    The unpolarised differential cross section and the two deuteron tensor analysing powers A{sub xx} and A{sub yy} of the vector dp {yields} {l_brace}pp{r_brace}{sub s}n charge-exchange reaction have been measured with the ANKE spectrometer at the COSY storage ring. Using deuteron beams with energies 1.2, 1.6, 1.8, and 2.27GeV, data were obtained for small momentum transfers to a {l_brace}pp{r_brace}{sub s} system with low excitation energy. The results at the three lower energies are consistent with impulse approximation predictions based upon the current knowledge of the neutron-proton amplitudes. However, at 2.27GeV, where these amplitudes are far more uncertain, agreement requires a reduction in the overall double-spin-flip contribution, with an especially significant effect in the longitudinal direction. These conclusions are supported by measurements of the deuteron-proton spin-correlation parameters C{sub x,x} and C{sub y,y} that were carried out in the vector dvector p {yields} {l_brace}pp{r_brace}{sub s}n reaction at 1.2 and 2.27GeV. The values obtained for the proton analysing power A{sub y}{sup p} also suggest the need for a radical re-evaluation of the neutron-proton elastic scattering amplitudes at the higher energy. It is therefore clear that such measurements can provide a valuable addition to the neutron-proton database in the charge-exchange region. (orig.)

  4. Defining Primary Care Shortage Areas: Do GIS-based Measures Yield Different Results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Michael R; Mellor, Jennifer M; Millones, Marco

    2018-02-12

    To examine whether geographic information systems (GIS)-based physician-to-population ratios (PPRs) yield determinations of geographic primary care shortage areas that differ from those based on bounded-area PPRs like those used in the Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) designation process. We used geocoded data on primary care physician (PCP) locations and census block population counts from 1 US state to construct 2 shortage area indicators. The first is a bounded-area shortage indicator defined without GIS methods; the second is a GIS-based measure that measures the populations' spatial proximity to PCP locations. We examined agreement and disagreement between bounded shortage areas and GIS-based shortage areas. Bounded shortage area indicators and GIS-based shortage area indicators agree for the census blocks where the vast majority of our study populations reside. Specifically, 95% and 98% of the populations in our full and urban samples, respectively, reside in census blocks where the 2 indicators agree. Although agreement is generally high in rural areas (ie, 87% of the rural population reside in census blocks where the 2 indicators agree), agreement is significantly lower compared to urban areas. One source of disagreement suggests that bounded-area measures may "overlook" some shortages in rural areas; however, other aspects of the HPSA designation process likely mitigate this concern. Another source of disagreement arises from the border-crossing problem, and it is more prevalent. The GIS-based PPRs we employed would yield shortage area determinations that are similar to those based on bounded-area PPRs defined for Primary Care Service Areas. Disagreement rates were lower than previous studies have found. © 2018 National Rural Health Association.

  5. Automated sorting of polymer flakes: fluorescence labeling and development of a measurement system prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, S; Fomin, P; Kargel, Ch

    2015-04-01

    The extensive demand and use of plastics in modern life is associated with a significant economical impact and a serious ecological footprint. The production of plastics involves a high energy consumption and CO2 emission as well as the large need for (limited) fossil resources. Due to the high durability of plastics, large amounts of plastic garbage is mounting in overflowing landfills (plus 9.6 million tons in Europe in the year 2012) and plastic debris is floating in the world oceans or waste-to-energy combustion releases even more CO2 plus toxic substances (dioxins, heavy metals) to the atmosphere. The recycling of plastic products after their life cycle can obviously contribute a great deal to the reduction of the environmental and economical impacts. In order to produce high-quality recycling products, mono-fractional compositions of waste polymers are required. However, existing measurement technologies such as near infrared spectroscopy show limitations in the sorting of complex mixtures and different grades of polymers, especially when black plastics are involved. More recently invented technologies based on mid-infrared, Raman spectroscopy or laser-aided spectroscopy are still under development and expected to be rather expensive. A promising approach to put high sorting purities into practice is to label plastic resins with unique combinations of fluorescence markers (tracers). These are incorporated into virgin resins during the manufacturing process at the ppm (or sub ppm) concentration level, just large enough that the fluorescence emissions can be detected with sensitive instrumentation but neither affect the visual appearance nor the mechanical properties of the polymers. In this paper we present the prototype of a measurement and classification system that identifies polymer flakes (mill material of a few millimeters size) located on a conveyor belt in real time based on the emitted fluorescence of incorporated markers. Classification performance

  6. Demonstration of a transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence measurement for a realistic radioactive waste canister scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angell, C.T.; Hajima, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Karwowski, H.J.; Silano, J.

    2015-01-01

    Transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a promising method for precision non-destructive assay (NDA) of fissile isotopes—including 239 Pu—in spent fuel while inside a storage canister. The assay, however, could be confounded by the presence of overlapping resonances from competing isotopes in the canister. A measurement is needed to demonstrate that transmission NRF is unaffected by the shielding material. To this end, we carried out a transmission NRF measurement using a mono-energetic γ-ray beam on a proxy target (Al) and absorbing material simulating a realistic spent fuel storage canister. Similar amounts of material as would be found in a possible spent fuel storage canister were placed upstream: concrete, stainless steel (SS 304), lead (as a proxy for U), and water. An Al absorption target was also used as a reference. These measurements demonstrated that the canister material should not significantly influence the non-destructive assay

  7. The 2010 Russian Drought Impact on Satellite Measurements of Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence: Insights from Modeling and Comparisons with the Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Y.; Joiner, J.; Tucker, C.; Berry, J.; Lee, J. -E.; Walker, G.; Reichle, R.; Koster, R.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We examine satellite-based measurements of chlorophyll solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) over the region impacted by the Russian drought and heat wave of 2010. Like the popular Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) that has been used for decades to measure photosynthetic capacity, SIF measurements are sensitive to the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically-active radiation (fPAR). However, in addition, SIF is sensitive to the fluorescence yield that is related to the photosynthetic yield. Both SIF and NDVI from satellite data show drought-related declines early in the growing season in 2010 as compared to other years between 2007 and 2013 for areas dominated by crops and grasslands. This suggests an early manifestation of the dry conditions on fPAR. We also simulated SIF using a global land surface model driven by observation-based meteorological fields. The model provides a reasonable simulation of the drought and heat impacts on SIF in terms of the timing and spatial extents of anomalies, but there are some differences between modeled and observed SIF. The model may potentially be improved through data assimilation or parameter estimation using satellite observations of SIF (as well as NDVI). The model simulations also offer the opportunity to examine separately the different components of the SIF signal and relationships with Gross Primary Productivity (GPP).

  8. Measurement [Gamma](Z[sup 0] [yields]b anti b)/[Gamma](Z[sup 0 ][yields]hadrons) using impact parameters and leptons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, R.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Astbury, A.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Banks, J.; Barlow, R.J.; Barnett, S.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Beaudoin, G.; Beck, A.; Beck, G.A.; Becker, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bella, G.; Bentkowski, P.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Boden, B.; Bosch, H.M.; Boutemeur, M.; Breuker, H.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R.M.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Chu, S.L.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clayton, J.C.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooper, M.; Coupland, M.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.M.; De Jong, S.; Del Pozo, L.A.; Deng, H.; Dieckmann, A.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M.S.; Do Couto e Silva, E.; Duboscq, J.E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Dumas, D.J.P.; Elcombe, P.A.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbro, B.; Fierro, M.; Fincke-; OPAL Collaboration

    1994-02-01

    A measurement of [Gamma]sub(b anti b)/[Gamma][sub had] triple bond [Gamma](Z[sup 0][yields]b anti b)/[Gamma] (Z[sup 0][yields]hadrons) is presented using a 'mixed tag' method involving the identification of Z[sup 0][yields]b anti b events by two different techniques. The first uses the large impact parameter of tracks emerging from the decay of b-flavoured hadrons and the second their semi-leptonic decay. The identification efficiencies are measured from the data using all possible combinations of the two tags in opposite hemispheres. The method is therefore insensitive to Monte Carlo modelling of bottom quark production and of b-flavoured hadron production and decay properties, and depends only weakly on the simulation of the detector. The data sample collected by OPAL at LEP in 1990 and 1991 is considered. The result is: [Gamma]sub(b anti b)/[Gamma][sub had]=0.218[+-]0.006(stat)[+-]0.007(syst)[+-]0.007([Gamma]sub(c anti c)/[Gamma][sub had]), where the systematic uncertainty due to the charm quark partial width has been separated from the other systematic uncertainties. Combination with previous OPAL measurements gives: [Gamma]sub(b anti b)/[Gamma][sub had]=0.220[+-]0.004(stat)[+-]0.006(syst)[+-]0.006([Gamma]sub(c anti c)/[Gamma][sub had]). (orig.)

  9. The photoneutron yield predictions by PICA and comparison with the measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Job, P.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gabriel, T.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The photoneutron yields at higher photon energies have become very important since the advent of high energy electron accelerators. Bremsstrahlung is produced when the particle beam interacts with the storage-ring components or residual-gas molecules in the storage-ring vacuum. Bremsstrahlung thus produced interacts with the high-Z materials in the beamline like the beam dumps and collimators to produce photoneutrons. There are three modes of neutron production by bremsstrahlung. At low energies ({>=}525 MeV), photons are absorbed by the dipole interaction and the compound nucleus thus formed decays emitting protons and neutrons and other heavier particles. At higher energies ({>=}25 MeV), photon interacts with the nucleus through absorption on a quasi-deuteron, which subsequently decays producing a neutron and proton pair which can interact with the rest of the nucleus. At still higher energies the photopion production becomes possible and competes with the quasi-deuteron process. In this paper we have calculated the photoneutron yield from a thick copper target using the photonuclear interaction code PICA. Using this as the neutron source, we have calculated the dose rates through heavy concrete and compared it with the measurements made at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Lab.

  10. Annual laminae as measured using fluorescence in historic stalagmites from Baradla Cave, Aggtelek National Park, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beynen, P.; Ford, D.; Schwarcz, H.

    2012-04-01

    capture delayed fluorescence. Experiments determined that there was negligible phosphorescence, that results were reproducible and were not affected by the grain of the film. Images were imported into IP-LAB Spectrum for data retrieval. They displayed strong couplet development with repeated layers of high-low fluorescence. Assuming that each couplet represents one climatic year, Sample AGG-1 was 165 years in age when collected; i.e. it commenced growing in 1827 CE. The true base of Sample AGG-2 was destroyed in extraction; it yielded an age of 156 years. Both are in excellent agreement with the expected ages. Correlation of fluorescence intensity and derived laminae thickness between the two samples is also excellent when fitted with a three-year running mean to avoid misallocation of individual years. Interannual fluorescence intensity grew slightly between ~1830 and 1900 CE, then was stable until minor decline commenced after 1970. Annual calcite lamina generally range between 0.5 and 1.0 mm in thickness in AGG-1 after 1900 CE, slightly less before that time. Thicknesses in AGG-2 follow the same trend but are consistently 0.1 -0.2 mm thinner. There is little correlation with the matching mean temperature and precipitation records from a nearby meteorological station that began operating in 1962. Relationships with much lengthier meteorological records from Miskolc and Budapest are being investigated.

  11. Guided fluorescence diagnosis of childhood caries: preliminary measures correlate with depth of carious decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshchuk, Mari-Alina; Zhang, Liang; Dickinson, Brian A.; Ridge, Jeremy S.; Kim, Amy S.; Baltuck, Camille T.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-02-01

    The current rise in childhood caries worldwide has increased the demand for portable technologies that can quickly and accurately detect and diagnose early stage carious lesions. These lesions, if identified at an early stage, can be reversed with remineralization treatments, education, and improvements in home care. A multi-modal optical prototype for detecting and diagnosing occlusal caries demineralization in vivo has been developed and pilot tested. The device uses a 405-nm laser as a scanned illumination source to obtain high resolution and high surface contrast reflectance images, which allows the user to quickly image and screen for any signs of demineralized enamel. When a suspicious region is located, the device can be switched to perform dual laser fluorescence spectroscopy using 405-nm and 532-nm laser excitations. These spectra are used to compute an auto-fluorescence (AF) ratio of the suspicious region and the percent difference of AF ratios from a healthy region of the same tooth. The device was tested on 7 children's teeth in vivo with clinically diagnosed carious lesions. Lesion depth was then visually estimated from the video image using the 405-nm scanned light source, and within a month the maximum drill depth was assessed by a clinician. The researcher and clinicians were masked from previous measurements in a blinded study protocol. Preliminary results show that the ratiometric percent difference measurement of the AF spectrum of the tooth correlates with the severity of the demineralization as assessed by the clinician after drilling.

  12. Measurements of neutron yields and radioactive isotope transmutation in collisions of relativistic ions with heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.

    1999-01-01

    The paper is based on the report presented at the 85th Session of the JINR Scientific Council. Some aspects of experimental studies of the problem of reprocessing radioactive wastes by means of transmutation in the fields of neutrons generated by relativistic particle beams are discussed. Research results on measurement of neutron yields in heavy targets irradiated with protons at energies up to 3.7 GeV as well as transmutation cross sections of some fission products (I-129) and actinides (Np-237) using radiochemical methods, activation detectors, solid state nuclear track detectors and other methods are presented. Experiments have been performed at the accelerator complex of the Laboratory of High Energies, JINR. Analogous results obtained by other research groups are also discussed

  13. Measurements of {Gamma}(Z{sup O} {yields} b{bar b})/{Gamma}(Z{sup O} {yields} hadrons) using the SLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, H.A. Jr. II

    1995-07-01

    The quantity R{sub b} = {Gamma}(Z{sup o} {yields}b{bar b})/{Gamma}(Z{sup o} {yields} hadrons) is a sensitive measure of corrections to the Zbb vertex. The precision necessary to observe the top quark mass dependent corrections is close to being achieved. LEP is already observing a 1.8{sigma} deviation from the Standard Model prediction. Knowledge of the top quark mass combined with the observation of deviations from the Standard Model prediction would indicate new physics. Models which include charged Higgs or light SUSY particles yield predictions for R{sub b} appreciably different from the Standard Model. In this thesis two independent methods are used to measure R{sub b}. One uses a general event tag which determines R{sub b} from the rate at which events are tagged as Z{sup o} {yields} b{bar b} in data and the estimated rates at which various flavors of events are tagged from the Monte Carlo. The second method reduces the reliance on the Monte Carlo by separately tagging each hemisphere as containing a b-decay. The rates of single hemisphere tagged events and both hemisphere tagged events are used to determine the tagging efficiency for b-quarks directly from the data thus eliminating the main sources of systematic error present in the event tag. Both measurements take advantage of the unique environment provided by the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) and the SLAC Large Detector (SLD). From the event tag a result of R{sub b} = 0.230{plus_minus}0.004{sub statistical}{plus_minus}0.013{sub systematic} is obtained. The higher precision hemisphere tag result obtained is R{sub b} = 0.218{plus_minus}0.004{sub statistical}{plus_minus}0.004{sub systematic}{plus_minus}0.003{sub Rc}.

  14. Measurement of radical-species concentrations and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in flames by fluorescence and absorption using a tunable dye laser. Progress report, March 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucht, R.P.; Sweeney, D.W.; Laurendeau, N.M.

    1981-03-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of OH saturated fluorescence is described. The goal of the research is to develop a saturated fluorescence technique which will yield accurate molecular number densities over a wide range of flame pressure, temperature, and composition. Experimentally, OH is excited by a ten nanosecond pulse from a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser tuned to an isolated rotational transition in the (0,0) band of the A/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/-X/sup 2/ pi electronic system. The resulting fluorescence signal is resolved both spectrally and temporally. Total OH number densities are calculated by collecting fluorescence from the directly excited upper rotational level, and using the balanced cross-rate model to analyze the experimental data. Fluorescence measurements of OH number density agree to within a factor of three with the results of independent OH absorption measurements. Significantly, the ratio of the fluorescence signal to the number density measured by absorption is nearly the same in 30, 100 and 250 torr H/sub 2//O/sub 2//N/sub 2/ flat flames, demonstrating the insensitivity of the saturated fluorescence signal to the quenching environment of the radical. Collisional transfer in excited OH is studied by recording the time development of OH fluorescence spectrum. The experimental spectra are compared with the results of time-dependent computer modeling. By varying rotational transfer rates until the calculated and experimental spectra agree, rotational transfer cross sections can be calculated. The signal processing system was thoroughly checked by comparing the photomultiplier output to that of a fast photodiode, and by comparing single pulse Rayleigh scattering and fluorescence traces with sampling oscilloscope traces.

  15. Automatic measurement of compression wood cell attributes in fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, B; Luengo Hendriks, C L; Bardage, S; Daniel, G; Borgefors, G

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a new automated method for analyzing compression wood fibers in fluorescence microscopy. Abnormal wood known as compression wood is present in almost every softwood tree harvested. Compression wood fibers show a different cell wall morphology and chemistry compared to normal wood fibers, and their mechanical and physical characteristics are considered detrimental for both construction wood and pulp and paper purposes. Currently there is the need for improved methodologies for characterization of lignin distribution in wood cell walls, such as from compression wood fibers, that will allow for a better understanding of fiber mechanical properties. Traditionally, analysis of fluorescence microscopy images of fiber cross-sections has been done manually, which is time consuming and subjective. Here, we present an automatic method, using digital image analysis, that detects and delineates softwood fibers in fluorescence microscopy images, dividing them into cell lumen, normal and highly lignified areas. It also quantifies the different areas, as well as measures cell wall thickness. The method is evaluated by comparing the automatic with a manual delineation. While the boundaries between the various fiber wall regions are detected using the automatic method with precision similar to inter and intra expert variability, the position of the boundary between lumen and the cell wall has a systematic shift that can be corrected. Our method allows for transverse structural characterization of compression wood fibers, which may allow for improved understanding of the micro-mechanical modeling of wood and pulp fibers. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health.

  16. Problems of exposure measurement with extended sources. Case of X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, J.L.

    A number of problems involved in the measurement of exposure rates in X-ray or gamma-ray beams from extended sources were studied. A mathematical model simulating an experimental device producing practically monoenergetic X-ray beams (X-ray fluorescence method) was developed. The theoretical results were in good agreement with experimental data previously published. From this theoretical analogy, it was possible to determine the influence of various parameters of a free-air ionization chamber, and several corrective coefficients were evaluated and measured. The experiments were performed with a mesh-grid free-air chamber especially fitted to wide beams. The results were compared with those of cavity chambers used in the same expermental conditions [fr

  17. Parallel ion flow velocity measurement using laser induced fluorescence method in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Okamoto, Atsushi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Ogiwara, Kohei; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi

    2010-01-01

    Parallel ion flow velocity along a magnetic field has been measured using a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) argon plasma with a weakly-diverging magnetic field. To measure parallel flow velocity in a cylindrical plasma using the LIF method, the laser beam should be injected along device axis; however, the reflection of the incident beam causes interference between the LIF emission of the incident and reflected beams. Here we present a method of quasi-parallel laser injection at a small angle, which utilizes the reflected beam as well as the incident beam to obtain the parallel ion flow velocity. Using this method, we observed an increase in parallel ion flow velocity along the magnetic field. The acceleration mechanism is briefly discussed on the basis of the ion fluid model. (author)

  18. Measurement of mass yields from the 241Am(2nth,f reaction at the Lohengrin Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köster U.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. While the yields are known for the major actinides (235U, 239Pu in the thermal neutron-induced fission, only few measurements have been performed on 242Am. The interest of 242Am concerns the reduction of radiotoxicity of 241Am in nuclear wastes using transmutation reactions. This paper presents the measurement of the fission mass yields from the reaction 241Am(2nth,f performed at the Lohengrin mass spectrometer (ILL, France for both the light and the heavy peaks: a total of 41 mass yields have been measured. The experiment was also meant to determine whether there is a difference in mass yields between the isomeric state and the ground state as it exists in fission and capture cross sections. The method used to address this question is based on a repeated measurement of a set of fission mass yields as a function of the ratio between the 242gAm and the 242mAm fission rates. The presented experiment is also a first step towards the measurement of the isotopic fission yields of 242Am.

  19. A chlorophyll fluorescence analysis of photosynthetic efficiency, quantum yield and photon energy dissipation in PSII antennae of Lactuca sativa L. leaves exposed to cinnamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of cinnamic acid (CA) on growth, biochemical and physiological responses of Lactuca sativa L. CA (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mM) treatments decreased plant height, root length, leaf and root fresh weight, but it did not affect the leaf water status. CA treatment (1.5 mM) significantly reduced F(v), F(m), photochemical efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)) and quantum yield of PSII (ΦPSII) photochemistry in L. sativa. The photochemical fluorescence quenching (qP) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) were reduced after treatment with 1.5 mM CA. Fraction of photon energy absorbed by PS II antennae trapped by "open" PS II reaction centers (P) was reduced by CA (1.5 mM) while, portion of absorbed photon energy thermally dissipated (D) and photon energy absorbed by PSII antennae and trapped by "closed" PSII reaction centers (E) was increased. Carbon isotope composition ratios (δ(13)C) was less negative (-27.10) in CA (1.5 mM) treated plants as compared to control (-27.61). Carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C) and ratio of intercellular CO(2) concentration (ci/ca) from leaf to air were also less in CA treated plants. CA (1.5 mM) also decreased the leaf protein contents of L. sativa as compared to control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Methodology and experimental setup for measuring short-lives fission product yields in actinides induced fission by charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellido, A.V.

    1995-07-01

    The theoretical principles and the laboratory set-up for the fission products yields measurements are described. The procedures for the experimental determinations are explain in detail. (author). 43 refs., 5 figs

  1. Use of fluorescence spectroscopy to measure molecular autofluorescence in diabetic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Cinthia Zanini

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) comprises a complex metabolic syndrome, caused by reduced or absent secretion of insulin by pancreatic beta cells, leading to hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia promotes glycation of proteins and, consequently, the appearance of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Currently, diabetic patients are monitored by determining levels of glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). The complications caused by hyperglycemia may be divided into micro and macrovascular complications, represented by retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy and cardiovascular disease. Albumin (HSA) is the most abundant serum protein in the human body and is subject to glycation. The Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is the precursor molecule of heme synthesis, structural component of hemoglobin. The in vitro and animals studies have indicated that hyperglycemia promotes a decrease in its concentration in erythrocytes. The fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique widely used in biomedical field. The autofluorescence corresponds to the intrinsic fluorescence present in some molecules, this being associated with the same structure. The aim of this study was to use fluorescence spectroscopy to measure levels of erythrocyte PpIX autofluorescence and AGE-HSA in diabetic and healthy subjects and compare them with levels of blood glucose and HbA1c. This study was conducted with 151 subjects (58 controls and 93 diabetics). Epidemiological data of patients and controls were obtained from medical records. For control subjects, blood glucose levels were obtained from medical records and levels of Hb1Ac obtained by using commercial kits. The determination of the PpIX autofluorescence was performed with excitation at 405 nm and emission at 632 nm. Determination of AGE-HSA was performed with excitation at 370 nm and emission at 455 nm. Approximately 50% of diabetic had micro and macrovascular lesions resulting from hyperglycemia. There were no significant differences in the PpIX emission intensity values

  2. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Shibayama, Naoya; Okabe, Takahiro; Happo, Naohisa; Kimura, Koji; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Park, Sam-Yong; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α 2 β 2 tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm 3 ) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  3. Meaningful interpretation of subdiffusive measurements in living cells (crowded environment) by fluorescence fluctuation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Gerd; Place, Robert F; Földes-Papp, Zeno

    2010-08-01

    In living cell or its nucleus, the motions of molecules are complicated due to the large crowding and expected heterogeneity of the intracellular environment. Randomness in cellular systems can be either spatial (anomalous) or temporal (heterogeneous). In order to separate both processes, we introduce anomalous random walks on fractals that represented crowded environments. We report the use of numerical simulation and experimental data of single-molecule detection by fluorescence fluctuation microscopy for detecting resolution limits of different mobile fractions in crowded environment of living cells. We simulate the time scale behavior of diffusion times tau(D)(tau) for one component, e.g. the fast mobile fraction, and a second component, e.g. the slow mobile fraction. The less the anomalous exponent alpha the higher the geometric crowding of the underlying structure of motion that is quantified by the ratio of the Hausdorff dimension and the walk exponent d(f)/d(w) and specific for the type of crowding generator used. The simulated diffusion time decreases for smaller values of alpha # 1 but increases for a larger time scale tau at a given value of alpha # 1. The effect of translational anomalous motion is substantially greater if alpha differs much from 1. An alpha value close to 1 contributes little to the time dependence of subdiffusive motions. Thus, quantitative determination of molecular weights from measured diffusion times and apparent diffusion coefficients, respectively, in temporal auto- and crosscorrelation analyses and from time-dependent fluorescence imaging data are difficult to interpret and biased in crowded environments of living cells and their cellular compartments; anomalous dynamics on different time scales tau must be coupled with the quantitative analysis of how experimental parameters change with predictions from simulated subdiffusive dynamics of molecular motions and mechanistic models. We first demonstrate that the crowding exponent

  4. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of native and glycated human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Joshi, Virgina O. d.; Contreras, Silvia; Gil, Herminia; Medina, Honorio; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, plays an important role in the secondary complications of the diabetic pathology and aging, therefore, human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated by a conventional method in our laboratory using glucose as the glycating agent. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out with a laser strobe fluorometer equipped with a nitrogen/dye laser and a frequency doubler as a pulsed excitation source. The samples were excited at 295 nm and the emission spectra were recorded at 345 nm. The obtained decay curves were tried for double and triple exponential functions. It has been found that the shorter lifetime increases for glycated proteins as compared with that of the native ones. For example, in the case of glycated BSA the lifetime increased from 1.36 ns to 2.30 ns. Similarly, for HSA, the lifetime increases from 1.58 ns to 2.26 ns. Meanwhile, the longer lifetime changed very slightly for both proteins (from 6.52 ns to 6.72 ns). The increase in the lifetime can be associated with the environmental effect; originated from the attachment of glucose to some lysine residues. A good example is Trp 214 which is in the cage of Lys 225, Lys 212, Lys 233, Lys 205, Lys 500, Lys 199 and Lys 195. If fluorescence lifetime technique is calibrated and properly used it could be employed for assessing glycation of proteins.

  5. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp; Shibayama, Naoya, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp; Okabe, Takahiro [Division of Biophysics, Department of Physiology, Jichi Medical University, Yakushiji, Shimotsuke 329-0498 (Japan); Happo, Naohisa [Department of Computer and Network Engineering, Graduate School of Information Sciences, Hiroshima City University, Asa-Minami-Ku, Hiroshima 731-3194 (Japan); Kimura, Koji [Department of Physical Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Matsushita, Tomohiro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Park, Sam-Yong [Drug Design Laboratory, Department of Medical Life Science, Yokohama City University, Suehiro, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Sasaki, Yuji C. [Department of Advanced Material Science, Graduate School of Frontier Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); Hayashi, Kouichi, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Frontier Research Institute for Materials Science, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α{sub 2}β{sub 2} tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm{sup 3}) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  6. Measuring yield performance of upland cotton varieties using adaptability, stability and principal component analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Nine upland cotton varieties/strains were tested over 36 environments in Pakistan so as to determine their stability in yield performance. The regression coefficient (b) was used as a measure of adaptability, whereas parameters such as coefficient of determination (r2) and sum of squared deviations from regression (s/sup 2/d) were used as measure of stability. Although the regression coefficients (b) of all varieties did not deviate significantly from the unit slope, the varieties CRIS-5A. BII-89, DNH-40 and Rehmani gave b value closer to unity implying their better adaptation. Lower s/sub 2/d and higher r/sub 2/ of CRIS- 121 and DNH-40 suggest that both of these are fairly stable. The results indicate that, generally, adaptability and stability parameters are independent of each in as much as not all of the parameters simultaneously favoured one variety over the other excepting the variety DNH-40, which was stable based on majority of the parameters. Principal component analysis revealed that the first two components (latent roots) account for about 91.4% of the total variation. The latent vectors of first principal component (PCA1) were smaller and positive which also suggest that most of the varieties were quite adaptive to all of the test environments. (author)

  7. Combined fluorescence, reflectance, and ground measurements of a stressed Norway spruce forest for forest damage assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banninger, C.

    1991-01-01

    The detection and monitoring of stress and damage in forested areas is of utmost importance to forest managers for planning purposes. Remote sensing are the most suitable means to obtain this information. This requires that remote sensing data employed in a forest survey be properly chosen and utilized for their ability to measure canopy spectral features directly related to key tree and canopy properties that are indicators of forest health and vitality. Plant reflectance in the visible to short wave IR regions (400 to 2500 nm) provides information on its biochemical, biophysical, and morphological make up, whereas plant fluorescence in the 400 to 750 nm region is more indicative of the capacity and functioning of its photosynthetic apparatus. A measure of both these spectral properties can be used to provide an accurate assessment of stress and damage within the forest canopy. Foliar chlorophyll and nitrogen are essential biochemical constituents required for the proper functioning and maintenance of a plant's biological processes. Chlorophyll-a is the prime reactive center for photosynthesis, by which a plant converts CO2 and H2O into necessary plant products. Nitrogen forms an important component of the amino-acids, enzymes, proteins, alkaloids, and cyanogenic compounds that make up a plant, including its pigments. Both chlorophyll and nitrogen have characteristic absorption features in the visible to short wave IR region. By measuring the wavelength position and depth of these features and the fluorescence response of the foliage, the health and vitality of a canopy can be ascertained. Examples for a stressed Norway spruce forest in south-eastern Austria are presented.

  8. Application of fluorescent tracer agent technology to point-of-care gastrointestinal permeability measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorshow, Richard B.; Shieh, Jeng-Jong; Rogers, Thomas E.; Hall-Moore, Carla; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Talcott, Michael; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2016-03-01

    Gut dysfunction, often accompanied by increased mucosal permeability to gut contents, frequently accompanies a variety of human intestinal inflammatory conditions. These disorders include inflammatory bowel diseases (e.g., Crohn's Disease) and environmental enteropathy and enteric dysfunction, a condition strongly associated with childhood malnutrition and stunting in resource poor areas of the world. The most widely used diagnostic assay for gastrointestinal permeability is the lactulose to mannitol ratio (L:M) measurement. These sugars are administered orally, differentially absorbed by the gut, and then cleared from the body by glomerular filtration in the kidney. The amount of each sugar excreted in the urine is measured. The larger sugar, lactulose, is minimally absorbed through a healthy gut. The smaller sugar, mannitol, in contrast, is readily absorbed through both a healthy and injured gut. Thus a higher ratio of lactulose to mannitol reflects increased intestinal permeability. However, several issues prevent widespread use of the L:M ratio in clinical practice. Urine needs to be collected over time intervals of several hours, the specimen then needs to be transported to an analytical laboratory, and sophisticated equipment is required to measure the concentration of each sugar in the urine. In this presentation we show that fluorescent tracer agents with molecular weights similar to those of the sugars, selected from our portfolio of biocompatible renally cleared fluorophores, mimic the L:M ratio test for gut permeability. This fluorescent tracer agent detection technology can be used to overcome the limitations of the L:M assay, and is amenable to point-of-care clinical use.

  9. Micro-Droplet Detection Method for Measuring the Concentration of Alkaline Phosphatase-Labeled Nanoparticles in Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rufeng Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper developed and evaluated a quantitative image analysis method to measure the concentration of the nanoparticles on which alkaline phosphatase (AP was immobilized. These AP-labeled nanoparticles are widely used as signal markers for tagging biomolecules at nanometer and sub-nanometer scales. The AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration measurement can then be directly used to quantitatively analyze the biomolecular concentration. Micro-droplets are mono-dispersed micro-reactors that can be used to encapsulate and detect AP-labeled nanoparticles. Micro-droplets include both empty micro-droplets and fluorescent micro-droplets, while fluorescent micro-droplets are generated from the fluorescence reaction between the APs adhering to a single nanoparticle and corresponding fluorogenic substrates within droplets. By detecting micro-droplets and calculating the proportion of fluorescent micro-droplets to the overall micro-droplets, we can calculate the AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration. The proposed micro-droplet detection method includes the following steps: (1 Gaussian filtering to remove the noise of overall fluorescent targets, (2 a contrast-limited, adaptive histogram equalization processing to enhance the contrast of weakly luminescent micro-droplets, (3 an red maximizing inter-class variance thresholding method (OTSU to segment the enhanced image for getting the binary map of the overall micro-droplets, (4 a circular Hough transform (CHT method to detect overall micro-droplets and (5 an intensity-mean-based thresholding segmentation method to extract the fluorescent micro-droplets. The experimental results of fluorescent micro-droplet images show that the average accuracy of our micro-droplet detection method is 0.9586; the average true positive rate is 0.9502; and the average false positive rate is 0.0073. The detection method can be successfully applied to measure AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration in fluorescence microscopy.

  10. Micro-Droplet Detection Method for Measuring the Concentration of Alkaline Phosphatase-Labeled Nanoparticles in Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rufeng; Wang, Yibei; Xu, Hong; Fei, Baowei; Qin, Binjie

    2017-11-21

    This paper developed and evaluated a quantitative image analysis method to measure the concentration of the nanoparticles on which alkaline phosphatase (AP) was immobilized. These AP-labeled nanoparticles are widely used as signal markers for tagging biomolecules at nanometer and sub-nanometer scales. The AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration measurement can then be directly used to quantitatively analyze the biomolecular concentration. Micro-droplets are mono-dispersed micro-reactors that can be used to encapsulate and detect AP-labeled nanoparticles. Micro-droplets include both empty micro-droplets and fluorescent micro-droplets, while fluorescent micro-droplets are generated from the fluorescence reaction between the APs adhering to a single nanoparticle and corresponding fluorogenic substrates within droplets. By detecting micro-droplets and calculating the proportion of fluorescent micro-droplets to the overall micro-droplets, we can calculate the AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration. The proposed micro-droplet detection method includes the following steps: (1) Gaussian filtering to remove the noise of overall fluorescent targets, (2) a contrast-limited, adaptive histogram equalization processing to enhance the contrast of weakly luminescent micro-droplets, (3) an red maximizing inter-class variance thresholding method (OTSU) to segment the enhanced image for getting the binary map of the overall micro-droplets, (4) a circular Hough transform (CHT) method to detect overall micro-droplets and (5) an intensity-mean-based thresholding segmentation method to extract the fluorescent micro-droplets. The experimental results of fluorescent micro-droplet images show that the average accuracy of our micro-droplet detection method is 0.9586; the average true positive rate is 0.9502; and the average false positive rate is 0.0073. The detection method can be successfully applied to measure AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration in fluorescence microscopy.

  11. Analytical model to describe fluorescence spectra of normal and preneoplastic epithelial tissue: comparison with Monte Carlo simulations and clinical measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sung K; Arifler, Dizem; Drezek, Rebekah; Follen, Michele; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has shown promise for the detection of precancerous changes in vivo. The epithelial and stromal layers of tissue have very different optical properties; the albedo is relatively low in the epithelium and approaches one in the stroma. As precancer develops, the optical properties of the epithelium and stroma are altered in markedly different ways: epithelial scattering and fluorescence increase, and stromal scattering and fluorescence decrease. We present an analytical model of the fluorescence spectrum of a two-layer medium such as epithelial tissue. Our hypothesis is that accounting for the two different tissue layers will provide increased diagnostic information when used to analyze tissue fluorescence spectra measured in vivo. The Beer-Lambert law is used to describe light propagation in the epithelial layer, while light propagation in the highly scattering stromal layer is described with diffusion theory. Predictions of the analytical model are compared to results from Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation under a range of optical properties reported for normal and precancerous epithelial tissue. In all cases, the mean square error between the Monte Carlo simulations and the analytical model are within 15%. Finally, model predictions are compared to fluorescence spectra of normal and precancerous cervical tissue measured in vivo; the lineshape of fluorescence agrees well in both cases, and the decrease in fluorescence intensity from normal to precancerous tissue is correctly predicted to within 5%. Future work will explore the use of this model to extract information about changes in epithelial and stromal optical properties from clinical measurements and the diagnostic value of these parameters. (c) 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  12. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  13. Measurement of uranium quantities by fluorescence-X using neuronal techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneron, V.; Martinez, J.M.; Simon, A.C.; Junca, R.

    1995-01-01

    Layered neural networks are a class of models based on neural computation in biological systems. Connexionists models are made of a large number of simple computing structures, highly interconnected. The weights assigned to the connections enable the encoding of the knowledge required for a task. They can be trained to learn any input-output relation after selecting a suitable architecture. This method appears useful in those cases in which a simple operation and a fast response are needed, together with a reasonable accuracy. They are applied here to the automatic analysis of X-ray fluorescence spectra, obtained with plastic bottles irradiate by collimated beam of photons, emitted by a sealed source of iridium. The method could allow the surveillance of the measurement of uranium quantities in nuclear fuel cycles in processing plants. (authors). 11 refs., 4 figs

  14. Thyroid iodine content measured by x-ray fluorescence in amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis: concise communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leger, A.F.; Fragu, P.; Rougier, P.; Laurent, M.F.; Tubiana, M.; Savole, J.C.

    1983-07-01

    Iodine-induced thyrotoxicosis (IiT) is characterized by (a) a low radioiodine uptake, increased by exogenous TSH, and (b) a spontaneous evolution towards cure within a few months. An hypothetical pathogenesis of IiT is an initial inflation in the stores of thyroid hormones during iodine excess, followed by their sudden discharge into the circulation. Thyroid iodine content was measured by fluorescent scanning in 10 patients with amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis and in various control groups. Results were found to be high at the onset of the disease and to decrease during its course. The data agree with the hypothetical pathogenesis. Furthermore they may permit exclusion of a painless subacute thyroiditis, which is the main differential diagnosis of IiT.

  15. Comparison of the rate constants for energy transfer in the light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin, calculated from Foerster`s theory and experimentally measured by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, Martin Paul [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    We have measured and assigned rate constants for energy transfer between chromophores in the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric and trimeric aggregation states, isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. In order to compare the measured rate constants with those predicted by Fdrster`s theory of inductive resonance in the weak coupling limit, we have experimentally resolved several properties of the three chromophore types ({beta}{sub 155} {alpha}{sub 84}, {beta}{sub 84}) found in PC monomers, including absorption and fluorescence spectra, extinction coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore, was, useful in effecting the resolution of the chromophore properties and in assigning the experimentally observed rate constants for energy transfer to specific pathways.

  16. Measurement of fission yields far from the center of isotopic distributions in the thermal neutron fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmid, M.

    1979-08-01

    The main purpose of this work was to measure independent yields, in the thermal neutron fission of 235 U, of fission products which lie far from the centers of the isotopic and isobaric yield distributions. These measurements were used to test the predictions of semi-empirical systematics of fission yields and theoretical fission models. Delay times were measured as a function of temperature in the range 1200-2000degC. The very low delay times achieved in the present work permitted expanding the measurable region to the isotopes 147 , 148 Cs and 99 Rb which are of special interest in the present work. The delay times of Sr and Ba isotopes achieved were more than two orders of magnitude lower than values reported in the literature and thus short-lived isotopes of these elements could be separated for the first time by mass spectrometry. The half-lives of 147 Ba, 148 Ba, 149 La and 149 Ce were measured for the first time. The isotopic distributions of fission yields were measured for the elements Rb, Sr, Cs and Ba in the thermal neutron fission of 235 U, those of 99 Rb, 147 Cs and 148 Cs having been measured for the first time. A comparison of the experimental yields with the predictions of the currently accepted semi-empirical systematics of fission yields, which is the odd-even effect systematics, shows that the systematics succeeds in accounting for the strong odd-even proton effect and the weaker odd-even neutron effect and also in predicting the shape of the distributions in the central region. It is shown that prompt neutron emission broadens the distribution only slightly in the wing of heavy isotopes and more significantly in the wing of light isotopes. But the effect of prompt neutron emission cannot explain the large discrepancies existing between the predictions of fission models and the experimentally measured fission yield in the wings of the isotopic distributions. (B.G.)

  17. Laser Induced Fluorescence Measurements in a Hall Thruster Plume as a Function of Background Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spektor, R.; Tighe, W. G.; Kamhawi, H.

    2016-01-01

    A set of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurements in the near-field region of the NASA- 173M Hall thruster plume is presented at four background pressure conditions varying from 9.4 x 10(exp -6) torr to 3.3 x 10(exp -5) torr. The xenon ion velocity distribution function was measured simultaneously along the axial and radial directions. An ultimate exhaust velocity of 19.6+/-0.25 km/s achieved at a distance of 20 mm was measured, and that value was not sensitive to pressure. On the other hand, the ion axial velocity at the thruster exit was strongly influenced by pressure, indicating that the accelerating electric field moved inward with increased pressure. The shift in electric field corresponded to an increase in measured thrust. Pressure had a minor effect on the radial component of ion velocity, mainly affecting ions exiting close to the channel inner wall. At that radial location the radial component of ion velocity was approximately 1000 m/s greater at the lowest pressure than at the highest pressure. A reduction of the inner magnet coil current by 0.6 A resulted in a lower axial ion velocity at the channel exit while the radial component of ion velocity at the channel inner wall location increased by 1300 m/s, and at the channel outer wall location the radial ion velocity remained unaffected. The ultimate exhaust velocity was not significantly affected by the inner magnet current.

  18. Effect of the sample matrix on measurement uncertainty in X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, P.; Brueggemann, L.; Wennrich, R.

    2005-01-01

    The estimation of measurement uncertainty, with reference to univariate calibration functions, is discussed in detail in the Eurachem Guide 'Quantifying Uncertainty in Analytical Measurement'. The adoption of these recommendations to quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) involves basic problems which are above all due to the strong influence of the sample matrix on the analytical response. In XRF-analysis, the proposed recommendations are consequently applicable only to the matrix corrected response. The application is also restricted with regard to both the matrices and analyte concentrations. In this context the present studies are aimed at the problems to predict measurement uncertainty also with reference to more variable sample compositions. The corresponding investigations are focused on the use of the intensity of the Compton scattered tube line as an internal standard to assess the effect of the individual sample matrix on the analytical response relatively to a reference matrix. Based on this concept the estimation of the measurement uncertainty of an analyte presented in an unknown specimen can be predicted in consideration of the data obtained under defined matrix conditions

  19. Development of an in situ polarization-dependent total-reflection fluorescence XAFS measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, W J; Tanizawa, Y; Shido, T; Iwasawa, Y; Nomura, M; Asakura, K

    2001-03-01

    An in situ polarization-dependent total-reflection fluorescence X-ray absorption fine structure (PTRF-XAFS) spectroscopy system has been developed, which enables PTRF-XAFS experiments to be performed in three different orientations at various temperatures (273-600 K) and pressures (10(-10) approximately 760 torr). The system consists of a measurement chamber and a preparation chamber. The measurement chamber has a high-precision six-axis goniometer and a multielement solid-state detector. Using a transfer chamber, also operated under ultra-high-vacuum conditions, the sample can be transferred to the measurement chamber from the preparation chamber, which possesses low-energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy facilities, as well as a sputtering gun and an annealing system. The in situ PTRF-EXAFS for Cu species on TiO2 (110) has been measured in three different orientations, revealing anisotropic growth of Cu under the influence of the TiO2 (110) surface.

  20. Ultraviolet Fluorescence LiDAR (UFL as a Measurement Tool for Water Quality Parameters in Turbid Lake Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Balzter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite longstanding contributions to oceanography, similar use of fluorescence light detection and ranging (LiDAR in lake settings is not routine. The potential for ship-mounted, multispectral Ultraviolet Fluorescence LiDAR (UFL to provide rapid, high-resolution data in variably turbid and productive lake conditions are investigated here through a series of laboratory tank and field measurements carried out on Lake Balaton, Hungary. UFL data, calibrated empirically to a set of coinciding conventionally-analyzed samples, provide simultaneous estimates of three important parameters-chlorophyll a(chla, total suspended matter (TSM and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM. Successful UFL retrievals from both laboratory and field measurements were achieved for chla (0.01–378 mg∙m−3; R = 0.83–0.92, TSM (0.1–130 g∙m−3; R = 0.90–0.96 and CDOM (0.003–0.125 aCDOM(440; R = 0.80–0.97. Fluorescence emission at 685 nm is shown through tank measurements to display robust but distinct relationships with chla concentration for the two cultured algae species investigated (cyanobacteria, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, and chlorophyta, Scenedesmus armatus. The ratio between fluorescence emissions measured at 650 nm, related to the phycocyanin fluorescence maximum, to that at 685 nm is demonstrated to effectively distinguish these two species. Validation through both laboratory measurements and field measurements confirmed that site specific calibration is necessary. This study presents the first known assessment and application of ship-mounted fluorescence LiDAR in freshwater lake conditions and demonstrates the use of UFL in measuring important water quality parameters despite the more complicated hydro-optic conditions of inland waters.

  1. The sensitivity of laser induced fluorescence instruments at low pressure to RO2 radicals and the use of this detection method to determine the yield of HO2 during OH-initiated isoprene oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, D. E.; Whalley, L. K.; Blitz, M. A.; Seakins, P. W.

    2011-12-01

    Ambient measurements of HO2 have almost exclusively been made by chemical titration of HO2 to OH by NO and the subsequent detection of the OH radical using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) at low pressures (~ 1 Torr) (Heard and Pilling, 2003). Until recently it was assumed that higher peroxy radicals (RO2) could not act as an HO2 interference in LIF because although these species also react with NO to form an alkoxy radical (RO) at 1 Torr the subsequent reaction RO + O2 to give HO2 is too slow. Independent laboratory studies conducted at the University of Leeds, UK and at the Forschungzentrum, Julich, Germany (Fuchs et al., 2011), however, have revealed that alkene-derived RO2 radicals and longer chain alkane-derived RO2 (>C3) are able to rapidly convert to HO2 in the presence of NO in a LIF detection cell. The yield of HO2 from a range of different RO2 species has been determined in Leeds and in the most part these yields agree well with model predictions based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (http://mcm.leeds.ac.uk/MCM/). For ethene and isoprene derived RO2 species, the relative sensitivity was found to be close to 100% with respect to that for HO2. The sensitivity of different LIF instruments/LIF operating conditions to this interference has been found to be highly variable, however. Under the operating conditions employed during the 2008 OP3 campaign that took place in the Borneo rainforest, the University of Leeds ground-based LIF instrument was not sensitive to detection of these RO2 species. The high pumping capacity of the system coupled with poor mixing of NO into the ambient air-stream for the titration of HO2 to OH effectively minimised this potential interference. Using the ground-based LIF detection cell coupled to a flow-tube, experiments to determine the time-resolved yield of HO2 radicals during the OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene have been conducted. OH was generated by photolysis of t-butyl-hydro-peroxide by 254 nm radiation from a Hg lamp in

  2. Measurement of photoelectron yield of the CDEX-10 liquid argon detector prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing-Hao; Yue, Qian; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Kang, Ke-Jun; Li, Yuan-Jing; Lin, Shin-Ted; Tang, Chang-Jian; Xing, Hao-Yang; Yu, Xun-Zhen; Zeng, Ming; Zhu, Jing-Jun

    2016-11-01

    The China Dark Matter Experiment (CDEX) is a low background experiment at China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL) designed to directly detect dark matter with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In the second phase, CDEX-10, which has a 10 kg germanium array detector system, a liquid argon (LAr) anti-Compton active shielding and cooling system is proposed. To study the properties of the LAr detector, a prototype with an active volume of 7 liters of liquid argon was built and operated. The photoelectron yields, as a critically important parameter for the prototype detector, have been measured to be 0.051-0.079 p.e./keV for 662 keV γ rays at different positions. The good agreement between the experimental and simulation results has provided a reasonable understanding and determination of the important parameters such as the surviving fraction of the excimers, the absorption length for 128 nm photons in liquid argon, the reflectivity of Teflon and so on.

  3. Light stress effect and by nitrogen deficiency in plants of Petiveria alliacea measured with two-chlorophyll-fluorescence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga, H.; Oviedo, A.; Solarte, Efrain; Pena, E. J.

    2004-10-01

    The chlorophyll fluorescence was studied in Petiveria alliacea plants exposed to different nitrogen concentrations and light radiation, the response was measured by two different forms; (1) measuring the photosynthetic efficiency with a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometro (PAM) emitted by a 650 nm diode and (2) measuring the fluorescence spectra caused by high power 452 nm diode with a SD2000 spectrometer. It was found out that the photosynthetic efficiency decreased in the plants exposed to high radiance and low nitrogen. Two chlorophyll fluorescence peaks were observed on 684 nm and 739 nm, the intensities in this wavelengths are inversely related with the light radiance. The correlation between the FIR and photosynthetic efficiency was very strong (r2 = -0.809, p Alliacea plants.

  4. Measurement of fission yields from the 241Am(2nth,f reaction at the Lohengrin Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amouroux Ch.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. While the yields are known for the major actinides (235U, 239Pu in the thermal neutron-induced fission, only few measurements have been performed on 242Am. This paper presents the results of a measurement at the Lohengrin mass spectrometer (ILL, France on the reaction 241Am(2nth,f: a total of 41 mass yields in the light and the heavy peaks have been measured and compared with the fission process simulation code GEF. Modus operandi and first results of a second experiment performed in May 2013 on the same reaction but with the goal of extracting the isotopic yields are presented as well: 8 mass yields were re-measured and 18 isotopic yields have been investigated and are being analyzed. Results concerning the kinetic energy and its comparison with the GEF Code are also presented in this paper.

  5. Two Photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence for Neutral Hydrogen Profile Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scime, Earl E.

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude and spatial dependence of neutral density in magnetic confinement fusion experiments is a key physical parameter, particularly in the plasma edge. Modeling codes require precise measurements of the neutral density to calculate charge-exchange power losses and drag forces on rotating plasmas. However, direct measurements of the neutral density are problematic. In this work, we proposed to construct a laser-based diagnostic capable of providing spatially resolved measurements of the neutral density in the edge of plasma in the DIII-D tokamak. The diagnostic concept is based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). By injecting two beams of 205 nm light (co or counter propagating), ground state hydrogen (or deuterium or tritium) can be excited from the n = 1 level to the n = 3 level at the location where the two beams intersect. Individually, the beams experience no absorption, and therefore have no difficulty penetrating even dense plasmas. After excitation, a fraction of the hydrogen atoms decay from the n = 3 level to the n = 2 level and emit photons at 656 nm (the H α line). Calculations based on the results of previous TALIF experiments in magnetic fusion devices indicated that a laser pulse energy of approximately 3 mJ delivered in 5 ns would provide sufficient signal-to-noise for detection of the fluorescence. In collaboration with the DIII-D engineering staff and experts in plasma edge diagnostics for DIII-D from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), WVU researchers designed a TALIF system capable of providing spatially resolved measurements of neutral deuterium densities in the DIII-D edge plasma. The laser systems were specified, purchased, and assembled at WVU. The TALIF system was tested on a low-power hydrogen discharge at WVU and the plan was to move the instrument to DIII-D for installation in collaboration with ORNL researchers. After budget cuts at DIII-D, the DIII-D facility declined to support installation on their

  6. Two Photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence for Neutral Hydrogen Profile Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scime, Earl E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2016-09-23

    The magnitude and spatial dependence of neutral density in magnetic confinement fusion experiments is a key physical parameter, particularly in the plasma edge. Modeling codes require precise measurements of the neutral density to calculate charge-exchange power losses and drag forces on rotating plasmas. However, direct measurements of the neutral density are problematic. In this work, we proposed to construct a laser-based diagnostic capable of providing spatially resolved measurements of the neutral density in the edge of plasma in the DIII-D tokamak. The diagnostic concept is based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). By injecting two beams of 205 nm light (co or counter propagating), ground state hydrogen (or deuterium or tritium) can be excited from the n = 1 level to the n = 3 level at the location where the two beams intersect. Individually, the beams experience no absorption, and therefore have no difficulty penetrating even dense plasmas. After excitation, a fraction of the hydrogen atoms decay from the n = 3 level to the n = 2 level and emit photons at 656 nm (the Hα line). Calculations based on the results of previous TALIF experiments in magnetic fusion devices indicated that a laser pulse energy of approximately 3 mJ delivered in 5 ns would provide sufficient signal-to-noise for detection of the fluorescence. In collaboration with the DIII-D engineering staff and experts in plasma edge diagnostics for DIII-D from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), WVU researchers designed a TALIF system capable of providing spatially resolved measurements of neutral deuterium densities in the DIII-D edge plasma. The laser systems were specified, purchased, and assembled at WVU. The TALIF system was tested on a low-power hydrogen discharge at WVU and the plan was to move the instrument to DIII-D for installation in collaboration with ORNL researchers. After budget cuts at DIII-D, the DIII-D facility declined to support

  7. Factors affecting in vivo measurement precision and accuracy of 109Cd K x-ray fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeill, F.E.; Stokes, L.; Kaye, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    109 Cd K x-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurement systems from two research centres were used to measure tibia lead content in a population (n=530) of young adults. The group mean bone lead contents (±SEM) determined by McMaster University (n=214) and the University of Maryland (n=316) were 2.80±0.51 and 2.33±0.50 μg Pb/(g bone mineral) respectively. The mean difference of 0.47±0.71 μg Pb/(g bone mineral) was not significant. There was no evidence of a systematic difference between measurements from the two systems. Measurement uncertainties for the young adults were poorer overall than uncertainties for a population of occupationally exposed men. This was because obese subjects and women were included in the study. Regressions of precision against body mass index (BMI, defined as weight/height 2 ) determined that uncertainties increased with BMI and were poorer for women than men. Measurement uncertainties (1σ) were >8 μg Pb/(g bone mineral) for women with a BMI > 0.004 kg cm -2 . Poor-precision data affected population estimates of bone lead content; an inverse correlation was found between precision and bone lead content. A small number (0.4%) of individual measurements with poor uncertainties were inaccurate to within the precision. It is suggested that obese subjects, whose BMI > 0.004 kg cm -2 , should be excluded from 109 Cd K XRF studies, as the measurement provides limited information and may be inaccurate. (author)

  8. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

    2011-01-14

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size

  9. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements in solution: Methods and reference materials (IUPAC Technical Report)

    OpenAIRE

    AMELOOT, Marcel; Van de Ven, Martin; Ulises Acuna, A.; Valeur, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    After recalling the basic relations relevant to both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence polarization, it is shown how the values of steady-state polarized intensities recorded experimentally usually need to be corrected for systematic effects and errors, caused by instrumentation and sample properties. A list of selected reference values of steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and polarization is given. Attention is also paid to analysis of time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy data ...

  10. Methods for measurement of electron emission yield under low energy electron-irradiation by collector method and Kelvin probe method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tondu, Thomas; Belhaj, Mohamed; Inguimbert, Virginie [Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France and Fondation STAE, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234-31432, Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Onera, DESP, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2010-09-15

    Secondary electron emission yield of gold under electron impact at normal incidence below 50 eV was investigated by the classical collector method and by the Kelvin probe method. The authors show that biasing a collector to ensure secondary electron collection while keeping the target grounded can lead to primary electron beam perturbations. Thus reliable secondary electron emission yield at low primary electron energy cannot be obtained with a biased collector. The authors present two collector-free methods based on current measurement and on electron pulse surface potential buildup (Kelvin probe method). These methods are consistent, but at very low energy, measurements become sensitive to the earth magnetic field (below 10 eV). For gold, the authors can extrapolate total emission yield at 0 eV to 0.5, while a total electron emission yield of 1 is obtained at 40{+-}1 eV.

  11. Methods for measurement of electron emission yield under low energy electron-irradiation by collector method and Kelvin probe method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondu, Thomas; Belhaj, Mohamed; Inguimbert, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    Secondary electron emission yield of gold under electron impact at normal incidence below 50 eV was investigated by the classical collector method and by the Kelvin probe method. The authors show that biasing a collector to ensure secondary electron collection while keeping the target grounded can lead to primary electron beam perturbations. Thus reliable secondary electron emission yield at low primary electron energy cannot be obtained with a biased collector. The authors present two collector-free methods based on current measurement and on electron pulse surface potential buildup (Kelvin probe method). These methods are consistent, but at very low energy, measurements become sensitive to the earth magnetic field (below 10 eV). For gold, the authors can extrapolate total emission yield at 0 eV to 0.5, while a total electron emission yield of 1 is obtained at 40±1 eV.

  12. Temperature field measurement research in high-speed diesel engine using laser induced fluorescence technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Zhang, You-tong; Gou, Chenhua; Tian, Hongsen

    2008-12-01

    Temperature laser- induced- fluorescence (LIF) 2-D imaging measurements using a new multi-spectral detection strategy are reported for high pressure flames in high-speed diesel engine. Schematic of the experimental set-up is outlined and the experimental data on the diesel engine is summarized. Experiment injection system is a third generation Bosch high-pressure common rail featuring a maximum pressure of 160 MPa. The injector is equipped with a six-hole nozzle, where each hole has a diameter of 0.124 mm. and slightly offset (by 1.0 mm) to the center of the cylinder axis to allow a better cooling of the narrow bridge between the exhaust valves. The measurement system includes a blower, which supplied the intake flow rate, and a prototype single-valve direct injection diesel engine head modified to lay down the swirled-type injector. 14-bit digital CCD cameras are employed to achieve a greater level of accuracy in comparison to the results of previous measurements. The temperature field spatial distributions in the cylinder for different crank angle degrees are carried out in a single direct-injection diesel engine.

  13. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, M J; Bond, E J; Clancy, T J; Eckart, M J; Khater, H Y; Glebov, V Yu

    2012-10-01

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator∕photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y(n)) measurements from below 10(9) (DD) to nearly 10(15) (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y(n) precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of ± 10% and precision of ± 1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y(n) measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  14. Intercomparison of peroxy radical measurements obtained at atmospheric conditions by laser-induced fluorescence and electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hofzumahaus

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of hydroperoxy radical (HO2 and organic peroxy radical (RO2 concentrations were performed by two different techniques in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany. The first technique was the well-established Matrix Isolation Electron Spin Resonance (MIESR, which provides absolute measurements with a time resolution of 30 min and high accuracy (10%, 2 σ. The other technique, ROxLIF, has been newly developed. It is based on the selective chemical conversion of ROx radicals (HO2 and RO2 to OH, which is detected with high sensitivity by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF. ROxLIF is calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor at 185 nm and provides ambient measurements at a temporal resolution of 1 min and accuracy of 20% (2 σ. The measurements of HO2 and RO2 obtained by the two techniques were compared for two types of atmospheric simulation experiments. In one experiment, HO2 and CH3O2 radicals were produced by photooxidation of methane in air at tropospheric conditions. In the second experiment, HO2 and C2H5O2 were produced by ozonolysis of 1-butene in air at dark conditions. The radical concentrations were within the range of 16 to 100 pptv for HO2 and 12 to 45 pptv for RO2. Good agreement was found in the comparison of the ROxLIF and MIESR measurements within their combined experimental uncertainties. Linear regressions to the combined data set yield slopes of 1.02±0.13 (1 σ for RO2 and 0.98±0.08 (1 σ for HO2 without significant offsets. The results confirm the calibration of the ROxLIF instrument and demonstrate that it can be applied with good accuracy for measurements of atmospheric peroxy radical concentrations.

  15. Measuring the contribution of Bt cotton adoption to India's cotton yields leap:

    OpenAIRE

    Gruere, Guillaume P.; Sun, Yan

    2012-01-01

    While a number of empirical studies have demonstrated the role of Bt cotton adoption in increasing Indian cotton productivity at the farm level, there has been questioning around the overall contribution of Bt cotton to the average cotton yield increase observed these last ten years in India. This study examines the contribution of Bt cotton adoption to long- term average cotton yields in India using a panel data analysis of production variables in nine Indian cotton-producing states from 197...

  16. Formaldehyde preparation methods for pressure and temperature dependent laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, A.; Müller, D.; Rieger, S.; Schmidl, G.; Triebel, W.; Paa, W.

    2015-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an excellent tracer for the early phase of ignition of hydrocarbon fuels and can be used, e.g., for characterization of single droplet ignition. However, due to its fast thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures and pressures, the determination of concentration fields from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements is difficult. In this paper, we address LIF measurements of this important combustion intermediate using a calibration cell. Here, formaldehyde is created from evaporation of paraformaldehyde. We discuss three setups for preparation of formaldehyde/air mixtures with respect to their usability for well-defined heating of formaldehyde/air mixtures. The "basic setup" uses a resist heater around the measurement cell for investigation of formaldehyde near vacuum conditions or formaldehyde/air samples after sequential admixing of air. The second setup, described for the first time in detail here, takes advantage of a constant flow formaldehyde/air regime which uses preheated air to reduce the necessary time for gas heating. We used the constant flow system to measure new pressure dependent LIF excitation spectra in the 343 nm spectral region (414 absorption band of formaldehyde). The third setup, based on a novel concept for fast gas heating via excitation of SF6 (chemically inert gas) using a TEA (transverse excitation at atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser, allows to further minimize both gas heating time and thermal decomposition. Here, an admixture of CO2 is served for real time temperature measurement based on Raman scattering. The applicability of the fast laser heating system has been demonstrated with gas mixtures of SF6 + air, SF6 + N2, as well as SF6 + N2 + CO2 at 1 bar total pressure.

  17. The measurement of the fluorescence response of plastic scintillator ST1422 to neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xiaobing; Xia Yijun; Yang Zhihua; Zhang Chuanfei; Peng Taiping; Li Rurong; Zhang Jianhua

    2004-01-01

    By using the T(p,n) and D(d,n) reactions as neutron resources, the fluorescence response of ST1422 plastic scintillators (40 mm in diameter and 5 mm in thickness) was determined in he neutron energy range of 0.655-5 MeV. The experimental results show a nonlinear response of fluorescence with neutron energy. (authors)

  18. A Starting Point for Fluorescence-Based Single-Molecule Measurements in Biomolecular Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gust

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-molecule fluorescence techniques are ideally suited to provide information about the structure-function-dynamics relationship of a biomolecule as static and dynamic heterogeneity can be easily detected. However, what type of single-molecule fluorescence technique is suited for which kind of biological question and what are the obstacles on the way to a successful single-molecule microscopy experiment? In this review, we provide practical insights into fluorescence-based single-molecule experiments aiming for scientists who wish to take their experiments to the single-molecule level. We especially focus on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments as these are a widely employed tool for the investigation of biomolecular mechanisms. We will guide the reader through the most critical steps that determine the success and quality of diffusion-based confocal and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We discuss the specific chemical and photophysical requirements that make fluorescent dyes suitable for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. Most importantly, we review recently emerged photoprotection systems as well as passivation and immobilization strategies that enable the observation of fluorescently labeled molecules under biocompatible conditions. Moreover, we discuss how the optical single-molecule toolkit has been extended in recent years to capture the physiological complexity of a cell making it even more relevant for biological research.

  19. Ultrafast polarized fluorescence measurements on monomeric and self-associated melittin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandit, A.; Larsen, O.F.A.; Stokkum, van I.H.M.; Grondelle, van R.; Kraayenhof, R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    The anisotropic and magic-angle fluorescence decay of the single tryptophan (Trp) residue of melittin, a bee venom peptide, was investigated by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy using a streak camera setup. The peptide was dissolved either in distilled water or in Hepes/NaOH buffer containing

  20. Fluorescence decay times of indigo-derivatives measured by means of a synchroscan streak camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, E.; Hefferle, P.; Schneider, S.; Dörr, F.

    1980-06-01

    Employing a synchronously pumped, modelocked dye laser for excitation in connection with a commercial, continuously operated streak camera the solvent dependent fluorescence decaytimes of several indigo-derivatives exhibiting a low fluorescence quantum efficiency were determined with a temporal resolution of about 5 ps in order to further elucidate their energy relaxation mechanisms, which are the object of continuous controversy.

  1. Fluorescently labeled cyclodextrin derivatives as exogenous markers for real-time transcutaneous measurement of renal function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Jiaguo; Weinfurter, Stefanie; Pinto, Pedro Caetano; Pretze, Marc; Kränzlin, Bettina; Pill, Johannes; Federica, Rodeghiero; Perciaccante, Rossana; Ciana, Leopoldo Della; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Gretz, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of renal function is crucial for a number of clinical situations. Here, we reported a novel exogenous fluorescent marker (FITC-HPβCD) to real-time assess renal function by using a transcutaneous fluorescent detection technique. FITC-HPβCD was designed based on the principle of renal

  2. Fluorescently Labeled Cyclodextrin Derivatives as Exogenous Markers for Real-Time Transcutaneous Measurement of Renal Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.; Weinfurter, S.; Pinto, P.C.; Pretze, M.; Kranzlin, B.; Pill, J.; Federica, R.; Perciaccante, R.; Ciana, L.D.; Masereeuw, R.; Gretz, N.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of renal function is crucial for a number of clinical situations. Here, we reported a novel exogenous fluorescent marker (FITC-HPbetaCD) to real-time assess renal function by using a transcutaneous fluorescent detection technique. FITC-HPbetaCD was designed based on the principle of renal

  3. Concentration of atomic hydrogen in a dielectric barrier discharge measured by two-photon absorption fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, P.; Talába, M.; Obrusník, A.; Kratzer, J.; Dědina, J.

    2017-08-01

    Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) was utilized for measuring the concentration of atomic hydrogen in a volume dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ignited in mixtures of Ar, H2 and O2 at atmospheric pressure. The method was calibrated by TALIF of krypton diluted in argon at atmospheric pressure, proving that three-body collisions had a negligible effect on quenching of excited krypton atoms. The diagnostic study was complemented with a 3D numerical model of the gas flow and a zero-dimensional model of the chemistry in order to better understand the reaction kinetics and identify the key pathways leading to the production and destruction of atomic hydrogen. It was determined that the density of atomic hydrogen in Ar-H2 mixtures was in the order of 1021 m-3 and decreased when oxygen was added into the gas mixture. Spatially resolved measurements and simulations revealed a sharply bordered region with low atomic hydrogen concentration when oxygen was added to the gas mixture. At substoichiometric oxygen/hydrogen ratios, this H-poor region is confined to an area close to the gas inlet and it is shown that the size of this region is not only influenced by the chemistry but also by the gas flow patterns. Experimentally, it was observed that a decrease in H2 concentration in the feeding Ar-H2 mixture led to an increase in H production in the DBD.

  4. Fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen concentration in a dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, P.; Mrkvičková, M.; Obrusník, A.; Kratzer, J.; Dědina, J.; Procházka, V.

    2017-06-01

    Concentration of atomic oxygen was measured in a volume dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ignited in mixtures of Ar + O2(+ H2) at atmospheric pressure. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic oxygen was used and this method was calibrated by TALIF of Xe in a mixture of argon and a trace of xenon. The calibration was performed at atmospheric pressure and it was shown that quenching by three-body collisions has negligible effect on the life time of excited Xe atoms. The concentration of atomic oxygen in the DBD was around 1021 m-3 and it was stable during the whole discharge period. The concentration did not depend much on the electric power delivered to the discharge provided that the power was sufficiently high so that the visible discharge filled the whole reactor volume. Both the addition of hydrogen or replacing of argon by helium led to a significant decrease of atomic oxygen concentration. The TALIF measurements of O concentration levels in the DBD plasma performed in this work are made use of e.g. in the field analytical chemistry. The results contribute to understanding the processes of analyte hydride preconcentration and subsequent atomization in the field of trace element analysis where DBD plasma atomizers are employed.

  5. The role of passive ocean spectral fluorescence measurements in satellite determinations of marine primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topliss, B. J.; Platt, Trevor C.

    The detection of spectral fluorescence is a rapidly-growing tool for marine biologists interested in both phytoplankton biomass and species composition. The presence of solar stimulated fluorescence at 685 nm (associated with chlorophyll a) has been detected in data sets collected from areas as diverse as the high Arctic and the Caribbean Sea. Interpretation and modelling of passive fluorescence signals in terms of optical efficiencies is dependent on accurate estimates of specific absorption coefficients. This in turn requires an optical modelling of the associated water mass in a similar manner to that used in interpretation of remote sensing signals (such as from the CZCS - Coastal Zone Colour Scanner, or the planned OCI - Ocean Colour Imager). A potential relationship between passive chlorophyll fluorescence efficiency and photosynthetic efficiency of chlorophyll a is outlined for the field data and the relevance of such a relationship to future remote sensing signals such as from the FLI (Fluorescence Line Imager) is discussed.

  6. Measurement of apoptosis by SCAN©, a system for counting and analysis of fluorescently labelled nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neta Shlezinger

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis-like programmed cell death (A-PCD is a universal process common to all types of eukaryotic organisms. Because A-PCD-associated processes are conserved, it is possible to define A-PCD by a standard set of markers. Many of the popular methods to measure A-PCD make use of fluorescent ligands that change in intensity or cellular localization during A-PCD. In single cell organisms, it is possible to quantify levels of A-PCD by scoring the number of apoptotic cells using flow cytometry instruments. In a multicellular organism, quantification of A-PCD is more problematic due to the complex nature of the tissue. The situation is further complicated in filamentous fungi, in which nuclei are divided between compartments, each containing a number of nuclei, which can also migrate between the compartments. We developed SCAN©, a System for Counting and Analysis of Nuclei, and used it to measure A-PCD according to two markers – chromatin condensation and DNA strand breaks. The package includes three modules designed for counting the number of nuclei in multi-nucleated domains, scoring the relative number of nuclei with condensed chromatin, and calculating the relative number of nuclei with DNA strand breaks. The method provides equal or better results compared with manual counting, the analysis is fast and can be applied on large data sets. While we demonstrated the utility of the software for measurement of A-PCD in fungi, the method is readily adopted for measurement of A-PCD in other types of multicellular specimens.

  7. Fluorescence Techniques for Measuring Kinetics of Specific Binding of Hormone to Cell Surface Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellen, Edward Herbert

    This thesis presents theoretical calculations and technical advances relevant to total internal reflection/ fluorescence photobleaching recovery (tir/fpr), and results from experiments using tir/fpr to measure the dissociation rate constant of epidermal growth factor (egf) hormone interacting with its receptor molecule on A431 cells. The classical electromagnetic calculations describe fluorescence emission from fluorophores near an interface (possibly metal coated). It is well known that an interface alters the emission properties of nearby fluorophores. Most previous classical calculations model the fluorophore as a fixed-amplitude dipole oscillator. However, for fluorophores under steady illumination, a fixed-power dipole is more appropriate. This modification corresponds to normalizing the fixed-amplitude dipole's intensity by its total dissipated power. The results for the fixed-power model differ nontrivially from the fixed-amplitude model. The observation-angle -dependent intensity as a function of the fluorophore's orientation and distance from the surface is calculated. General expressions are derived for the emission power as observed through a circular-aperture collection system located on either side of the interface. A system for maintaining long-term focus of samples under high-magnification quantitative observation in an epi-illumination optical microscope is described. Focus -dependent changes in the backreflection of an off-axis HeNe laser generate negative feedback signals which drive a dc motor coupled to the fine-focus knob of the microscope. This system has several advantages: (1) it is compatible and nonobstructive with concurrent data acqusition of sample intensities; (2) it requires no alteration of the sample, stage, or objective; (3) it monitors the position of sample areas very near to those under observation; (4) it is inexpensive. The system can hold a glass coverslip sample to within 0.5 μm of its preset focus position. Prismless tir

  8. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments. PBAPs can thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurement data and techniques for PBAPs in natural environments at high time- and size resolution are, however, sparse, and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in southwestern Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of a waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with a ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behavior, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night, when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each was correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multimodal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging, and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent

  9. Oxygenation measurement by multi-wavelength oxygen-dependent phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence: catchment depth and application in intact heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balestra, Gianmarco M.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Specht, Patricia A. C.; Ince, Can; Mik, Egbert G.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen delivery and metabolism represent key factors for organ function in health and disease. We describe the optical key characteristics of a technique to comprehensively measure oxygen tension (PO(2)) in myocardium, using oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence of

  10. Spaceborne Sun-Induced Vegetation Fluorescence Time Series from 2007 to 2015 Evaluated with Australian Flux Tower Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Abram; Verstraeten, Willem; Kooreman, Maurits; Leth, Van Thomas; Beringer, Jason; Joiner, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    A global, monthly averaged time series of Sun-induced Fluorescence (SiF), spanning January 2007 to June 2015, was derived from Metop-A Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) spectral measurements. Far-red SiF was retrieved using the filling-in of deep solar Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric

  11. Limits to the resolution of beam size measurement from fluorescent screens due to the thickness of the phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of fluorescent screens for the measurement of beam profiles on non-circulating particle beams. An expression for the intensity of the beam profile as a function of phosphor thickness is given. 3 refs., 8 figs

  12. Measuring tubulin content in Toxoplasma gondii: A comparison of laser-scanning confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedlow, Jason R.; Hu, Ke; Andrews, Paul D.; Roos, David S.; Murray, John M.

    2002-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that proliferates within most nucleated cells, an important human pathogen, and a model for the study of human and veterinary parasitic infections. We used a stable yellow fluorescent protein-α-tubulin transgenic line to determine the structure of the microtubule cytoskeleton in T. gondii. Imaging of living yellow fluorescent protein-α-tubulin parasites by laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) failed to resolve the 22 subpellicular microtubules characteristic of the parasite cytoskeleton. To understand this result, we analyzed sources of noise in the LSCM and identified illumination fluctuations on time scales from microseconds to hours that introduce significant amounts of noise. We confirmed that weakly fluorescent structures could not be imaged in LSCM by using fluorescent bead standards. By contrast, wide-field microscopy (WFM) did visualize weak fluorescent standards and the individual microtubules of the parasite cytoskeleton. We therefore measured the fluorescence per unit length of microtubule by using WFM and used this information to estimate the tubulin content of the conoid (a structure important for T. gondii infection) and in the mitotic spindle pole. The conoid contains sufficient tubulin for ≈10 microtubule segments of 0.5-μm length, indicating that tubulin forms the structural core of the organelle. We also show that the T. gondii mitotic spindle contains ≈1 microtubule per chromosome. This analysis expands the understanding of structures used for invasion and intracellular proliferation by an important human pathogen and shows the advantage of WFM combined with image deconvolution over LSCM for quantitative studies of weakly fluorescent structures in moderately thin living cells. PMID:11830634

  13. Measurement of the fluorescence of crop residues: A tool for controlling soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Chappelle, E. W.; Hunter, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Management of crop residues, the portion of a crop left in the field after harvest, is an important conservation practice for minimizing soil erosion and for improving water quality. Quantification of crop residue cover is required to evaluate the effectiveness of conservation tillage practices. Methods are needed to quantify residue cover that are rapid, accurate, and objective. The fluorescence of crop residue was found to be a broadband phenomenon with emission maxima at 420 to 495 nm for excitations of 350 to 420 nm. Soils had low intensity broadband emissions over the 400 to 690 nm region for excitations of 300 to 600 nm. The range of relative fluorescence intensities for the crop residues was much greater than the fluorescence observed of the soils. As the crop residues decompose their blue fluorescence values approach the fluorescence of the soil. Fluorescence techniques are concluded to be less ambiguous and better suited for discriminating crop residues and soils than reflectance methods. If properly implemented, fluorescence techniques can be used to quantify, not only crop residue cover, but also photosynthetic efficiency in the field.

  14. Ultraviolet emission and excitation fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of DMBA-treated Swiss Albino mice skin carcinogenesis for measuring tissue transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruna, Prakasa R.; Hemamalini, Srinivasan; Ebenezar, Jeyasingh; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2002-05-01

    The ultraviolet fluorescence emission spectra of skin tissues under different pathological conditions were measured at 280nm excitation. At this excitation wavelength, the normal skin showed a primary peak emission at 352nm and this primary peak emission from neoplastic skin shows a blue shift with respect to normal tissue. This blue shift increases as the stage of abnormality increases and it is maximum (19nm) for well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. This alteration is further confirmed from fluorescence excitation spectra of the tissues for 340nm emission. The study concludes that the change in the emission of tryptophan around 340nm may be due to partial unfolding of protein.

  15. A method for the measurement of in line pistachio aflatoxin concentration based on the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paghaleh, Soodeh Jamali [Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan, Rafsanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Askari, Hassan Ranjbar; Marashi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan, Rafsanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, Mojtaba, E-mail: m_rahimi@vru.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan, Rafsanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahrampour, Ali Reza [Physics Department of Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Contamination of pistachio nuts with aflatoxin is one of the most significant issues related to pistachio health and expert. A fast pistachio aflatoxin concentration measurement method based on the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) is proposed. The proposed method from theoretical and experimental points of view is analyzed. In our experiments XeCl Excimer laser is employed as an Ultra Violet (UV) source (λ=308 nm) and a UV–visible (UV–vis) spectrometer is used for fluorescent emission detection. Our setup is employed to measure the concentration of different type of Aflatoxins in pistachio nuts. Measurements results obtained by the LIFS method are compared with those are measured by the standard HPLC method. Aflatoxins concentrations are in good agreement with those are obtained by the HPLC method. The proposed laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy can be used as an in line aflatoxins concentrations measurement instrument for industrial applications. - Highlights: • XeCl Excimer laser is employed as an UV source for measurement of AFs in pistachio nuts. • Results are compared with those are measured by the standard HPLC method. • LIFS is an online AFs concentration measurement method for industrial applications.

  16. A method for the measurement of in line pistachio aflatoxin concentration based on the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paghaleh, Soodeh Jamali; Askari, Hassan Ranjbar; Marashi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Rahimi, Mojtaba; Bahrampour, Ali Reza

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of pistachio nuts with aflatoxin is one of the most significant issues related to pistachio health and expert. A fast pistachio aflatoxin concentration measurement method based on the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) is proposed. The proposed method from theoretical and experimental points of view is analyzed. In our experiments XeCl Excimer laser is employed as an Ultra Violet (UV) source (λ=308 nm) and a UV–visible (UV–vis) spectrometer is used for fluorescent emission detection. Our setup is employed to measure the concentration of different type of Aflatoxins in pistachio nuts. Measurements results obtained by the LIFS method are compared with those are measured by the standard HPLC method. Aflatoxins concentrations are in good agreement with those are obtained by the HPLC method. The proposed laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy can be used as an in line aflatoxins concentrations measurement instrument for industrial applications. - Highlights: • XeCl Excimer laser is employed as an UV source for measurement of AFs in pistachio nuts. • Results are compared with those are measured by the standard HPLC method. • LIFS is an online AFs concentration measurement method for industrial applications

  17. A Low-Cost Fluorescent Sensor for pCO2 Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Ge

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is believed to be caused by increasing amounts of greenhouse gases (mostly CO2 discharged into the environment by human activity. In addition to an increase in environmental temperature, an increased CO2 level has also led to ocean acidification. Ocean acidification and rising temperatures have disrupted the water’s ecological balance, killing off some plant and animal species, while encouraging the overgrowth of others. To minimize the effect of global warming on local ecosystem, there is a strong need to implement ocean observing systems to monitor the effects of anthropogenic CO2 and the impacts thereof on ocean biological productivity. Here, we describe the development of a low-cost fluorescent sensor for pCO2 measurements. The detector was exclusively assembled with low-cost optics and electronics, so that it would be affordable enough to be deployed in great numbers. The system has several novel features, such as an ideal 90° separation between excitation and emission, a beam combiner, a reference photodetector, etc. Initial tests showed that the system was stable and could achieve a high resolution despite the low cost.

  18. Non-invasive tryptophan fluorescence measurements as a novel method of grading cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Jesper Høiberg; Mensah, Aurore; Kessel, Line

    2017-01-01

    . All cataracts were age-related. Lens material from 16 eyes of 14 patients was included in the study. Cataracts were preoperatively graded in categories 1, 2 and 3. No lenses were category 4. For nuclear cataracts mean values of F-factor were 52.9 (SD 12.2), 61.7 (SD 5.3) and 75.7 (SD 8.......9) for categories 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Linear regression on F-factor as a function of preoperative grading category showed increasing values of F-factor with increasing preoperative grading category, R2 = 0.515. Our experiment showed that preoperative optical grading of cataracts by Scheimpflug imaging may......Development of non-invasive treatments for cataract calls for a sensitive diagnostic assay. We conducted a study to test whether the ratio of folded tryptophan to non-tryptophan fluorescence emission (F-factor) may be used for grading cataracts in human lenses. The F-factor was measured...

  19. Using remotely sensed spectral reflectance to indicate leaf photosynthetic efficiency derived from active fluorescence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi; Zeng, Aoli; Zhu, Tinge; Fang, Shenghui; Gong, Yan; Tao, Yanqi; Zhou, Ying; Liu, Kan

    2017-04-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) is an important signature of photosynthesis to evaluate plant response to the environment. We explored an approach to estimate an important leaf ChlF-derived parameter, the intrinsic efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry (Fv/Fm), using spectral indices calculated from leaf reflectance measured by a hyperspectral radiometer. It is observed that leaf chlorophyll content closely related to Fv/Fm in nonstressed leaves, thus the indices developed for chlorophyll estimation were successfully used to estimate Fv/Fm. For leaves under short-term stress, Fv/Fm dropped dramatically while leaf chlorophyll content remained almost the same. Compared to leaf chlorophyll content, reflectance was more sensitive to Fv/Fm variations. As Fv/Fm decreased, the slope of reflectance in the spectrum range of 700 to 900 nm obviously increased, and the first derivative reflectance in the red edge and infrared (NIR) regions was highly correlated with Fv/Fm. The indices using longwave red edge and NIR reflectance (NDRE740 and CI740) worked well for Fv/Fm retrieval in both stressed and nonstressed leaves with the coefficients of determination (R2) above 0.72 and normalized root-mean-square errors below 0.16. Note that the relationships NDRE740 and CI740 versus Fv/Fm were significantly different between nonstressed and stressed leaves, which may give a good implication to detect short-term stress occurrence.

  20. Optimization of an in vivo X-ray fluorescence mercury measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Meara, J.M.; Boerjesson, J.; Chettle, D.R.; McNeill, F.E.

    2004-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo X-ray fluorescence (XRF) method of measuring renal mercury concentrations has previously been reported, as a potential occupational monitoring tool for those who work with this toxic element [Phys. Med. Biol. 40 (1995) 413]. However, the detection limits remain high compared to the typical values anticipated in these populations. Our approach for further enhancing the XRF renal mercury detection limit has been threefold: investigations of the ideal filtration and tube voltage with a conventional tungsten anode X-ray tube, and the replacement of the existing tungsten X-ray tube with a Fluorex tube [Phys. Med. Biol. 36 (1991) 1573]. In all cases the systems were compared by Monte Carlo simulation to that reported by Boerjesson et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 40 (1995) 413]. The optimal filtration was found to be a 0.035 cm uranium filter, positioned after the polarizer. Modest improvement was achieved by increasing the tungsten tube voltage from 160 [Phys. Med. Biol. 40 (1995) 413] to 200 kV, decreasing the system detection limit by 27% for the same subject dose. It was found that the Fluorex tube did not improve the system sensitivity for a given dose rate, either when the tube was used for direct excitation or in a polarized configuration. Despite the improved performance reported here at 200 kV, detection limits remain high compared to typical levels in occupationally exposed individuals

  1. Measurement of biomolecular diffusion in extracellular matrix condensed by fibroblasts using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Kihara

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM comprises the heterogeneous environment outside of cells in a biological system. The ECM is dynamically organized and regulated, and many biomolecules secreted from cells diffuse throughout the ECM, regulating a variety of cellular processes. Therefore, investigation of the diffusive behaviors of biomolecules in the extracellular environment is critical. In this study, we investigated the diffusion coefficients of biomolecules of various sizes, measuring from 1 to 10 nm in radius, by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in contracted collagen gel caused by fibroblasts, a traditional culture model of dynamic rearrangement of collagen fibers. The diffusion coefficients of the biomolecules in control collagen gel without cells decreased slightly as compared to those in solution, while the diffusion coefficients of biomolecules in the contracted gel at the cell vicinity decreased dramatically. Additionally, the diffusion coefficients of biomolecules were inversely correlated with molecular radius. In collagen gels populated with fibroblasts, the diffusion coefficient at the cell vicinity clearly decreased in the first 24 h of culture. Furthermore, molecular diffusion was greatly restricted, with a central focus on the populated cells. By using the obtained diffusion coefficients of biomolecules, we calculated the collagen fiber condensation ratio by fibroblasts in the cell vicinity at 3 days of culture to represent a 52-fold concentration. Thus, biomolecular diffusion is restricted in the vicinity of the cells where collagen fibers are highly condensed.

  2. Noninvasive quantitative measurement of colloid transport in mesoscale porous media using time lapse fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Jonathan W; Banwart, Steven A; Heathwaite, A Louise

    2006-10-01

    We demonstrate noninvasive quantitative imaging of colloid and solute transport at millimeter to decimeter (meso-) scale. Ultraviolet (UV) excited fluorescent solute and colloid tracers were independently measured simultaneously during co-advection through saturated quartz sand. Pulse-input experiments were conducted at constant flow rates and ionic strengths 10(-3), 10(-2) and 10(-1) M NaCl. Tracers were 1.9 microm carboxylate latex microspheres and disodium fluorescein. Spatial moments analysis was used to quantify relative changes in mass distribution of the colloid and solute tracers over time. The solute advected through the sand at a constant velocity proportional to flow rate and was described well by a conservative transport model (CXTFIT). In unfavorable deposition conditions increasing ionic strength produced significant reduction in colloid center of mass transport velocity over time. Velocity trends correlated with the increasing fraction of colloid mass retained along the flowpath. Attachment efficiencies (defined by colloid filtration theory) calculated from nondestructive retained mass data were 0.013 +/- 0.03, 0.09 +/- 0.02, and 0.22 +/- 0.05 at 10(-3), 10(-2), and 10(-1) M ionic strength, respectively, which compared well with previously published data from breakthrough curves and destructive sampling. Mesoscale imaging of colloid mass dynamics can quantify key deposition and transport parameters based on noninvasive, nondestructive, spatially high-resolution data.

  3. Three-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence measurements of turbulent chemical plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Aaron; Crimaldi, John

    2017-11-01

    In order to find prey, mates, and suitable habitat, many organisms must navigate through complex chemical plume structures in turbulent flow environments. In this context, we investigate the spatial and temporal structure of chemical plumes released isokinetically into fractal-grid-generated turbulence in an open channel flow. We first utilized particle image velocimetry (PIV) to characterize flow conditions (mean free stream velocities, turbulence intensities, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates, Taylor Reynolds numbers). We then implemented a newly developed high-resolution, high-speed, volumetric scanning laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system for near time-resolved measurements of three-dimensional chemical plume structures. We investigated cases with and without a cylinder wake, and compare statistical (mean, variance, intermittency, probability density functions) and spectral (power spectrum of concentration fluctuations) characteristics of the chemical plume structure. Stretching and folding of complex three-dimensional filament structures during chaotic turbulent mixing is greatly enhanced in the cylinder wake case. In future experiments, we will implement simultaneous PIV and LIF, enabling computation of the covariance of the velocity and chemical concentration fluctuations and thus estimation of turbulent eddy diffusivities. NSF PHY 1555862.

  4. The application of β-ray excitation fluorescence to the measurement of the thickness of deposits and to analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, P.

    1961-01-01

    Principles of the method are first outlined and the instrumentation used is described. The different types of radiation detectors are subject of a detailed study. As a source of β-radiation 90 (Sr + Y) was used as well as 147 Pm. Great care was taken to eliminate back-diffused electrons by deflection by a strong permanent magnet. The method was applied to the measurement of the thickness of deposits of Cr, Zn, Sn, Cd and Cu on iron as well as Zn, Cr, Ag and Au on copper and the results obtained are discussed. An attempt was made, to use β-X-ray fluorescence for the analysis of minerals, iron ore and glass and for routine control of Si-Mn, Si-Ca, Fe-Mn and Fe-W. Finally the method of β-X-ray fluorescence is compared with normal-X-ray fluorescence and possibilities of further development are cited. (author) [fr

  5. Light on Cut Chrysanthemum : Measurements and Simulation of Crop Growth and Yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelink, E.; Lee, J.H.; Buiskool, R.P.M.; Ortega, L.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of plant density and light intensity on crop growth and yield of cut chrysanthemum were investigated experimentally and simulated with a generic explanatory crop growth model (HORTISIM). In winter, supplementary light (HPS; 48 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR) increased total incident PAR with

  6. Measurement of the production yield for negative 209 Bi ions and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Constantinescu, O.; Enachescu, M.; Carli, W.

    2001-01-01

    The production yield for negative 209 Bi ions and compounds as obtained by sputtering the material with Cs ions in a high current ion source was determined. The accelerated Bi material consumption during the sputter process was also determined and the optimum chemical form of Bi suitable for an AMS experiment was established. (authors)

  7. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and CP Content for the Decay B o yields D (sup asterisk +) D (sup asterisk -)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D.

    2002-03-01

    We report a measurement of the branching fraction of the decay B o yields D (sup asterisk +) D (sup asterisk -) and of the CP-odd component of its final state using the BABAR detector. With data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.4 fb to the minus 1 power collected at the gamma(4S) resonance during 1999-2000, we have reconstructed 38 candidate signal events in the mode B o yields D (sup asterisk +) D (sup asterisk -) with an estimated background of 6.2 + or - 0.5 events. From these events, we determine the branching fraction to be beta B o yields D (sup asterisk +) D (sup asterisk -) = (8.3+ or -1.6(stat) + or - 1.2(syst)) X 10 to the minus 4th power. The measured CP-odd fraction of the final state is 0.22 + or - 0.18(stat) + or - 0.03(syst).

  8. The thermogenic actions of natriuretic peptide in brown adipocytes: The direct measurement of the intracellular temperature using a fluorescent thermoprobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Haruka; Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Yoshii, Akira; Kashiwagi, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoshiro; Ito, Keiichi; Yoshino, Takuya; Tanaka, Toshikazu D; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2017-10-11

    In addition to the various effects of natriuretic peptides (NPs) on cardiovascular systems, increasing attention is being paid to the possibility that NPs induce adipose tissue browning and activate thermogenic program. We herein established a direct intracellular temperature measurement system using a fluorescent thermoprobe and investigated the thermogenic effects of A-type NP (ANP) on brown adipocytes. The thermoprobe was successfully introduced into rat brown adipocytes, and the temperature dependent change in fluorescence intensity ratio was measured using a fluorescence microscope. After one-hour incubation with ANP, the degree of the change in fluorescence intensity ratio was significantly higher in ANP-treated (P thermogenic actions of ANP were more prominent when brown adipocytes were incubated at 35 °C than at 37 °C. Moreover, the increase in the intracellular temperature and the expression of UCP1 induced by ANP were cancelled by p38MAPK inhibition. Taken together, this study directly demonstrated the thermogenic actions of ANP in brown adipocytes through the use of a novel method of intracellular temperature measurement.

  9. Toward autonomous measurements of photosynthetic electron transport rates: An evaluation of active fluorescence-based measurements of photochemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Silsbe, G.; Oxborough, K.; Suggett, D. J.; Forster, R. M.; Ihnken, S.; Komárek, Ondřej; Lawrenz, Evelyn; Prášil, Ondřej; Roettgers, R.; Šicner, M.; Simis, S. G. H.; Van Dijk, M. A.; Kromkamp, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 13, MAR 2015 (2015), s. 138-155 ISSN 1541-5856 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : REPETITION- RATE FLUOROMETRY * CAVITY ABSORPTION METER * CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.008, year: 2015

  10. Measurements of KrF laser-induced O2 fluorescence in high-temperature atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Laufer, Gabriel; Mcdaniel, James C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Conditions for obtaining laser-induced O2 fluorescence using a tunable KrF laser has been determined theoretically and experimentally. With this laser source, O2 rotational temperature measurement is possible even in the absence of vibrational equilibrium. Temperature measurement using a two-line excitation scheme has been demonstrated in a high-temperature atmospheric-air furnace. A measurement uncertainty of 10.7 percent for the temperature range 1325-1725 K was realized. At atmospheric pressure, O2 LIF measurements are possible for air temperatures above 1250 K. Interference from OH fluorescence in reacting flows can be avoided by the proper selection of O2 transitions. Depletion of the ground state population by the incident laser is negligible for intensities below 7.5 x 10 to the 6th W/sq cm/per cm.

  11. Method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.; Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high-speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainties in the temperature and density measurements can be less than 2 percent, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  12. A method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Fletcher, Douglas G.; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations due to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high-speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature and density measurements can be less than 2 and 3 percent, respectively, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon-statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  13. Subcellular localization-dependent changes in EGFP fluorescence lifetime measured by time-resolved flow cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Gohar, Ali Vaziri; Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Li, Wenyan; Houston, Jessica P.; Houston, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular protein transport and localization to subcellular regions are processes necessary for normal protein function. Fluorescent proteins can be fused to proteins of interest to track movement and determine localization within a cell. Currently, fluorescence microscopy combined with image processing is most often used to study protein movement and subcellular localization. In this contribution we evaluate a high-throughput time-resolved flow cytometry approach to correlate intracellul...

  14. The Effect of Test Machine Compliance on the Measured Shear Punch Yield Stress as Predicted Using Finite Element Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, Mychailo; Abe, Katsunori; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Garner, Francis A.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2001-10-01

    In previous research involving the use of the shear punch test, it was assumed that the displacement of the punch tip was only slightly different than the crosshead displacement. The present work explores this assumption and its ramifications by simulating the shear punch test with finite element analysis (FEA). The simulations suggest that punch tip displacement is much less than previously assumed, and that for the test frames which have been used, crosshead displacement is over an order of magnitude greater than punch tip displacement. This difference in displacements is thought to be due to test machine and punch compliance, and a simple elasticity calculation of the compliance of the punch, the test machine, and a specimen gives a result which is in agreement with the FEA simulations. The effect of using punch tip displacement on the observed effective shear yield stress was evaluated using FEA simulated shear punch tests on several different metals. Yield was measured at several different offset shear strains with a 1.0% offset shear yield strength measurement providing the best correlation with 0.2% offset uniaxial yield strength. When using the 1.0% offset shear yield values, the previously observed material-to-material variability in the tensile-shear correlation all but disappeared. Based on this work, it appears that the material-to-material variations in prior correlations between uniaxial yield strength and shear yield strength is due to a combination of large test machine compliance and material-to-material differences in the work hardening exponent.

  15. An automated and highly efficient method for counting and measuring fluorescent foci in rod-shaped bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, H J; Hansen, F G

    2010-09-01

    Direct measurements of cells from photo micrographs are becoming increasingly used when investigating the position and/or distribution of chromosomal loci in bacteria. In general, these measurements have been done manually, and without clear definition of how they are made. Here we present a procedure for standardizing the measurement of cell properties from phase contrast images. Furthermore, we present a program using these standardized methods that can measure the intracellular positions of fluorescent foci in bacterial cells faster and with more precision than manual measurement.

  16. Two decades of water vapor measurements with the FISH fluorescence hygrometer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Meyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For almost two decades, the airborne Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH has stood for accurate and precise measurements of total water mixing ratios (WMR, gas phase + evaporated ice in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the measurement technique (Lyman-α photofragment fluorescence, calibration procedure, accuracy and reliability of FISH. Crucial for FISH measurement quality is the regular calibration to a water vapor reference, namely the commercial frost-point hygrometer DP30. In the frame of this work this frost-point hygrometer is compared to German and British traceable metrological water standards and its accuracy is found to be 2–4 %. Overall, in the range from 4 to 1000 ppmv, the total accuracy of FISH was found to be 6–8 %, as stated in previous publications. For lower mixing ratios down to 1 ppmv, the uncertainty reaches a lower limit of 0.3 ppmv. For specific, non-atmospheric conditions, as set in experiments at the AIDA chamber – namely mixing ratios below 10 and above 100 ppmv in combination with high- and low-pressure conditions – the need to apply a modified FISH calibration evaluation has been identified. The new evaluation improves the agreement of FISH with other hygrometers to ± 10 % accuracy in the respective mixing ratio ranges. Furthermore, a quality check procedure for high total water measurements in cirrus clouds at high pressures (400–500 hPa is introduced. The performance of FISH in the field is assessed by reviewing intercomparisons of FISH water vapor data with other in situ and remote sensing hygrometers over the last two decades. We find that the agreement of FISH with the other hygrometers has improved over that time span from overall up to ± 30 % or more to about ± 5–20 % @ 10 ppmv. As presented here, the robust and continuous calibration and operation procedures of the FISH instrument over the last two decades establish the

  17. Accurate isotopic fission yields of electromagnetically induced fission of 238U measured in inverse kinematics at relativistic energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellereau, E.; Taïeb, J.; Chatillon, A.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; Bélier, G.; Benlliure, J.; Boutoux, G.; Caamaño, M.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Ebran, A.; Farget, F.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Gorbinet, T.; Grente, L.; Heinz, A.; Johansson, H.; Jurado, B.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Kurz, N.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Nociforo, C.; Paradela, C.; Pietri, S.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Simon, H.; Tassan-Got, L.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.; Weick, H.

    2017-05-01

    SOFIA (Studies On Fission with Aladin) is a novel experimental program, dedicated to accurate measurements of fission-fragment isotopic yields. The setup allows us to fully identify, in nuclear charge and mass, both fission fragments in coincidence for the whole fission-fragment range. It was installed at the GSI facility (Darmstadt), to benefit from the relativistic heavy-ion beams available there, and thus to use inverse kinematics. This paper reports on fission yields obtained in electromagnetically induced fission of 238U.

  18. Multiple effects of cadmium on the photosynthetic apparatus of Avicennia germinans L. as probed by OJIP chlorophyll fluorescence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales-Mendoza, D.; Zapata-Perez, O. [Cinvestav Unidad Merida, Yucatan (Mexico). Dept. de Recursos del Mar; Espadas y Gil, F.; Santamaria, J.M. [Unidad de Biotecnologia, CICY, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2007-03-15

    The toxic effects of cadmium on the photosynthetic apparatus of Avicennia germinans were evaluated by means of the chlorophyll fluorescence transient O-J-I-P. The chlorophyll fluorescence transients were recorded in vivo with high time resolution and analyzed according to the OJIP-test that can quantify the performance of photosystem II. Cadmium-treated plants showed a decrease in yield for primary photochemistry, TR{sup 0}/ABS. The performance index of photosystem II (PSII), PI{sub ABS}, decreased due to cadmium treatment. This performance index is the combination of the indexes of three independent parameters: (1) total number of active reaction centers per absorption (RC/ABS), (2) yield of primary photochemistry (TR{sup 0}/ABS), and (3) efficiency with which a trapped exciton can move an electron into the electron transport chain (ET{sup 0}/TR{sup 0}). Additionally, the F{sub 0}/F{sub v} registered the highest sensitivity to the metal, thus indicating that the water-splitting apparatus of the oxidizing side of PSII is the primary site of action of cadmium. In summary, cadmium affects several targets of photosystem II. More specifically the main targets of cadmium, according to the OJIP-test, can be listed as a decrease in the number of active reaction centers and damage to the activity of the water-splitting complex. (orig.)

  19. Multiple effects of cadmium on the photosynthetic apparatus of Avicennia germinans L. as probed by OJIP chlorophyll fluorescence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mendoza, Daniel; Espadas y Gil, Francisco; Santamaría, Jorge M; Zapata-Perez, Omar

    2007-01-01

    The toxic effects of cadmium on the photosynthetic apparatus of Avicennia germinans were evaluated by means of the chlorophyll fluorescence transient O-J-I-P. The chlorophyll fluorescence transients were recorded in vivo with high time resolution and analyzed according to the OJIP-test that can quantify the performance of photosystem II. Cadmium-treated plants showed a decrease in yield for primary photochemistry, TR0/ABS. The performance index of photosystem II (PSII), PI(ABS), decreased due to cadmium treatment. This performance index is the combination of the indexes of three independent parameters: (1) total number of active reaction centers per absorption (RC/ABS), (2) yield of primary photochemistry (TR0/ABS), and (3) efficiency with which a trapped exciton can move an electron into the electron transport chain (ET0/TR0). Additionally, the F0/Fv registered the highest sensitivity to the metal, thus indicating that the water-splitting apparatus of the oxidizing side of PSII is the primary site of action of cadmium. In summary, cadmium affects several targets of photosystem II. More specifically the main targets of cadmium, according to the OJIP-test, can be listed as a decrease in the number of active reaction centers and damage to the activity of the water-splitting complex.

  20. Mechanisms of ultrafast fluorescence depletion spectroscopy and applications to measure slovation dynamics of coummarin 153 in methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Songqiu; Liu Jianyong; Zhou Panwang; Chen Junsheng; Han Keli; He Guozhong

    2012-01-01

    Subpicosecond fluorescence depletion spectroscopy (FDS) was used to measure the solvation dynamics of coumarin 153 (C153) in methanol. The FDS mechanisms were discussed. A quasi-continuous model was used to describe the solvational relaxation of excited states. The perturbations of the probe pulse on the excited sample system, including up-conversion and stimulated emission, were sufficiently discussed. For a probe molecule used in the FDS experiment, ensuring that the up-conversion perturbation can be negligible is important. FDS was found to be a good technique for measuring the solvation dynamics of C153 in methanol. - Highlights: ► Mechanisms of subpicosecond fluorescence depletion spectroscopy. ► Quasi-continuous model was used to describe the solvational relaxation. ► The solvation dynamics of coumarin 153 in methanol has been measured.

  1. Measure of the e+e-{yields}bb Cross Section at the LEP Energies; Medida de la seccion eficaz e''+e''-{yields}bb a las Energias de LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arce Dubois, P.

    1992-07-01

    In the present work I analyse the data collected during 1990 by the L3 detector, situated in the electron-positron collider LEP. After selecting the events e''+e''-{yields} bb through their semileptonic decays into muons, I calculate the cross section for the process e''+e''- {yields} bb at different energy points around the mass of the vectorial boson Z, and I measure some parameters of the Standard Model, namely, the Br(b{yields}{mu} ),{gamma}{sub z}n-{yields}bb/{gamma}{sub z}n{yields}had and {gamma}{sub z}n{yields}bb{gamma}{sub z}n{yields}e''+e''-. (Author) 26 refs.

  2. Effects of amiodarone therapy on thyroid iodine content as measured by x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragu, P.; Schlumberger, M.; Davy, J.M.; Slama, M.; Berdeaux, A.

    1988-01-01

    Thyroid iodine content (TIC) was measured by x-ray fluorescence in 68 patients who had received amiodarone treatment for varying intervals (1 g/week for 1-120 months). Thirty-six patients were euthyroid; the mean TIC of the patients (n = 15), who had been treated for less than 12 months was 30 +/- 19 (+/- SD) mg, twice the normal mean value (14.6 +/- 5.0 mg), and it was 39 +/- 17 mg in those (n = 16) who had been treated for 12-60 months and 29 +/- 6 mg in those (n = 5) who had been treated longer (greater than 60 months). Nineteen patients were hyperthyroid and had elevated TIC values. Of them, 6 patients had a goiter; their TIC (50 +/- 19 mg) was not significantly different from that of the hyperthyroid patients with no goiter (55 +/- 29 mg), but they became hyperthyroid more rapidly. Thirteen patients were hypothyroid; none had TIC values above the normal range, and it was below 2.5 mg in 5 patients. A sequential study was undertaken in 11 euthyroid patients who had no detectable antithyroid antibodies. TIC did not increase during treatment in 2 patients; both developed hypothyroidism, which was transient in 1 despite continuation of amiodarone treatment. The TIC initially increased during amiodarone treatment in the other 9 patients, leveling off at the end of the first year. The TIC rose well above the upper limit of the normal range in 4 patients, of whom 2 became hyperthyroid during the second year of treatment. TIC remained within the normal range in the other 5 patients, of whom 3 became hypothyroid after 12-24 months of treatment (1 subclinical, 2 overt). Although the TIC was significantly higher in the patients with hyperthyroidism than in the patients who remained euthyroid, the TIC test cannot be used to predict the occurrence of hyperthyroidism

  3. Healthy Dietary Patterns and Oxidative Stress as Measured by Fluorescent Oxidation Products in Nurses’ Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungyoun Jung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Healthy diets may lower oxidative stress and risk of chronic diseases. However, no previous studies examined associations between diet and fluorescent oxidation products (FlOP, a global marker of oxidative stress. We evaluated associations between healthy eating patterns (Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI, Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH, and Alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMED and FlOP, measured at three excitation/emission wavelengths (FlOP_360, FlOP_320, FlOP_400 from 2021 blood samples collected from 1688 women within the Nurses’ Health Study. AHEI, DASH, and aMED scores were significantly positively associated with FlOP_360 and FlOP_320 concentrations (p-trend ≤ 0.04, but not associated with FlOP_400. Among specific food groups that contribute to these diet scores, significantly positive associations were observed with legumes and vegetables for FlOP_360, vegetables and fruits for FlOP_320, and legumes and alcohol for FlOP_400. Inverse associations were observed with nuts, sweets or desserts, and olive oil for FlOP_360, nuts for FlOP_320 and sweets or desserts for FlOP_400 (all p-trend ≤ 0.05. However, FlOP variation due to diet was small compared to overall FlOP variation. In conclusion, AHEI, DASH, and aMED scores were unexpectedly positively, but weakly, associated with FlOP_360 and FlOP_320. However, these findings should be interpreted cautiously as the determinants of FlOP concentrations are not fully understood.

  4. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Jacob N.; Miara, Lincoln J.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Gopalan, Srikanth; Pal, Uday B.; Woicik, Joseph C.; Basu, Soumendra N.; Ludwig, Karl F.

    2012-12-01

    Commonly, SOFCs are operated at high temperatures (above 800°C). At these temperatures expensive housing is needed to contain an operating stack as well as coatings to contain the oxidation of the metallic interconnects. Lowering the temperature of an operating device would allow for more conventional materials to be used, thus lowering overall cost. Understanding the surface chemical states of cations in the surface of the SOFC cathode is vital to designing a system that will perform well at lower temperatures. The samples studied were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). 20% strontium doped lanthanum manganite (LSM-20) was grown on YSZ and NGO (neodymium gallate). The films on YSZ have a fiber texture. LSM-20 on NGO is heteroepitaxial. Lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF-6428) films were grown on LAO and YSZ with a GDC barrier layer. Total X-ray Reflection Fluorescence (TXRF) was used to depth profile the samples. In a typical experiment, the angle of the incident beam is varied though the critical angle. Below the critical angle, the x-ray decays as an evanescent wave and will only penetrate the top few nanometers. TXRF experiments done on LSM films have suggested strontium segregates to the surface and form strontium enriched nanoparticles (1). It should be pointed out that past studies have focused on 30% strontium A-site doping, but this project uses 20% strontium doped lanthanum manganite. XANES and EXAFS data were taken as a function of incoming angle to probe composition as a function of depth. XANES spectra can be difficult to analyze fully. For other materials density functional theory calculations compared to near edge measurements have been a good way to understand the 3d valence electrons (2).

  5. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements using microlens array and area imaging devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, Susanne; Lietz, Achim; Kroner, Margareta; Valler, Martin; Heilker, Ralf

    2004-02-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) assay formats are frequently used technologies in high-throughput screening. In this article, we have characterised the novel Plate::Vision(2) 96-microlens array reader (Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Germany) and compared it to the novel LEADseeker Generation IV multimodality imaging system (LEADseeker Gen IV; Amersham Biosciences UK Ltd., UK) for applications in the TRF mode. In europium measurements using the TRF mode, the Plate::Vision displayed a limit of detection for europium of approximately 3 pM, which was comparable to two established TRF readers, the Discovery and the Victor V (both PerkinElmer Life Sciences Inc., USA). The LEADseeker's limit of detection only extended down to europium concentrations of approximately 10 pM in these experiments. For TRF resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) experiments, a europium-biotin (Eu-biotin) conjugate was titrated with a streptavidin-allophycocyanin (SA-APC) conjugate. The Plate::Vision produced Z' values larger than 0.5 for the acceptor fluorophor emission with concentrations of Eu-biotin as low as 3 nM combined with 175 pM SA-APC. To achieve Z' values of at least 0.5 with the LEADseeker, concentrations of 10 nM Eu-biotin combined with SA-APC of at least 0.8 nM were required. In a drug screening application using TR-FRET, the energy transfer from a europium-labelled protein X (Eu-protein X) to a complex of biotinylated peptide Y with SA-APC was measured. Using the Plate::Vision, a Z' factor larger than 0.5 for the acceptor fluorophor emission was only obtained for a Eu-protein X concentration of at least 10 nM in combination with biotinylated peptide Y/SA-APC at saturating concentrations. Both the Plate::Vision and the LEADseeker show good quality results for applications in the TRF mode and enable an increased throughput based on their shortened measurement time in comparison to classic photomultiplier tube-based readers.

  6. Enthalpy Distributions of Arc Jet Flow Based on Measured Laser Induced Fluorescence, Heat Flux and Stagnation Pressure Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Leonard E.; Milhoan, James D.; Oelke, Lance; Godfrey, Dennis; Larin, Maksim Y.; Scott, Carl D.; Grinstead, Jay H.; DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The centerline total enthalpy of arc jet flow is determined using laser induced fluorescence of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. Each component of the energy, kinetic, thermal, and chemical can be determined from LIF measurements. Additionally, enthalpy distributions are inferred from heat flux and pressure probe distribution measurements using an engineering formula. Average enthalpies are determined by integration over the radius of the jet flow, assuming constant mass flux and a mass flux distribution estimated from computational fluid dynamics calculations at similar arc jet conditions. The trends show favorable agreement, but there is an uncertainty that relates to the multiple individual measurements and assumptions inherent in LIF measurements.

  7. A measurement of the decay K sub L yields. pi. sup 0. gamma. gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, G.D.; Buchholz, P.; Carosi, R.; Coward, D.; Cundy, D.; Doble, N.; Gatignon, L.; Grafstroem, P.; Hagelberg, R.; Nelson, H.N.; Wahl, H. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Peach, K.J. (Physics Dept., Univ. Edinburgh (United Kingdom)); Bluemer, H.; Heinz, R.; Kleinknecht, K.; Mayer, P.; Panzer, B.; Renk, B.; Rohrer, H.; Wagner, A. (Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Auge, E.; Fournier, D.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Harrus, I.; Perdereau, O.; Schaffer, A.C.; Serin, L. (Lab. de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, 91 - Orsay (France)); Bertanza, L.; Bigi, A.; Calafiura, P.; Calvetti, M.; Casali, R.; Mannelli, I.G.; Marzulli, V.M.; Nappi, A.; Pierazzini, G. (Dipt. di Fisica, Pisa (Italy) INFN, Pisa (Italy)); Holder, M.; Kreutz, A.; Rost, M.; Werthenbach, R. (Fachbereich Physik, Univ. Siegen (Germany))

    1992-06-25

    The full data set of the experiment NA31 at CERN has been used to analyse the decay mode K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma}. A signal of 63 events has been observed with an estimated background of 6.0{+-}1.7 events, corresponding to a branching ratio of (1.7{+-}0.3)x10{sup -6} consistent with our previous result based on partial statistics. The invariant mass spectrum of the two photons is found to be consistent with chiral perturbation theory, and the decay is dominated by the J=0 two-photon state. (orig.).

  8. Live-cell Microscopy and Fluorescence-based Measurement of Luminal pH in Intracellular Organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Luminal pH is an important functional feature of intracellular organelles. Acidification of the lumen of organelles such as endosomes, lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus plays a critical role in fundamental cellular processes. As such, measurement of the luminal pH of these organelles has relevance to both basic research and translational research. At the same time, accurate measurement of intraorganellar pH in living cells can be challenging and may be a limiting hurdle for research in some areas. Here, we describe three powerful methods to measure rigorously the luminal pH of different intracellular organelles, focusing on endosomes, lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus. The described methods are based on live imaging of pH-sensitive fluorescent probes and include: (1 A protocol based on quantitative, ratiometric measurement of endocytosis of pH-sensitive and pH-insensitive fluorescent conjugates of transferrin; (2 A protocol for the use of proteins tagged with a ratiometric variant of the pH-sensitive intrinsically fluorescent protein pHluorin; and (3 A protocol using the fluorescent dye LysoSensor™. We describe necessary reagents, key procedures, and methods and equipment for data acquisition and analysis. Examples of implementation of the protocols are provided for cultured cells derived from a cancer cell line and for primary cultures of mouse hippocampal neurons. In addition, we present strengths and weaknesses of the different described intraorganellar pH measurement methods. These protocols are likely to be of benefit to many researchers, from basic scientists to those conducting translational research with a focus on diseases in patient-derived cells.

  9. How to measure separation and angles between inter-molecular fluorescent markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    Structure and function of an individual biomolecule can be explored with minimum two fluorescent markers of different colors. Since the light of such markers can be spec- trally separated and imaged simultaneously, the markers can be colocalized. Here, we describe the method used for such two......-color colocalization microscopy. Then we extend it to fluorescent markers with fixed orientations and in intramolecular proximity. Our benchmarking of this extension produced two extra results: (a) we established short double-labeled DNA molecules as probes of 3D orientation of anything to which one can attach them...

  10. Uncertainty calculations for the measurement of in vivo bone lead by x-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, J M; Fleming, D E B

    2009-04-21

    In order to quantify the bone lead concentration from an in vivo x-ray fluorescence measurement, typically two estimates of the lead concentration are determined by comparing the normalized x-ray peak amplitudes from the Kalpha(1) and Kbeta(1) features to those of the calibration phantoms. In each case, the normalization consists of taking the ratio of the x-ray peak amplitude to the amplitude of the coherently scattered photon peak in the spectrum. These two Pb concentration estimates are then used to determine the weighted mean lead concentration of that sample. In calculating the uncertainties of these measurements, it is important to include any covariance terms where appropriate. When determining the uncertainty of the lead concentrations from each x-ray peak, the standard approach does not include covariance between the x-ray peaks and the coherently scattered feature. These spectral features originate from two distinct physical processes, and therefore no covariance between these features can exist. Through experimental and simulated data, we confirm that there is no observed covariance between the detected Pb x-ray peaks and the coherently scattered photon signal, as expected. This is in direct contrast to recent work published by Brito (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 6125-39). There is, however, covariance introduced in the calculation of the weighted mean lead concentration due to the common coherent normalization. This must be accounted for in calculating the uncertainty of the weighted mean lead concentration, as is currently the case. We propose here an alternative approach to calculating the weighted mean lead concentration in such a way as to eliminate the covariance introduced by the common coherent normalization. It should be emphasized that this alternative approach will only apply in situations in which the calibration line intercept is not included in the calculation of the Pb concentration from the spectral data: when the source of the intercept is

  11. Non-invasive detection of iron deficiency by fluorescence measurement of erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin in the lip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Georg; Homann, Christian; Teksan, Ilknur; Hasbargen, Uwe; Hasmüller, Stephan; Holdt, Lesca M; Khaled, Nadia; Sroka, Ronald; Stauch, Thomas; Stepp, Herbert; Vogeser, Michael; Brittenham, Gary M

    2016-02-17

    Worldwide, more individuals have iron deficiency than any other health problem. Most of those affected are unaware of their lack of iron, in part because detection of iron deficiency has required a blood sample. Here we report a non-invasive method to optically measure an established indicator of iron status, red blood cell zinc protoporphyrin, in the microcirculation of the lower lip. An optical fibre probe is used to illuminate the lip and acquire fluorescence emission spectra in ∼1 min. Dual-wavelength excitation with spectral fitting is used to distinguish the faint zinc protoporphyrin fluorescence from the much greater tissue background fluorescence, providing immediate results. In 56 women, 35 of whom were iron-deficient, the sensitivity and specificity of optical non-invasive detection of iron deficiency were 97% and 90%, respectively. This fluorescence method potentially provides a rapid, easy to use means for point-of-care screening for iron deficiency in resource-limited settings lacking laboratory infrastructure.

  12. Kinetics of a single cross-bridge in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy heart muscle measured by reverse Kretschmann fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettikolla, Prasad; Calander, Nils; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Borejdo, Julian

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a serious heart disease that often leads to a sudden cardiac death of young athletes. It is believed that the alteration of the kinetics of interaction between actin and myosin causes FHC by making the heart to pump blood inefficiently. We set out to check this hypothesis ex vivo. During contraction of heart muscle, a myosin cross-bridge imparts periodic force impulses to actin. The impulses are analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of fluorescently labeled actin. To minimize observation volume and background fluorescence, we carry out FCS measurements in surface plasmon coupled emission mode in a reverse Kretschmann configuration. Fluorescence is a result of near-field coupling of fluorophores excited in the vicinity of the metal-coated surface of a coverslip with the surface plasmons propagating in the metal. Surface plasmons decouple on opposite sides of the metal film and emit in a directional manner as far-field p-polarized radiation. We show that the rate of changes of orientation is significantly faster in contracting cardiac myofibrils of transgenic mice than wild type. These results are consistent with the fact that mutated heart muscle myosin translates actin faster in in vitro motility assays.

  13. Distinguishing nitrogen fertilization levels in field corn (Zea mays L.) with actively induced fluorescence and passive reflectance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurtrey, J.E. III; Chappelle, E.W.; Kim, M.S.; Meisinger, J.J.; Corp, L.A

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is an active sensing technique capable of capturing immediate and specific indications of changes in plant physiology and metabolism as they relate to the concentration and photosynthetic activity of the plant pigments. Reflectance is a passive sensing technique that can capture differences in the concentration of the primary plant pigments. Fluorescence and reflectance were compared for their ability to measure levels of plant stress that are of agronomic importance in corn (Zea mays L.) crops. Laboratory LIF and reflectance spectra were made on excised leaves from field grown corn. Changes in the visible region of the spectrum were compared between groups of plants fertilized with seven different levels of nitrogen (N) fertilization. A pulsed nitrogen laser emitting photons at a wavelength of 337 nm was used as a fluorescence excitation source. Differences in maximum intensity of fluorescence occurred at 440 nm, 525 nm, 685 nm, and 740 nm. Significant separations were found between levels of N fertilization at several LIF wavelength ratios. Several reflectance algorithms also produced significant separations between certain levels of N fertilization

  14. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown.

  15. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankan, P.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D.C.; Doebele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has a bandwith of 0.15 cm -1 . The wavelength of the laser radiation is calibrated by simultaneous recording of the two-photon laser induced fluorescence spectrum of nitric oxide. The excited hydrogen populations are calibrated on the basis of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements. A population distribution is measured in the shock region of a pure hydrogen plasma expansion. The higher rotational levels (J>5) show overpopulation compared to a Boltzmann distribution determined from the lower rotational levels (J≤5)

  16. Measurement of the Exclusive Branching Fractions B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K*{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K*{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2004-02-12

    The authors present the results of searches for B decays to the two charmless two-body final states B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K*{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K*{sup +}, based on 20.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected in 1999 and 2000 with the BABAR detector at PEP-II. They find the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K*{sup 0}) = (19.8 {sub -5.6}{sup +6.5} {+-} 1.7) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K*{sup +}) = (22.1 {sub -9.2}{sup +11.1} {+-} 3.3) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error quoted is the statistical and the second systematic.

  17. A rate-equation model for polarized laser-induced fluorescence to measure electric field in glow discharge He plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takiyama, K.; Watanabe, M.; Oda, T.

    1998-01-01

    Possibility of applying polarized laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy for measuring the electric field in a plasma with a large collisional depolarization has been investigated. A rate equation model including the depolarization process was employed to analyze the time evolution of LIF polarization components. The polarized LIF pulse shapes observed in the sheath of a He glow discharge plasma were successfully reproduced, and the electric field distribution was obtained with high accuracy. (author)

  18. New developments in the analysis and measurement of thicknesses by excitation of the fluorescent lines by means of β particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, P.

    1960-01-01

    The process for analysing and measuring the thickness of deposits by β-X fluorescence which we have already described has undergone further development. The use of promethium-147 and krypton-85 sources makes it possible to reduce the background noise which is observed with strontium-90. We present the results obtained for various measurements of the thickness of metallic coatings and the continuous measurement of calcium and of iron in ore samples. We describe the tests carried out with a view to analysing the X-rays by means of a crystal. (author) [fr

  19. CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF THE CYTOPLASMIC PH IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS WITH A FLUORESCENT PH INDICATOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLENAAR, D; ABEE, T; KONINGS, WN

    1991-01-01

    The cytoplasmic pH of Lactococcus lactis was studied with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 (and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). A novel method was applied for loading bacterial cells with BCECF, which consists of briefly treating a dense cell suspension with acid in the

  20. Optimized measurements of separations and angles between intra-molecular fluorescent markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kim; Sung, Jongmin; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel, yet simple tool for the study of structure and function of biomolecules by extending two-colour co-localization microscopy to fluorescent molecules with fixed orientations and in intra-molecular proximity. From each colour-separated microscope image in a time-lapse movie...

  1. Applications of phasors to in vitro time-resolved fluorescence measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefl, Martin; James, N. G.; Jameson, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 410, č. 1 (2011), s. 62-69 ISSN 0003-2697 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : phasor * fraquency domain * fluorescence lifetimes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.996, year: 2011

  2. A novel device for quantitative measurement of chloride concentration by fluorescence indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junsheng; Wu, Xudong; Chon, Chanhee; Gonska, Tanja; Li, Dongqing

    2012-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-threatening genetic disease. At present, the common method for diagnosis of CF is to detect the chloride concentration in sweat using ion-selective electrodes. However, the current sweat testing methods require a relatively large quantity of sweat sample, at least 25 µL, which is very difficult to obtain, especially for newborns. This paper presents a new method and a new device for rapid detection of the chloride concentration from a small volume of solution. In this method, the chloride concentration is determined quantitatively by the fluorescence intensity of MQAE, a chloride ion fluorescent indicator. In this device, the sample is carried by a small piece of filter paper on a cover glass exposed to an UV LED light source. The resulting fluorescent signals are detected by a Si photodiode. Data acquisition and processing are accomplished by LabVIEW software in a PDA. Based on the Stern-Volmer relationship, the effects of different parameters on the fluorescence intensity were analyzed. The observed significant difference between 40 and 60 mM (the borderline of chloride concentration for CF) is discussed in this paper. The results show that detection can be completed within 10 s. The minimum detectable volume of the chloride solution is 1 μL. The novel method and the device are of great potential for CF diagnosis.

  3. Red and far red Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence as a measure of plant photosynthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rossini, P. M.; Nedbal, L.; Guanter, L.; Ač, Alexander; Alonso, L.; Burkart, A.; Cogliati, S.; Colombo, R.; Damm, A.; Drusch, M.; Hanuš, Jan; Janoutová, Růžena; Julitta, T.; Kokkalis, P.; Moreno, J.; Novotný, Jan; Panigada, C.; Pinto, F.; Schickling, A.; Schuettemeyer, D.; Zemek, František; Rascher, U.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 6 (2015), s. 1632-1639 ISSN 0094-8276 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : sun-induced fluorescence * remote sensing * stress detection * airborne images * HyPlant Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 4.212, year: 2015

  4. A fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe using photonic crystal fiber for nanoscale thermometry based on fluorescence-lifetime measurement of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takuro; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Saiki, Toshiharu; Nagasaka, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel nanoscale temperature-measurement method using fluorescence in the near-field called fluorescence near-field optics thermal nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN). Fluor-NOTN enables the temperature distributions of nanoscale materials to be measured in vivo/in situ. The proposed method measures temperature by detecting the temperature dependent fluorescence lifetimes of Cd/Se quantum dots (QDs). For a high-sensitivity temperature measurement, the auto-fluorescence generated from a fiber probe should be reduced. In order to decrease the noise, we have fabricated a novel near-field optical-fiber probe by fusion-splicing a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF). The validity of the novel fiber probe was assessed experimentally by evaluating the auto-fluorescence spectra of the PCF. Due to the decrease of auto-fluorescence, a six- to ten-fold increase of S/N in the near-field fluorescence lifetime detection was achieved with the newly fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe. Additionally, the near-field fluorescence lifetime of the quantum dots was successfully measured by the fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe at room temperature, and was estimated to be 10.0 ns.

  5. A Fusion-Spliced Near-Field Optical Fiber Probe Using Photonic Crystal Fiber for Nanoscale Thermometry Based on Fluorescence-Lifetime Measurement of Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiharu Saiki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel nanoscale temperature-measurement method using fluorescence in the near-field called Fluorescence Near-field Optics Thermal Nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN. Fluor-NOTN enables the temperature distributions of nanoscale materials to be measured in vivo/in situ. The proposed method measures temperature by detecting the temperature dependent fluorescence lifetimes of Cd/Se Quantum Dots (QDs. For a high-sensitivity temperature measurement, the auto-fluorescence generated from a fiber probe should be reduced. In order to decrease the noise, we have fabricated a novel near-field optical-fiber probe by fusion-splicing a photonic crystal fiber (PCF and a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF. The validity of the novel fiber probe was assessed experimentally by evaluating the auto-fluorescence spectra of the PCF. Due to the decrease of auto-fluorescence, a six- to ten-fold increase of S/N in the near-field fluorescence lifetime detection was achieved with the newly fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe. Additionally, the near-field fluorescence lifetime of the quantum dots was successfully measured by the fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe at room temperature, and was estimated to be 10.0 ns.

  6. Measurement of the G asymmetry for the {gamma}p{yields}N{pi} channels in the {delta}(1232) resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Arends, H.-J.; Beck, R.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Jennewein, P.; Lang, M.; Rost, M.; Tamas, G.; Thomas, A.; Walcher, Th. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Altieri, S.; Panzeri, A.; Pinelli, T. [INFN, Pavia (Italy); Univ. di Pavia (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica; Annand, J.R.M.; Livingston, K.; McGeorge, J.C.; Rosner, G. [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); d' Hose, N. [CEA Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Dutz, H. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Goertz, S.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Bochum (Germany); Grabmayr, P.; Krimmer, J. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Hasegawa, S.; Horikawa, N. [Nagoya University, CIRSE, Nagoya (Japan); Holvoet, H.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Lannoy, B.; Rostomyan, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Vyver, R. van de [Universiteit Gent, Subatomaire en Stralingsfysica, Gent (Belgium); Iwata, T. [Nagoya University, Department of Physics, Nagoya (Japan); Kondratiev, R. [INR, Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation); Preobrajenski, I. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation). INR; Schumacher, M.; Seitz, B.; Zapadtka, F. [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    The G asymmetry of the {gamma}p{yields}N{pi} reaction has been measured for the first time for E{sub {gamma}}=340{+-}14 MeV. This observable, for which very scarce published data exist, plays an important role to disentangle the contributions of the various nucleon resonances. The experiment, performed at the Mainz microtron MAMI, used a 4{pi}-detector system, a linearly polarized, tagged photon beam, and a longitudinally polarized proton target. (orig.)

  7. Measurement of the polarization transfer coefficient K sub LS in the p vectorp yields d vector. pi. sup + reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abegg, R.; Green, P.W.; Greeniaus, L.G.; Hutcheon, D.A. (TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) Centre for Subatomic Research, Univ. Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)); Yanlin, Y.; Korkmaz, E.; Mack, D.; Moss, G.A.; Olsen, W.C. (Centre for Subatomic Research, Univ. Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)); Stevenson, N.R. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada))

    1992-04-06

    We have measured the polarization transfer asymmetries of the reaction p vectorp{yields}d vector{pi}{sup +} from the longitudinally polarized proton to the sideways polarized deuteron for deuteron center-of-mass angles from 25deg to 140deg. Our longitudinal to sideways polarization transfer data are best represented by the partial-wave amplitude fits of Bugg et al. while several model calculations are only in qualitative agreement. (orig.).

  8. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Keilhauer, B; Fraga, M; Matthews, J; Sakaki, N; Tameda, Y; Tsunesada, Y; Ulrich, A

    2012-01-01

    Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of \\emph{Air Fluorescence Workshops} commenced in 2002. At the 8$^{\\rm{th}}$ Air Fluoresc...

  9. The Air Microwave Yield (AMY experiment to measure the GHz emission from air shower plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smida R.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The AMY experiment aims to measure the Microwave Bremsstrahlung Radiation (MBR emitted by air-showers secondary electrons accelerating in collisions with neutral molecules of the atmosphere. The measurements are performed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF of Frascati INFN National Laboratories and the final purpose is to characterize the process to be used in a next generation detectors of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (up to 1020eV. We describe the experimental set-up and the first test measurement performed in November 2011.

  10. Production of extremely low volatile organic compounds from biogenic emissions: Measured yields and atmospheric implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Tuija; Berndt, Torsten; Makkonen, Risto; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Junninen, Heikki; Paasonen, Pauli; Stratmann, Frank; Herrmann, Hartmut; Guenther, Alex B; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku; Ehn, Mikael; Sipilä, Mikko

    2015-06-09

    Oxidation products of monoterpenes and isoprene have a major influence on the global secondary organic aerosol (SOA) burden and the production of atmospheric nanoparticles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Here, we investigate the formation of extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOC) from O3 and OH radical oxidation of several monoterpenes and isoprene in a series of laboratory experiments. We show that ELVOC from all precursors are formed within the first minute after the initial attack of an oxidant. We demonstrate that under atmospherically relevant concentrations, species with an endocyclic double bond efficiently produce ELVOC from ozonolysis, whereas the yields from OH radical-initiated reactions are smaller. If the double bond is exocyclic or the compound itself is acyclic, ozonolysis produces less ELVOC and the role of the OH radical-initiated ELVOC formation is increased. Isoprene oxidation produces marginal quantities of ELVOC regardless of the oxidant. Implementing our laboratory findings into a global modeling framework shows that biogenic SOA formation in general, and ELVOC in particular, play crucial roles in atmospheric CCN production. Monoterpene oxidation products enhance atmospheric new particle formation and growth in most continental regions, thereby increasing CCN concentrations, especially at high values of cloud supersaturation. Isoprene-derived SOA tends to suppress atmospheric new particle formation, yet it assists the growth of sub-CCN-size primary particles to CCN. Taking into account compound specific monoterpene emissions has a moderate effect on the modeled global CCN budget.

  11. Measurement of the {eta}{yields}3{pi}{sup 0} slope parameter {alpha} with the KLOE detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosino, F., E-mail: Fabio.Ambrosino@na.infn.i [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita ' Federico II' , Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Archilli, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); Beltrame, P. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Bencivenni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Bini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); Bloise, C. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Bocchetta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' Roma Tre' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Bossi, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Branchini, P. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Campana, P.; Capon, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Capussela, T., E-mail: Tiziana.Capussela@na.infn.i [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita ' Federico II' , Napoli (Italy); Ceradini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' Roma Tre' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Ciambrone, P.; De Lucia, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); De Santis, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); De Simone, P. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); De Zorzi, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy)

    2010-10-25

    We present a measurement of the slope parameter {alpha} for the {eta}{yields}3{pi}{sup 0} decay, with the KLOE experiment at the DA{Phi}NE {phi}-factory, based on a background free sample of {approx}17 million {eta} mesons produced in {phi} radiative decays. By fitting the event density in the Dalitz plot we determine {alpha}=-0.0301{+-}0.0035stat{sub -0.0035}{sup +0.0022}syst. The result is in agreement with recent measurements from hadro- and photo-production experiments.

  12. Label-free silicon nanodots featured ratiometric fluorescent aptasensor for lysosomal imaging and pH measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Guo, Shan; Cheng, Shibo; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2017-08-15

    The homeostasis of lysosomal pH is crucial in cell physiology. Developing small fluorescent nanosensors for lysosome imaging and ratiometric measurement of pH is highly demanded yet challenging. Herein, a pH-sensitive fluorescein tagged aptamer AS1411 has been utilized to covalently modify the label-free fluorescent silicon nanodots via a crosslinker for construction of a ratiometric pH biosensor. The established aptasensor exhibits the advantages of ultrasmall size, hypotoxicity, excellent pH reversibility and good photostability, which favors its application in an intracellular environment. Using human breast MCF-7 cancer cells and MCF-10A normal cells as the model, this aptasensor shows cell specificity for cancer cells and displays a wide pH response range of 4.5-8.0 in living cells. The results demonstrate that the pH of MCF-7 cells is 5.1, which is the expected value for acidic organelles. Lysosome imaging and accurate measurement of pH in MCF-7 cells have been successfully conducted based on this nanosensor via fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. OH Reactivity and Potential SOA Yields from Volatile Organic Compounds and Other Trace Gases Measured in Controlled Laboratory Biomass Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, J. B.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Goldan, P. D.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; de Gouw, J. A.; Burling, I. R.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    A comprehensive suite of instruments were used to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other trace gases (e.g., CO, CH4, NO2, etc.) emitted from controlled burns of various fuel types common to the Southeastern and Southwestern United States. These laboratory-based measurements were conducted in February 2009 at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. An on-line GC-MS provided highly speciated VOC measurements of alkenes, alkanes, oxygenates, aromatics, biogenics, and nitrogen-containing compounds during the flaming or smoldering phases of replicate burns. The speciated GC-MS “grab” samples were integrated with fast-response gas-phase measurements (e.g., PTR-MS, PTR-IT-MS, NI-PT-CIMS, and FTIR) in order to determine VOC emission ratios and the fraction of identified vs. unidentifiable mass detected by PTR-MS. Emission ratios were used to calculate OH reactivity, which is a measure of potential ozone formation, as well as potential secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from the various fuel types. Small oxygenated VOCs had the highest emission ratios of the compounds observed. Alkenes dominated the VOC OH reactivity, which occasionally exceeded 1000 s-1. Calculated SOA yields from known precursors were dominated by aromatic VOCs, such as toluene, naphthalene (C10H8), and 1,3-benzenediol (C6H6O2, resorcinol). The contribution of several compounds not typically reported in ambient air measurements, such as substituted furans (C4H4O), pyrroles (C4H5N), and unsaturated C9 aromatics (C9H10), on OH reactivity and SOA yields will be discussed.

  14. Propidium iodide and PicoGreen as dyes for the DNA fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kral, Teresa; Widerak, K.; Langner, M.; Hof, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2005), s. 179-183 ISSN 1053-0509 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400400413; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/2308 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : nucleic acid * fluorescence labeling * PicoGreen * propidium iodide Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.038, year: 2005

  15. Recent Developments in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for Diffusion Measurements in Planar Lipid Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2010), s. 427-457 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0114; GA AV ČR GEMEM/09/E006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : lateral diffusion * fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy * confocal microscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.279, year: 2010

  16. Measurement of the pressure dependence of air fluorescence emision induced by electronos

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ave, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Nožka, Libor; Palatka, Miroslav; Řídký, Jan; Schovánek, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2007), s. 41-57 ISSN 0927-6505 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA 134; GA MŠk LC527 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : air fluorescence detection * ultra high energy cosmic rays * nitrogen collisional quenching Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.483, year: 2007

  17. Spectrally resolved pressure dependence measurements of air fluorescence emission with AIRFLY

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ave, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Buonomo, B.; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Nožka, Libor; Palatka, Miroslav; Řídký, Jan; Schovánek, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 597, č. 1 (2008), s. 41-45 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527; GA MŠk(CZ) LA08016; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : air fluorescence * cosmic rays Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.019, year: 2008

  18. Reaction-time-resolved measurements of laser-induced fluorescence in a shock tube with a single laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabeti, S.; Fikri, M.; Schulz, C.

    2017-11-01

    Shock tubes allow for the study of ultra-fast gas-phase reactions on the microsecond time scale. Because the repetition rate of the experiments is low, it is crucial to gain as much information as possible from each individual measurement. While reaction-time-resolved species concentration and temperature measurements with fast absorption methods are established, conventional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements with pulsed lasers provide data only at a single reaction time. Therefore, fluorescence methods have rarely been used in shock-tube diagnostics. In this paper, a novel experimental concept is presented that allows reaction-time-resolved LIF measurements with one single laser pulse using a test section that is equipped with several optical ports. After the passage of the shock wave, the reactive mixture is excited along the center of the tube with a 266-nm laser beam directed through a window in the end wall of the shock tube. The emitted LIF signal is collected through elongated sidewall windows and focused onto the entrance slit of an imaging spectrometer coupled to an intensified CCD camera. The one-dimensional spatial resolution of the measurement translates into a reaction-time-resolved measurement while the species information can be gained from the spectral axis of the detected two-dimensional image. Anisole pyrolysis was selected as the benchmark reaction to demonstrate the new apparatus.

  19. Predicting seed yield in perennial ryegrass using repeated canopy reflectance measurements and PLSR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislum, René; Deleuran, Lise Christina; Boelt, Birte

    2009-01-01

    reflectance measurements was from approximately 600 cumulative growing degree-days (CGDD) to approximately 900 CGDD. This is the period just before and at heading of the seed crop. Furthermore, regression coefficients showed that information about N and water is important. The results support the development...

  20. Cultural control measures to diminish sorghum yield loss and parasite success under Striga hermonthica infestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ast, van A.; Bastiaans, L.; Katile, S.

    2005-01-01

    Prospects of reducing Striga hermonthica (Del.) Benth. parasitism by means of cultural control measures were assessed. In a pot experiment, deep planting, the use of transplants and shallow soil-tillage, strongly delayed and reduced Striga infection of a sensitive and a tolerant sorghum cultivar.

  1. Forage Quality and Composition Measurements as Predictors of Ethanol Yield from Maize (Zea mays L.) Stover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improvement of biofeedstock quality for cellulosic ethanol production will be facilitated by inexpensive and rapid methods of evaluation, such as those already employed in the field of ruminant nutrition. Our objective was to evaluate whether forage quality and compositional measurements could be u...

  2. Fluorescently Labeled Cyclodextrin Derivatives as Exogenous Markers for Real-Time Transcutaneous Measurement of Renal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiaguo; Weinfurter, Stefanie; Pinto, Pedro Caetano; Pretze, Marc; Kränzlin, Bettina; Pill, Johannes; Federica, Rodeghiero; Perciaccante, Rossana; Ciana, Leopoldo Della; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Gretz, Norbert

    2016-10-19

    Evaluation of renal function is crucial for a number of clinical situations. Here, we reported a novel exogenous fluorescent marker (FITC-HPβCD) to real-time assess renal function by using a transcutaneous fluorescent detection technique. FITC-HPβCD was designed based on the principle of renal clearance of designed drugs. It displays favorable fluorescent properties, high hydrophilicity, low plasma protein binding, and high stability in porcine liver esterase as well as in plasma and nontoxicity. More importantly, FITC-HPβCD can be efficiently and rapidly filtered by glomerulus and completely excreted into urine without proximal tubular reabsorption or secretion in rat models. Additionally, the marker was well-tolerated, with nearly 100% urinary recovery of the given doses, and no metabolism were found. Relying on this novel kidney function marker and transcutaneous devices, we demonstrate a rapid, robust, and convenient approach for real-time assessing renal function without the need of time-consuming blood and urine sample preparation. Our work provides a promising tool for noninvasive real-time monitoring of renal function in vivo.

  3. Feasibility study for the in vivo measurement of lead in bone using L-x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielopolski, L.; Slatkin, D.N.; Vartsky, D.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    Lead deposits in bone were detected by x-ray fluorescence using x-rays from either a 125 I or a 109 Cd source. Measurements were taken from tibia in intact human legs, post-mortem. On the basis of preliminary measurements, it was concluded that an exposure of one rad is adequate for determination of lead in bone. Both the advantages and the disadvantages of L-x-rays, used in the technique developed for this study, are compared with those of K-x-rays

  4. Measurements of Bacterial Concentrations on a Millimeter Scale in Ice Cores With a Scanning Laser Fluorescence Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, P.; Rohde, R. A.; Bramall, N. E.; Bay, R. C.

    2006-12-01

    We report non-destructive detection of variability on a mm depth scale in the organic content of ice cores at NICL, as determined by the fluorescence spectrum measured by a Targeted Ultraviolet Chemical Sensor (TUCS). Many of the spectra we obtained are consistent with the amino acid tryptophan, a strongly fluorescing constituent in microbes. Identification with native fluorescence of microbes is supported by previous measurements of varying microbial concentration in samples from selected regions of the GISP2 core (Tung et al., 2005; 2006) that are consistent with our observations at the same depths. Sub-mm depth resolution was achieved and structure at this scale was observed. At each depth the fluorescence emission spectrum was measured at 5 wavelengths using 20-nm narrow band filters plus a long pass channel. The spectrum of microbes was calibrated by making lab measurements of fluorescence of various species and is distinguishable from mineral dust and metals due to differences in spectral shape. In bulk ice samples from 3 depths in the GISP2 core, where a table of methane concentrations (Ed Brook, unpublished) had shown several excesses above the atmospheric contribution, Tung et al. (2005) found 10-fold excesses of microbial concentrations at 2954 m and 3036 m and a 3-fold excess at 3018 m. In the present work we found strong, rapidly varying organic signals at all three depths. At 3018 m the peak value was much stronger than that obtained by Brook and occurred in the core section below the one he studied. Since he measured methane at several-meter depth intervals, and since we found the microbial excesses to be concentrated in 0.3 m intervals, we conclude that of order 30 microbe-rich regions may be present in GISP2. The 3 microbe-rich depths found by Tung et al. (2005) were less than 90 m above the basal ice at 3041-3053 m. The large fluctuations in apparent tryptophan concentrations that we found at 2954, 3018, and 3036 m are consistent with microbe

  5. Creatinine measurements often yielded false estimates of progression in chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, M.; Drew, H.H.; LaFrance, N.D.

    1988-01-01

    In 9 of 22 observation periods (lasting an average of 15 months) in 17 patients with moderate to severe chronic renal failure (GFR 4 to 23 ml/min), rates of progression as estimated from the linear regression on time of 24-hour creatinine clearance (b1) differed significantly from rates of progression as estimated from the regression on time of urinary clearance of 99mTc-DTPA (b2), during all or part of the period of observation. b1 exceeded b2 in four cases and was less than b2 in the other five. Thus there were gradual changes in the fractional tubular secretion of creatinine in individual patients, in both directions. Owing to these changes, measurements of creatinine clearance gave erroneous impressions of the rate or existence of progression during all or a portion of the period of observation in nearly half of these patients. In the 22 studies as a group, using the entire periods of observation, b1 indicated significantly more rapid progression (by 0.18 +/- 0.06 ml/min/month, P less than 0.01) than did b2, and had a significantly greater variance. Measurements of progression based on the rate of change of reciprocal plasma creatinine (multiplied by an average rate of urinary creatinine excretion in each study) were equally misleading, even though less variable. We conclude that sequential creatinine measurements are often misleading as measures of progression and should, when feasible, be replaced by urinary clearance of isotopes in following patients with chronic renal failure

  6. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: an efficient tool for measuring size, size-distribution and polydispersity of microemulsion droplets in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Nibedita; Dev Verma, Sachin; Singh, Moirangthem Kiran; Sen, Sobhan

    2011-10-15

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an ideal tool for measuring molecular diffusion and size under extremely dilute conditions. However, the power of FCS has not been utilized to its best to measure diffusion and size parameters of complex chemical systems. Here, we apply FCS to measure the size, and, most importantly, the size distribution and polydispersity of a supramolecular nanostructure (i.e., microemulsion droplets, MEDs) in dilute solution. It is shown how the refractive index mismatch of a solution can be corrected in FCS to obtain accurate size parameters of particles, bypassing the optical matching problem of light scattering techniques that are used often for particle-size measurements. We studied the MEDs of 13 different W(0) values from 2 to 50 prepared in a ternary mixture of water, sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT), and isooctane, with sulforhodamine-B as a fluorescent marker. We find that, near the optical matching point of MEDs, the dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements underestimate the droplet sizes while FCS estimates the accurate ones. A Gaussian distribution model (GDM) and a maximum-entropy-based FCS data fitting model (MEMFCS) are used to analyze the fluorescence correlation curves that unfold Gaussian-type size distributions of MEDs in solution. We find the droplet size varies linearly with W(0) up to ~20, but beyond this W(0) value, the size variation deviates from this linearity. To explain nonlinear variation of droplet size for W(0) values beyond ~20, we invoke a model (the coated-droplet model) that incorporates the size polydispersity of the droplets. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. On the measurement of the delayed neutron yields in effectively infinite critical media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filip, A.; d'Angelo, A.

    1992-01-01

    Considering the persistent uncertainties (∼ 5%) in the prediction of the reactivity scale (β eff ) for a fast power reactor, an international project was recently initiated in the framework of the Organization of Economic Cooperation Development/Nuclear Energy Agency activities for reevaluation, new measurements and integral benchmarking of delayed neutron data and related kinetic parameters (principally β eff ). The integral benchmarking, the β eff experiment, planned at Cadarache (CEA-France) on Masurca fast assembly, aims to extract reliable information both on basic delayed neutron data (namely ν d ) and on the reactor response separation of effects a particular strategy is adopted. Concerning the experimental side, several techniques for measuring the β eff (deterministic and noise) on several clean, large cores of different ratio of fissile nuclides are planned. Concerning the interpretation of the measurements, an adapted method related to the effectively infinite critical media (the Perturbed Fundamental Mode) was developed. Moreover, the information on ν d from direct (nuclear) remeasurements and/or reevaluations are included in the final interpretation. In this paper the authors present a preliminary analysis of the Masurca planned β eff experiment. The results permit the authors to expect firstly a significant reduction of the uncertainties in ν d for U235, Pu 239 and U238 (to ± 2%, 3% and 3.5% respectively) and, secondly, a better insight in the effectiveness problem

  8. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Verveer, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the

  9. HARP targets pion production cross section and yield measurements. Implications for MiniBooNE neutrino flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickremasinghe, Don Athula Abeyarathna [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The prediction of the muon neutrino flux from a 71.0 cm long beryllium target for the MiniBooNE experiment is based on a measured pion production cross section which was taken from a short beryllium target (2.0 cm thick - 5% nuclear interaction length) in the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment at CERN. To verify the extrapolation to our longer target, HARP also measured the pion production from 20.0 cm and 40.0 cm beryllium targets. The measured production yields, d2Nπ± (p; θ )=dpd Ω, on targets of 50% and 100% nuclear interaction lengths in the kinematic rage of momentum from 0.75 GeV/c to 6.5 GeV/c and the range of angle from 30 mrad to 210 mrad are presented along with an update of the short target cross sections. The best fitted extended Sanford-Wang (SW) model parameterization for updated short beryllium target π+ production cross section is presented. Yield measurements for all three targets are also compared with that from the Monte Carlo predictions in the MiniBooNE experiment for different SW parameterization. The comparisons of vμ flux predictions for updated SW model is presented.

  10. Estimation of Corn Yield and Soil Nitrogen via Soil Electrical Conductivity Measurement Treated with Organic, Chemical and Biological Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Khalilzade

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Around the world maize is the second crop with the most cultivated areas and amount of production, so as the most important strategic crop, have a special situation in policies, decision making, resources and inputs allocation. On the other side, negative environmental consequences of intensive consumption of agrochemicals resulted to change view concerning food production. One of the most important visions is sustainable production of enough food plus attention to social, economic and environmental aspects. Many researchers stated that the first step to achieve this goal is optimization and improvement of resources use efficiencies. According to little knowledge on relation between soil electrical conductivity and yield of maize, beside the environmental concerns about nitrogen consumption and need to replace chemical nitrogen by ecological inputs, this study designed and aimed to evaluate agroecological characteristics of corn and some soil characteristics as affected by application of organic and biological fertilizers under field conditions. Materials and Methods In order to probing the possibility of grain yield and soil nitrogen estimation via measurement of soil properties, a field experiment was conducted during growing season 2010 at Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran. A randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications was used. Treatments included: 1- manure (30 ton ha-1, 2-vermicompost (10 ton ha-1, 3- nitroxin (containing Azotobacter sp. and Azospirillum sp., inoculation was done according to Kennedy et al., 4- nitrogen as urea (400 kg ha-1 and 5- control (without fertilizer. Studied traits were soil pH, soil EC, soil respiration rate, N content of soil and maize yield. Soil respiration rate was measured using equation 1: CO2= (V0- V× N×22 Equation 1 In which V0 is the volume of consumed acid for control treatment titration, V is of the volume of consumed acid for sample treatment

  11. Applications of MODIS Fluorescent Line Height Measurements to Monitor Water Quality Trends and Algal Bloom Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andrew; Moreno-Mardinan, Max; Ryan, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in satellite and airborne remote sensing, such as improvements in sensor and algorithm calibrations, processing techniques and atmospheric correction procedures have provided for increased coverage of remote-sensing, ocean-color products for coastal regions. In particular, for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensor calibration updates, improved aerosol retrievals and new aerosol models has led to improved atmospheric correction algorithms for turbid waters and have improved the retrieval of ocean color in coastal waters. This has opened the way for studying ocean phenomena and processes at finer spatial scales, such as the interactions at the land-sea interface, trends in coastal water quality and algal blooms. Human population growth and changes in coastal management practices have brought about significant changes in the concentrations of organic and inorganic, particulate and dissolved substances entering the coastal ocean. There is increasing concern that these inputs have led to declines in water quality and have increase local concentrations of phytoplankton, which cause harmful algal blooms. In two case studies we present MODIS observations of fluorescence line height (FLH) to 1) assess trends in water quality for Tampa Bay, Florida and 2) illustrate seasonal and annual variability of algal bloom activity in Monterey Bay, California as well as document estuarine/riverine plume induced red tide events. In a comprehensive analysis of long term (2003-2011) in situ monitoring data and satellite imagery from Tampa Bay we assess the validity of the MODIS FLH product against chlorophyll-a and a suite of water quality parameters taken in a variety of conditions throughout a large optically complex estuarine system. A systematic analysis of sampling sites throughout the bay is undertaken to understand how the relationship between FLH and in situ chlorophyll-a responds to varying conditions and to develop a near decadal trend in

  12. Experimental approach to measure thick target neutron yields induced by heavy ions for shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinh N.D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Double differential (angular and energy neutron distributions were measured using an activation foil technique. Reactions were induced by impinging two low-energy heavy-ion beams accelerated with the GANIL CSS1 cyclotron: (36S (12 MeV/u and 208Pb (6.25 MeV/u onto thick natCu targets. Results have been compared to Monte-Carlo calculations from two codes (PHITS and FLUKA for the purpose of benchmarking radiation protection and shielding requirements. This comparison suggests a disagreement between calculations and experiment, particularly for high-energy neutrons.

  13. Characterization of a versatile reference instrument for traceable fluorescence measurements using different illumination and viewing geometries specified in practical colorimetry—part 2: sphere geometry (8:d)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwinkels, Joanne; Neil, William; Noël, Mario; Côté, Eric

    2017-02-01

    In the second part of this two-part series on the development of a versatile reference instrument at the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), we have extended the characterization of the NRC Reference Goniospectrofluorimeter to high-accuracy fluorescence measurements in a sphere geometry (8:d) that is specified in standard test methods for many practical applications in colorimetry. This builds upon the work reported in part-one of this series which described in detail the design, characterization and validation of this new instrument for realizing a total spectral radiance factor scale in a bidirectional (45a:0) geometry. To extend the measurement capabilities to a sphere geometry, it was configured with a large diameter integrating sphere accessory. Preliminary results using a substitution-mode operating procedure showed large sphere errors that were characterized and corrected for. To improve this traceability, the sphere was modified to operate in comparison-mode and this effectively eliminated many of the sphere-related errors that typically limit the accuracy of sphere-based fluorescence measurements. The performance of the instrument configured for a sphere geometry (8:d) with this modified sphere design has been validated by means of comparison measurements of both non-fluorescent and fluorescent artifacts. The reflectance component has been validated using non-fluorescent comparison samples that have been calibrated under the same geometric conditions with traceability to the NRC Absolute Reflectometer (d:0 geometry). The fluorescent-only component has been validated using near-Lambertian fluorescent reflecting materials with traceability to the NRC Reference Spectrofluorimeter (45:0 geometry), under the assumption that this component is nearly the same for these two geometries. This work has enabled NRC to provide an uninterrupted link for improved traceability of fluorescence calibrations that specify a sphere geometry. These calibration requests

  14. Measurement of interferences associated with the detection of the hydroperoxy radical in the atmosphere using laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Michelle M.; Dusanter, Sebastien; Stevens, Philip S.

    2018-01-01

    One technique used to measure concentrations of the hydroperoxy radical (HO2) in the atmosphere involves chemically converting it to OH by addition of NO and subsequent detection of OH. However, some organic peroxy radicals (RO2) can also be rapidly converted to HO2 (and subsequently OH) in the presence of NO, interfering with measurements of ambient HO2 radical concentrations. This interference must be characterized for each instrument to determine to what extent various RO2 radicals interfere with measurements of HO2 and to assess the impact of this interference on past measurements. The efficiency of RO2-to-HO2 conversion for the Indiana University laser-induced fluorescence-fluorescence assay by gas expansion (IU-FAGE) instrument was measured for a variety of RO2 radicals. Known quantities of OH and HO2 radicals were produced from the photolysis of water vapor at 184.9 nm, and RO2 radicals were produced by the reaction of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with OH. The conversion efficiency of RO2 radicals to HO2 was measured when NO was added to the sampling cell for conditions employed during several previous field campaigns. For these conditions, approximately 80 % of alkene-derived RO2 radicals and 20 % of alkane-derived RO2 radicals were converted to HO2. Based on these measurements, interferences from various RO2 radicals contributed to approximately 35 % of the measured HO2 signal during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) 2006 campaign (MCMA-2006), where the measured VOCs consisted of a mixture of saturated and unsaturated species. However, this interference can contribute more significantly to the measured HO2 signal in forested environments dominated by unsaturated biogenic emissions such as isoprene.

  15. Energy Yield Determination of Concentrator Solar Cells using Laboratory Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisz, John F.; Garcia, Ivan; McMahon, William E.; Steiner, Myles A.; Ochoa, Mario; France, Ryan M.; Habte, Aron; Friedman, Daniel J.

    2015-09-14

    The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated for a four junction inverted metamorphic solar cell that has been completely characterized in the laboratory at room temperature using measurements fit to a comprehensive optoelectronic model of the multijunction solar cells. A simple model of the temperature dependence is used to predict the performance of the solar cell under varying temperature and spectra characteristic of Golden, CO for an entire year. The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated by integrating the predicted cell performance over the entire year. The effects of geometric concentration, CPV system thermal characteristics, and luminescent coupling are highlighted. temperature and spectra characteristic of Golden, CO for an entire year. The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated by integrating the predicted cell performance over the entire year. The effects of geometric concentration, CPV system thermal characteristics, and luminescent coupling are highlighted.

  16. Feasibility of measuring temperature and density fluctuations in air using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, G. A.; Lemon, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A tunable line-narrowed ArF laser can selectively excite several rotation al lines of the Schumann-Runge band system of O2 in air. The resulting ultraviolet fluorescence can be monitored at 90 deg to the laser beam axis, permitting space and time resolved observation of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulence. Experiments and calculations show that + or - 1 K, + or - 1 percent density, 1 cu mm spatial, and 1 microsecond temporal resolution can be achieved simultaneously under some conditions.

  17. Fluorescence photobleaching measurements of plant membrane viscosity: effects of environmental stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breidenbach, R.W.; Rains, D.W.; Saxton, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Correct interpretation of photobleaching results depends on knowing that the label is confined to the plasma membrane. In the case of labels such as lectins, fluorescent glycosides, oligosaccharide elicitors and antibodies that bind to external determinants on the membrane, proper interpretation will depend on knowing as much as possible about the binding sites of the labels in the membrane. We have developed procedures to characterize binding to intact membrane vesicles, detergent-solubilized membrane proteins, lipid fractions and solubilized proteins resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis/isoelectric focusing. Using these methods we have been able to characterize and compare the binding of several 125 I-labeled lectins

  18. Development of an electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry procedure for direct measurements of arsenic in diluted serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, D J; Simeonsson, J B

    1999-11-01

    A procedure for the direct determination of arsenic in diluted serum by electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS) is reported. Laser radiation needed to excite As at 193.696 and 197.197 nm is generated as the second anti-Stokes stimulated Raman scattering output of a frequency-doubled dye laser operating near 230.5 and 235.5 nm, respectively. Two different LEAFS schemes have been utilized and provide limits of detection of 200-300 fg for As in aqueous standards. When measurements of serum samples diluted 1:10 with deionized water are performed, a stable background signal is observed that can be accounted for by taking measurements with the laser tuned off-wavelength. No As is detected in any of the bovine or human serum samples analyzed. Measurements of 100 pg/mL standard additions of As to a diluted bovine serum sample utilizing either inorganic or organic As species demonstrate a linear relationship of the fluorescence signal to As spike concentration, but exhibit a sensitivity of approximately half that observed in pure aqueous standards. The limit of detection for As in 1:10 diluted serum samples is 65 pg/mL or 650 fg absolute mass, which corresponds to 0.65 ng/mL As in undiluted serum. To our knowledge, the ETA-LEAFS procedure is currently the only one capable of directly measuring As in diluted serum at these levels.

  19. Ultra-high-speed pumping of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) for high-speed laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, Johan; Kristensson, Elias; Richter, Mattias; Aldén, Marcus; Göritz, Guido; Knebel, Kai

    2009-02-01

    The feasibility of pumping an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with an ultra-high repetition rate multi:YAG laser system, producing a burst of up to eight high-energy pulses, has been investigated. For this investigation an OPO with a bandwidth around 5 cm-1, together with a frequency doubling crystal, was selected. In some laser-induced fluorescence measurements the large linewidth from the OPO can be advantageous as several lines can be excited simultaneously avoiding the saturation effects of individual lines. The energy output from the OPO as a function of pulse separation was measured down to pulse separations of 400 ns and was found to be completely independent of the pulse separation. The efficiency of the OPO unit, when optimized for single-pulse operation, was measured to be around 25% for all pulses, giving over 80 mJ at 585 nm output when pumped with ~350 mJ at 355 nm. This is similar to the specified efficiency for the OPO. The system was found to give a slightly lower efficiency when double pulsing the Nd:YAG lasers. This is attributed to a somewhat elongated pulse length from the Nd:YAG lasers giving a lower pump energy density. The system was applied for measuring high-speed planar laser-induced fluorescence images of OH radicals in a Bunsen burner.

  20. On the Measurement of D-meson Yield in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Gazdzicki, M; Gazdzicki, Marek; Markert, Christina

    2000-01-01

    We argue that the measurement of open charm gives a unique opportunity to test the validity of pQCD-based and statistical models of nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies. We show that various approaches used to estimate D-meson multiplicity in central Pb+Pb collisions at 158 A GeV give predictions which differ by more than a factor of 100. Finally we demonstrate that decisive experimental results concerning the open charm yield in A+A collisions can be obtained using data of the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS.

  1. Development of a portable transfer standard for the neutron source yield measurement using Fluka simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Meghnath, E-mail: meghms@barc.gov.in; Sathian, V.; Shobha, G.; Sujatha, P.N.; Yashoda, S.; Kulkarni, M.S.; Babu, D.A.R.

    2015-10-01

    A novel light weight portable transfer standard has been developed for the standardization of the laboratory neutron sources conforming to in-situ measurements. Fluka simulation was used to optimize various design parameters in such a way that it has almost constant efficiency for the neutron energy range of few keV to 10 MeV and also for the commonly available laboratory neutron sources. The optimized total length and radius of the system is 39.4 cm and 13.5 cm, respectively. The weight of the system is about 22 kg. The efficiency of the system obtained from experiment for four laboratory neutron sources ({sup 241}Am–Be, {sup 241}Am–B, {sup 252}Cf and {sup 241}Am–F) is constant within the deviation of ±8% having the average value of 2.85 counts/n.cm{sup 2}. The efficiency of the system was also calculated from Fluka simulation. For mono-energetic neutrons from 1 MeV to 10 MeV the efficiency of the system was found to be constant within ±10% having the average value of 2.9 counts/n.cm{sup 2} and for the above mentioned four neutron sources also it is constant within ±4% with the same average value.

  2. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  3. Measurement of the ratio {gamma}(K{sub L}{yields}{gamma}{gamma})/{gamma}(K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) with the KLOE detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bacci, C.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Capussela, T.; Carboni, G.; Casarsa, M.; Casavola, V.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervelli, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; De Lucia, E.; De Simone, P.; De Zorzi, G.; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Falco, S.; Di Micco, B.; Doria, A.; Dreucci, M.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giannasi, A.; Giovannella, S.; Gorini, E.; Graziani, E.; Incagli, M.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Leone, D.; Lu, F.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Nguyen, F.; Palomba, M.; Pacciani, L.; Palutan, M.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Perfetto, F.; Petrolo, E.; Pirozzi, G.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sibidanov, A.; Spadaro, T.; Spiriti, E.; Tabidze, M.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, S.; Versaci, R

    2003-07-24

    We have measured the ratio R={gamma}(K{sub L}{yields}{gamma}{gamma})/{gamma}(K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) using the KLOE detector. From a sample of {approx}10{sup 9} phi-mesons produced at DAPHINE, the Frascati phi-factory, we select {approx}1.6x10{sup 8} K{sub L}-mesons tagged by observing K{sub S}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} following the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}phi{yields}K{sub L}K{sub S}. From this sample we select 27,375 K{sub L}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} events and obtain R=(2.79{+-}0.02{sub stat}{+-}0.02{sub syst})x10{sup -3}. Using the world average value for BR(K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}), we obtain BR(K{sub L}{yields}{gamma}{gamma})=(5.89{+-}0.07{+-}0.08)x10{sup -4} where the second error is due to the uncertainty on the {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} branching fraction.

  4. [Measurement of effective energy and entrance surface dose using fluorescent glass dosimeter in interventional radiology procedures: make of half-value layer measurement instrument and IVR-phantom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hiroji; Noto, Kimiya; Takata, Tadanori; Chabatake, Mitsuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki

    2010-05-20

    In interventional radiology (IVR) procedures, automatic brightness control (ABC) is helpful in maintaining good image quality by adjusting kV and/or mA based on the subject's thickness. However, it was difficult to measure effective energy using half-value layer (HVL). We investigated the usefulness of measuring effective energy and entrance surface dose using a fluorescent glass dosimeter in IVR procedures, and we made an HVL folder and IVR-phantom for that purpose. Effective energy measured using the HVL folder correlated well with reference ionization dosimeter (y=0.992x, r=0.963). The result indicated that the present method using an HVL folder and IVR-phantom provides accurate measurements of effective energy and entrance surface dose in IVR procedures. In conclusion, the present measurement method may be useful for quality control of IVR equipment. In addition, the development of this measurement technique may be useful for comparisons of exposure levels in different hospitals.

  5. Fluorescence polarization assays to measure interactions between Gα subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and regulatory motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziarz, Marcin; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) is a simple and sensitive method allowing for the quantification of interactions between proteins and fluorescently tagged small molecules like peptides. Heterotrimeric G proteins are critical signal transducing molecules and their activity is controlled by a complex network of regulatory proteins. Some of these regulators have defined short motifs (G proteins and subsequently modulate their activity. For these cases, FP represents a robust and quantitative method to characterize the G protein regulator interaction. Here we describe FP assays in a 384-well plate format to quantify interactions between Gα subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and peptides corresponding to the Gα binding and activating (GBA) or GoLoco motifs, which are present in some proteins with guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) (e.g., GIV/Girdin) or guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) (e.g., RGS12) activity, respectively. This assay can be used to determine equilibrium dissociation constants, characterize the impact of single amino acid point mutations on the Gα-peptide interaction, and is suitable for high-throughput screening. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Spaceborne Sun-Induced Vegetation Fluorescence Time Series from 2007 to 2015 Evaluated with Australian Flux Tower Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Abram; Verstraeten, Willem; Kooreman, Maurits; Leth, Van, Thomas; Beringer, Jason; Joiner, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    A global, monthly averaged time series of Sun-induced Fluorescence (SiF), spanning January 2007 to June 2015, was derived from Metop-A Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) spectral measurements. Far-red SiF was retrieved using the filling-in of deep solar Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric absorption bands based on the general methodology described by Joiner et al, AMT, 2013. A Principal Component (PC) analysis of spectra over non-vegetated areas was performed to describe the effects o...

  7. Some considerations on X-ray fluorescence use in museum measurements - The case of medieval silver coins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Bugoi, R.; Oberlaender-Tarnoveanu, E.; Parvan, K.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give a general layout for the potential applications of Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) technique for ancient silver coin characterization, using in-situ (in museums) measurements. Examples concerning originality testing, provenance (mines, workshops) identification, counterfeits selection, historical studies (manufacturing technologies, commercial, military and political relationships) are given. Two study cases of medieval coins are described: German brakteaten pfennige and Moldavian groschen. Other analysis methods and their use in the study of medieval coins are illustrated with the example of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique. (authors)

  8. Phosphorescence quantum yield determination with time-gated fluorimeter and Tb(III)-acetylacetonate as luminescence reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Procedure for absolute phosphorescence quantum yield measurement is described. ► Experimental setup for absolute luminescence quantum yield standard calibration. ► Tb(acac){sub 3} proposed as phosphorescence quantum yield reference standard. ► Luminescence quantum yield of Tb(acac){sub 3} in cyclohexane measured. ► Luminescence lifetime of Tb(acac){sub 3} in cyclohexane measured. - Abstract: Phosphorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent and phosphorescent samples require the use of time-gated fluorimeters in order to discriminate against the fluorescence contribution. As reference standard a non-fluorescent luminescent compound is needed for absolute phosphorescence quantum yield determination. For this purpose the luminescence behavior of the rare earth chelate terbium(III)-acetylacetonate (Tb(acac){sub 3}) was studied (determination of luminescence quantum yield and luminescence lifetime). The luminescence quantum yield of Tb(acac){sub 3} was determined by using an external light source and operating the fluorimeter in chemo/bioluminescence mode with a fluorescent dye (rhodamine 6G in methanol) as reference standard. A procedure is developed for absolute luminescence (phosphorescence) quantum yield determination of samples under investigation with a time-gated fluorimeter using a non-fluorescent luminescent compound of known luminescence quantum yield and luminescence lifetime.

  9. A statistical analysis of the freshness of postharvest leafy vegetables with application of water based on chlorophyll fluorescence measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichen Qiu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable freshness is very important for both restaurant and home consumers. In market, sellers frequently apply water to leafy vegetables to make them not lose weight and look fresh; however, these vegetables may not be stored for a long time as they appear. After a time limit, they may be quickly rotten. It is thus meaningful to investigate early and simple detection tools to measure leafy vegetable freshness while they are frequently applied water in selling. In this work, three types of newly harvested leafy vegetables were bought from a local farmer market and stored in the air with room temperature and roots submerging in water. Chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF from the vegetables was measured each half a day for three days. The obtained ChlF data were analyzed statistically and the correlation of ChlF parameters and vegetable freshness/storage time was obtained. The k-mean classification was also performed. It is found that Fo, Fj, Fm/Fo, and Fv/Fm can be used as an early detection tool to differentiate the freshness of leafy vegetables on which water is constantly applied in storage without visible difference. Keywords: Vegetable freshness, Chlorophyll fluorescence, Food measurement

  10. Determination of the mass attenuation coefficients for X-ray fluorescence measurements correction by the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, C. C.; Anjos, M. J.; Salgado, C. M.

    2014-09-01

    X-ray fluorescence technique plays an important role in nondestructive analysis nowadays. The development of equipment, including portable ones, enables a wide assortment of possibilities for analysis of stable elements, even in trace concentrations. Nevertheless, despite of the advantages, one important drawback is radiation self-attenuation in the sample being measured, which needs to be considered in the calculation for the proper determination of elemental concentration. The mass attenuation coefficient can be determined by transmission measurement, but, in this case, the sample must be in slab shape geometry and demands two different setups and measurements. The Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio, determined from the X-ray fluorescence spectrum, provides a link to the mass attenuation coefficient by means of a polynomial type equation. This work presents a way to construct a Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio versus mass attenuation coefficient curve by using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo computer code. The comparison between the calculated and literature values of the mass attenuation coefficient for some known samples showed to be within 15%. This calculation procedure is available on-line at www.macx.net.br.

  11. A New System for Measuring Auto-Fluorescence Changes in Neovascular-AMD after Intravitreal Injection of Bavecizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Norouzifard

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD is the second disease diabetes which causes blindness in aged people. The only remedy for AMD is intravenous injection of bavecizumab. To prove the efficiency of remedy, the degenerated cells in Macula should be measured. In this article, a modern system is introduced to measure Auto-Fluorescence in Macula part of retina in order to obtain number of degenerated cells. The system consists of three main parts: Pre-processing stage is omission of margins and reversion of images in retina. Analysis stage is in charge of classification of images and elicitation of their features. In classification the target areas are identified by methods like morphology, dynamic threshold and connected comportments and the features of target area including Euclidean distance to the center of image and density. In the stage of understanding by gathering the features of each class, we will get the measurable parameter of evaluating Auto Fluorescence by the help of which we can count the number of degenerated cells of Macula area. The results are coming from statistical analysis, including linear regression and correlation of data. Experiments have been done on a database of 34 retina images of AMD patients. The average statistical error rate is equal to76 percent. In clinical reviews, the founded relation to disinflation of Macula has been proved, while there were no proved relations to the vision decreasing or increasing of patients.

  12. Self-absorption in upconverter luminescent layers: impact on quantum yield measurements and on designing optimized photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccolini, Alessandro; Marques-Hueso, Jose; Richards, Bryce S

    2014-05-15

    This Letter details a theoretical investigation of self-absorption within an upconverter (UC) material, consisting of trivalent erbium (Er3+)-doped hexagonal sodium yttrium fluoride (β-NaYF4) and its implications on two experimental situations: the case of a quantum yield measurement, and on the effective performance in a UC-enhanced photovoltaic (PV) device. The study demonstrates that an optimization of the thickness is essential in order to reduce the effect of self-absorption and maximize the possible additional photocurrent that could be harvested. It also has been found that the external photoluminescence quantum yield (ePLQY) measured through an integrating sphere may result in an underestimation with respect to the performance that the UC material could achieve in a UC-PV device. Finally, it has been found the optimal thickness and the molar concentration of Er3+ ions are inversely proportional, suggesting that an optimal number (1.3-2.9·10(17)) of Er3+ ions should be contained within the UC layer.

  13. Enhanced Measurements of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) for Water Quality Analysis using a New Simultaneous Absorbance and Fluorescence Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Water quality, with respect to suspended particles and dissolved organic and inorganic compounds, is now recognized as one of the top global environmental concerns. Contemporary research indicates fluorescence spectral analyses coupled with UV-VIS absorbance assays have the potential, especially when combined and coordinated, to facilitate rapid, robust quantification of a wide range of compounds, including interactions among them. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) collected over the UV-VIS region provide a wealth of information on chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). CDOM includes humic and fulvic acid, chlorophyll, petroleum, protein, amino acid, quinone, fertilizer, pesticide, sewage and numerous other compound classes. Analysis of the EEMs using conventional and multivariate techniques, including primarily parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), provides information about many types of CDOM relevant to carbon cycling and pollution of fresh, marine and drinking water sources. Of critical concern also are the CDOM interactions with, and optical activities of, dissolved inorganic compounds. Many of the inorganic compounds and oxygen demand parameters can be analyzed with a wide range of UV-VIS absorbance assays. The instrument is designed and optimized for high UV throughput and low stray light performance. The sampling optics are optimized for both fluorescence and absorbance detection with the same sample. Both EEM and absorbance measurements implement NIST traceable instrument correction and calibration routines. The fluorescence detection utilizes a high dynamic range CCD coupled to a high-resolution spectrograph while absorbance utilizes diode based detection with a high dynamic range and extremely low-stray light specifications. The CDOM analysis is facilitated by a transfer of the data and model information with the PARAFAC routine. The EEM analysis software package facilitates coordinated correction of and correlation with the

  14. Total internal reflection fluorescence anisotropy imaging microscopy: setup, calibration, and data processing for protein polymerization measurements in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhl, Florian; Wong, Hovy H. W.; Holt, Christine E.; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy imaging microscopy (FAIM) measures the depolarization properties of fluorophores to deduce molecular changes in their environment. For successful FAIM, several design principles have to be considered and a thorough system-specific calibration protocol is paramount. One important calibration parameter is the G factor, which describes the system-induced errors for different polarization states of light. The determination and calibration of the G factor is discussed in detail in this article. We present a novel measurement strategy, which is particularly suitable for FAIM with high numerical aperture objectives operating in TIRF illumination mode. The method makes use of evanescent fields that excite the sample with a polarization direction perpendicular to the image plane. Furthermore, we have developed an ImageJ/Fiji plugin, AniCalc, for FAIM data processing. We demonstrate the capabilities of our TIRF-FAIM system by measuring β -actin polymerization in human embryonic kidney cells and in retinal neurons.

  15. Radioisotopic-excited x-ray fluorescent system for PPM measurement of toxic heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leddicotte, G.W.; Tolea, F.; Hansen, J.S.

    1974-01-01

    In agricultural research there is a continual awareness of the need to determine the role trace elements have as micronutrients in soil-plant systems. Similarly, these agronomic needs have a strong relationship to the concern other life sciences researchers have about the roles and effects of toxic trace elements on the natural environment and the physiological well-being of man and animals. However, in order for these interest areas to carry out more effective study efforts, more practical and precise analytical methodology and devices need to be developed. This report describes a research effort to develop an analytical system for micronutient as well as toxic elements based on x-ray fluorescence

  16. Nondestructive method to coat thickness measurements through X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, F.

    1986-01-01

    It's described a system that permits thickness measurement and composition of Sn-Pb alloys to simultaneous measurement of Au over Ni over any base, beyond convestionals measurements, including flash coats or touch. (C.M.) [pt

  17. Measurement of jets production in association with a Z boson and in the search for the SM Higgs boson via H {yields} {tau}{tau} {yields} ll + 4{nu} with ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Psoroulas, Serena

    2012-10-15

    Three measurements focussing on the understanding of jet final states in ATLAS, in dijet, Z and Higgs boson candidate events, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 pb{sup -1} in 2010 and 4.7 fb{sup -1} in 2011, are presented. In the first part, a calibration method, based on the transverse momentum balance in dijet events, is described. The method is used to estimate the uncertainty of the jet energy scale in the forward region. The results show that the parton shower models are limited in reproducing the results in data, mostly for jets of low transverse momentum. In the second part, the differential cross section measurement of the Z{yields}ll+jets process is reported. Phase space regions not been previously studied at other experiments are investigated. The models used for the theory predictions provide a good description of the data, within the relative uncertainties. In the last part, two contribution to the Higgs searches in the H {yields}{tau}{tau} channel are shown: the modelling of the Z{yields}{tau}{tau} background, and the modelling of jet final states. The Z{yields}{tau}{tau} background is derived from data and validated in the H{yields}{tau}{tau}{yields}ll+4{nu} channel. The modelling of jet final states in simulations is in good agreement with the data, when low-energy pile-up effects are subtracted.

  18. Measurement and Estimation of the 99Mo Production Yield by 100Mo(n,2n)99Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Futoshi; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Sato, Nozomi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Saeki, Hideya; Kawabata, Masako; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Nagai, Yasuki

    2017-11-01

    We, for the first time, measured the yield of 99Mo, the mother nuclide of 99mTc used in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures, produced by the 100Mo(n,2n)99Mo reaction with accelerator neutrons. The neutrons with a continuous energy spectrum from the thermal energy up to about 40 MeV were provided by the C(d,n) reaction with 40 MeV deuteron beams. It was proved that the 99Mo yield agrees with that estimated by using the latest data on neutrons from the C(d,n) reaction and the evaluated cross section of the 100Mo(n,2n)99Mo reaction given in the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library. On the basis of the agreement, a systematic calculation was carried out to search for an optimum condition that enables us to produce as much 99Mo as possible with a good 99Mo/100Mo value from an economical point of view. The calculated 99Mo yield from a 150 g 100MoO3 sample indicated that about 30% of the demand for 99Mo in Japan can be met with a single accelerator capable of 40 MeV, 2 mA deuteron beams. Here, by referring to an existing 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) distribution system we assumed that 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals formed after separating 99mTc from 99Mo can be delivered to hospitals from a radiopharmaceutical company within 6 h. The elution of 99mTc from 99Mo twice a day would meet about 50% of the demand for 99Mo.

  19. Non-invasive measurements of leaf epidermal transmittance of UV radiation using chlorophyll fluorescence: field and laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.W. [Southwest Texas State Univ.. Dept. of Biology, San Marcos, TX (United States); Searles, P.S.; Ryel, R.J.; Caldwell, M.M. [Utah State Univ., Dept. of Rangeland Resources and the Ecology Center, Logan, UT (United States); Ballare, C.L. [IFEVA, Univ. de Buenos Aires, Dept. de Ecologia, Facultad de Agronomia, Buenos Aires, (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    Ratios of chlorophyll fluorescence induced by ultraviolet (UV) and bluegreen (BG) radiation [F(UV)/F(BG)] were determined with a Xe-PAM fluorometer to test the utility of this technique as a means of non-intrusively assessing changes in the pigmentation and optical properties of leaves exposed to varying UV exposures under laboratory and field conditions. For plants of Vicia faba and Brassica campestris, grown under controlled-environmental conditions, F(UV-B)/F(BG) was negatively correlated with whole-leaf UV-B-absorbing pigment concentrations. Fluorescence ratios of V.faba were similar to, and positively correlated with (r{sup 2} = 0.77 [UV-B]; 0.85 [UV-A]), direct measurements of epidermal transmittance made with an integrating sphere. Leaves of 2 of 4 cultivars of field-grown Glycine max exposed to near-ambient solar UV-B at a mid-latitude site (Buenos Aires, Argentina, 34 degrees S) showed significantly lower abaxial F(UV-B)/F(BG) values (i.e., lower UV-B epidermal transmittance) than those exposed to attenuated UV-B, but solar UV-B reduction had a minimal effect on F(UV-B)/F(BG) in plants growing at a high-latitude site (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, 55 degrees S). Similarly, the exotic Taraxacum officinale did not show significant changes in F(UV-B)/F(BG) when exposed to very high supplemental UV-B (biologically effective UV-B = 14-15 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1}) in the field in Tierra del Fuego, whereas a native species, Gunnera magellanica, showed significant increases in F(UV-B)/F(BG) relative to those receiving ambient UV-B. These anomalous fluorescence changes were associated with increases in BG-absorbing pigments (anthocyanins), but not UV-B-absorbing pigments. These results indicate that non-invasive estimates of epidermal transmittance of UV radiation using chlorophyll fluorescence can detect changes in pigmentation and leaf optical properties induced by UV-B radiation under both field and laboratory conditions. However, this technique may be of limited

  20. Ultraviolet photochemistry of buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-dienes: laser spectroscopic absolute hydrogen atom quantum yield and translational energy distribution measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanf, A; Volpp, H-R; Sharma, P; Mittal, J P; Vatsa, R K

    2010-07-14

    Using pulsed H-atom Lyman-alpha laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy along with a photolytic calibration approach, absolute H-atom product quantum yields of phi(H-b13d) = (0.32+/-0.04) and phi(H-b12d) = (0.36+/-0.04) were measured under collision-free conditions for the 193 nm gas-phase laser flash photolysis of buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-diene at room temperature, which demonstrate that nascent H-atom formation is of comparable importance for both parent molecules. Comparison of the available energy fraction, f(T-b13d) = (0.22+/-0.03) and f(T-b12d) = (0.13+/-0.01), released as H+C(4)H(5) product translational energy with results of impulsive and statistical energy partitioning modeling calculations indicates that for both, buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-diene, H-atom formation is preceded by internal conversion to the respective electronic ground state (S(0)) potential energy surfaces. In addition, values of sigma(b-1,3-d-L alpha) = (3.5+/-0.2)x10(-17) cm(2) and sigma(b-1,2-d-L alpha) = (4.4+/-0.2)x10(-17) cm(2) for the previously unknown Lyman-alpha (121.6 nm) radiation photoabsorption cross sections of buta-1,3- and buta-1,2-diene in the gas-phase were determined.

  1. A bench-top K X-ray fluorescence system for quantitative measurement of gold nanoparticles for biological sample diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricketts, K., E-mail: k.ricketts@ucl.ac.uk [Division of Surgery and Interventional Sciences, University College London, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Guazzoni, C.; Castoldi, A. [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria Politecnico di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano P.za Leonardo da Vinci, 32-20133 Milano (Italy); Royle, G. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place Engineering Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-21

    Gold nanoparticles can be targeted to biomarkers to give functional information on a range of tumour characteristics. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques offer potential quantitative measurement of the distribution of such heavy metal nanoparticles. Biologists are developing 3D tissue engineered cellular models on the centimetre scale to optimise targeting techniques of nanoparticles to a range of tumour characteristics. Here we present a high energy bench-top K-X-ray fluorescence system designed for sensitivity to bulk measurement of gold nanoparticle concentration for intended use in such thick biological samples. Previous work has demonstrated use of a L-XRF system in measuring gold concentrations but being a low energy technique it is restricted to thin samples or superficial tumours. The presented system comprised a high purity germanium detector and filtered tungsten X-ray source, capable of quantitative measurement of gold nanoparticle concentration of thicker samples. The developed system achieved a measured detection limit of between 0.2 and 0.6 mgAu/ml, meeting specifications of biologists and being approximately one order of magnitude better than the detection limit of alternative K-XRF nanoparticle detection techniques. The scatter-corrected K-XRF signal of gold was linear with GNP concentrations down to the detection limit, thus demonstrating potential in GNP concentration quantification. The K-XRF system demonstrated between 5 and 9 times less sensitivity than a previous L-XRF bench-top system, due to a fundamental limitation of lower photoelectric interaction probabilities at higher K-edge energies. Importantly, the K-XRF technique is however less affected by overlying thickness, and so offers future potential in interrogating thick biological samples.

  2. Designing and making of a tool used for measurements by X fluorescence using HgI{sub 2} detectors; Conception et realisation d`un instrument de mesure par fluorescence X utilisant des detecteurs HgI{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu-Xu, X.

    1994-10-01

    A new measuring apparatus by X fluorescence based on a HgI{sub 2} detector, operating at room temperature is presented. The principal properties of HgI{sub 2} are outlined. A computer code designed for this apparatus is developed. Some experimental results are given to illustrate the performances of the device. (author). 67 refs., 117 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Global Monitoring of Terrestrial Chlorophyll Fluorescence from Moderate-spectral-resolution Near-infrared Satellite Measurements: Methodology, Simulations, and Application to GOME-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, J.; Gaunter, L.; Lindstrot, R.; Voigt, M.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Middleton, E. M.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Yoshida, Y.; Frankenberg, C.

    2013-01-01

    Globally mapped terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence retrievals are of high interest because they can provide information on the functional status of vegetation including light-use efficiency and global primary productivity that can be used for global carbon cycle modeling and agricultural applications. Previous satellite retrievals of fluorescence have relied solely upon the filling-in of solar Fraunhofer lines that are not significantly affected by atmospheric absorption. Although these measurements provide near-global coverage on a monthly basis, they suffer from relatively low precision and sparse spatial sampling. Here, we describe a new methodology to retrieve global far-red fluorescence information; we use hyperspectral data with a simplified radiative transfer model to disentangle the spectral signatures of three basic components: atmospheric absorption, surface reflectance, and fluorescence radiance. An empirically based principal component analysis approach is employed, primarily using cloudy data over ocean, to model and solve for the atmospheric absorption. Through detailed simulations, we demonstrate the feasibility of the approach and show that moderate-spectral-resolution measurements with a relatively high signal-to-noise ratio can be used to retrieve far-red fluorescence information with good precision and accuracy. The method is then applied to data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument 2 (GOME-2). The GOME-2 fluorescence retrievals display similar spatial structure as compared with those from a simpler technique applied to the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). GOME-2 enables global mapping of far-red fluorescence with higher precision over smaller spatial and temporal scales than is possible with GOSAT. Near-global coverage is provided within a few days. We are able to show clearly for the first time physically plausible variations in fluorescence over the course of a single month at a spatial resolution of 0.5 deg × 0.5 deg

  4. Estimation of Biochemical Oxygen Demand Based on Dissolved Organic Carbon, UV Absorption, and Fluorescence Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihyun Kwak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of 5-d biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5 is the most commonly practiced test to assess the water quality of surface waters and the waste loading. However, BOD5 is not a good parameter for the control of water or wastewater treatment processes because of its long test period. It is very difficult to produce consistent and reliable BOD5 results without using careful laboratory quality control practices. This study was performed to develop software sensors to predict the BOD5 of river water and wastewater. The software sensors were based on the multiple regression analysis using the dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentration, UV light absorbance at 254 nm, and synchronous fluorescence spectra. River water samples and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP effluents were collected at 1-hour interval to evaluate the feasibility of the software sensors. In short, the software sensors developed in this study could well predict the BOD5 of river water (r=0.78 and for the WWTP effluent (r=0.90.

  5. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde Over California: First Results from the Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Josette Elizabeth; Saint Clair, Jason; Yates, Emma L.; Gore, Warren; Swanson, Andrew K.; Iraci, Laura T.; Hanisco, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, playing a role multiple atmospheric processes. Measurements of HCHO can be used to help quantify convective transport, the abundance of VOCs, and ozone production in urban environments. The Compact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of HCHO as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. Developed at NASA GSFC, COFFEE is a small, low maintenance instrument with a sensitivity of 100 pptv and a quick response time (1 sec). The COFFEE instrument has been customized to fit in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA ARC. The instrument can operate over a broad range of altitudes, from boundary layer to lower stratosphere, making it well suited for the Alpha Jet, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. Results of the first COFFEE science flights preformed over the California's Central Valley will be presented. Boundary layer measurements and vertical profiles in the tropospheric column will both be included. This region is of particular interest, due to its elevated levels of HCHO, revealed in satellite images, as well as its high ozone concentrations. In addition to HCHO, the AJAX payload includes measurements of atmospheric ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space. Plans to compare in-situ COFFEE data with satellite-based HCHO observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP) will also be presented.

  6. Measurement of ep {yields} e{prime} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}: experimental procedures and baryon resonance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ripani; V.D. Burkert; V. Mokeev; M. Battaglieri; R. De Vita; E. Golovach; M. Taiuti; et al

    2003-04-01

    The cross section for the reaction ep {yields} e{prime} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} was measured in the resonance region for 1.4 < W < 2.1 GeV and 0.5 < Q{sup 2} < 1.5 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory. The data show resonant structures not visible in previous experiments. The comparison of our data to a phenomenological prediction using available information on N* and {Delta} states shows an evident discrepancy. A better description of the data is obtained either by a sizeable change of the properties of the P{sub 13}(1720) resonance or by introducing a new baryon state, not reported in published analyses.

  7. Measurement of ep {yields} e{prime}p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and Baryon Resonance Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco Ripani; et. Al.

    2003-07-01

    The cross section for the reaction ep {yields} e{prime}p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} was measured in the resonance region for 1.4 < W < 2.1 GeV and 0.5 < Q{sup 2} < 1.5 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory. The data shows resonant structures not visible in previous experiments. The comparison of our data to a phenomenological prediction using available information on N* and {Delta} states shows an evident discrepancy. A better description of the data is obtained either by a sizeable change of the properties of the P{sub 13}(1720) resonance or by introducing a new baryon state, not reported in published analyses.

  8. A continuous on-line method for fission yield measurements with the combined GJTR-SISAK technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernstad, T.

    1981-01-01

    The principles of a method for fission yield measurements with the combined GJRT-SISAK techniques are outlined. Only the simple case where parent effects can be neglected is considered in detail. The article includes derivation of a relation between the production rate and the counting rate of a nuclide. The expression contains various efficiency parameters and the system dependent delay probability function p(t). The way to experimentally determine these parameters and the delay probability curve, as well as the fitting of an analytical function to the curve are shown. The method is general in the sense that the main principles are independent upon the nuclide under study, fissile target material and bombarding particle used. (orig.)

  9. P-Glycoprotein-Activity Measurements in Multidrug Resistant Cell Lines: Single-Cell versus Single-Well Population Fluorescence Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Pasquier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. P-gp expression has been linked to the efflux of chemotherapeutic drugs in human cancers leading to multidrug resistance. Fluorescence techniques have been widely applied to measure the P-gp activity. In this paper, there is a comparison between the advantages of two fluorescence approaches of commonly available and affordable instruments: the microplate reader (MPR and the flow cytometer to detect the P-gp efflux activity using calcein-AM. Results. The selectivity, sensibility, and reproducibility of the two methods have been defined. Our results showed that the MPR is more powerful for the detection of small inhibition, whereas the flow cytometry method is more reliable at higher concentrations of the inhibitors. We showed that to determine precisely the inhibition efficacy the flow cytometry is better; hence, to get the correct Emax and EC50 values, we cannot only rely on the MPR. Conclusion. Both techniques can potentially be used extensively in the pharmaceutical industry for high-throughput drug screening and in biology laboratories for academic research, monitoring the P-gp efflux in specific assays.

  10. Identifiability analysis of rotational diffusion tensor and electronic transition moments measured in time-resolved fluorescence depolarization experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szubiakowski, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this paper is studies of the deterministic identifiability of molecular parameters, such as rotational diffusion tensor components and orientation of electronic transition moments, resulting from the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiment. In the most general case considered, a pair of perpendicularly polarized emissions enables the unique determination of all the rotational diffusion tensor's principal components. The influence of the tensor's symmetry and the associated degeneration of its eigenvalues on the identifiability of the electronic transitions moments is systematically investigated. The analysis reveals that independently of the rotational diffusion tensor's symmetry, the transition moments involved in photoselection and emission processes cannot be uniquely identified without a priori information about their mutual orientation or their orientation with respect to the principal axes of the tensor. Moreover, it is shown that increasing the symmetry of the rotational diffusion tensor deteriorates the degree of the transition moments identifiability. To obtain these results analytically, a novel approach to solve bilinear system of equations for Markov parameters is applied. The effect of the additional information, obtained from fluorescence measurements for different molecular mobilities, to improve the identifiability at various levels of analysis is shown. The effectiveness and reliability of the target analysis method for experimental determination of the molecular parameters is also discussed

  11. Measurement of neutral Ti atoms from TiC and Ti targets sputtered by low-energy H+ and Ar+ ions using laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, R.; Bay, H.L.; Schweer, B.

    1984-01-01

    The sputtering of Ti from TiC and also from pure Ti targets for 500 eV H + and Ar + ion irradiation at normal incidence has been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence. The sputtered neutral Ti atoms in the ground state were observed as a function of fluence and target temperature. This technique is shown to be applicable for in-situ sputtering investigations of TiC. Strong fluence dependences of the fluorescence intensities for Ti and TiC targets were observed. These results are discussed from the viewpoint of chemisorption of oxygen on the target surfaces. In the case of H + bombardment, the depleted layer of carbon atoms near the surface of TiC due to chemical sputtering should also be taken into account to explain the fluence dependence of the fluorescence intensity. No significant temperature dependence of the Ti sputtering yield of TiC for Ar + and H + ion bombardment was found in the steady state, and the physical sputtering yield of the Ti component of TiC is about half the Ti yield from a Ti target for Ar + ion bombardment. (orig.)

  12. Thickness measurement of aluminum, titanium, titanium silicide, and tungsten silicide films by x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, S.; Lee, C.O.; Lee, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has received a great deal of attention in the last few years as a quantitative means of determining both the stoichiometry and thickness of many different kinds of films. Examples include Ag and Cu films on mica substrates, Sn-Pb alloys on steel substrates, Al-Ti multilayers on Cu substrates and oxide films on silicon substrates. In XRF the sample is irradiated with x-rays which in turn cause x-rays to be given off by the sample. These x-rays that are given off by the sample can then be analyzed both for energy and intensity. The energy of the x-rays is characteristic of the elemental makeup of the sample and the intensity of the x-rays is dependent on how much of the particular element is present. The intensity then can be related to the thickness of a film if the stoichiometry of the film can be assumed constant. With the increased interest in silicides and more recently, the self-aligned silicide (salicide) process (8-10) for VLSI applications, in-line process monitoring of silicide film thickness has become important to integrated circuit manufacturing. In this study, the number of x-ray photons given of by Al, Ti, titanium silicide, and tungsten silicide films on silicon-based substrates was quantified so that a film thickness for an unknown sample could then be determined easily. In addition, XRF is a more accurate technique, limited principally by the accuracy technique, limited principally by the accuracy of the reference used and the amount of time the x-ray photons are counted

  13. X-ray fluorescence microscopic measurement of elemental distribution in the mouse retina with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubman, Alexandra; Guennel, Philipp; Vessey, Kirstan A; Jones, Michael W M; James, Simon A; de Jonge, Martin D; White, Anthony R; Fletcher, Erica L

    2016-10-01

    The biologically important metals such as zinc, copper and iron play key roles in retinal function, yet no study has mapped the spatio-temporal distribution of retinal biometals in healthy or diseased retina. We investigated a natural mouse model of retinal degeneration, the Cln6 nclf mouse. As dysfunctional metabolism of biometals is observed in the brains of these animals and deregulated metal homeostasis has been linked to retinal degeneration, we focused on mapping the elemental distribution in the healthy and Cln6 nclf mouse retina with age. Retinal and RPE elemental homeostasis was mapped in Cln6 nclf and C57BL6/J mice from 1 to 8 months of age using X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy at the Australian Synchrotron. In the healthy retina, we detected a progressive loss of phosphorus in the outer nuclear layer and significant reduction in iron in the inner segments of the photoreceptors. Further investigation revealed a unique elemental signature for each retinal layer, with high areal concentrations of iron and sulfur in the photoreceptor segments and calcium, phosphorus, zinc and potassium enrichment predominantly in the nuclear layers. The analysis of retinae from Cln6 nclf mice did not show significant temporal changes in elemental distributions compared to age matched controls, despite significant photoreceptor cell loss. Our data therefore demonstrates that retinal layers have unique elemental composition. Elemental distribution is, with few exceptions, stably maintained over time in healthy and Cln6 nclf mouse retina, suggesting conservation of elemental distribution is critical for basic retinal function with age and is not modulated by processes underlying retinal degeneration.

  14. CH3CO + O2 + M (M = He, N2) Reaction Rate Coefficient Measurements and Implications for the OH Radical Product Yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Karafas, Emmanuel S; Gierczak, Tomasz; Burkholder, James B

    2015-07-16

    The gas-phase CH3CO + O2 reaction is known to proceed via a chemical activation mechanism leading to the formation of OH and CH3C(O)OO radicals via bimolecular and termolecular reactive channels, respectively. In this work, rate coefficients, k, for the CH3CO + O2 reaction were measured over a range of temperature (241-373 K) and pressure (0.009-600 Torr) with He and N2 as the bath gas and used to characterize the bi- and ter-molecular reaction channels. Three independent experimental methods (pulsed laser photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence (PLP-LIF), pulsed laser photolysis-cavity ring-down spectroscopy (PLP-CRDS), and a very low-pressure reactor (VLPR)) were used to characterize k(T,M). PLP-LIF was the primary method used to measure k(T,M) in the high-pressure regime under pseudo-first-order conditions. CH3CO was produced by PLP, and LIF was used to monitor the OH radical bimolecular channel reaction product. CRDS, a complementary high-pressure method, measured k(295 K,M) over the pressure range 25-600 Torr (He) by monitoring the temporal CH3CO radical absorption following its production via PLP in the presence of excess O2. The VLPR technique was used in a relative rate mode to measure k(296 K,M) in the low-pressure regime (9-32 mTorr) with CH3CO + Cl2 used as the reference reaction. A kinetic mechanism analysis of the combined kinetic data set yielded a zero pressure limit rate coefficient, kint(T), of (6.4 ± 4) × 10(-14) exp((820 ± 150)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (with kint(296 K) measured to be (9.94 ± 1.3) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)), k0(T) = (7.39 ± 0.3) × 10(-30) (T/300)(-2.2±0.3) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1), and k∞(T) = (4.88 ± 0.05) × 10(-12) (T/300)(-0.85±0.07) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with Fc = 0.8 and M = N2. A He/N2 collision efficiency ratio of 0.60 ± 0.05 was determined. The phenomenological kinetic results were used to define the pressure and temperature dependence of the OH radical yield in the CH3CO + O2 reaction. The

  15. A measurement of [Gamma](Z[sup 0] [yields]b anti b) / [Gamma](Z[sup 0] [yields]hadrons) using an impact parameter technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acton, P.D.; Akers, R.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Astbury, A.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Banks, J.; Barlow, R.J.; Barnett, S.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Beaudoin, G.; Beck, A.; Beck, G.A.; Becker, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bella, G.; Bentkowski, P.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Boden, B.; Bosch, H.M.; Boutemeur, M.; Breuker, H.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R.M.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Chu, S.L.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clayton, J.C.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooper, M.; Coupland, M.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.M.; De Jong, S.; Del Pozo, L.A.; Deng, H.; Dieckmann, A.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M.S.; Do Couto e Silva, E.; Duboscq, J.E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Dumas, D.J.P.; Elcombe, P.A.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbro, B.; Fierro; OPAL Collaboration

    1993-12-01

    The fractional partial width of the Z[sup 0] to b quarks, [Gamma]sub(b anti b)/[Gamma][sub had], has been measured by OPAL using an impact parameter technique. The method has been developed using 130 000 hadronic events collected by OPAL in 1990. We find: [Gamma]sub(b anti b)/[Gamma][sub had]=0.222[+-]0.007(stat)[+-]0.008(sys). The measurement assumes the relative rates of the Z[sup 0] to uds and c quarks given by the Standard Model. Varying the charm fraction from the Standard Model value of [Gamma]sub(c anti c)/[Gamma][sub had]=0.171 changes the result by an additional [Delta][Gamma]sub(b anti b)/[Gamma]sub(b anti b)=-0.135x[Delta][Gamma]sub(c anti c)/[Gamma]sub(c anti c). (orig.)

  16. Rare-gas yields in 238U and 232Th fission by 14MeV neutrons, measured by an emanating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feu Alvim, C.A.; Bocquet, J.P.; Brissot, R.; Crancon, J.; Moussa, A.

    1977-01-01

    A direct method, using emanation of rare gases by uranyle stearate and thorium stearate, has been applied to the measurement of cumulative fractional yields of certain isotopes of krypton and xenon, in the fissions of 238 U and 232 Th by 14MeV-neutrons. The independent yields of the same isotopes were measured previously by means of isotopic on-line separation. From these results, the widths of the mass and charge distributions, the relative chain yields, the fractional cumulative yields of certain bromine and iodine isotopes, the values of Zsub(p) the most probable charge, in the isobaric chains 87-93 and 137-142, and the elemental yields of krypton and xenon were calculated [fr

  17. Using fluorescence measurement of zinc ions liberated from ZnS nanoparticle labels in bioassay for Escherichia coli O157:H7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowles, Chad L.; Zhu Xiaoshan; Pai, Chi-Yun

    2011-01-01

    In this study, an alternative approach using ZnS nanoparticle biolabels as fluorescence signal transducers is reported for the immunoassay of E. coli O157:H7 in tap water samples. Instead of measuring the fluorescence of ZnS nanoparticles in the assay, the fluorescence signal is generated through the binding of zinc ions released from nanoparticle labels with zinc-ion sensitive fluorescence indicator Fluozin-3. In the assay, ZnS nanoparticles around 50 nm in diameter were synthesized, bioconjugated, and applied for the detection of E. coli O157:H7. The assay shows a detection range over two orders of magnitude and a detection limit around 1000 colony-forming units (cfu) of E. coli O157:H7.

  18. Using Continuous In-situ Measurement of Fluorescence to Reveal Hot Spots and Hot Moments of Dissolved Organic Matter Dynamics in a Forested Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, K. A.; Hosen, J. D.; Raymond, P. A.; Stubbins, A.; Shanley, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    River systems serve as net carbon exporters from land to the ocean, fueling downstream aquatic ecosystem food webs. Fluorescence signatures of aquatic organic matter can be used as a proxy for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and can characterize DOC composition, reactivity, and source to improve our understanding of ecological processes. In-situ measurement of fluorescence using fifteen-minute interval data logging allows greater temporal resolution than laboratory studies. However, in-situ data must be corrected for interferences from temperature, absorbance and turbidity changes occurring in the field. We installed multiparameter water quality sondes (Eureka Mantas) and in-situ fluorometers (Turner Designs Cyclops) at sites nested within streams and riparian zones in the Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont in 2017. We coupled these measurements with simultaneous intensive field sampling campaigns and laboratory analysis of DOC and fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrices. The data loggers from the nested sites recorded fluorescence peaks responding to discharge events and tracked changes in fluorescence occurring from upstream to downstream sites. Laboratory results confirm a nonlinear, hysteretic relationship between discharge and DOC where peak DOC lags peak discharge. This hysteresis is predicted to be controlled by multiple flow paths and DOC sources (i.e. groundwater, overland flow). We conclude that continuous in-situ records of river water fluorescence can be used to inform ecological processes and test new hypotheses concerning dissolved organic matter dynamics in watersheds.

  19. Measuring Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) Tooth Growth and Eruption by Fluorescence Markers and Bur Marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Fabia; Müller, Jacqueline; Clauss, Marcus; Kircher, Patrick; Geyer, Hans; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2016-03-01

    Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and rodents possess continuously growing teeth, and dental problems are a major health issue in these species. Knowledge of tooth growth characteristics is required to adequately treat dental problems and advise owners concerning diets. Most research was performed using bur marks and measuring eruption and wear manually. However, this method cannot be applied to teeth less rostral than the first premolar; therefore, for evaluation of molars, other methods are needed. We evaluated the use of fluorochromes xylenol orange and calcein green to measure growth rates of rabbit teeth and compared this method to results obtained by manually measuring the distance between a bur mark and the gingival margin of the same tooth (eruption) and by measuring the distance between the bur mark and the apex of the same tooth on computed tomography scans (growth). Apical fluorochrome measurements correlated well with eruption and growth rates obtained with bur marks, whereas measurements coronal to the pulp cavity did not. Growth rates were approximately 1.9 mm/wk for maxillary and 2.2 mm/wk for mandibular incisors. Growth rates of premolars were 2.14 ± 0.28 mm/wk in rabbits on a grass/rice hulls/sand pelleted diet and 0.93 ± 0.18 mm/wk in rabbits on a hay diet. Growth of molars could only be assessed using the measurement in dentin on the wall of the pulp cavity, which does not account for the real growth. However, being similar to this measurement in premolars, one could hypothesize similar growth in molars as in premolars. We conclude that the application of fluorochrome staining can be used to measure tooth growth in teeth that are not accessible for bur marks or in animals that are too small to assess tooth eruption or growth by bur marks.

  20. Evaluation of Image Processing Technique for Measuring of Nitrogen and Yield in Paddy Rice and Comparing it with Standard Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Larijani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to use new and low cost methods in precision agriculture, nitrogen should be supplied for plants on time and precisely. For determining the required nitrogen of paddy rice in the clustering stage, a series of experiments were conducted using three different methods of: image processing, kjeldahl and chlorophyll meter set (SPAD-502, in a randomized complete block design with three replications during 2010 at Rice Research Center of Tonekabon, Iran. Four experimental treatments were different level of fertilizer (Urea with 46% nitrogen. In the clustering stage, some images from rice plants were taken vertically by a digital camera and were analyzed using image processing technique. Simultaneously the chlorophyll index of plants was measured by SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter set and the percentage amount of nitrogen was measured using of the so called kjeldahl laboratory method. The results showed that the three methods of determining nitrogen of rice plant were highly correlated. Moreover, the correlation among the three methods and crop yield were almost the same. In general, the method of image processing could have a high potential for nitrogen management in the field, while this method was low-cost, faster and also nondestructive in comparison to the other methods.

  1. Addendum: Measurement of charged particle yields from PMMA irradiated by a 220 MeV/u 12C beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, I.; Battistoni, G.; Collini, F.; De Lucia, E.; Durante, M.; Fiore, S.; La Tessa, C.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Mirabelli, R.; Muraro, S.; Paramatti, R.; Piersanti, L.; Rucinski, A.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Toppi, M.; Traini, G.; Valle, S. M.; Vanstalle, M.; Patera, V.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we report the re-analysis of the data published in Piersanti et al (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 1857) documenting the charged secondary particles production induced by the interaction of a 220 MeV/u 12C ion beam impinging on a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) target, measured in 2012 at the GSI facility in Darmstadt (Germany). This re-analysis takes into account the inhomogeneous light response of the LYSO crystal in the experimental setup measured in a subsequent experiment (2014) performed in the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center. A better description of the detector and re-calculation of the geometrical efficiencies have been implemented as well, based on an improved approach that accounts also for the energy dependence of the emission spectrum. The new analysis has little effect on the total secondary charged flux, but has an impact on the production yield and emission velocity distributions of the different particle species (protons, deuterons and tritons) at different angles with respect to the beam direction (60^\\circ and 90^\\circ ). All these observables indeed depend on the particle identification algorithms and hence on the LYSO detector energy response. The results of the data re-analysis presented here are intended to supersede and replace the results published in Piersanti et al (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 1857).

  2. Measurements of molecular carbon radical concentrations by saturated laser-induced fluorescence in hydrocarbon flames at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, Michele; D'Apice, Massimo; Giammartini, Stefano; Magaldi, M.; Romano, G. P.

    2003-09-01

    The C2 abundance in flames at atmospheric pressure is reported for three fuel-rich combustion environments: acetylene/oxygen, Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG)/air and methane/air flames. Measurements have been based on spectrographic and two-dimensional Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of the Δv = -1 d3IIg-a3IIu band. The oxyacetylene flame was utilized to establish a comparison with literature data and absolute values, calibrated through Rayleigh scattering, were found to be distributed within the 1014 cm-3 range. The induced emission from two Bunsen flames fed with LPG/air or methane/air was also investigated. Accumulated acquisitions were necessary to detect small C2 quantities in the order of 1010 cm-3 concentrated on the flame front.

  3. On limitations of laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics for xenon ion velocity distribution function measurements in Hall thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romadanov, I.; Raitses, Y.; Diallo, A.; Hara, K.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Smolyakov, A.

    2018-03-01

    Hall thruster operation is characterized by strong breathing oscillations of the discharge current, the plasma density, the temperature, and the electric field. Probe- and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics were used to measure temporal variations of plasma parameters and the xenon ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) in the near-field plasma plume in regimes with moderate (reducing the production of metastable ions. Because the residence time of ions in the channel is generally shorter than the time scale of breathing oscillations, the density of the excited ions outside the thruster is low and they cannot be detected. In the range of temperature of oscillations, the ionization cross-section of xenon atoms remains sufficiently large to sustain the discharge. This finding suggests that the commonly used LIF diagnostic of xenon IVDF can be subject to large uncertainties in the regimes with significant oscillations of the electron temperature, or other plasma parameters.

  4. Distribution of lead in lead-accumulating pteridophyte Blechnum niponicum, measured by synchrotron radiation micro X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodera, Hirofumi; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Yasuji; Terada, Yasuko

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of lead (Pb) accumulated in the pteridophyte Blechnum niponicum, a Pb-hyperaccumulator, was measured using synchrotron-radiation micro X-ray fluorescence (SR-μ-XRF) at BL37XU of SPring-8. From two dimensional (2D) imagings of Pb at the root, petiole, leaf vein, pinna epidermis and sorus in the Blechnum niponicum, the mechanism for the transportation and accumulation of Pb can be suggested to be as follows: Lead is accumulated in conductive tissues. Most of the Pb solubilized in the rhizosphere is fixed in the conductive tissue, with the remainder being transported with the transpiration stream to the above-ground parts of the plant. Lead transported to the upper parts of the plant ultimately remains at the terminal points of the transpiration stream, including the stomatal apparatus and water pores; it was shown that these sections contain high concentrations of Pb. (author)

  5. Measurement of L subshell fluorescence cross sections and intensity ratios of heavy elements at 22.6 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacal, M.R., E-mail: mustafakacal@hotmail.co [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Durak, R. [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Akman, F. [Bingoel University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, 12000 Bingoel (Turkey); Turhan, M.F. [Atatuerk University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Han, I. [Agri Ibrahim Cecen University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, 04100 Agri (Turkey)

    2011-06-15

    The L X-ray fluorescence cross sections ({sigma}{sub L}{sub 1},{sigma}{sub L}{alpha},{sigma}{sub L}{eta}, {sigma}{sub L}{beta},{sigma}{sub L}{beta}{sub 6}, {sigma}{sub L}{beta}{sub 2,4,15}, {sigma}{sub L}{beta}{sub 1,3}, {sigma}{sub L}{gamma}, {sigma}{sub L}{gamma}{sub 1}, {sigma}{sub L}{gamma}{sub 2,3,6,8}, {sigma}{sub L}{gamma}{sub 4,4}{sup '} and {sigma}{sub L}{gamma}{sub 5}) and I{sub L}{alpha}/I{sub L}{sub i} (i=l, {eta}, {beta}{sub 6}, {beta}{sub 2,4,1,5}, {beta}{sub 1,3}, {gamma}, {gamma}{sub 1}, {gamma}{sub 2,3,6,8}, {gamma}{sub 4,4}{sup '} and {gamma}{sub 5} intensity ratios for some elements in the atomic range 66{<=}Z{<=}92 have been measured at 22.6 keV photon energy emitted from a {sup 109}Cd radioactive point source. The L X-rays emitted by samples have been counted by a Si(Li) detector. The L X-ray fluorescence cross sections and intensity ratios have also been calculated theoretically by using atomic parameters. The measurement results have been compared with available data and the theoretical values. Within experimental deviations, our data are in good agreement with the available data and the theoretical values.

  6. Sinking towards destiny: High throughput measurement of phytoplankton sinking rates through time-resolved fluorescence plate spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Catherine C; Campbell, Douglas A

    2017-01-01

    Diatoms are marine primary producers that sink in part due to the density of their silica frustules. Sinking of these phytoplankters is crucial for both the biological pump that sequesters carbon to the deep ocean and for the life strategy of the organism. Sinking rates have been previously measured through settling columns, or with fluorimeters or video microscopy arranged perpendicularly to the direction of sinking. These side-view techniques require large volumes of culture, specialized equipment and are difficult to scale up to multiple simultaneous measures for screening. We established a method for parallel, large scale analysis of multiple phytoplankton sinking rates through top-view monitoring of chlorophyll a fluorescence in microtitre well plates. We verified the method through experimental analysis of known factors that influence sinking rates, including exponential versus stationary growth phase in species of different cell sizes; Thalassiosira pseudonana CCMP1335, chain-forming Skeletonema marinoi RO5A and Coscinodiscus radiatus CCMP312. We fit decay curves to an algebraic transform of the decrease in fluorescence signal as cells sank away from the fluorometer detector, and then used minimal mechanistic assumptions to extract a sinking rate (m d-1) using an RStudio script, SinkWORX. We thereby detected significant differences in sinking rates as larger diatom cells sank faster than smaller cells, and cultures in stationary phase sank faster than those in exponential phase. Our sinking rate estimates accord well with literature values from previously established methods. This well plate-based method can operate as a high throughput integrative phenotypic screen for factors that influence sinking rates including macromolecular allocations, nutrient availability or uptake rates, chain-length or cell size, degree of silification and progression through growth stages. Alternately the approach can be used to phenomically screen libraries of mutants.

  7. The role of secondary electrons in some experiments determining fluorescence emission from nitrogen C3Πu levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.; Arqueros, F.

    2005-01-01

    The processes involved in fluorescence emission from C 3 Π u levels of N 2 molecule by electron impact are studied. Secondary electrons are shown to play an important role in typical experiments for the measurement of emission cross sections and fluorescence yields, dominating at high impact energies. A simple model is proposed which accounts for fluorescence measurements in a wide range of experimental conditions, and in particular for some recent results up to 1 GeV energies

  8. Precise measurement of {gamma}(K{sub S}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}({gamma}))/{gamma}(K{sub S}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) with the KLOE detector at DA{phi}NE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosino, F.; Capussela, T.; Chiefari, G.; Di Donato, C.; Doria, A.; Massarotti, P.; Meola, S.; Napolitano, M.; Perfetto, F.; Saracino, G. [Univ. ' ' Federico II' ' e Sezione INFN, Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Napoli (Italy); Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chi, S.; Ciambrone, P.; De Lucia, E.; De Simone, P.; Dell' Agnello, S.; Dreucci, M.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Gatti, C.; Giovannella, S.; Lanfranchi, G.; Martini, M.; Mei, W.; Miscetti, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Palutan, M.; Santangelo, P.; Sciascia, B.; Sfiligoi, I.; Spadaro, T.; Venanzoni, G.; Versaci, R. [Lab. Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Bacci, C.; Bocchetta, S.; Branchini, P.; Ceradini, F.; Di Micco, B.; Graziani, E.; Nguyen, F.; Passeri, A.; Tortora, L. [Univ. ' ' Roma Tre' ' e Sezione INFN, Dipt. di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Beltrame, P.; Denig, A.; Kluge, W.; Leone, D.; Valeriani, B. [Univ. Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Bini, C.; Bocci, V.; Caloi, R.; De Santis, A.; De Zorzi, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Fiore, S.; Franzini, P.; Gauzzi, P.; Lacava, F.; Pasqualucci, E.; Pontecorvo, L.; Testa, M.; Valente, P.; Veneziano, S. [Universita ' ' La Sapienza' ' e Sezione INFN, Dipt. di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Bowring, D. [Lab. Nazionale di Frascati (Italy)]|[Physics Dept., Univ. of Virginia (United States); Conetti, S. [Univ. of Virginia, Physics Dept., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Di Falco, S.; Incagli, M.; Scuri, F. [Univ. e Sezione INFN, Dipt. di Fisica, Pisa (Italy); Gorini, E.; Primavera, M.; Ventura, A. [Univ. e Sezione INFN, Dipt. di Fisica, Lecce (Italy); Kulikov, V. [Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lee-Franzini, J. [Lab. Nazionale di Frascati (Italy)]|[Physics Dept., State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States); Patera, V.; Sciubba, A. [and others

    2006-12-15

    Using a sample of over 400 million {phi}{yields}K{sub S}K{sub L} decays produced during the years 2001 and 2002 at the DA{phi}NE e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, the ratio R{sub S} {sup {pi}}={gamma}(K{sub S}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}({gamma}))/{gamma}(K{sub S}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) has been measured with the KLOE detector. The result is R{sub S} {sup {pi}}=2.2555{+-}0.0012{sub stat}{+-}0.0021{sub corr-stat}{+-}0.0050{sub syst}, which is in good agreement with the previously published result based on the KLOE data sample from the year 2000. The average of the KLOE results is R{sub S} {sup {pi}}=2.2549{+-}0.0054, reducing the total error by a factor of three, to 0.25%. (orig.)

  9. Application of Space Borne CO2 and Fluorescence Measurements to Detect Urban CO2 Emissions and Anthropogenic Influence on Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetzold, Johannes C.; Chen, Jia; Ruisinger, Veronika

    2017-04-01

    The Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) is a NASA satellite mission dedicated to make global, space-based observations of atmospheric, column-averaged carbon dioxide (XCO2). In addition, the OCO-2 also measures Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF). In our research we have studied the combination of OCO-2's XCO2 and SIF measurements for numerous urban areas on the different continents. Applying GIS and KML visualization techniques as well as statistical approaches we are able to reliably detect anthropogenic CO2 emissions in CO2 column concentration enhancements over urban areas. Moreover, we detect SIF decreases over urban areas compared to their rural vicinities. We are able to obtain those findings for urban areas on different continents, of diverse sizes, dissimilar topographies and urban constructions. Our statistical analysis finds robust XCO2 enhancements of up to 3 ppm for urban areas in Europe, Asia and North America. Furthermore, the analysis of SIF indicates that urban construction, population density and seasonality influence urban vegetation, which can be observed from space. Additionally, we find that OCO-2's SIF measurements have the potential to identify and approximate green areas within cities. For Berlin's Grunewald Forest as well as Mumbai's Sanjay Gandhi and Tungareshwar National Parks we observe enhancements in SIF measurements at sub-city scales.

  10. Performance evaluation of currently used portable X ray fluorescence instruments for measuring the lead content of paint in field samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Yan; Favreau, Philippe; Kohler, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF) instruments are important for non-destructive, rapid and convenient measurements of lead in paint, in view of potential remediation. Using real-life paint samples, we compared measurements from three FP-XRF instruments currently used in Switzerland with laboratory measurements using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after complete sample dissolution. Two FP-XRF devices that functioned by lead L shell excitation frequently underestimated the lead concentration of samples. Lack of accuracy correlated with lead depth and/or the presence of additional metal elements (Zn, Ba or Ti). A radioactive source emitter XRF that enabled the additional K shell excitation showed higher accuracy and precision, regardless of the depth of the lead layer in the sample or the presence of other elements. Inspection of samples by light and electron microscopy revealed the diversity of real-life samples, with multi-layered paints showing various depths of lead and other metals. We conclude that the most accurate measurements of lead in paint are currently obtained with instruments that provide at least sufficient energy for lead K shell excitation.

  11. A study of the effect of molecular and aerosol conditions in the atmosphere on air fluorescence measurements at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutierrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.

    The air fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is designed to perforin calorimetric measurements of extensive air showers created by Cosmic rays of above 10(18) eV. To correct these measurements for the effects introduced by atmospheric fluctuations, the Observatory contains a group

  12. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 3-hyroxyflavone isolated in solid argon: fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectra and tautomer fluorescence rise time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, B.; Ernsting, N.P.

    1987-07-30

    The fluorescence properties of 3-hydroxyflavone isolated in solid argon at 15 K have been investigated. Upon electronic excitation the molecules undergo rapid intramolecular proton transfer. No fluorescence from the excited state of the normal form of the molecule could be detected. Perturbations due to hydrogen-bonding impurities which produce serious experimental problems in hydrocarbon glasses are largely suppressed in argon matrices. The rise of the green fluorescence of the tautomer was studied with excitation pulses of 230-fs duration and streak camera detection. An apparent tautomer fluorescence rise time of 2.7 ps was obtained by deconvolution. A comparative measurement of the dye coumarine 6 yielded an apparent fluorescence rise time of 2.5 ps, which can be entirely attributed to the group velocity dispersion of the streak camera optics. This indicates a rate constant for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 3-hydroxyflavone of greater than 10/sup 12/ s/sup -1/.

  13. Characterization of a versatile reference instrument for traceable fluorescence measurements using different illumination and viewing geometries specified in practical colorimetry—part 1: bidirectional geometry (45:0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwinkels, Joanne; Neil, William; Noël, Mario

    2016-10-01

    For highest accuracy fluorescence colorimetry, standardizing organizations recommend the use of a two-monochromator method with a bidirectional illumination and viewing geometry (45:0 or 0:45). For this reason, reference fluorescence instruments developed by National Measurement Institutes (NMIs) have largely conformed to this bidirectional geometry. However, for many practical applications in colorimetry where the samples exhibit texture, surface roughness or other spatial non-uniformities, the relevant standard test methods specify a sphere geometry with diffuse illumination or viewing (e.g. d:8 or 8:d) which gives improved measurement precision. This difference in the measurement geometry between the primary instrument used to realize the fluorescence scale and the secondary testing instruments used for practical measurements, compromises the traceability of these fluorescence calibrations. To address this metrology issue, a two-monochromator goniospectrofluorimeter instrument has been developed at the National Research Council of Canada (NRC). This instrument can be configured for different illumination and viewing geometries to conform with international standards for different colorimetric applications. To improve the traceability chain for measurements using different geometries, the instrument has been thoroughly characterized and validated by means of comparison measurements with NRC’s other spectrophotometric and fluorescence reference instruments. This uncertainty analysis has been carried out in a step-wise manner; first, for a bidirectional geometry (45:0) and then for a sphere geometry (8:d) to provide an uninterrupted traceability to primary radiometric scales. The first paper in this two paper series reviews the background to this work and provides details of the basic design of the new instrument and its characterization for measurements using a bidirectional geometry (45:0), including a representative uncertainty budget. In part 2, the major

  14. Measurement of the fission yields of selected prompt and decay fission product gamma-rays of spontaneously fissioning 252Cf and 244Cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reber, E.L.; Gehrke, R.J.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Hartwell, J.K.

    2005-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometry measurements have been made of the fission yields of selected γ -rays emitted by the spontaneously fissioning isotopes 252 Cf and 244 Cm. The measured γ-rays were selected based on their relative abundance in the spectrum and their freedom from interference or, in a few instances, ease of interference correction. From these data and the cumulative and independent yield data of England and Rider, those γ-rays that are primarily produced by radioactive decay, as opposed to direct yield, were converted into the decays per spontaneous fission expressed in percent and compared to cumulative yield values of England and Rider. For those γ-rays whose production is dominated by direct (independent) yield, the ratio of γ-rays per spontaneous fission is reported. The γ-ray yield can be compared to the independent yield values of England and Rider when 100% of the direct feeding passes through the γ-ray. In those cases where both cumulative and independent yields contribute to the observed γ-ray emission rate, a direct comparison is not possible but a method to quantify the contribution from each is proposed. (author)

  15. Development of a “Fission-proxy” Method for the Measurement of 14-MeV Neutron Fission Yields at CAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharibyan, Narek [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-25

    Relative fission yield measurements were made for 50 fission products from 25.6±0.5 MeV alpha-induced fission of Th-232. Quantitative comparison of these experimentally measured fission yields with the evaluated fission yields from 14-MeV neutron-induced fission of U-235 demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed fission-proxy method. This new technique, based on the Bohr-independence hypothesis, permits the measurement of fission yields from an alternate reaction pathway (Th-232 + 25.6 MeV α → U-236* vs. U-235 + 14-MeV n → U-236*) given that the fission process associated with the same compound nucleus is independent of its formation. Other suitable systems that can potentially be investigated in this manner include (but are not limited to) Pu-239 and U-237.

  16. Multispectral In-situ Measurements of Organic Matter and Chlorophyll Fluorescence in Seawater: Documenting the Intrusion of the Mississippi River Plume in the West Florida Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelCastillo, Carlos E.; Coble, Paula G.; Conmy, Robyn N.; Mueller-Karger, Frank E.; Vanderbloomen, Lisa; Vargo, Gabriel A.

    2000-01-01

    We performed multispectral in-situ fluorescence measurement of colored dissolved organic matter and chlorophyll in surface water of the West Florida Shelf using West Labs Spectral absorption and Fluorescence Instrument (SAFIre). Continuous measurements underway allowed us to simultaneously map the dispersion of riverine organic material and chlorophyll on the shelf. By using two fluorescence emission ratios we were able to differentiate between riverine and marine CDOM. Our data also showed unusually high concentrations of CDOM offshore. These were attributed to an intrusion of the Mississippi River Plume. We performed limited comparisons between in-situ chlorophyll concentrations measured with SAFIre and chlorophyll values obtained from SeaWiFS satellite data using OC4 and MODIS algorithm. Our results show that, although both algorithms overestimated chlorophyll, MODIS performed better than OC4, particularly in areas with high CDOM concentrations. Analysis of the relationship between chlorophyll and CDOM concentrations within the study area showed regional variability causes by differences in river source.

  17. Fluorescence-detected X-ray magnetic circular dichroism of well-defined Mn(II) and Ni(II) doped in MgO crystals: credential evaluation for measurements on biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Bryant, Craig; LeGros, M; Wang, Xin; Cramer, S P

    2012-10-18

    L(2,3)-edge X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra have been measured for the well-defined dilute Ni(II) and Mn(II) ions doped into a MgO crystal, with sub-Kelvin dilution refrigerator cooling and 2 T magnetic field magnetization. A 30-element Ge array X-ray detector has been used to measure the XMCD for these dilute ions, whose concentrations are 1400 ppm for Ni(II) and 10,000 ppm for Mn(II). Large XMCD effects have been observed for both Ni(II) and Mn(II), and multiplet simulation described the observed spectra. The fluorescence-detected L-edge absorption spectrum and XMCD of Ni(II) in MgO are comparable with both theoretical calculations and the total electron yield measured ions in similar chemical environments, at least qualitatively validating the use of the sensitive fluorescence detection technique for studying XMCD for dilute 3d metal ions, such as various metalloproteins. Sum rule analyses on the XMCD spectra are also performed. In addition, these XMCD measurements have also been used to obtain the sample's magnetization curve and the beamline's X-ray helicity curve. This study also illustrated that bend magnet beamlines are still useful in examining XMCD on dilute and paramagnetic metal sites.

  18. Evaluation on the stability of Hg in ABS disk CRM during measurements by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Masaki; Kidokoro, Toshihiro; Hioki, Akiharu

    2012-01-01

    The stability of Hg in an acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene disk certified reference material (ABS disk CRM, NMIJ CRM 8116-a) during measurements by wavelength dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) analysis was evaluated in this study. The XRF intensities of Hg (L(α)) and Pb (L(α)) as well as the XRF intensity ratios of Hg (L(α))/Pb (L(α)) observed under different X-ray tube current conditions as well as their irradiation time were examined to evaluate the stability of Hg in the ABS disk CRM. The observed XRF intensities and the XRF intensity ratios for up to 32 h of measurements under 80 mA of X-ray tube current condition were constant, even though the surface of the ABS disk CRM was charred by the X-ray irradiation with high current for a long time. Moreover, the measurements on Hg and Pb in the charred disks by an energy dispersive XRF (ED-XRF) spectrometer showed constant XRF intensity ratios of Hg (L(α))/Pb (L(α)). From these results, Hg in the ABS disk CRM was evaluated to be sufficiently stable for XRF analysis.

  19. Validation of the calibration of a laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the measurement of OH radicals in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Bloss

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An assessment of the accuracy of OH concentrations measured in a smog chamber by a calibrated laser-induced fluorescence (LIF instrument has been made, in the course of 9 experiments performed to study the photo-oxidation of benzene, toluene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, para-xylene, ortho-cresol and ethene at the European Photoreactor facility (EUPHORE. The LIF system was calibrated via the water photolysis / ozone actinometry approach. OH concentrations were inferred from the instantaneous rate of removal of each hydrocarbon species (measured by FTIR or HPLC via the appropriate rate coefficient for their reaction with OH, and compared with those obtained from the LIF system. Good agreement between the two approaches was found for all species with the exception of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, for which OH concentrations inferred from hydrocarbon removal were a factor of 3 lower than those measured by the LIF system. From the remaining 8 experiments, an overall value of 1.15±0.13 (±1σ was obtained for [OH]LIF / [OH]Hydrocarbon Decay, compared with the estimated uncertainty in the accuracy of the water photolysis / ozone actinometry OH calibration technique of 26% (1σ.

  20. Validation of the calibration of a laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the measurement of OH radicals in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, W. J.; Lee, J. D.; Bloss, C.; Heard, D. E.; Pilling, M. J.; Wirtz, K.; Martin-Reviejo, M.; Siese, M.

    2004-04-01

    An assessment of the accuracy of OH concentrations measured in a smog chamber by a calibrated laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument has been made, in the course of 9 experiments performed to study the photo-oxidation of benzene, toluene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, para-xylene, ortho-cresol and ethene at the European Photoreactor facility (EUPHORE). The LIF system was calibrated via the water photolysis / ozone actinometry approach. OH concentrations were inferred from the instantaneous rate of removal of each hydrocarbon species (measured by FTIR or HPLC) via the appropriate rate coefficient for their reaction with OH, and compared with those obtained from the LIF system. Good agreement between the two approaches was found for all species with the exception of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, for which OH concentrations inferred from hydrocarbon removal were a factor of 3 lower than those measured by the LIF system. From the remaining 8 experiments, an overall value of 1.15±0.13 (±1σ) was obtained for [OH]LIF / [OH]Hydrocarbon Decay, compared with the estimated uncertainty in the accuracy of the water photolysis / ozone actinometry OH calibration technique of 26% (1σ).

  1. Plane polarized x-ray fluorescence system for the in vivo measurement of platinum in head and neck tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, P. A.; Al-Hussany, A. F.; Bennett, C. A.; Hancock, D. A.; El-Sharkawi, A. M.

    1998-08-01

    A plane polarized x-ray fluorescence system based on an orthovoltage radiotherapy treatment unit, the Pantak DXT-300, has been developed and optimized to measure tumour platinum concentration. The platinum derives from platinum based chemotherapy agents, such as cisplatin and carboplatin used to treat tumours in the head and neck region. Photons from an x-ray tube are polarized by scattering through , and used to stimulate the emission of characteristic platinum x-rays from the tumour. Information about the drug in the tumour could be of use in establishing dose-response relationships, in order to optimize the treatment and reduce the toxicity of the drug. The performance of the system was optimized with respect to the applied x-ray tube voltage, the current and the filter material; the effect on the minimum detection limit (MDL) of the thickness of the overlying tissue surrounding the tumour was investigated in detail. The lowest MDL is achieved using 0.25 mm of tin filter and x-ray tube voltage of 220 kV. This is 5.6 ppm for a tumour surrounded with 20 mm of overlying tissue, a measurement time of 2000 s and an estimated skin dose of 3.0 mGy. This represents the most sensitive in vivo XRF system to date. We have embarked on a clinical pilot study to measure the platinum concentration in tumours of the head and neck, and expect initial results to be available in the near future.

  2. Measurement of Fuel Concentration Profile at Leading Edge of Lifted Flame with Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Mitsutomo; Sekine, Kazushi; Hashimoto, Kouta; Saiki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Hidemi; Masuya, Goro

    This is a study of the leading-edge characteristics of a methane-air triple flame. Few experiment results are available for physical examination of such characteristics, so further experimental investigations are strongly needed to understand the stability mechanism in a mixture with a steep concentration gradient. To this end, we measured concentration profiles at the leading edge of a flame using acetone laser-induced fluorescence (acetone LIF). The results demonstrated that the lifted height of the flame changed when acetone was added to the mixture and correlated well with increased C2 radical behind the flame edge. However, the OH radical luminous intensity, measured with a spectroscope, did not change with addition of acetone. Moreover, the burning velocity obtained by the Bunsen-burner method remained constant when acetone was added to the mixture. Therefore, acetone had little influence on burning intensity. Acetone LIF can thus be employed to measure the local concentration gradient at the leading edge of a flame. The acetone LIF signals could be corrected to consider the thermal effect by using silicone oil vanishing-plane data. From the corrected acetone LIF data, the width between the lean and rich flammability limits (flammability limit width) in the flow upstream of the flame with a steep concentration gradient was clearly observed and could be quantitatively compared with the recent numerical results.

  3. Transgressive variation for yield components measured throughout the growth cycle of Jefferson rice (Oryza sativa) x O. rufipogon introgression lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies demonstrated alleles introduced into elite rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars from the wild ancestral species, O. rufipogon, enhanced yield and yield components as a result of transgressive variation. A study was conducted to unveil phenological and agronomic mechanisms that underlie in...

  4. The Activation of Non-evaporable Getters Monitored by AES, XPS, SSIMS and Secondary Electron Yield Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis the potential of the three classical surface analysis techniques Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SSIMS) for the characterisation of non-evaporable getter (NEG) materials is assessed and artefacts are described. The various NEG samples have been analysed in the context of the development of NEG thin film coatings for use in accelerator ultra high vacuum (UHV) systems. The secondary electron yield (SEY), which is a functional surface property of great importance for the application of NEG to accelerators, has been measured. The maximum SEY of an air exposed TiZr and TiZrV coating can be reduced from above 2.0 to below 1.1 during a 2 h heat treatment at 250 and 200 °C, respectively. Saturating an activated TiZrV surface in UHV increases the maximum SEY by about 0.1. Thus, in UHV the SEY of an activated NEG coating does not exceed the threshold value of 1.35, above which multipacting is predicted to occur in th...

  5. Temperature effects on microalgal photosynthesis-light responses measured by O-2 production, pulse-amplitude-modulated fluorescence, and C-14 assimilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancke, Kasper; Hancke, Torunn B.; Olsen, Lasse M.

    2008-01-01

    Short-term temperature effects on photosynthesis were investigated by measuring O-2 production, PSII-fluorescence kinetics, and C-14-incorporation rates in monocultures of the marine phytoplankton species Prorocentrum minimum (Pavill.) J. Schiller (Dinophyceae), Prymnesium parvum f. patelliferum ...... to the absorption properties in PSII.......Short-term temperature effects on photosynthesis were investigated by measuring O-2 production, PSII-fluorescence kinetics, and C-14-incorporation rates in monocultures of the marine phytoplankton species Prorocentrum minimum (Pavill.) J. Schiller (Dinophyceae), Prymnesium parvum f. patelliferum (J...

  6. Optical scanner system for high resolution measurement of lubricant distributions on metal strips based on laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Philipp; Lutz, Christian; Brandenburg, Albrecht

    2017-06-01

    We present a new optical setup, which uses scanning mirrors in combination with laser induced fluorescence to monitor the spatial distribution of lubricant on metal sheets. Current trends in metal processing industry require forming procedures with increasing deformations. Thus a welldefined amount of lubricant is necessary to prevent the material from rupture, to reduce the wearing of the manufacturing tool as well as to prevent problems in post-deforming procedures. Therefore spatial resolved analysis of the thickness of lubricant layers is required. Current systems capture the lubricant distribution by moving sensor heads over the object along a linear axis. However the spatial resolution of these systems is insufficient at high strip speeds, e.g. at press plants. The presented technology uses fast rotating scanner mirrors to deflect a laser beam on the surface. This 405 nm laser light excites the autofluorescence of the investigated lubricants. A coaxial optic collects the fluorescence signal which is then spectrally filtered and recorded using a photomultiplier. From the acquired signal a two dimensional image is reconstructed in real time. This paper presents the sensor setup as well as its characterization. For the calibration of the system reference targets were prepared using an ink jet printer. The presented technology for the first time allows a spatial resolution in the millimetre range at production speed. The presented test system analyses an area of 300 x 300 mm² at a spatial resolution of 1.1 mm in less than 20 seconds. Despite this high speed of the measurement the limit of detection of the system described in this paper is better than 0.05 g/m² for the certified lubricant BAM K-009.

  7. A novel fluorescent carbon dots derived from tamarind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha Jhonsi, Mariadoss; Thulasi, Sekar

    2016-09-01

    Herein, a novel fluorescent carbon dots (TCDs) is synthesized from tamarind by a simple one pot hydrothermal method. The synthesized TCDs are completely characterized by vital techniques. TCDs exhibit an excitation-dependent emission with the quantum yield of 4% and storage stability of more than three months without any stabilizer. Further, fluorescence quenching of TCDs by acceptors such as methyl viologen and hydroxy TEMPO are studied. Quenching of TCDs is due to electron transfer as evidenced by the decrease in fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  8. Measurement of the weak mixing angle and the spin of the gluon from angular distributions in the reaction pp{yields} Z/{gamma}*+X{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}+X with ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieden, Kristof

    2013-04-15

    The measurement of the effective weak mixing angle with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is presented. It is extracted from the forward-backward asymmetry in the polar angle distribution of the muons originating from Z boson decays in the reaction pp{yields}Z/{gamma}{sup *}+X{yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}+X. In total 4.7 fb{sup -1} of proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV are analysed. In addition, the full polar and azimuthal angular distributions are measured as a function of the transverse momentum of the Z/{gamma}{sup *} system and are compared to several simulations as well as recent results obtained in p anti p collisions. Finally, the angular distributions are used to confirm the spin of the gluon using the Lam-Tung relation.

  9. Beveled fiber-optic probe couples a ball lens for improving depth-resolved fluorescence measurements of layered tissue: Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaillon, Franck; Zheng Wei; Huang Zhiwei

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of designing a beveled fiber-optic probe coupled with a ball lens for improving depth-resolved fluorescence measurements of epithelial tissue using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The results show that by using the probe configuration with a beveled tip collection fiber and a flat tip excitation fiber associated with a ball lens, discrimination of fluorescence signals generated in different tissue depths is achievable. In comparison with a flat-tip collection fiber, the use of a large bevel angled collection fiber enables a better differentiation between the shallow and deep tissue layers by changing the excitation-collection fiber separations. This work suggests that the beveled fiber-optic probe coupled with a ball lens has the potential to facilitate depth-resolved fluorescence measurements of epithelial tissues

  10. Beveled fiber-optic probe couples a ball lens for improving depth-resolved fluorescence measurements of layered tissue: Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillon, Franck; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2008-02-21

    In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of designing a beveled fiber-optic probe coupled with a ball lens for improving depth-resolved fluorescence measurements of epithelial tissue using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The results show that by using the probe configuration with a beveled tip collection fiber and a flat tip excitation fiber associated with a ball lens, discrimination of fluorescence signals generated in different tissue depths is achievable. In comparison with a flat-tip collection fiber, the use of a large bevel angled collection fiber enables a better differentiation between the shallow and deep tissue layers by changing the excitation-collection fiber separations. This work suggests that the beveled fiber-optic probe coupled with a ball lens has the potential to facilitate depth-resolved fluorescence measurements of epithelial tissues.

  11. Model and methods to assess hepatic function from indocyanine green fluorescence dynamical measurements of liver tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Chloe; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E

    2018-03-30

    The indocyanine green (ICG) clearance, presented as plasma disappearance rate is, presently, a reliable method to estimate the hepatic "function". However, this technique is not instantaneously available and thus cannot been used intra-operatively (during liver surgery). Near-infrared spectroscopy enables to assess hepatic ICG concentration over time in the liver tissue. This article proposes to extract more information from the liver intensity dynamics by interpreting it through a dedicated pharmacokinetics model. In order to account for the different exchanges between the liver tissues, the proposed model includes three compartments for the liver model (sinusoids, hepatocytes and bile canaliculi). The model output dependency to parameters is studied with sensitivity analysis and solving an inverse problem on synthetic data. The estimation of model parameters is then performed with in-vivo measurements in rabbits (El-Desoky et al. 1999). Parameters for different liver states are estimated, and their link with liver function is investigated. A non-linear (Michaelis-Menten type) excretion rate from the hepatocytes to the bile canaliculi was necessary to reproduce the measurements for different liver conditions. In case of bile duct ligation, the model suggests that this rate is reduced, and that the ICG is stored in the hepatocytes. Moreover, the level of ICG remains high in the blood following the ligation of the bile duct. The percentage of retention of indocyanine green in blood, which is a common test for hepatic function estimation, is also investigated with the model. The impact of bile duct ligation and reduced liver inflow on the percentage of ICG retention in blood is studied. The estimation of the pharmacokinetics model parameters may lead to an evaluation of different liver functions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Online measurements of ambient fluorescent aerosol particles by WIBS at a polluted regional site in the North China Plain: potential impact of burning activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, Y.; Xie, Z.; Kecorius, S.; McMeeking, G. R.; Yu, X.; Pöhlker, C.; Zhang, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kuhn, U.; Poeschl, U.; Huffman, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Online measurements of ambient fluorescent aerosol particles by WIBS at a polluted regional site in the North China Plain: potential impact of burning activities Zhibin Wang1, Xiawei Yu1,3, Simonas Kecorius2, Zhouqing Xie3, Gavin McMeeking4, Christopher Pöhlker1, Minghui, Zhang1, Alfred Wiedensohler2, Uwe Kuhn1, Yafang Cheng1, Ulrich Pöschl1, Hang Su1,*1Multiphase Chemistry and Biogeochemistry Departments, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz 55128, Germany2Leibniz-Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig 04318, Germany3School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China4Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder 80301, USA ABSTRACTBioaerosols are the main subset of super-micron particles, and significantly influence the evolution of cloud and precipitation, as well as the public health. Currently, the detection of ambient biological materials in real-time is mainly based on the presence of fluorophores in the particles. In this study, we present the wideband integrated bioaerosol spectrometer (WIBS) measurement results to characterize the fluorescent aerosol particles (FAP) at a polluted regional site (Xianghe, 39.80 °N, 116.96 °E) in the North China Plain. We observed substantially much higher number concentration of FAP as compared with those of previous studies in clean environments. We found the good agreement between the FAP number fraction in coarse mode particles (> 1 mm) and BC mass fraction in fine particles (SOA, PAH and soot) may significantly lead to a positive fluorescence measurement artifacts and an overestimation of actual fluorescent biological aerosol particles. We also suggested to introduce the classification analysis of fluorescence spectral patterns from single FAP into the data analysis, which aims to reduce the potential misattribution and provide extra dimensions in the differentiation and identification of fluorescent aerosol particle.

  13. A Laser-Induced Fluorescence Instrument for Aircraft Measurements of Sulfur Dioxide in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Andrew W.; Thornberry, Troy D.; Ciciora, Steven J.; McLaughlin, Richard J.; Watts, Laurel A.; Hanisco, Thomas F.; Baumann, Esther; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Bui, Thaopaul V.; Fahey, David W.

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and testing of a new instrument for in situ measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) on airborne platforms in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The instrument is based on the laser-induced fluorescence technique and uses the fifth harmonic of a tunable fiber-amplified semiconductor diode laser system at 1084.5 nm to excite SO2 at 216.9 nm. Sensitivity and background checks are achieved in flight by additions of SO2 calibration gas and zero air, respectively. Aircraft demonstration was performed during the NASA Volcano Plume Investigation Readiness and Gas-Phase and Aerosol Sulfur (VIRGAS) experiment, which was a series of flights using the NASA WB-57F during October 2015 based at Ellington Field and Harlingen, Texas. During these flights, the instrument successfully measured SO2 in the UTLS at background (non-volcanic) conditions with a precision of 2 ppt at 10 s and an overall uncertainty determined primarily by instrument drifts of +/- (16% + 0.9 ppt).

  14. Influence of the condition of the adjacent tooth surface on fluorescence measurements for the detection of approximal caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussi, A; Zimmerli, B; Hellwig, E; Jaeggi, T

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether the status of the adjacent tooth surface has an influence on the signal of a new laser fluorescence (LF) device for the detection of approximal caries. Seventy-eight teeth were selected from a pool of extracted permanent human molars, frozen at -20 degrees C until use. Before being measured the teeth were defrosted, cleaned, and any calculus removed. As a control, a defined approximal surface of each tooth was measured with the LF device holding the tip with the detecting- and the reverse-side on it, but without a neighboring tooth contacting the surface. The proximal site under examination was then placed adjacent to a tooth, which had deep dentinal caries, a composite restoration, a provisional ZnO-Eugenol restoration, or a ceramic restoration. The adjacent tooth with the ZnO-Eugenol restoration, the composite restoration, and the dentinal caries all demonstrated a statistically significant increase of LF readings on sound tooth surfaces. Teeth with enamel or dentinal caries were only slightly (and not statistically significantly) influenced by the different types of neighboring surfaces compared with the control LF readings. It can be concluded that caries detection of approximal tooth surfaces with the new LF system might be influenced by the condition of the adjacent tooth surface.

  15. S3 HMBC: Spin-State-Selective HMBC for accurate measurement of homonuclear coupling constants. Application to strychnine yielding thirteen hitherto unreported JHH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, Louise; Benie, Andrew J.; Hoeck, Casper

    2016-01-01

    A novel method, Spin-State-Selective (S3) HMBC, for accurate measurement of homonuclear coupling constants is introduced. As characteristic for S3 techniques, S3 HMBC yields independent subspectra corresponding to particular passive spin states and thus allows determination of coupling constants ...... are demonstrated by an application to strychnine where thirteen JHH coupling constants not previously reported could be measured....

  16. Clearing the waters: Evaluating the need for site-specific field fluorescence corrections based on turbidity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraceno, John F.; Shanley, James B.; Downing, Bryan D.; Pellerin, Brian A.

    2017-01-01

    In situ fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM) measurements have gained increasing popularity as a proxy for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in streams. One challenge to accurate fDOM measurements in many streams is light attenuation due to suspended particles. Downing et al. (2012) evaluated the need for corrections to compensate for particle interference on fDOM measurements using a single sediment standard in a laboratory study. The application of those results to a large river improved unfiltered field fDOM accuracy. We tested the same correction equation in a headwater tropical stream and found that it overcompensated fDOM when turbidity exceeded ∼300 formazin nephelometric units (FNU). Therefore, we developed a site-specific, field-based fDOM correction equation through paired in situ fDOM measurements of filtered and unfiltered streamwater. The site-specific correction increased fDOM accuracy up to a turbidity as high as 700 FNU, the maximum observed in this study. The difference in performance between the laboratory-based correction equation of Downing et al. (2012) and our site-specific, field-based correction equation likely arises from differences in particle size distribution between the sediment standard used in the lab (silt) and that observed in our study (fine to medium sand), particularly during high flows. Therefore, a particle interference correction equation based on a single sediment type may not be ideal when field sediment size is significantly different. Given that field fDOM corrections for particle interference under turbid conditions are a critical component in generating accurate DOC estimates, we describe a way to develop site-specific corrections.

  17. Measurement of urinary advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) using a fluorescence assay for metabolic syndrome-related screening tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, Akira; Uchida, Kagehiro; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Wakabayashi, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The simple screening test of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) has not been established yet. We aimed to clarify the usefulness of simple measurement of AGEs for screening tests. The subjects were healthy participants and patients with metabolic syndrome. Urine samples were diluted from 1:10 to 1:200 using phosphate-buffered saline, and the fluorescence intensity was measured at 440nm after excitation at 370nm in a 96-well microplate spectrophotometer. The obtained intensities were adjusted according to the urinary creatinine levels. In patients with metabolic syndrome, urinary AGE levels were significantly higher than in healthy individuals (median [range], 168.25 [82.51-1276.15] AU/g creatinine [n=37] versus 134.67 [37.86-776.31] AU/g creatinine [n=350], respectively; p=0.0066). We found significant positive correlations between urinary AGEs and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (Spearman's correlation r=0.119 [p=0.019] and r=0.128 [p=0.012], respectively). There was no significant correlation between estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary AGEs (r=0.018 [p=0.744]), confirming that renal dysfunction did not influence results of urinary AGE measurements. When all of the participants in the study were classified into four groups according to the numbers of components of metabolic syndrome, we found a significant tendency (p=0.0127) for urinary AGE levels to be higher with the increasing number of metabolic syndrome components. These results suggested that measurement of urinary AGE levels may be useful for evaluating the risk of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Equity yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, E.; van Binsbergen, J.H.; Koijen, R.S.J.; Hueskes, W.

    2013-01-01

    We study a new data set of dividend futures with maturities up to ten years across three world regions: the US, Europe, and Japan. We use these asset prices to construct equity yields, analogous to bond yields. We decompose the equity yields to obtain a term structure of expected dividend growth

  19. An Approach to Precise Nitrogen Management Using Hand-Held Crop Sensor Measurements and Winter Wheat Yield Mapping in a Mediterranean Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Quebrajo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Regardless of the crop production system, nutrients inputs must be controlled at or below a certain economic threshold to achieve an acceptable level of profitability. The use of management zones and variable-rate fertilizer applications is gaining popularity in precision agriculture. Many researchers have evaluated the application of final yield maps and geo-referenced geophysical measurements (e.g., apparent soil electrical conductivity-ECa as a method of establishing relatively homogeneous management zones within the same plot. Yield estimation models based on crop conditions at certain growth stages, soil nutrient statuses, agronomic factors, moisture statuses, and weed/pest pressures are a primary goal in precision agriculture. This study attempted to achieve the following objectives: (1 to investigate the potential for predicting winter wheat yields using vegetation measurements (the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index—NDVI at the beginning of the season, thereby allowing for a yield response to nitrogen (N fertilizer; and (2 evaluate the feasibility of using inexpensive optical sensor measurements in a Mediterranean environment. A field experiment was conducted in two commercial wheat fields near Seville, in southwestern Spain. Yield data were collected at harvest using a yield monitoring system (RDS Ceres II-volumetric meter installed on a combine. Wheat yield and NDVI values of 3498 ± 481 kg ha−1 and 0.67 ± 0.04 nm nm−1 (field 1 and 3221 ± 531 kg ha−1 and 0.68 ± 0.05 nm nm−1 (field 2 were obtained. In both fields, the yield and NDVI exhibited a strong Pearson correlation, with rxy = 0.64 and p < 10−4 in field 1 and rxy = 0.78 and p < 10−4 in field 2. The preliminary results indicate that hand-held crop sensor-based N management can be applied to wheat production in Spain and has the potential to increase agronomic N-use efficiency on a long-term basis.

  20. Application of normal fluorescence and stability-indicating derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of gliquidone in presence of its fluorescent alkaline degradation product

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-ghobashy, Mohamed R.; Yehia, Ali M.; Helmy, Aya H.; Youssef, Nadia F.

    2018-01-01

    Simple, smart and sensitive normal fluorescence and stability-indicating derivative synchronous spectrofluorimetric methods have been developed and validated for the determination of gliquidone in the drug substance and drug product. Normal spectrofluorimetric method of gliquidone was established in methanol at λ excitation 225 nm and λ emission 400 nm in concentration range 0.2-3 μg/ml with LOD equal 0.028. The fluorescence quantum yield of gliquidone was calculated using quinine sulfate as a reference and found to be 0.542. Stability-indicating first and third derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy were successfully utilized to overcome the overlapped spectra in normal fluorescence of gliquidone and its alkaline degradation product. Derivative synchronous methods are based on using the synchronous fluorescence of gliquidone and its degradation product in methanol at Δ λ50 nm. Peak amplitude in the first derivative of synchronous fluorescence spectra was measured at 309 nm where degradation product showed zero-crossing without interference. The peak amplitudes in the third derivative of synchronous fluorescence spectra, peak to trough were measured at 316,329 nm where degradation product showed zero-crossing. The different experimental parameters affecting the normal and synchronous fluorescence intensity of gliquidone were studied and optimized. Moreover, the cited methods have been validated as per ICH guidelines. The peak amplitude-concentration plots of the derivative synchronous fluorescence were linear over the concentration range 0.05-2 μg/ml for gliquidone. Limits of detection were 0.020 and 0.022 in first and third derivative synchronous spectra, respectively. The adopted methods were successfully applied to commercial tablets and the results demonstrated that the derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful stability-indicating method, suitable for routine use with a short analysis time. Statistical comparison between