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Sample records for fluid viscosity senpaku

  1. Fundamental study on the new method to estimate vibration level on a ship. Formulation of the damping matrix based on dissipation energy caused by fluid viscosity; Senpaku no shindo level suitei ni kansuru kisoteki kenkyu. Ryutai no nensei ni yoru san`itsu energy ni motozuku gensui matrix no teishikika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funaki, T.; Hayashi, S. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of engineering

    1996-12-31

    It is known in estimating vibration characteristics of a ship that fluid range affects largely a structure. In order to analyze the compound vibration therein, a method was proposed, which estimates vibration levels without using the finite element method. However, the problem of mode decay ratio has not been solved. Therefore, this paper first describes a method to introduce an equivalent linear decay matrix. The paper then mentions difference in the decay effects due to fluid viscosity in a shallow and deep water regions. Furthermore, vibration levels in the deep water region were estimated in a model experiment to verify the estimation result. Under a hypothesis that two-node vibration in a rotating ellipse has displacement distributions in the deep and shallow water regions equivalent, and when a case of vibration in a layer flow condition is calculated, dissipation energy in the shallow region is larger than that in the deep region by about 26%. About 5% of the total dissipation energy is consumed at bottom of the sea. According to a frequency response calculation, estimated values for the response levels still differ from experimental values, although the trend that the vibration levels change can be reproduced. 6 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Odd viscosity in chiral active fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debarghya; Souslov, Anton; Abanov, Alexander G; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2017-11-17

    We study the hydrodynamics of fluids composed of self-spinning objects such as chiral grains or colloidal particles subject to torques. These chiral active fluids break both parity and time-reversal symmetries in their non-equilibrium steady states. As a result, the constitutive relations of chiral active media display a dissipationless linear-response coefficient called odd (or equivalently, Hall) viscosity. This odd viscosity does not lead to energy dissipation, but gives rise to a flow perpendicular to applied pressure. We show how odd viscosity arises from non-linear equations of hydrodynamics with rotational degrees of freedom, once linearized around a non-equilibrium steady state characterized by large spinning speeds. Next, we explore odd viscosity in compressible fluids and suggest how our findings can be tested in the context of shock propagation experiments. Finally, we show how odd viscosity in weakly compressible chiral active fluids can lead to density and pressure excess within vortex cores.

  3. Viscosity kernel of molecular fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puscasu, Ruslan; Todd, Billy; Daivis, Peter

    2010-01-01

    forms that fit the wave-vector-dependent kernel data over a large density and wave-vector range have also been tested. Finally, a structural normalization of the kernels in physical space is considered. Overall, the real-space viscosity kernel has a width of roughly 3–6 atomic diameters, which means......The wave-vector dependent shear viscosities for butane and freely jointed chains have been determined. The transverse momentum density and stress autocorrelation functions have been determined by equilibrium molecular dynamics in both atomic and molecular hydrodynamic formalisms. The density......, temperature, and chain length dependencies of the reciprocal and real-space viscosity kernels are presented. We find that the density has a major effect on the shape of the kernel. The temperature range and chain lengths considered here have by contrast less impact on the overall normalized shape. Functional...

  4. Quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen J.; Wiczer, James J.; Cernosek, Richard W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Gebert, Charles T.; Casaus, Leonard; Mitchell, Mary A.

    1998-01-01

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  5. Poiseuille flow to measure the viscosity of particle model fluids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backer, J.A.; Lowe, C.P.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Iedema, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    The most important property of a fluid is its viscosity, it determines the flow properties. If one simulates a fluid using a particle model, calculating the viscosity accurately is difficult because it is a collective property. In this article we describe a new method that has a better signal to

  6. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  7. Poiseuille Flow of Fluid Whose Viscosity is Temperature Dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We discuss a fluid flowing between two parallel plates. We assume a Poiseuille flow. Furthermore, we assume that the viscosity μ, depends on temperature T. We show that the velocity equation has two solutions. Graph features prominently in the presentation.

  8. Effect of Fluid Dynamic Viscosity on the Strength of Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, K.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The mechanical strength of high porosity and weakly cemented chalk is affected by the fluid in the pores. In this study, the effect of the dynamic viscosity of non-polar fluids has been measured on outcrop chalk from Sigerslev Quarry, Stevns, Denmark. The outcome is that the measured strength...... of the chalk decreases with increasing dynamic viscosity. The proposed qualitative explanation is that pressure difference supports and enhances the generation of microscopic shear and tensile failures....

  9. Numerical solutions of Williamson fluid with pressure dependent viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffat Zehra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we have examined the flow of Williamson fluid in an inclined channel with pressure dependent viscosity. The governing equations of motion for Williamson fluid model under the effects of pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porosity are modeled and then solved numerically by the shooting method with Runge Kutta Fehlberg for two types of geometries i.e., (i Poiseuille flow and (ii Couette flow. Four different cases for pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porosity are assumed and the physical features of pertinent parameters are discussed through graphs.

  10. Origin of apparent viscosity in yield stress fluids below yielding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Møller, P.C.F.; Fall, A.; Bonn, D.

    2009-01-01

    For more than 20 years it has been debated if yield stress fluids are solid below the yield stress or actually flow; whether true yield stress fluids exist or not. Advocates of the true yield stress picture have demonstrated that the effective viscosity increases very rapidly as the stress is

  11. Effect of Ratio of Visco-Elastic Material Viscosity to Fluid Viscosity on Stability of Flexible Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANBUKUMAR, S.; KUMAR, MUNENDRA

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, a flexible pipe has been considered to study the effect of ratio of visco-elastic material viscosity to fluid viscosity on the stability of flexible laminar pipe flow with axi-symmetric disturbances. The effect of thickness of visco-elastic material on the stability of flexible pipe flow with outer rigid shroud has also been studied. The stability curves are drawn for various values of the ratio of visco-elastic material viscosity to fluid viscosity. It is observed that stability of flow is increasing by decreasing the ratio of visco-elastic material viscosity to fluid viscosity.

  12. Effect of viscosity on harmonic signals from magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Takashi, E-mail: t_yoshi@ees.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Bai, Shi; Hirokawa, Aiki; Tanabe, Kazuhiro; Enpuku, Keiji

    2015-04-15

    We explored the effect of viscosity on harmonic signals from a magnetic fluid. Using a numerical simulation that accounts for both the Brownian and Néel processes, we clarified how the magnetization mechanism is affected by viscosity. When the excitation field varies much slower than the Brownian relaxation time, magnetization can be described by the Langevin function. On the other hand, for the case when the excitation field varies much faster than the Brownian relaxation time, but much slower than the Néel relaxation time, the easy axes of the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) turn to some extent toward the direction of the excitation field in an equilibrium state. This alignment of the easy axes of MNPs caused by the AC field becomes more significant with the increase of the AC field strength. Consequently, the magnetization is different from the Langevin function even though Néel relaxation time is faster than time period of the external frequency. It is necessary to consider these results when we use harmonic signals from a magnetic fluid in a high-viscosity medium. - Highlights: • We explore the effect of viscosity on harmonic signals from a magnetic fluid. • We clarify how the magnetization mechanism is affected by the viscosity of the fluid. • The magnetization in a high-viscosity medium is different from a Langevin function. • We empirically express the alignment of easy axes of the MNPs caused by an AC field.

  13. Control of the Fluid Viscosity in a Mock Circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boës, Stefan; Ochsner, Gregor; Amacher, Raffael; Petrou, Anastasios; Meboldt, Mirko; Schmid Daners, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    A mock circulation allows the in vitro investigation, development, and testing of ventricular assist devices. An aqueous-glycerol solution is commonly used to mimic the viscosity of blood. Due to evaporation and temperature changes, the viscosity of the solution drifts from its initial value and therefore, deviates substantially from the targeted viscosity of blood. Additionally, the solution needs to be exchanged to account for changing viscosities when mimicking different hematocrits. This article presents a method to control the viscosity in a mock circulation. This method makes use of the relationship between temperature and viscosity of aqueous-glycerol solutions and employs the automatic control of the viscosity of the fluid. To that end, an existing mock circulation was extended with an industrial viscometer, temperature probes, and a heating nozzle band. The results obtained with different fluid viscosities show that a viscosity controller is vital for repeatable experimental conditions on mock circulations. With a mixture ratio of 49 mass percent of aqueous-glycerol solution, the controller can mimic a viscosity range corresponding to a hematocrit between 29 and 42% in a temperature range of 30-42°C. The control response has no overshoot and the settling time is 8.4 min for a viscosity step of 0.3 cP, equivalent to a hematocrit step of 3.6%. Two rotary blood pumps that are in clinical use are tested at different viscosities. At a flow rate of 5 L/min, both show a deviation of roughly 15 and 10% in motor current for high rotor speeds. The influence of different viscosities on the measured head pressure is negligible. Viscosity control for a mock circulation thus plays an important role for assessing the required motor current of ventricular assist devices. For the investigation of the power consumption of rotary blood pumps and the development of flow estimators where the motor current is a model input, an integrated viscosity controller is a valuable

  14. The role of fluid viscosity in an immersed granular collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Geng Chao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Instabilities of immersed slopes and cliffs can lead to catastrophic events that involve a sudden release of huge soil mass. The scaled deposit height and runout distance are found to follow simple power laws when a granular column collapses on a horizontal plane. However, if the granular column is submerged in a fluid, the mobility of the granular collapse due to high inertia effects will be reduced by fluid-particle interactions. In this study, the effects of fluid viscosity on granular collapse is investigated qualitatively by adopting a numerical approach based on the coupled lattice Boltzmann method (LBM and discrete element method (DEM. It is found that the granular collapse can be dramatically slowed down due to the presence of viscous fluids. For the considered granular configuration, when the fluid viscosity increases. the runout distance decreases and the final deposition shows a larger deposit angle.

  15. Measuring Viscosity with a Levitating Magnet: Application to Complex Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, C.; Bouquet, F.; Remond, J.; Deloche, B.

    2009-01-01

    As an experimental project proposed to students in fourth year of university, a viscometer was developed, consisting of a small magnet levitating in a viscous fluid. The viscous force acting on the magnet is directly measured: viscosities in the range 10-10[superscript 6] mPa s are obtained. This experiment is used as an introduction to complex…

  16. Contribution of pitcher fragrance and fluid viscosity to high prey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    important yet unsuspected role in the ecological success of the species. [Di Giusto B, Grosbois V, Fargeas E, Marshall D J and Gaume L 2008 Contribution of pitcher fragrance and fluid viscosity to high prey diversity in a Nepenthes carnivorous plant from Borneo; J. Biosci. 33 121–136] http://www.ias.ac.in/jbiosci. J. Biosci.

  17. Preparation of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, Mark R.; Flynn, Peter F.; Wand, A. Joshua

    1999-01-01

    The majority of proteins are too large to be comprehensively examined by solution NMR methods, primarily because they tumble too slowly in solution. One potential approach to making the NMR relaxation properties of large proteins amenable to modern solution NMR techniques is to encapsulate them in a reverse micelle which is dissolved in a low viscosity fluid. Unfortunately, promising low viscosity fluids such as the short chain alkanes, supercritical carbon dioxide, and various halocarbon refrigerants all require the application of significant pressure to be kept liquefied at room temperature. Here we describe the design and use of a simple cost effective NMR tube suitable for the preparation of solutions of proteins encapsulated in reverse micelles dissolved in such fluids

  18. High viscosity fluid simulation using particle-based method

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yuanzhang

    2011-03-01

    We present a new particle-based method for high viscosity fluid simulation. In the method, a new elastic stress term, which is derived from a modified form of the Hooke\\'s law, is included in the traditional Navier-Stokes equation to simulate the movements of the high viscosity fluids. Benefiting from the Lagrangian nature of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method, large flow deformation can be well handled easily and naturally. In addition, in order to eliminate the particle deficiency problem near the boundary, ghost particles are employed to enforce the solid boundary condition. Compared with Finite Element Methods with complicated and time-consuming remeshing operations, our method is much more straightforward to implement. Moreover, our method doesn\\'t need to store and compare to an initial rest state. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and efficient to handle the movements of highly viscous flows, and a large variety of different kinds of fluid behaviors can be well simulated by adjusting just one parameter. © 2011 IEEE.

  19. Black strings, low viscosity fluids, and violation of cosmic censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Luis; Pretorius, Frans

    2010-09-03

    We describe the behavior of 5-dimensional black strings, subject to the Gregory-Laflamme instability. Beyond the linear level, the evolving strings exhibit a rich dynamics, where at intermediate stages the horizon can be described as a sequence of 3-dimensional spherical black holes joined by black string segments. These segments are themselves subject to a Gregory-Laflamme instability, resulting in a self-similar cascade, where ever-smaller satellite black holes form connected by ever-thinner string segments. This behavior is akin to satellite formation in low-viscosity fluid streams subject to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. The simulation results imply that the string segments will reach zero radius in finite asymptotic time, whence the classical space-time terminates in a naked singularity. Since no fine-tuning is required to excite the instability, this constitutes a generic violation of cosmic censorship.

  20. Effect of fluid viscosity on wave propagation in a cylindrical bore in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and filled with viscous fluids. The frequency equation for each problem is obtained from. Figure 5. (Material 1) Effect of liquid viscosity on dispersion curves (Solid curve ± when bore is filled with castor oil. Dashed curve ± when bore is filled with inviscid liquid.) Effect of fluid viscosity on wave propagation in a cylindrical bore.

  1. Thermophysical properties of fluids: dynamic viscosity and thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latini, G.

    2017-11-01

    Thermophysical properties of fluids strongly depend upon atomic and molecular structure, complex systems governed by physics laws providing the time evolution. Theoretically the knowledge of the initial position and velocity of each atom, of the interaction forces and of the boundary conditions, leads to the solution; actually this approach contains too many variables and it is generally impossible to obtain an acceptable solution. In many cases it is only possible to calculate or to measure some macroscopic properties of fluids (pressure, temperature, molar volume, heat capacities...). The ideal gas “law,” PV = nRT, was one of the first important correlations of properties and the deviations from this law for real gases were usefully proposed. Moreover the statistical mechanics leads for example to the “hard-sphere” model providing the link between the transport properties and the molecular size and speed of the molecules. Further approximations take into account the intermolecular interactions (the potential functions) which can be used to describe attractions and repulsions. In any case thermodynamics reduces experimental or theoretical efforts by relating one physical property to another: the Clausius-Clapeyron equation provides a classical example of this method and the PVT function must be known accurately. However, in spite of the useful developments in molecular theory and computers technology, often it is usual to search for physical properties when the existing theories are not reliable and experimental data are not available: the required value of the physical or thermophysical property must be estimated or predicted (very often estimation and prediction are improperly used as synonymous). In some cases empirical correlations are useful, if it is clearly defined the range of conditions on which they are based. This work is concerned with dynamic viscosity µ and thermal conductivity λ and is based on clear and important rules to be respected

  2. Blood viscosity monitoring during cardiopulmonary bypass based on pressure-flow characteristics of a Newtonian fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okahara, Shigeyuki; Zu Soh; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro; Tsuji, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We proposed a blood viscosity estimation method based on pressure-flow characteristics of oxygenators used during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a previous study that showed the estimated viscosity to correlate well with the measured viscosity. However, the determination of the parameters included in the method required the use of blood, thereby leading to high cost of calibration. Therefore, in this study we propose a new method to monitor blood viscosity, which approximates the pressure-flow characteristics of blood considered as a non-Newtonian fluid with characteristics of a Newtonian fluid by using the parameters derived from glycerin solution to enable ease of acquisition. Because parameters used in the estimation method are based on fluid types, bovine blood parameters were used to calculate estimated viscosity (ηe), and glycerin parameters were used to estimate deemed viscosity (ηdeem). Three samples of whole bovine blood with different hematocrit levels (21.8%, 31.0%, and 39.8%) were prepared and perfused into the oxygenator. As the temperature changed from 37 °C to 27 °C, the oxygenator mean inlet pressure and outlet pressure were recorded for flows of 2 L/min and 4 L/min, and the viscosity was estimated. The value of deemed viscosity calculated with the glycerin parameters was lower than estimated viscosity calculated with bovine blood parameters by 20-33% at 21.8% hematocrit, 12-27% at 31.0% hematocrit, and 10-15% at 39.8% hematocrit. Furthermore, deemed viscosity was lower than estimated viscosity by 10-30% at 2 L/min and 30-40% at 4 L/min. Nevertheless, estimated and deemed viscosities varied with a similar slope. Therefore, this shows that deemed viscosity achieved using glycerin parameters may be capable of successfully monitoring relative viscosity changes of blood in a perfusing oxygenator.

  3. Viscosity of thickened fluids that relate to the Australian National Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten Hadde, Enrico; Ann Yvette Cichero, Julie; Michael Nicholson, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    In 2007, Australia published standardized terminology and definitions for three levels of thickened fluids used in the management of dysphagia. This study examined the thickness of the current Australian National Fluid Standards rheologically (i.e. viscosity, yield stress) and correlated these results with the "fork test", as described in the national standards. Clinicians who prescribe or work with thickened liquids and laypersons were recruited to categorize 15 different thickened fluids of known viscosities using the fork test. The mean apparent viscosity and the yield stress for each fluid category were calculated. Clear responses were obtained by both clinicians and laypersons for very thin fluids ( 1150 mPa.s), but large variations of responses were seen for intermediate viscosities. Measures of viscosity and yield stress were important in allocating liquids to different categories. Three bands of fluid viscosity with distinct intermediate band gaps and associated yield stress measures were clearly identifiable and are proposed as objective complements to the Australian National Standards. The "fork test" provides rudimentary information about both viscosity and yield stress, but is an inexact measure of both variables.

  4. Including fluid shear viscosity in a structural acoustic finite element model using a scalar fluid representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl

    2013-01-01

    An approximate boundary condition is developed in this paper to model fluid shear viscosity at boundaries of coupled fluid-structure system. The effect of shear viscosity is approximated by a correction term to the inviscid boundary condition, written in terms of second order in-plane derivatives of pressure. Both thin and thick viscous boundary layer approximations are formulated; the latter subsumes the former. These approximations are used to develop a variational formation, upon which a viscous finite element method (FEM) model is based, requiring only minor modifications to the boundary integral contributions of an existing inviscid FEM model. Since this FEM formulation has only one degree of freedom for pressure, it holds a great computational advantage over the conventional viscous FEM formulation which requires discretization of the full set of linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The results from thick viscous boundary layer approximation are found to be in good agreement with the prediction from a Navier-Stokes model. When applicable, thin viscous boundary layer approximation also gives accurate results with computational simplicity compared to the thick boundary layer formulation. Direct comparison of simulation results using the boundary layer approximations and a full, linearized Navier-Stokes model are made and used to evaluate the accuracy of the approximate technique. Guidelines are given for the parameter ranges over which the accurate application of the thick and thin boundary approximations can be used for a fluid-structure interaction problem. PMID:23729844

  5. A review on rising bubble dynamics in viscosity-stratified fluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kirti Chandra Sahu

    Systems with a bubble rising in a fluid, which has a variation of viscosity in space and time can be found in various natural phenomena and ... situations, due to the inherent presence of temperature variation and/or concentration gradient ... high contrasts in fluid properties, dynamically changing interface between the fluids, ...

  6. Thickened water-based hydraulic fluid with reduced dependence of viscosity on temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deck, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Improved hydraulic fluids or metalworking lubricants, utilizing mixtures of water, metal lubricants, metal corrosion inhibitors, and an associative polyether thickener, have reduced dependence of the viscosity on temperature achieved by the incorporation therein of an ethoxylated polyether surfactant.

  7. Dynamic topography and gravity anomalies for fluid layers whose viscosity varies exponentially with depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revenaugh, Justin; Parsons, Barry

    1987-01-01

    Adopting the formalism of Parsons and Daly (1983), analytical integral equations (Green's function integrals) are derived which relate gravity anomalies and dynamic boundary topography with temperature as a function of wavenumber for a fluid layer whose viscosity varies exponentially with depth. In the earth, such a viscosity profile may be found in the asthenosphere, where the large thermal gradient leads to exponential decrease of viscosity with depth, the effects of a pressure increase being small in comparison. It is shown that, when viscosity varies rapidly, topography kernels for both the surface and bottom boundaries (and hence the gravity kernel) are strongly affected at all wavelengths.

  8. Approximate Solution of Dam-break Flow of Low Viscosity Bingham Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puay, How Tion; Hosoda, Takashi

    In this study, we investigate the characteristics of dam-break flow of low viscosity Bingham fluid by deriving an approximate solution for the time development of the front position and depth at the origin of the flow. The asymptotic solutions representing the characteristic of Bingham fluid in the limit of low plastic viscosity are verified with a depth-averaged numerical model. Numerical simulations showed that with the decrease of plastic viscosity, the time development of the front position and depth at the origin approach to the theoretical asymptotic solution.

  9. Correlation between retention force of experimental plates and viscosity of experimental fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Dragan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Saliva viscosity plays a significant role in the biophysical segment of the total retention potential of total dentures. Objective. The aim of the paper was to establish the dependence of dynamic retention force of experimental plates on experimental fluid viscosity and especially time dependence of these parameters, following at the same time relative changes of the distance between the experimental plate and dentures support established by the dislocation of the experimental plate in both directions. Methods. For experimental verification we used an original device with the aim to enable in vivo simulation on the phantom made of the upper total denture prosthesis support and experimental plate. The experiment consisted of two parts. In the first part we determined the value of the dynamic retention force with plates without and with achieved ventilation effect. In the second part we determined time dependence of the dynamic retention force of experimental plates on the viscosity of experimental fluids that had been priorly determined on identical samples (8 ml of experimental fluid samples using a rotational viscometer (Haake RV-12 with a sensor (MV, Germany. Results Under the conditions of variable viscosity rates of seven experimental fluids (from 0.02 to 1309.04 mPa•s, we registered the time dependence of dynamic retention force of the experimental plate related to fluid viscosity during the action of the continual dislocating force of the separating directions. In addition, the maximal height of the dislocation of the experimental plate was registered. The dynamic retention force, manifested by the separating direction of the experimental plate dislocation, was increased concurrently with increased viscosity. Conclusion. The increase of dynamic retention force depends directly on medium viscosity. Close border values of fluid viscosity above the investigated ones, the impossibility of experimental layer thinning and the

  10. 3D Suspended Polymeric Microfluidics (SPMF3) with Flow Orthogonal to Bending (FOB) for Fluid Analysis through Kinematic Viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Mostapha Marzban; Muthukumaran Packirisamy; Javad Dargahi

    2017-01-01

    Measuring of fluid properties such as dynamic viscosity and density has tremendous potential for various applications from physical to biological to chemical sensing. However, it is almost impossible to affect only one of these properties, as dynamic viscosity and density are coupled. Hence, this paper proposes kinematic viscosity as a comprehensive parameter which can be used to study the effect of fluid properties applicable to various fluids from Newtonian fluids, such as water, to non-New...

  11. Effects of powdered versus liquid barium on the viscosity of fluids used in modified swallow studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, J.; Alexander, T. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Radiology, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2003-06-01

    To determine if the viscosity of thickened juice mixtures used in modified barium swallow studies significantly changes with the addition of powdered barium. We also describe a test formulation created using liquid barium, which has a negligible effect on juice viscosity. The viscosities of water and standardized honey- and nectar-consistency juices mixed with different amounts of powdered barium were measured by timing the laminar flow of a given initial hydrostatic head of fluid under gravity though an orifice of fixed diameter. Standardized juices were then mixed with a liquid formulation of barium and with measured quantities of water to produce viscosities that more closely equated with those of the standardized juices. With the addition of powdered barium, viscosity increased in all fluids, most markedly with the nectar-consistency juice. Liquid barium formulations maintained the viscosities of the original thickened juices. Rendering juices radio-opaque with barium powder results in dramatic increases in the viscosity of the resulting mixture and compromises diagnostic accuracy. Liquid barium preparations have the advantage that they can be rapidly and accurately dispensed by syringe, and their use does not significantly increase the viscosity of the preparation. (author)

  12. Effect of Viscosity Variation on the Micropolar Fluid Squeeze Film Lubrication of a Short Journal Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Naduvinamani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical study of the effect of the viscosity variation on the squeeze film performance of a short journal bearing operating with micropolar fluid is presented. The modified Reynolds equation accounting for the viscosity variation in micropolar fluid is mathematically derived. To obtain a closed form solution, the short bearing approximation under constant load is considered. The modified Reynolds equation is solved for the fluid film pressure and then the bearing characteristics, such as obtaining the load carrying capacity and the squeeze film time. According to the results evaluated, the micropolar fluid as a lubricant improves the squeeze film characteristics and results in a longer bearing life, whereas the viscosity variation factor decreases the load carrying capacity and squeezes film time. The result is compared with the corresponding Newtonian case.

  13. Empirical Modeling of the Viscosity of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Foam Fracturing Fluid under Different Downhole Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehzad Ahmed

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High-quality supercritical CO2 (sCO2 foam as a fracturing fluid is considered ideal for fracturing shale gas reservoirs. The apparent viscosity of the fracturing fluid holds an important role and governs the efficiency of the fracturing process. In this study, the viscosity of sCO2 foam and its empirical correlations are presented as a function of temperature, pressure, and shear rate. A series of experiments were performed to investigate the effect of temperature, pressure, and shear rate on the apparent viscosity of sCO2 foam generated by a widely used mixed surfactant system. An advanced high pressure, high temperature (HPHT foam rheometer was used to measure the apparent viscosity of the foam over a wide range of reservoir temperatures (40–120 °C, pressures (1000–2500 psi, and shear rates (10–500 s−1. A well-known power law model was modified to accommodate the individual and combined effect of temperature, pressure, and shear rate on the apparent viscosity of the foam. Flow indices of the power law were found to be a function of temperature, pressure, and shear rate. Nonlinear regression was also performed on the foam apparent viscosity data to develop these correlations. The newly developed correlations provide an accurate prediction of the foam’s apparent viscosity under different fracturing conditions. These correlations can be helpful for evaluating foam-fracturing efficiency by incorporating them into a fracturing simulator.

  14. A MEMS Resonant Sensor to Measure Fluid Density and Viscosity under Flexural and Torsional Vibrating Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods to calculate fluid density and viscosity using a micro-cantilever and based on the resonance principle were put forward. Their measuring mechanisms were analyzed and the theoretical equations to calculate the density and viscosity were deduced. The fluid-solid coupling simulations were completed for the micro-cantilevers with different shapes. The sensing chips with micro-cantilevers were designed based on the simulation results and fabricated using the micro electromechanical systems (MEMS technology. Finally, the MEMS resonant sensor was packaged with the sensing chip to measure the densities and viscosities of eight different fluids under the flexural and torsional vibrating modes separately. The relative errors of the measured densities from 600 kg/m3 to 900 kg/m3 and viscosities from 200 μPa·s to 1000 μPa·s were calculated and analyzed with different microcantilevers under various vibrating modes. The experimental results showed that the effects of the shape and vibrating mode of micro-cantilever on the measurement accuracies of fluid density and viscosity were analyzed in detail.

  15. A MEMS Resonant Sensor to Measure Fluid Density and Viscosity under Flexural and Torsional Vibrating Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Libo; Hu, Yingjie; Wang, Tongdong; Ding, Jianjun; Liu, Xixiang; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-06-06

    Methods to calculate fluid density and viscosity using a micro-cantilever and based on the resonance principle were put forward. Their measuring mechanisms were analyzed and the theoretical equations to calculate the density and viscosity were deduced. The fluid-solid coupling simulations were completed for the micro-cantilevers with different shapes. The sensing chips with micro-cantilevers were designed based on the simulation results and fabricated using the micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Finally, the MEMS resonant sensor was packaged with the sensing chip to measure the densities and viscosities of eight different fluids under the flexural and torsional vibrating modes separately. The relative errors of the measured densities from 600 kg/m³ to 900 kg/m³ and viscosities from 200 μPa·s to 1000 μPa·s were calculated and analyzed with different microcantilevers under various vibrating modes. The experimental results showed that the effects of the shape and vibrating mode of micro-cantilever on the measurement accuracies of fluid density and viscosity were analyzed in detail.

  16. 3D Suspended Polymeric Microfluidics (SPMF3 with Flow Orthogonal to Bending (FOB for Fluid Analysis through Kinematic Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostapha Marzban

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring of fluid properties such as dynamic viscosity and density has tremendous potential for various applications from physical to biological to chemical sensing. However, it is almost impossible to affect only one of these properties, as dynamic viscosity and density are coupled. Hence, this paper proposes kinematic viscosity as a comprehensive parameter which can be used to study the effect of fluid properties applicable to various fluids from Newtonian fluids, such as water, to non-Newtonian fluids, such as blood. This paper also proposes an ideal microplatform, namely polymeric suspended microfluidics (SPMF3, with flow plane orthogonal to the bending plane of the structure, along with tested results of various fluids covering a wide range of engineering applications. Kinematic viscosity, also called momentum diffusivity, considers changes in both fluid intermolecular forces and molecular inertia that define dynamic viscosity and fluid density, respectively. In this study a 3D suspended polymeric microfluidic system (SPMF3 was employed to detect changes in fluid parameters such as dynamic viscosity and density during fluid processes. Using this innovative design along with theoretical and experimental results, it is shown that, in fluids, the variations of fluid density and dynamic viscosity are not easily comprehensible due to their interconnectivity. Since any change in a fluid will affect both density and dynamic viscosity, measuring both of them is necessary to identify the fluid or process status. Finally, changes in fluid properties were analyzed using simulation and experiments. The experimental results with salt-DI water solution and milk with different fat concentrations as a colloidal fluid show that kinematic viscosity is a comprehensive parameter that can identify the fluids in a unique way using the proposed microplatform.

  17. Flow of an Eyring-Powell Model Fluid between Coaxial Cylinders with Variable Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the flow of Eyring-Powell model fluid in the annulus between two cylinders whose viscosity depends upon the temperature. We consider the steady flow in the annulus due to the motion of inner cylinder and constant pressure gradient. In the problem considered the flow is found to be remarkedly different from that for the incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid with constant viscosity. An analytical solution of the nonlinear problem is obtained using homotopy analysis method. The behavior of pertinent parameters is analyzed and depicted through graphs.

  18. Cosmology with bulk viscosity and the gravitino problem. Consequences of imperfect fluids on gravitino production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buoninfante, L.; Lambiase, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' E.R. Caianiello' ' Universita di Salerno, Fisciano (Italy); INFN-Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Fisciano (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    The gravitino problem is revisited in the framework of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. Dissipative effects (or bulk viscosity effects) arise owing to the different cooling rates of the fluid components. We show that the effects of the bulk viscosity allow one to avoid the late abundance of gravitinos. In particular, for particular values of the parameters characterizing the cosmological model, the gravitino abundance turns out to be weakly depending on the reheating temperature. (orig.)

  19. The Effect of Viscosity of a Fluid on the Frequency Response of a Viscoelastic Plate Loaded by This Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanov, A. D.; Ismailov, M. I.; Akbarov, S. D.

    2018-03-01

    A hydroviscoelastic system consisting of a viscoelastic plate and a half-plane filled with a viscous fluid is considered. The effect of viscosity of the fluid on the frequency response of the system and its dependence on the rheological parameters of plate material are estimated. The problem on forced vibrations of the system in the plane strain state is investigated using the exact equations of viscoelastodynamics for describing the motion of the plate and linearized Navier-Stokes equations for describing the flow of the fluid. The results found in the cases of nonviscous compressible and Newtonian compressible viscous fluids are compared.

  20. Impact of viscosity variation and micro rotation on oblique transport of Cu-water fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Rabil; Mehmood, R; Nadeem, S

    2017-09-01

    This study inspects the influence of temperature dependent viscosity on Oblique flow of micropolar nanofluid. Fluid viscosity is considered as an exponential function of temperature. Governing equations are converted into dimensionless forms with aid of suitable transformations. Outcomes of the study are shown in graphical form and discussed in detail. Results revealed that viscosity parameter has pronounced effects on velocity profiles, temperature distribution, micro-rotation, streamlines, shear stress and heat flux. It is found that viscosity parameter enhances the temperature distribution, tangential velocity profile, normal component of micro-rotation and shear stress at the wall while it has decreasing effect on tangential component of micro-rotation and local heat flux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Continuous mixer, process and use in a pumping plant for a high viscosity fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cholet, H.

    1993-03-12

    The invention concerns a novel continuous mixer comprising a rotary shaft carrying two or more vanes for mixing two or more fluids of different viscosities supplied at the inlet of the mixer body and for providing, at the mixer body outlet, a mixture of viscosity lower than that of the more or most viscous fluid. Preferentially, the vane profile is such that, without fluid circulation, rotation of the vanes produces a reaction force parallel to the rotational axis and in the same direction as the resulting flow or does not produce a reaction force of significant magnitude parallel to the rotational axis. The mixer shaft is connected to a pump shaft which is rotated by hydraulic motor driven by pressurized fluid injection. The mixer is used especially for facilitating viscous crude oil pumping from directional wells including horizontal or inclined portions.

  2. Effect of fluid viscosity on wave propagation in a cylindrical bore in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Е18Ж. In order to obtain the equation of motion in a viscous liquid medium, the elastic wave equation is modified by replacing Lame's parameter ! by KH └ Е2a3Ж"H, where KH is the bulk modulus and "H is the rigidity of the fluid considered. Using the correspondence principle (Ewing et al 1957) the effect of fluid viscosity is ...

  3. A review on rising bubble dynamics in viscosity-stratified fluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Systems with a bubble rising in a fluid, which has a variation of viscosity in space and time can be found in various natural phenomena and industrial applications, including food processing, oil extraction, waste processing and biochemical reactors, to name a few. A review of the aspects studied in the literature on ...

  4. Investigation of the Capture of Magnetic Particles From High-Viscosity Fluids Using Permanent Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, Alexandra; Velez, Camilo; Shah, Yash; Garraud, Nicolas; Kozissnik, Bettina; Yarmola, Elena G; Allen, Kyle D; Dobson, Jon; Arnold, David P

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the practicality of using a small, permanent magnet to capture magnetic particles out of high-viscosity biological fluids, such as synovial fluid. Numerical simulations are used to predict the trajectory of magnetic particles toward the permanent magnet. The simulations are used to determine a "collection volume" with a time-dependent size and shape, which determines the number of particles that can be captured from the fluid in a given amount of time. The viscosity of the fluid strongly influences the velocity of the magnetic particles toward the magnet, hence, the collection volume after a given time. In regards to the design of the magnet, the overall size is shown to most strongly influence the collection volume in comparison to the magnet shape or aspect ratio. Numerical results showed good agreement with in vitro experimental magnetic collection results. In the long term, this paper aims to facilitate optimization of the collection of magnetic particle-biomarker conjugates from high-viscosity biological fluids without the need to remove the fluid from a patient.

  5. Thermodynamic scaling of the shear viscosity of Mie n-6 fluids and their binary mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delage-Santacreu, Stephanie; Galliero, Guillaume; Hoang, Hai; Bazile, Jean-Patrick; Boned, Christian; Fernandez, Josefa

    2015-05-07

    In this work, we have evaluated the applicability of the so-called thermodynamic scaling and the isomorph frame to describe the shear viscosity of Mie n-6 fluids of varying repulsive exponents (n = 8, 12, 18, 24, and 36). Furthermore, the effectiveness of the thermodynamic scaling to deal with binary mixtures of Mie n-6 fluids has been explored as well. To generate the viscosity database of these fluids, extensive non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for various thermodynamic conditions. Then, a systematic approach has been used to determine the gamma exponent value (γ) characteristic of the thermodynamic scaling approach for each system. In addition, the applicability of the isomorph theory with a density dependent gamma has been confirmed in pure fluids. In both pure fluids and mixtures, it has been found that the thermodynamic scaling with a constant gamma is sufficient to correlate the viscosity data on a large range of thermodynamic conditions covering liquid and supercritical states as long as the density is not too high. Interestingly, it has been obtained that, in pure fluids, the value of γ is directly proportional to the repulsive exponent of the Mie potential. Finally, it has been found that the value of γ in mixtures can be deduced from those of the pure component using a simple logarithmic mixing rule.

  6. Thermodynamic scaling of the shear viscosity of Mie n-6 fluids and their binary mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delage-Santacreu, Stephanie [Laboratoire de Mathématiques et leurs Applications (UMR-5142 with CNRS), Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, BP 1155, F-64013 PAU Cedex (France); Galliero, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.galliero@univ-pau.fr; Hoang, Hai; Bazile, Jean-Patrick; Boned, Christian [Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes et leurs Reservoirs (UMR-5150 with CNRS and TOTAL), Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, BP 1155, F-64013 PAU Cedex (France); Fernandez, Josefa [Laboratorio de Propiedades Termofisicas, Universidade Santiago de Compostela, Campus Vida, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2015-05-07

    In this work, we have evaluated the applicability of the so-called thermodynamic scaling and the isomorph frame to describe the shear viscosity of Mie n-6 fluids of varying repulsive exponents (n = 8, 12, 18, 24, and 36). Furthermore, the effectiveness of the thermodynamic scaling to deal with binary mixtures of Mie n-6 fluids has been explored as well. To generate the viscosity database of these fluids, extensive non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for various thermodynamic conditions. Then, a systematic approach has been used to determine the gamma exponent value (γ) characteristic of the thermodynamic scaling approach for each system. In addition, the applicability of the isomorph theory with a density dependent gamma has been confirmed in pure fluids. In both pure fluids and mixtures, it has been found that the thermodynamic scaling with a constant gamma is sufficient to correlate the viscosity data on a large range of thermodynamic conditions covering liquid and supercritical states as long as the density is not too high. Interestingly, it has been obtained that, in pure fluids, the value of γ is directly proportional to the repulsive exponent of the Mie potential. Finally, it has been found that the value of γ in mixtures can be deduced from those of the pure component using a simple logarithmic mixing rule.

  7. Studying effect of carrier fluid viscosity in magnetite based ferrofluids using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitha, S.; Iyengar, Shruthi S.; Ananthamurthy, Sharath; Bhattacharya, Sarbari

    2018-02-01

    Ferrofluids with varying viscosities of carrier fluids have been prepared with magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation and characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). They were found to be nearly spherical in shape with an almost uniform size of 13nm. The superparamagnetic nature of the water based ferrofluids at room temperature was established by SQUID magnetometry. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) was carried out to establish the size of the nanoparticle clusters in the ferrofluids synthesized. The results indicate an increase in cluster size with increase in carrier fluid viscosity. This is supported by results from Raman Spectroscopy. A further attempt to characterise these ferrofluids was made by studying the behaviour of well characterised non-magnetic micron sized probes that are optically trapped while suspended in the ferrofluid. An increase in carrier fluid viscosity results in a decrease in corner frequency when only the carrier fluid is used as the suspending medium. When the magnetic component is also present the corner frequency is higher than with just the carrier fluid. This relative increase happens at all laser powers at the trapping plane. This trend is also found to be independent of the size and material of the probe particle. Comparisons of various parameters that influence optical trapping lead us to believe that the enhancement could be due to a directed motion of the magnetic clusters in the presence of an optical trap.

  8. Transient molecular dynamics simulations of liquid viscosity for nonpolar and polar fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jason C.; Rowley, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    A transient molecular dynamics (TMD) method for obtaining fluid viscosity is extended to multisite, force-field models of both nonpolar and polar liquids. The method overlays a sinusoidal velocity profile over the peculiar particle velocities and then records the transient decay of the velocity profile. The viscosity is obtained by regression of the solution of the momentum equation with an appropriate constitutive equation and initial and boundary conditions corresponding to those used in the simulation. The transient velocity decays observed appeared to include both relaxation and retardation effects. The Jeffreys viscoelastic model was found to model accurately the transient responses obtained for multisite models for n-butane, isobutane, n-hexane, water, methanol, and 1-hexanol. TMD viscosities obtained for saturated liquids over a wide range of densities agreed well for the polar fluids, both with nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) results using the same force-field models and with correlations based on experimental data. Viscosities obtained for the nonpolar fluids agreed well with the experimental and NEMD results at low to moderate densities, but underpredicted experimental values at higher densities where shear-thinning effects and viscous heating may impact the TMD simulations.

  9. Stirring Up an Elastic Fluid: Critical Viscosity of Xenon-2 (CVX-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2002-12-01

    Whipped cream stays in place even when turned upside down. Yet it readily flows through the nozzle of a spray can to reach the dessert plate. This demonstrates the phenomenon of shear thinning that is important to many industrial and physical processes. Paints, film emulsions, and other complex solutions that are highly viscous under normal conditions but become thin and flow easily under shear forces. A simple fluid, such as water, does not exhibit shear thinning under normal conditions. Very close to the liquid-vapor critical point, where the distinction between liquid and vapor disappears, the fluid becomes more complex and is predicted to display shear thinning. At the critical point, xenon atoms interact over long distances in a classical model of cooperative phenomena. Physicists rely on this system to learn how long-range order arises. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of fluids. Viscosity originates from the interactions of individual molecules. It is so complicated that, except for the simplest gas, it cannot be calculated accurately from theory. Tests with critical fluids can provide key data, but are limited on Earth because critical fluids are highly compressed by gravity. CVX-2 employs a tiny metal screen vibrating between two electrodes in a bath of critical xenon. The vibrations and how they dampen are used to measure viscosity. CVX flew on STS-85 (1997), where it revealed that, close to the critical point, the xenon is partly elastic: it can 'stretch' as well as flow. For STS-107, the hardware has been enhanced to determine if critical xenon is a shear-thinning fluid.

  10. Synthesis of high-temperature viscosity stabilizer used in drilling fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanna; Luo, Huaidong; Shi, Libao; Huang, Hongjun

    2018-02-01

    Abstract For a well performance drilling fluid, when it operates in deep wells under high temperature, the most important property required is the thermal stability. The drilling fluid properties under high temperature can be controlled by proper selection of viscosity stabilizer, which can capture oxygen to protect polymer agent in the drilling fluid. In this paper a viscosity stabilizer PB-854 is described, which was synthesized by 4-phenoxybutyl bromide, paraformaldehyde, and phloroglucinol using etherification method and condensation reaction. We studied the effect of catalyst dosage, temperature, time, and stirring rate on the synthetic yield. Under this condition: molar ratio of 2-tert-Butylphenol, paraformaldehyde and phloroglucinol of 2:1:2.5, reacting temperature of 100 °C, stirring rate of 100 r min‑1, and mass content of catalyst of 15 %, char yield of 5-bromine-3-tert-butyl salicylaldehyde reached 86 %. Under this condition: molar ratio of 5-bromine-3-tert-butyl salicylaldehyde and phloroglucinol of 4, reacting temperature of 60 °C, reacting time of 30 min, volume content of sulphuric acid of 80 %, char yield of the target product viscosity stabilizer PB-854 is 86%. Finally, in this paper, infrared spectroscopy is adopted to analyse the structure of the synthetic product PB-854.The improvement in the stability of drilling fluid was further shown after adding the viscosity stabilizer in the common polymer drilling fluid under high temperature conditions of 120 °C ∼ 180 °C. The results show significant change in terms of fluid stability in the presence of this new stabilizer as it provides better stability.

  11. Odd Viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Avron, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    When time reversal is broken the viscosity tensor can have a non vanishing odd part. In two dimensions, and only then, such odd viscosity is compatible with isotropy. Elementary and basic features of odd viscosity are examined by considering solutions of the wave and Navier-Stokes equations for hypothetical fluids where the stress is dominated by odd viscosity.

  12. Viscosity of magnetic fluids must be modified in calculations of dynamic susceptibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, A.V., E-mail: lav@icmm.ru

    2017-06-01

    The frequency dependences of dynamic susceptibility were measured for a series of magnetic fluid samples with the same dispersed composition at different temperatures. Coincidence of normalized dynamic susceptibility curves plotted for different concentrations was obtained only after introducing correction for the value of dynamic viscosity of the magnetic fluid. The value of the correction coefficient doesn’t depend on temperature and is the universal function of the hydrodynamic concentration of particles. - Highlights: • Dynamic susceptibility was measured at different temperatures and concentrations. • Coincidence of curves requires a correction of value of viscosity in calculations. • This correction is function of the hydrodynamic concentration of particles. • With this function the rotation of particles are described correctly.

  13. Determination of fluid viscosity and femto Newton forces of Leishmania amazonensis using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma; de Castro, Archimedes, Jr.; Neto, Vivaldo M.; de Y. Pozzo, Liliana; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2005-08-01

    The displacements of a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) can be used as a force transducer for mechanical measurements in life sciences such as the measurement of forces of living microorganisms or the viscosity of local fluids. The technique we used allowed us to measure forces on the 200 femto Newtons to 4 pico Newtons range of the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for a serious tropical disease. These observations can be used to understand the infection mechanism and chemotaxis of these parasites. The same technique was used to measure viscosities of few microliters sample with agreement with known samples better than 5%. To calibrate the force as a function of the microsphere displacement we first dragged the microsphere in a fluid at known velocity for a broad range of different optical and hydrodynamical parameters. The hydrodynamical model took into account the presence of two walls and the force depends on drag velocity, fluid viscosity and walls proximities, while the optical model in the geometric optics regime depends on the particle and fluid refractive indexes and laser power. To measure the high numerical (NA) aperture laser beam power after the objective we used an integration sphere to avoid the systematic errors of usual power meters for high NA beams. After this careful laser power measurement we obtained an almost 45 degrees straight line for the plot of the optical force (calculated by the particle horizontal displacement) versus hydrodynamic force (calculated by the drag velocity) under variation of all the parameters described below. This means that hydrodynamic models can be used to calibrate optical forces, as we have done for the parasite force measurement, or vice-versa, as we did for the viscosity measurements.

  14. Finite element approximation of flow of fluids with shear-rate- and pressure-dependent viscosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirn, A.; Lanzendörfer, Martin; Stebel, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 4 (2012), s. 1604-1634 ISSN 0272-4979 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917; GA AV ČR IAA100300802; GA MŠk LC06052 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504; CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : non-Newtonian fluid * shear-rate- and pressure-dependent viscosity * finite element method * error analysis Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.326, year: 2012

  15. Thermal conductivity and viscosity of self-assembled alcohol/polyalphaolefin nanoemulsion fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Very large thermal conductivity enhancement had been reported earlier in colloidal suspensions of solid nanoparticles (i.e., nanofluids) and more recently also in oil-in-water emulsions. In this study, nanoemulsions of alcohol and polyalphaolefin (PAO) are spontaneously generated by self-assembly, and their thermal conductivity and viscosity are investigated experimentally. Alcohol and PAO have similar thermal conductivity values, so that the abnormal effects, such as particle Brownian motion, on thermal transport could be deducted in these alcohol/PAO nanoemulsion fluids. Small angle neutron-scattering measurement shows that the alcohol droplets are spheres of 0.8-nm radius in these nanoemulsion fluids. Both thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity of the fluids are found to increase with alcohol droplet loading, as expected from classical theories. However, the measured conductivity increase is very moderate, e.g., a 2.3% increase for 9 vol%, in these fluids. This suggests that no anomalous enhancement of thermal conductivity is observed in the alcohol/PAO nanoemulsion fluids tested in this study. PMID:21711807

  16. Thermal conductivity and viscosity of self-assembled alcohol/polyalphaolefin nanoemulsion fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammouda Boualem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Very large thermal conductivity enhancement had been reported earlier in colloidal suspensions of solid nanoparticles (i.e., nanofluids and more recently also in oil-in-water emulsions. In this study, nanoemulsions of alcohol and polyalphaolefin (PAO are spontaneously generated by self-assembly, and their thermal conductivity and viscosity are investigated experimentally. Alcohol and PAO have similar thermal conductivity values, so that the abnormal effects, such as particle Brownian motion, on thermal transport could be deducted in these alcohol/PAO nanoemulsion fluids. Small angle neutron-scattering measurement shows that the alcohol droplets are spheres of 0.8-nm radius in these nanoemulsion fluids. Both thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity of the fluids are found to increase with alcohol droplet loading, as expected from classical theories. However, the measured conductivity increase is very moderate, e.g., a 2.3% increase for 9 vol%, in these fluids. This suggests that no anomalous enhancement of thermal conductivity is observed in the alcohol/PAO nanoemulsion fluids tested in this study.

  17. Results of the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement International Space Station Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaukler, William; Antar, Basil

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of FMVM is to measure the rate of coalescence of two highly viscous liquid drops and correlate the results with the liquid viscosity and surface tension. The experiment takes advantage of the low gravitational free floating conditions in space to permit the unconstrained coalescence of two nearly spherical drops. The merging of the drops is accomplished by deploying them from a syringe and suspending them on Nomex threads followed by the astronaut s manipulation of one of the drops toward a stationary droplet till contact is achieved. Coalescence and merging occurs due to shape relaxation and reduction of surface energy, being resisted by the viscous drag within the liquid. Experiments were conducted onboard the International Space Station in July of 2004 and subsequently in May of 2005. The coalescence was recorded on video and down-linked near real-time. When the coefficient of surface tension for the liquid is known, the increase in contact radius can be used to determine the coefficient of viscosity for that liquid. The viscosity is determined by fitting the experimental speed to theoretically calculated contact radius speed for the same experimental parameters. Recent fluid dynamical numerical simulations of the coalescence process will be presented. The results are important for a better understanding of the coalescence process. The experiment is also relevant to liquid phase sintering, free form in-situ fabrication, and as a potential new method for measuring the viscosity of viscous glass formers at low shear rates.

  18. An automated system for performing continuous viscosity versus temperature measurements of fluids using an Ostwald viscometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, L. Y.; Logan, E. R.; Gering, K. L.; Dahn, J. R.

    2017-09-01

    An automated system was developed to measure the viscosity of fluids as a function of temperature using image analysis tracking software. An Ostwald viscometer was placed in a three-wall dewar in which ethylene glycol was circulated using a thermal bath. The system collected continuous measurements during both heating and cooling cycles exhibiting no hysteresis. The use of video tracking analysis software greatly reduced the measurement errors associated with measuring the time required for the meniscus to pass through the markings on the viscometer. The stability of the system was assessed by performing 38 consecutive measurements of water at 42.50 ± 0.05 °C giving an average flow time of 87.7 ± 0.3 s. A device was also implemented to repeatedly deliver a constant volume of liquid of 11.00 ± 0.03 ml leading to an average error in the viscosity of 0.04%. As an application, the system was used to measure the viscosity of two Li-ion battery electrolyte solvents from approximately 10 to 40 °C with results showing excellent agreement with viscosity values calculated using Gering's Advanced Electrolyte Model (AEM).

  19. An automated system for performing continuous viscosity versus temperature measurements of fluids using an Ostwald viscometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, L Y; Logan, E R; Gering, K L; Dahn, J R

    2017-09-01

    An automated system was developed to measure the viscosity of fluids as a function of temperature using image analysis tracking software. An Ostwald viscometer was placed in a three-wall dewar in which ethylene glycol was circulated using a thermal bath. The system collected continuous measurements during both heating and cooling cycles exhibiting no hysteresis. The use of video tracking analysis software greatly reduced the measurement errors associated with measuring the time required for the meniscus to pass through the markings on the viscometer. The stability of the system was assessed by performing 38 consecutive measurements of water at 42.50 ± 0.05 °C giving an average flow time of 87.7 ± 0.3 s. A device was also implemented to repeatedly deliver a constant volume of liquid of 11.00 ± 0.03 ml leading to an average error in the viscosity of 0.04%. As an application, the system was used to measure the viscosity of two Li-ion battery electrolyte solvents from approximately 10 to 40 °C with results showing excellent agreement with viscosity values calculated using Gering's Advanced Electrolyte Model (AEM).

  20. Study of specific loss power of magnetic fluids with various viscosities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phong, P.T., E-mail: phamthanhphong@tdt.edu.vn [Department for Management of Science and Technology Development, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nguyen, L.H., E-mail: luuhuunguyen@ukh.edu.vn [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,18- Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Cau Giay District, Ha Noi City (Viet Nam); Khanh Hoa University, 1- Nguyen Chanh Street, Nha Trang City, Khanh Hoa Province (Viet Nam); Phong, L.T.H., E-mail: lthp52a@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,18- Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Cau Giay District, Ha Noi City (Viet Nam); Nam, P.H., E-mail: namph.ims@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,18- Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Cau Giay District, Ha Noi City (Viet Nam); Manh, D.H., E-mail: manhdh.ims@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,18- Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Cau Giay District, Ha Noi City (Viet Nam); Lee, I.J., E-mail: lij@dongguk.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Chemistry, Dongguk University-Gyeongju, Dongdae-roDongdae-ro 123, Gyeongju-Si, Gyeongbuk 38066 (Korea, Republic of); Phuc, N.X., E-mail: phucnx1949@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,18- Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Cau Giay District, Ha Noi City (Viet Nam)

    2017-04-15

    Abstracts: Using hydrothermal method, CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (hard ferrite) and MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (soft ferrite) nanoparticles of size up to 20 nm were synthesized and the viscosities were controlled using various concentrations of agar. The hydrodynamic diameter of these particles was measured and fitted to a lognormal distribution and the results showed their polydispersity is very narrow. From the calorimetric measurements of the particles stabilized in agar solutions, we have demonstrated that at a given frequency, the dependence of the specific loss power of magnetic fluids on the viscosity is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions made in the earlier studies. - Highlights: • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (hard ferrite) and MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (soft ferrite) nanoparticles size up to 20 nm were synthesized. • The relaxation loss depends on both the particle's intrinsic properties and the viscosity of the environment. • The SLP of hard nanoparticles strongly decreases with increasing the viscosity whereas that of soft nanoparticles remains almost unchanged.

  1. Viscosity and non-Newtonian features of thickened fluids used for dysphagia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Mark; Hanson, Ben; Smith, Christina

    2010-08-01

    Thickening agents based primarily on granulated maize starch are widely used in the care of patients with swallowing difficulties, increasing viscosity of consumed fluids. This slows bolus flow during swallowing, allowing airway protection to be more properly engaged. Thickened fluids have been shown to exhibit time-varying behavior and are non-Newtonian, complicating assessment of fluid thickness, potentially compromising efficacy of therapy. This work aimed to quantify the flow properties of fluids produced with commercial thickeners at shear rates representative of slow tipping in a beaker to fast swallowing. Results were presented as indices calculated using a power-law model representing apparent viscosity (consistency index) and non-Newtonian nature of flow (flow behavior index). Immediately following mixing, 3 fluid thicknesses showed distinct consistency indices and decreasing flow behavior index with increasing thickener concentration. An increase in consistency index over 30 min was observed, but only for samples that were repeatedly sheared during acquisition. Three-hour measurements showed changes in consistency index across fluids with the largest being a 25% rise from initial value. This may have implications for efficacy of treatment, as fluids are not always consumed immediately upon mixing. Flow behavior indices were comparable across thickeners exhibiting similar rises over time. The indices were a more complete method of quantifying flow properties compared with single viscosity measurements, allowing an increased depth of analysis. The non-Newtonian nature of fluids perhaps renders them particularly suitable for use as dysphagia therapies, and such analysis may allow the possibility of altering these properties to optimize therapeutic efficacy to be explored. Practical Application: Effective treatment of swallowing disorders relies upon the appropriate choice and subsequent reproduction of drinks thickened to one of a number of predetermined

  2. Preparation, characterization, and NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, Charles R.; Flynn, Peter F.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2003-01-01

    Encapsulating a protein in a reverse micelle and dissolving it in a low-viscosity solvent can lower the rotational correlation time of a protein and thereby provides a novel strategy for studying proteins in a variety of contexts. The preparation of the sample is a key element in this approach and is guided by a number of competing parameters. Here we examine the applicability of several strategies for the preparation and characterization of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids that are suitable for high performance NMR spectroscopy. Ubiquitin is used as a model system to explore various issues such as the homogeneity of the encapsulation, characterization of the hydrodynamic performance of reverse micelles containing protein molecules, and the effective pH of the water environment of the reverse micelle

  3. The effect of fluid viscosity on the hemodynamic energy changes during operation of the pulsatile ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chi Bum; Son, Kuk Hui; Lee, Jung Joo; Choi, Jaesoon; Song, Seung Joon; Jung, Jae Seung; Lee, Sung Ho; Son, Ho Sung; Sun, Kyung

    2011-11-01

    Blood viscosity during operation of ventricular assist device (VAD) can be changed by various conditions such as anemia. It is known generally that the blood viscosity can affect vascular resistance and lead to change of blood flow. In this study, the effect of fluid viscosity variation on hemodynamic energy was evaluated with a pulsatile blood pump in a mock system. Six solutions were used for experiments, which were composed of water and glycerin and had different viscosities of 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, and 4.5 cP. The hemodynamic energy at the outlet cannula was measured. Experimental results showed that mean pressure was increased in accordance with the viscosity increase. When the viscosity increased, the mean pressure was also increased. However, the flow was decreased according to the viscosity increase. Energy equivalent pressure value was increased according to the viscosity-induced pressure rise; however, surplus hemodynamic energy value did not show any apparent changing trend. The hemodynamic energy made by the pulsatile VAD was affected by the viscosity of the circulating fluid. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Label-free viscosity measurement of complex fluids using reversal flow switching manipulation in a microfluidic channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun Kang, Yang; Ryu, Jeongeun; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    The accurate viscosity measurement of complex fluids is essential for characterizing fluidic behaviors in blood vessels and in microfluidic channels of lab-on-a-chip devices. A microfluidic platform that accurately identifies biophysical properties of blood can be used as a promising tool for the early detections of cardiovascular and microcirculation diseases. In this study, a flow-switching phenomenon depending on hydrodynamic balancing in a microfluidic channel was adopted to conduct viscosity measurement of complex fluids with label-free operation. A microfluidic device for demonstrating this proposed method was designed to have two inlets for supplying the test and reference fluids, two side channels in parallel, and a junction channel connected to the midpoint of the two side channels. According to this proposed method, viscosities of various fluids with different phases (aqueous, oil, and blood) in relation to that of reference fluid were accurately determined by measuring the switching flow-rate ratio between the test and reference fluids, when a reverse flow of the test or reference fluid occurs in the junction channel. An analytical viscosity formula was derived to measure the viscosity of a test fluid in relation to that of the corresponding reference fluid using a discrete circuit model for the microfluidic device. The experimental analysis for evaluating the effects of various parameters on the performance of the proposed method revealed that the fluidic resistance ratio ( R J L / R L , fluidic resistance in the junction channel ( R J L ) to fluidic resistance in the side channel ( R L )) strongly affects the measurement accuracy. The microfluidic device with smaller R J L / R L values is helpful to measure accurately the viscosity of the test fluid. The proposed method accurately measured the viscosities of various fluids, including single-phase (Glycerin and plasma) and oil-water phase (oil vs. deionized water) fluids, compared with conventional

  5. Determination of Fluid Density and Viscosity by Analyzing Flexural Wave Propagations on the Vibrating Micro-Cantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deokman; Hong, Seongkyeol; Jang, Jaesung; Park, Junhong

    2017-10-27

    The determination of fluid density and viscosity using most cantilever-based sensors is based on changes in resonant frequency and peak width. Here, we present a wave propagation analysis using piezoelectrically excited micro-cantilevers under distributed fluid loading. The standing wave shapes of microscale-thickness cantilevers partially immersed in liquids (water, 25% glycerol, and acetone), and nanoscale-thickness microfabricated cantilevers fully immersed in gases (air at three different pressures, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen) were investigated to identify the effects of fluid-structure interactions to thus determine the fluid properties. This measurement method was validated by comparing with the known fluid properties, which agreed well with the measurements. The relative differences for the liquids were less than 4.8% for the densities and 3.1% for the viscosities, and those for the gases were less than 6.7% for the densities and 7.3% for the viscosities, showing better agreements in liquids than in gases.

  6. Near Wellbore Hydraulic Fracture Propagation from Perforations in Tight Rocks: The Roles of Fracturing Fluid Viscosity and Injection Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Fallahzadeh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracture initiation and near wellbore propagation is governed by complex failure mechanisms, especially in cased perforated wellbores. Various parameters affect such mechanisms, including fracturing fluid viscosity and injection rate. In this study, three different fracturing fluids with viscosities ranging from 20 to 600 Pa.s were used to investigate the effects of varying fracturing fluid viscosities and fluid injection rates on the fracturing mechanisms. Hydraulic fracturing tests were conducted in cased perforated boreholes made in tight 150 mm synthetic cubic samples. A true tri-axial stress cell was used to simulate real far field stress conditions. In addition, dimensional analyses were performed to correspond the results of lab experiments to field-scale operations. The results indicated that by increasing the fracturing fluid viscosity and injection rate, the fracturing energy increased, and consequently, higher fracturing pressures were observed. However, when the fracturing energy was transferred to a borehole at a faster rate, the fracture initiation angle also increased. This resulted in more curved fracture planes. Accordingly, a new parameter, called fracturing power, was introduced to relate fracture geometry to fluid viscosity and injection rate. Furthermore, it was observed that the presence of casing in the wellbore impacted the stress distribution around the casing in such a way that the fracture propagation deviated from the wellbore vicinity.

  7. On Pressure Boundary Conditions for Steady Flows of Incompressible Fluids with Pressure and Shear Rate Dependent Viscosities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lanzendörfer, Martin; Stebel, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2011), s. 265-285 ISSN 0862-7940 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06052 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA201/06/0352 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504; CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : existence * weak solutions * incompressible fluids * non-Newtonian fluids * pressure dependent viscosity * shear dependent viscosity * inflow/outflow boundary conditions * pressure boundary conditions * filtration boundary conditions Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.480, year: 2011 http://dml.cz/handle/10338.dmlcz/141486

  8. Experimental model for non-Newtonian fluid viscosity estimation: Fit to mathematical expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillem Masoliver i Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The  construction  process  of  a  viscometer,  developed  in  collaboration  with  a  final  project  student,  is  here  presented.  It  is  intended  to  be  used  by   first  year's  students  to  know  the  viscosity  as  a  fluid  property, for  both  Newtonian  and  non-Newtonian  flows.  Viscosity  determination  is  crucial  for  the  fluids  behaviour knowledge  related  to  their  reologic  and  physical  properties.  These  have  great  implications  in  engineering aspects  such  as  friction  or  lubrication.  With  the  present  experimental  model  device  three  different fluids are  analyzed  (water,  kétchup  and  a  mixture  with  cornstarch  and  water.  Tangential stress is measured versus velocity in order to characterize all the fluids in different thermal conditions. A mathematical fit process is proposed to be done in order to adjust the results to expected analytical expressions, obtaining good results for these fittings, with R2 greater than 0.88 in any case.

  9. Viscous heating in fluids with temperature-dependent viscosity: implications for magma flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Costa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscous heating plays an important role in the dynamics of fluids with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity because of the coupling between the energy and momentum equations. The heat generated by viscous friction produces a local temperature increase near the tube walls with a consequent decrease of the viscosity which may dramatically change the temperature and velocity profiles. These processes are mainly controlled by the Peclét number, the Nahme number, the flow rate and the thermal boundary conditions. The problem of viscous heating in fluids was investigated in the past for its practical interest in the polymer industry, and was invoked to explain some rheological behaviours of silicate melts, but was not completely applied to study magma flows. In this paper we focus on the thermal and mechanical effects caused by viscous heating in tubes of finite lengths. We find that in magma flows at high Nahme number and typical flow rates, viscous heating is responsible for the evolution from Poiseuille flow, with a uniform temperature distribution at the inlet, to a plug flow with a hotter layer near the walls. When the temperature gradients  induced by viscous heating are very pronounced, local instabilities may occur and the triggering of secondary flows is possible. For completeness, this paper also describes magma flow in infinitely long tubes both at steady state and in transient phase.

  10. Associations of viscosity, stercobilin and bilirubin levels in meconium stained amniotic fluid to meconium aspiration syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sholeh Kosim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Meconium-stained amniotic fluid (MSAF increases morbidity and mortality in neonates. Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS occurs in 2-9% of neonates with MSAF. Viscosity of MSAF is associated with the amount of the meconium release. Objective To determine the associations between viscosity and the presence of stercobilin and bilirubin in MSAF with MAS in neonates. Methods This observational cohort study was perfonned with term babies who were born v.ith MSAF in Kariadi Hospital from August 2009 to May 2010. Amniotic fluid specimens were taken at birth and neonates were observed for respiratory symptoms until the 5th day of life. Analysis was done by chi-square test, Fisher's exact test and relative risk. Results The majority of the 48 subjects were male, Mth mean gestational age of 39.9 (SD 1.73 weeks. Classification of MSAF as thick or thin was done by macroscopic examination Mth Kappa test 0.741. The MSAF tested ositively for stercobilin and bilirubin in 12/48 and 17/48 subjects, respectively. Thick MSAF correlated significantly to MAS (P=0.03 Mth a relative risk of 10.1 (95% CI 1.2 to 87 .6, while stercobilin and bilirubin presence did not. Conclusion Thick MSAF was associated Mth lvtAS and was a risk factor for MAS. Stercobilin and bilirubin presence in MSAF were not associated with MAS.

  11. Effects of viscosity and fluid outflow on postcibal gastric emptying of solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J H; Gu, Y; Elashoff, J; Reedy, T; Dressman, J; Amidon, G

    1986-02-01

    It is known that the food-filled stomach retains large spheres or pieces of food, allowing the passage of food particles or of plastic spheres with diameters mainly below 2 mm. We have recently shown that spheres having densities greater or less than water emptied from the food-filled canine stomach more slowly than spheres of the same diameter with a density of 1. Thus, hydrodynamics seem to govern gastric emptying of spheres. The present studies were undertaken to determine how altering other hydrodynamic factors, viscosity and velocity of fluid outflow, might affect gastric sieving. Ten mongrel dogs were prepared with chronic duodenal fistulas, which allowed collecting and measuring of emptied spheres and food. The dogs were fed a standard meal of 75 g of steak plus 25 g of 99mTc-labeled chicken liver. Immediately afterward, 50 3.2-mm Teflon spheres were instilled into the stomachs along with 200- or 800-ml volumes of saline or saline plus guar (a viscous polysaccharide). Whether 200- or 800-ml volumes were instilled, the guar significantly sped the emptying of the spheres. Fluid outflow was twice as fast after the 800-ml instillates, but the faster outflow with the 800 ml of saline did not speed emptying of spheres. With the guar instillates, the faster outflow slightly sped the emptying of the spheres and significantly increased the diameter of emptied particles of 99mTc-labeled chicken liver. We conclude that meal viscosity significantly affects gastric sieving.

  12. Surface Effect on Vibration of Y-SWCNTs Embedded on Pasternak Foundation Conveying Viscose Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghorbanpour-Arani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface and small scale effects on free transverse vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT fitted with Y-junction at downstream end conveying viscose fluid is investigated in this article based on Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB model. Nonlocal elasticity theory is employed to consider small scale effects due to its simplicity and efficiency. The energy method and Hamilton’s principle are used to establish the corresponding motion equation. To discretize and solve the governing equation of motion the Galerkin method is applied. Moreover, the small-size effect, angle of Y-junction, surface layer and Pasternak elastic foundation are studied in detail. Regarding fluid flow effects, it has been concluded that the fluid flow is an effective factor on increasing the instability of Y-SWCNT. Results show that increasing the angle of Y-junction enhances the flutter fluid velocity where the first and second modes are merged. This work could be used in medical application and design of nano-electromechanical devices such as measuring the density of blood flowing through such nanotubes.

  13. Flows of Carreau fluid with pressure dependent viscosity in a variable porous medium: Application of polymer melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Y. Malik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work concerns the pressure dependent viscosity in Carreau fluid through porous medium. Four different combinations of pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porous medium parameters are considered for two types of flow situations namely (i Poiseuille flow and (ii Couette flow. The solutions of non-linear equations have been evaluated numerically by Shooting method along with Runge-Kutta Fehlberg method. The physical features of pertinent parameters have been discussed through graphs.

  14. Effect of Fluid Viscosity on Noise of Bileaflet Prosthetic Heart Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Voskoboinick

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Numerical simulation and experimental research have been used as powerful tools to understand and predict the behavior and mechanics of the operation of natural heart valves and their prostheses in natural and patho­logical conditions. Such studies help to evaluate the effectiveness of the valves, their design and the results of surgical procedures, to diagnose healthy and impaired function of the heart valves. There is an actual problem in creating more reliable methods and tools for the operation diagnostics of mechanical heart valves. Objective. The aim of the research is to investigate the effect of fluid viscosity on the hydroacoustic characteristics of jets that flow from a semi-closed and open mechanical bileaflet heart valve. To study the possibility of using hydro­acoustic measuring instruments as diagnostic equipment for determining the working conditions of the bileaflet pro­sthe­tic heart valve. Methods. The experimental research was carried out by means of hydroacoustic measurements of the hydrodynamic noise in the near wake of the side and central jets of the glycerin solution and the pure water flow downstream of the prosthetic bileaflet heart valve. Results. The effect of fluid viscosity on the hydroacoustic characteristics of the jets that flow from a semi-closed and open mechanical bileaflet heart valve has been experimentally determined. Integral and spectral characteristics of the hydrodynamic noise of jets of the glycerin solution and the pure water flow downstream of the bileaflet mitral heart valve for different fluid rate were detected. Conclusions. In the stream conditions of pure water, the integral characteristics of the pressure field are lower than in stream conditions of the aqueous glycerin solution. As the glycerin concentration in the solution increases, increase average pressures and especially RMS pressure fluctuations. The spectral levels of the hydrodynamic noise in the near wake of the side

  15. Extensional flow of low-viscosity fluids in capillary bridges formed by pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, P K; McDonnell, A G; Prabhakar, R; Yeo, L Y; Friend, J, E-mail: james.friend@monash.edu.au [MicroNanophysics Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia); Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Forming capillary bridges of low-viscosity ({approx}<10 mPa s) fluids is difficult, making the study of their capillary-thinning behavior and the measurement of the fluid's extensional viscosity difficult as well. Current techniques require some time to form a liquid bridge from the stretching of a droplet. Rapidly stretching a liquid bridge using these methods can cause its breakup if the viscosity is too low. Stretching more slowly allows the bridge to thin and break up before a suitable bridge geometry can be established to provide reliable and accurate rheological data. Using a pulsed surface acoustic wave to eject a jet from a sessile droplet, a capillary bridge may be formed in about 7.5 ms, about seven times quicker than current methods. With this approach, capillary bridges may be formed from Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids having much lower viscosities-water, 0.04% by weight solution of high-molecular-weight (7 MDa) polystyrene in dioctyl phthalate and 0.25% fibrinogen solution in demineralized water, for example. Details of the relatively simple system used to achieve these results are provided, as are experimental results indicating deviations from a Newtonian response by the low-viscosity non-Newtonian fluids used in our study.

  16. Determination of femto Newton forces and fluid viscosity using optical tweezers: application to Leishmania amazonensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma; de Castro, Archimedes B., Jr.; Neto, Vivaldo M.; Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Marques, Gustavo P.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this research is to use the displacements of a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) as a force transducer in mechanical measurements in life sciences. To do this we compared the theoretical optical and hydrodynamic models with experimental data under a broad variation of parameters such as fluid viscosity, refractive index, drag velocity and wall proximities. The laser power was measured after the objective with an integration sphere because normal power meters do not provide an accurate measurement for beam with high numerical apertures. With this careful laser power determination the plot of the optical force (calculated by the particle displacement) versus hydrodynamic force (calculated by the drag velocity) under very different conditions shows an almost 45 degrees straight line. This means that hydrodynamic models can be used to calibrate optical forces and vice-versa. With this calibration we observed the forces of polystyrene bead attached to the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for a serious tropical disease. The force range is from 200 femto Newtons to 4 pico Newtons and these experiments shows that OT can be used for infection mechanism and chemotaxis studies in parasites. The other application was to use the optical force to measure viscosities of few microliters sample. Our result shows 5% accuracy measurements.

  17. Atomization of High-Viscosity Fluids for Aromatherapy Using Micro-heaters for Heterogeneous Bubble Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Junhui; Kong, Ka Wai; Chan, Ho-Yin; Sun, Winston; Li, Wen Jung; Chau, Eric Boa Fung; Chan, George Kak Man

    2017-01-01

    The development of a novel lead-free microelectromechanical-system (MEMS)-based atomizer using the principle of thermal bubble actuation is presented. It is a low-cost, lead-free design that is environmentally friendly and harmless to humans. It has been tested to be applicable over a wide range of fluid viscosities, ranging from 1 cP (e.g., water) to 200 cP (e.g., oil-like fluid) at room temperature, a range that is difficult to achieve using ordinary atomizers. The results demonstrate that the average power consumption of the atomizer is approximately 1 W with an atomization rate of 0.1 to 0.3 mg of deionized (DI) water per cycle. The relationships between the micro-heater track width and the track gap, the size of the micro-cavities and the nucleation energy were studied to obtain an optimal atomizer design. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) results indicate that the diameter of the ejected droplets ranges from 30 to 90 μm with a speed of 20 to 340 mm/s. In addition, different modes of spraying are reported for the first time. It is envisioned that the successful development of this MEMS-based atomizing technology will revolutionize the existing market for atomizers and could also benefit different industries, particularly in applications involving viscous fluids.

  18. Linearized fluid/gravity correspondence: from shear viscosity to all order hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Yanyan; Lublinsky, Michael

    2014-11-01

    In ref. [1], we reported a construction of all order linearized fluid dynamics with strongly coupled =4 super-Yang-Mills theory as underlying microscopic description. The linearized fluid/gravity correspondence makes it possible to resum all order derivative terms in the fluid stress tensor. Dissipative effects are fully encoded by the shear term and a new one, emerging starting from third order in hydrodynamic derivative expansion. In this work, we provide all computational details omitted in [1] and present additional results. We derive closed-form linear holographic RG flow-type equations for momenta-dependent transport coefficient functions. Generalized Navier-Stokes equations are shown to emerge from the constraint components of the bulk Einstein equations. We perturbatively solve the RG equations for the viscosity functions, up to third order in derivative expansion, and up to this order compute spectrum of small fluctuations. Finally, we solve the RG equations numerically, thus accounting for all order derivative terms in the boundary stress tensor.

  19. On steady two-dimensional Carreau fluid flow over a wedge in the presence of infinite shear rate viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Masood; Sardar, Humara

    2018-03-01

    This paper investigates the steady two-dimensional flow over a moving/static wedge in a Carreau viscosity model with infinite shear rate viscosity. Additionally, heat transfer analysis is performed. Using suitable transformations, nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations and solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta Fehlberg method coupled with the shooting technique. The effects of various physical parameters on the velocity and temperature distributions are displayed graphically and discussed qualitatively. A comparison with the earlier reported results has been made with an excellent agreement. It is important to note that the increasing values of the wedge angle parameter enhance the fluid velocity while the opposite trend is observed for the temperature field for both shear thinning and thickening fluids. Generally, our results reveal that the velocity and temperature distributions are marginally influenced by the viscosity ratio parameter. Further, it is noted that augmented values of viscosity ratio parameter thin the momentum and thermal boundary layer thickness in shear thickening fluid and reverse is true for shear thinning fluid. Moreover, it is noticed that the velocity in case of moving wedge is higher than static wedge.

  20. The Combination of Cyst Fluid Carcinoembryonic Antigen, Cytology and Viscosity Increases the Diagnostic Accuracy of Mucinous Pancreatic Cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Hun; Lee, Jong Kyun; Lee, Kyu Taek; Lee, Kwang Hyuck; Woo, Young Sik; Noh, Dong Hyo

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the value of cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with cytology and viscosity for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cysts. We retrospectively reviewed our data for patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and cyst fluid analysis. We investigated the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the combination of cyst fluid CEA, cytology and viscosity testing. A total of 177 patients underwent EUS-FNA and cyst fluid analysis. Of these, 48 subjects were histologically and clinically confirmed to have pancreatic cysts and were therefore included in the analysis. Receiver operator curve analysis demonstrated that the optimal cutoff value of cyst fluid CEA for differentiating mucinous versus nonmucinous cystic lesions was 48.6 ng/mL. The accuracy of cyst fluid CEA (39/48, 81.3%) was greater than the accuracy of cytology (23/45, 51.1%) or the string sign (33/47, 70.2%). Cyst fluid CEA in combination with cytology and string sign assessment exhibited the highest accuracy (45/48, 93.8%). Cyst fluid CEA was the most useful single test for identifying mucinous pancreatic cysts. The addition of cytology and string sign assessment to cyst fluid CEA increased the overall accuracy for the diagnosis of mucinous pancreatic cysts.

  1. Three-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model with eddy viscosity and turbulent resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Goldstein, Melvyn L., E-mail: arcadi.usmanov@nasa.gov [Code 672, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    We have developed a three-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that incorporates turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating. The solar wind plasma is described as a system of co-moving solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons, with separate energy equations for each species. Numerical steady-state solutions of Reynolds-averaged solar wind equations coupled with turbulence transport equations for turbulence energy, cross helicity, and correlation length are obtained by the time relaxation method in the corotating with the Sun frame of reference in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU (but still inside the termination shock). The model equations include the effects of electron heat conduction, Coulomb collisions, photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with the solar wind protons, turbulence energy generation by pickup protons, and turbulent heating of solar wind protons and electrons. The turbulence transport model is based on the Reynolds decomposition and turbulence phenomenologies that describe the conversion of fluctuation energy into heat due to a turbulent cascade. In addition to using separate energy equations for the solar wind protons and electrons, a significant improvement over our previous work is that the turbulence model now uses an eddy viscosity approximation for the Reynolds stress tensor and the mean turbulent electric field. The approximation allows the turbulence model to account for driving of turbulence by large-scale velocity gradients. Using either a dipole approximation for the solar magnetic field or synoptic solar magnetograms from the Wilcox Solar Observatory for assigning boundary conditions at the coronal base, we apply the model to study the global structure of the solar wind and its three-dimensional properties, including embedded turbulence, heating, and acceleration throughout the heliosphere. The model results are

  2. Determination of Fluid Density and Viscosity by Analyzing Flexural Wave Propagations on the Vibrating Micro-Cantilever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deokman Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The determination of fluid density and viscosity using most cantilever-based sensors is based on changes in resonant frequency and peak width. Here, we present a wave propagation analysis using piezoelectrically excited micro-cantilevers under distributed fluid loading. The standing wave shapes of microscale-thickness cantilevers partially immersed in liquids (water, 25% glycerol, and acetone, and nanoscale-thickness microfabricated cantilevers fully immersed in gases (air at three different pressures, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen were investigated to identify the effects of fluid-structure interactions to thus determine the fluid properties. This measurement method was validated by comparing with the known fluid properties, which agreed well with the measurements. The relative differences for the liquids were less than 4.8% for the densities and 3.1% for the viscosities, and those for the gases were less than 6.7% for the densities and 7.3% for the viscosities, showing better agreements in liquids than in gases.

  3. Effective viscosity in Brinkman equation and stress condition at the interface between a porous medium and a pure fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Howard

    2017-11-01

    We examine the flow parallel to the interface between a porous medium and a pure fluid. When Darcy's law is used to describe the momentum transport in the porous layer, the classic Beavers-Joseph condition relates the shear rate and the slip velocity at the interface with a slip parameter that depends on the structure of the porous surface. When the Brinkman equation is used, the averaged velocity is continuous at the interface, however the fluid shear stress across the interface commonly experiences a jump. This shear stress jump can be expressed in terms of the slip velocity at the interface divided by a length characterized by the square root of the permeability, a dimensionless stress jump coefficient, and the effective viscosity introduced in the Brinkman equation. In this work, we explore methods to compute numerically the values of effective viscosity for given porous structures, and study the momentum transfer from the clear fluid onto the solid structure at the interface.

  4. Multivariable Real-Time Control of Viscosity Curve for a Continuous Production Process of a Non-Newtonian Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Mei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of a multivariable predictive controller to the mixing process for the production of a non-Newtonian fluid is discussed in this work. A data-driven model has been developed to describe the dynamic behaviour of the rheological properties of the fluid as a function of the operating conditions using experimental data collected in a pilot plant. The developed model provides a realistic process representation and it is used to test and verify the multivariable controller, which has been designed to maintain viscosity curves of the non-Newtonian fluid within a given region of the viscosity-vs-shear rate plane in presence of process disturbances occurring in the mixing process.

  5. Particle Acceleration Due to Cosmic-ray Viscosity and Fluid Shear in Astrophysical Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.; Barghouty, A. F.; Hu, Q.; le Roux, J. A.

    2018-03-01

    An analytical model describing the acceleration of energetic charged particles due to cosmic-ray viscosity and fluid shear in radio jets based on the diffusive transport equation for cosmic rays is developed. The model indicates that laminar shear is not a significant mechanism for particle acceleration in nonrelativistic jets but may be important in relativistic jets. The model produces a power-law momentum spectrum of particles accelerated by the shear (i.e., {f}0\\propto {p}-{μ ∞ } as p\\to ∞ , where f 0 is the isotropic phase space distribution in the scattering frame). For ultra-relativistic jets with no back-flowing cocoon, {μ }∞ \\to 3+α for the energetic particle diffusion coefficient case κ ∝ p α . Increasing the shear in the background flow gives harder accelerated particle momentum spectra. Monoenergetic source solutions (Green’s functions) and Green’s formula are derived and used to obtain solutions for monoenergetic particle momentum spectra specified on the edge of the jet at radius r = r 2.

  6. Obesity is not a descriptive factor for oxidative stress and viscosity in follicular fluid of in vitro fertilization patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, B; Kilic, S; Yilmaz, N; Goktas, T; Keskin, U; Seven, A; Ulubay, M; Batioglu, S

    2017-08-01

    Obesity's impact on micro-environmental oxidative stress and follicular fluid (FF) viscosity and whether or not it has any effect on in vitro fertilization (IVF) success is a matter of debate. In this study, our aim was to evaluate the levels of oxidative stress markers and the FF viscosity in obese and non-obese patients. Eighty norm-responder patients undergoing IVF were prospectively grouped according to their body mass indexes (BMI). Group 1 (n = 40) and group 2 (n = 40) had BMI values of ≤24.9 and ≥25.0, respectively. Total sulfhydryl (RSH) levels (nmol/m) and the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (malondialdehyde, or MDA) (µmol/ml) in FFs were quantified. For the first time in our study, FF viscosity with changing BMI values was also determined. The mean levels of MDA (µmol/ml) and RSH (nmol/ml) were not significantly different between groups (1.37 ± 0.51; 1.51 ± 0.51; p > 0.05 for MDA and 0.42 ± 0.30; 0.41 ± 0.20; p > 0.05 for RSH, respectively). Similarly, the FF viscosity (centipoise) was not different between groups (1.28 ± 0.28; 1.30 ± 0.19; p viscosity with changing BMI values. We also demonstrated that the levels of oxidative stress markers and the viscosity of follicular fluid did not affect clinical outcomes.

  7. Effects of radiation and variable viscosity on unsteady MHD flow of a rotating fluid from stretching surface in porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Rashad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the study of unsteady magnetohydrodynamics boundary-layer flow and heat transfer for a viscous laminar incompressible electrically conducting and rotating fluid due to a stretching surface embedded in a saturated porous medium with a temperature-dependent viscosity in the presence of a magnetic field and thermal radiation effects. The fluid viscosity is assumed to vary as an inverse linear function of temperature. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. With appropriate transformations, the unsteady MHD boundary layer equations are reduced to local nonsimilarity equations. Numerical solutions of these equations are obtained by using the Runge–Kutta integration scheme as well as the local nonsimilarity method with second order truncation. Comparisons with previously published work have been conducted and the results are found to be in excellent agreement. A parametric study of the physical parameters is conducted and a representative set of numerical results for the velocity in primary and secondary flows as well as the local skin-friction coefficients and the local Nusselt number are illustrated graphically to show interesting features of Darcy number, viscosity-variation, magnetic field, rotation of the fluid, and conduction radiation parameters.

  8. Peristaltic Transport of a Jeffrey Fluid with Variable Viscosity through a Porous Medium in an Asymmetric Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Afsar Khan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The peristaltic flow of a Jeffrey fluid with variable viscosity through a porous medium in an asymmetric channel is investigated. The channel asymmetric is produced by choosing the peristaltic wave train on the wall of different amplitude and phase. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations for the Jeffrey fluid model are derived in Cartesian coordinates system. Analytic solutions for stream function, velocity, pressure gradient, and pressure rise are first developed by regular perturbation method, and then the role of pertinent parameters is illustrated graphically.

  9. Effects of temperature-dependent viscosity on fluid flow and heat transfer in a helical rectangular duct with a finite pitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuihua Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An incompressible fully developed laminar flow in a helical rectangular duct having finite pitch and curvature with temperature-dependent viscosity under heating condition is studied in this work. Both the cases of one wall heated and four walls heated are studied. The cross-sectional dimensions of the rectangular duct are 2a and 2b. The aspect ratio n=2b/2a is 0.5. Water is used as the fluid and Reynolds number (Re is varied in the range of 100 to 400. The secondary flow with temperature-dependent viscosity is enhanced markedly as compared to constant viscosity. An additional pair of vortices is obtained near the center of the outer wall at Re=400 for the model of four walls heated with temperature-dependent viscosity, y, while for constant viscosity, the appearance of two additional vortices near the outer wall cannot be found. Besides, the axial velocity decreases and the temperature increases at the central region of the rectangular duct when the temperature-dependent viscosity is considered. Due to the decrease of the viscosity near the walls, the friction factor obtained with temperature-dependent viscosity is lower than that of constant viscosity, while the convective heat transfer for temperature-dependent viscosity is significantly enhanced owing to the strengthened secondary flow. Especially for four heated walls, the effects of viscosity variation on the flow resistance and heat transfer are more significant.

  10. Volume-of-fluid simulations in microfluidic T-junction devices: Influence of viscosity ratio on droplet size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, Mehdi; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2017-03-01

    We used volume-of-fluid (VOF) method to perform three-dimensional numerical simulations of droplet formation of Newtonian fluids in microfluidic T-junction devices. To evaluate the performance of the VOF method we examined the regimes of drop formation and determined droplet size as a function of system parameters. Comparison of the simulation results with four sets of experimental data from the literature showed good agreement, validating the VOF method. Motivated by the lack of adequate studies investigating the influence of viscosity ratio (λ) on the generated droplet size, we mapped the dependence of drop volume on capillary number (0.001 1. In addition, we find that at a given capillary number, the size of droplets does not vary appreciably when λ 1. We develop an analytical model for predicting the droplet size that includes a viscosity-dependent breakup time for the dispersed phase. This improved model successfully predicts the effects of the viscosity ratio observed in simulations. Results from this study are useful for the design of lab-on-chip technologies and manufacture of microfluidic emulsions, where there is a need to know how system parameters influence the droplet size.

  11. Solution of magnetohydrodynamic flow and heat transfer of radiative viscoelastic fluid with temperature dependent viscosity in wire coating analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zeeshan; Khan, Muhammad Altaf; Siddiqui, Nasir; Ullah, Murad; Shah, Qayyum

    2018-01-01

    Wire coating process is a continuous extrusion process for primary insulation of conducting wires with molten polymers for mechanical strength and protection in aggressive environments. In the present study, radiative melt polymer satisfying third grade fluid model is used for wire coating process. The effect of magnetic parameter, thermal radiation parameter and temperature dependent viscosity on wire coating analysis has been investigated. Reynolds model and Vogel's models have been incorporated for variable viscosity. The governing equations characterizing the flow and heat transfer phenomena are solved analytically by utilizing homotopy analysis method (HAM). The computed results are also verified by ND-Solve method (Numerical technique) and Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM). The effect of pertinent parameters is shown graphically. In addition, the instability of the flow in the flows of the wall of the extrusion die is well marked in the case of the Vogel model as pointed by Nhan-Phan-Thien.

  12. Viscosity of holographic fluid in the presence of dark matter sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogatko, Marek; Wysokinski, Karol I. [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, pl. Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2016-08-22

    Based on the gauge/gravity correspondence, the hydrodynamic response coefficients, shear and Hall viscosities, have been studied. The holographic model of Einstein-Maxwell-AdS (3+1)-dimensional system additionally coupled with the another gauge field mimicking the dark matter sector, as well as, gravitational Chern-Simons term bounded with a dynamical scalar field, were taken into account. Condensation of the scalar field in the presence of the deformation chemical potential for the dark matter gauge field provide the parity violating terms. Both shear and Hall viscosities have been calculated and their dependence on α — the coupling constant between matter and dark matter sectors has been studied. To the lowest order in the derivative expansion and perturbation in α, the shear viscosity is not influenced by the dark matter, while the Hall component linearly depends on α.

  13. A review on rising bubble dynamics in viscosity-stratified fluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kirti Chandra Sahu

    example, in the ice-cream and lotion industries, by the addition of only 2% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) the viscosity of water or milk is made to increase by almost three orders of magnitude, while keeping the density con- stant [5]. The presence of temperature and concentration gradients also creates a variation of the ...

  14. Effect of fluid viscosity on wave propagation in a cylindrical bore in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wave propagation in a cylindrical bore filled with viscous liquid and situated in a micropolar elastic medium of infinite extent is studied. Frequency equation for surface wave propagation near the surface of the cylindrical bore is obtained and the effect of viscosity and micropolarity on dispersion curves is observed.

  15. Heat transfer analysis on peristaltically induced motion of particle-fluid suspension with variable viscosity: Clot blood model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, M M; Zeeshan, A; Ellahi, R

    2016-12-01

    In this article, heat transfer analysis on clot blood model of the particle-fluid suspension through a non-uniform annulus has been investigated. The blood propagating along the whole length of the annulus was induced by peristaltic motion. The effects of variable viscosity and slip condition are also taken into account. The governing flow problem is modeled using lubrication approach by taking the assumption of long wavelength and creeping flow regime. The resulting equation for fluid phase and particle phase is solved analytically and closed form solutions are obtained. The physical impact of all the emerging parameters is discussed mathematically and graphically. Particularly, we considered the effects of particle volume fraction, slip parameter, the maximum height of clot, viscosity parameter, average volume flow rate, Prandtl number, Eckert number and fluid parameter on temperature profile, pressure rise and friction forces for outer and inner tube. Numerical computations have been used to determine the behavior of pressure rise and friction along the whole length of the annulus. The present study is also presented for an endoscope as a special case of our study. It is observed that greater influence of clot tends to rise the pressure rise significantly. It is also found that temperature profile increases due to the enhancement in Prandtl number, Eckert number, and fluid parameter. The present study reveals that friction forces for outer tube have higher magnitude as compared to the friction forces for an inner tube. In fact, the results for present study can also be reduced to the Newtonian fluid by taking ζ → ∞. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Measurement of viscosity in small volumes of fluids by tuning fork oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotter Miloš

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on the construction and performance of a home-built viscometer employing a quartz tuning fork resonator as the sensing element. The resulting device allows measuring the viscosity of fluids in volumes as low as 300 μl, while controlling the temperature between -120 °C and 150 °C. For non-conducting fluids, bare tuning forks can be used, reaching the accuracy of 1% or better in the whole temperature range. For weakly conducting fluids such as aqueous solutions, an insulating coating of paint is applied, resulting in reduced sensitivity and accuracy. The capabilities and limitations of the viscometer are illustrated on the viscosity measurements of n-hexane (between -90 °C and +50 °C and water (between 10 °C and 90 °C. Improvements regarding performance in conducting liquids and temperature stabilization are discussed.

  17. Application of the DTM to Nonlinear Cases Arising in Fluid Flows with Variable Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barari, Amin; Rahimi, M; Hosseini, M.J

    2012-01-01

    method is employed to derive solutions of nonlinear equation systems. The results of differential transformation method are compared with those ones obtained by Adomian decomposition method to verify the accuracy of proposed method. The results reveal that the differential transformation method can......This paper employs the differential transformation method to investigate two nonlinear ordinary differential systems for plane coquette flow having variable viscosity and thermal conductivity. The concept of differential transformation is briefly introduced, and then differential transformation...

  18. Coefficients of viscosity for a fluid in a magnetic field or in a rotating system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooyman, G.J.; Mazur, P.; Groot, S.R. de

    1954-01-01

    The linear equations between the elements of the viscous pressure tensor and the rates of deformation are investigated for the case of an isotropic fluid in an external magnetic field or for the equivalent case of a rotating fluid. Since these equations can be incorporated within the thermodynamics

  19. Natural convection in Bingham plastic fluids from an isothermal spheroid: Effects of fluid yield stress, viscous dissipation and temperature-dependent viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anoop Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay; Chhabra, Rajendra Prasad

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the buoyancy-induced convection from an isothermal spheroid is studied in a Bingham plastic fluid. Extensive results on the morphology of approximate yield surfaces, temperature profiles, and the local and average Nusselt numbers are reported to elucidate the effects of the pertinent dimensionless parameters: Rayleigh number, 102 ≤ Ra ≤ 106; Prandtl number, 20 ≤ Pr ≤ 100; Bingham number, 0 ≤ Bn ≤ 103, and aspect ratio, 0.2 ≤ e ≤ 5. Due to the fluid yield stress, fluid-like (yielded) and solid-like (unyielded) regions coexist in the flow domain depending upon the prevailing stress levels vis-a-vis the value of the fluid yield stress. The yielded parts progressively grow in size with the rising Rayleigh number while this tendency is countered by the increasing Bingham and Prandtl numbers. Due to these two competing effects, a limiting value of the Bingham number ( Bn max) is observed beyond which heat transfer occurs solely by conduction due to the solid-like behaviour of the fluid everywhere in the domain. Such limiting values bear a positive dependence on the Rayleigh number ( Ra) and aspect ratio ( e). In addition to this, oblate shapes ( e 1) impede it. Finally, simple predictive expressions for the maximum Bingham number and the average Nusselt number are developed which can be used to predict a priori the overall heat transfer coefficient in a new application. Also, a criterion is developed in terms of the composite parameter Bn• Gr-1/2 which predicts the onset of convection in such fluids. Similarly, another criterion is developed which delineates the conditions for the onset of settling due to buoyancy effects. The paper is concluded by presenting limited results to delineate the effects of viscous dissipation and the temperature-dependent viscosity on the Nusselt number. Both these effects are seen to be rather small in Bingham plastic fluids.

  20. Tip-splitting instabilities in the channel Saffman-Taylor flow of constant viscosity elastic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, D. H.; Maher, J. V.

    2000-01-01

    Boger fluids are used to study viscous fingering growth in viscoelastic fluids in channel Hele-Shaw flow. We have found that the viscous finger growing in the Boger fluid is unstable to tip splitting at high velocities, in a regime where a Newtonian viscous finger is stable. No fracturelike instabilities were observed. We show that the viscoelastic normal stress differences arising in shear and extensional flow reach very high values at shear and extensional rates comparable to those achieved at the tip of the finger at the onset of tip splitting, and the fluid becomes highly anisotropic. The viscoelastic stress could affect the dynamics of the finger and induce the tip-splitting instability. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  1. Characterization of immiscible fluid displacement processes with various capillary numbers and viscosity ratios in 3D natural sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takeshi; Jiang, Fei; Christensen, Kenneth T.

    2016-09-01

    To characterize the influence of reservoir conditions upon multiphase flow, we calculated fluid displacements (drainage processes) in 3D pore spaces of Berea sandstone using two-phase lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations. The results of simulations under various conditions were used to classify the resulting two-phase flow behavior into three typical fluid displacement patterns on the diagram of capillary number (Ca) and viscosity ratio of the two fluids (M). In addition, the saturation of the nonwetting phase was calculated and mapped on the Ca-M diagram. We then characterized dynamic pore-filling events (i.e., Haines jumps) from the pressure variation of the nonwetting phase, and linked this behavior to the occurrence of capillary fingering. The results revealed the onset of capillary fingering in 3D natural rock at a higher Ca than in 2D homogeneous granular models, with the crossover region between typical displacement patterns broader than in the homogeneous granular model. Furthermore, saturation of the nonwetting phase mapped on the Ca-M diagram significantly depends on the rock models. These important differences between two-phase flow in 3D natural rock and in 2D homogeneous models could be due to the heterogeneity of pore geometry in the natural rock and differences in pore connectivity. By quantifying two-phase fluid behavior in the target reservoir rock under various conditions (e.g., saturation mapping on the Ca-M diagram), our approach could provide useful information for investigating suitable reservoir conditions for geo-fluid management (e.g., high CO2 saturation in CO2 storage).

  2. Second-order transport, quasinormal modes and zero-viscosity limit in the Gauss-Bonnet holographic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozdanov, Sašo [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden 2333 CA (Netherlands); Starinets, Andrei O. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-30

    Gauss-Bonnet holographic fluid is a useful theoretical laboratory to study the effects of curvature-squared terms in the dual gravity action on transport coefficients, quasinormal spectra and the analytic structure of thermal correlators at strong coupling. To understand the behavior and possible pathologies of the Gauss-Bonnet fluid in 3+1 dimensions, we compute (analytically and non-perturbatively in the Gauss-Bonnet coupling) its second-order transport coefficients, the retarded two- and three-point correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in the hydrodynamic regime as well as the relevant quasinormal spectrum. The Haack-Yarom universal relation among the second-order transport coefficients is violated at second order in the Gauss-Bonnet coupling. In the zero-viscosity limit, the holographic fluid still produces entropy, while the momentum diffusion and the sound attenuation are suppressed at all orders in the hydrodynamic expansion. By adding higher-derivative electromagnetic field terms to the action, we also compute corrections to charge diffusion and identify the non-perturbative parameter regime in which the charge diffusion constant vanishes.

  3. Modeling of heat and high viscous fluid distributions with variable viscosity in a permeable channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Hona

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow field under study is characterized by velocity components, temperature and pressure in non-dimensional formulation. The flow is driven by suction through the horizontal channel with permeable walls fixed at different temperatures. In order to ascertain a better understanding of the dynamic behavior of the flow, the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation are solved concurrently applying a similarity transformation technique. The hydrodynamic structures obtained from the numerical integration include flow reversal or backward flow, collision zones due to the coexistence of wall suction and flow reversal inside the channel, the inflection through temperature distribution, the growth of thermal gradients near the walls, and the sensitivity of normal pressure gradients to the difference of temperatures at boundaries. These hydrodynamic structures are investigated considering the influences of the Péclet number P and the sensitivity of viscosity to thermal variations α which are the main control parameters of the problem.

  4. Ubiquitous transient stagnant domain formation during thermal convection in a well-mixed two component fluid with large viscosity difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya U; Kurita, Rei

    2017-10-11

    The formation of a transient stagnant domain in the presence of thermal convection was previously reported near the sol-gel transition temperature of a gelatin solution. The transient stagnant domain is observed near a critical Rayleigh number where a "roll" pattern is usually stable. It is important to understand the origin of the transient stagnant domain formation since it induces a large deformation of convection patterns; the nature of the formation of the transient stagnant domain remains unclear. Here, we observe thermal convection using several different fluids and find that stagnant domain formation is ubiquitous in two component mixtures. In addition, we find that difference in viscosity between the two components is crucial for transient stagnant domain formation, more so than the concentration gradient induced by the temperature gradient.

  5. Analysis of oil lubricated, fluid film, thrust bearings with allowance for temperature dependent viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, C. H. T.; Malanoski, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary design study was performed to seek a fluid-film thrust bearing design intended to be part of a high-speed, hybrid (rolling element/fluid film) bearing configuration. The base line used is a design previously tested. To improve the accuracy of theoretical predictions of load capacity, flow rate, and friction power loss, an analytical procedure was developed to include curvature effects inherent in thrust bearings and to allow for the temperature rise in the fluid due to viscous heating. Also, a narrow-groove approximation in the treatment of the temperature field was formulated to apply the procedure to the Whipple thrust bearing. A comparative trade-off study was carried out assuming isothermal films; its results showed the shrouded-step design to be superior to the Whipple design for the intended application. An extensive parametric study was performed, employing isoviscous calculations, to determine the optimized design, which was subsequently recalculated allowing for temperature effects.

  6. Viscosity measuring using microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Patrick Ian

    2001-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the viscosity of a fluid uses a micromachined cantilever mounted on a moveable base. As the base is rastered while in contact with the fluid, the deflection of the cantilever is measured and the viscosity determined by comparison with standards.

  7. Photoacoustic monitoring of sedimentation of micro-particles in low viscosity fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech-May, Nelson W.; Alvarado-Gil, Juan J.

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the potential of photoacoustic technique in the study of the sedimentation process of particles in liquids is explored. Experiments were performed using zirconia particles of 50 and 100 μm in three different low viscosity liquids, water, citronella, and ethylene glycol. It is shown that the evolution of the PA signal depends not only on the kind of liquids used but also on the size of the particles. An effective thermal model is developed in order to study the process and to infer the evolution of the thermal conductivity of the sedimented layer when it behaves as thermally thin, or the thermal effusivity if it behaves as thermally thick. It is shown that based on these results, the time evolution of the volume fraction of particles, in the region in which the sediment is deposited, can be obtained. These results can be useful in establishing a methodology for the photoacoustic monitoring of the process of sedimentation in more complex systems.

  8. Peripheral layer viscosity on the stenotic blood vessels for Herschel-Bulkley fluid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Neeraja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a theoretical investigation of blood flow in an arterial fragment with the existence of stenosis. The stream-wise blood is treated as steady and it is composed of two layers (the central core and plasma. The blood is taken to be non-Newtonian liquid described with help of Herschel-Bulkley fluid model. The artery is simulated as a cylindrical tube. Flow of blood is considered as steady. An extensive quantitative exploration has been performed through numerical computations of the flow physical parameters (the velocity, mass flux and shear stress. It is found that the mass-flux reduced as the consistency of peripheral layer fluid decreases, this happens due to the enhancement of pseudo plastic nature of the blood.

  9. Impact behavior of a high viscosity magnetorheological fluid-based energy absorber with a radial flow mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Benyuan; Liao, Changrong; Li, Zhuqiang; Xie, Lei; Zhang, Peng; Jian, Xiaochun

    2017-02-01

    High viscosity linear polysiloxane magnetorheological fluid (HVLP MRF) was demonstrated with excellent suspension stability. Such material is suitable for application in the magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) under axial impact loading conditions. On this basis, a new energy absorber incorporating a radial valve with high magnetic field utilization and a corrugated tube is proposed. In energy absorption applications where the MREA is rarely if ever used, our MREA takes the ultra-stable HVLP MRF as controlled medium in order for a long-term stability. For MREA performing at very high shear rates where the minor losses are important contributing factors to damping, a nonlinear analytical model, based on the Herschel-Bulkley flow model (HB model), is developed taking into account the effects of minor losses (called HBM model). The HB model parameters are determined by rheological experiments with a commercial shear rheometer. Then, continuity equation and governing differential equation of the HVLP MRF in radial flow are established. Based on the HB model, the expressions of radial velocity distribution are deduced. The influences of minor losses on pressure drop are analyzed with mean fluid velocities. Further, mechanical behavior of the corrugated tube is investigated via drop test. In order to verify the theoretical methodology, a MREA is fabricated and tested using a high-speed drop tower facility with a 600 kg mass at different drop heights and in various magnetic fields. The experiment results show that the HBM model is capable of well predicting the impact behavior of the proposed MREA.

  10. Approximate analytic solutions for steady MHD flow and heat transfer of a third grade fluid in wire coating process with constant viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinca, Vasile; Herisanu, Nicolae

    2017-07-01

    In the present paper, the Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM) is applied to determine approximate analytic solutions of steady MHD flow and heat transfer of a third grade fluid analysis, considering constant viscosity. The effect of the magnetic parameter is shown. Some examples are given and the results obtained reveal that the proposed method is effective and easy to use.

  11. Numerical Investigation of Influence of In-Situ Stress Ratio, Injection Rate and Fluid Viscosity on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Using a Distinct Element Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation is very useful for understanding the hydraulic fracturing mechanism. In this paper, we simulate the hydraulic fracturing using the distinct element approach, to investigate the effect of some critical parameters on hydraulic fracturing characteristics. The breakdown pressure obtained by the distinct element approach is consistent with the analytical solution. This indicates that the distinct element approach is feasible on modeling the hydraulic fracturing. We independently examine the influence of in-situ stress ratio, injection rate and fluid viscosity on hydraulic fracturing. We further emphasize the relationship between these three factors and their contributions to the hydraulic fracturing. With the increase of stress ratio, the fracture aperture increases almost linearly; with the increase of injection rate and fluid viscosity, the fracture aperture and breakdown pressure increase obviously. A low value of product of injection rate and fluid viscosity (i.e., Qμ will lead to narrow fracture aperture, low breakdown pressure, and complex or dispersional hydraulic fractures. A high value of Qμ would lead wide fracture aperture, high breakdown pressure, and simple hydraulic fractures (e.g., straight or wing shape. With low viscosity fluid, the hydraulic fracture geometry is not sensitive to stress ratio, and thus becomes a complex fracture network.

  12. Contribution of pitcher fragrance and fluid viscosity to high prey diversity in a Nepenthes carnivorous plant from Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusto, Bruno Di; Grosbois, Vladimir; Fargeas, Elodie; Marshall, David J; Gaume, Laurence

    2008-03-01

    Mechanisms that improve prey richness in carnivorous plants may involve three crucial phases of trapping:attraction, capture and retention. Nepenthes rafflesiana var. typica is an insectivorous pitcher plant that is widespread in northern Borneo. It exhibits ontogenetic pitcher dimorphism with the upper pitchers trapping more flying prey than the lower pitchers. While this difference in prey composition has been ascribed to differences in attraction,the contribution of capture and retention has been overlooked. This study focused on distinguishing between the prey trapping mechanisms, and assessing their relative contribution to prey diversity. Arthropod richness and diversity of both visitors and prey in the two types of pitchers were analysed to quantify the relative contribution of attraction to prey trapping. Rate of insect visits to the different pitcher parts and the presence or absence of a sweet fragrance was recorded to clarify the origin and mechanism of attraction. The mechanism of retention was studied by insect bioassays and measurements of fluid viscosity. Nepenthes rafflesiana was found to trap a broader prey spectrum than that previously described for any Nepenthes species,with the upper pitchers attracting and trapping a greater quantity and diversity of prey items than the lower pitchers. Capture efficiency was low compared with attraction or retention efficiency. Fragrance of the peristome,or nectar rim,accounted mainly for the observed non-specific, better prey attraction by the upper pitchers, while the retentive properties of the viscous fluid in these upper pitchers arguably explains the species richness of their flying prey. The pitchers of N. rafflesiana are therefore more than simple pitfall traps and the digestive fluid plays an important yet unsuspected role in the ecological success of the species.

  13. Evaluation of polymers of different degrees viscosities as additives for drilling fluids for oil well; Avaliacao de polimeros de diferentes graus de viscosidades como aditivos para fluidos de perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, K.V.; Amorim, L.V.; Silva, A.V. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (DEMa/UFCG), PB (Brazil); Lira, H.L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia. Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais], e-mail: kassiefarias@gmail.com

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this work is to study the polymers influence of different degrees of viscosity, used as viscositying and filtered reducer additives, in the rheological, filtration and lubricity properties of drilling fluids for oil wells. Were determined the rheological behavior, the apparent and plastic viscosities, the yield limit and gel force, the filtered volume and the lubricity coefficient in accordance with API standard. The fluids showed pseudoplastic behavior with properties close to the standard fluid; the increase of viscositying and filtered reducer concentrations lead to the increase of rheological properties and the filtered reducer values, from the concentration of 3,5g/350mL of water it acted as viscositying, increasing the values of apparent and plastic viscosities, yield limit and gel force, being 3,0g/350mL of water the adequate concentration of this additive, promoting better results of rheological and filtration properties. (author)

  14. Design of instantaneous liquid film thickness measurement system for conductive or non-conductive fluid with high viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a new capacitive sensor with a dielectric film coating was designed to measure the thickness of the liquid film on a flat surface. The measured medium can be conductive or non-conductive fluid with high viscosity such as silicone oil, syrup, CMC solution and melt. With the dielectric film coating, the defects caused by the humidity in a capacitor can be avoided completely. With a excitation frequency 0-20kHz, the static permittivity of capacitive sensor is obtained and stable when small thicknesses are monitored within the frequency of 0-3kHz. Based on the measurement principle, an experimental system was designed and verified including calibration and actual measurement for different liquid film thickness. Experimental results showed that the sensitivity, the resolution, repeatability and linear range of the capacitive sensor are satisfied to the liquid film thickness measurement. Finally, the capacitive measuring system was successfully applied to the water, silicone oil and syrup film thickness measurement.

  15. Correlation of fluid properties and geochemical parameters with heavy oil viscosity and density on trans-regional scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehne, E.; Rojas, K.; McCarthy, K.; Taylor, S.D. [Schlumberger (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Heavy oils around the world are characterized by high specific gravity and high contents of heavy components but their viscosity differs from one reservoir to another. This research aimed at finding correlations of geochemical characteristics with oil viscosity for heavy oil from different basins. This study was conducted on 15 heavy oil samples from northern and southern America and from Asia; the samples were characterized using gas chromatography, capillarity viscometer, data from stable carbon isotopes, SARA analysis, GC-FID and freezing point depression. Results showed that the degradation-viscosity correlation observed on a regional scale cannot be applied to the worldwide scale, and determined that, at that scale, oil viscosity depends on the original oil maturity and organofacies characteristics. In addition, biomarkers were found to help limit potential oil viscosity although they did not show a direct correlation. This study showed that original oil maturity and organofacies characteristics have to be taken into account in predictive models of oil viscosity.

  16. Free convective boundary layers in variable-viscosity fluids by the method of local nonsimilarity: application to plumes in the earth's mantle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quareni, F.; Yuen, D.A.; Eby, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    The effects due to departures from local similarity in steady-state boundary layers ascending through a fluid with strongly variable viscosity are examined with the local-nonsimilarity method. Both the absolute temperature and the hydrostatic pressure appear in the argument of an exponential in the viscosity function. The fluid-dynamical system studied here is that which characterizes plume structures in the Earth's mantle. By means of an iterative approach, two successive nonlinear boundary value problems are solved simultaneously and the errors incurred in the locally similar solutions are then assessed from a comparison between the first (locally similar) and the second level of a system of truncated equations. Three different sources of nonsimilarity have been considered: 1) localized radiogenic hearting within the plume, 2) ambient thermal stratification, 3) pressure dependence of mantle rheology. Of particular interest is an appraisal of the degree of accuracy of the locally similar solutions as a function of viscosity contrast within the boundary layer. For the range of viscosity contrast examined, up to 10 8 , the velocity and temperature fields between the first- and second-level solutions differ at most by 20 to 30%, for the rheological parameter values relevant to the Earth's mantle

  17. Effect of viscosity on the wave propagation: Experimental determination of compression and expansion pulse wave velocity in fluid-fill elastic tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Rajković, Nemanja; Milošević, Nebojša; Lazović, Biljana; Žikić, Dejan

    2015-11-26

    The velocity by which the disturbance travels through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is one of the main parameters in hemodynamics. The study of wave propagation through the fluid-fill elastic tube is of great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through of cardiovascular system. The effect of viscosity on the pulse wave velocity is generally ignored. In this paper we present the results of experimental measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) of compression and expansion waves in elastic tube. The solutions with different density and viscosity were used in the experiment. Biophysical model of the circulatory flow is designed to perform measurements. Experimental results show that the PWV of the expansion waves is higher than the compression waves during the same experimental conditions. It was found that the change in viscosity causes a change of PWV for both waves. We found a relationship between PWV, fluid density and viscosity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Numerical experiments on thermal convection of highly compressible fluids with variable viscosity and thermal conductivity: Implications for mantle convection of super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Masanori; Yamamoto, Mayumi

    2018-01-01

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments of thermal convection of highly compressible fluids in a two-dimensional rectangular box, in order to study the mantle convection on super-Earths. The thermal conductivity and viscosity are assumed to exponentially depend on depth and temperature, respectively, while the variations in thermodynamic properties (thermal expansivity and reference density) with depth are taken to be relevant for the super-Earths with 10 times the Earth's. From our experiments we identified a distinct regime of convecting flow patterns induced by the interplay between the adiabatic temperature change and the spatial variations in viscosity and thermal conductivity. That is, for the cases with strong temperature-dependent viscosity and depth-dependent thermal conductivity, a "deep stratosphere" of stable thermal stratification is formed at the base of the mantle, in addition to thick stagnant lids at their top surfaces. In the "deep stratosphere", the fluid motion is insignificant particularly in the vertical direction in spite of smallest viscosity owing to its strong dependence on temperature. Our finding may further imply that some of super-Earths which are lacking in mobile tectonic plates on their top surfaces may have "deep stratospheres" at the base of their mantles.

  19. Effect of variable viscosity on free flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids along a vertical surface with thermal stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorthy M.B.K.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of thermal stratification together with variable viscosity on free convection flow of non- Newtonian fluids along a nonisothermal semi infinite vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium. The governing equations of continuity, momentum and energy are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations and then solved by using the Runge-Kutta-Gill method along with shooting technique. Governing parameters for the problem under study are the variable viscosity, thermal stratification parameter, non-Newtonian parameter and the power-law index parameter.The velocity and temperature distributions are presented and discussed. The Nusselt number is also derived and discussed numerically.

  20. Elastic moduli of sandstones saturated with a range of pore fluids correlated with kinematic viscosity and frequency ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2011-01-01

    . The purpose of this study is to investigate if frame parameters can be extracted from air saturated measurements in sandstones, because earlier studies have shown that air may have a non-negligible effect on carbonates due to the high kinematic viscosity of air (Fabricius et al., 2010)....

  1. Experimental contribution to the understanding of the dynamics of spreading of Newtonian fluids: effect of volume, viscosity and surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques-Carmes, Thibault; Mathieu, Vincent; Gigante, Alexandra

    2010-04-01

    The dynamics of drop spreading of glycerol-water mixtures with and without surfactant on hydrophilic glass surfaces has been investigated. The influence of different factors, such as viscosity, drop volume and non-ionic alkyl (8-16) glucoside (Plantacare) surfactant concentration on the number and the nature of the spreading regimes is systematically investigated. More than 25 spreading experiments have been performed in order to obtain clear trends. The results confirm the existence of several spreading regimes for the duration of an experiment (200 s). For each regime, the radius can be expressed by a power law of the form R=Kt(n). Both n and K are necessary to identify the regime. The experimental data are compared with the analytical predictions of the combined theory of spreading. One of the main results of this study is that the nature of the regimes is strongly affected by the drop volume, the viscosity and the surfactant concentration. This behavior is not predicted by the theory. For drop volume less than or equal to 15 microL, a succession of two different regimes which depend on the viscosity and surfactant concentration are observed in the following order: a molecular-kinetic regime followed by a hydrodynamic regime (for high viscosity in the presence of surfactant) or a hydrodynamic regime and lastly a final asymptotic regime corresponding to a long relaxation time to equilibrium (for high viscosity in absence of surfactant and for low viscosity regardless of the presence of surfactant). The spreading follows quantitatively the predictions of the theory. Our results demonstrate that the theory is still valid for low viscosity liquids and in the presence of surfactant. The contact angle for which the crossover between molecular-kinetic regime and hydrodynamic regime occurs is thoroughly estimated since the theories do not allow the exact calculation of this value. Here for the first time, an empirical power law exponent (n=0.08+/-0.05) is proposed for

  2. The effect of shear and extensional viscosities on atomization of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids in ultrasonic inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniarz-Press, L; Sosnowski, T R; Matuszak, M; Ochowiak, M; Jabłczyńska, K

    2015-05-15

    The paper contains results of the experimental study on atomization process of aqueous solutions of glycerol and aqueous solutions of glycerol-polyacrylamide (Rokrysol WF1) in an ultrasonic inhaler. In experiments the different concentration aqueous solutions of glycerol and glycerol-polyacrylamide have been tested. The results have been obtained by the use of laser diffraction technique. The differences between characteristics of ultrasonic atomization for test liquids have been observed. The analysis of drop size histograms shows that the different sizes of drops have been formed during atomization process. The present study confirmed the previous reports which suggested that the drops size changes with the increase in viscosity of solution changes in spray characteristics were also observed. It has been shown that the shear and extensional viscosities affect the process of atomization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Theoretical study of the flow in a fluid damper containing high viscosity silicone oil: Effects of shear-thinning and viscoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrakos, Alexandros; Dimakopoulos, Yannis; Tsamopoulos, John

    2018-03-01

    The flow inside a fluid damper where a piston reciprocates sinusoidally inside an outer casing containing high-viscosity silicone oil is simulated using a finite volume method, at various excitation frequencies. The oil is modeled by the Carreau-Yasuda (CY) and Phan-Thien and Tanner (PTT) constitutive equations. Both models account for shear-thinning, but only the PTT model accounts for elasticity. The CY and other generalised Newtonian models have been previously used in theoretical studies of fluid dampers, but the present study is the first to perform full two-dimensional (axisymmetric) simulations employing a viscoelastic constitutive equation. It is found that the CY and PTT predictions are similar when the excitation frequency is low, but at medium and higher frequencies, the CY model fails to describe important phenomena that are predicted by the PTT model and observed in experimental studies found in the literature, such as the hysteresis of the force-displacement and force-velocity loops. Elastic effects are quantified by applying a decomposition of the damper force into elastic and viscous components, inspired from large amplitude oscillatory shear theory. The CY model also overestimates the damper force relative to the PTT model because it underpredicts the flow development length inside the piston-cylinder gap. It is thus concluded that (a) fluid elasticity must be accounted for and (b) theoretical approaches that rely on the assumption of one-dimensional flow in the piston-cylinder gap are of limited accuracy, even if they account for fluid viscoelasticity. The consequences of using lower-viscosity silicone oil are also briefly examined.

  4. EFFECT OF VARIABLE VISCOSITY AND SUCTION/INJECTION ON THERMAL BOUNDARY LAYER OF A NON-NEWTONIAN POWER-LAW FLUIDS PAST A POWER-LAW STRETCHED SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Fathy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of laminar boundary layer flow and heat transfer of non-Newtonian fluids over a continuous stretched surface with suction or injection has been presented.The velocity and temperature of the sheet were assumed to vary in a power-law form, that is u = U0xm, and Tw(x = T+ Cxb. The viscosity of the fluid is assumed to be inverse linear function of temperature. The resulting governing boundary-layer equations are highly non-linear and coupled form of partial differential equations and they have been solved numerically by using the Runge-Kutta method and Shooting technique. Velocity and temperature distributions as well as the Nusselt number where studied for two thermal boundary conditions: uniform surface temperature (b = 0 and cooled surface temperature (b = -1, for different parameters: variable viscosity parameter qr, temperature exponent b, blowing parameter d and Prandtl number. The obtained results show that the flow and heat transfer characteristics are significantly influenced by these parameters.

  5. Rotation of Magnetization Derived from Brownian Relaxation in Magnetic Fluids of Different Viscosity Evaluated by Dynamic Hysteresis Measurements over a Wide Frequency Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Satoshi; Kitaguchi, Ryoichi; Takeda, Ryoji; Yamada, Tsutomu; Takemura, Yasushi

    2016-09-10

    The dependence of magnetic relaxation on particle parameters, such as the size and anisotropy, has been conventionally discussed. In addition, the influences of external conditions, such as the intensity and frequency of the applied field, the surrounding viscosity, and the temperature on the magnetic relaxation have been researched. According to one of the basic theories regarding magnetic relaxation, the faster type of relaxation dominates the process. However, in this study, we reveal that Brownian and Néel relaxations coexist and that Brownian relaxation can occur after Néel relaxation despite having a longer relaxation time. To understand the mechanisms of Brownian rotation, alternating current (AC) hysteresis loops were measured in magnetic fluids of different viscosities. These loops conveyed the amplitude and phase delay of the magnetization. In addition, the intrinsic loss power (ILP) was calculated using the area of the AC hysteresis loops. The ILP also showed the magnetization response regarding the magnetic relaxation over a wide frequency range. To develop biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles, such as hyperthermia and magnetic particle imaging, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation.

  6. Rotation of Magnetization Derived from Brownian Relaxation in Magnetic Fluids of Different Viscosity Evaluated by Dynamic Hysteresis Measurements over a Wide Frequency Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ota

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of magnetic relaxation on particle parameters, such as the size and anisotropy, has been conventionally discussed. In addition, the influences of external conditions, such as the intensity and frequency of the applied field, the surrounding viscosity, and the temperature on the magnetic relaxation have been researched. According to one of the basic theories regarding magnetic relaxation, the faster type of relaxation dominates the process. However, in this study, we reveal that Brownian and Néel relaxations coexist and that Brownian relaxation can occur after Néel relaxation despite having a longer relaxation time. To understand the mechanisms of Brownian rotation, alternating current (AC hysteresis loops were measured in magnetic fluids of different viscosities. These loops conveyed the amplitude and phase delay of the magnetization. In addition, the intrinsic loss power (ILP was calculated using the area of the AC hysteresis loops. The ILP also showed the magnetization response regarding the magnetic relaxation over a wide frequency range. To develop biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles, such as hyperthermia and magnetic particle imaging, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation.

  7. An approximate solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture that accounts for fracture toughness, fluid viscosity and leak-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontsov, E V

    2016-12-01

    This paper develops a closed-form approximate solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture whose behaviour is determined by an interplay of three competing physical processes that are associated with fluid viscosity, fracture toughness and fluid leak-off. The primary assumption that permits one to construct the solution is that the fracture behaviour is mainly determined by the three-process multiscale tip asymptotics and the global fluid volume balance. First, the developed approximation is compared with the existing solutions for all limiting regimes of propagation. Then, a solution map, which indicates applicability regions of the limiting solutions, is constructed. It is also shown that the constructed approximation accurately captures the scaling that is associated with the transition from any one limiting solution to another. The developed approximation is tested against a reference numerical solution, showing that accuracy of the fracture width and radius predictions lie within a fraction of a per cent for a wide range of parameters. As a result, the constructed approximation provides a rapid solution for a penny-shaped hydraulic fracture, which can be used for quick fracture design calculations or as a reference solution to evaluate accuracy of various hydraulic fracture simulators.

  8. "Understanding" cosmological bulk viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Zimdahl, Winfried

    1996-01-01

    A universe consisting of two interacting perfect fluids with the same 4-velocity is considered. A heuristic mean free time argument is used to show that the system as a whole cannot be perfect as well but neccessarily implies a nonvanishing bulk viscosity. A new formula for the latter is derived and compared with corresponding results of radiative hydrodynamics.

  9. Viscosity Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Camilli, Fabio; Prados, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Viscosity solution is a notion of weak solution for a class of partial differential equations of Hamilton-Jacobi type. The range of applications of the notions of viscosity solution and Hamilton-Jacobi equations is enormous, including common class of partial differential equations such as evolutive problems and problems with boundary conditions, equations arising in optimal control theory, differential games, second-order equations arising in stochastic optimal control...

  10. The viscosity of dimethyl ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    appeared capable of measuring these properties of DME. The development of this is rendered difficult because DME has to be pressurised to remain in the liquid state and it dissolves most of the commercially available elastomers. This paper deals fundamentally with the measurement of the viscosity of DME...... in a glass tube it is possible to measure the viscosity of fluids at pressures below 15 bars. The kinematic viscosity of DME was established at 0.184 cSt @ 25 °C at the vapour pressure of the fluid at that temperature. The measurements were made at reasonable Reynolds numbers so the correction factors...

  11. Effect of rotational speed modulation on heat transport in a fluid layer with temperature dependent viscosity and internal heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Bhadauria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a theoretical investigation has been carried out to study the combined effect of rotation speed modulation and internal heating on thermal instability in a temperature dependent viscous horizontal fluid layer. Rayleigh–Bénard momentum equation with Coriolis term has been considered to describe the convective flow. The system is rotating about it is own axis with non-uniform rotational speed. In particular, a time-periodic and sinusoidally varying rotational speed has been considered. A weak nonlinear stability analysis is performed to find the effect of modulation on heat transport. Nusselt number is obtained in terms of amplitude of convection and internal Rayleigh number, and depicted graphically for showing the effects of various parameters of the system. The effect of modulated rotation speed is found to have a stabilizing effect for different values of modulation frequency. Further, internal heating and thermo-rheological parameters are found to destabilize the system.

  12. Effects of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on unsteady MHD flow of non-Newtonian fluid over a stretching porous sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Abdel-Gamal M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady flow and heat transfer in an incompressible laminar, electrically conducting and non-Newtonian fluid over a non-isothermal stretching sheet with the variation in the viscosity and thermal conductivity in a porous medium by the influence of an external transverse magnetic field have been obtained and studied numerically. By using similarity analysis the governing differential equations are transformed into a set of non-linear coupled ordinary differential equations which are solved numerically. Numerical results were presented for velocity and temperature profiles for different parameters of the problem as power law parameter, unsteadiness parameter, radiation parameter, magnetic field parameter, porous medium parameter, temperature buoyancy parameter, Prandtl parameter, modified Eckert parameter, Joule heating parameter , heat source/sink parameter and others. A comparison with previously published work has been carried out and the results are found to be in good agreement. Also the effects of the pertinent parameters on the skin friction and the rate of heat transfer are obtained and discussed numerically and illustrated graphically.

  13. Viscosity in Modified Gravity 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Brevik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A bulk viscosity is introduced in the formalism of modified gravity. It is shownthat, based on a natural scaling law for the viscosity, a simple solution can be found forquantities such as the Hubble parameter and the energy density. These solutions mayincorporate a viscosity-induced Big Rip singularity. By introducing a phase transition inthe cosmic fluid, the future singularity can nevertheless in principle be avoided. 

  14. Viscosity: From air to hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-09

    Oct 9, 2014 ... After a brief review of the history of viscosity from classical to quantal fluids, a discussion of how the shear viscosity of a finite hot nucleus is calculated directly from the width and energy of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) of the nucleus is given in this paper. The ratio / with s being the entropy volume ...

  15. Particle migration using local variation of the viscosity (LVOV) model in flow of a non-Newtonian fluid for ceramic tape casting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    behaviour is assumed in the simulation of the ceramic slurry flow.A local variation of the viscosity (LVOV) model as a function of the particle volume fraction is introduced and taken into account in the advection and the settling of the particles inthe flow field. The results show that using the LVOV model...

  16. The reality of artificial viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, L. G.

    2018-02-01

    Artificial viscosity is used in the computer simulation of high Reynolds number flows and is one of the oldest numerical artifices. In this paper, I will describe the origin and the interpretation of artificial viscosity as a physical phenomenon. The basis of this interpretation is the finite scale theory, which describes the evolution of integral averages of the fluid solution over finite (length) scales. I will outline the derivation of finite scale Navier-Stokes equations and highlight the particular properties of the equations that depend on the finite scales. Those properties include enslavement, inviscid dissipation, and a law concerning the partition of total flux of conserved quantities into advective and diffusive components.

  17. Shear viscosity of liquid mixtures Mass dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushal, R

    2002-01-01

    Expressions for zeroth, second, and fourth sum rules of transverse stress autocorrelation function of two component fluid have been derived. These sum rules and Mori's memory function formalism have been used to study shear viscosity of Ar-Kr and isotopic mixtures. It has been found that theoretical result is in good agreement with the computer simulation result for the Ar-Kr mixture. The mass dependence of shear viscosity for different mole fraction shows that deviation from ideal linear model comes even from mass difference in two species of fluid mixture. At higher mass ratio shear viscosity of mixture is not explained by any of the emperical model.

  18. Viscosity of Xenon Examined in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Why does water flow faster than honey? The short answer, that honey has a greater viscosity, merely rephrases the question. The fundamental answer is that viscosity originates in the interactions between a fluid s molecules. These interactions are so complicated that, except for low-density gases, the viscosity of a fluid cannot be accurately predicted. Progress in understanding viscosity has been made by studying moderately dense gases and, more recently, fluids near the critical point. Modern theories predict a universal behavior for all pure fluids near the liquid-vapor critical point, and they relate the increase in viscosity to spontaneous fluctuations in density near this point. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX) experiment tested these theories with unprecedented precision when it flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85) in August 1997. Near the critical point, xenon is a billion times more compressible than water, yet it has about the same density. Because the fluid is so "soft," it collapses under its own weight when exposed to the force of Earth s gravity - much like a very soft spring. Because the CVX experiment is conducted in microgravity, it achieves a very uniform fluid density even very close to the critical point. At the heart of the CVX experiment is a novel viscometer built around a small nickel screen. An oscillating electric field forces the screen to oscillate between pairs of electrodes. Viscosity, which dampens the oscillations, can be calculated by measuring the screen motion and the force applied to the screen. So that the fluid s delicate state near the critical point will not be disrupted, the screen oscillations are set to be both slow and small.

  19. The Effects of Variable Viscosity, Viscous Dissipation and Chemical Reaction on Heat and Mass Transfer Flow of MHD Micropolar Fluid along a Permeable Stretching Sheet in a Non-Darcian Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Salem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model is developed to study the effects of temperature-dependent viscosity on heat and mass transfer flow of magnetohydrodynamic(MHD micropolar fluids with medium molecular weight along a permeable stretching surface embedded in a non-Darcian porous medium in the presence of viscous dissipation and chemical reaction. The governing boundary equations for momentum, angular momentum (microrotation, and energy and mass transfer are transformed to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity solutions which are then solved numerically by shooting technique. A comparison between the analytical and the numerical solutions has been included. The effects of the various physical parameters entering into the problem on velocity, microrotation, temperature and concentration profiles are presented graphically. Finally, the effects of pertinent parameters on local skin-friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are also presented graphically. One important observation is that for some kinds of mixtures (e.g., H2, air with light and medium molecular weight, the magnetic field and temperature-dependent viscosity effects play a significant role and should be taken into consideration as well.

  20. Viscosity of particle laden films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timounay Yousra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform retraction experiments on soap films where large particles bridge the two interfaces. Local velocities are measured by PIV during the unstationnary regime. The velocity variation in time and space can be described by a continuous fluid model from which effective viscosity (shear and dilatational of particulate films is measured. The 2D effective viscosity of particulate films η2D increases with particle surface fraction ϕ: at low ϕ, it tends to the interfacial dilatational viscosity of the liquid/air interfaces and it diverges at the critical particle surface fraction ϕc ≃ 0.84. Experimental data agree with classical viscosity laws of hard spheres suspensions adapted to the 2D geometry, assuming viscous dissipation resulting from the squeeze of the liquid/air interfaces between the particles. Finally, we show that the observed viscous dissipation in particulate films has to be considered to describe the edge velocity during a retraction experiment at large particle coverage.

  1. Viscosity as related to dietary fiber: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikeman, Cheryl L; Fahey, George C

    2006-01-01

    Viscosity is a physicochemical property associated with dietary fibers, particularly soluble dietary fibers. Viscous dietary fibers thicken when mixed with fluids and include polysaccharides such as gums, pectins, psyllium, and beta-glucans. Although insoluble fiber particles may affect viscosity measurement, viscosity is not an issue regards insoluble dietary fibers. Viscous fibers have been credited for beneficial physiological responses in human, animal, and animal-alternative in vitro models. The following article provides a review of viscosity as related to dietary fiber including definitions and instrumentation, factors affecting viscosity of solutions, and effects of viscous polysaccharides on glycemic response, blood lipid attenuation, intestinal enzymatic activity, digestibility, and laxation.

  2. The effect of the volume fraction and viscosity on the compression and tension behavior of the cobalt-ferrite magneto-rheological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shokrollahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of the volume fraction and bimodal distribution of solid particles on the compression and tension behavior of the Co-ferrite-based magneto-rheological fluids (MRFs containing silicon oil as a carrier. Hence, Co-ferrite particles (CoFe2O4 with two various sizes were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method and mixed so as to prepare the bimodal MRF. The X-Ray Diffraction (XRD analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Laser Particle Size Analysis (LPSA and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM were conducted to examine the structural and magnetic properties, respectively. The results indicated that the increase of the volume fraction has a direct increasing influence on the values of the compression and tension strengths of fluids. In addition, the compression and tension strengths of the mixed MRF sample (1.274 and 0.647 MPa containing 60 and 550 nm samples were higher than those of the MRF sample with the same volume fraction and uniform particle size of 550 nm.

  3. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorio, A. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Lambiase, G. [Universita di Salerno, Dipartimento di Fisica E.R. Caianiello, Fisciano (Italy); INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Fisciano (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, which cannot be explained by conventional cosmology and particle physics. (orig.)

  4. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  5. Viscosity of water fog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shavlov, A V; Sokolov, I V; Khazan, V L; Romanyuk, S N

    2014-01-01

    Fog stream velocity profiles were analysed inside narrow and wide flat channels. To calculate the shear viscosity coefficient, we used the Navier–Stokes equation. It was revealed that fog is a non-Newtonian liquid: its viscosity grows when the shear speed drops, and it can exceed the viscosity of clean air hundreds of times when the speed gradient is less than 0.01 sec −1 . The high viscosity can be explained by the electrostatic interaction of the charged water drops. (paper)

  6. Viscosity and Solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying the phenomena of solution viscosities, involving the Jones and Dole equation, B-coefficient determination, and flickering cluster model. Indicates that viscosity measurements provide a basis for the study of the structural effects of ions in aqueous solutions and are applicable in teaching high school chemistry. (CC)

  7. High Ra, high Pr convection with viscosity gradients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. High Ra, high Pr convection with viscosity gradients. Weak upward flow through mesh. Top fluid more viscous. Unstable layer Instability Convection.

  8. Measurement of Viscosity of Hydrocarbon Liquids Using a Microviscometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandekar, Abhijit; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    amount as only 120 to 2500 micro l. is required depending on the viscosity range. The densities of the fluids were also determined. The accuracy of these measurements is ascertained and compared with literature data on n-alkane mixtures. The data reported for reservoir fluids includes molecular weights...... as well as density. Finally, generalized viscosity correlations for the C (sub 6) to C (sub 19) fractions are discussed....

  9. Tidal viscosity of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efroimsky, Michael

    2018-01-01

    In the preceding paper (Efroimsky, 2017), we derived an expression for the tidal dissipation rate in a homogeneous near-spherical Maxwell body librating in longitude. Now, by equating this expression to the outgoing energy flux due to the vapour plumes, we estimate the mean tidal viscosity of Enceladus, under the assumption that the Enceladean mantle behaviour is Maxwell. This method yields a value of 0.24 × 1014 Pa s for the mean tidal viscosity, which is very close to the viscosity of ice near the melting point.

  10. Viscosity Prediction of Hydrocarbon Mixtures Based on the Friction Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Cisneros, Sergio; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    The application and capability of the friction theory (f-theory) for viscosity predictions of hydrocarbon fluids is further illustrated by predicting the viscosity of binary and ternary liquid mixtures composed of n-alkanes ranging from n-pentane to n-decane for wide ranges of temperature and from...... low to high pressures. In the f-theory viscosity predictions the SRK and the PRSV EOS have respectively been used. Further, a comparison with the widely used LBC viscosity model shows that better results are obtained with the f-theory models. The obtained AAD% is within or close to the experimental...

  11. Determination of viscosity in recirculating fluidized bed using radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, G.G. da.

    1986-01-01

    The use of radioactive tracer for measuring viscosity is proposed. The methodology relates the terminal velocity of a radioactive sphere in interior of fluid with the viscosity, which can be a fluidized bed or total flow of solids. The arrangement is composed by two γ detectors placed externally and along the bed. Both detectors are coupled by amplifier to electronic clock. The drop time of sphere between two detectors is measured. The bed viscosity two detectors is measured. The bed viscosity is calculated from mathematical correlations of terminal velocity of the sphere. (M.C.K.)

  12. Communication: Simple liquids' high-density viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, Lorenzo; Pedersen, Ulf R; Heyes, David M; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2018-02-28

    This paper argues that the viscosity of simple fluids at densities above that of the triple point is a specific function of temperature relative to the freezing temperature at the density in question. The proposed viscosity expression, which is arrived at in part by reference to the isomorph theory of systems with hidden scale invariance, describes computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones system as well as argon and methane experimental data and simulation results for an effective-pair-potential model of liquid sodium.

  13. Communication: Simple liquids' high-density viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, Lorenzo; Pedersen, Ulf R.; Heyes, David M.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2018-02-01

    This paper argues that the viscosity of simple fluids at densities above that of the triple point is a specific function of temperature relative to the freezing temperature at the density in question. The proposed viscosity expression, which is arrived at in part by reference to the isomorph theory of systems with hidden scale invariance, describes computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones system as well as argon and methane experimental data and simulation results for an effective-pair-potential model of liquid sodium.

  14. Viscosity in the edge of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M.

    1993-05-01

    A fluid representation of viscosity has been incorporated into a set of fluid equations that are maximally ordered in the ''short-radial-gradient-scale-length'' (srgsl) ordering that is appropriate for the edge of tokamak plasmas. The srgsl ordering raises viscous drifts and other viscous terms to leading order and fundamentally alters the character of the fluid equations. A leasing order viscous drift is identified. Viscous-driven radial particle and energy fluxes in the scrape-off layer and divertor channel are estimated to have an order unity effect in reducing radial peaking of energy fluxes transported along the field lines to divertor collector plates

  15. Excess molar volumes and viscosities of binary mixtures of 1,2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The Bloomfield and Dewan model has been used to calculate viscosity coefficients and these have also been .... time for each fluid was taken for the purpose of the calculation of viscosity. The flow time measurements were made ... graphically represented in figure 1. The viscosities were fitted to a polynomial of type: ,. 1. 1.

  16. The Friction Theory for Viscosity Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    In this work the one-parameter friction theory (f-theory) general models have been extended to the viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. It is demonstrated that these simple models, which take advantage of the repulsive and attractive pressure terms of cubic equations of state...... such as the SRK, PR and PRSV, can provide accurate viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. In the case of light reservoir oils, whose properties are close to those of normal alkanes, the one-parameter f-theory general models can predict the viscosity of these fluids with good accuracy. Yet...... below the saturation pressure. In addition, a tuned f-theory general model delivers accurate modeling of different kinds of light and heavy oils. Thus, the simplicity and stability of the f-theory general models make them a powerful tool for applications such as reservoir simulations, between others. (C...

  17. The shear viscosity in anisotropic phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Sachin [Department of Physics, Cornell University,Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Samanta, Rickmoy; Trivedi, Sandip P. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2015-10-06

    We construct anisotropic black brane solutions and analyse the behaviour of some of their metric perturbations. These solutions correspond to field theory duals in which rotational symmetry is broken due an externally applied, spatially constant, force. We find, in several examples, that when the anisotropy is sufficiently big compared to the temperature, some components of the viscosity tensor can become very small in units of the entropy density, parametrically violating the KSS bound. We obtain an expression relating these components of the viscosity, in units of the entropy density, to a ratio of metric components at the horizon of the black brane. This relation is generally valid, as long as the forcing function is translationally invariant, and it directly connects the parametric violation of the bound to the anisotropy in the metric at the horizon. Our results suggest the possibility that such small components of the viscosity tensor might also arise in anisotropic strongly coupled fluids found in nature.

  18. A viscosity adaption method for Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Daniel; Schneider, Andreas; Böhle, Martin

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we consider the limited fitness for practical use of the Lattice Boltzmann Method for non-Newtonian fluid flows. Several authors have shown that the LBM is capable of correctly simulating those fluids. However, due to stability reasons the modeled viscosity range has to be truncated. The resulting viscosity boundaries are chosen arbitrarily, because the correct simulation Mach number for the physical problem is unknown a priori. This easily leads to corrupt simulation results. A viscosity adaption method (VAM) is derived which drastically improves the applicability of LBM for non-Newtonian fluid flows by adaption of the modeled viscosity range to the actual physical problem. This is done through tuning of the global Mach number to the solution-dependent shear rate. We demonstrate that the VAM can be used to accelerate LBM simulations and improve their accuracy, for both steady state and transient cases.

  19. Microfluidic method for measuring viscosity using images from smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooyeong; Kim, Kyung Chun; Yeom, Eunseop

    2018-05-01

    The viscosity of a fluid is the most important characteristic in fluid rheology. Many microfluidic devices have been proposed for easily measuring the fluid viscosity of small samples. A hybrid system consisting of a smartphone and microfluidic device can offer a mobile laboratory for performing a wide range of detection and analysis functions related to healthcare. In this study, a new mobile sensing method based on a microfluidic device was proposed for fluid viscosity measurements. By separately delivering sample and reference fluids into the two inlets of a Y-shaped microfluidic device, an interfacial line is induced at downstream of the device. Because the interfacial width (W) between the sample and reference fluid flows was determined by their pressure ratio, the viscosity (μ) of the sample could be estimated by measuring the interfacial width. To distinguish the interfacial width of a sample, optical images of the flows at downstream of the Y-shaped microfluidic device were acquired using a smartphone. To check the measurement accuracy of the proposed method, the viscosities of glycerol mixtures were compared with those measured by a conventional viscometer. The proposed technique was applied to monitor the variations in blood and oil samples depending on storage or rancidity. We expect that this mobile sensing method based on a microfluidic device could be utilized as a viscometer with significant advantages in terms of mobility, ease-of-operation, and data management.

  20. Viscosity-Induced Crossing of the Phantom Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Brevik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We show explicitly, by using astrophysical data plus reasonable assumptions for the bulk viscosity in the cosmic fluid, how the magnitude of this viscosity may be high enough to drive the fluid from its position in the quintessence region at present time t = 0 across the barrier w = −1 into the phantom region in the late universe. The phantom barrier is accordingly not a sharp mathematical divide, but rather a fuzzy concept. We also calculate the limiting forms of various thermodynamical quantities, including the rate of entropy production, for a dark energy fluid near the future Big Rip singularity.

  1. PVT characterization and viscosity modeling and prediction of crude oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Eduardo Salvador P.; Dalberg, Anders; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2004-01-01

    method based on an accurate description of the fluid mass distribution is presented. The characterization procedure accurately matches the fluid saturation pressure. Additionally, a Peneloux volume translation scheme, capable of accurately reproducing the fluid density above and below the saturation...... deliver accurate viscosity predictions. The modeling approach presented in this work can deliver accurate viscosity and density modeling and prediction results over wide ranges of reservoir conditions, including the compositional changes induced by recovery processes such as gas injection.......In previous works, the general, one-parameter friction theory (f-theory), models have been applied to the accurate viscosity modeling of reservoir fluids. As a base, the f-theory approach requires a compositional characterization procedure for the application of an equation of state (EOS), in most...

  2. Maintenance of reference standards in the field of viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moşulică, E. A.; Cîrneanu, I.; Constantin, N.; Rucai, V.

    2018-01-01

    Participation in the work of comparison in the field of viscosity, within the program conducted under the jurisdiction of ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials), D-2 Committee, Subcommittee "Flow Properties," Newtonian Fluids) was necessary to ensure traceability of measuring unit of kinematic viscosity. Results of the comparison of the specialized participating laboratories on 4 continents, has proved annual capability of INM in the transmission unit of kinematic viscosity. Cannon Position Company in the US organizes co-operation program in the field of kinematic viscosity ASTM D 02.07. The company distributes standard substances Cannon viscosity participating laboratories and consolidate the results of the measurements. Physical-chemical laboratory has fully accepted the proposed schedule of the company Cannon. Final report of the comparison showed that in the year 2015 a number of 25 laboratories and institutes of metrology attented to the program.

  3. Comment on "Accelerating cosmological expansion from shear and bulk viscosity"

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In a recent Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 091301 (2105)] the cause of the acceleration of the present Universe has been identified with the shear viscosity of an imperfect relativistic fluid even in the absence of any bulk viscous contribution. The gist of this comment is that the shear viscosity, if anything, can only lead to an accelerated expansion over sufficiently small scales well inside the Hubble radius.

  4. Human capability in the perception of extensional and shear viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhihong; Chen, Jianshe; Holmes, Melvin

    2017-10-01

    Shear and extensional deformation are two basic rheological phenomena which occur commonly in our daily life. Because of the very different nature of the two deformations, fluid materials may exhibit significant differences in their responses to shear and extensional forces. This work investigated the human perception of shear and extensional viscosity and tested the hypothesis that human have different discriminatory sensation mechanisms including scaling to the two deformations. A series of fluid samples were prepared using two common food thickeners, guar gum and sodium carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC-Na). The shear and extensional flow behavior of these fluids were assessed using shear and extensional rheometers and in addition two separate sensory analysis sessions were organized to assess human sensitivity in perceiving the two viscosities. Magnitude estimation was used in the first session to assess human sensitivity in the perception of the shear and extensional viscosities and just-noticeable-difference (JND) assessment was used for the second session to identify the typical threshold of viscosity discrimination. For the participants considered, it was found that the perception of both shear and extensional viscosity follow a power law relationship i.e. Steven's law. It was also observed that the human has a greater discriminatory capacity in perceiving extensional viscosity. JND analysis showed that the human threshold in detecting shear viscosity difference was 9.33%, but only 6.20% for extensional viscosity. Shear and extensional deformation are two basic rheological properties which occur during food manipulation, mastication, deglutition executed during oral consumption and also in the processing and packaging of foods. Fluid resistance against shear and extensional deformation differ widely and whilst this has been confirmed theoretically and experimentally, a clear understanding of human perception of these properties will have beneficial returns to

  5. Technological characteristics of meat - viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    DIBĎÁK, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is focused on the technological characteristics of meat, mainly viscosity of meat. At the beginning I dealt with construction of meat and various types of meat: beef, veal, pork, mutton, rabbit, poultry and venison. Then I described basic chemical composition of meat and it?s characteristic. In detail I dealt with viscosity of meat. Viscosity is the ability of meat to bind water both own and added. I mentioned influences, which effects viscosity and I presented the possib...

  6. Bulk viscosity from hydrodynamic fluctuations with relativistic hydrokinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Mazeliauskas, Aleksas; Teaney, Derek

    2018-02-01

    Hydrokinetic theory of thermal fluctuations is applied to a nonconformal relativistic fluid. Solving the hydrokinetic equations for an isotropically expanding background we find that hydrodynamic fluctuations give ultraviolet divergent contributions to the energy-momentum tensor. After shifting the temperature to account for the energy of nonequilibrium modes, the remaining divergences are renormalized into local parameters, e.g., pressure and bulk viscosity. We also confirm that the renormalization of the pressure and bulk viscosity is universal by computing them for a Bjorken expansion. The fluctuation-induced bulk viscosity reflects the nonconformal nature of the equation of state and is modestly enhanced near the QCD deconfinement temperature.

  7. Skyrmions and Hall viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bom Soo

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the contribution of magnetic Skyrmions to the Hall viscosity and propose a simple way to identify it in experiments. The topological Skyrmion charge density has a distinct signature in the electric Hall conductivity that is identified in existing experimental data. In an electrically neutral system, the Skyrmion charge density is directly related to the thermal Hall conductivity. These results are direct consequences of the field theory Ward identities, which relate various physica...

  8. Early dissipation and viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Bozek, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    We consider dissipative phenomena due to the relaxation of an initial anisotropic local pressure in the fireball created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, both for the Bjorken boost-invariant case and for the azimuthally symmetric radial expansion with boost-invariance. The resulting increase of the entropy can be counterbalanced by a suitable retuning of the initial temperature. An increase of the transverse collective flow is observed. The influence of the shear viscosity on the longitu...

  9. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C., E-mail: cliu@pppl.gov [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Fox, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Bhattacharjee, A. [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  10. Density and viscosity modeling and characterization of heavy oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Creek, J

    2005-01-01

    to thousands of mPa center dot s. Essential to the presented extended approach for heavy oils is, first, achievement of accurate P nu T results for the EOS-characterized fluid. In particular, it has been determined that, for accurate viscosity modeling of heavy oils, a compressibility correction in the way...... are widely used within the oil industry. Further work also established the basis for extending the approach to heavy oils. Thus, in this work, the extended f-theory approach is further discussed with the study and modeling of a wider set of representative heavy reservoir fluids with viscosities up...

  11. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. This is a detail view of MSFC 0100143.

  12. From Suitable Weak Solutions to Entropy Viscosity

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2010-12-16

    This paper focuses on the notion of suitable weak solutions for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and discusses the relevance of this notion to Computational Fluid Dynamics. The purpose of the paper is twofold (i) to recall basic mathematical properties of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and to show how they might relate to LES (ii) to introduce an entropy viscosity technique based on the notion of suitable weak solution and to illustrate numerically this concept. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  13. A "distorted-BODIPY"-based fluorescent probe for imaging of cellular viscosity in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao; Fan, Jiangli; Li, Miao; Cao, Jianfang; Wang, Jingyun; Peng, Xiaojun

    2014-04-14

    Cellular viscosity is a critical factor in governing diffusion-mediated cellular processes and is linked to a number of diseases and pathologies. Fluorescent molecular rotors (FMRs) have recently been developed to determine viscosity in solutions or biological fluid. Herein, we report a "distorted-BODIPY"-based probe BV-1 for cellular viscosity, which is different from the conventional "pure rotors". In BV-1, the internal steric hindrance between the meso-CHO group and the 1,7-dimethyl group forced the boron-dipyrrin framework to be distorted, which mainly caused nonradiative deactivation in low-viscosity environment. BV-1 gave high sensitivity (x=0.62) together with stringent selectivity to viscosity, thus enabling viscosity mapping in live cells. Significantly, the increase of cytoplasmic viscosity during apoptosis was observed by BV-1 in real time. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Accelerating cosmological expansion from shear and bulk viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2015-01-01

    The dissipation of energy from local velocity perturbations in the cosmological fluid affects the time evolution of spatially averaged fluid dynamic fields and the cosmological solution of Einstein's field equations. We show how this backreaction effect depends on shear and bulk viscosity and other material properties of the dark sector, as well as the spectrum of perturbations. If sufficiently large, this effect could account for the acceleration of the cosmological expansion.

  15. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Ethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Eckhard, E-mail: eckhard.vogel@uni-rostock.de [Institut für Chemie, Universität Rostock, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Span, Roland [Lehrstuhl für Thermodynamik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Herrmann, Sebastian [Fachgebiet Technische Thermodynamik, Hochschule Zittau/Görlitz, D-02763 Zittau (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A new representation of the viscosity for the fluid phase of ethane includes a zero-density correlation and a contribution for the critical enhancement, initially both developed separately, but based on experimental data. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρ{sub c} and of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = T{sub c}/T (ρ{sub c}—critical density and T{sub c}—critical temperature). The final formulation contains 14 coefficients obtained using a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the selected primary data sets is reviewed, in particular with respect to the assessment used in earlier viscosity correlations. The new viscosity surface correlation makes use of the reference equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of ethane by Bücker and Wagner [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 35, 205 (2006)] and is valid in the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 100 MPa. The viscosity in the limit of zero density is described with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 290 < T/K < 625, increasing to 1.0% at temperatures down to 212 K. The uncertainty of the correlated values is 1.5% in the range 290 < T/K < 430 at pressures up to 30 MPa on the basis of recent measurements judged to be very reliable as well as 4.0% and 6.0% in further regions. The uncertainty in the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2) increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0% considering the available reliable data. Tables of the viscosity calculated from the correlation are listed in an appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor–liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  16. Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    the effects of viscous dissipation and variable viscosity on the flow of heat and mass transfer characteristics in a viscous fluid over a semi-infinite vertical porous plate in the ..... been solved by Gauss-. Seidel iteration method and numerical values are carried out after executing the computer program for it. In order to prove.

  17. Measurement of Viscosity of Hydrocarbon Liquids Using a Microviscometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandekar, Abhijit; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    The viscosity of normal alkanes, their mixtures, and true boiling point (TBP) fractions (C (sub 6) -C (sub 19)) of four North Sea petroleum reservoir fluids have been measured by use of an automatic rolling ball mixroviscometer at 20°C. The equipment is specially suited for samples of limited...

  18. Pendulum Underwater--An Approach for Quantifying Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leme, José Costa; Oliveira, Agostinho

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the experiment presented in this paper is to quantify the viscosity of a liquid. Viscous effects are important in the flow of fluids in pipes, in the bloodstream, in the lubrication of engine parts, and in many other situations. In the present paper, the authors explore the oscillations of a physical pendulum in the form of a long…

  19. On the measurement of elongational viscosity of polyethylene materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švrčinová, Petra; Kharlamov, Alexander; Filip, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2009), s. 49-57 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/08/1307 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Elongational viscosity * SER Universal * Testing Platform * LDPE Escorene Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  20. The Unsteady Variable – Viscosity Free Convection Flow on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The unsteady variable-viscosity free convection flow of a viscous incompressible fluid near an infinite vertical plate (or wall) is investigated under an arbitrary timedependent heating of the plates, and the governing equations of motion and energy transformed into ordinary differential equations. Employing asymptotic ...

  1. The Asymptotic Solution for the Steady Variable-Viscosity Free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Under an arbitrary time-dependent heating of an infinite vertical plate (or wall), the steady viscosity-dependent free convection flow of a viscous incompressible fluid is investigated. Using the asymptotic method of solution on the governing equations of motion and energy, the resulting Ordinary differential equations were ...

  2. Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analysis is carried out to study the viscous dissipation and variable viscosity effects on the flow, heat and mass transfer characteristics in a viscous fluid over a semi-infinite vertical porous plate in the presence of chemical reaction. The governing boundary layer equations are written into a dimensionless form by similarity ...

  3. Effective Viscosity Coefficient of Nanosuspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Systematic calculations of the effective viscosity coefficient of nanosuspensions have been performed using the molecular dynamics method. It is established that the viscosity of a nanosuspension depends not only on the volume concentration of the nanoparticles but also on their mass and diameter. Differences from Einstein's relation are found even for nanosuspensions with a low particle concentration.

  4. Singularities and Entropy in Bulk Viscosity Dark Energy Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xinhe; Dou Xu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper bulk viscosity is introduced to describe the effects of cosmic non-perfect fluid on the cosmos evolution and to build the unified dark energy (DE) with (dark) matter models. Also we derive a general relation between the bulk viscosity form and Hubble parameter that can provide a procedure for the viscosity DE model building. Especially, a redshift dependent viscosity parameter ζ ∝ λ 0 + λ 1 (1 + z) n proposed in the previous work [X.H. Meng and X. Dou, Commun. Theor. Phys. 52 (2009) 377] is investigated extensively in this present work. Further more we use the recently released supernova dataset (the Constitution dataset) to constrain the model parameters. In order to differentiate the proposed concrete dark energy models from the well known ΛCDM model, statefinder diagnostic method is applied to this bulk viscosity model, as a complementary to the Om parameter diagnostic and the deceleration parameter analysis performed by us before. The DE model evolution behavior and tendency are shown in the plane of the statefinder diagnostic parameter pair {r, s} as axes where the fixed point represents the ΛCDM model. The possible singularity property in this bulk viscosity cosmology is also discussed to which we can conclude that in the different parameter regions chosen properly, this concrete viscosity DE model can have various late evolution behaviors and the late time singularity could be avoided. We also calculate the cosmic entropy in the bulk viscosity dark energy frame, and find that the total entropy in the viscosity DE model increases monotonously with respect to the scale factor evolution, thus this monotonous increasing property can indicate an arrow of time in the universe evolution, though the quantum version of the arrow of time is still very puzzling. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  5. Capillary waves with surface viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Denner, Fabian; Morgan, Neal; van Wachem, Berend; Dini, Daniele

    2017-11-01

    Experiments over the last 50 years have suggested a correlation between the surface (shear) viscosity and the stability of a foam or emulsion. With recent techniques allowing more accurate measurements of the elusive surface viscosity, we examine this link theoretically using small-amplitude capillary waves in the presence of the Marangoni effect and surface viscosity modelled via the Boussinesq-Scriven model. The surface viscosity effect is found to contribute a damping effect on the amplitude of the capillary wave with subtle differences to the effect of the convective-diffusive Marangoni transport. The general wave dispersion is augmented to take into account the Marangoni and surface viscosity effects, and a first-order correction to the critical damping wavelength is derived. The authors acknowledge the financial support of the Shell University Technology Centre for fuels and lubricants.

  6. Flow of Jeffrey Fluid through Narrow Tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Nallapu, Santhosh; Radhakrishnamacharya, G.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper deals with a two-fluid model for the flow of Jeffrey fluid in tubes of small diameters. It is assumed that the core region consists of Jeffrey fluid and Newtonian fluid in the peripheral region. Analytical expressions for velocity, effective viscosity, core hematocrit and mean hematocrit have been derived. The effects of various parameters, namely, Jeffrey parameter ({\\lambda}1), tube hematocrit (H0) and tube radius (a) on effective viscosity, core hematocrit and mean hemato...

  7. Bulk viscosity, interaction and the viability of phantom solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyva, Yoelsy; Sepulveda, Mirko [Universidad de Tarapaca, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Arica (Chile)

    2017-06-15

    We study the dynamics of a bulk viscosity model in the Eckart approach for a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) Universe. We have included radiation and dark energy, assumed as perfect fluids, and dark matter treated as an imperfect fluid having bulk viscosity. We also introduce an interaction term between the dark matter and dark energy components. Considering that the bulk viscosity is proportional to the dark matter energy density and imposing a complete cosmological dynamics, we find bounds on the bulk viscosity in order to reproduce a matter-dominated era (MDE). This constraint is independent of the interaction term. Some late time phantom solutions are mathematically possible. However, the constraint imposed by a MDE restricts the interaction parameter, in the phantom solutions, to a region consistent with a null value, eliminating the possibility of late time stable solutions with w < -1. From the different cases that we study, the only possible scenario, with bulk viscosity and interaction term, belongs to the quintessence region. In the latter case, we find bounds on the interaction parameter compatible with latest observational data. (orig.)

  8. Simulation of phase separation with temperature-dependent viscosity using lattice Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heping; Zang, Duyang; Li, Xiaoguang; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-12-27

    This paper presents an exploration of the phase separation behavior and pattern formation in a binary fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity via a coupled lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). By introducing a viscosity-temperature relation into the LBM, the coupling effects of the viscosity-temperature coefficient [Formula: see text] , initial viscosity [Formula: see text] and thermal diffusion coefficient [Formula: see text] , on the phase separation were successfully described. The calculated results indicated that an increase in initial viscosity and viscosity-temperature coefficient, or a decrease in the thermal diffusion coefficient, can lead to the orientation of isotropic growth fronts over a wide range of viscosity. The results showed that droplet-type phase structures and lamellar phase structures with domain orientation parallel or perpendicular to the walls can be obtained in equilibrium by controlling the initial viscosity, thermal diffusivity, and the viscosity-temperature coefficient. Furthermore, the dataset was rearranged for growth kinetics of domain growth and thermal diffusion fronts in a plot by the spherically averaged structure factor and the ratio of separated and continuous phases. The analysis revealed two different temporal regimes: spinodal decomposition and domain growth stages, which further quantified the coupled effects of temperature and viscosity on the evolution of temperature-dependent phase separation. These numerical results provide guidance for setting optimum temperature ranges to obtain expected phase separation structures for systems with temperature-dependent viscosity.

  9. Combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability bubble growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Rahul; Mandal, Labakanta; Roy, S.; Khan, M.; Gupta, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    The combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on the growth rate of the bubble associated with single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. It is shown that the effect of viscosity on the motion of the lighter fluid associated with vorticity accumulated inside the bubble due to mass ablation may be such as to reduce the net viscous drag on the bubble exerted by the upper heavier fluid as the former rises through it.

  10. Local viscosity distribution in bifurcating microfluidic blood flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2018-03-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) aggregation phenomenon is majorly responsible for the non-Newtonian nature of blood, influencing the blood flow characteristics in the microvasculature. Of considerable interest is the behaviour of the fluid at the bifurcating regions. In vitro experiments, using microchannels, have shown that RBC aggregation, at certain flow conditions, affects the bluntness and skewness of the velocity profile, the local RBC concentration, and the cell-depleted layer at the channel walls. In addition, the developed RBC aggregates appear unevenly distributed in the outlets of these channels depending on their spatial distribution in the feeding branch, and on the flow conditions in the outlet branches. In the present work, constitutive equations of blood viscosity, from earlier work of the authors, are applied to flows in a T-type bifurcating microchannel to examine the local viscosity characteristics. Viscosity maps are derived for various flow distributions in the outlet branches of the channel, and the location of maximum viscosity magnitude is obtained. The viscosity does not appear significantly elevated in the branches of lower flow rate as would be expected on the basis of the low shear therein, and the maximum magnitude appears in the vicinity of the junction, and towards the side of the outlet branch with the higher flow rate. The study demonstrates that in the branches of lower flow rate, the local viscosity is also low, helping us to explain why the effects of physiological red blood cell aggregation have no adverse effects in terms of in vivo vascular resistance.

  11. Temperature dependent kinematic viscosity of different types of engine oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Severa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to measure how the viscosity of engine oil changes with temperature. Six different commercially distributed engine oils (primarily intended for motorcycle engines of 10W–40 viscosity grade have been evaluated. Four of the oils were of synthetic type, two of semi–synthetic type. All oils have been assumed to be Newtonian fluids, thus flow curves have not been determined. Oils have been cooled to below zero temperatures and under controlled temperature regulation, kinematic viscosity (mm2 / s have been measured in the range of −5 °C and +115 °C. Anton Paar digital viscometer with concentric cylinders geometry has been used. In accordance with expected behavior, kinematic viscosity of all oils was decreasing with increasing temperature. Viscosity was found to be independent on oil’s density. Temperature dependence has been modeled using se­ve­ral mathematical models – Vogel equation, Arrhenius equation, polynomial, and Gaussian equation. The best match between experimental and computed data has been achieved for Gaussian equation (R2 = 0.9993. Knowledge of viscosity behavior of an engine oil as a function of its temperature is of great importance, especially when considering running efficiency and performance of combustion engines. Proposed models can be used for description and prediction of rheological behavior of engine oils.

  12. Critical Viscosity of Xenon investigators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Dr. Robert F. Berg (right), principal investigator and Dr. Micheal R. Moldover (left), co-investigator, for the Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX/CVX-2) experiment. They are with the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Although it does not easily combine with other chemicals, its viscosity at the critical point can be used as a model for a range of chemicals.

  13. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  14. ZBLAN Viscosity Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, William

    2001-01-01

    The past year's contribution from Dr. Kaukler's experimental effort consists of these 5 parts: a) Construction and proof-of-concept testing of a novel shearing plate viscometer designed to produce small shear rates and operate at elevated temperatures; b) Preparing nonlinear polymeric materials to serve as standards of nonlinear Theological behavior; c) Measurements and evaluation of above materials for nonlinear rheometric behavior at room temperature using commercial spinning cone and plate viscometers available in the lab; d) Preparing specimens from various forms of pitch for quantitative comparative testing in a Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer, Thermal Mechanical Analyzer; and Archeological Analyzer; e) Arranging to have sets of pitch specimens tested using the various instruments listed above, from different manufacturers, to form a baseline of the viscosity variation with temperature using the different test modes offered by these instruments by compiling the data collected from the various test results. Our focus in this project is the shear thinning behavior of ZBLAN glass over a wide range of temperature. Experimentally, there are no standard techniques to perform such measurements on glasses, particularly at elevated temperatures. Literature reviews to date have shown that shear thinning in certain glasses appears to occur, but no data is available for ZBLAN glass. The best techniques to find shear thinning behavior require the application of very low rates of shear. In addition, because the onset of the thinning behavior occurs at an unknown elevated temperature, the instruments used in this study must provide controlled low rates of shear and do so for temperatures approaching 600 C. In this regard, a novel shearing parallel plate viscometer was designed and a prototype built and tested.

  15. The relationship between plate velocity and trench viscosity in Newtonian and power-law subduction calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Scott D.; Hager, Bradford H.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between oceanic trench viscosity and oceanic plate velocity is studied using a Newtonian rheology by varying the viscosity at the trench. The plate velocity is a function of the trench viscosity for fixed Rayleigh number and plate/slab viscosity. Slab velocities for non-Newtonian rheology calculations are significantly different from slab velocities from Newtonian rheology calculations at the same effective Rayleigh number. Both models give reasonable strain rates for the slab when compared with estimates of seismic strain rate. Non-Newtonian rheology eliminates the need for imposed weak zones and provides a self-consistent fluid dynamical mechanism for subduction in numerical convection models.

  16. Passive non-linear microrheology for determining extensional viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Dinic, Jelena; Ren, Yi; Sharma, Vivek; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2017-12-01

    Extensional viscosity is a key property of complex fluids that greatly influences the non-equilibrium behavior and processing of polymer solutions, melts, and colloidal suspensions. In this work, we use microfluidics to determine steady extensional viscosity for polymer solutions by directly observing particle migration in planar extensional flow. Tracer particles are suspended in semi-dilute solutions of DNA and polyethylene oxide, and a Stokes trap is used to confine single particles in extensional flows of polymer solutions in a cross-slot device. Particles are observed to migrate in the direction transverse to flow due to normal stresses, and particle migration is tracked and quantified using a piezo-nanopositioning stage during the microfluidic flow experiment. Particle migration trajectories are then analyzed using a second-order fluid model that accurately predicts that migration arises due to normal stress differences. Using this analytical framework, extensional viscosities can be determined from particle migration experiments, and the results are in reasonable agreement with bulk rheological measurements of extensional viscosity based on a dripping-onto-substrate method. Overall, this work demonstrates that non-equilibrium properties of complex fluids can be determined by passive yet non-linear microrheology.

  17. Tension Independence of Lipid Diffusion and Membrane Viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Vincent L; Hormel, Tristan T; Reyer, Matthew A; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2017-10-31

    The diffusion of biomolecules at lipid membranes is governed by the viscosity of the underlying two-dimensionally fluid lipid bilayer. For common three-dimensional fluids, viscosity can be modulated by hydrostatic pressure, and pressure-viscosity data have been measured for decades. Remarkably, the two-dimensional analogue of this relationship, the dependence of molecular mobility on tension, has to the best of our knowledge never been measured for lipid bilayers, limiting our understanding of cellular mechanotransduction as well as the fundamental fluid mechanics of membranes. Here we report both molecular-scale and mesoscopic measures of fluidity in giant lipid vesicles as a function of mechanical tension applied using micropipette aspiration. Both molecular-scale data, from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and micron-scale data, from tracking the diffusion of phase-separated domains, show a surprisingly weak dependence of viscosity on tension, in contrast to predictions of recent molecular dynamics simulations, highlighting fundamental gaps in our understanding of membrane fluidity.

  18. Viscosity Depressants for Coal Liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfayan, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed process modification incorporates viscosity depressants to prevent coal from solidifying during liquefaction. Depressants reduce amount of heat needed to liquefy coal. Possible depressants are metallic soaps, such as stearate, and amides, such as stearamide and dimer acid amides.

  19. On radiative fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straumann, N.

    1976-01-01

    The Thomas calculation of the energy-momentum tensor of radiation quanta, which are nearly in thermal equilibrium with a relativistically moving material medium, is simplified and extended to more general transport equations. It is shown that the fluid (matter plus radiation) behaves, independently of the detailed form of the Boltzmann equation, like a relativistic imperfect fluid (in the formulation of Eckart). General expressions for the coefficients of heat conduction, shear viscosity and bulk viscosity are given. Published formulae for these coefficients in special cases are corrected. (Auth.)

  20. MHD natural convection from a heated vertical wavy surface with variable viscosity and thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, M.; Hazarika, G.C.; Sibanda, P.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity on natural convection flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid along a vertical wavy surface. The flow is permeated by uniform transverse magnetic field. The fluid viscosity and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary as inverse linear functions of temperature. The coupled non-linear systems of partial differential equations are solved using the finite difference method. The effects of variable viscosity parameter, variable thermal conductivity parameter and magnetic parameter on the flow field and the heat transfer characteristics are discussed and shown graphically. (author)

  1. Viscosity model for aluminosilicate melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang G.H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The structurally based viscosity model proposed in our previous study is extended to include more components, e.g. SiO2, Al2O3, FeO, MnO, MgO, CaO, Na2O and K2O. A simple method is proposed to calculate the numbers of different types of oxygen ions classified by the different cations they bonded with, which is used to characterize the influence of composition on viscosity. When dealing with the aluminosilicate melts containing several basic oxides, the priority order is established for different cations for charge compensating Al3+ ions, according to the coulombic force between cation and oxygen anion. It is indicated that basic oxides have two paradox influences on viscosity: basic oxide with a higher basicity decreases viscosity more greatly by forming weaker non-bridging oxygen bond; while it increases viscosity more greatly by forming stronger bridging oxygen bond in tetrahedron after charge compensating Al3+ ion. The present model can extrapolate its application range to the system without SiO2. Furthermore, it could also give a satisfy interpretation to the abnormal phenomenon that viscosity increases when adding K2O to CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 melt within a certain composition range.

  2. Viscosity of magnetite–toluene nanofluids: Dependence on temperature and nanoparticle concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Rahul [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Sanchez, Oswaldo [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Morningside College, Sioux City, IA (United States); Ghosh, Suvojit [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Kadimcherla, Naveen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Sen, Swarnendu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Balasubramanian, Ganesh, E-mail: bganesh@iastate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-10-23

    Highlights: • Viscosity of magnetite in toluene nanofluid increases monotonically with particle concentration. • Clusters formed at higher particle concentration are monodisperse. • With increasing temperature, viscosity decreases due less fraction of immobile fluid molecules. - Abstract: We examine the dependence of the viscosity of nanofluids, comprised of magnetite nanoparticles dispersed in toluene, on particle concentration and temperature. The nanofluid viscosity increases monotonically with particle concentration. We show that although the nanoparticles aggregate to form clusters with increasing concentration, the cluster size is fairly monodisperse and hence the viscosity can be expressed as a function of only the particle concentration. The viscosity of the nanofluid is found to decrease with temperature, similarly to the characteristics of the carrier liquid. We describe these dependencies through an empirical correlation, since the observations are useful to employ such nanofluids in engineering applications.

  3. Energy Loss in Pulse Detonation Engine due to Fuel Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weipeng Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid viscosity is a significant factor resulting in the energy loss in most fluid dynamical systems. To analyze the energy loss in the pulse detonation engine (PDE due to the viscosity of the fuel, the energy loss in the Burgers model excited by periodic impulses is investigated based on the generalized multisymplectic method in this paper. Firstly, the single detonation energy is simplified as an impulse; thus the complex detonation process is simplified. And then, the symmetry of the Burgers model excited by periodic impulses is studied in the generalized multisymplectic framework and the energy loss expression is obtained. Finally, the energy loss in the Burgers model is investigated numerically. The results in this paper can be used to explain the difference between the theoretical performance and the experimental performance of the PDE partly. In addition, the analytical approach of this paper can be extended to the analysis of the energy loss in other fluid dynamic systems due to the fluid viscosity.

  4. Comparison of Parallel Viscosity with Neoclassical Theory

    OpenAIRE

    K., Ida; N., Nakajima

    1996-01-01

    Toroidal rotation profiles are measured with charge exchange spectroscopy for the plasma heated with tangential NBI in CHS heliotron/torsatron device to estimate parallel viscosity. The parallel viscosity derived from the toroidal rotation velocity shows good agreement with the neoclassical parallel viscosity plus the perpendicular viscosity. (mu_perp =2m^2 /s).

  5. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A. [Inst. of Complex Systems and Inst. for Advanced Simulation, Julich (Germany); Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Pan, Wenxiao [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Caswell, Bruce [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Gompper, Gerhard [Inst. of Complex Systems and Inst. for Advanced Simulation, Julich (Germany); Karniadakis, George E. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2011-07-05

    Cellular suspensions such as blood are a part of living organisms and their rheological and flow characteristics determine and affect majority of vital functions. The rheological and flow properties of cell suspensions are determined by collective dynamics of cells, their structure or arrangement, cell properties and interactions. We study these relations for blood in silico using a mesoscopic particle-based method and two different models (multi-scale/low-dimensional) of red blood cells. The models yield accurate quantitative predictions of the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly model cell aggregation interactions and demonstrate the formation of reversible rouleaux structures resulting in a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates and yield stress, in agreement with experiments. The non-Newtonian behavior of such cell suspensions (e.g., shear thinning, yield stress) is analyzed and related to the suspension’s microstructure, deformation and dynamics of single cells. We provide the flrst quantitative estimates of normal stress differences and magnitude of aggregation forces in blood. Finally, the flexibility of the cell models allows them to be employed for quantitative analysis of a much wider class of complex fluids including cell, capsule, and vesicle suspensions.

  6. Viscosity of diluted suspensions of vegetal particles in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szydłowska Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscosity and rheological behaviour of sewage as well as sludge are essential while designing apparatuses and operations employed in the sewage treatment process and its processing. With reference to these substances, the bio-suspensions samples of three size fractions ((i 150÷212 μm, (ii 106÷150 μm and (iii below106 μm of dry grass in water with solid volume fraction 8%, 10% and 11% were prepared. After twenty four hours prior to their preparation time, the suspension samples underwent rheometeric measurements with the use of a rotational rheometer with coaxial cylinders. On the basis of the obtained results, flow curves were plotted and described with both the power model and Herschel-Bulkley model. Moreover, the viscosity of the studied substances was determined that allowed to conclude that the studied bio-suspensions display features of viscoelastic fluids. The experimentally established viscosity was compared to the calculated one according to Manley and Manson equation, recommended in the literature. It occurred that the measured viscosity values substantially exceed the calculation viscosity values, even by 105 times. The observations suggest that it stems from water imbibition of fibrous vegetal particles, which causes their swelling and decreases the amount of liquid phase in the suspension.

  7. Viscosity changes in hyaluronic acid: Irradiation and rheological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daar, Eman [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: e.daar@surrey.ac.uk; King, L.; Nisbet, A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thorpe, R.B. [Fluids and Systems Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a significant component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), particular interest being shown herein in synovial fluid. The present study aims to investigate the degrading effects of X-ray radiation on HA at radiotherapy doses. Measurements of viscosity and shear stresses on HA solutions have been made at different shear rates using various types of viscometer for different concentrations in the range 0.01-1% w/v of HA. The HA has been subjected to doses of 6 MV photon radiation ranging from 0 to 20 Gy, the major emphasis being on doses below 5 Gy. It is found that there is a dose-dependent relationship between viscosity and shear rate, viscosity reducing with radiation dose, this being related to polymer scissions via the action of radiation-induced free radicals. The dependency appears to become weaker at higher concentrations, possibly due to the contribution to viscosity from polymer entanglement becoming dominant over that from mean molecular weight. Present results, for HA solutions in the concentration range 0.01% to 1% w/v, show reduced viscosity with dose over the range 0-4 Gy, the latter covering the dose regime of interest in fractionated radiotherapy. The work also shows agreement with previous Raman microspectrometry findings by others, the possible bond alterations being defined by comparison with available published data.

  8. A Quasi-Mechanistic Mathematical Representation for Blood Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. Hund

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood viscosity is a crucial element for any computation of flow fields in the vasculature or blood-wetted devices. Although blood is comprised of multiple elements, and its viscosity can vary widely depending on several factors, in practical applications, it is commonly assumed to be a homogeneous, Newtonian fluid with a nominal viscosity typically of 3.5 cP. Two quasi-mechanistic models for viscosity are presented here, built on the foundation of the Krieger model of suspensions, in which dependencies on shear rate, hematocrit, and plasma protein concentrations are explicitly represented. A 3-parameter Asymptotic Krieger model (AKM exhibited excellent agreement with published Couette experiments over four decades of shear rate (0–1000 s-1, root mean square (RMS error = 0.21 cP. A 5-parameter Modified Krieger Model (MKM5 also demonstrated a very good fit to the data (RMS error = 1.74 cP. These models avoid discontinuities exhibited by previous models with respect to hematocrit and shear rate. In summary, the quasi-mechanistic, Modified-Krieger Model presented here offers a reasonable compromise in complexity to provide flexibility to account for several factors that affect viscosity in practical applications, while assuring accuracy and stability.

  9. Hydrodynamic tails and a fluctuation bound on the bulk viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Mauricio; Schäfer, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    We study the small frequency behavior of the bulk viscosity spectral function using stochastic fluid dynamics. We obtain a number of model independent results, including the long-time tail of the bulk stress correlation function and the leading nonanalyticity of the spectral function at small frequency. We also establish a lower bound on the bulk viscosity which is weakly dependent on assumptions regarding the range of applicability of fluid dynamics. The bound on the bulk viscosity ζ scales as ζmin˜(P-2/3 E ) 2∑iDi-2 , where Di are the diffusion constants for energy and momentum and P -2/3 E , where P is the pressure and E is the energy density, is a measure of scale breaking. Applied to the cold Fermi gas near unitarity, |λ /as|≳1 , where λ is the thermal de Broglie wavelength and as is the s -wave scattering length, this bound implies that the ratio of bulk viscosity to entropy density satisfies ζ /s ≳0.1 ℏ /kB . Here, ℏ is Planck's constant and kB is Boltzmann's constant.

  10. Suprathermal viscosity of dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, Mark; Mahmoodifar, Simin; Schwenzer, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the existence of unstable modes of compact stars that eventually grow large, we study the bulk viscosity of dense matter, taking into account non-linear effects arising in the large amplitude regime, where the deviation μ Δ of the chemical potentials from chemical equilibrium fulfills μ Δ > or approx. T. We find that this supra-thermal bulk viscosity can provide a potential mechanism for saturating unstable modes in compact stars since the viscosity is strongly enhanced. Our study confirms previous results on strange quark matter and shows that the suprathermal enhancement is even stronger in the case of hadronic matter. We also comment on the competition of different weak channels and the presence of suprathermal effects in various color superconducting phases of dense quark matter.

  11. Viscosity Control Experiment Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Heidi E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bradley, Paul Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-31

    Turbulent mix has been invoked to explain many results in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density (HED) physics, such as reduced yield in capsule implosions. Many ICF capsule implosions exhibit interfacial instabilities seeded by the drive shock, but it is not clear that fully developed turbulence results from this. Many simulations use turbulent mix models to help match simulation results to data, but this is not appropriate if turbulence is not present. It would be useful to have an experiment where turbulent mixing could be turned on or off by design. The use of high-Z dopants to modify viscosity and the resulting influence on turbulence is considered here. A complicating factor is that the plasma in some implosions can become strongly coupled, which makes the Spitzer expression for viscosity invalid. We first consider equations that cover a broad parameter space in temperature and density to address regimes for various experimental applications. Next, a previous shock-tube and other ICF experiments that investigate viscosity or use doping to examine the effects on yield are reviewed. How viscosity and dopants play a role in capsule yield depends on the region and process under consideration. Experiments and simulations have been performed to study the effects of viscosity on both the hot spot and the fuel/ablator mix. Increases in yield have been seen for some designs, but not all. We then discuss the effect of adding krypton dopant to the gas region of a typical OMEGA and a 2-shock NIF implosion to determine approximately the effect of adding dopant on the computed Reynolds number. Recommendations for a path forward for possible experiments using high-Z dopants to affect viscosity and turbulence are made.

  12. Charm contribution to bulk viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, M.; Sohrabi, Kiyoumars A.

    2015-02-01

    In the range of temperatures reached in future heavy ion collision experiments, hadronic pair annihilations and creations of charm quarks may take place within the lifetime of the plasma. As a result, charm quarks may increase the bulk viscosity affecting the early stages of hydrodynamic expansion. Assuming thermalisation, we estimate the charm contribution to bulk viscosity within the same effective kinetic theory framework in which the light parton contribution has been computed previously. The time scale at which this physics becomes relevant is related to the width of the transport peak associated with the trace anomaly correlator and is found to be fm/c for MeV.

  13. Viscosity measurements of barium sulfate mixtures for use in motility studies of the pharynx and esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Brasseur, J G; Kern, M K; Dodds, W J

    1992-01-01

    Detailed viscosity measurements have been made of barium sulfate mixtures over a wide range of viscosities for use in radiography of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. A new methodology was developed for more accurate estimation of viscosity in non-Newtonian fluids in conventional cylinder-type viscometers. As base cases, the variation of viscosity with shear rate was measured for standard commercial mixes of e.z.hd (250% w/v) and a diluted mixture of liquid e.z.paque (40% w/v). These suspensions are strongly shear thinning at low shear rates. Above about 3s-1 the viscosity is nearly constant, but relatively low. To increase the viscosity of the barium sulfate mixture, Knott's strawberry syrup was mixed to different proportions with e.z.hd powder. In this way viscosity was systematically increased to values 130,000 times that of water. For these mixtures the variation of viscosity with temperature, and the change in mixture density with powder-syrup ratio are documented. From least-square fits through the data, simple mathematical formulas are derived for approximate calculation of viscosity as a function of mixture ratio and temperature. These empirical formulas should be useful in the design of "test kits" for systematic study for pharyngeal and esophageal motility, and clinical analysis of motility disorders as they relate to bolus consistency.

  14. Fission hindrance and nuclear viscosity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    viscosity in slowing down the diffusion rate in comparison to the decay rate without vis- cosity predicted by Bohr and ... revived Kramers' dynamical approach to understand nuclear fission at finite temperature and angular momentum. ... tor and (2) a compact seven-element array of BaF2 detectors. The fission fragments were.

  15. Pressure Effect on Extensional Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Kjær, Erik Michael

    1999-01-01

    The primary object of these experiments was to investigate the influence of hydrostatic pressure on entrance flow. The effect of pressure on shear and extensional viscosity was evaluated using an axis symmetric capillary and a slit die where the hydrostatic pressure was raised with valves...

  16. Fission hindrance and nuclear viscosity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of fission in terms of the ratio of transition states at the saddle point to the level density ... It was also intended to probe any turning over or reduction of γ .... 4. Summary and discussion. In this contribution we have reviewed our measurements which were carried out to inves- tigate the dependence of nuclear viscosity ...

  17. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  18. Viscosity in hot mix construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-11-01

    Viscosity, one of the oldest known and tested properties of Asphalt, yet one of the least studied is recently being given the attention it so rightfully deserves. Numerous engineers did recognize the importance of this property to the extent that sev...

  19. Temperature Dependence of Dynamic Viscosity and DSC Analysis of the Plantohyd samples

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasta Vozarova

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with physical properties – dynamic viscosity and DSC analysis of biodegradable hydraulic fluids and lubricating oils based on vegetable oils or on synthetic esters – PLANTOHYD S series (15S, 46S) and PLANTOHYD N series (40N). The brief characterization of investigated material is presented. This article presents the experimental results of measuring the main rheological characteristic – dynamic viscosity of samples of Plantohyd. Measurements were made under laboratory c...

  20. Shear viscosity of the quark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Iwasaki, Masaharu; Ohnishi, Hiromasa; Fukutome, Takahiko

    2007-01-01

    We discuss shear viscosity of the quark matter by using Kubo formula. The shear viscosity is calculated in the framework of the quasi-particle RPA for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We obtain a formula that the shear viscosity is expressed by the quadratic form of the quark spectral function in the chiral symmetric phase. The magnitude of the shear viscosity is discussed assuming the Breit-Wigner type for the spectral function.

  1. Second viscosity effects in cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potupa, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    The object of the investigation is to draw attention to two important aspects in the choice of a substance model, namely an allowance for the viscosity and behaviour of the metrics at the later stages of cosmological evolution. It is shown that in homogeneous cosmological models taking into account the viscosity there are solutions which realize interpolation between the Fridman and steady-state regimes. In a closed model a solution is obtained which corresponds to the ''curvature compensation'' regime with an unboundedly increasing radius. The problem of compensation of singularity at t → o is discussed as well as the choice of the equations of state for the early (hadron) stages of cosmological evolution in connection with the hydrodynamic theory of multiple hadron production

  2. On the helical pipe flow with a pressure-dependent viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Pažanin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the flow of incompressible fluid with a pressure-dependent viscosity through a pipe with helical shape. The viscosity-pressure relation is defined by the Barus law. The thickness of the pipe and the helix step are assumed to be of the same order and considered as the small parameter. After transforming the starting problem, we compute the asymptotic solution using curvilinear coordinates and standard perturbation technique. The solution is provided in the explicit form clearly showing the influence of viscosity-pressure dependence and pipe's geometry on the effective flow.

  3. Effective shear viscosity and dynamics of suspensions of micro-swimmers at moderate concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, Lipnikov [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gyrya, V [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.; Aronson, I [ANL; Berlyand, L [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, there have been a number of experimental studies suggesting that a suspension of self-propelled bacteria (microswimmers in general) may have an effective viscosity significantly smaller than the viscosity of the ambient fluid. This is in sharp contrast with suspensions of hard passive inclusions, whose presence always increases the viscosity. Here we present a 2D model for a suspension of microswimmers in a fluid and analyze it analytically in the dilute regime (no swimmer-swimmer interactions) and numerically using a Mimetic Finite Difference discretization. Our analysis shows that in the dilute regime the effective shear viscosity is not affected by self-propulsion. But at the moderate concentrations (due to swimmer-swimmer interactions) the effective viscosity decreases linearly as a function of the propulsion strength of the swimmers. These findings prove that (i) a physically observable decrease of viscosity for a suspension of self-propelled bacteria can be explained purely by hydrodynamic interactions and (ii) self-propulsion and interaction of swimmers are both essential to the reduction of the effective shear viscosity. We performed a number of numerical experiments analyzing the dynamics of swimmers resulting from pairwise interactions. The numerical results agree with the physically observed phenomena (e.g., attraction of swimmer to swimmer and swimmer to the wall). This is viewed as an additional validation of the model and the numerical scheme.

  4. Effect of viscosity on learned satiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, M.; Hogenkamp, P.S.; Gosses, A.M.; Stafleu, A.; Graaf, C.de

    2009-01-01

    A higher viscosity of a food leads to a longer orosensory stimulation. This may facilitate the learned association between sensory signals and metabolic consequences. In the current study we investigated the effect of viscosity on learned satiation. In two intervention groups a low viscosity (LV)

  5. Density and viscosity of lipids under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a lack of data for the viscosity of lipids under pressure. The current report is a part of the effort to fill this gap. The viscosity, density, and elastohydrodynamic film thicknesses of vegetable oil (HOSuO) were investigated. Pressure–viscosity coefficients (PVC) of HOSuO at different tem...

  6. Modified Artificial Viscosity in Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Selhammar, Magnus

    1996-01-01

    Artificial viscosity is needed in Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics to prevent interparticle penetration, to allow shocks to form and to damp post shock oscillations. Artificial viscosity may, however, lead to problems such as unwanted heating and unphysical solutions. A modification of the standard artificial viscosity recipe is proposed which reduces these problems. Some test cases discussed.

  7. Flow with Negative Differential Viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    川口, 明彦; Akihiko, KAWAGUCHI; 京大人環; Graduate School of Human and Enviromental Studies, Kyoto University

    2000-01-01

    Only a monotonous flow appears to the movement of the incompressible flow body in a porous medium under a simple condition according to Darcy's law. However, the character of the flow changes greatly if we think about the model by which the temperature dependency in the coefficient of viscosity is considered. Becoming of the inclination of pressure deifference-flow velocity specific characteristics nagative if we think about the one-dimensnional flow under a suitable condition, that is, "Flow...

  8. Shear viscosity of nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, A. G.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Grygoriev, U. V.; Plujko, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    Shear viscosity η is calculated for the nuclear matter described as a system of interacting nucleons with the van der Waals (VDW) equation of state. The Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation is solved in terms of the plane waves of the collective overdamped motion. In the frequent-collision regime, the shear viscosity depends on the particle-number density n through the mean-field parameter a , which describes attractive forces in the VDW equation. In the temperature region T =15 -40 MeV, a ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density s is smaller than 1 at the nucleon number density n =(0.5 -1.5 ) n0 , where n0=0.16 fm-3 is the particle density of equilibrium nuclear matter at zero temperature. A minimum of the η /s ratio takes place somewhere in a vicinity of the critical point of the VDW system. Large values of η /s ≫1 are, however, found in both the low-density, n ≪n0 , and high-density, n >2 n0 , regions. This makes the ideal hydrodynamic approach inapplicable for these densities.

  9. Estimation of the viscosities of liquid binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Su, Xiang-Yu

    2018-01-01

    As one of the most important physical and chemical properties, viscosity plays a critical role in physics and materials as a key parameter to quantitatively understanding the fluid transport process and reaction kinetics in metallurgical process design. Experimental and theoretical studies on liquid metals are problematic. Today, there are many empirical and semi-empirical models available with which to evaluate the viscosity of liquid metals and alloys. However, the parameter of mixed energy in these models is not easily determined, and most predictive models have been poorly applied. In the present study, a new thermodynamic parameter Δ G is proposed to predict liquid alloy viscosity. The prediction equation depends on basic physical and thermodynamic parameters, namely density, melting temperature, absolute atomic mass, electro-negativity, electron density, molar volume, Pauling radius, and mixing enthalpy. Our results show that the liquid alloy viscosity predicted using the proposed model is closely in line with the experimental values. In addition, if the component radius difference is greater than 0.03 nm at a certain temperature, the atomic size factor has a significant effect on the interaction of the binary liquid metal atoms. The proposed thermodynamic parameter Δ G also facilitates the study of other physical properties of liquid metals.

  10. Effect of viscosity on seismic response of waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yu; Uras, R.A.; Chang, Yao-Wen.

    1992-06-01

    The dynamic response of liquid-storage tanks subjected to harmonic excitations and earthquake ground motions has been studied. A rigid tank of negligible mass, rigidly supported at the base having a diameter of 50 ft. and fluid height of 20.4 ft. was used in the computer analysis. The liquid is assumed to have a density of 1.5 g/ml. Viscosity values, μ = 60, 200, 100, and 10,000 cP, were used in the numerical analyses to study the effects of viscosity on sloshing wave height, impulsive and convective pressure on the tank wall, base shear and base moments. Harmonic excitations as well as earthquake ground motions were used as input motions. The harmonic excitations used in the analyses covers a wide range of frequencies, including both the resonant and non-resonant frequencies. Two earthquake motions were used. One matches the Newmark-Hall median response spectrum and is anchored at 0.24 g for a rock site with a damping of 2% and a time duration of 10 s. The other is the 1978 Tabas earthquake which had a peak ZPA of 0.81 g and a time duration of 29 s. A small tank, about 1/15 the size of the typical waste storage tank, was used in the harmonic excitation study to investigate the effect of viscosity on the response of liquid-storage tanks and how the viscosity effect is affected by the size of the storage tank. The results of this study show that for the typical waste storage tank subjected to earthquake motions, the effect of viscosity on sloshing wave height and impulsive and convective pressures is very small and can be neglected. For viscosity effect to become noticeable in the response of the typical waste storage tank, the waste viscosity must be greater than 10,000 cP. This value is far greater than the estimated viscosity value of the high level wastes, which may range from 60 to 200 cP for some tanks

  11. Fabrication and Testing of Viscosity Measuring Instrument (Viscometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. HASSAN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the fabrication and testing of a simple and portable viscometer for the measurement of bulk viscosity of different Newtonian fluids. It is aimed at making available the instrument in local markets and consequently reducing or eliminating the prohibitive cost of importation. The method employed is the use of a D.C motor to rotate a disc having holes for infra-red light to pass through and fall on a photo-diode thus undergoing amplification and this signal being translated on a moving-coil meter as a deflection. The motor speed is kept constant but varies with changes in viscosity of the fluid during stirring, which alter signals being read on the meter. The faster is revolution per minute of the disc, the less the deflection on the meter and vise-versa. From the results of tests conducted on various sample fluids using data on standard Newtonian fluids as reliable guide the efficiency of the viscometer was 76.5%.

  12. Influence of Oil Viscosity on Alkaline Flooding for Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Du

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil viscosity was studied as an important factor for alkaline flooding based on the mechanism of “water drops” flow. Alkaline flooding for two oil samples with different viscosities but similar acid numbers was compared. Besides, series flooding tests for the same oil sample were conducted at different temperatures and permeabilities. The results of flooding tests indicated that a high tertiary oil recovery could be achieved only in the low-permeability (approximately 500 mD sandpacks for the low-viscosity heavy oil (Zhuangxi, 390 mPa·s; however, the high-viscosity heavy oil (Chenzhuang, 3450 mPa·s performed well in both the low- and medium-permeability (approximately 1000 mD sandpacks. In addition, the results of flooding tests for the same oil at different temperatures also indicated that the oil viscosity put a similar effect on alkaline flooding. Therefore, oil with a high-viscosity is favorable for alkaline flooding. The microscopic flooding test indicated that the water drops produced during alkaline flooding for oils with different viscosities differed significantly in their sizes, which might influence the flow behaviors and therefore the sweep efficiencies of alkaline fluids. This study provides an evidence for the feasibility of the development of high-viscosity heavy oil using alkaline flooding.

  13. On the penetration of a hot diapir through a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, S. F.; Raefsky, A.

    1985-01-01

    The ascent of a hot spherical body through a fluid with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity has been studied using an axisymmetric finite element method. Numerical solutions range over Peclet numbers of 0.1 - 1000 from constant viscosity up to viscosity variations of 100,000. Both rigid and stress-free boundary conditions were applied at the surface of the sphere. The dependence of drag on viscosity variation was shown to have no dependence on the stress boundary condition except for a Stokes flow scaling factor. A Nusselt number parameterization based on the stress-free constant viscosity functional dependence on the Peclet number scaled by a parameter depending on the viscosity structure fits both stress-free and rigid boundary condition data above viscosity variations of 100. The temperature scale height was determined as a function of sphere radius. For the simple physical model studied in this paper pre-heating is required to reduce the ambient viscosity of the country rock to less than 10 to the 22nd sq cm/s in order for a 10 km diapir to penetrate a distance of several radii.

  14. Spectroscopic studies on di-pophyrin rotor as micro-viscosity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, H.; Raut, S.; Kimbal, J.; Gryczynski, Z.; Dzyuba, S.; Balaz, M.

    2015-03-01

    In typical biological systems the fluid compartment makes up more than 70% percent of the system weight. A variety of mass and signal transportation as well as intermolecular interactions are often governed by viscosity. It is important to be able to measure/estimate viscosity and detect the changes in viscosity upon various stimulations. Understanding the influence of changes in viscosity is crucial and development of the molecular systems that sensitive to micro-viscosity is a goal of many researches. Molecular rotors have been considered the potential target since they present enhanced sensitivity to local viscosity that can strongly restrict molecular rotation. To understand the mechanics of rotor interaction with the environment we have been studied conjugated pophyrin-dimer rotor (DP) that emit in the near IR. Our goal is to investigate the photo physical properties such as absorption, transition moment orientation, emission and excitation, polarization anisotropy and fluorescence lifetime in various mediums of different viscosities from ethanol to poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) matrices. The results imply the influences of the medium's viscosity on the two distinct confirmations: planar and twisted conformations of DP. Linear dichroism from polarized absorption in PVA matrices shows various orientations of transition moments. Excitation anisotropy shows similar transition splitting between two conformations. Time resolved intensity decay at two different observations confirms the two different emission states and furthermore the communication between the two states in the form of energy transfer upon excitation.

  15. On the effective viscosity of nanosuspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2009-08-01

    The effective viscosity of nanosuspensions is simulated using the molecular dynamics method. It is found that viscosity is controlled not only by the volume concentration of nanoparticles, by also by their mass and diameter. The viscosity of even strongly rarefied nanosuspensions (with a low concentration of nanoparticles) cannot be described by the Einstein relation. This means that the mechanism responsible for the increase in the viscosity of the medium is not of hydrodynamic origin. It is shown that the formation of viscosity of nanosuspensions is associated to a considerable extent with nonequilibrium microfluctuations of density and velocity of the carrier medium, which are induced by the motion of nanoparticles.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION TO STUDY THE VISCOSITY AND DISPERSION OF CONDUCTIVE AND NON-CONDUCTIVE NANOPOWDERS’ BLENDED DIELECTRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Santarao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nano fluids are nanotechnology-based colloidal dispersions engineered by stably suspending nanoparticles. The characteristics of nano fluids such as thermal and electrical conductivities, viscosity, specific heat, dispersion etc. were studied and analyzed by earlier researches at different particle concentrations with different nano fluids. It was established that nano fluids have a significant impact on the process due the improvised characteristics. nano fluid viscosity and dispersion deserve the same attention as thermal conductivity in cases of nano dielectric fluids that are used in EDM as they influence the MRR. In this work, The viscosity and dispersion of the conductive and nonconductive nano powders blended dielectrics are investigated as a function of volume fraction so as to evaluate the behavior of these nano fluids at different particle volume concentrations. Kerosene and deionized water based nano fluids blended with conductive (SiC and non-conductive (boric acid nano particles are selected for the current study. It is observed that as the percentage volume fraction of Nano particles (both SiC and boric acid increased, the viscosity was found increasing when blended with DI water. But the viscosity behavior with Kerosene blended with SiC and boric acid is not same. The existing experimental results about the nano fluids viscosity shows clearly that viscosity have a specific trend in variation with an increase of volume concentration. Boric acid blended with DIW and Kerosene shows similar trend in dispersion. However, in case of SiC blended with DIW and Kerosene showed some contradictory results giving scope for further investigation. The outcome of these experimental investigations will augment the works that are going on in studying its influence on MRR in EDM processes using nano blended dielectric medium.

  17. Dynamic viscosity modeling of methane plus n-decane and methane plus toluene mixtures: Comparative study of some representative models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baylaucq, A.; Boned, C.; Canet, X.

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity measurements of well-defined mixtures are useful in order to evaluate existing viscosity models. Recently, an extensive experimental study of the viscosity at pressures up to 140 MPa has been carried out for the binary systems methane + n-decane and methane toluene, between 293.15 and 373.......15 and for several methane compositions. Although very far from real petroleum fluids, these mixtures are interesting in order to study the potential of extending various models to the simulation of complex fluids with asymmetrical components (light/heavy hydrocarbon). These data (575 data points) have been...

  18. Setting the pace of microswimmers: when increasing viscosity speeds up self-propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Jayant; Merchant, Laura; Krüger, Timm; Harting, Jens; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2017-05-01

    It has long been known that some microswimmers seem to swim counter-intuitively faster when the viscosity of the surrounding fluid is increased, whereas others slow down. This conflicting dependence of the swimming velocity on the viscosity is poorly understood theoretically. Here we explain that any mechanical microswimmer with an elastic degree of freedom in a simple Newtonian fluid can exhibit both kinds of response to an increase in the fluid viscosity for different viscosity ranges, if the driving is weak. The velocity response is controlled by a single parameter Γ, the ratio of the relaxation time of the elastic component of the swimmer in the viscous fluid and the swimming stroke period. This defines two velocity-viscosity regimes, which we characterize using the bead-spring microswimmer model and analyzing the different forces acting on the parts of this swimmer. The analytical calculations are supported by lattice-Boltzmann simulations, which accurately reproduce the two velocity regimes for the predicted values of Γ.

  19. Real-time viscosity and mass density sensors requiring microliter sample volume based on nanomechanical resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Benjamin A; Duempelmann, Luc; Renggli, Kasper; Lang, Hans Peter; Gerber, Christoph; Bruns, Nico; Braun, Thomas

    2013-09-17

    A microcantilever based method for fluid viscosity and mass density measurements with high temporal resolution and microliter sample consumption is presented. Nanomechanical cantilever vibration is driven by photothermal excitation and detected by an optical beam deflection system using two laser beams of different wavelengths. The theoretical framework relating cantilever response to the viscosity and mass density of the surrounding fluid was extended to consider higher flexural modes vibrating at high Reynolds numbers. The performance of the developed sensor and extended theory was validated over a viscosity range of 1-20 mPa·s and a corresponding mass density range of 998-1176 kg/m(3) using reference fluids. Separating sample plugs from the carrier fluid by a two-phase configuration in combination with a microfluidic flow cell, allowed samples of 5 μL to be sequentially measured under continuous flow, opening the method to fast and reliable screening applications. To demonstrate the study of dynamic processes, the viscosity and mass density changes occurring during the free radical polymerization of acrylamide were monitored and compared to published data. Shear-thinning was observed in the viscosity data at higher flexural modes, which vibrate at elevated frequencies. Rheokinetic models allowed the monomer-to-polymer conversion to be tracked in spite of the shear-thinning behavior, and could be applied to study the kinetics of unknown processes.

  20. Dynamic viscosity versus probe-reported microviscosity of aqueous mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanot, Chhavi; Trivedi, Shruti; Gupta, Arti; Pandey, Shubha; Pandey, Siddharth

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Aqueous polymer mixtures, non-toxic media of huge industrial importance, are investigated. ► Bulk viscosity of aqueous. PEG mixtures is shown to vary widely with composition and temperature. ► T-dependent viscosity follows Arrhenius behavior suggesting aqueous PEGs to be Newtonian fluids. ► Microviscosity sensed by a fluorescence ratiometric probe is estimated and correlated with viscosity. ► Microviscosity correlates well with bulk viscosity at higher PEG concentrations. - Abstract: Correlation between the dynamic viscosity (η) and the microviscosity of a hybrid green medium constituted of water and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) of average molar mass (200, 400, and 600) g · mol −1 , respectively, is explored over the temperatures range (10 to 90) °C across the complete composition regime. The microviscosity is obtained using a fluorescence probe 1,3-bis-(1-pyrenyl)propane (BPP), which is manifested through the ratio of the monomer-to-intramolecular excimer intensities (I M /I E ). Aqueous PEG mixtures are observed to behave similar to Newtonian fluids as the temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity follows Arrhenius-type behavior. Surprisingly, a simple and convenient linear dependence of ln η with wt% PEG of the mixture is established. The BPP I M /I E is observed, in general, to increase with the bulk dynamic viscosity of the mixture having >10 wt% PEG suggesting a good correlation between the bulk dynamic viscosity and BPP-reported microviscosity when the viscosity of the aqueous PEG mixture is relatively high.

  1. Critical Viscosity of Xenon team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure (at left) that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister (right) holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (left) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

  2. Relativistic thermodynamics of fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souriau, J.-M.

    1977-05-01

    The relativistic covariant definition of a statistical equilibrium, applied to a perfect gas, involves a 'temperature four-vector', whose direction is the mean velocity of the fluid, and whose length is the reciprocal temperature. The hypothesis of this 'temperature four-vector' being a relevant variable for the description of the dissipative motions of a simple fluid is discussed. The kinematics is defined by using a vector field and measuring the number of molecules. Such a dissipative fluid is subject to motions involving null entropy generation; the 'temperature four-vector' is then a Killing vector; the equations of motion can be completely integrated. Perfect fluids can be studied by this way and the classical results of Lichnerowicz are obtained. In weakly dissipative motions two viscosity coefficient appear together with the heat conductibility coefficient. Two other coefficients perharps measurable on real fluids. Phase transitions and shock waves are described with using the model [fr

  3. Contribution of pitcher fragrance and fluid viscosity to high prey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    Nepenthes rafflesiana var. typica is an insectivorous pitcher plant that is widespread in northern. Borneo. It exhibits ontogenetic pitcher dimorphism with the upper pitchers trapping more flying prey than the lower pitchers. While this difference in prey composition has been ascribed to differences in attraction, the contribution ...

  4. Slip in quantum fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einzel, D.; Parpia, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    In this review the authors describe theoretical and experimental investigations of general slip phenomena in context with the flow of the quantum liquids 3 He, 4 He and their mixtures at low temperatures. The phenomena of slip is related to a boundary effect. It occurs when sufficiently dilute gases flow along the wall of an experimental cell. A fluid is said to exhibit slip when the fluid velocity at the wall is not equal to the wall's velocity. Such a situation occurs whenever the wall reflects the fluid particles in a specular-like manner, and/or if the fluid is describable in terms of a dilute ordinary gas (classical fluid) or a dilute gas of thermal excitations (quantum fluid). The slip effect in quantum fluids is discussed theoretically on the basis of generalized Landau-Boltzmann transport equations and generalized to apply to a regime of ballistic motion of the quasiparticles in the fluid. The central result is that the transport coefficient of bulk shear viscosity, which typically enters in the Poiseuille flow resistance and the transverse acoustic impedance, has to be replaced by geometry dependent effective viscosity, which depends on the details of the interaction of the fluid particles with the cell walls. The theoretical results are compared with various experimental data obtained in different geometries and for both Bose and Fermi quantum fluids. Good agreement between experiment and theory is found particularly in the case of pure normal and superfluid 3 He, with discrepancies probably arising because of deficiencies in characterization of the experimental surfaces

  5. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana

    2013-10-15

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  6. Application of SEAWAT to select variable-density and viscosity problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dausman, Alyssa M.; Langevin, Christian D.; Thorne, Danny T.; Sukop, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    SEAWAT is a combined version of MODFLOW and MT3DMS, designed to simulate three-dimensional, variable-density, saturated groundwater flow. The most recent version of the SEAWAT program, SEAWAT Version 4 (or SEAWAT_V4), supports equations of state for fluid density and viscosity. In SEAWAT_V4, fluid density can be calculated as a function of one or more MT3DMS species, and optionally, fluid pressure. Fluid viscosity is calculated as a function of one or more MT3DMS species, and the program also includes additional functions for representing the dependence of fluid viscosity on temperature. This report documents testing of and experimentation with SEAWAT_V4 with six previously published problems that include various combinations of density-dependent flow due to temperature variations and/or concentration variations of one or more species. Some of the problems also include variations in viscosity that result from temperature differences in water and oil. Comparisons between the results of SEAWAT_V4 and other published results are generally consistent with one another, with minor differences considered acceptable.

  7. A comprehensive viscosity model for micro magnetic particle dispersed in silicone oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Im Doo; Kim, Moobum; Park, Seong Jin, E-mail: sjpark87@postech.ac.kr

    2016-04-15

    Magnetorheological behavior of micro magnetic particle dispersed in silicone oil has been characterized by a multiplied form of phenomenological models taking the effect of shear rate, powder volume fraction, temperature and magnetic flux density. Magnetorheological fluid samples with seven different particle volume fraction were prepared by adding ferrite particles in silicone base oil and their shear viscosity of fluid samples were measured under three different temperatures (40 °C, 70 °C, and 110 °C) and ten different magnetic flux density (0–100 mT). The fluid had an upper limit to the increase of viscosity under the effect of external magnetic field and the saturation values were dependent on the operating temperature, shear rate and volume fraction of magnetic powder. The rheological behaviors have been characterized by our developed model which can be very useful for the precise control of the magnetorheological fluid. - Highlights: • A magnetorheological model has been developed for micro particle based MR fluids. • Krieger & Dougherty model described well the effect of metal particle volume fraction. • Upper limits to the increase of viscosity by magnetic field have been characterized. • Multiplied form of models represented well the experimental viscosity data. • Our proposed model can well predict the rheological behavior under various conditions.

  8. Determination of Viscosity-Average Molecular Weight of Chitosan using Intrinsic Viscosity Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norzita Yacob; Norhashidah Talip; Maznah Mahmud

    2011-01-01

    Molecular weight of chitosan can be determined by different techniques such as Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), Static Light Scattering (SLS) and intrinsic viscosity measurement. Determination of molecular weight by intrinsic viscosity measurement is a simple method for characterization of chitosan. Different concentrations of chitosan were prepared and measurement was done at room temperature. The flow time data was used to calculate the intrinsic viscosity by extrapolating the reduced viscosity to zero concentration. The value of intrinsic viscosity was then recalculated into the viscosity-average molecular weight using Mark-Houwink equation. (author)

  9. Study on viscosity measurement using fiber Bragg grating micro-vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Le; Fang, Fengzhou; Zhao, Jibo

    2013-01-01

    It is now ascertained that traditional electric sensors are vulnerable to electromagnetic interference when measuring viscosity. Here, we propose a new viscosity-sensitive structure based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing principle and a micro-vibration measurement method. The symmetric micro-vibration motivation method is also described, and a mathematical model for compensational voltage and fluid viscosity is established. The probe amplitude, which is produced by reciprocating stimulation, is accessible by means of an FBG sensor mounted on an equal-strength beam. Viscosity can be therefore calculated using a demodulation technique based on linear edge filtering with long period grating. After performing a group of verifying tests, the sensor has been subsequently calibrated with a series of standard fluids to determine uncertain parameters in the mathematical model. The results of the experiment show that the relative measurement error was less than 2% when the viscosity ranged from 200 to 500 mPa s. The proposed architecture utilizes the characteristics of anti-interference, fast response speed, high resolution and compact structure of FBG, thereby offering a novel modality to achieve an online viscosity measurement. (paper)

  10. VISCOSITY DICTATES METABOLIC ACTIVITY of Vibrio ruber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja eBoric

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment.

  11. Viscosity dictates metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borić, Maja; Danevčič, Tjaša; Stopar, David

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment. PMID:22826705

  12. Transport Signatures of the Hall Viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacrétaz, Luca V; Gromov, Andrey

    2017-12-01

    Hall viscosity is a nondissipative response function describing momentum transport in two-dimensional systems with broken parity. It is quantized in the quantum Hall regime, and contains information about the topological order of the quantum Hall state. Hall viscosity can distinguish different quantum Hall states with identical Hall conductances, but different topological order. To date, an experimentally accessible signature of Hall viscosity is lacking. We exploit the fact that Hall viscosity contributes to charge transport at finite wavelengths, and can therefore be extracted from nonlocal resistance measurements in inhomogeneous charge flows. We explain how to determine the Hall viscosity from such a transport experiment. In particular, we show that the profile of the electrochemical potential close to contacts where current is injected is sensitive to the value of the Hall viscosity.

  13. Excessive Additive Effect On Engine Oil Viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Vojtěch Kumbár; Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is excessive additive (for oil filling) effect on engine oil dynamic viscosity. Research is focused to commercially distribute automotive engine oil with viscosity class 15W–40 designed for vans. There were prepared blends of new and used engine oil without and with oil additive in specific ratio according manufacturer’s recommendations. Dynamic viscosity of blends with additive was compared with pure new and pure used engine oil. The temperature dependence dynamic...

  14. Uniaxial Elongational viscosity of bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for three bidisperse polystyrene (PS) melts, consisting of blends of monodisperse PS with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole or 103 kg/mole and 390 kg/mole. The bidisperse melts have a maximum in the steady elongational...... viscosity, of up to a factor of 7 times the Trouton limit of 3 times the zero-shear viscosity....

  15. Growth rates of lava domes with respect to viscosity of magmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yokoyama

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In the discussion of lava dome formation, viscosity of magma plays an important role. Measurements of viscosity of magmas in field and laboratory are briefly summarized. The types of lava dome emplacements are classified into two, squeeze- and spine-type, by kinetic processes. The squeeze-type is the formation of a dome as a result of squeezes of magma through conduits and the latter is solidified magma forced to ascend by underlying fluid magma. An important parameter in the formation of such lava domes is their growth rates. Lava domes of squeeze-type are governed by the Hagen-Poiseuille Law which involves their viscosoties and other eruption parameters. At present, the real viscosity of magmas at the site of lava dome is still inaccessible. In order to avoid uncertainty in viscosity of magmas, a conception of «macroscopic viscosity» is proposed, which involves effects of chemical components, mainly SiO2 and volatile material, crystals and temperature, and their changes with time. Lava dome formations during the 20th century are briefly examined and their growth rates are estimated. The relationship between the growth rates and the SiO2 content of the magma is statistically studied, and the macroscopic viscosity is empirically expressed as a function of SiO2 content. The linearity between the two parameters is reasonably interpreted. This means that formation processes of lava domes are dominantly controlled by macroscopic viscosity of magma.

  16. Viscosity of Molten Alkaline-Earth Fluorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Osamu; Hoshino, Yosuke; Anbo, Yusuke; Yanagase, Kei-ichi; Aono, Masahiro; Sato, Yuzuru

    2015-04-01

    The viscosities of molten alkaline-earth fluorides were measured using the oscillating crucible method, which is especially suitable for measuring molten salts with low viscosity. The results showed a good Arrhenius linearity over a wide temperature range. The measured viscosities and activation energies increased in the following order: . Judging by the charge density, the viscosity of alkaline-earth fluorides should increase from molten to . However, the results indicate a different tendency, which may be explained by a Coulomb force that is very strong. The low viscosity of can be attributed to a decreased cohesive force, due to a partial loss of the Coulomb force caused by a higher charge density of the material. The viscosities were also compared to those of molten alkali fluorides and alkaline-earth chlorides. The viscosities of molten alkaline-earth fluorides were higher than those of molten alkali fluorides and alkaline-earth chlorides. The viscosity determined in this study was compared to literature values and showed a reasonable value in the relatively low-viscosity region.

  17. Gas viscosity measurement with diamagnetic-levitation viscometer based on electromagnetically spinning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Y.; Matsuura, Y.; Hirano, T.; Sakai, K.

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing a graphite-disk probe attached with a thin aluminum disk, we have developed a friction-free viscosity measurement system. The probe is levitated above a NdFeB magnet because of diamagnetic effect and rotated by an electromagnetically induced torque. The probe is absolutely free form mechanical friction, and therefore, the accurate measurements of the viscosity of gases can be achieved. To demonstrate the accuracy and sensitivity of our method, we measured the viscosity of 8 kinds of gases and its temperature change from 278 K to 318 K, and we confirmed a good agreement between the obtained values and literature values. This paper demonstrates that our method has the ability to measure the fluid viscosity in the order of μPa ṡ s.

  18. Effect of a shallow low-viscosity zone on the formation of midplate swells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, E. M.; Parsons, B.

    1988-01-01

    A finite-element numerical method is used here to analyze the effect of a low-viscosity zone on convection driven by heating from below in the upper mantle, in particular on the formation of midplate swells. The convective temperature and velocity solutions are calculated for different combinations of the viscosity in the top layer, the fluid layer thicknesses, and the Rayleigh number based on the viscosity in the bottom layer. The temperature solutions are used to calculate the geoid, topography, and heat flow anomalies, the elastic plate thickness, the depth of compensation, and an upper bound on the uplift time that result from the flow. The results are compared to data at the Hawaii, Bermuda, Cape Verde, and Marquesas swells. The magnitudes and the trend with age are consistent with theoretical and other estimates of the viscosity variation in the shallow upper mantle. Convective models can therefore explain the uplift and observed anomalies at midplate swells.

  19. The Effect of Variable Viscosities on Micropolar Flow of Two Nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, S.; Ahmed, Z.; Saleem, S.

    2016-12-01

    A study of nanofluids is carried out that reveals the effect of rotational inertia and other physical parameters on the heat transfer and fluid flow. Temperature-dependent dynamic viscosity makes the microrotation viscosity parameter and the micro inertia density variant as well. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by introducing suitable similarity transformations. These reduced nonlinear differential equations are then solved numerically by Keller-box method. The obtained numerical and graphical result discloses many interesting behaviour of nanofluids. It is seen that the temperature gradient decreases with the increase in viscosity parameter. Also, it is observed that with the fixed values of micropolar parameter and viscosity parameter, the velocity gradient near the wall increases with increasing values of solid particle volume fraction parameter. A suitable comparison of results is also presented in this study.

  20. Gas viscosity measurement with diamagnetic-levitation viscometer based on electromagnetically spinning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Y; Matsuura, Y; Hirano, T; Sakai, K

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing a graphite-disk probe attached with a thin aluminum disk, we have developed a friction-free viscosity measurement system. The probe is levitated above a NdFeB magnet because of diamagnetic effect and rotated by an electromagnetically induced torque. The probe is absolutely free form mechanical friction, and therefore, the accurate measurements of the viscosity of gases can be achieved. To demonstrate the accuracy and sensitivity of our method, we measured the viscosity of 8 kinds of gases and its temperature change from 278 K to 318 K, and we confirmed a good agreement between the obtained values and literature values. This paper demonstrates that our method has the ability to measure the fluid viscosity in the order of μPa ⋅ s.

  1. Shear Viscosity from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Mages, Simon W; Fodor, Zoltán; Schäfer, Andreas; Szabó, Kálmán

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the transport properties of the the quark-gluon plasma is becoming increasingly important to describe current measurements at heavy ion collisions. This work reports on recent efforts to determine the shear viscosity h in the deconfined phase from lattice QCD. The main focus is on the integration of the Wilson flow in the analysis to get a better handle on the infrared behaviour of the spectral function which is relevant for transport. It is carried out at finite Wilson flow time, which eliminates the dependence on the lattice spacing. Eventually, a new continuum limit has to be carried out which sends the new regulator introduced by finite flow time to zero. Also the non-perturbative renormalization strategy applied for the energy momentum tensor is discussed. At the end some quenched results for temperatures up to 4 : 5 T c are presented

  2. Determination of the shear and bulk viscosity from equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Frederike; Muller, Erich; Matar, Omar K.

    2017-11-01

    Determining fluid properties accurately is essential for large-scale fluid dynamics simulations where only a few parameters determine the behaviour of an entire system. Even though many properties are well known, others are more obscure and difficult to determine experimentally. One such property is the bulk viscosity which plays a particularly large role in compressible fluids but is rarely considered in fluid-dynamics simulations. We determine both the shear and bulk viscosity using equilibrium methods within the molecular-dynamics framework using both atomistic and coarse-grained models with a view of assessing both the accuracy of coarse-grained models for transport-property calculations and the necessity of including such properties at various scales and scenarios. Funding from the Theory and Simulation of Materials, EPSRC (UK) Centre for Doctoral Training is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Water-Based Fe2O3 Nanofluid Characterization: Thermal Conductivity and Viscosity Measurements and Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Colla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation on water-based nanofluids containing iron oxide (Fe2O3 in concentrations ranging between 5 and 20% in mass is presented. The purpose of this study is to measure thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity of these fluids, as a starting point to study the heat transfer capability. The stability of the nanofluids was verified by pH and Zeta potential measurements. A dynamic light scattering (DLS technique was used to obtain the mean nanoparticle diameters. It was found that thermal conductivity of these nanofluids improved with temperature and particles concentration. The temperature and nanoparticle concentration effects on viscosity were analyzed, obtaining a significant increase with respect to water. All the fluids exhibited a Newtonian behaviour. The experimental values were compared with some theoretical models for both thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity.

  4. Ferromagnetic Convection in a Densely Packed Porous Medium with Magnetic-Field-Dependent Viscosity - Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Jyoti; Kumar, Pankaj; Kumari, Kultaran; Manan, Shweta

    2018-02-01

    The effect of magnetic-field-dependent (MFD) viscosity on the thermal convection in a ferromagnetic fluid in the presence of a uniform vertical magnetic field is investigated for a fluid layer saturating a densely packed porous medium using the Darcy model. A correction is applied to the model by Sunil et al. [Z. Naturforsch. 59, 397 (2004)], which is very important to predict the correct behaviour of MFD viscosity. A linear stability analysis is carried out for stationary modes. The critical wave number and critical Rayleigh number for the onset of instability, for the case of free boundaries, are determined numerically for sufficiently large values of the magnetic parameter M1. Numerical results are obtained and illustrated graphically. It is shown that MFD viscosity has stabilizing effect on the system, whereas medium permeability has a destabilizing effect.

  5. Temperature-Dependent Conformations of Model Viscosity Index Improvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasamy, Uma Shantini; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-05-01

    Lubricants are comprised of base oils and additives where additives are chemicals that are deliberately added to the oil to enhance properties and inhibit degradation of the base oils. Viscosity index (VI) improvers are an important class of additives that reduce the decline of fluid viscosity with temperature [1], enabling optimum lubricant performance over a wider range of operating temperatures. These additives are typically high molecular weight polymers, such as, but not limited to, polyisobutylenes, olefin copolymer, and polyalkylmethacrylates, that are added in concentrations of 2-5% (w/w). Appropriate polymers, when dissolved in base oil, expand from a coiled to an uncoiled state with increasing temperature [2]. The ability of VI additives to increase their molar volume and improve the temperature-viscosity dependence of lubricants suggests there is a strong relationship between molecular structure and additive functionality [3]. In this work, we aim to quantify the changes in polymer size with temperature for four polyisobutylene (PIB) based molecular structures at the nano-scale using molecular simulation tools. As expected, the results show that the polymers adopt more conformations at higher temperatures, and there is a clear indication that the expandability of a polymer is strongly influenced by molecular structure.

  6. The influence of viscosity stratification on boundary-layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Jung, Seo Yoon; Sung, Hyung Jin; Zaki, Tamer A.

    2012-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over isothermally-heated walls were performed to investigate the influence of viscosity stratification on boundary-layer turbulence and drag. The adopted model for temperature-dependent viscosity was typical of water. The free-stream temperature was set to 30°C, and two wall temperatures, 70°C and 99°C, were simulated. In the heated flows, the mean shear-rate is enhanced near the wall and reduced in the buffer region, which induces a reduction in turbulence production. On the other hand, the turbulence dissipation is enhanced near the wall, despite the the reduction in fluid viscosity. The higher dissipation is attributed to a decrease in the smallest length scales and near-wall fine-scale motions. The combined effect of the reduced production and enhanced dissipation leads to lower Reynolds shear stresses and, as a result, reduction of the skin-friction coefficient. Supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (Grant EP/F034997/1) and partially supported by the Erasmus Mundus Build on Euro-Asian Mobility (EM-BEAM) programme.

  7. Viscosity of aqueous and cyanate ester suspensions containing alumina nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, Katherine [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    be the cause of the viscosity reduction. The flow behavior of alumina particles in water and BECy is markedly different. Aqueous alumina suspensions are shear thinning at all alumina loadings and capable of 50 vol% loading before losing fluidity whereas BECy/alumina suspensions show Newtonian behavior up to 5 vol%, and above 5 vol% show shear thinning at all shear rates. Highly loaded suspensions (i.e. 20vol% alumina) exhibit shear thinning at low and moderate shear rates and shear thickening at higher shear rates. The maximum particle loading for a fluid suspension, in this case, appears to be about 20 vol%. The difference in the viscosity of these suspensions must be related to the solvent-particle interactions for each system. The reason is not exactly known, but there are some notable differences between BECy and water. Water molecules are {approx}0.28 nm in length and highly hydrogen bonded with a low viscosity (1 mPa's) whereas in the cyanate ester (BECy) system, the solvent molecule is about 1.2 nm, in the largest dimension, with surfaces of varied charge distribution throughout the molecule. The viscosity of the monomer is also reasonably low for organic polymer precursor, about 7 mPa's. Nanoparticles in water tend to agglomerate and form flocs which are broken with the shear force applied during viscosity measurement. The particle-particle interaction is very important in this system. In BECy, the particles appear to be well dispersed and not as interactive. The solvent-particle interaction appears to be most important. It is not known exactly how the alumina particles interact with the monomer, but NMR suggests hydrogen bonding. These hydrogen bonds between the particle and monomer could very well affect the viscosity. A conclusion that can be reached in this work is that the presence of hydroxyl groups on the surface of the alumina particles is significant and seems to affect the interactions between other particles and the solvent. Thus, the

  8. Correlation between the viscosity and quality of palm wine and palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The viscosities of various grades of two important local fluids, palm wine and palm oil, were investigated using a locally fabricated and standardised viscometer. The viscometer so fabricated is a Saybolt-type viscometer which is based on the difference in pressure heads for parallel flow, derived from the Navier-Stokes ...

  9. Local linear viscoelasticity of confined fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J S; Daivis, P J; Todd, B D

    2007-04-14

    In this paper the authors propose a novel method to study the local linear viscoelasticity of fluids confined between two walls. The method is based on the linear constitutive equation and provides details about the real and imaginary parts of the local complex viscosity. They apply the method to a simple atomic fluid undergoing zero mean oscillatory flow using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The method shows that the viscoelastic properties of the fluid exhibit dramatic spatial changes near the wall-fluid boundary due to the high density in this region. It is also shown that the real part of the viscosity converges to the frequency dependent local shear viscosity sufficiently far away from the wall. This also provides valuable information about the transport properties in the fluid, in general. The viscosity is compared with predictions from the local average density model. The two methods disagree in that the local average density model predicts larger viscosity variations near the wall-fluid boundary than what is observed through the method presented here.

  10. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent

  11. VISCOSITY OF CONCENTRATED POTATO-STARCH PASTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LAMMERS, G; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1994-01-01

    A new viscosity equation for the description of the viscosity of concentrated aqueous starch pastes is proposed: eta(app) = Ke([Bmstarch+(C/T)-DW+(n-1)ln gamma]) with: m(starch) = mass fraction starch in paste, T = temperature, W = amount of work performed on the starch, n = power-law index, K =

  12. Bulk-viscosity-driven asymmetric inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waga, I.; Lima, J.A.S.; Portugal, R.

    1987-01-01

    A primordial net bosinic charge is introduced in the context of the bulk-viscosity-driven inflationary models. The analysis is carried through a macroscopic point of view in the framework of the causal thermodynamic theory. The conditions for having exponetial and generalized inflation are obtained. A phenomenological expression for the bulk viscosity coefficient is also derived. (author) [pt

  13. Evaluation of the impact of viscosity, injection volume, and injection flow rate on subcutaneous injection tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berteau C

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cecile Berteau,1 Orchidée Filipe-Santos,1 Tao Wang,2 Humberto E Rojas,2 Corinne Granger,1 Florence Schwarzenbach1 1Becton-Dickinson Medical Pharmaceutical Systems, Le Pont de Claix, France; 2Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Aim: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluid injection viscosity in combination with different injection volumes and flow rates on subcutaneous (SC injection pain tolerance. Methods: The study was a single-center, comparative, randomized, crossover, Phase I study in 24 healthy adults. Each participant received six injections in the abdomen area of either a 2 or 3 mL placebo solution, with three different fluid viscosities (1, 8–10, and 15–20 cP combined with two different injection flow rates (0.02 and 0.3 mL/s. All injections were performed with 50 mL syringes and 27G, 6 mm needles. Perceived injection pain was assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS (0 mm/no pain, 100 mm/extreme pain. The location and depth of the injected fluid was assessed through 2D ultrasound echography images. Results: Viscosity levels had significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.0003. Specifically, less pain was associated with high viscosity (VAS =12.6 mm than medium (VAS =16.6 mm or low (VAS =22.1 mm viscosities, with a significant difference between high and low viscosities (P=0.0002. Target injection volume of 2 or 3 mL was demonstrated to have no significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.89. Slow (0.02 mL/s or fast (0.30 mL/s injection rates also showed no significant impact on perceived pain during SC injection (P=0.79. In 92% of injections, the injected fluid was located exclusively in SC tissue whereas the remaining injected fluids were found located in SC and/or intradermal layers. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that solutions of up to 3 mL and up to 15–20 cP injected into the abdomen within 10 seconds are well tolerated without pain. High

  14. Large particles increase viscosity and yield stress of pig cecal contents without changing basic viscoelastic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toru; Sakata, Takashi

    2002-05-01

    The viscosity of gut contents should influence digestion and absorption. Earlier investigators measured the viscosity of intestinal contents after the removal of solid particles. However, we previously found that removal of solid particles from pig cecal contents dramatically lowered the viscosity of the contents. Accordingly, we examined the contribution of large solid particles to viscoelastic parameters of gut contents in the present study. We removed large particles from pig cecal contents by filtration through surgical gauze. Then, we reconstructed the cecal contents by returning all, one half or none of the original amount of the large particles to the filtrate. We measured the viscosity, shear stress and shear rate of these reconstructed cecal contents using a tube-flow viscometer. The coefficient of viscosity was larger when the large-particle content was higher (P Bingham plastic nature irrespective of large-particle content. We calculated the yield stress of these fluids assuming that the fluids behave as Bingham plastic. The yield stress of the cecal contents was greater (P Bingham plastic characteristics to pig cecal contents.

  15. Excessive Additive Effect On Engine Oil Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is excessive additive (for oil filling effect on engine oil dynamic viscosity. Research is focused to commercially distribute automotive engine oil with viscosity class 15W–40 designed for vans. There were prepared blends of new and used engine oil without and with oil additive in specific ratio according manufacturer’s recommendations. Dynamic viscosity of blends with additive was compared with pure new and pure used engine oil. The temperature dependence dynamic viscosity of samples was evaluated by using rotary viscometer with standard spindle. Concern was that the oil additive can moves engine oil of several viscosity grades up. It is able to lead to failure in the engine. Mathematical models were used for fitting experimental values of dynamic viscosity. Exponential fit function was selected, which was very accurate because the coefficient of determination R2 achieved high values (0.98–0.99. These models are able to predict viscosity behaviour blends of engine oil and additive.

  16. Comparative evaluation of aqueous humor viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyshia; Carter, Renee; Tully, Thomas; Negulescu, Ioan; Storey, Eric

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate aqueous humor viscosity in the raptor, dog, cat, and horse, with a primary focus on the barred owl (Strix varia). Twenty-six raptors, ten dogs, three cats, and one horse. Animals were euthanized for reasons unrelated to this study. Immediately, after horizontal and vertical corneal dimensions were measured, and anterior chamber paracentesis was performed to quantify anterior chamber volume and obtain aqueous humor samples for viscosity analysis. Dynamic aqueous humor viscosity was measured using a dynamic shear rheometer (AR 1000 TA Instruments, New Castle, DE, USA) at 20 °C. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, unpaired t-tests, and Tukey's test to evaluate the mean ± standard deviation for corneal diameter, anterior chamber volume, and aqueous humor viscosity amongst groups and calculation of Spearman's coefficient for correlation analyses. The mean aqueous humor viscosity in the barred owl was 14.1 centipoise (cP) ± 9, cat 4.4 cP ± 0.2, and dog 2.9 cP ± 1.3. The aqueous humor viscosity for the horse was 1 cP. Of the animals evaluated in this study, the raptor aqueous humor was the most viscous. The aqueous humor of the barred owl is significantly more viscous than the dog (P humor viscosity of the raptor, dog, cat, and horse can be successfully determined using a dynamic shear rheometer. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  17. The extension of radiative viscosity to superfluid matter

    OpenAIRE

    Pi, Chun-Mei; Yang, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The radiative viscosity of superfluid $npe$ matter is studied, and it is found that to the lowest order of $\\delta \\mu/T$ the ratio of radiative viscosity to bulk viscosity is the same as that of the normal matter.

  18. Application and mechanism of ultrasonic static mixer in heavy oil viscosity reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chunwei; Yang, Wei; Chen, Jianbin; Sun, Xiaoping; Chen, Wenyi; An, Huiyong; Duo, Yili; Pei, Mingyuan

    2017-07-01

    In the present study, heavy oil viscosity reduction in Daqing oil field was investigated by using an ultrasonic static mixer. The influence of the ultrasonic power on the viscosity reduction rate was investigated and the optimal technological conditions were determined for the ultrasonic treatment. The mechanism for ultrasonic viscosity reduction was analyzed. The flow characteristics of heavy oil in the mixer under the effect of cavitation were investigated using numerical modeling, and energy consumptions were calculated during the ultrasonic treatment and vis-breaking processes. The experimental results indicated that the ultrasonic power made the largest impact on the viscosity reduction rate, followed by the reaction time and temperature. The highest viscosity reduction rate was 57.34%. Vacuole was migrated from the axis to the wall along the fluid, accelerating the two-phase transmission and enhancing the radial flow of the fluid, which significantly improved the ultrasonic viscosity reduction. Compared to the vis-breaking process, the energy consumption of ultrasonic treatment process was 43.03% lower when dealing with the same quality heavy oil. The optimal process conditions were found to be as follows: ultrasonic power of 1.8kW, reaction time of 45min and reaction temperature of 360°C. The dissociation of the molecules of heavy oil after ultrasonication has been checked. After being kept at room temperature 12days, some light components were produced by the cavitation cracking, so the viscosity of the residual oil could not return to that of the original residual oil, which meant that the "cage effect" was not reformed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Viscosity studies of water based magnetite nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anu, K.; Hemalatha, J. [Advanced Materials Lab, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu, India – 620015 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Magnetite nanofluids of various concentrations have been synthesized through co-precipitation method. The structural and topographical studies made with the X-Ray Diffractometer and Atomic Force Microscope are presented in this paper. The density and viscosity studies for the ferrofluids of various concentrations have been made at room temperature. The experimental viscosities are compared with theoretical values obtained from Einstein, Batchelor and Wang models. An attempt to modify the Rosensweig model is made and the modified Rosensweig equation is reported. In addition, new empirical correlation is also proposed for predicting viscosity of ferrofluid at various concentrations.

  20. Intrinsic viscosity of a suspension of cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.

    2013-11-06

    We report on the viscosity of a dilute suspension of cube-shaped particles. Irrespective of the particle size, size distribution, and surface chemistry, we find empirically that cubes manifest an intrinsic viscosity [η]=3.1±0.2, which is substantially higher than the well-known value for spheres, [η]=2.5. The orientation-dependent intrinsic viscosity of cubic particles is determined theoretically using a finite-element solution of the Stokes equations. For isotropically oriented cubes, these calculations show [η]=3.1, in excellent agreement with our experimental observations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  1. Laboratory Tests for Dispersive Soil Viscosity Determining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter-Martirosyan, Z. G.; Ter-Martirosyan, A. Z.; Sobolev, E. S.

    2017-11-01

    There are several widespread methods for soil viscosity determining now. The standard shear test device and torsion test apparatus are the most commonly used installations to do that. However, the application of them has a number of disadvantages. Therefore, the specialists of Moscow State University of Civil Engineering proposed a new device to determine the disperse soil viscosity on the basis of a stabilometer with the B-type camera (viscosimeter). The paper considers the construction of a viscosimeter and the technique for determining soil viscosity inside this tool as well as some experimental verification results of its work.

  2. Bulk viscosity in holographic Lifshitz hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Kim, Bom Soo; Oz, Yaron

    2014-01-01

    We compute the bulk viscosity in holographic models dual to theories with Lifshitz scaling and/or hyperscaling violation, using a generalization of the bulk viscosity formula derived in arXiv:1103.1657 from the null focusing equation. We find that only a class of models with massive vector fields are truly Lifshitz scale invariant, and have a vanishing bulk viscosity. For other holographic models with scalars and/or massless vector fields we find a universal formula in terms of the dynamical exponent and the hyperscaling violation exponent

  3. Ultrasound rays in droplets: The role of viscosity and caustics in acoustic streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    When an acoustic wave propagates through a viscous fluid, it progressively transfers momentum to the fluid through viscous dissipation, which results in the formation of a steady vortical flow called acoustic streaming. Although spawned by viscous effects, the magnitude of the streaming does...... not depend on the viscosity in most simple geometries. However, viscosity has a profound influence on the acoustic streaming as demonstrated by Riaud et al. (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 821, 2017, pp. 384-420) in their study of sessile mm-sized water-glycerol droplets placed on a piezoelectric substrate with a 20......-MHz ultrasound surface acoustic wave propagating along its surface. A detailed experimental and numerical analysis reveals that streaming dynamics is driven by a few ultrasound ray caustics inside the droplet....

  4. Impact of biofluid viscosity on size and sedimentation efficiency of the isolated microvesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Microvesicles are nano-sized lipid vesicles released by all cells in vivo and in vitro. They are released physiologically under normal conditions but their rate of release is higher under pathological conditions such as tumors. Once released they end up in the systemic circulation and have been found and characterized in all biofluids such as plasma, serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, breast milk, ascites, and urine. Microvesicles represent the status of the donor cell they are released from and they are currently under intense investigation as a potential source for disease biomarkers. Currently, the gold standard for isolating microvesicles is ultracentrifugation, although alternative techniques such as affinity purification have been explored. Viscosity is the resistance of a fluid to a deforming force by either shear or tensile stress. The different chemical and molecular compositions of biofluids have an effect on its viscosity and this could affect movements of the particles inside the fluid. In this manuscript we addressed the issue of whether viscosity has an effect on sedimentation efficiency of microvesicles using ultracentrifugation. We used different biofluids and spiked them with polystyrene beads and assessed their recovery using the Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis. We demonstrate that MVs recovery inversely correlates with viscosity and as a result, sample dilutions should be considered prior to ultracentifugation when processing any biofluids.

  5. Gyro-viscosity and linear dispersion relations in pair-ion magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, M. [Faculty of Policy Studies, Chuo University, Tokyo 192-0393 (Japan); Vranjes, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife E38205 (Spain); Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad de La Laguna, Tenerife E38205 (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    A fluid theory has been developed by taking account of gyro-viscosity to study wave propagation characteristics in a homogeneous pair-ion magnetized plasma with a cylindrical symmetry. The exact dispersion relations derived by the Hankel-Fourier transformation are shown comparable with those observed in the experiment by Oohara and co-workers. The gyro-viscosity is responsible for the change in propagation characteristics of the ion cyclotron wave from forward to backward by suppressing the effect of the thermal pressure which normally causes the forward nature of dispersion. Although the experiment has been already explained by a kinetic theory by the present authors, the kinetic derivations are so involved because of exact particle orbits in phase space, finite Lamor radius effects, and higher order ion cyclotron resonances. The present fluid theory provides a simple and transparent structure to the dispersion relations since the gyro-viscosity is renormalized into the ion cyclotron frequency which itself indicates the backward nature of dispersion. The usual disadvantage of a fluid theory, which treats only fundamental modes of eigen-waves excited in a system and is not able to describe higher harmonics that a kinetic theory does, is compensated by simple derivations and clear picture based on the renormalization of the gyro-viscosity.

  6. Absorption fluids data survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macriss, R. A.; Zawacki, T. S.

    Development of improved data for the thermodynamic, transport and physical properties of absorption fluids were studied. A specific objective of this phase of the study is to compile, catalog and coarse screen the available US data of known absorption fluid systems and publish it as a first edition document to be distributed to manufacturers, researchers and others active in absorption heat pump activities. The methodology and findings of the compilation, cataloguing and coarse screening of the available US data on absorption fluid properties and presents current status and future work on this project are summarized. Both in house file and literature searches were undertaken to obtain available US publications with pertinent physical, thermodynamic and transport properties data for absorption fluids. Cross checks of literature searches were also made, using available published bibliographies and literature review articles, to eliminate secondary sources for the data and include only original sources and manuscripts. The properties of these fluids relate to the liquid and/or vapor state, as encountered in normal operation of absorption equipment employing such fluids, and to the crystallization boundary of the liquid phase, where applicable. The actual data were systematically classified according to the type of fluid and property, as well as temperature, pressure and concentration ranges over which data were available. Data were sought for 14 different properties: Vapor-Liquid Equilibria, Crystallization Temperature, Corrosion Characteristics, Heat of Mixing, Liquid-Phase-Densities, Vapor-Liquid-Phase Enthalpies, Specific Heat, Stability, Viscosity, Mass Transfer Rate, Heat Transfer Rate, Thermal Conductivity, Flammability, and Toxicity.

  7. Materials for ER Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodworth, Robert; Wendt, Eckhard

    Recent improvements in the physical understanding of ER fluids have led to the rational design of new ER materials with improved properties. This paper gives an overview of several recent developments in the formulation of ER fluids, concentrating on new particulate phases for ER dispersions. Examples of homogeneous ER fluids are also discussed. The trend leading to designed ER dispersions is demonstrated by a new class of electrorheological fluids based on non-aqueous polyurethane dispersions. The fluids exhibit an attractive combination of properties: low viscosity, high ER effect, and low conductivity. The dispersed phase consists of a specially developed polyurethane elastomer which solvates and stabilizes metal salts. The polymer network density influences the mobility of the dissolved ions, allowing a surprising degree of control over the ER effect. Properties such as the field strength dependence of the ER-effect, switching response, and conductivity of these fluids correlate directly with changes in the polymer structure. Electrorheological measurements in a couette viscometer (shear-mode) and in a model shock absorber (flow-mode) using a commercial polyurethane-based fluid show that the ER effect is also dependent upon the shearing geometry.

  8. A Magnetorheological Fluid Damper for Rotor Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Forte, P.; Paternò, M.; Rustighi, E.

    2004-01-01

    Even though we are still far from industrial applications, in the last decade there has been increasing attention directed toward the employment of electrorheological (ER) and magnetorheological (MR) fluids in active bearings and active squeeze film dampers in rotordynamics. MR fluids react to magnetic fields undergoing reversible changes in their mechanical characteristics, viscosity, and stiffness in particular. In previous literature, some applications of ER fluids in rotor squeeze film da...

  9. Leidenfrost Vapor Layers Reduce Drag without the Crisis in High Viscosity Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Berry, Joseph D.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2016-09-01

    The drag coefficient CD of a solid smooth sphere moving in a fluid is known to be only a function of the Reynolds number Re and diminishes rapidly at the drag crisis around Re ˜3 ×1 05 . A Leidenfrost vapor layer on a hot sphere surface can trigger the onset of the drag crisis at a lower Re. By using a range of high viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids, we show that the drag reduction effect can occur over a wide range of Re, from as low as ˜600 to 1 05. The Navier slip model with a viscosity dependent slip length can fit the observed drag reduction and wake shape.

  10. Second coefficient of viscosity in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Zheng, Zhonquan

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic attenuation measurements in air were analyzed in order to estimate the second coefficient of viscosity. Data over a temperature range of 11 C to 50 C and at relative humidities between 6 percent and 91 percent were used. This analysis showed that the second coefficient of viscosity varied between 1900 and 20,000 times larger than the dynamic or first coefficient of viscosity over the temperature and humidity range of the data. In addition, the data showed that the molecular relaxation effects, which are responsible for the magnitude of the second coefficient of viscosity, place severe limits on the use of time-independent, thermodynamic equations of state. Compressible flows containing large streamwise velocity gradients, like shock waves, which cause significant changes in particle properties to occur during time intervals shorter than hundredths of seconds, must be modeled using dynamic equations of state. The dynamic model approach is described briefly.

  11. Effect of pore fluid on the cyclic behavior of laterally loaded offshore piles modelled in centrifuge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askarinejad, A.; Philia Boru Sitanggang, Anggi; Schenkeveld, Ferry; Lee, W.; Lee, J-S.; Kim, H-K.; kim, D-S.

    The common practice in centrifuge modelling of dynamic processes is to use high-viscosity pore fluids to unify the time scaling factors for the generation and dissipation of pore pressures. This paper focuses on the effects of the density and viscosity of the pore fluid on the behaviour of an

  12. Physics of Nontraditional Electrorheological and Magnetorheological Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, G. Q.; Tao, R.

    Nontraditional electrorheology (ER) and magnetorheology (MR) are new areas. It started with high demands, such as reducing the viscosity of crude oil and suppressing turbulence to improve crude oil flow in pipelines. Normally, these two goals conflict each other. When the viscosity is reduced, Reynolds number goes up, and the turbulence would get worse. The non-traditional ER and MR have provided unconventional technologies to solve such issues. Different from traditional ER and MR, where the strong electric field or magnetic field is applied in the direction perpendicular to the flow or shearing, the fluid can even be solidified as the viscosity increases dramatically. In nontraditional ER and MR, the electric field or magnetic field is applied in the direction parallel to the flow, the particles are aggregated into short chains along the flow direction by the field, and the fluid viscosity becomes anisotropic. Along the flow direction, the viscosity is reduced, while in the directions perpendicular to the flow, the viscosity is dramatically increased. Thus the turbulence is suppressed; the flow becomes laminar and is further improved by the reduced viscosity along the flow direction. The original conflicted two goals can now be accomplished simultaneously. The new physics began to produce big impacts on energy, food industry, and medical science.

  13. A Simple BODIPY-Based Viscosity Probe for Imaging of Cellular Viscosity in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Gao, Nengyue; Xu, Qing-Hua; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-08-31

    Intracellular viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we developed a simple boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based probe, BTV, for cellular mitochondria viscosity imaging by coupling a simple BODIPY rotor with a mitochondria-targeting unit. The BTV exhibited a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement of more than 100-fold as the solvent viscosity increased. Also, the probe showed a direct linear relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and the media viscosity, which makes it possible to trace the change of the medium viscosity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that BTV could achieve practical applicability in the monitoring of mitochondrial viscosity changes in live cells through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

  14. STUDY OF THE VISCOSITY OF PROTEIN SOLUTIONS THROUGH THE RAPID VISCOSITY ANALYZER (RVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura P. Alves

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine viscosity curves prepared from whey protein concentrates (WPCs by the rapid viscosity analyzer (RVA and determine the optimal heat treatment time in order to obtain the maximum viscosity solutions at this stage. The WPCs produced from whey samples initially subjected to thermal treatment and microfiltration presented composition compatible with the international standards, with a significant difference (p<0.05 for fat concentration. Viscographic profiles indicated that WPCs produced from microfiltered whey had higher viscosities than those subjected to heat treatment. In addition, 10 min was determined to be the optimal length of time for heat treatment in order to maximise WPCs viscosity. These results indicate that WPC production can be designed for different food applications. Finally, a rapid viscosity analyzer was demonstrated to be an appropriate tool to study the application of whey proteins in food systems.

  15. Viscosity properties of sodium borophosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaylord, S.; Tincher, B.; Petit, L.; Richardson, K.

    2009-01-01

    The viscosity behavior of (1 - x)NaPO 3 -xNa 2 B 4 O 7 glasses (x = 0.05-0.20) have been measured as a function of temperature using beam-bending and parallel-plate viscometry. The viscosity was found to shift to higher temperatures with increasing sodium borate content. The kinetic fragility parameter, m, estimated from the viscosity curve, decreases from 52 to 33 when x increases from 0.05 to 0.20 indicating that the glass network transforms from fragile to strong with the addition of Na 2 B 4 O 7 . The decrease in fragility with increasing x is due to the progressive depolymerization of the phosphate network by the preferred four-coordinated boron atoms present in the low alkali borate glasses. As confirmed by Raman spectroscopy increasing alkali borate leads to enhanced B-O-P linkages realized with the accompanying transition from solely four-coordinated boron (in BO 4 units) to mixed BO 4 /BO 3 structures. The glass viscosity characteristics of the investigated glasses were compared to those of P-SF67 and N-FK5 commercial glasses from SCHOTT. We showed that the dependence of the viscosity of P-SF67 was similar to the investigated glasses due to similar phosphate network organization confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, whereas N-FK5 exhibited a very different viscosity curve and fragility parameter due to its highly coordinated silicate network

  16. Surface/Fluid Interactions in Micro and Nano-Channels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meinhart, Carl D

    2007-01-01

    ...-channels can create slip flow whereby the no-slip boundary condition may not be valid. The slip flow may be a result of a low-viscosity nanoscale gaseous layer forming between the fluid and the microchannel surface...

  17. Options for refractive index and viscosity matching to study variable density flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Simon A.; Guillemain, Anaïs; McCleney, Amy B.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2018-02-01

    Variable density flows are often studied by mixing two miscible aqueous solutions of different densities. To perform optical diagnostics in such environments, the refractive index of the fluids must be matched, which can be achieved by carefully choosing the two solutes and the concentration of the solutions. To separate the effects of buoyancy forces and viscosity variations, it is desirable to match the viscosity of the two solutions in addition to their refractive index. In this manuscript, several pairs of index matched fluids are compared in terms of viscosity matching, monetary cost, and practical use. Two fluid pairs are studied in detail, with two aqueous solutions (binary solutions of water and a salt or alcohol) mixed into a ternary solution. In each case: an aqueous solution of isopropanol mixed with an aqueous solution of sodium chloride (NaCl) and an aqueous solution of glycerol mixed with an aqueous solution of sodium sulfate (Na_2SO_4). The first fluid pair allows reaching high-density differences at low cost, but brings a large difference in dynamic viscosity. The second allows matching dynamic viscosity and refractive index simultaneously, at reasonable cost. For each of these four solutes, the density, kinematic viscosity, and refractive index are measured versus concentration and temperature, as well as wavelength for the refractive index. To investigate non-linear effects when two index-matched, binary solutions are mixed, the ternary solutions formed are also analyzed. Results show that density and refractive index follow a linear variation with concentration. However, the viscosity of the isopropanol and NaCl pair deviates from the linear law and has to be considered. Empirical correlations and their coefficients are given to create index-matched fluids at a chosen temperature and wavelength. Finally, the effectiveness of the refractive index matching is illustrated with particle image velocimetry measurements performed for a buoyant jet in a

  18. Inference of viscosity jump at 670 km depth and lower mantle viscosity structure from GIA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Masao; Okuno, Jun'ichi; Irie, Yoshiya

    2018-03-01

    A viscosity model with an exponential profile described by temperature (T) and pressure (P) distributions and constant activation energy (E_{{{um}}}^{{*}} for the upper mantle and E_{{{lm}}}^* for the lower mantle) and volume (V_{{{um}}}^{{*}} and V_{{{lm}}}^*) is employed in inferring the viscosity structure of the Earth's mantle from observations of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). We first construct standard viscosity models with an average upper-mantle viscosity ({\\bar{η }_{{{um}}}}) of 2 × 1020 Pa s, a typical value for the oceanic upper-mantle viscosity, satisfying the observationally derived three GIA-related observables, GIA-induced rate of change of the degree-two zonal harmonic of the geopotential, {\\dot{J}_2}, and differential relative sea level (RSL) changes for the Last Glacial Maximum sea levels at Barbados and Bonaparte Gulf in Australia and for RSL changes at 6 kyr BP for Karumba and Halifax Bay in Australia. Standard viscosity models inferred from three GIA-related observables are characterized by a viscosity of ˜1023 Pa s in the deep mantle for an assumed viscosity at 670 km depth, ηlm(670), of (1 - 50) × 1021 Pa s. Postglacial RSL changes at Southport, Bermuda and Everglades in the intermediate region of the North American ice sheet, largely dependent on its gross melting history, have a crucial potential for inference of a viscosity jump at 670 km depth. The analyses of these RSL changes based on the viscosity models with {\\bar{η }_{{{um}}}} ≥ 2 × 1020 Pa s and lower-mantle viscosity structures for the standard models yield permissible {\\bar{η }_{{{um}}}} and ηlm (670) values, although there is a trade-off between the viscosity and ice history models. Our preferred {\\bar{η }_{{{um}}}} and ηlm (670) values are ˜(7 - 9) × 1020 and ˜1022 Pa s, respectively, and the {\\bar{η }_{{{um}}}} is higher than that for the typical value of oceanic upper mantle, which may reflect a moderate laterally heterogeneous upper

  19. Hydrodynamic instability of compressible fluid in porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argal, Shraddha; Tiwari, Anita; Sharma, P K; Prajapati, R P

    2014-01-01

    The hydrodynamic Rayleigh -Taylor instability of two superposed compressible fluids in porous medium has been studied. The dispersion relation is derived for such a medium by using normal mode analysis. The RT instability is discussed for various simplified configuration. The effect of porosity and dynamic viscosity has been analyzed and it is observed that porosity and dynamic viscosity have stabilizing effect on the Rayleigh- Taylor instability of compressible fluids.

  20. Dynamics of high viscosity contrast confluent microfluidic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdzinski, Michael E; Gol, Berrak; Hee, Aaron Co; Thurgood, Peter; Zhu, Jiu Yang; Petersen, Phred; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2017-07-19

    The laminar nature of microfluidic flows is most elegantly demonstrated via the confluence of two fluids forming two stable parallel flows within a single channel meeting at a highly stable interface. However, maintenance of laminar conditions can become complicated when there is a large viscosity contrast between the neighbouring flows leading to unique instability patterns along their interface. Here, we study the dynamics of high viscosity contrast confluent flows - specifically a core flow made of highly viscous glycerol confined by sheath flows made of water within a microfluidic flow focusing system. Our experiments indicate the formation of tapered core structures along the middle of the channel. Increasing the sheath flow rate shortens the tapered core, and importantly induces local instability patterns along the interface of core-sheath flows. The dynamics of such tapered core structures is governed by the intensity of instability patterns and the length of the core, according to which the core structure can experience stable, disturbed, broken or oscillated regimes. We have studied the dynamics of tapered core structures under these regimes. In particular, we have analysed the amplitude and frequency of core displacements during the broken core and oscillating core regimes, which have not been investigated before.

  1. Entropy production and effective viscosity in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Yu.B. [National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Soldatov, A.A. [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The entropy production and an effective viscosity in central Au+Au collisions are estimated in a wide range of incident energies 3.3 GeV ≤ √(s{sub NN}) ≤ 39 GeV. The simulations are performed within a three-fluid model employing three different equations of state with and without deconfinement transition, which are equally good in the reproduction of the momentum-integrated elliptic flow of charged particles in the considered energy range. It is found that more than 80% entropy is produced during a short early collision stage which lasts ∝ 1 fm/c at the highest considered energies √(s{sub NN}) >or similar 20 GeV. The estimated values of the viscosity-to-entropy ratio (η/s) are approximately the same in all considered scenarios. At the final stages of the system expansion they range from ∝ 0.05 at the highest considered energies to ∝ 0.5 at the lowest ones. It is found that the η/s ratio decreases with the temperature (T) rise, approximately as ∝ 1/T{sup 4}, and exhibits a rather weak dependence on the net-baryon density. (orig.)

  2. Human sperm swimming in a high viscosity mucus analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Kenta; Gadêlha, Hermes; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Smith, David J; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson

    2018-02-17

    Remarkably, mammalian sperm maintain a substantive proportion of their progressive swimming speed within highly viscous fluids, including those of the female reproductive tract. Here, we analyse the digital microscopy of a human sperm swimming in a highly viscous, weakly elastic mucus analogue. We exploit principal component analysis to simplify its flagellar beat pattern, from which boundary element calculations are used to determine the time-dependent flow field around the sperm cell. The sperm flow field is further approximated in terms of regularized point forces, and estimates of the mechanical power consumption are determined, for comparison with analogous low viscosity media studies. This highlights extensive differences in the structure of the flows surrounding human sperm in different media, indicating how the cell-cell and cell-boundary hydrodynamic interactions significantly differ with the physical microenvironment. The regularized point force decomposition also provides cell-level information that may ultimately be incorporated into sperm population models. We further observe indications that the core feature in explaining the effectiveness of sperm swimming in high viscosity media is the loss of cell yawing, which is related with a greater density of regularized point force singularities along the axis of symmetry of the flagellar beat to represent the flow field. In turn this implicates a reduction of the wavelength of the distal beat pattern - and hence dynamical wavelength selection of the flagellar beat - as the dominant feature governing the effectiveness of sperm swimming in highly viscous media. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Entropy viscosity method applied to Euler equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delchini, M. O.; Ragusa, J. C.; Berry, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    The entropy viscosity method [4] has been successfully applied to hyperbolic systems of equations such as Burgers equation and Euler equations. The method consists in adding dissipative terms to the governing equations, where a viscosity coefficient modulates the amount of dissipation. The entropy viscosity method has been applied to the 1-D Euler equations with variable area using a continuous finite element discretization in the MOOSE framework and our results show that it has the ability to efficiently smooth out oscillations and accurately resolve shocks. Two equations of state are considered: Ideal Gas and Stiffened Gas Equations Of State. Results are provided for a second-order time implicit schemes (BDF2). Some typical Riemann problems are run with the entropy viscosity method to demonstrate some of its features. Then, a 1-D convergent-divergent nozzle is considered with open boundary conditions. The correct steady-state is reached for the liquid and gas phases with a time implicit scheme. The entropy viscosity method correctly behaves in every problem run. For each test problem, results are shown for both equations of state considered here. (authors)

  4. Viscosity bound violation in holographic solids and the viscoelastic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberte, Lasma [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP),Strada Costiera 11, 34151, Trieste (Italy); Baggioli, Matteo [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE),The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST),Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Physics, Institute for Condensed Matter Theory, University of Illinois,1110 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Pujolàs, Oriol [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE),The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST),Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-07-14

    We argue that the Kovtun-Son-Starinets (KSS) lower bound on the viscosity to entropy density ratio holds in fluid systems but is violated in solid materials with a non-zero shear elastic modulus. We construct explicit examples of this by applying the standard gauge/gravity duality methods to massive gravity and show that the KSS bound is clearly violated in black brane solutions whenever the massive gravity theories are of solid type. We argue that the physical reason for the bound violation relies on the viscoelastic nature of the mechanical response in these materials. We speculate on whether any real-world materials can violate the bound and discuss a possible generalization of the bound that involves the ratio of the shear elastic modulus to the pressure.

  5. Viscosity bound for anisotropic superfluids in higher derivative gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Arpan; Roychowdhury, Dibakar [Centre for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,C.V. Raman Avenue, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-03-11

    In the present paper, based on the principles of gauge/gravity duality we analytically compute the shear viscosity to entropy (η/s) ratio corresponding to the super fluid phase in Einstein Gauss-Bonnet gravity. From our analysis we note that the ratio indeed receives a finite temperature correction below certain critical temperature (T

  6. A Preliminary Study Of The Effect Of Some Pressurising Gasses On The Viscosity Of Dimethyl Ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    -micro glass viscometers, size 25, submerged completely in a constant temperature bath. A kinematic viscosity of 0,188 cSt  0,001 cSt @ 25 C, was found, consistent with the previous and initial result 0,186 cSt   0,002 cSt. Key words: Dimethyl Ether (DME), a clean substitute for diesel oil. DME viscosity......, of glass, has been used. No significant change of the efflux time was found for all the pressurising gasses, except for the gas CO2. A reduction of efflux times was found for the CO2 of about 9 %   0,6 %. The measurement accuracy for all these series was found for this very low viscosity fluid...... to be in the range 0,2 % up to more than 1 %. The previously reported viscosity of DME has been corrected for the surface tension effect. Viscosity determination was initially based on a direct comparison of efflux times of DME with efflux times of distilled water. Assuming an upper limit for the variation...

  7. Simultaneous viscosity and density measurement of small volumes of liquids using a vibrating microcantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payam, A F; Trewby, W; Voïtchovsky, K

    2017-05-02

    Many industrial and technological applications require precise determination of the viscosity and density of liquids. Such measurements can be time consuming and often require sampling substantial amounts of the liquid. These problems can partly be overcome with the use of microcantilevers but most existing methods depend on the specific geometry and properties of the cantilever, which renders simple, accurate measurement difficult. Here we present a new approach able to simultaneously quantify both the density and the viscosity of microliters of liquids. The method, based solely on the measurement of two characteristic frequencies of an immersed microcantilever, is completely independent of the choice of a cantilever. We derive analytical expressions for the liquid's density and viscosity and validate our approach with several simple liquids and different cantilevers. Application of our model to non-Newtonian fluids shows that the calculated viscosities are remarkably robust when compared to measurements obtained from a standard rheometer. However, the results become increasingly dependent on the cantilever geometry as the frequency-dependent nature of the liquid's viscosity becomes more significant.

  8. On the self-preservation of turbulent jet flows with variable viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaila, Luminita; Gauding, Michael; Varea, Emilien; Turbulence; mixing Team

    2017-11-01

    The concept of self-preservation has played an important role in shaping the understanding of turbulent flows. The assumption of complete self-preservation imposes certain constrains on the dynamics of the flow, allowing to express one-point or two-point statistics by choosing an appropriate unique length scale. Determining this length scale and its scaling is of high relevance for modeling. In this work, we study turbulent jet flows with variable viscosity from the self-preservation perspective. Turbulent flows encountered in engineering and environmental applications are often characterized by fluctuations of viscosity resulting for instance from variations of temperature or species composition. Starting from the transport equation for the moments of the mixture fraction increment, constraints for self-preservation are derived. The analysis is based on direct numerical simulations of turbulent jet flows where the viscosity between host and jet fluid differs. It is shown that fluctuations of viscosity do not affect the decay exponents of the turbulent energy or the dissipation but modify the scaling of two-point statistics in the dissipative range. Moreover, the analysis reveals that complete self-preservation in turbulent flows with variable viscosity cannot be achieved. Financial support from Labex EMC3 and FEDER is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Contrast Media Viscosity versus Osmolality in Kidney Injury: Lessons from Animal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeliger, Erdmann; Lenhard, Diana C.; Persson, Pontus B.

    2014-01-01

    Iodinated contrast media (CM) can induce acute kidney injury (AKI). CM share common iodine-related cytotoxic features but differ considerably with regard to osmolality and viscosity. Meta-analyses of clinical trials generally failed to reveal renal safety differences of modern CM with regard to these physicochemical properties. While most trials' reliance on serum creatinine as outcome measure contributes to this lack of clinical evidence, it largely relies on the nature of prospective clinical trials: effective prophylaxis by ample hydration must be employed. In everyday life, patients are often not well hydrated; here we lack clinical data. However, preclinical studies that directly measured glomerular filtration rate, intrarenal perfusion and oxygenation, and various markers of AKI have shown that the viscosity of CM is of vast importance. In the renal tubules, CM become enriched, as water is reabsorbed, but CM are not. In consequence, tubular fluid viscosity increases exponentially. This hinders glomerular filtration and tubular flow and, thereby, prolongs intrarenal retention of cytotoxic CM. Renal cells become injured, which triggers hypoperfusion and hypoxia, finally leading to AKI. Comparisons between modern CM reveal that moderately elevated osmolality has a renoprotective effect, in particular, in the dehydrated state, because it prevents excessive tubular fluid viscosity. PMID:24707482

  10. Contrast Media Viscosity versus Osmolality in Kidney Injury: Lessons from Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdmann Seeliger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodinated contrast media (CM can induce acute kidney injury (AKI. CM share common iodine-related cytotoxic features but differ considerably with regard to osmolality and viscosity. Meta-analyses of clinical trials generally failed to reveal renal safety differences of modern CM with regard to these physicochemical properties. While most trials’ reliance on serum creatinine as outcome measure contributes to this lack of clinical evidence, it largely relies on the nature of prospective clinical trials: effective prophylaxis by ample hydration must be employed. In everyday life, patients are often not well hydrated; here we lack clinical data. However, preclinical studies that directly measured glomerular filtration rate, intrarenal perfusion and oxygenation, and various markers of AKI have shown that the viscosity of CM is of vast importance. In the renal tubules, CM become enriched, as water is reabsorbed, but CM are not. In consequence, tubular fluid viscosity increases exponentially. This hinders glomerular filtration and tubular flow and, thereby, prolongs intrarenal retention of cytotoxic CM. Renal cells become injured, which triggers hypoperfusion and hypoxia, finally leading to AKI. Comparisons between modern CM reveal that moderately elevated osmolality has a renoprotective effect, in particular, in the dehydrated state, because it prevents excessive tubular fluid viscosity.

  11. The Viscosity of Organic Liquid Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Len, C. W.; Trusler, J. P. M.; Vesovic, V.; Wakeham, W. A.

    2006-01-01

    The paper reports measurements of the viscosity and density of two heavy hydrocarbon mixtures, Dutrex and Arab Light Flashed Distillate (ALFD), and of their mixtures with hydrogen. The measurements have been carried out with a vibrating-wire device over a range of temperatures from 399 to 547 K and at pressures up to 20 MPa. Measurements have also been carried out on systems in which hydrogen at different concentrations has been dissolved in the liquids. The measurements have an estimated uncertainty of ±5% for viscosity and ±2% for density and represent the first results on these prototypical heavy hydrocarbons. The results reveal that the addition of hydrogen reduces both the density and viscosity of the original hydrocarbon mixture at a particular temperature and pressure.

  12. Polyfunctional dispersants for controlling viscosity of phyllosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiko, David J.

    2006-07-25

    This invention provides phyllosilicates and polyfunctional dispersants which can be manipulated to selectively control the viscosity of phyllosilicate slurries. The polyfunctional dispersants used in the present invention, which include at least three functional groups, increase the dispersion and exfoliation of phyllosilicates in polymers and, when used in conjunction with phyllosilicate slurries, significantly reduce the viscosity of slurries having high concentrations of phyllosilicates. The functional groups of the polyfunctional dispersants are capable of associating with multivalent metal cations and low molecular weight organic polymers, which can be manipulated to substantially increase or decrease the viscosity of the slurry in a concentration dependent manner. The polyfunctional dispersants of the present invention can also impart desirable properties on the phyllosilicate dispersions including corrosion inhibition and enhanced exfoliation of the phyllosilicate platelets.

  13. Viscosity of Ga-Li liquid alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyaev, Dmitriy; Boretsky, Evgeny; Verkhorubov, Dmitriy

    2018-03-01

    The measurement of dynamic viscosity of Ga-Li liquid alloys has been performed using low-frequency vibrational viscometer at five temperatures in the range 313-353 K and four gallium-based dilute alloy compositions containing 0-1.15 at.% Li. It was found that the viscosity of the considered alloys increases with decreasing temperature and increasing lithium concentration in the above ranges. It was shown that dependence of the viscosity of Ga-Li alloys in the investigated temperature range has been described by Arrhenius equation. For this equation the activation energy of viscous flow and pre-exponential factor were calculated. This study helped to determine the conditions of the alkali metals separating process in gallam-exchange systems.

  14. Numerical analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a helical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    exchanger and analysis is done on ten helical ducts by changing the flow rates of four different fluids like water, ethanol, kerosene and Nano ... numerical study on double-pipe helical heat exchanger modeled for laminar fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics under different fluid flow .... Dynamic viscosity of fluid. Q. Heat ...

  15. Simultaneous effects of single wall carbon nanotube and effective variable viscosity for peristaltic flow through annulus having permeable walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqra Shahzadi

    Full Text Available The current article deals with the combine effects of single wall carbon nanotubes and effective viscosity for the peristaltic flow of nanofluid through annulus. The nature of the walls is assumed to be permeable. The present theoretical model can be considered as mathematical representation to the motion of conductive physiological fluids in the existence of the endoscope tube which has many biomedical applications such as drug delivery system. The outer tube has a wave of sinusoidal nature that is travelling along its walls while the inner tube is rigid and uniform. Lubrication approach is used for the considered analysis. An empirical relation for the effective variable viscosity of nanofluid is proposed here interestingly. The viscosity of nanofluid is the function of radial distance and the concentration of nanoparticles. Exact solution for the resulting system of equations is displayed for various quantities of interest. The outcomes show that the maximum velocity of SWCNT-blood nanofluid enhances for larger values of viscosity parameter. The pressure gradient in the more extensive part of the annulus is likewise found to increase as a function of variable viscosity parameter. The size of the trapped bolus is also influenced by variable viscosity parameter. The present examination also revealed that the carbon nanotubes have many applications related to biomedicine. Keywords: Variable nanofluid viscosity, SWCNT, Annulus, Permeable walls, Exact solution

  16. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  17. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, Heng [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  18. Determination of viscosity through terminal velocity: use of the drag force with a quadratic term in velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vertchenko, Lev; Vertchenko, Larissa

    2017-01-01

    A correction to the term with quadratic dependency of the velocity in the Oseen´s drag force by a dimensionless factor is proposed in order to determine the viscosity of glycerin through the measurement of the terminal velocity of spheres falling inside the fluid. This factor incorporates...... relation between these factors, the viscosity coefficient turns into a linear coefficient in the relation between the parameter that corresponds to the viscosity that would be determined if only the Stokes’ force was considered and the product of the terminal velocity by the diameter of the spheres....... The experiment with steel spheres falling inside tubes of different diameters showed values for the viscosity coefficient of glycerin compatible with the expected, for the temperature range worked. This method might be applied to Reynolds number of order of ten of the sphere’s motion, relaxing the restriction...

  19. Effects of Viscosity Variation and Surface Roughness on the Couple stress Squeeze Film Characteristics of Short Journal Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.H. Ayyappa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of the combined effects of surface roughness and viscosity variation on the couple stress squeeze film characteristics of short journal bearings is presented. The modified stochastic Reynold’s equation accounting for the viscosity variation of couple stresses fluid and randomized surface roughness structure on bearing surface is mathematically derived using the Christensen stochastic theory. It is observed that, the transverse roughness pattern improves the squeeze film characteristics whereas the bearing performance is affected due to the presence of one dimensional longitudinal surface roughness. Further, it is observed that, the effect of viscosity variation is to reduce the load carrying capacity and squeeze film time as compared to the case of constant viscosity.

  20. Viscosity-temperature correlation for crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanshool, J.; Niazi, E. [Chemical Engineering Dept., Al-Nahrain Univ., Baghdad (Iraq)

    2004-12-01

    The kinematic viscosities of crude oils were measured over a temperature range 10-50 C and at atmospheric pressure. These data were used to develop a method to predict the viscosity of crude oils, based upon API gravity, pour point and molecular weight. The proposed new correlation has been verified using data base of about twelve Middle East crude oils, showing significantly improved correlation, with an average absolute deviation of 5.3%. The correlation is also applicable to crude oils with a wide range of API gravities, pour points and molecular weights. (orig.)

  1. Gravimetric capillary method for kinematic viscosity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Jin, Wei-Qing

    1992-01-01

    A novel version of the capillary method for viscosity measurements of liquids is presented. Viscosity data can be deduced in a straightforward way from mass transfer data obtained by differential weighing during the gravity-induced flow of the liquid between two cylindrical chambers. Tests of this technique with water, carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol suggest that this arrangement provides an accuracy of about +/- 1 percent. The technique facilitates operation under sealed, isothermal conditions and, thus can readily be applied to reactive and/or high vapor pressure liquids.

  2. Entropy viscosity method for nonlinear conservation laws

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2011-05-01

    A new class of high-order numerical methods for approximating nonlinear conservation laws is described (entropy viscosity method). The novelty is that a nonlinear viscosity based on the local size of an entropy production is added to the numerical discretization at hand. This new approach does not use any flux or slope limiters, applies to equations or systems supplemented with one or more entropy inequalities and does not depend on the mesh type and polynomial approximation. Various benchmark problems are solved with finite elements, spectral elements and Fourier series to illustrate the capability of the proposed method. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  3. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, H. P., E-mail: patel.harshal2@gmail.com; Thakor, P. B., E-mail: pbthakore@rediffmail.com; Prajapati, A. V., E-mail: anand0prajapati@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Veer Narmad South Gujarat University, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India); Sonvane, Y. A., E-mail: yas@ashd.svnit.ac.in [Department of Applied Physics, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India)

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  4. An evaluation of the pressure-dependent melt viscosity of Polyphenylsulfone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, T.; Hausnerová, B.; Filip, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 3 (2014), s. 711-715 ISSN 0032-3888 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/08/1307 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0111 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : polyphenysulfone * shear viscosity * PVT behaviour Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.520, year: 2014

  5. Anisotropic universe with cosmic strings and bulk viscosity in a scalar-tensor theory of gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V. U. M.; Sree Devi Kumari, G.; Sireesha, K. V. S.

    2011-10-01

    A spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-I cosmological model is obtained in a scalar-tensor theory of gravitation proposed by Saez and Ballester (Phys. Lett. A 113:467, 1986) when the source for energy momentum tensor is a bulk viscous fluid containing one dimensional cosmic strings. Some physical and kinematical properties of the model are discussed. It is observed that the bulk viscosity has a greater role in getting an accelerated expansion of the universe in this theory.

  6. Measurement of elongational viscosity of polymer melts using SER Universal Testing Platform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filip, Petr; Švrčinová, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2012), s. 14776 ISSN 1430-6395 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/08/1307; GA ČR GA103/09/2066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : elongational viscosity * SER Universal Testing Platform * polymer melts * LDPE Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.226, year: 2012 http://www.ar.ethz.ch/TMPPDF/23074299892.48/ApplRheol_22_14776.pdf

  7. Hydrodynamic response of viscous fluids under seismic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrodynamic response of liquid-tank systems, such as reactor vessels, spent-fuel pools and liquid storage tanks have been studied extensively in the last decade (Chang et al. 1988; Ma et al. 1991). However, most of the studies are conducted with the assumption of an inviscid fluid. In recent years, the hydrodynamic response of viscous fluids has received increasing attention in high level waste storage tanks containing viscous waste material. This paper presents a numerical study on the hydrodynamic response of viscous fluids in a large 2-D fluid-tank system under seismic excitation. Hydrodynamic responses (i.e. sloshing wave height, fluid pressures, shear stress, etc.) are calculated for a fluid with various viscosities. Four fluid viscosities are considered. They are 1 cp, 120 cp, 1,000 cp and 12,000 cp (1 cp = 1.45 x 10 -7 lb-sec/in 2 ). Note that the liquid sodium of the Liquid-Metal Reactor (LMR) reactor has a viscosity of 1.38 x 10 -5 lb-sec/in 2 (about 95 cp) at an operational temperature of 900 degree F. Section 2 describes the pertinent features of the mathematical model. In Section 3, the fundamental sloshing phenomena of viscous fluid are examined. Sloshing wave height and shear stress for fluid with different viscosities are compared. The conclusions are given in Section 4

  8. Natural Convection Flow along an Isothermal Vertical Flat Plate with Temperature Dependent Viscosity and Heat Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mamun Molla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the natural convection laminar flow along an isothermal vertical flat plate immersed in a fluid with viscosity which is the exponential function of fluid temperature in presence of internal heat generation. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into a nondimensional form and the resulting nonlinear system of partial differential equations is reduced to a convenient form which are solved numerically using an efficient marching order implicit finite difference method with double sweep technique. Numerical results are presented in terms of the velocity and temperature distribution of the fluid as well as the heat transfer characteristics, namely, the wall shear stress and the local and average rate of heat transfer in terms of the local skin-friction coefficient, the local and average Nusselt number for a wide range of the viscosity-variation parameter, heat generation parameter, and the Rayleigh number. Increasing viscosity variation parameter and Rayleigh number lead to increasing the local and average Nusselt number and decreasing the wall shear stress. Wall shear stress and the rate of heat transfer decreased due to the increase of heat generation.

  9. Elasticity, viscosity, and deformation of orbital fat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Schoemaker (Ivo); P.P.W. Hoefnagel (Pepijn); T.J. Mastenbroek (Tom); C.F. Kolff (Cornelis); S. Schutte (Sander); F.C.T. van der Helm (Frans); S.J. Picken (Stephen); A.F.C. Gerritsen (Anton); P.A. Wielopolski (Piotr); H. Spekreijse (Henk); H.J. Simonsz (Huib)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE. For development of a finite element analysis model of orbital mechanics, it was necessary to determine the material properties of orbital fat and its degree of deformation in eye rotation. METHODS. Elasticity and viscosity of orbital fat of eight orbits of four calves and two

  10. Shear viscosity of an ordering latex suspension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vorst, A.M.; van der Vorst, B.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Aelmans, N.J.J.; Mellema, J.

    1997-01-01

    The shear viscosity of a latex which is ordered at rest is studied as a function of the shear rate and volume fraction. At low shear rates and for moderate to high volume fractions, the flow curves show dynamic yield behavior which disappears below a volume fraction of 8%. At high shear rates, the

  11. Ciliary Locomotion in Varying Viscosity Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, Patrick; Shoele, Kourosh

    2017-11-01

    Ciliary locomotion is a common method of transportation employed by bacteria. They must be able to move through their environment at will to seek nutrients as well as avoid dangers. While research into bacteria motility has received considerable attention, very little has been done to consider the effects of a spatially-varying viscosity environment on swimming. This presentation will discuss recent research into how bacteria can take advantage of nutrient-dependent viscosity to generate an asymmetric stress field around their body, potentially increasing free-swimming velocity. First, we analytically show that asymptotically small variations in viscosity due to nutrient concentrations can affect the free-swimming velocity of a bacteria. Then we extend our study to fully nonlinear coupling between nutrient concentration and viscosity and employ the Finite Element method to solve a system containing a convection-diffusion equation for nutrient concentration as well as Stokes flow for stress distribution on the swimmer. We will discuss how the free-swimming velocity profile changes for various nutrient Pecletnumbers and ciliary locomotion modes.

  12. surface properties of electrochemically reduced viscose rayon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    A viscose rayon based activated carbon cloth (ACC) was electrochemically reduced under a wide ... Electrochemical reduction resulted in a loss of 28% BET surface .... electrodes. As shown in. Figure 1. Schematic of the electrochemical cell used for electrochemical reduction. Figure 1, the anodes were placed at equal.

  13. Extensional viscosity of microfibrillated cellulose suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Tobias; Rigdahl, Mikael; Stading, Mats; Levenstam Bragd, Emma

    2014-02-15

    The extensional properties of micro fibrillated cellulose (MFC)-suspensions at different fibril concentrations and with different amounts of added sodium chloride were evaluated. The MFC-suspensions were obtained by diluting a stock solution consisting of 0.95 wt.% cellulose with either deionized water or sodium chloride solution, giving a series of different concentrations and sodium chloride contents. The extensional viscosities of the suspensions were measured utilizing contraction flow geometry. Here the specimens were forced through a hyperbolic nozzle and the required pressure drop over the nozzle was measured. The extensional viscosity exhibited an extensional-thinning behaviour over the extensional strain rates used. Furthermore the extensional viscosity decreased with decreasing concentration of the suspensions, in similarities with the shear properties of the specimens. For the suspensions containing sodium chloride, the extensional viscosity appeared to increase when the concentration of sodium chloride was increased. But excessive amounts of added sodium chloride promoted an agglomeration of the suspensions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  15. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  16. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, J.; Moore, J.E. Jr.; Ebadian, M.A.; Jones, W.K.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation

  17. Effect of Viscosity on Liquid Curtain Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Suszynski, Wieslaw; Francis, Lorraine; Carvalho, Marcio; Dow Chemical Company Collaboration; PUC Rio Collaboration; University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The effect of viscosity on the stability of Newtonian liquid curtains was explored by high-speed visualization. Glycerol/water solutions with viscosity ranging from 19.1 to 210 mPa.s were used as coating liquids. The experimental set-up used a slide die delivery and steel tube edge guides. The velocity along curtain at different positions was measured by tracking small particles at different flow conditions. The measurements revealed that away from edge guides, velocity is well described by free fall effect. However, close to edge guides, liquid moves slower, revealing formation of a viscous boundary layer. The size of boundary layer and velocity near edge guides are strong function of viscosity. The critical condition was determined by examining flow rate below which curtain broke. Curtain failure was initiated by growth of a hole within liquid curtain, close to edge guides. Visualization results showed that the hole forms in a circular shape then becomes elliptical as it grows faster in vertical direction compared to horizontal direction. As viscosity rises, minimum flow rate for destabilization of curtain increased, indicating connection between interaction with edge guides and curtain stability. We would like to acknowledge the financial support from the Dow Chemical Company.

  18. Viscosity: From air to hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    November 2014 physics pp. 683–693. Viscosity: From air to hot nuclei. NGUYEN DINH DANG1,2. 1RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako City,. 351-0198 Saitama, Japan. 2Institute for Nuclear Science and Technique, 179 Hoang Quoc Viet, Nghia Do,. Cau Giay Hanoi, Vietnam.

  19. Exponentially varying viscosity of magnetohydrodynamic mixed convection Eyring-Powell nanofluid flow over an inclined surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imad; Fatima, Sumreen; Malik, M. Y.; Salahuddin, T.

    2018-03-01

    This paper explores the theoretical study of the steady incompressible two dimensional MHD boundary layer flow of Eyring-Powell nanofluid over an inclined surface. The fluid is considered to be electrically conducting and the viscosity of the fluid is assumed to be varying exponentially. The governing partial differential equations (PDE's) are reduced into ordinary differential equations (ODE's) by applying similarity approach. The resulting ordinary differential equations are solved successfully by using Homotopy analysis method. The impact of pertinent parameters on velocity, concentration and temperature profiles are examined through graphs and tables. Also coefficient of skin friction, Sherwood and Nusselt numbers are illustrated in tabular and graphical form.

  20. Viscosity in strongly interacting quantum field theories from black hole physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtun, P K; Son, D T; Starinets, A O

    2005-03-25

    The ratio of shear viscosity to volume density of entropy can be used to characterize how close a given fluid is to being perfect. Using string theory methods, we show that this ratio is equal to a universal value of variant Planck's over 2pi/4pik(B) for a large class of strongly interacting quantum field theories whose dual description involves black holes in anti-de Sitter space. We provide evidence that this value may serve as a lower bound for a wide class of systems, thus suggesting that black hole horizons are dual to the most ideal fluids.

  1. Experimental Evidence of Volcanic Earthquakes Induced by Different Fluid Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, J. A.; Adam, L.; Sarout, J.; van Wijk, K.; Dautriat, J. D.; Kennedy, B.

    2017-12-01

    Low Frequency volcanic seismicity has long been associated with resonance in fluid-filled cracks or conduits driven by pressure perturbations at depth. In volcano monitoring, fluid movement, fracturing and the conduit geometry are interpreted based on field observations, laboratory experiments, and numerical models. Fluids in a volcanic environment include gasses, brine and magmas with different viscosities. Magma viscosity is a key influence on eruptive behaviour. For example, increasing magma viscosity is known to favour explosive eruptions. How different fluids affect volcano seismicity is not well understood. Here, we explore the effects of fluid type on volcano seismic signals. Frequency content in the signal, frequency of the events, source mechanism and quality factor are studied. We simulate volcano tectonic (fracturing) and volcano seismic (fluid movement) signatures in a controlled laboratory environment using a range of rock samples, fluid types and pressure conditions. The viscosity of the fluids spans six orders of magnitude, representing realistic volcanic fluids. Microseismicity is generated by venting pressurised fluids through pre-generated fracture networks in cylindrical rock core samples and detected by an array of 18 ultrasonic transducers. We fracture samples of two lithologies: 1) low porosity impermeable granite samples and 2) a permeable volcanic ash tuff sample. Permeability and porosity in the granites are due to a fracture network, while in the tuff a high porosity matrix ( 40 %) and a fracture network interact. The fluids used are nitrogen gas, water, and mixtures of water and glycerol. We generate and detect a myriad of seismic event types, some of which resemble well-known families of volcano-tectonic, low-frequency, hybrid and tremor-type seismicity. Samples with fluids of lower density and viscosity generate a higher number of seismic events. We will present an integrated analysis of the event types, frequency content, source

  2. FLUID- THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS (IBM PC VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate computation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids is a necessity for many engineering calculations. The FLUID program was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids in both the liquid and gas phases. Fluid properties are calculated using a simple gas model, empirical corrections, and an efficient numerical interpolation scheme. FLUID produces results that are in very good agreement with measured values, while being much faster than older more complex programs developed for the same purpose. A Van der Waals equation of state model is used to obtain approximate state values. These values are corrected for real-gas effects by model correction factors obtained from tables based on experimental data. These tables also accurately compensate for the special circumstances which arise whenever phase conditions occur. Viscosity and thermal conductivity values are computed directly from tables. Interpolation within tables is based on Lagrange's three point formula. A set of tables must be generated for each fluid implemented. FLUID currently contains tables for nine fluids including dry air and steam. The user can add tables for any fluid for which adequate thermal property data is available. The FLUID routine is structured so that it may easily be incorporated into engineering programs. The IBM 360 version of FLUID was developed in 1977. It is written in FORTRAN IV and has been implemented on an IBM 360 with a central memory requirement of approximately 222K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID is written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on an IBM PC with a memory requirement of 128K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID was developed in 1986.

  3. FLUID- THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS (IBM VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate computation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids is a necessity for many engineering calculations. The FLUID program was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids in both the liquid and gas phases. Fluid properties are calculated using a simple gas model, empirical corrections, and an efficient numerical interpolation scheme. FLUID produces results that are in very good agreement with measured values, while being much faster than older more complex programs developed for the same purpose. A Van der Waals equation of state model is used to obtain approximate state values. These values are corrected for real-gas effects by model correction factors obtained from tables based on experimental data. These tables also accurately compensate for the special circumstances which arise whenever phase conditions occur. Viscosity and thermal conductivity values are computed directly from tables. Interpolation within tables is based on Lagrange's three point formula. A set of tables must be generated for each fluid implemented. FLUID currently contains tables for nine fluids including dry air and steam. The user can add tables for any fluid for which adequate thermal property data is available. The FLUID routine is structured so that it may easily be incorporated into engineering programs. The IBM 360 version of FLUID was developed in 1977. It is written in FORTRAN IV and has been implemented on an IBM 360 with a central memory requirement of approximately 222K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID is written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on an IBM PC with a memory requirement of 128K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID was developed in 1986.

  4. Critical exponent for the viscosity of carbon dioxide and xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, R. F.; Moldover, M. R.

    1990-01-01

    The viscosities of carbon dioxide and xenon have been measured near their critical points and the critical exponent y characterizing the asymptotic divergence has been determined. Both fluids yielded exponents in the range y = 0.041 + or - 0.001 and thus also fell in the range y = 0.042 + or - 0.002 from an earlier study of four binary liquids. This agreement between experiments is the first evidence that pure fluids and binary liquids are in the same dynamic universality class. A recent theoretical value for y is 0.032. The 30 percent discrepancy is much greater than the combined errors from experiment and theory. The torsion oscillator viscometer operated at low frequency and low shear rate to avoid systematic errors caused by critical slowing down. Far from T(c) the analysis accounted for the crossover from critical to noncritical temperature dependence, where the latter was obtained from previously published correlations. Corrections for gravitational stratification were included close to T(c).

  5. A method for matching the refractive index and kinematic viscosity of a blood analog for flow visualization in hydraulic cardiovascular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T T; Biadillah, Y; Mongrain, R; Brunette, J; Tardif, J C; Bertrand, O F

    2004-08-01

    In this work, we propose a simple method to simultaneously match the refractive index and kinematic viscosity of a circulating blood analog in hydraulic models for optical flow measurement techniques (PIV, PMFV, LDA, and LIF). The method is based on the determination of the volumetric proportions and temperature at which two transparent miscible liquids should be mixed to reproduce the targeted fluid characteristics. The temperature dependence models are a linear relation for the refractive index and an Arrhenius relation for the dynamic viscosity of each liquid. Then the dynamic viscosity of the mixture is represented with a Grunberg-Nissan model of type 1. Experimental tests for acrylic and blood viscosity were found to be in very good agreement with the targeted values (measured refractive index of 1.486 and kinematic viscosity of 3.454 milli-m2/s with targeted values of 1.47 and 3.300 milli-m2/s).

  6. High-throughput viscosity measurement using capillary electrophoresis instrumentation and its application to protein formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmendinger, Andrea; Dieu, Le-Ha; Fischer, Stefan; Mueller, Robert; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Huwyler, Jörg

    2014-10-01

    Viscosity characterization of protein formulations is of utmost importance for the development of subcutaneously administered formulations. However, viscosity determinations are time-consuming and require large sample volumes in the range of hundreds of microliters to a few milliliters, depending on the method used. In this article, an automated, high-throughput method is described to determine dynamic viscosity of Newtonian fluids using standard capillary electrophoresis (CE) equipment. CE is an analytical method routinely used for the separation and characterization of proteins. In our set-up, the capillary is filled with the test sample, and a constant pressure is applied. A small aliquot of riboflavin is subsequently loaded into the capillary and used as a dye to monitor movement of protein samples. Migration time of the riboflavin peak moving through the filled capillary is converted to the viscosity by applying the Hagen-Poiseuille's law. The instrument is operated without using an electrical field. Repeatability, robustness, linearity, and reproducibility were demonstrated for different capillary lots and instruments, as well as for different capillary lengths and diameters. Accuracy was verified by comparing the viscosity data obtained by CE instrumentation with those obtained by plate/cone rheometry. The suitability of the method for protein formulations was demonstrated, and limitations were discussed. Typical viscosities in the range of 5-40mPas were reliably measured with this method. Advantages of the CE instrumentation-based method included short measurement times (1-15min), small sample volumes (few microliters) for a capillary with a diameter of 50μm and a length of 20.5cm as well as potential to be suitable for high-throughput measurements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of Maximum Bubble Pressure Method for Surface Tension Measurement of High Viscosity Molten Silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Osamu; Iwamoto, Hirone; Sakashita, Ryota; Iseki, Chiaki; Zhu, Hongmin

    2017-07-01

    A surface tension measurement method based on the maximum bubble pressure (MBP) method was developed in order to precisely determine the surface tension of molten silicates in this study. Specifically, the influence of viscosity on surface tension measurements was quantified, and the criteria for accurate measurement were investigated. It was found that the MBP apparently increased with an increase in viscosity. This was because extra pressure was required for the flowing liquid inside the capillary due to viscous resistance. It was also expected that the extra pressure would decrease by decreasing the fluid velocity. For silicone oil with a viscosity of 1000 \\hbox {mPa}{\\cdot }\\hbox {s}, the error on the MBP could be decreased to +1.7 % by increasing the bubble detachment time to 300 \\hbox {s}. However, the error was still over 1 % even when the bubble detachment time was increased to 600 \\hbox {s}. Therefore, a true value of the MBP was determined by using a curve-fitting technique with a simple relaxation function, and that was succeeded for silicone oil at 1000 \\hbox {mPa}{\\cdot } \\hbox {s} of viscosity. Furthermore, for silicone oil with a viscosity as high as 10 000 \\hbox {mPa}{\\cdot }\\hbox {s}, the apparent MBP approached a true value by interrupting the gas introduction during the pressure rising period and by re-introducing the gas at a slow flow rate. Based on the fundamental investigation at room temperature, the surface tension of the \\hbox {SiO}2-40 \\hbox {mol}%\\hbox {Na}2\\hbox {O} and \\hbox {SiO}2-50 \\hbox {mol}%\\hbox {Na}2\\hbox {O} melts was determined at a high temperature. The obtained value was slightly lower than the literature values, which might be due to the influence of viscosity on surface tension measurements being removed in this study.

  8. The fluid dynamics of human birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Andrea; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2012-11-01

    This study investigates the fluid dynamics associated with the human birth process. Specifically, we investigate the role of the viscosity of the amniotic fluid in transferring force from the contracting uterus to the fetus during delivery. This experimental work uses an approximate uterus and dilated cervix-fabricated with liquid latex-filled with a fluid of known viscosity and an oblong solid fetus. The force required to extract the fetus is recorded for several values of amniotic viscosity. The study looks at both pull-out force values (where the fetus is pulled from outside the uterus) and push-out force values (where pressure in the experimental uterus is used to remove the fetus). In addition to the viscosity study, we also investigate the increased force required to deliver an offset fetus by tilting the major axis of the oblong fetus and repeating the pull-and push-out experiments. This study will provide knowledge about the fundamental fluid dynamic processes involved in human birth.

  9. Dynamic fluid loss characteristics of foam fracturing fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, P.C.

    1982-09-01

    Dynamic fluid loss measurements were conducted on core samples ranging in permeability between 0.02 to 140 md. These tests were run to measure the effect of several parameters on the foam fluid loss coefficients. The parameters tested were: core permeability, gel concentration in the liquid phase, foam quality, temperature, core length and differential test pressure. The type of foam that is used in most conventional fracturing treatments is a wall building fluid. Although this foam has excellent inherent fluid loss properties, the fluid loss values reported in this paper more closely resemble those of conventional fracturing fluids than reported earlier. These values have been used in the successful design of field fracturing treatments. These data support the mechanism of two phase flow in porous media suggested by Holm. The fluid passing through the cores was rich in liquid phase with composition proportional to the viscosity of the liquid phase. The broad range of fluid loss coefficients for foam calculated in these tests are intermediate in value to those reported in similar tests by Blauer and Kohlhaas, who obtained lower values, and King, who obtained higher values.

  10. Effects of viscosity on cerebral blood flow after cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschops, L.L.A.; Pop, G.A.M.; Teerenstra, S.; Struijk, P.C.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine blood viscosity in adult comatose patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and to assess the relation between blood viscosity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral oxygen extraction. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Tertiary care university

  11. Fluid dynamics of the sliding plate | Makinde | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fluid with viscosity which depends on temperature and concentration is placed between two infinite parallel plates moving relative to each other with constant velocity. On the basis of certain simplifying assumptions, the fluid equations of continuity, momentum, energy and concentration are obtained and solved analytically ...

  12. Fluid mechanics a concise introduction to the theory

    CERN Document Server

    Yih, Chia-Shun

    1969-01-01

    Fundamentals ; the basic equations ; general theorems for the flow of an inviscid fluid ; irrotational flows of an inviscid fluid of constant density ; waves in an incompressible ; effects of viscosity ; heat transfer and boundary layers of a gas ; hydrodynamic stability ; turbulence ; basic thermodynamics ; curvilinear coordinates.

  13. Bianchi type-I massive string magnetized barotropic perfect fluid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    by either a perfect fluid or a cosmic string in bimetric theory of gravitation. Bali and Prad- han [41] have investigated Bianchi type-III string cosmological model with time-dependent bulk viscosity. In view of the importance of Maxwell's electromagnetic field interactions with a perfect fluid or a cosmic string and there is a lot of ...

  14. Bouncy Fluid Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Navish; Jung, Sunghwan; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2012-11-01

    Contrary to intuition, free fluid jets can sometimes ``bounce'' off each other upon collision, due to an entrained air film that keeps them separated. So far, there have only been a few descriptive studies of bouncing jets, since the first recorded observation by Rayleigh more than a century ago. We present a quantitative investigation of non-coalescence in jets of same fluid upon an oblique collision. Using a simple experimental set-up, we carried out a parametric study of the bouncing jets by varying the jet diameter, velocity, angle of inclination and fluid viscosity. Our results reveal a scaling law for the contact time of bouncing jets. We further investigate the transition of colliding jets from non-coalescence to coalescence, which seems to be caused by instability of the fluid interface. A dimensionless parameter, which is a function of the Normal Weber Number, Normal Reynolds Number and the angle of inclination of the jets, quantitatively dictates the transition. Presently at Department of Physics, Danish Technical University, Denmark.

  15. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders; Almdal, Kristoffer; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2003-01-01

    Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene melts of molar masses 200 000 and 390 000 by means of a filament stretching rheometer. Total Hencky strains of about five have been obtained. The transient elongational viscosity rises...... above the linear viscoelastic prediction at intermediate strains, indicating strain hardening. The steady elongational viscosities are monotone decreasing functions of elongation rate. At elongation rates larger than the inverse reptation time, the steady elongational viscosity scales linearly...

  16. Evaluation of Relative Blood Viscosity During Menstruation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relative blood viscosity, relative plasma viscosity and hematocrit were significantly reduced (P<0.001) during menstruation compared to the values before menstruation. The mean values of relative blood viscosity, relative plasma viscosity and hematocrit were 2.52±0.07, 1.15±0.01 and 0.37±0.004L/L respectively for ...

  17. Caldera resurgence driven by magma viscosity contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetto, Federico; Acocella, Valerio; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-11-24

    Calderas are impressive volcanic depressions commonly produced by major eruptions. Equally impressive is the uplift of the caldera floor that may follow, dubbed caldera resurgence, resulting from magma accumulation and accompanied by minor eruptions. Why magma accumulates, driving resurgence instead of feeding large eruptions, is one of the least understood processes in volcanology. Here we use thermal and experimental models to define the conditions promoting resurgence. Thermal modelling suggests that a magma reservoir develops a growing transition zone with relatively low viscosity contrast with respect to any newly injected magma. Experiments show that this viscosity contrast provides a rheological barrier, impeding the propagation through dikes of the new injected magma, which stagnates and promotes resurgence. In explaining resurgence and its related features, we provide the theoretical background to account for the transition from magma eruption to accumulation, which is essential not only to develop resurgence, but also large magma reservoirs.

  18. Effect of urea formaldehyde viscosity on urea formaldehyde and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The melting point, refractive index, density and formaldehyde emission were found to increase with increase in UF viscosity while the dry time, moisture uptake and elongation at break were found to decrease with increase in viscosity. UF viscosity below 10.82 mPa.s was found to produce UF/UP copolymer composite which ...

  19. On the scaling of entropy viscosity in high order methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kornelus, Adeline; Appelö, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we outline the entropy viscosity method and discuss how the choice of scaling influences the size of viscosity for a simple shock problem. We present examples to illustrate the performance of the entropy viscosity method under two distinct scalings.

  20. Viscosity solution of linear regulator quadratic for degenerate diffusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied a linear regulator quadratic control problem for degenerate Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB equation. We showed the existence of viscosity properties and established a unique viscosity solution of the degenerate HJB equation associated with this problem by the technique of viscosity solutions.

  1. Viscoelastic gravel-pack carrier fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehmer, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of a fluid to flow adequately into the formation during gravel-pack treatments is critical to achieving a good pack. Recent studies have indicated ''fish-eyes'' and/or ''microgels'' present in many polymer gelled carrier fluids will plug pore throats, leading to impaired leakoff and causing formation damage. Intensive manipulation of the polymer gelled fluid using shear and filter devices will help remove the particles, but it adds to the cost of the treatment in terms of equipment and manpower. Excessive shear will degrade the polymer leading to poor gravel suspension, while too little shear will cause filtration problems. A gelled carried fluid using a viscoelastic surfactant system has been found to leak off very efficiently to the formation, and cause no formation damage, without the use of shear/filter devices. Viscoelastic surfactant-base gelled fluids develop viscosity because of the association of surfactant moloecules into large rod-shaped aggregates. There is no hydration of polymer involved, so fish-eyes and microgels will not be formed in the viscoelastic fluid. A surfactant-base system having a yield point allows the gravel carrying properties to be much better than fluids gelled with conventional polymer systems (hydroxyethylcellulose [HEC]). For example, a gravel carried fluid gelled with 80 lb HEC/1,000 gal has a viscosity of about 400 cp at 170 sec/sup -1/; a viscoelastic surfactant-base system having only one-half the viscosity still flows into cores about four times more efficiently than the HEC-base fluid. The rheology, leakoff, formation damage and mixing properties of a viscoelastic, surfactant-base, gravel-pack carrier fluid are discussed

  2. Elasticity, viscosity, and deformation of orbital fat

    OpenAIRE

    Schoemaker, Ivo; Hoefnagel, Pepijn; Mastenbroek, Tom; Kolff, Cornelis; Schutte, Sander; Helm, Frans; Picken, Stephen; Gerritsen, Anton; Wielopolski, Piotr; Spekreijse, Henk; Simonsz, Huib

    2006-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE. For development of a finite element analysis model of orbital mechanics, it was necessary to determine the material properties of orbital fat and its degree of deformation in eye rotation. METHODS. Elasticity and viscosity of orbital fat of eight orbits of four calves and two orbits of one rhesus monkey were measured with a parallel-plate rheometer. The degree of deformation of orbital fat was studied in two human subjects by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) through the o...

  3. A bulk viscosity driven inflationary model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waga, I.; Falcao, R.C.; Chanda, R.

    1985-01-01

    Bulk viscosity associated with the production of heavy particles during the GUT phase transition can lead to exponential or 'generalized' inflation. The condition of inflation proposed is independent of the details of the phase transition and remains unaltered in presence of a cosmological constant. Such mechanism avoids the extreme supercooling and reheating needed in the usual inflationary models. The standard baryongenesis mechanism can be maintained. (Author) [pt

  4. Viscoelastic-electromagnetism and Hall viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Hidaka, Yoshimasa; Hirono, Yuji; Kimura, Taro; Minami, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a kind of electromagnetism, which we call viscoelastic-electromagnetism, to investigate viscoelastic transport phenomena. It is shown that Cartan's formalism of general relativity is essential for viscoelastic theory, and then the corresponding electric and magnetic fields are regarded as a velocity gradient and a Burgers vector density, respectively. As an application of this formalism, the Streda formula for the Hall viscosity is obtained.

  5. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  6. Wound dressing based on nonwoven viscose fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Okeil, A; Sheta, A M; Amr, A; Ali, Marwa A

    2012-09-01

    Nonwoven viscose fabric was treated with chitosan/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) using pad-dry method, using different concentrations of chitosan and PVA. Increasing the amount of PVA leads to increasing of air permeability. Water permeability increased by increasing the amount of PVA to 2 ml (10% solution) then decreased by any increase of the quantity of PVA solution. Roughness increased with increasing the amount of 10% PVA solution. It is shown that roughness, water and air permeability increased with increasing the chitosan concentration. Antibacterial properties was increased with increasing PVA/or chitosan concentration. The chitosan/PVA treated nonwoven viscose fabric was immersed in a solution of Ag nanoparticles. The chitosan/PVA/Ag nanoparticles treated nonwoven fabrics were used as wound dressings on French white Bouscat rabbits, with age ranged from 1 to 2 years. A complete healing was achieved using wound dressing consists of nonwoven viscose fabric treated with chitosan/PVA/Ag nanoparticles after 21 days. The histopathological examination confirmed the complete re-epithelialization and averagely thick epidermis formation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Temperature Dependence of Dynamic Viscosity and DSC Analysis of the Plantohyd samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Vozarova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with physical properties – dynamic viscosity and DSC analysis of biodegradable hydraulic fluids and lubricating oils based on vegetable oils or on synthetic esters – PLANTOHYD S series (15S, 46S and PLANTOHYD N series (40N. The brief characterization of investigated material is presented. This article presents the experimental results of measuring the main rheological characteristic – dynamic viscosity of samples of Plantohyd. Measurements were made under laboratory conditions with digital viscometer DV-3P Anton Paar. Examination of the dynamic viscosity in the temperature interval from -10 °C to 50 °C was made. The exponential dependency of viscosity on the temperature for the each sample was obtained in accordance with Arrhenius equation. DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry analysis providing information on thermal effects in the sample subjected to the temperature programme was realised in the temperature range from -30 °C to 100 °C by using differential scanning calorimeter DSC 822e METTLER TOLEDO. It was determined endo/exo thermal effects and temperature interval with no thermal effects for each sample of Plantohyd.

  8. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shit, G.C., E-mail: gopal_iitkgp@yahoo.co.in; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-15

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field.

  9. Adaptation of a High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography System for the Measurement of Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art instruments for the determination of viscosity of liquids typically require a significant amount of sample, and have relatively low throughput due to manual and sequential measurements. In this study, it was demonstrated that the pressure generated by the flow of viscous fluids through a capillary could be precisely measured employing high-pressure liquid chromatography systems (HPLC using glycerol solutions of moderate viscosity as a mobile phase, and correlated to the dynamic (absolute viscosity. The parameters allowing calculation of the viscosity of glycerol calibration standards as a function of temperature were established. The measurements were made with volumes as small as 10 μL, and the use of an autosampler permitted unattended analysis of a large number samples. The method appears to be particularly well suited for the development of viscous formulations of therapeutic, protein-based macromolecules, where the amount sample is typically limited and relatively wide ranges of conditions are considered in the optimization process. The utility of the methods was illustrated by application to the development of concentrated inactivated virus vaccines.

  10. Effect of two viscosity models on lethality estimation in sterilization of liquid canned foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Alvarado, M P; Alvarado-Orozco, J M; Herrera-Hernández, E C; Martínez-González, G M; Miranda-López, R; Jiménez-Islas, H

    2016-09-01

    A numerical study on 2D natural convection in cylindrical cavities during the sterilization of liquid foods was performed. The mathematical model was established on momentum and energy balances and predicts both the heating dynamics of the slowest heating zone (SHZ) and the lethal rate achieved in homogeneous liquid canned foods. Two sophistication levels were proposed in viscosity modelling: 1) considering average viscosity and 2) using an Arrhenius-type model to include the effect of temperature on viscosity. The remaining thermodynamic properties were kept constant. The governing equations were spatially discretized via orthogonal collocation (OC) with mesh size of 25 × 25. Computational simulations were performed using proximate and thermodynamic data for carrot-orange soup, broccoli-cheddar soup, tomato puree, and cream-style corn. Flow patterns, isothermals, heating dynamics of the SHZ, and the sterilization rate achieved for the cases studied were compared for both viscosity models. The dynamics of coldest point and the lethal rate F0 in all food fluids studied were approximately equal in both cases, although the second sophistication level is closer to physical behavior. The model accuracy was compared favorably with reported sterilization time for cream-style corn packed at 303 × 406 can size, predicting 66 min versus an experimental time of 68 min at retort temperature of 121.1 ℃. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Initial value problem for Rayleigh--Taylor instability of viscous fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menikoff, R.; Mjolsness, R.C.; Sharp, D.H.; Zemach, C.; Doyle, B.J.

    1978-01-01

    The initial value problem associated with the development of small amplitude disturbances in Rayleigh--Taylor unstable, viscous, incompressible fluids is studied. Solutions to the linearized equations of motion which satisfy general initial conditions are obtained in terms of Fourier--Laplace transforms of the hydrodynamic variables, without restriction on the density or viscosity of either fluid. When the two fluids have equal kinematic viscosities, these transforms can be inverted explicitly to express the fluid variables as integrals of Green's functions multiplied by initial data. In addition to normal modes, a set of continuum modes, not treated explicitly in the literature, makes an important contribution to the development of the fluid motion

  12. Damping of a fluid-conveying pipe surrounded by a viscous annulus fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjolsing, Eric J.; Todd, Michael D.

    2017-04-01

    To further the development of a downhole vibration based energy harvester, this study explores how fluid velocity affects damping in a fluid-conveying pipe stemming from a viscous annulus fluid. A linearized equation of motion is formed which employs a hydrodynamic forcing function to model the annulus fluid. The system is solved in the frequency domain through the use of the spectral element method. The three independent variables investigated are the conveyed fluid velocity, the rotational stiffness of the boundary (using elastic springs), and the annulus fluid viscosity. It was found that, due to the hydrodynamic functions frequency-dependence, increasing the conveyed fluid velocity increases the systems damping ratio. It was also noted that stiffer systems saw the damping ratio increase at a slower rate when compared to flexible systems as the conveyed fluid velocity was increased. The results indicate that overestimating the stiffness of a system can lead to underestimated damping ratios and that this error is made worse if the produced fluid velocity or annulus fluid viscosity is underestimated. A numeric example was provided to graphically illustrate these errors. Approved for publication, LA-UR-15-28006.

  13. The forward undulatory locomotion of Ceanorhabditis elegans in viscoelastic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Amy; Ulrich, Xialing

    2013-11-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a soil dwelling roundworm that has served as model organisms for studying a multitude of biological and engineering phenomena. We study the undulatory locomotion of nematode in viscoelastic fluids with zero-shear viscosity varying from 0.03-75 Pa .s and relaxation times ranging from 0-350 s. We observe that the averaged normalized wavelength of swimming worm is essentially the same as that in Newtonian fluids. The undulatory frequency f shows the same reduction rate with respect to zero-shear viscosity in viscoelastic fluids as that found in the Newtonian fluids, meaning that the undulatory frequency is mainly controlled by the fluid viscosity. However, the moving speed Vm of the worm shows more distinct dependence on the elasticity of the fluid and exhibits a 4% drop with each 10-fold increase of the Deborah number De, a dimensionless number characterizing the elasticity of a fluid. To estimate the swimming efficiency coefficient and the ratio K =CN /CL of resistive coefficients of the worm in various viscoelastic fluids, we show that whereas it would take the worm around 7 periods to move a body length in a Newtonian fluid, it would take 27 periods to move a body length in a highly viscoelastic fluid.

  14. The role of viscosity in TATB hot spot ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Laurence E.; Zepeda-Ruis, Luis; Howard, W. Michael; Najjar, Fady; Reaugh, John E.

    2012-03-01

    The role of dissipative effects, such as viscosity, in the ignition of high explosive pores is investigated using a coupled chemical, thermal, and hydrodynamic model. Chemical reactions are tracked with the Cheetah thermochemical code coupled to the ALE3D hydrodynamic code. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the viscosity of liquid TATB. We also analyze shock wave experiments to obtain an estimate for the shock viscosity of TATB. Using the lower bound liquid-like viscosities, we find that the pore collapse is hydrodynamic in nature. Using the upper bound viscosity from shock wave experiments, we find that the pore collapse is closest to the viscous limit.

  15. The influence of magma viscosity on convection within a magma chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, M.; Driesner, T.; Ulmer, P.

    2012-12-01

    Magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits are the most important sources of metals like Cu, Mo, W and Sn and a major resource for Au. It is well accepted that they are formed by the release of magmatic fluids from a batholith-sized magma body. Traditionally, it has been assumed that crystallization-induced volatile saturation (called "second boiling") is the main mechanism for fluid release, typically operating over thousands to tens of thousands of years (Candela, 1991). From an analysis of alteration halo geometries caused by magmatic fluids, Cathles and Shannon (2007) suggested much shorter timescales in the order of hundreds of years. Such rapid release of fluids cannot be explained by second boiling as the rate of solidification scales with the slow conduction of heat away from the system. However, rapid fluid release is possible if convection is assumed within the magma chamber. The magma would degas in the upper part of the magma chamber and volatile poor magma would sink down again. Such, the rates of degassing can be much higher than due to cooling only. We developed a convection model using Navier-Stokes equations provided by the computational fluid dynamics platform OpenFOAM that gives the possibility to use externally derived meshes with complex (natural) geometries. We implemented a temperature, pressure, composition and crystal fraction dependent viscosity (Ardia et al., 2008; Giordano et al., 2008; Moore et al., 1998) and a temperature, pressure, composition dependent density (Lange1994). We found that the new viscosity and density models strongly affect convection within the magma chamber. The dependence of viscosity on crystal fraction has a particularly strong effect as the steep viscosity increase at the critical crystal fraction leads to steep decrease of convection velocity. As the magma chamber is cooling from outside to inside a purely conductive layer is developing along the edges of the magma chamber. Convection continues in the inner part of the

  16. Simulation Of The Synovial Fluid In A Deformable Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gutierrez, Nancy; Ibarra-Bracamontes, Laura A.

    2016-11-01

    The main components of a synovial joint are a cartilage and a biofluid known as the synovial fluid. The results were obtained using the FLUENT software to simulate the behavior of the synovial fluid within a deformable cavity with a simple geometry. The cartilage is represented as a porous region. By reducing the available region for the fluid, a fluid displacement into the cartilage is induced. The total pressure reached in the interface of the deformable cavity and the porous region is presented. The geometry and properties of the system are scaled to values found in a knee joint. The effect of deformation rate, fluid viscosity and properties of the porous medium on the total pressure reached are analyzed. The higher pressures are reached either for high deformation rate or when the fluid viscosity increases. This study was supported by the Mexican Council of Science and Technology (CONACyT) and by the Scientific Research Coordination of the University of Michoacan in Mexico.

  17. Electron treatment of wood pulp for the viscose process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanik, T.M.; Ewing, D.E.; Whitehouse, R.

    2000-01-01

    Electron processing is currently being evaluated by several viscose producers for integration into their process. The viscose industry converts dissolving wood pulp into products such as staple fibre, filament, cord, film, packaging, and non-edible sausage casings. These materials are used in the clothing, drapery, hygiene, automobile, food, and packaging industries. Viscose producers are facing increasingly high production costs and stringent environmental regulations that have forced some plants to close. Electron treatment of wood pulp can significantly reduce the amounts of chemicals used for producing viscose and the production of hazardous pollutants. Acsion Industries has worked with companies worldwide to demonstrate the benefits of using electron treated pulp for producing viscose (rayon). This paper describes the viscose process, the benefits of using electron treatment in the viscose process, and Acsion's efforts in developing this technology. (author)

  18. Electron treatment of wood pulp for the viscose process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanik, T.M. E-mail: stepanik@acsion.com; Ewing, D.E.; Whitehouse, R

    2000-03-01

    Electron processing is currently being evaluated by several viscose producers for integration into their process. The viscose industry converts dissolving wood pulp into products such as staple fibre, filament, cord, film, packaging, and non-edible sausage casings. These materials are used in the clothing, drapery, hygiene, automobile, food, and packaging industries. Viscose producers are facing increasingly high production costs and stringent environmental regulations that have forced some plants to close. Electron treatment of wood pulp can significantly reduce the amounts of chemicals used for producing viscose and the production of hazardous pollutants. Acsion Industries has worked with companies worldwide to demonstrate the benefits of using electron treated pulp for producing viscose (rayon). This paper describes the viscose process, the benefits of using electron treatment in the viscose process, and Acsion's efforts in developing this technology. (author)

  19. Convection Heat Transfer Modeling of Ag Nanofluid Using Different Viscosity Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bakhsh Kasaeian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In this paper, the effects of adding nanoparticles (including Ag to a fluid media for improving free convection heat transfer were analysed. The free convective heat transfer was assumed to be in laminar flow regime, and the corresponding calculations and solutions were all done by the integral method. Water, as a Newtonian fluid, was considered as the base and all relevant thermo physical properties of the nanofluids were considered to be unvarying. The calculations performed and the graphs generated showed that, in general, the addition of nanoparticles to the fluid media resulted in an increment or improvement of its heat transfer coefficient. With increase in the concentration of the nanoparticles, the heat transfer rate of the fluid also increased. The increment in heat transfer is also dependent on the nanoparticles’ thermal conductivity and the viscosity theory which was utilized in the calculations. In this study, four different theories were used to calculate the viscosities of the nanofluids. The effects of viscosity on the nanofluids’ thermal conductivity were apparent from the calculations which were performed for nanoparticle concentrations of 4% or less. ABSTRAK: Kajian ini menganalisis kesan penambahan nanopartikel Ag ke dalam media bendalir bagi tujuan pembaikkan pemindahan haba perolakan bebas. Perolakan bebas diandaikan berada di zon aliran laminar, di mana penyelesaian dan pengiraan telah dilakukan mengunakan kaedah kamilan. Air yang merupakan cecair Newtonian, dianggap sebagai asas dan sifat terma fizikal nanocecair dianggapkan tidak berubah. Mengikut pengiraan yang dilakukan dan graf yang diplotkan, umumnya penambahan nanopartikel kepada media bendalir menyebabkan peningkatan dan pengembangan pekali pemindahan haba. Kadar pemindahan haba meningkat dengan nanopartikel. Peningkatan pemindahan haba juga bergantung kepada pengalir haba nanopartikel dan teori kelikatan yang digunakan. Di dalam kajian ini, empat

  20. Substitute fluid examinations for liquid manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrader Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the farming industry it is essential to use liquid manure as natural fertilizer. Through new agricultural regulation 2015 in Germany the industry must develop new liquid manure spreader systems because the ammonia and methane emission are limited. In a research project the University of Applied Sciences Zwickau and some other industry partners will develop such a new innovative liquid manure spreader. The new liquid manure spreader should use pulsating air to distribute the liquid manure exactly. The pulsating air, which flows through the pipelines, should be analysed at a test station. For examinations at this test station it is important to find another substitute fluid because liquid manure smells strong, is not transparent and is also not homogeneous enough for scientific investigations. Furthermore it is important to ensure that the substitute fluid is, like liquid manure, a non-Newtonian fluid. The substitute fluid must be a shear-thinning substance - this means the viscosity decrease at higher shear rate. Many different samples like soap-water-farragoes, jelly-water-farragoes, agar-water-farragoes, soap-ethanol-farragoes and more are, for the project, examined in regard of their physical properties to find the best substitute fluid. The samples are examined at the rotational viscometer for viscosity at various shear rates and then compared with the viscosity values of liquid manure.

  1. Experimental study on viscosity reduction for residual oil by ultrasonic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xintong; Zhou, Cuihong; Suo, Quanyu; Zhang, Lanting; Wang, Shihan

    2018-03-01

    Because of characteristics of large density, high viscosity and poor mobility, the processing and transportation of residual oil are difficult and challenging, viscosity reduction of residual oil is of great significance. In this paper, the effects of different placement forms of ultrasonic transducers on the sound pressure distribution of ultrasonic inside a cubic container have been simulated, the characteristics of oil bath heating and ultrasonic viscosity reduction were compared, viscosity reduction rule of residual oil was experimentally analyzed by utilizing Response Surface Method under conditions of changing ultrasonic exposure time, power and action mode, the mechanism of viscosity reduction was studied by applying Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, the viscosity retentivity experiment was carried out at last. Experiments were conducted using two kinds of residual oil, and results show that ultrasonic effect on the viscosity reduction of residual oil is significant, the higher viscosity of residual oil, the better effect of ultrasonic, ultrasonic power and exposure time are the significant factors affecting the viscosity reduction rate of residual oil. The maximum viscosity reduction rate is obtained under condition of ultrasonic power is 900W, exposure time is 14min and action mode of exposure time is 2s and interrupting time is 2s, viscosity reduction rate reaching up to 63.95%. The infrared spectroscopy results show that light component in residual oil increased. The viscosity retentivity experiment results show that the viscosity reduction effect remains very well. This paper can provide data reference for the application of ultrasonic in the field of viscosity reduction for residual oil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of the additive effect of nanoparticles on the hydrodynamic characteristics of drilling fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhienkova, E. I.; Neverov, A. L.; Matveev, A. V.; Zhigarev, V. A.; Kudryavcev, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    Investigations of the rheological properties of drilling fluids based on nanoparticles are carried out. The dependences of the effective viscosity and rheological parameters of fluids on the concentration, size and material of nanoparticles, and the physico-chemical properties of the model fluid are obtained. The study results of the filtration of drilling fluids with nanoparticles are obtained. Dependences of filtration characteristics of drilling fluids on concentration, size and material of nanoparticles are obtained.

  3. Bianchi Type-IX viscous fluid cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bianchi Type-IX viscous fluid cosmological model is investigated. To get a deterministic model, we have assumed the condition = ( is a constant) between metric potentials and where is the coefficient of shear viscosity and the scalar of expansion in the model. The coefficient of bulk viscosity () is taken as ...

  4. Non-Newtonian fluid flow in annular pipes and entropy generation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Non-Newtonian fluid; third-grade fluid; variable viscosity; entropy; entropy generation number. 1. Introduction. Flow through annular pipes finds application in the process industry. In some cases, the fluid may consist of two phases such as coal particles–water mixture (coal slurries) and the numerical modelling of such flow ...

  5. Making a Magnetorheological Fluid from Mining Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitian, G.; Saldarriaga, W.; Rojas, N.

    2017-12-01

    We have obtained magnetite mining tailings and used it to fabricate a magnetorheological fluid (MRF). Mineralogical and morphological characteristics were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), as well as size and geometry for the obtained magnetite. Finally, the fabricated MRF was rheologically characterized in a device attached to a rheometer. The application of a magnetic field of 0.12 Tesla can increase the viscosity of the MRF by more than 400 pct. A structural formation should occur within the fluid by a reordering of particles into magnetic columns, which are perpendicular to the flow direction. These structures give the fluid an increased viscosity. As the magnetic field increases, the structure formed is more resistant, resulting in an increased viscosity. One can appreciate that with a value equal to or less than 0.06 Tesla of applied magnetic field, many viscosity values associated with the work area of the oils can be achieved (0.025 and 0.34 Pa s).

  6. A glimpse of fluid turbulence from the molecular scale

    KAUST Repository

    Komatsu, Teruhisa S.

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of freely decaying turbulence in three-dimensional space are reported. Fluid components are defined from the microscopic states by eliminating thermal components from the coarse-grained fields. The energy spectrum of the fluid components is observed to scale reasonably well according to Kolmogorov scaling determined from the energy dissipation rate and the viscosity of the fluid, even though the Kolmogorov length is of the order of the molecular scale. © 2014 The Authors.

  7. Remote magneto-elastic analyte, viscosity and temperature sensing apparatus and associated methods of sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Craig A. (Inventor); Stoyanov, Plamen G. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An analyte, viscosity, or temperature sensing apparatus for operative arrangement within a time-varying magnetic field, including a sensor with an outer surface that is chemically, frictionally, or thermally responsive and adhered to a base magnetostrictive element, and a receiver to measure a first and second value for magneto-elastic emission intensity of the sensor taken at, respectively, a first and second interrogation frequency. A change in mass or a change in material stiffness of the sensor due to the responsiveness, the viscosity and mass density of a fluid therearound, or the temperature, can be identified. The receiver, alternatively, measures a plurality of successive values for magneto-elastic emission intensity of the sensor taken over an operating range of successive interrogation frequencies to identify a value for the sensor's magneto-elastic resonant frequency (a fundamental frequency or harmonic thereof). Several sensors in an ordered array will provide a package of information.

  8. Leidenfrost Vapor Layers Reduce Drag without the Crisis in High Viscosity Liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2016-09-08

    The drag coefficient CD of a solid smooth sphere moving in a fluid is known to be only a function of the Reynolds number Re and diminishes rapidly at the drag crisis around Re∼3×105. A Leidenfrost vapor layer on a hot sphere surface can trigger the onset of the drag crisis at a lower Re. By using a range of high viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids, we show that the drag reduction effect can occur over a wide range of Re, from as low as ∼600 to 105. The Navier slip model with a viscosity dependent slip length can fit the observed drag reduction and wake shape. © 2016 American Physical Society.

  9. Shear viscosities from Kubo formalism in a large-Nc Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Robert Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    The quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC is a hot and dense state of strongly correlated matter. It behaves like an almost-perfect fluid featuring a small ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density. In this thesis we calculate within a two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model the shear viscosity as function of temperature and chemical potential. A new Kubo formula is developed, incorporating the full Dirac structure of the quark spectral function and avoiding commonly used on-shell approximations. Mesonic fluctuations occurring at Fock level provide the dominant dissipative process. The resulting parameter-free ratio is an overall decreasing function of temperature and chemical potential. In combination with hard-thermal-loop results we nd this ratio to feature a minimum slightly above the AdS/CFT benchmark.

  10. Hall viscosity: A link between quantum Hall systems, plasmas and liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingam, Manasvi, E-mail: manasvi@physics.utexas.edu

    2015-07-17

    In this Letter, the assumption of two simple postulates is shown to give rise to a Hall viscosity term via an action principle formulation. The rationale behind the two postulates is clearly delineated, and the connections to an intrinsic angular momentum are emphasized. By employing this methodology, it is shown that Hall viscosity appears in a wide range of fields, and the interconnectedness of quantum Hall systems, plasmas and nematic liquid crystals is hypothesized. Potential avenues for experimental and theoretical work arising from this cross-fertilization are also indicated. - Highlights: • Connections between simple 2D fluid models in different fields of physics presented. • Structure emerges via varied physical mechanisms driven by internal angular momentum. • Properties of these models such as Casimirs, equilibria and stability are analyzed.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of immiscible displacement process with large viscosity ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Parthib; Schaefer, Laura

    2017-11-01

    Immiscible displacement is a key physical mechanism involved in enhanced oil recovery and carbon sequestration processes. This multiphase flow phenomenon involves a complex interplay of viscous, capillary, inertial and wettability effects. The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is an accurate and efficient technique for modeling and simulating multiphase/multicomponent flows especially in complex flow configurations and media. In this presentation we present numerical simulation results of displacement process in thin long channels. The results are based on a new psuedo-potential multicomponent LB model with multiple relaxation time collision (MRT) model and explicit forcing scheme. We demonstrate that the proposed model is capable of accurately simulating the displacement process involving fluids with a wider range of viscosity ratios (>100) and which also leads to viscosity-independent interfacial tension and reduction of some important numerical artifacts.

  12. Entropy-viscosity based LES of turbulent flow in a flexible pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhicheng; Xie, Fangfang; Triantafyllou, Michael; Constantinides, Yiannis; Karniadakis, George

    2016-11-01

    We present large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent flow in a flexible pipe conveying incompressible fluid. We are interested in quantifying the flow-structure interaction in terms of mean quantities and their variances. For the LES, we employ an Entropy Viscosity Method (EVM), implemented in a spectral element code. In previous work, we investigated laminar flow and studied the complex interaction between structural and internal flow dynamics and obtained a phase diagram of the transition between states as function of three non-dimensional quantities: the fluid-tension parameter, the dimensionless fluid velocity, and the Reynolds number. Here we extend our studies in the turbulence regime, Re from 5,000 to 50,000. The motion of the flexible pipe affects greatly the turbulence statistics of the pipe flow, with substantial differences for free (self-sustained) vibrations and prescribed (forced) vibrations.

  13. Nuclear viscosity of hot rotating 240Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, N. P.; Dioszegi, I.; Mazumdar, I.; Buda, A.; Morton, C. R.; Velkovska, J.; Beene, J. R.; Stracener, D. W.; Varner, R. L.; Thoennessen, M.

    2000-01-01

    The absolute γ-ray/fission multiplicities from hot rotating 240 Cf, populated at seven bombarding energies using the reaction 32 S+ 208 Pb, are reported. Statistical model calculations including nuclear dissipation have been performed to extract the dependence of the nuclear viscosity on temperature and/or nuclear deformation. The extracted nuclear dissipation coefficient is found to be independent of temperature. Large dissipation during the saddle to scission path provides a good fit to the γ-ray spectra. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  14. MISCIBLE FLUID DISPLACEMENT STABILITY IN UNCONFINED POROUS MEDIA: TWO-DIMENSIONAL FLOW EXPERIMENTS AND SIMULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In situ flushing groundwater remediation technologies, such as cosolvent flushing, rely on the stability of the interface between the resident and displacing fluids for efficient removal of contaminants. Contrasts in density and viscosity between the resident and displacing flui...

  15. Evaluation of saponite and saponite/sepiolite fluids for geothermal drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guven, N.; Panfil, D.J.; Carney, L.L. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (USA). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1991-02-01

    The rheology and other properties of drilling fluids containing saponite and a saponite-sepiolite mixture as the main vicosifier have been systematically evaluated in the temperature range of 300-600{degree}F under appropriate confining pressures up to 16,000 psi. Saponite represents the magnesium analog of the clay mineral montmorillonite, which is the main constituent in conventional bentonite-based fluids. The fluid with 6% saponite exhibits a prominent viscosity enhancement at temperatures above 250{degree}F. This viscosity enhancement is easily controlled by salts and hydroxides of Na and K. The addition of Na-polyacrylates (low- and high-molecular weight polymers) eliminates the viscosity anomaly of pure saponite fluids. These polymers also increase the filtration control of saponite. The anomalous viscosity enhancement of saponite is significantly reduced by the addition of sepiolite (a clay mineral with a fibrous morphology). 12 refs., 31 figs., 26 tabs.

  16. Predicting optimal back-shock times in ultrafiltration hollow fiber modules II: Effect of inlet flow and concentration dependent viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank; Pinelo, Manuel; Brøns, Morten

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamics of back-shocking during hollow fibre ultrafiltration of dextran T500. In this paper we present a mathematical model based on first Principles, i.e., solving the Navier-Stokes equation along with the continuity equation...... fibre membranes, J. Membr. Sci. 470 (2014) 275-293 [33]).Furthermore, the simulations have been performed with two different inlet velocities, i.e., crossflow velocities and are clone with and without a concentration dependent viscosity. This enables us, for the first time, to investigate the effect...... in this paper.Furthermore, it is found that the optimal back-shock time increases when the viscosity is allowed to depend on the concentration It is found that this can be explained by a decrease in the velocity tangential to the membrane due to the increase in viscosity where the concentration is high...

  17. Variable-viscosity mixing in the very near field of a round jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, B.; Danaila, L.; Renou, B.

    2013-07-01

    One of the persistent challenges in turbulent mixing is understanding of the phenomenology associated with heterogeneous mixtures of gases. The turbulence in single, homogeneous fluid has drawn much attention. However, heterogeneous mixing of gases is prevalent in real flows, whether nonreactive or reactive. This paper is dedicated to advancing our understanding of the turbulent mixing phenomenology in a round jet flow of propane issuing in an oxidizer. The ratio of the propane/oxidizer kinematic viscosities is 1/5.5, whereas their densities are nearly equal. Therefore, the main physical property that differentiates the two fluids is their viscosity. The focus of this paper is on the role played by the viscosity gradients on the turbulent flow, over the first several diameters. The addressed questions concern a comparison between the present flow, which is a variable-viscosity flow (hereafter, VVF), and an air jet flow issuing in the air (constant-viscosity flow, hereafter CVF). The comparison is made at the same initial conditions, i.e. the same jet momentum per surface unit, M0 = ρ0U20 = 130 and 360 kg m-1 s-2 (U0 is the injection velocity and ρ0 is the fluid density). For doing so, an experiment has been designed and both the velocity and the scalar fields have been measured by using a technique based on hot-wire anemometry and Rayleigh light scattering, as well as laser Doppler velocimetry which provides two velocity components. The comparison criteria between the VVF and CVF are the instantaneous aspect of the turbulent velocity field, the axial mean velocity (\\overline U ) and the rms (root mean squares) of the two measured velocity fluctuations. The one-point kinetic energy budget, which involves the mean energy dissipation rate, is developed and the expression of the mean energy dissipation rate is revisited. The latter involves additional terms reflecting the velocity-viscosity gradient correlation. This contribution is positive, thus enhancing the real

  18. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  19. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  20. Beyond baking soda: Demonstrating the link between volcanic eruptions and viscosity to all ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithka, I. N.; Walters, R. L.; Harpp, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Public interest in volcanic eruptions and societal relevance of volcanic hazards provide an excellent basis for successful earth science outreach. During a museum-based earth science outreach event free and open to the public, we used two new interactive experiments to illustrate the relationship between gas content, magma viscosity, and eruption style. Learning objectives for visitors are to understand: how gas drives volcanic eruptions, the differences between effusive and explosive eruption styles, viscosity's control on gas pressure within a magma reservoir, and the role of gas pressure on eruption style. Visitors apply the scientific method by asking research questions and testing hypotheses by conducting the experiments. The demonstrations are framed with real life examples of volcanic eruptions (e.g., Mt. St. Helens eruption in 1980), providing context for the scientific concepts. The first activity demonstrates the concept of fluid viscosity and how gas interacts with fluids of different viscosities. Visitors blow bubbles into water and corn syrup. The corn syrup is so viscous that bubbles are trapped, showing how a more viscous material builds up higher gas pressure. Visitors are asked which kind of magma (high or low viscosity) will produce an explosive eruption. To demonstrate an explosive eruption, visitors add an Alka-Seltzer tablet to water in a snap-top film canister. The reaction rapidly produces carbon dioxide gas, increasing pressure in the canister until the lid pops off and the canister launches a few meters into the air (tinyurl.com/nzsgfoe). Increasing gas pressure in the canister is analogous to gas pressure building within a magma reservoir beneath a volcano. The lid represents high-viscosity magma that prevents degassing, causing gas pressure to reach explosive levels. This interactive activity is combined with a display of an effusive eruption: add vinegar to baking soda in a model volcano to produce a quick-flowing eruption. These

  1. Visual study of the effect of viscosity ratio, flow rate and porous medium topology on two-phase relative permeabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-Arango, J.D.; Kantzas, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Relative permeability is one of the most important properties for understanding the dynamic behaviour of multiphase flow in porous media. The relative permeability to a given phase in two-phase flow is normally assumed to be only a function of the saturation of that phase, independent of the properties of fluids involved and/or flow conditions and ranging in value from zero to one. This paper presented several experiments in order to determine the effect of viscosity ratio, flow rate and porous medium topology on two-phase relative permeabilities. Two different etched-glass micromodels and acrylic-made triangular capillary tubes were used as porous media. Three different pairs of fluids with viscosity ratios ranging from 0.005 to 202.3 were also used. Primary drainage and secondary imbibition displacements were performed at different injection flow rates and unsteady-state relative permeability curves were constructed. The paper first provided background information on multiphase flow and Darcy's law. The materials for the experiments were also described, with particular reference to the apparatus such as etched-glass micromodels, equilateral triangular channels, and fluids. The experimental procedure and results of the experiments were then outlined in detail. It was concluded that relative permeabilities do not only depend on fluid saturations but also on the viscosity ratio of the phases flowing, the displacement rate and the topology of the porous medium. 8 refs., 8 tabs., 25 figs.

  2. Effective viscosity of two-dimensional suspensions: Confinement effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyeux, Vincent; Priem, Stephane; Jibuti, Levan; Farutin, Alexander; Ismail, Mourad; Peyla, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    We study the rheology of a sheared two-dimensional (2D) suspension of non-Brownian disks in the presence of walls. Although it is of course possible today with modern computers and powerful algorithms to perform direct numerical simulations that fully account for multiparticle 3D interactions in the presence of walls, the analysis of the simple case of a 2D suspension provides valuable insights and helps in the understanding of 3D results. Due to the direct visualization of the whole 2D flow (the shear plane), we are able to give a clear interpretation of the full hydrodynamics of semidilute confined suspensions. For instance, we examine the role of disk-wall and disk-disk interactions to determine the dissipation of confined sheared suspensions whose effective viscosity depends on the area fraction ϕ of the disks as ηeff=η0[1 +[η ] ϕ +β ϕ2+O (ϕ3) ] . We provide numerical estimates of [η ] and β for a wide range of confinements. As a benchmark for our simulations, we compare the numerical results obtained for [η ] and β for very weak confinements with analytical values [η] ∞ and β∞ obtained for an infinite fluid. If the value [η] ∞=2 is well known in the literature, much less is published on the value of β . Here we analytically calculate with very high precision β∞=3.6 . We also reexamine the 3D case in the light of our 2D results.

  3. Viscosity properties of tellurite-based glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tincher, B.; Massera, J.; Petit, L.; Richardson, K.

    2010-01-01

    The viscosity behavior of glasses with the composition (90-x)TeO 2 -10Bi 2 O 3 -xZnO with x = 15, 17.5, and 20 (TBZ glasses) and 80TeO 2 -(20-y)Na 2 O-yZnO system with y = 0, 5, and 10 (TNZ glasses) have been measured as a function of temperature using a beam-bending (BBV) and a parallel-plate (PPV) viscometer. The structure of the glass' network has been characterized using Raman spectroscopy and has been related to the viscosity temperature behavior and the fragility parameter (m) of the glasses. As the concentration of ZnO in the TBZ system (x) increases, the fragility parameter of the glass increases, whereas it decreases with an increase of the ZnO concentration (y) in the TNZ system. In both glasses, these variations in m have been related to the partial depolymerization of the tellurite network associated with the level of modifier content. The depolymerization of the tellurite network is believed to be the result of a reduction in the number of [TeO 4 ] units and the formation of [TeO 3 ] and [TeO 3+1 ] units that occurs with a change in TeO 2 content in the TBZ system and modifier content in the TNZ system.

  4. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    El, Andrej; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Using the Grad's method we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$ are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with $\\eta/s$ obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling $\\alpha_s \\sim 0.3$(with $\\eta/s\\approx 0.18$) and is a factor of 2-3 larger at a small coupling $\\alpha_s \\sim 0.01$. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on $\\eta/s$, except when employing a small $\\alpha_s$. On the other hand, we demonstrate th...

  5. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    El, Andrej; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Using Grad’s method, we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second-order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance, the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second-order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with η/s obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling αs ∼ 0.3 (with η/s ≈ 0.18) and is a factor of 2–3 larger at a small coupling αs ∼ 0.01. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on η/s, except when employing a small αs . On the other hand, we demonstrate that for such small αs , the gluon syst...

  6. Textural perception of liquid emulsions: Role of oil content, oil viscosity and emulsion viscosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aken, van G.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Wijk, de R.A.

    2011-01-01

    This work describes a study on the in-mouth textural perception of thickened liquid oil-in-water emulsions. The variables studied are oil content, oil viscosity, and the concentration of polysaccharide thickener. Gum arabic was chosen as the thickener because of the nearly Newtonian behavior of its

  7. The kinematic viscosity influence on energetic cost of oil pipeline flow; Influencia da viscosidade cinematica sobre o custo energetico no escoamento de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucena, Kennedy F.M. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Paraiba (CEFET-PB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Torres, Euriclides G.; Lacerda, Ivonaldo de S.; Machado, Erica C.M.N. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    In the petroleum pipelines flow the objective of the maximum production with the minor cost is desired, considering the techniques, operational and administrative restrictions. One of the biggest difficulties in the pipelines flow is related to increase of viscosity that the fluids produced can present and to the variations during the transport. In this study had been analyzed through computational simulations, using Smart Pumping software, the hydraulic behavior of the network and the operational cost with energy consumption, in function of the variation of the viscosity. Two scenes had been simulated, using a initial kinematic viscosity of 3,029x10{sup -5} m{sup 2}/s, that it was reduced gradually until the minimum limit of 10% of initial viscosity, remaining the too much constant the fluid properties. In scene 1 it was verified that the reduction of viscosity implied in the reduction of the energy cost in up to 14,53%, increase of the daily production in up to 3,88% and the reduction in the cost for m3 flowed off in up to 17,73%, without alterations in the operations. Scene 2 presented similar behavior to scene 1, however, had been necessary interventions to get operations that did not violate the restrictions. The results had ratified the interference of viscosity in the operations and the system petroleum flow costs. (author)

  8. Fluid dynamics of dilatant fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-01-01

    A dense mixture of granules and liquid often shows a severe shear thickening and is called a dilatant fluid. We construct a fluid dynamics model for the dilatant fluid by introducing a phenomenological state variable for a local state of dispersed particles. With simple assumptions for an equation...

  9. Modeling the viscosity of silicate melts containing manganese oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Wan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed model for the viscosity of silicate melts is applied to describe and predict the viscosities of oxide melts containing manganese oxide. The model requires three pairs of adjustable parameters that describe the viscosities in three systems: pure MnO, MnO-SiO2 and MnO-Al2O3-SiO2. The viscosity of other ternary and multicomponent silicate melts containing MnO is then predicted by the model without any additional adjustable model parameters. Experimental viscosity data are reviewed for melts formed by MnO with SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, PbO, Na2O and K2O. The deviation of the available experimental data from the viscosities predicted by the model is shown to be within experimental error limits.

  10. Viscosity Control of Protein Solution by Small Solutes: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Taehun; Iwashita, Kazuki; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2017-12-12

    Viscosity of protein solution is one of the most troublesome issues for the high-concentration formulation of protein drugs. In this review, we summarize the practical methods that suppress the viscosity of protein solution using small molecular additives. The small amount of salts decreases the viscosity that results from electrostatic repulsion and attraction. The chaotrope suppresses the hydrophobic attraction and cluster formation, which can lower the solution viscosity. Arginine hydrochloride (ArgHCl) also suppresses the solution viscosity due to the hydrophobic and aromatic interactions between protein molecules. The small molecular additives are the simplest resolution of the high viscosity of protein solution as well as understanding of the primary cause in complex phenomena of protein interactions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Determination of the Density and Temperature Dependence of the Shear Viscosity of a Unitary Fermi Gas Based on Hydrodynamic Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhm, Marcus; Hou, Jiaxun; Schäfer, Thomas

    2017-08-11

    We determine the shear viscosity of the ultracold Fermi gas at unitarity in the normal phase using hydrodynamic expansion data. The analysis is based on a generalized fluid dynamic framework which ensures a smooth transition between the fluid dynamic core of the cloud and the ballistic corona. We use expansion data taken by Joseph, Elliott, and Thomas [Shear Viscosity of a Universal Fermi Gas Near the Superfluid Phase Transition, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 020401 (2015).PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.020401] and measurements of the equation of state by Ku et al. [Revealing the superfluid lambda transition in the universal thermodynamics of a unitary Fermi gas, Science 335, 563 (2012).SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1214987]. We find that the shear viscosity to particle density ratio just above the critical temperature is η/n|_{T_{c}}=0.41±0.11. We also obtain evidence that the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio has a minimum slightly above T_{c} with η/s|_{min}=0.50±0.10.

  12. Impact of Viscosity on Filling the Injection Mould Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satin Lukáš

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to look closer at the rheological properties of plastics and their impact on technology in the plastics processing industry. The paper focuses on the influence of viscosity of the material on filling the mould cavity. Four materials were tested with the settings of process parameters with different viscosity. Using simulation software of Moldex3D, we can see the effect of change in viscosity in the material to be filled.

  13. Modeling of Viscosity and Thermal Expansion of Bioactive Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Farid, Saad B. H.

    2012-01-01

    The behaviors of viscosity and thermal expansion for different compositions of bioactive glasses have been studied. The effect of phosphorous pentoxide as a second glass former in addition to silica was investigated. Consequently, the nonlinear behaviors of viscosity and thermal expansion with respect to the oxide composition have been modeled. The modeling uses published data on bioactive glass compositions with viscosity and thermal expansion. -regression optimization technique has been uti...

  14. Viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump for a total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurimoto, Terumi; Hara, Shintaro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    Estimation of pressure and flow has been an important subject for developing implantable artificial hearts. To realize real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow for a total artificial heart, we propose the table estimation method with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump in which systolic high flow and diastolic low flow phased are generated. The table estimation method utilizes three kinds of tables: viscosity, pressure and flow tables. Viscosity is estimated from the characteristic that differential value in motor speed between systolic and diastolic phases varies depending on viscosity. Potential of this estimation method was investigated using mock circulation system. Glycerin solution diluted with salty water was used to adjust viscosity of fluid. In verification of this method using continuous flow data, fairly good estimation could be possible when differential pulse width modulation (PWM) value of the motor between systolic and diastolic phases was high. In estimation under quasi-pulsatile condition, inertia correction was provided and fairly good estimation was possible when the differential PWM value was high, which was not different from the verification results using continuous flow data. In the experiment of real-time estimation applying moving average method to the estimated viscosity, fair estimation could be possible when the differential PWM value was high, showing that real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow would be possible with this novel estimation method when the differential PWM value would be set high.

  15. Viscosity of Heterogeneous Silicate Melts: A Non-Newtonian Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuangzhuang; Blanpain, Bart; Guo, Muxing

    2017-12-01

    The recently published viscosity data of heterogeneous silicate melts with well-documented structure and experimental conditions are critically re-analyzed and tabulated. By using these data, a non-Newtonian viscosity model incorporating solid fraction, solid shape, and shear rate is proposed on the basis of the power-law equation. This model allows calculating the viscosity of the heterogeneous silicate melts with solid fraction up to 34 vol pct. The error between the calculated and measured data is evaluated to be 32 pct, which is acceptable considering the large error in viscosity measurement of the completely liquid silicate melt.

  16. Fluorescence-based Broad Dynamic Range Viscosity Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragan, Anatoliy; Graham, August E; Geddes, Chris D

    2014-03-01

    We introduce two new fluorescent viscosity probes, SYBR Green (SG) and PicoGreen (PG), that we have studied over a broad range of viscosity and in collagen solutions. In water, both dyes have low quantum yields and excited state lifetimes, while in viscous solvents or in complex with DNA both parameters dramatically (300-1000-fold) increase. We show that in log-log scale the dependence of the dyes' quantum yield vs. viscosity is linear, the slope of which is sensitive to temperature. Application of SG and PG, as a fluorescence-based broad dynamic range viscosity probes, to the life sciences is discussed.

  17. Effect of temperature on the viscosities of mixed micellar solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, C. Durga; Kumar, D. Sudheer; Sarma, G. V. S.; Ramesh, K. V.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of addition of Triton X-100 (TX-100) on the viscosities of Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micellar solution containingNaCl and Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micellar solution containingKBr at various temperatures are presented. The viscosity of SDS micellar solution is found to increase on addition of TX-100 at all temperatures (25 to 45 °C). However the increase in viscosity is large up to certain % of TX-100, after that the increase in viscosity is found to be small. Where as in CTAB micelles, at lower temperatures, the viscosity of micellar solution decreased up to certain composition of TX-100 and with further addition of TX-100 the viscosity got increaed. At higher temperatures viscosity of CTAB micellar solution increased on addition of TX-100. Depending on the nature of surfactant system and temperature, the viscosity of micellar solution may increase or decrease on addition of TX-100. The thermodynamic parameters for the viscous flow of micellar solutions in the presence of TX-100 are also determined. The effect of TX-100 on the viscosity and the activation enthalpy for viscous flow of anionic micelles is tremendously large as compared to cationic micelles. This is due to transition of micellar shape from rod to elongated rod or to sphere in the presence of added TX-100.

  18. Applicability of viscosity measurement to the detection of irradiated peppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Todoriki, S.; Kohyama, K.

    1996-01-01

    Starch is degraded by ionising radiation, resulting in a decrease in viscosity. The viscosities of black and white peppers which contain large amounts of starch are reduced by irradiation so, therefore, viscosity measurement has been proposed as a method to detect the irradiation treatment of these food products. Although detection of irradiated spices by thermoluminescence measurement has been established, it is useful to establish the viscosity measuring technique for detecting irradiated peppers, as this method is carried out widely in the laboratories of food controlling authorities and food processing companies. (author)

  19. Fluids engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Fluids engineering has played an important role in many applications, from ancient flood control to the design of high-speed compact turbomachinery. New applications of fluids engineering, such as in high-technology materials processing, biotechnology, and advanced combustion systems, have kept up unwaining interest in the subject. More accurate and sophisticated computational and measurement techniques are also constantly being developed and refined. On a more fundamental level, nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of fluid flow are no longer an intellectual curiosity and fluid engineers are increasingly interested in finding practical applications for these emerging sciences. Applications of fluid technology to new areas, as well as the need to improve the design and to enhance the flexibility and reliability of flow-related machines and devices will continue to spur interest in fluids engineering. The objectives of the present seminar were: to exchange current information on arts, science, and technology of fluids engineering; to promote scientific cooperation between the fluids engineering communities of both nations, and to provide an opportunity for the participants and their colleagues to explore possible joint research programs in topics of high priority and mutual interest to both countries. The Seminar provided an excellent forum for reviewing the current state and future needs of fluids engineering for the two nations. With the Seminar ear-marking the first formal scientific exchange between Korea and the United States in the area of fluids engineering, the scope was deliberately left broad and general

  20. Derivation of a new kinetic equation. Application to the determination of viscosity coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, Jean-Jacques

    1970-01-01

    By introducing a new hypothesis concerning the closure in the B.B.G.K.Y. equation system, an approximate expression for f 12 is obtained. By inserting this expression in the first B.B.G.K.Y. equation, a new kinetic equation results. It is verified that this equation does in fact give the fluid mechanics equations, and new expressions for the shear and expansion viscosity coefficients are obtained. The numerical calculations which have been carried out show that very satisfactory agreement exists with experimental results. (author) [fr

  1. Combined effect of thermal dispersion and variable viscosity of non-darcy convection heat transfer in a fluidsaturated porous medium

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of thermal dispersion and variable viscosity on the non-Darcy free, mixed, and forced convection heat transfer along a vertical flat plate embedded in a fluid-saturated porous medium are investigated. Forchheimer extension is employed in the flow equation to express the non-Darcy model. The fluid viscosity varies as an inverse linear function of temperature. The coefficient of thermal diffusivity has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. Similarity solutions of the governing equations, for an isothermally heated plate, are obtained. Effects of the physical parameters, which govern the problem, on the rate of heat transfer in terms of Nusselt number, the slip velocity, and the boundary layer thickness, for the two cases Darcy and non-Darcy, are shown on graphs or entered in tables. © 2013 by Begell House, Inc.

  2. Holographic bulk viscosity: GPR vs EO

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, Alex; Kiritsis, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Recently Eling and Oz (EO) proposed a formula for the holographic bulk viscosity, in arXiv:1103.1657, derived from the null horizon focusing equation. This formula seems different from that obtained earlier by Gubser, Pufu and Rocha (GPR) in arXiv:0806.0407 calculated from the IR limit of the two-point function of the trace of the stress tensor. The two were shown to agree only for some simple scaling cases. We point out that the two formulae agree in two non-trivial holographic theories describing RG flows. The first is the strongly coupled N=2* gauge theory plasma. The second is the semi-phenomenological model of Improved Holographic QCD.

  3. Sensor for viscosity and shear strength measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dillion, J.; Moore, J.; Jones, K.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. Two different viscometer techniques are being investigated in this study, based on: magnetostrictive pulse generated acoustic waves; and an oscillating cylinder. Prototype sensors have been built and tested which are based on both techniques. A base capability instrumentation system has been designed, constructed, and tested which incorporates both of these sensors. It requires manual data acquisition and off-line calculation. A broad range of viscous media has been tested using this system. Extensive test results appear in this report. The concept for each technique has been validated by these test results. This base capability system will need to be refined further before it is appropriate for field tests. The mass of the oscillating system structure will need to be reduced. A robust acoustic probe assembly will need to be developed. In addition, in March 1997 it was made known for the first time that the requirement was for a deliverable automated viscosity instrumentation system. Since then such a system has been designed, and the hardware has been constructed so that the automated concept can be proved. The rest of the hardware, which interfaced to a computer, has also been constructed and tested as far as possible. However, for both techniques the computer software for automated data acquisition, calculation, and logging had not been completed before funding and time ran out.

  4. Fluid machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jae Hyeon; Son, Byeong Jin

    2001-04-01

    This book tells of definition and classification of fluid machinery, energy equation of incompressible fluid, principle of momentum, classification and structure of pump, size, safety of centrifugal pump, theory and operation of contraction pump, reciprocating pump, rotary pump, special pump, using of water power, classification of water turbine, impulse water turbine, reaction water turbine, pump water turbine, liquid movement apparatus, fluid type control machinery and solid and gas type pneumatic machine.

  5. Viscosity of iodinated contrast agents during renal excretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Jost@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Lengsfeld, Philipp, E-mail: Philipp.Lengsfeld@bayer.com [Global Medical Affairs Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Lenhard, Diana C., E-mail: Diana.Lenhard@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Pietsch, Hubertus, E-mail: Hubertus.Pietsch@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Huetter, Joachim, E-mail: Joachim.Huetter@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Sieber, Martin A., E-mail: Martin.Sieber@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: Modern iodinated non-ionic contrast agents (CAs) can be classified based on their molecular structure into monomeric and dimeric CAs and have at comparable iodine concentrations a different viscosity and osmolality. During their renal excretion, CAs are concentrated in the renal tubuli which might enhance the viscosity difference between monomeric and dimeric CAs. The viscosity of a CA might have an underestimated importance for renal safety, as suggested by recent publications. In this study, we investigated the viscosities of CAs at the concentrations expected to be present in renal tubules. This concentration process was simulated in vitro using dialysis. Furthermore, we investigated urine viscosity and urine flow in rodents after administration of several non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. Materials and methods: To estimate the viscosity of the CAs in vivo, we performed an in vitro dialysis of monomeric and dimeric CAs at various physiological osmolalities of the renal tubulus (290, 400, 500, 700 and 1000 mOsm/kg H{sub 2}O). Following the dialysis, the iodine concentrations and the viscosities of the CAs were determined. Furthermore, to investigate the concentration process in vivo, we measured the urine viscosity and the urine flow in Han Wister rats after the administration of Iopromide, Iohexol, Ioversol, Iomeprol, Iodixanol, and Iosimenol at comparable iodine concentrations. As a control, saline was injected at the same volume. Results: In vitro dialysis of the dimeric CA increased the iodine concentration and strongly increased the viscosity at all tested osmolalities. In contrast, for the monomeric agents an increase in concentration and viscosity was observed only at 700 as well 1000 mOsm/kg H{sub 2}O but to a lesser extent. In summary, dialysis strongly enhanced the viscosity differences between the non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. The administration of dimeric CAs leads to a strong increase in urine viscosity; this was not observed for

  6. Bouncing-to-Merging Transition in Drop Impact on Liquid Film: Role of Liquid Viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Saha, Abhishek; Law, Chung K; Sun, Chao

    2018-02-27

    When a drop impacts on a liquid surface, it can either bounce back or merge with the surface. The outcome affects many industrial processes, in which merging is preferred in spray coating to generate a uniform layer and bouncing is desired in internal combustion engines to prevent accumulation of the fuel drop on the wall. Thus, a good understanding of how to control the impact outcome is highly demanded to optimize the performance. For a given liquid, a regime diagram of bouncing and merging outcomes can be mapped in the space of Weber number (ratio of impact inertia and surface tension) versus film thickness. In addition, recognizing that the liquid viscosity is a fundamental fluid property that critically affects the impact outcome through viscous dissipation of the impact momentum, here we investigate liquids with a wide range of viscosity from 0.7 to 100 cSt, to assess its effect on the regime diagram. Results show that while the regime diagram maintains its general structure, the merging regime becomes smaller for more viscous liquids and the retraction merging regime disappears when the viscosity is very high. The viscous effects are modeled and subsequently the mathematical relations for the transition boundaries are proposed which agree well with the experiments. The new expressions account for all the liquid properties and impact conditions, thus providing a powerful tool to predict and manipulate the outcome when a drop impacts on a liquid film.

  7. Viscosity measurements of water at high temperatures and pressures using dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Shigeru; Ghosh, Swapan K; Alargova, Rossitza G; Tsujii, Kaoru

    2006-09-21

    The application of dynamic light scattering to measure viscosity of water at high temperatures and pressures is demonstrated. Viscosity was obtained from the translational diffusion coefficient of probe particles dispersed in the medium by the Einstein-Stokes relationship. Measurements were carried out with polystyrene latex, colloidal silica, and colloidal gold. Under a constant pressure of 25 MPa, good agreement was found between the measured and calculated viscosities up to 275 degrees C with the polystyrene latex, 200 degrees C with the colloidal silica, and 297 degrees C with the colloidal gold. It was found that failure of the measurements at high temperatures is ascribed to change in either the dispersion stability or chemical stability of the probe particles. The present results indicate that the technique could also be used for other supercritical fluids having high critical temperature and pressure, such as methanol (T(c) = 239.4 degrees C, P(c) = 8.1 MPa) and ethanol (T(c) = 243.1 degrees C, P(c) = 6.4 MPa).

  8. Influence of the temperature-dependent viscosity on convective flow in the radial force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travnikov, Vadim; Zaussinger, Florian; Beltrame, Philippe; Egbers, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    The numerical investigation of convective flows in the radial force field caused by an oscillating electric field between spherical surfaces has been performed. A temperature difference (T_{1}>T_{2}) as well as a radial force field triggers a fluid flow similar to the Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The onset of convective flow has been studied by means of the linear stability analysis as a function of the radius ratio η=R_{1}/R_{2}. The influence of the temperature-dependent viscosity has been investigated in detail. We found that a varying viscosity contrast β=ν(T_{2})/ν(T_{1}) between β=1 (constant viscosity) and β=50 decreases the critical Rayleigh number by a factor of 6. Additionally, we perform a bifurcation analysis based on numerical simulations which have been calculated using a modified pseudospectral code. Numerical results have been compared with the GeoFlow experiment which is located on the International Space Station (ISS). Nonturbulent three-dimensional structures are found in the numerically predicted parameter regime. Furthermore, we observed multiple stable solutions in both experiments and numerical simulations, respectively.

  9. Two-fluid model for locomotion under self-confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2017-09-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes ulcers in the stomach of humans by invading mucus layers protecting epithelial cells. It does so by chemically changing the rheological properties of the mucus from a high-viscosity gel to a low-viscosity solution in which it may self-propel. We develop a two-fluid model for this process of swimming under self-generated confinement. We solve exactly for the flow and the locomotion speed of a spherical swimmer located in a spherically symmetric system of two Newtonian fluids whose boundary moves with the swimmer. We also treat separately the special case of an immobile outer fluid. In all cases, we characterize the flow fields, their spatial decay, and the impact of both the viscosity ratio and the degree of confinement on the locomotion speed of the model swimmer. The spatial decay of the flow retains the same power-law decay as for locomotion in a single fluid but with a decreased magnitude. Independent of the assumption chosen to characterize the impact of confinement on the actuation applied by the swimmer, its locomotion speed always decreases with an increase in the degree of confinement. Our modeling results suggest that a low-viscosity region of at least six times the effective swimmer size is required to lead to swimming with speeds similar to locomotion in an infinite fluid, corresponding to a region of size above ≈25 μ m for Helicobacter pylori.

  10. Kinematics and flow patterns in deep mantle and upper mantle subduction models : Influence of the mantle depth and slab to mantle viscosity ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    Three-dimensional fluid dynamic laboratory simulations are presented that investigate the subduction process in two mantle models, an upper mantle model and a deep mantle model, and for various subducting plate/mantle viscosity ratios (ηSP/ηM = 59-1375). The models investigate the mantle flow field,

  11. Impression creep of a viscous fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); He, X.; Dembo, M. [Theoretical Biology and Biophysics, Group T-10, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Li, J.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The impression test of a Newtonian fluid under a constant load and for a small Reynolds number flow was simulated by using the finite element method. It is found that the penetration velocity is a constant if the surface tension/viscosity ratio is less than 0.1 cm/s, the product of surface tension and indenter radius is less than 0.05 of the applied load, and the penetration depth is less than 1/3 of the indenter radius. Such constant penetration velocity is proportional to the applied load and inversely proportional to the viscosity and the indenter radius. The stick or slip boundary condition at the interface between the indenter and the fluid has no effect on the penetration velocity under these conditions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. On the Effects of Viscosity on the Shock Waves for a Hydrodynamical Case—Part I: Basic Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Cavus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of shock waves with viscosity is one of the central problems in the supersonic regime of compressible fluid flow. In this work, numerical solutions of unmagnetised fluid equations, with the viscous stress tensor, are investigated for a one-dimensional shock wave. In the algorithm developed the viscous stress terms are expressed in terms of the relevant Reynolds number. The algorithm concentrated on the compression rate, the entropy change, pressures, and Mach number ratios across the shock wave. The behaviour of solutions is obtained for the Reynolds and Mach numbers defining the medium and shock wave in the supersonic limits.

  13. Effect of viscosity on droplet-droplet collisional interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finotello, Giulia; Padding, J.T.; Deen, Niels G.; Jongsma, Alfred; Innings, Fredrik; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    A complete knowledge of the effect of droplet viscosity on droplet-droplet collision outcomes is essential for industrial processes such as spray drying. When droplets with dispersed solids are dried, the apparent viscosity of the dispersed phase increases by many orders of magnitude, which

  14. Evaluation of Relative Blood Viscosity During Menstruation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    statistical analysis (paired t-Test; correlation and regression). Blood samples were collected during two phases of the menstrual cycle – the premenstrual and the mid menstrual phase. Results show variations in the studied parameters before and during menstruation. Relative blood viscosity, relative plasma viscosity.

  15. Temperature-dependent viscosity effects on free convection flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temperature-dependent viscosity effects on free convection flow over a vertical moving cylinder with constant axial velocity under consideration of radial ... Prandtl number, viscosity-variation parameter, thermal conductivity-variation parameter and magnetic parameter on free convection flow and heat transfer is discussed.

  16. Effective viscosity of dispersions approached by a statistical continuum method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellema, J.; Willemse, M.W.M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the determination of the effective viscosity of disperse systems (emulsions, suspensions) is considered. On the basis of the formal solution of the equations governing creeping flow in a statistically homogeneous dispersion, the effective viscosity is expressed in a series expansion

  17. Relook on fitting of viscosity with undercooling of glassy liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present approach is on the modification of viscosity fitting of undercooled liquid as a function of undercooling. The method consists of finding analytical solution of three arbitrary constants of the Vogel–Fulcher–Tamman (VFT) equation by choosing three viscosity data at three critical temperatures for an undercooled ...

  18. Nonlinear Eddy Viscosity Models applied to Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laan, van der, Paul Maarten; Sørensen, Niels N.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2013-01-01

    The linear k−ε eddy viscosity model and modified versions of two existing nonlinear eddy viscosity models are applied to single wind turbine wake simulations using a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes code. Results are compared with field wake measurements. The nonlinear models give better results...

  19. Viscosity of liquids theory, estimation, experiment, and data

    CERN Document Server

    Viswanath, Dabir S; Prasad, Dasika HL; Dutt, Nidamarty VK; Rani, Kalipatnapu Y

    2007-01-01

    Single comprehensive book on viscosity of liquids, as opposed to most of the books in this area which are data books, i.e., a compilation of viscosity data from the literature, where the information is scattered and the description and analysis of the experimental methods and governing theory are not readily available in a single place.

  20. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The start-up and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 and 103 kg/mole, and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The monodisperse melts show a maximum in the steady elongational viscosity vs. the elongational...

  1. A Riemann problem with small viscosity and dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayyunnapara Thomas Joseph

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we prove existence of global solutions to a hyperbolic system in elastodynamics, with small viscosity and dispersion terms and derive estimates uniform in the viscosity-dispersion parameters. By passing to the limit, we prove the existence of solution the Riemann problem for the hyperbolic system with arbitrary Riemann data.

  2. Degree of cure and viscosity of Hercules HBRF-55 resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhi, S. T.; Hansen, R. Scott; Wilson, Brian A.; Calius, Emilo P.; Springer, George S.

    1987-01-01

    The rate of cure and viscosity were measured for Hercules HBRF-55 resin. The rate of cure was measured by differential scanning calorimetry, while the viscosity was measured by a parallel disk and plate type apparatus. The data were fitted to analytic expressions to make them suitable for use in numerical calculations.

  3. On-line measurement of food viscosity during flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mason, Sarah Louise; Friis, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Sarah L. Mason and Alan Friis discuss some of the principles and equipment used to monitor food viscosity in real time.......Sarah L. Mason and Alan Friis discuss some of the principles and equipment used to monitor food viscosity in real time....

  4. Effect of viscosity on appetite and gastro-intestinal hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, N.; Mars, M.; Wijk, de R.A.; Westerterp-Plantenga, M.S.; Holst, J.J.; Graaf, de C.

    2009-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that higher viscosity resulted in lower ad libitum intake and that eating rate is an important factor. In this study we aimed to explore the effect of viscosity on the gastro-intestinal hormones ghrelin, CCK-8 and GLP-1. Thirty-two subjects (22 ± 2 y, BMI 21.9 ± 2.2

  5. Anisotropic cosmological models with bulk viscosity and particle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cosmological model with power-law expansion has a Big-Bang singularity at time t = 0 , whereas the model with exponential expansion has no finite singularity. We study bulk viscosity and particle creation in each model in four different cases. The bulk viscosity coefficient is obtained for full causal, Eckart's and truncated ...

  6. Specifically and wash-free labeling of SNAP-tag fused proteins with a hybrid sensor to monitor local micro-viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Song, Xinbo; Chen, Lingcheng; Xiao, Yi

    2017-05-15

    Viscosity, as one of the major factors of intracellular microenvironment, influences the function of proteins. To detect local micro-viscosity of a protein, it is a precondition to apply a viscosity sensor for specifically target to proteins. However, all the reported small-molecule probes are just suitable for sensing/imaging of macro-viscosity in biological fluids of entire cells or organelles. To this end, we developed a hybrid sensor BDP-V BG by connecting a viscosity-sensitive boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) molecular rotor (BDP-V) to O 6 -benzylguanine (BG) for specific detection of local micro-viscosity of SNAP-tag fused proteins. We measured and calculated the reaction efficiency between the sensor and SNAP-tag protein in vitro to confirm the high labeling specificity. We also found that the labeling reaction results in a 53-fold fluorescence enhancement for the rotor, which qualifies it as a wash-free sensor with ignorable background fluorescence. The high sensitivity of protein labeled sensor (BDP-V-SNAP) to the changes of local viscosity was evaluated by detecting the enhancement of fluorescence lifetimes. Further, with the sensor BDP-V BG, we achieved high specific labeling of cells expressing two SNAP-tag fused proteins (nuclear histone H2B and mitochondrial COX8A). Two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging revealed that, the micro-viscosities nearby the SNAP-tag fused two proteins are distinct. The different changes of local micro-viscosity of SNAP-tag fused histone protein in apoptosis induced by three nucleus-targeted drugs were also characterized for the first time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Student Experiments for Investigations of Physical Controls on Viscosity and the Implications for Volcanic Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, B. R.; Teasdale, R.; Myers, J.

    2003-12-01

    Interactive laboratory investigations and demonstrations using analog materials can be used to introduce students to the rheologic properties of magmas and lavas. Using such an approach, students investigate the physical, compositional, and thermodynamic controls on viscosity through observations, experimental investigations, calculations, and computer simulations. During lab exercises, which are typically preceded by a reading assignment and brief introduction, students use analog materials (e.g. corn syrup) to experiment with parameters controlling viscosity. They prepare a set of syrup solutions at 3 (or more) temperatures, another set of syrup solutions with varying proportions of particles (e.g. sand), and a final set of syrup solutions mixed with water. A fourth experiment, which produces somewhat more complex results, can be prepared by using a hand mixer to make syrup with varying proportions of bubbles. Students make qualitative observations of the relative force required to blow bubbles into the syrup solutions with a straw as an analog for comparing the effects of viscosity on the formation and bursting behavior of gas bubbles in magma. During class, students observe syrup "lava flows" flowing on a slope. Measured flow characteristics are used to calculate viscosities for each "lava" using a dynamic visual equation (DVE) of the Jeffries equation. The DVE, which was created in Flash MX, allows students to explore interactively and visually how changing various parameters in the Jeffries equation affects fluid viscosity. Before each experiment, a critical set of questions lead students to make predictions and hone their observational skills. The questions also help students generate graphs and sketches and write brief reports to synthesize their observations. Additional activities incorporating volcanic hazards associated with low versus high viscosity flows and highly viscous explosive eruptions bring students back to very real applications of the

  8. Schroedinger fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, K.K.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of nuclear internal flow and collective inertia, the difference of this flow from that of a classical fluid, and the approach of this flow to rigid flow in independent-particle model rotation are elucidated by reviewing the theory of Schroedinger fluid and its implications for collective vibration and rotation. (author)

  9. Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University.......These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University....

  10. Viscosity Prediction of Natural Gas Using the Friction Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Cisneros, Sergio; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2002-01-01

    Based on the concepts of the friction theory (f-theory) for viscosity modeling, a procedure is introduced for predicting the viscosity of hydrocarbon mixtures rich in one component, which is the case for natural gases. In this procedure, the mixture friction coefficients are estimated with mixing...... rules based on the values of the pure component friction coefficients. Since natural gases contain mainly methane, two f-theory models are combined, where the friction coefficients of methane are estimated by a seven-constant f-theory model directly fitted to methane viscosities, and the friction...... coefficients of the other components are estimated by the one-parameter general f-theory model. The viscosity predictions are performed with the SRK, the PR, and the PRSV equations of state, respectively. For recently measured viscosities of natural gases, the resultant AAD (0.5 to 0.8%) is in excellent...

  11. Bulk viscosity of spin-one color superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa' d, Basil A.

    2009-08-27

    The bulk viscosity of several quark matter phases is calculated. It is found that the effect of color superconductivity is not trivial, it may suppress, or enhance the bulk viscosity depending on the critical temperature and the temperature at which the bulk viscosity is calculated. Also, is it found that the effect of neutrino-emitting Urca processes cannot be neglected in the consideration of the bulk viscosity of strange quark matter. The results for the bulk viscosity of strange quark matter are used to calculate the r-mode instability window of quark stars with several possible phases. It is shown that each possible phase has a different structure for the r-mode instability window. (orig.)

  12. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium dynamics of soft sphere fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yajun; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-07-14

    We use computer simulations to test the freezing-point scaling relationship between equilibrium transport coefficients (self-diffusivity, viscosity) and thermodynamic parameters for soft sphere fluids. The fluid particles interact via the inverse-power potential (IPP), and the particle softness is changed by modifying the exponent of the distance-dependent potential term. In the case of IPP fluids, density and temperature are not independent variables and can be combined to obtain a coupling parameter to define the thermodynamic state of the system. We find that the rescaled coupling parameter, based on its value at the freezing point, can approximately collapse the diffusivity and viscosity data for IPP fluids over a wide range of particle softness. Even though the collapse is far from perfect, the freezing-point scaling relationship provides a convenient and effective way to compare the structure and dynamics of fluid systems with different particle softness. We further show that an alternate scaling relationship based on two-body excess entropy can provide an almost perfect collapse of the diffusivity and viscosity data below the freezing transition. Next, we perform nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the shear-dependent viscosity and to identify the distinct role of particle softness in underlying structural changes associated with rheological properties. Qualitatively, we find a similar shear-thinning behavior for IPP fluids with different particle softness, though softer particles exhibit stronger shear-thinning tendency. By investigating the distance and angle-dependent pair correlation functions in these systems, we find different structural features in the case of IPP fluids with hard-sphere like and softer particle interactions. Interestingly, shear-thinning in hard-sphere like fluids is accompanied by enhanced translational order, whereas softer fluids exhibit loss of order with shear. Our results provide a systematic evaluation

  13. Numerical study of shear thickening fluid with discrete particles embedded in a base fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Zhu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Shear Thickening Fluid (STF is a dilatant material, which displays non-Newtonian characteristics in its unique ability to transit from a low viscosity fluid to a high viscosity fluid. The research performed investigates the STF behavior by modeling and simulation of the interaction between the base flow and embedded rigid particles when subjected to shear stress. The model considered the Lagrangian description of the rigid particles and the Eulerian description of fluid flow. The numerical analysis investigated key parameters such as applied flow acceleration, particle distribution and arrangement, volume concentration of particles, particle size, shape and their behavior in a Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid base. The fluid-particle interaction model showed that the arrangement, size, shape and volume concentration of the particles had a significant effect on the behavior of the STF. Although non-conclusive, the addition of particles in non-Newtonian fluids showed a promising trend of improved shear thickening effects at high shear strain rates.

  14. Navier-Stokes-Voigt Equations with Memory in 3D Lacking Instantaneous Kinematic Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Plinio, Francesco; Giorgini, Andrea; Pata, Vittorino; Temam, Roger

    2017-11-01

    We consider a Navier-Stokes-Voigt fluid model where the instantaneous kinematic viscosity has been completely replaced by a memory term incorporating hereditary effects, in presence of Ekman damping. Unlike the classical Navier-Stokes-Voigt system, the energy balance involves the spatial gradient of the past history of the velocity rather than providing an instantaneous control on the high modes. In spite of this difficulty, we show that our system is dissipative in the dynamical systems sense and even possesses regular global and exponential attractors of finite fractal dimension. Such features of asymptotic well-posedness in absence of instantaneous high modes dissipation appear to be unique within the realm of dynamical systems arising from fluid models.

  15. Mathematical Modelling of Blood Flow through a Tapered Overlapping Stenosed Artery with Variable Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Shit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical study of blood flow through a tapered and overlapping stenosed artery under the action of an externally applied magnetic field. The fluid (blood medium is assumed to be porous in nature. The variable viscosity of blood depending on hematocrit (percentage volume of erythrocytes is taken into account in order to improve resemblance to the real situation. The governing equation for laminar, incompressible and Newtonian fluid subject to the boundary conditions is solved by using a well known Frobenius method. The analytical expressions for velocity component, volumetric flow rate, wall shear stress and pressure gradient are obtained. The numerical values are extracted from these analytical expressions and are presented graphically. It is observed that the influence of hematocrit, magnetic field and the shape of artery have important impact on the velocity profile, pressure gradient and wall shear stress. Moreover, the effect of primary stenosis on the secondary one has been significantly observed.

  16. Navier-Stokes-Voigt Equations with Memory in 3D Lacking Instantaneous Kinematic Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Plinio, Francesco; Giorgini, Andrea; Pata, Vittorino; Temam, Roger

    2018-04-01

    We consider a Navier-Stokes-Voigt fluid model where the instantaneous kinematic viscosity has been completely replaced by a memory term incorporating hereditary effects, in presence of Ekman damping. Unlike the classical Navier-Stokes-Voigt system, the energy balance involves the spatial gradient of the past history of the velocity rather than providing an instantaneous control on the high modes. In spite of this difficulty, we show that our system is dissipative in the dynamical systems sense and even possesses regular global and exponential attractors of finite fractal dimension. Such features of asymptotic well-posedness in absence of instantaneous high modes dissipation appear to be unique within the realm of dynamical systems arising from fluid models.

  17. Coating Of Model Rheological Fluids In Microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelling, Kurt; Boehm, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Researchers have strived to understand and quantify the dynamics within the myriad micro/nano-devices proposed and developed within the last decade. Concepts such as fluid flow, mass transfer, molecule manipulation, and reaction kinetics must be understood in order to intelligently design and operate these devices. In addition to general engineering principles, intelligent design should also focus on material properties (e.g. density, viscosity, conductivity). One key property, viscosity, will play a large part of any fluidic device, including biomedical devices, because the fluids used will, most likely, be non-Newtonian and therefore highly dependent upon the shear rate. Be it a biomedical or macromolecule separation device, or simply the processing of polymeric material, select model polymers and simple flow schemes can be used to investigate the dynamics within micro-devices. Here, we present results for the processing of Newtonian and non-Newtonian polymeric fluids in micro-channels during two-phase penetrating flow. The system investigated is a circular capillary 100 microns in diameter, which is pre-filled with a polymeric liquid. The polymeric liquid is either of Newtonian viscosity, or the same liquid with dispersed high molecular weight polystyrene, which exhibits viscoelastic behavior. A second, immiscible phase, silicone oil of low Newtonian viscosity, is pumped into the system and subsequently cores the polymeric liquid. The dynamics of bubble flow (e.g. bubble velocity and bubble shape) as well as the influence of rheology on coating will be investigated. By studying these model systems, we will learn how complex fluids behave on progressively smaller size scales.

  18. Time-dependent convective flows with high viscosity contrasts under micro gravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaussinger, Florian; Egbers, Christoph; Krebs, Andreas; Schwarzbach, Felix; Kunze, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Thermal driven convection in spherical geometry is of main interest in geo- and astrophysical research. To capture certain aspects of temperature dependent viscosity we investigate the micro-gravity experiment GeoFlow-IIb, located on the ISS. This unique experimental setup consists of a bottom heated and top cooled spherical gap, filled with the silicon oil 1-Nonanol. However, rotation and varying temperature gradients can be applied, to spread the experimental parameter space. The main focus of the current mission is the investigation of time dependent convective flow structures. Since the ISS requirements makes it impossible to use tracer particles, the flow structures are captured by interferometry, whose outcome is analysed by an ground based adapted image processing technique. To guarantee valid results the experimental time of each parameter is in the order of the thermal time scale, which is about 40 min. We are presenting latest results of plume-like and sheet-like time-dependent convective patterns in the spherical shell, their evolution and temporal behaviour under high viscosity contrasts. Due to an unexpected nonlinear coupling between the temperature dependent viscosity of the working fluid and the applied dielectrophoretic force field, we are able to maintain a viscosity contrast of 50 and more. This gives the chance to compare cautiously our experimental results with theoretical assumptions of the mantle convection theory. Besides, numerical simulations in the same parameter regime are performed, which give the opportunity to deduce the internal structure of the experimental flow flied. The main focus of the presented results are the long time temporal evolution of convective plumes in the spherical gap, image capturing- and processing techniques and the deduction of the internal flow field based on planar interferometry pictures.

  19. Turbulent thermal boundary layers with temperature-dependent viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin; Jung, Seo Yoon; Sung, Hyung Jin; Zaki, Tamer A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Turbulent thermal boundary layers with temperature-dependent viscosity are simulated. • Effect of temperature-dependent viscosity on the statistics of the scalar field. • An identity for the Stanton number is derived and analyzed. • Effect of temperature-dependent viscosity on the statistics of scalar transfer rate. • Modification of turbulent flow field leads to an enhanced scalar transfer rate. - Abstract: Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over isothermally heated walls were performed, and the influence of the wall-heating on the thermal boundary layers was investigated. The DNS adopt an empirical relation for the temperature-dependent viscosity of water. The Prandtl number therefore changes with temperature, while the Péclet number is constant. Two wall temperatures (T w = 70 °C and 99 °C) were considered relative to T ∞ = 30 °C, and a reference simulation of TBL with constant viscosity was also performed for comparison. In the variable viscosity flow, the mean and variance of the scalar, when normalized by the friction temperature deficit, decrease relative to the constant viscosity flow. A relation for the mean scalar which takes into account the variable viscosity is proposed. Appropriate scalings for the scalar fluctuations and the scalar flux are also introduced, and are shown to be applicable for both variable and constant viscosity flows. Due to the modification of the near-wall turbulence, the Stanton number and the Reynolds analogy factor are augmented by 10% and 44%, respectively, in the variable viscosity flow. An identity for the Stanton number is derived and shows that the mean wall-normal velocity and wall-normal scalar flux cause the increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Finally, the augmented near-wall velocity fluctuations lead to an increase of the wall-normal scalar flux, which contributes favorably to the enhanced heat transfer at the wall

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of the rheological and dynamical properties of a model alkane fluid under confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D.

    1999-01-01

    We study the effect of wall endash fluid interactions on the state conditions and the effective properties of a model dodecane fluid confined between parallel solid walls. A significant increase in the effective density of the confined fluid is observed with increasing strength of the wall endash fluid interaction. The effect of the wall endash fluid interaction on the rotational relaxation and diffusional relaxation of the fluid is seen in the significant slowing down of the relaxation with increasing wall endash fluid interaction strength. The difference between the confined fluid and the three-dimensional bulk fluid is demonstrated by the strong anisotropy of the dynamical properties, the molecular rotation, and self-diffusion. The viscosity of the confined fluid shows a large difference between weak and strong wall endash fluid interactions, and a significant difference from bulk fluid at low shear rate. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  1. Effect of ionic and non-ionic contrast media on whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity and hematocrit in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspelin, P.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the ionic contrast media diatrizoate, iocarmate and metrizoate and the non-ionic metrizamide on whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity and hematocrit was investigated. All the contrast media increased whole blood and plasma viscosity and reduced the hematocrit. The whole blood viscosity increased with increasing osmolality of the contrast medium solutions, whereas the plasma viscosity increased with increasing viscosity of the contrast medium solutions. The higher the osmolality of the contrast media, the lower the hematocrit became. The normal shear-thinning (decreasing viscosity with increasing shear rate) property of blood was reduced when contrast medium was added to the blood. At 50 per cent volume ratio (contrast medium to blood), the ionic contrast media converted the blood into a shear-thickening (increasing viscosity with increasing shear rate) suspension, indicating a marked rigidification of the single red cell, while the non-ionic contrast medium still produced shear-thinning, indicating less rigidification of the red cell (p<0.01). (Auth.)

  2. Effects of Metal Ions on Viscosity of Aqueous Sodium Carboxylmethylcellulose Solution and Development of Dropping Ball Method on Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Set, Seng; Ford, David; Kita, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    This research revealed that metal ions with different charges could significantly affect the viscosity of aqueous sodium carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) solution. On the basis of an Ostwald viscometer, an improvised apparatus using a dropping ball for examining the viscosity of liquids/solutions has been developed. The results indicate that the…

  3. Is swimming in a shear-thinning fluid more efficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyk, Kyle; Nganguia, Herve; Pak, On Shun

    2017-11-01

    Micro-organisms expend energy moving through complex fluids that often display shear-thinning viscosity. A motility mechanism not only needs to generate the necessary propulsion speed but also be energetically efficient. Although the efficiency of swimming is well characterized in Newtonian fluids, much less is known about this biologically relevant aspect of locomotion in shear-thinning fluids. Does the shear-thinning rheology render swimming more efficient or less? How does it alter the efficiency of different types of swimmers? We will address these fundamental questions of locomotion in a shear-thinning fluid.

  4. Wave anisotropy of shear viscosity and elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the theory of shear wave propagation in a "soft solid" material possessing anisotropy of elastic and dissipative properties. The theory is developed mainly for understanding the nature of the low-frequency acoustic characteristics of skeletal muscles, which carry important diagnostic information on the functional state of muscles and their pathologies. It is shown that the shear elasticity of muscles is determined by two independent moduli. The dissipative properties are determined by the fourth-rank viscosity tensor, which also has two independent components. The propagation velocity and attenuation of shear waves in muscle depend on the relative orientation of three vectors: the wave vector, the polarization vector, and the direction of muscle fiber. For one of the many experiments where attention was distinctly focused on the vector character of the wave process, it was possible to make a comparison with the theory, estimate the elasticity moduli, and obtain agreement with the angular dependence of the wave propagation velocity predicted by the theory.

  5. Dynamic aerofracture or hydrofracture of dense granular packing: pressure and viscosity control of the fracture patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebling, Michael J.; Toussaint, Renaud; Flekkøy, Eirik G.; Jørgen Måløy, Knut

    2013-04-01

    Stress induced by fluid or gases can cause diverse materials to break and fracture. Such hydraulic fractures are a natural and common phenomenon in the field of volcanism and are artificially initiated to enhance the recovery of natural gas and mineral oil by fracturing the reservoir rock with pressurized fluids. A procedure also known as fracking. Recently a new perspective on hydrofractures was added with the storage of supercritical CO2. In this respect two scenarios are considered. First it is one option to inject CO2 into existing hydrofractures, and second the injection of the CO2 can create additional fractures. The typical components for such fractures are a porous material and a compressible gas. The dynamics of such fractures and displacement patterns are simulated and studied in a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell filled with a dense but permeable two-dimensional granular layer. The model used, mixing highly deformable solid and fluid components, can simulate sedimentation problems [1,2], as well as hydrofracture or aerofracture ones. The emerging displacement patterns and fractures variate according to the properties of the injected fluid or gas and the characteristics of the granular phase [3]. The physics behind these variations is discussed and explained. The role of the fluid viscosity and system size shows to lead to a transition from fracturing to compaction, depending on the dynamics of convection versus diffusion of overpressure. The dependence of the obtained patterns on the injection pressure is also explored [4]. References: [1] Niebling, M.J., E.G. Flekkøy, K.J. Måløy, R. Toussaint, Sedimentation instabilities: impact of the fluid compressibility and viscosity, Phys. Rev. E 82, 051302, 2010. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.051302 [2] Niebling, M.J., E.G. Flekkøy, K.J. Måløy, R. Toussaint, Mixing of a granular layer falling through a fluid, Phys. Rev. E 82, 011301 (2010) doi: 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.011301 [3] Niebling, M., R. Toussaint, E.G. Flekk

  6. Effect of viscosity on the dynamics of a spark-generated non-equilibrium bubble in free-field and near a free-surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Y. S.; Balusamy, Saravanan; Karri, Badarinath; Chandra Sahu, Kirti; Badarinath Karri Team

    2017-11-01

    The effect of viscosity on the behaviour of a spark-generated non-equilibrium bubble is investigated experimentally. In specific, the dynamics of the bubble in two scenarios, namely, when the bubble is generated in the bulk of the fluid (``free-field'' bubble) and when the bubble is generated near a free-surface (``free-surface'' bubble) are investigated. The bubble is created using a low-voltage spark circuit and its dynamics is captured using a high speed camera with back-lit illumination. The viscosity of the surrounding medium is varied by using different grades of silicone oil. It is observed that for a ``free-field'' bubble, the bubble oscillates radially and with an increase in the viscosity of the liquid, both the number of oscillations as well as time period of each oscillation are increased. For ``free-surface'' bubbles, our experiments reveal a variety of distinctive bubble and re-entrant jet behaviours as the initial distance of the bubble from the free-surface and the viscosity of the surrounding fluid are varied. It is observed that beyond a certain initial distance of the bubble from the free surface, the bubble behaves as a ``free-field'' bubble.This limiting initial distance is observed to decrease as the viscosity increases.

  7. Influence of Febrile Neutropenia Period on Plasma Viscosity at Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Tek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer, chemotherapy, and infections all together make changes in blood rheology and may affect the defense mechanisms by changing the thrombocyte function and endothelial cell. We have examined changes of blood rheology on plasma viscosity to put on probable following criteria for starting the treatment of febrile neutropenia immediately. A total of 27 postchemotherapy patients (16 males and 11 females with febrile neutropenia diagnosed according to international guidelines have been included into the study. The plasma viscosity of the patients whose febrile neutropenia has been successfully treated was also measured to assess the impact of the duration of neutropenia on viscosity. The plasma viscosities of the patients were significantly higher during neutropenic episode than in nonneutropenic state ( except for alkaline phosphatase. All study parameters, particularly acute phase reactants, were statistically similar during both states. In the correlation of analysis with study parameters and stages, significant correlation was not observed between plasma viscosity alteration and leukocyte-neutrophil alteration, also other study parameters. We have demonstrated significantly elevated plasma viscosity in our patients during febrile neutropenic episode. Despite normal values of various parameters known to trigger plasma viscosity, particularly fibrinogen, it can be easily argued that the main mechanism may be the endothelial injury during infectious process and immune response mediated microcirculatory blood flow alterations.

  8. Aggregates of Chemically Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes as Viscosity Reducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Petriccione

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Confinement and surface effects provided by nanoparticles have been shown to produce changes in polymer molecules affecting their macroscopic viscosity. Nanoparticles may induce rearrangements in polymer conformation with an increase in free volume significantly lowering the viscosity. This phenomenon is generally attributed to the selective adsorption of the polymer high molar mass fraction onto nanoparticles surface when the polymer radius of gyration is comparable to the nanoparticles characteristic dimensions. Carbon nanotubes seem to be the ideal candidate to induce viscosity reduction of polymer due to both their high surface-to-volume ratio and their nanometric sizes, comparable to the gyration radius of polymer chains. However, the amount of nanotube in a polymer system is limited by the percolation threshold as, above this limit, the formation of a nanotubes network hinders the viscosity reduction effect. Based on these findings, we have used multiwalled carbon nanotubes MWCNT “aggregates” as viscosity reducers. Our results reveal both that the use of nanotube clusters reduce significantly the viscosity of the final system and strongly increase the nanotube limiting concentration for viscosity hindering. By using hydroxyl and carboxyl functionalized nanotubes, this effect has been rather maximized likely due to the hydrogen bridged stabilization of nanotube aggregates.

  9. Aggregates of Chemically Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes as Viscosity Reducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriccione, Angelo; Zarrelli, Mauro; Antonucci, Vincenza; Giordano, Michele

    2014-04-22

    Confinement and surface effects provided by nanoparticles have been shown to produce changes in polymer molecules affecting their macroscopic viscosity. Nanoparticles may induce rearrangements in polymer conformation with an increase in free volume significantly lowering the viscosity. This phenomenon is generally attributed to the selective adsorption of the polymer high molar mass fraction onto nanoparticles surface when the polymer radius of gyration is comparable to the nanoparticles characteristic dimensions. Carbon nanotubes seem to be the ideal candidate to induce viscosity reduction of polymer due to both their high surface-to-volume ratio and their nanometric sizes, comparable to the gyration radius of polymer chains. However, the amount of nanotube in a polymer system is limited by the percolation threshold as, above this limit, the formation of a nanotubes network hinders the viscosity reduction effect. Based on these findings, we have used multiwalled carbon nanotubes MWCNT "aggregates" as viscosity reducers. Our results reveal both that the use of nanotube clusters reduce significantly the viscosity of the final system and strongly increase the nanotube limiting concentration for viscosity hindering. By using hydroxyl and carboxyl functionalized nanotubes, this effect has been rather maximized likely due to the hydrogen bridged stabilization of nanotube aggregates.

  10. Clay-based geothermal drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guven, N.; Carney, L.L.; Lee, L.J.; Bernhard, R.P.

    1982-11-01

    The rheological properties of fluids based on fibrous clays such as sepiolite and attapulgite have been systematically examined under conditions similar to those of geothermal wells, i.e. at elevated temperatures and pressures in environments with concentrated brines. Attapulgite- and sepiolite-based fluids have been autoclaved at temperatures in the range from 70 to 800/sup 0/F with the addition of chlorides and hydroxides of Na, K, Ca, and Mg. The rheological properties (apparent and plastic viscosity, fluid loss, gel strength, yield point, and cake thickness) of the autoclaved fluids have been studied and correlated with the chemical and physical changes that occur in the clay minerals during the autoclaving process.

  11. Kinematic viscosity of unstimulated whole saliva in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglio-Bonda, A; Pattarino, F; Foglio-Bonda, P L

    2014-10-01

    To analyze kinematic viscosity and pH of unstimulated whole saliva, evaluate possible variations after sampling, identify any gender differences and detect possible correlations between them. The sample consisted of sixty-four healthy young adults (37 females and 27 males, mean age 25.2 years). Saliva was collected using the spitting method at 11:00 am. Kinematic viscosity was determined with a capillary viscometer (ViscoClock, Schott-Geräte Mainz, Germany) equipped with a micro-Ubbelohde capillary. Viscosity and pH were measured at a temperature of 36 °C in a thermostatic bath. Viscosity and pH data were evaluated almost simultaneously at six different times after sampling in order to identify any variations due to aging. The data were statistically analyzed using Student's t test and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. In total sample kinematic viscosity was 1.40 cSt (SD = 0.39; RSD % = 27.81), in the male and female groups was 1.33 cSt (SD = 0.35, RSD% = 26.31) and 1.45 cSt (SD = 0.41, RSD % = 28.45) respectively; the difference was not statistically significant. Viscosity decreased exponentially as a function of time after sampling then reaching a plateau around 1.12 cSt, while the pH values increased linearly. There was a trend of pH to decrease while viscosity decreases. Kinematic viscometry could be a valid tool to evaluate salivary viscosity. Degradation of saliva after sampling affects viscosity and slightly pH. The use of capillary viscometer to evaluate salivary aging needs more improvements. Further studies are required to investigate and explain the effects of different techniques to reduce the film forming on the air/liquid interface during measurement.

  12. An eddy viscosity model for flow in a tube bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussan, D.; Grandotto, M.

    1998-01-01

    The work described in this paper is part of the development of GENEPI a 3-dimensional finite element code, designed for the thermalhydraulic analysis of steam generators. It focuses on the implementation of two-phase flow turbulence-induced viscosity in a tube bundle. The GENEPI code, as other industrial codes, uses the eddy viscosity concept introduced by Boussinesq for single phase flow. The concept assumes that the turbulent momentum transfer is similar to the viscous shear stresses. Eddy viscosity formulation is reasonably well known for single phase flows, especially in simple geometries (i.e., in smooth tube, around a single body, or behind a row of bars/tubes), but there exists very little information on it for two-phase flows. An analogy between single and two-phases is used to set up a model for eddy viscosity. The eddy viscosity model examined in this paper is used for a tube bundle geometry and, therefore, is extended to include anisotropy to the classic model. Each of the main flow directions (cross flow inline, cross flow staggered, and parallel flows) gives rise to a specific eddy viscosity formula. The results from a parametric study indicate that the eddy viscosity in the staggered flow is roughly 1.5 times as large as that for the inline cross flow, 60 times as large as that for the parallel flow, and 105 as large as that for the molecular viscosity. Then, the different terms are combined with each other to result in a global eddy viscosity model for a steam generator tube bundle flow. (author)

  13. Swimming efficiency in a shear-thinning fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Nganguia, Herve; Pietrzyk, Kyle; Pak, On Shun

    2017-01-01

    Micro-organisms expend energy moving through complex media. While propulsion speed is an important property of locomotion, efficiency is another factor that may determine the swimming gait adopted by a micro-organism in order to locomote in an energetically favorable manner. The efficiency of swimming in a Newtonian fluid is well characterized for different biological and artificial swimmers. However, these swimmers often encounter biological fluids displaying shear-thinning viscosities. Litt...

  14. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  15. Physical Properties of Low-Molecular Weight Polydimethylsiloxane Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Christine Cardinal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Graham, Alan [Univ. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States); Nemer, Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Phinney, Leslie M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garcia, Robert M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Soehnel, Melissa Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stirrup, Emily Kate [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Physical property measurements including viscosity, density, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity of low-molecular weight polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fluids were measured over a wide temperature range (-50°C to 150°C when possible). Properties of blends of 1 cSt and 20 cSt PDMS fluids were also investigated. Uncertainties in the measurements are cited. These measurements will provide greater fidelity predictions of environmental sensing device behavior in hot and cold environments.

  16. Jet-medium interaction and conformal relativistic fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2018-03-01

    A formalism to study the mode-by-mode response to the energy deposition of external hard partons propagating in a relativistic fluid is developed, based on a semianalytical solution of conformal fluid dynamics. The soft-particle production resulting from the jet-medium interaction is calculated, and the recoil of the viscous medium is studied for different orientations of the relativistic jets and for different values of the specific shear viscosity η /s .

  17. Theoretical aspects concerning working fluids in hydraulic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tița Irina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the properties of working fluid, viscosity is the most important as it regards especially to pumps. In order to study the behavior of hydrostatic transmission it is important to create a reliable research instrument for dynamic simulation. Our research expertise being in SimHydraulics consequently this instrument is the suitable block diagram. The purpose of this paper is to present the possible ways to customize the properties of the working fluid in the block diagram.

  18. Yam tuber mucilage as a candidate substance for saliva substitute: in vitro study of its viscosity and influences on lysozyme and peroxidase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Hong-Seop; Park, Moon-Soo; Chang, Ji-Youn; Kim, Yoon-Young

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the viscosity of yam tuber mucilage (YTM) and its effects on lysozyme and peroxidase activities in solution phase and on surface phase. Two kinds of YTM were extracted, one containing both protein and carbohydrate and the other containing mainly carbohydrate. Hen egg-white lysozyme and bovine lactoperoxidase were used as lysozyme and peroxidase sources, respectively. Viscosity was measured with a cone-and-plate digital viscometer. Lysozyme activity was determined using the turbidimetric method, and peroxidase activity was determined using the NbsSCN assay. Hydroxyapatite beads were used as a solid phase. The viscosity values of YTM followed a pattern of a non-Newtonian fluid. The carbohydrate concentration affected the viscosity values at all shear rates, while the protein concentration affected the viscosity values at low shear rates. It could be suggested that YTM composed of 1.0 mg/ml protein and 1.0 mg/ml carbohydrate has viscosity values similar to those of unstimulated whole saliva at shear rates present at routine oral functions. Hydroxyapatite-adsorbed YTM significantly increased the adsorption and subsequent enzymatic activities of lysozyme, but not those of peroxidase. Yam tuber mucilage has viscoelastic properties similar to those of human saliva and enhances the enzymatic activity of lysozyme on hydroxyapatite surfaces. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method for water hammer analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Chen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new fast and efficient algorithm, Chebyshev super spectral viscosity (SSV method, is introduced to solve the water hammer equations. Compared with standard spectral method, the method's advantage essentially consists in adding a super spectral viscosity to the equations for the high wave numbers of the numerical solution. It can stabilize the numerical oscillation (Gibbs phenomenon and improve the computational efficiency while discontinuities appear in the solution. Results obtained from the Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method exhibit greater consistency with conventional water hammer calculations. It shows that this new numerical method offers an alternative way to investigate the behavior of the water hammer in propellant pipelines.

  20. Temperature Dependence Viscosity and Density of Different Biodiesel Blends

    OpenAIRE

    Vojtěch Kumbár; Antonín Skřivánek

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to assess the effect of rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME) concentration in diesel fuel on its viscosity and density behaviour. The density and dynamic viscosity were observed at various mixing ratios of RME and diesel fuel. All measurements were performed at constant temperature of 40 °C. Increasing ratio of RME in diesel fuel was reflected in increased density value and dynamic viscosity of the blend. In case of pure RME, pure diesel fuel, and a blend of both (B3...

  1. Temperature Relations of Selected Engine Oils Dynamic Viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Hlaváč Peter; Božiková Monika; Presová Radmila

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on temperature relations of dynamic viscosity for selected engine oils. The effect of temperature on new and used oil dynamic viscosity was investigated. Measurements were performed on three different motor oil samples. All the three motor oil samples were synthetic. The first oil sample was new, the second sample was used for 15,000 km, and the third sample was used for 30,000 km. There were made two measurements of samples in one week. Dynamic viscosity was measured usi...

  2. Intrinsic viscosity of bead models for macromolecules and bioparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmachowski, L

    2001-10-01

    A new method based on the fractal dimension dependence of the hydrodynamic radius is proposed for calculation of the intrinsic viscosity of bead models. The method describes properly the viscosity increment except for elongated structures such as linear aggregates and ellipsoids. It is expected to be useful for very compact structures, for which the volume correction does not improve the results calculated by the modified Oseen tensor. The results obtained for the viscosity increment lie between the volume corrected ones and those determined by the cubic substitution procedure. They are close to the values recalculated from the falling velocities of the models analyzed.

  3. Prescission neutron multiplicities and nuclear viscosity: A systematic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Krishan, K.

    1996-01-01

    Prescission neutron multiplicities have been calculated in the framework of a simple, dynamical model of fission. The fission trajectories have been calculated by solving Euler-Lagrange equations with dissipation generated through two-body nuclear viscosity. Systematic study of the relationship between the prescission neutron multiplicities and nuclear viscosity has been made in the range of mass 150 endash 200 and incident energy 4 endash 13 MeV/nucleon. The values of the viscosity coefficients which are used to predict the observed prescission neutron multiplicities follow a global relation in the region of mass and energy studied

  4. Elongational viscosity of multiarm (Pom-Pom) polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2006-01-01

    -Pom was estimated to have 2.5 arms on average, while the estimate is 3.3 for the asymmetric star. The molar mass of each arm is about 27 kg/mol. The melts were characterized in the linear viscoelastic regime and in non-linear elongational rheometry. The transient elongational viscosity for the Pom-Pom molecule...... it corresponds well with an estimate of the maximum stretchability of the backbone. Time-strain separability was not observed for the 'Asymmetric star' molecule at the elongation rates investigated. The transient elongational viscosity for the 'Pom-Pom' molecule went through a reproducible maximum...... in the viscosity at the highest elongational rate....

  5. Shear viscosities of photons in strongly coupled plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di-Lun Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the shear viscosity of thermalized photons in the quark gluon plasma (QGP at weak coupling and N=4 super Yang–Mills plasma (SYMP at both strong and weak couplings. We find that the shear viscosity due to the photon–parton scattering up to the leading order of electromagnetic coupling is suppressed when the coupling of the QGP/SYMP is increased, which stems from the blue-shift of the thermal-photon spectrum at strong coupling. In addition, the shear viscosity rapidly increases near the deconfinement transition in a phenomenological model analogous to the QGP.

  6. Viscosity and attenuation of sound wave in high density deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuko; Ariyasu, Tomio

    1985-01-01

    The penetration of low frequency sound wave into the fuel deuterium is discussed as for laser fusion. The sound velocity and the attenuation constant due to viscosity are calculated for high density (n = 10 24 -- 10 27 cm -3 , T = 10 -1 -- 10 4 eV) deuterium. The shear viscosity of free electron gas and the bulk viscosity due to ion-ion interaction mainly contribute to the attenuation of sound wave. The sound wave of the frequency below 10 10 Hz can easily penetrate through the compressed fuel deuterium of diameter 1 -- 10 3 μm. (author)

  7. Structural Origin of Shear Viscosity of Liquid Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2018-01-25

    The relation between the microscopic structure and shear viscosity of liquid water was analyzed by calculating the cross-correlation between the shear stress and the two-body density using the molecular dynamics simulation. The slow viscoelastic relaxation that dominates the steady-state shear viscosity was ascribed to the destruction of the hydrogen-bonding network structure along the compression axis of the shear distortion, which resembles the structural change under isotropic hydrostatic compression. It means that the shear viscosity of liquid water reflects the anisotropic destruction-formation dynamics of the hydrogen-bonding network.

  8. Magnetoviscous effect of ferrite-based magnetic fluid for EOR application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latiff, Noor Rasyada Ahmad; Soleimani, Hassan; Zaid, Hasnah Mohd; Adil, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic fluid is proposed as a substitute for the application of polymer solution as a means to recover the residual oil left in the bypassed region in oil reservoirs. When subjected to magnetic field, the viscosity of magnetic fluids increases and enable flow control. In this study, the response of magnetic nanofluid with the applied magnetic field was observed as a function of shear rate. Two types of samples, namely magnetite and cobalt ferrite of 0.1% w/v of different polydispersity index, saturation magnetization and mean hydrodynamic particle size were used. The strength of the applied magnetic field was also varied to investigate the effect of magnetic field strength on the viscosity enhancement of magnetic fluid. Shear dependence response of the magnetic fluid exhibit non-Newtonian behavior when magnetic field of 20 to 40 mT was applied. Viscosity of the magnetic fluid reduced with increasing shear rates, showing shear thinning behavior. At a particular shear rate, viscosity remains constant when the strength of magnetic field increases indicating saturation in chain length even at low field. Magnetoviscous effect (MVE) is calculated as an indicator for a viscosity gain magnitude when magnetic field is applied. Cobalt ferrite sample shows larger MVE compared to magnetite that may be attributed to the higher polydispersity index. In conclusion, particle size distribution is the most dominant factor affecting MVE of the dilute magnetic fluid when magnetic field is applied.

  9. Bianchi Type-I bulk viscous fluid string dust magnetized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bianchi Type-I magnetized bulk viscous fluid string dust cosmological model is investigated. To get a determinate model, we have assumed the conditions and = constant where is the shear, the expansion in the model and the coefficient of bulk viscosity. The behaviour of the model in the presence and ...

  10. Bianchi Type-I bulk viscous fluid string dust magnetized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Bianchi Type-I magnetized bulk viscous fluid string dust cosmological model is investigated. To get a determinate model, we have assumed the conditions σ ∝ θ and ζθ = constant where σ is the shear, θ the expansion in the model and ζ the coefficient of bulk viscosity. The behaviour of the model in the presence ...

  11. Long-time stability effects of quadrature and artificial viscosity on nodal discontinuous Galerkin methods for gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Bradford; Hackl, Jason; Balachandar, Sivaramakrishnan

    2017-11-01

    Nodal discontinuous Galerkin schemes present an attractive approach to robust high-order solution of the equations of fluid mechanics, but remain accompanied by subtle challenges in their consistent stabilization. The effect of quadrature choices (full mass matrix vs spectral elements), over-integration to manage aliasing errors, and explicit artificial viscosity on the numerical solution of a steady homentropic vortex are assessed over a wide range of resolutions and polynomial orders using quadrilateral elements. In both stagnant and advected vortices in periodic and non-periodic domains the need arises for explicit stabilization beyond the numerical surface fluxes of discontinuous Galerkin spectral elements. Artificial viscosity via the entropy viscosity method is assessed as a stabilizing mechanism. It is shown that the regularity of the artificial viscosity field is essential to its use for long-time stabilization of small-scale features in nodal discontinuous Galerkin solutions of the Euler equations of gas dynamics. Supported by the Department of Energy Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program Contract DE-NA0002378.

  12. Vapour pressures, densities, and viscosities of the (water + lithium bromide + potassium acetate) system and (water + lithium bromide + sodium lactate) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, Antonio de; Donate, Marina; Rodriguez, Juan F.

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of thermophysical properties (vapour pressure, density, and viscosity) of the (water + lithium bromide + potassium acetate) system LiBr:CH 3 COOK = 2:1 by mass ratio and the (water + lithium bromide + sodium lactate) system LiBr:CH 3 CH(OH)COONa = 2:1 by mass ratio were measured. The system, a possible new working fluid for absorption heat pump, consists of absorbent (LiBr + CH 3 COOK) or (LiBr + CH 3 CH(OH)COONa) and refrigerant H 2 O. The vapour pressures were measured in the ranges of temperature and absorbent concentration from T = (293.15 to 333.15) K and from mass fraction 0.20 to 0.50, densities and viscosities were measured from T = (293.15 to 323.15) K and from mass fraction 0.20 to 0.40. The experimental data were correlated with an Antoine-type equation. Densities and viscosities were measured in the same range of temperature and absorbent concentration as that of the vapour pressure. Regression equations for densities and viscosities were obtained with a minimum mean square error criterion

  13. Vapour pressures, densities, and viscosities of the (water + lithium bromide + potassium acetate) system and (water + lithium bromide + sodium lactate) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Antonio de [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Castilla - La Mancha, Avda. de Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13004 Ciudad Real (Spain); Donate, Marina [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Castilla - La Mancha, Avda. de Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13004 Ciudad Real (Spain); Rodriguez, Juan F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Castilla - La Mancha, Avda. de Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13004 Ciudad Real (Spain)]. E-mail: juan.rromero@uclm.es

    2006-02-15

    Measurements of thermophysical properties (vapour pressure, density, and viscosity) of the (water + lithium bromide + potassium acetate) system LiBr:CH{sub 3}COOK = 2:1 by mass ratio and the (water + lithium bromide + sodium lactate) system LiBr:CH{sub 3}CH(OH)COONa = 2:1 by mass ratio were measured. The system, a possible new working fluid for absorption heat pump, consists of absorbent (LiBr + CH{sub 3}COOK) or (LiBr + CH{sub 3}CH(OH)COONa) and refrigerant H{sub 2}O. The vapour pressures were measured in the ranges of temperature and absorbent concentration from T = (293.15 to 333.15) K and from mass fraction 0.20 to 0.50, densities and viscosities were measured from T = (293.15 to 323.15) K and from mass fraction 0.20 to 0.40. The experimental data were correlated with an Antoine-type equation. Densities and viscosities were measured in the same range of temperature and absorbent concentration as that of the vapour pressure. Regression equations for densities and viscosities were obtained with a minimum mean square error criterion.

  14. Mathematical model for the prediction of the dead heavy crude oil viscosity produced in Monagas State, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Darío Marín Velásquez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Viscosity is the property of fluids to oppose movement when a cutting effort is applied on them to convey them from one point to another. Heavy oil has a high viscosity greater than 1000 cP, which makes it difficult to transport. The present work shows a mathematical model for the prediction of the viscosity of dead heavy oils produced in the fields of Monagas State, Venezuela. For the development of the work, 25 samples of oil were collected and the viscosity was measured at 5 temperatures, in addition to the API gravity and the percentage of Asphaltenes. The data were introduced in the Statgraphics Centurion XVI statistical package and through multiple regression analysis two mathematical models were obtained, 1 linear multiple and 2 multiple nonlinear; The best model being divided according to its coefficient of determination R2 and the average relative error (ARE. The selected model was compared with the Glaso, Bennison and Naseri models. The nonlinear multiple model with R2 of 0.9792 and ARE of 5.05% was obtained as the best model, surpassing the models of Glaso (35.5% ARR, Bennison (107.5% ARE and Naseri (61.7% ARE.

  15. Lie group analysis for the effect of viscosity and thermophoresis particle deposition on free convective heat and mass transfer in the presence of suction/injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivagnana Prabhu K.K.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis has been carried out to study heat and mass transfer characteristics of an incompressible and Newtonian fluid having temperature-dependent fluid viscosity and thermophoresis particle deposition over a vertical stretching surface with variable stream condition. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. The vertical surface is assumed to be permeable so as to allow for possible wall suction or injection. The governing differential equations are derived and transformed using Lie group analysis. The transformed equations are solved numerically by applying Runge-Kutta Gill scheme with shooting technique. Favorable comparisons with previously published work on various special cases of the problem are obtained. Numerical results for the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles for a prescribed temperature-dependent fluid viscosity and thermophoresis particle deposition parameters are presented graphically to elucidate the influence of the various physical parameters.

  16. Learning about Non-Newtonian Fluids in a Student-Driven Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounas-Frazer, D. R.; Lynn, J.; Zaniewski, A. M.; Roth, N.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a simple, low-cost experiment and corresponding pedagogical strategies for studying fluids whose viscosities depend on shear rate, referred to as "non-Newtonian fluids." We developed these materials teaching for the Compass Project, an organization that fosters a creative, diverse, and collaborative community of science…

  17. BEHAVIOR OF AN IMMERSED CORE SAMPLE IN A FLUID CONTAINER DURING A SATURATION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S GHEBOULI

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present the behavior of some core samples immersed in a  fluid container during a saturation technique. The experimental work was carried out by using two different fluids. The results obtained are similar except for the saturation stages. They are caused by different viscosities and surface tensions.

  18. Translational friction coefficient of a permeable cylinder in a sheet of viscous fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegel, F.W.

    1979-01-01

    The author calculates the translational friction coefficient and the translational diffusion coefficient of a permeable cylinder moving in a sheet of fluid which is embedded on both sides in a fluid of much lower viscosity. The result, which is an asymptotic expression valid in the limit of small

  19. Deriving a blood-mimicking fluid for particle image velocimetry in Sylgard-184 vascular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Majid Y; Holdsworth, David W; Poepping, Tamie L

    2009-01-01

    A new blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) has been developed for particle image velocimetry (PIV), which enables flow studies in vascular models (phantoms). A major difficulty in PIV that affects measurement accuracy is the refraction and distortion of light passing through the interface between the model and the fluid, due to the difference in refractive index (n) between the two materials. The problem can be eliminated by using a fluid with a refractive index matching that of the model. Such fluids are not commonly available, especially for vascular research where the fluid should also have a viscosity similar to human blood. In this work, a blood-mimicking fluid, composed of water (47.38% by weight), glycerol (36.94% by weight) and sodium iodide salt (15.68% by weight), was developed for compatibility with our silicone (Sylgard 184; n = 1.414) phantoms. The fluid exhibits a dynamic viscosity of 4.31+/-0.03 cP which lies within the range of human blood viscosity (4.4+/-0.6 cP). Both refractive index and viscosity were attained at 22.2+/-0.2 degrees C, which is a feasible room temperature, thus eliminating the need for a temperature-control system. The fluid will be used to study hemodynamics in vascular flow models fabricated from Sylgard 184.

  20. Supercritical fluids in chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertz, A.; Charton, F.

    2011-01-01

    When the pressure and temperature of a fluid are simultaneously higher than their critical point values, the fluid is said to be supercritical. Supercritical fluids have unique physico-chemical properties, in particular they have specific gravity close to that of liquids and viscosity close to that of gases. Carbon dioxide CO 2 (P c = 73.8 bars, T c = 31 C. degrees) is the most widely used compound in supercritical processes. In the nuclear field, chemistry inspired by liquid phase extraction has been developed for the supercritical CO 2 used as a diluent in association with extractant systems such as organo-phosphorus compounds or β-dike-tones. The Japanese Super-DIREX (Supercritical fluid Direct Extraction) process exploits the supercritical CO 2 - tri-n-butyl phosphate - nitric acid chemical system to extract actinides from spent fuel. In the United States, the same chemical system is utilized in an industrial facility to recover enriched uranium from incineration ash. Supercritical water H 2 O (P c = 221 bars, T c = 374 C. degrees) exhibits solvation properties close to those of organic solvents and can solubilise organic compounds that are insoluble in liquid water. In the nuclear field, CEA is studying oxidation in supercritical water, also called hydrothermal oxidation, for the mineralization of contaminated organic solvents. (A.C.)