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Sample records for fluid pressure measurements

  1. Measuring fluid pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for measuring the pressure of a fluid having characteristics that make it unsuitable for connection directly to a pressure gauge. The method is particularly suitable for the periodic measurement of the pressure of a supply of liquid Na to Na-lubricated bearings of pumps for pumping Na from a reservoir to the bearing via a filter, the reservoir being contained in a closed vessel containing an inert blanket gas, such as Ar, above the Na. (UK)

  2. Sound velocity and equation-of-state measurements in high pressure fluid and solid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebenberg, D.H.; Mills, R.L.; Bronson, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    A piston--cylinder apparatus was used to obtain P, V, T, and simultaneous values of longitudinal sound velocity in helium fluid throughout the ranges 75 to 300 0 K and 3 to 20 kbar. Some 670 data sets were obtained for the fluid and used in a double-process least-squares fit to an equation of state of the Benedict type. Additional measurements extended across the melting line into the solid phase at pressures up to 18 kbar. Measurements of the compressibility are compared with those obtained by Stewart along the 4 0 K isotherm up to 20 kbar. We discuss the use of helium as a pressure medium in high-pressure diamond anvil cells. Essentially no data are given

  3. Sensor for measurement of fuel rod gas pressure during loss-of-fluid-tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billeter, T.R.

    1979-05-01

    Qualification tests have been conducted of a measurement system for determining the pressure of certain fuel rods in the loss-of-fluid-test (LOFT) reactor. Because of physical size (0.35-in. OD by 5.5-in length) and operational characteristics, an eddy current device was selected as the most promising measurement transducer for the application. The sensor must operate at pressure up to 17.2 MPa (2500 psig) and at temperatures up to 800 0 F. During the reactor transient caused by loss of coolant flow, sensor temperature and applied pressure will vary rapidly and significantly. Consequently, qualification tests included subjection of the sensor to rapid depressurization, temperature transients, and blowdowns in an autoclave, as well as to calibrations and various slow temperature cycles

  4. Brachial cuff measurements of blood pressure during passive leg raising for fluid responsiveness prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhal, K; Ehrmann, S; Benzekri-Lefèvre, D; Runge, I; Legras, A; Dequin, P-F; Mercier, E; Wolff, M; Régnier, B; Boulain, T

    2012-05-01

    The passive leg raising maneuver (PLR) for fluid responsiveness testing relies on cardiac output (CO) measurements or invasive measurements of arterial pressure (AP) whereas the initial hemodynamic management during shock is often based solely on brachial cuff measurements. We assessed PLR-induced changes in noninvasive oscillometric readings to predict fluid responsiveness. Multicentre interventional study. In ICU sedated patients with circulatory failure, AP (invasive and noninvasive readings) and CO measurements were performed before, during PLR (trunk supine, not modified) and after 500-mL volume expansion. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were determined for fluid responsiveness (>10% volume expansion-induced increase in CO) prediction. In 112 patients (19% with arrhythmia), changes in noninvasive systolic AP during PLR (noninvasiveΔ(PLR)SAP) only predicted fluid responsiveness (cutoff 17%, n=21, positive likelihood ratio [LR] of 26 [18-38]), not unresponsiveness. If PLR-induced change in central venous pressure (CVP) was at least of 2 mm Hg (n=60), suggesting that PLR succeeded in altering cardiac preload, noninvasiveΔ(PLR)SAP performance was good: AUC of 0.94 [0.85-0.98], positive and negative LRs of 5.7 [4.6-6.8] and 0.07 [0.009-0.5], respectively, for a cutoff of 9%. Of note, invasive AP-derived indices did not outperform noninvasiveΔ(PLR)SAP. Regardless of CVP (i.e., during "blind PLR"), noninvasiveΔ(PLR)SAP more than 17% reliably identified fluid responders. During "CVP-guided PLR", in case of sufficient change in CVP, noninvasiveΔ(PLR)SAP performed better (cutoff of 9%). These findings, in sedated patients who had already undergone volume expansion and/or catecholamines, have to be verified during the early phase of circulatory failure (before an arterial line and/or a CO measuring device is placed). Copyright © 2012 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Molybdenum cell for x-ray diffraction measurements of fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Kozaburo; Katoh, Masahiro; Inui, Masanori

    2004-03-01

    We have developed a sample cell for x-ray diffraction measurements of fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and high pressures. All parts of the cell are made of molybdenum which is resistant to the chemical corrosion of alkali metals. Single crystalline molybdenum disks electrolytically thinned down to 40 μm were used as the walls of the cell through which x rays pass. The crystal orientation of the disks was controlled in order to reduce the background from the cell. All parts of the cell were assembled and brazed together using a high-temperature Ru-Mo alloy. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements have been successfully carried out for fluid rubidium up to 1973 K and 16.2 MPa. The obtained S(Q) demonstrates the applicability of the molybdenum cell to x-ray diffraction measurements of fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and high pressures.

  6. Direct measurement of cerebrospinal fluid pressure through the cochlea in a congenitally deaf child with Mondini dysplasia undergoing cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J M; Ashcroft, P

    1999-03-01

    Perilymph/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) "gushers" may occur at cochleostomy during cochlear implant surgery, particularly in patients with congenital cochlear duct malformation in which CSF in the internal auditory meatus is in direct communication with the perilymphatic space in the cochlea. The object of the study was to measure the pressure and flow of a CSF gusher at cochleostomy. The design was a preoperative pressure measurement. The setting was a multidisciplinary cochlear implant program. A 4-year-old girl with bilateral Mondini deformity undergoing cochlear implantation was studied. A size 23 FG intravenous cannula was inserted into the cochlea and connected to a pediatric drip set to form an improvised manometer. Intracochlear fluid pressure was measured at 14 cm H2O, equivalent to the normal CSF pressure that would be recorded in a child of this age at lumbar puncture. An indirect measurement of the likely size of the CSF/perilymph defect was made. This technique may allow better assessment of the risk of postoperative CSF leakage and meningitis. This simple technique of measuring the pressure in a perilymph gusher can be used to assess the need for careful sealing of the cochleostomy, to measure the reduction in pressure produced by head elevation or a spinal drain, and to assess the probable size of a defect in the lamina cribrosa.

  7. Fluid-flow pressure measurements and thermo-fluid characterization of a single loop two-phase passive heat transfer device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinca, A.; Mangini, D.; Mameli, M.; Fioriti, D.; Filippeschi, S.; Araneo, L.; Roth, N.; Marengo, M.

    2017-11-01

    A Novel Single Loop Pulsating Heat Pipe (SLPHP), with an inner diameter of 2 mm, filled up with two working fluids (Ethanol and FC-72, Filling Ratio of 60%), is tested in Bottom Heated mode varying the heating power and the orientation. The static confinement diameter for Ethanol and FC-72, respectively 3.4 mm and 1.7mm, is above and slightly under the inner diameter of the tube. This is important for a better understanding of the working principle of the device very close to the limit between the Loop Thermosyphon and Pulsating Heat Pipe working modes. With respect to previous SLPHP experiments found in the literature, such device is designed with two transparent inserts mounted between the evaporator and the condenser allowing direct fluid flow visualization. Two highly accurate pressure transducers permit local pressure measurements just at the edges of one of the transparent inserts. Additionally, three heating elements are controlled independently, so as to vary the heating distribution at the evaporator. It is found that peculiar heating distributions promote the slug/plug flow motion in a preferential direction, increasing the device overall performance. Pressure measurements point out that the pressure drop between the evaporator and the condenser are related to the flow pattern. Furthermore, at high heat inputs, the flow regimes recorded for the two fluids are very similar, stressing that, when the dynamic effects start to play a major role in the system, the device classification between Loop Thermosyphon and Pulsating Heat Pipe is not that sharp anymore.

  8. A fluid-structure interaction model of the internal carotid and ophthalmic arteries for the noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiulis, Edgaras; Džiugys, Algis; Navakas, Robertas; Striūgas, Nerijus

    2017-05-01

    Accurate and clinically safe measurements of intracranial pressure (ICP) are crucial for secondary brain damage prevention. There are two methods of ICP measurement: invasive and noninvasive. Invasive methods are clinically unsafe; therefore, safer noninvasive methods are being developed. One of the noninvasive ICP measurement methods implements the balance principle, which assumes that if the velocity of blood flow in both ophthalmic artery segments - the intracranial (IOA) and extracranial (EOA) - is equal, then the acting ICP on the IOA and the external pressure (Pe) on the EOA are also equal. To investigate the assumption of the balance principle, a generalized computational model incorporating a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) module was created and used to simulate noninvasive ICP measurement by accounting for the time-dependent behavior of the elastic internal carotid (ICA) and ophthalmic (OA) arteries and their interaction with pulsatile blood flow. It was found that the extra balance pressure term, which incorporates the hydrodynamic pressure drop between measurement points, must be added into the balance equation, and the corrections on a difference between the velocity of blood flow in the IOA and EOA must be made, due to a difference in the blood flow rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pressure and density measurements of selected fluid-bearing zones at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winstanley, D.; Carrasco, R.; Zurkoff, J.

    1986-01-01

    A field effort is presently being conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to collect accurate pressure and density information from the Culebra and Magenta dolomite members of the Rustler formation. The spatial variation of fluid density that occurs in these water-bearing units requires the use of numerical models to accurately solve for flow direction and velocity. The groundwater regime is a vital element in possible release scenarios of radionuclide-bearing fluid from the repository. Field tests were conducted on four wells utilizing a testing apparatus composed of two pressure and temperature monitoring systems and a point water sampler. Pressure versus depth plots are linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.999 or greater. Comparison of the calculated density and measured density of water obtained at depth agree within 2 percent of density measurements obtained after continuous pumping of the formation for several days before sampling. The temperature gradients ranged from 0.4 0 to 0.6 0 C per 100 feet. The data presented here are preliminary and serve as developmental information for the detailed operating plan currently under preparation

  10. Remote query measurement of pressure, fluid-flow velocity, and humidity using magnetoelastic thick-film sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, C. A.; Kouzoudis, D.

    2000-01-01

    Free-standing magnetoelastic thick-film sensors have a characteristic resonant frequency that can be determined by monitoring the magnetic flux emitted from the sensor in response to a time varying magnetic field. This property allows the sensors to be monitored remotely without the use of direct physical connections, such as wires, enabling measurement of environmental parameters from within sealed, opaque containers. In this work, we report on application of magnetoelastic sensors to measurement of atmospheric pressure, fluid-flow velocity, temperature, and mass load. Mass loading effects are demonstrated by fabrication of a remote query humidity sensor, made by coating the magnetoelastic thick film with a thin layer of solgel deposited Al2O3 that reversibly changes mass in response to humidity. c2000 Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. [Arterial pressure curve and fluid status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, G; Fukui, K

    2009-04-01

    Fluid optimization is a major contributor to improved outcome in patients. Unfortunately, anesthesiologists are often in doubt whether an additional fluid bolus will improve the hemodynamics of the patient or not as excess fluid may even jeopardize the condition. This article discusses physiological concepts of liberal versus restrictive fluid management followed by a discussion on the respective capabilities of various monitors to predict fluid responsiveness. The parameter difference in pulse pressure (dPP), derived from heart-lung interaction in mechanically ventilated patients is discussed in detail. The dPP cutoff value of 13% to predict fluid responsiveness is presented together with several assessment techniques of dPP. Finally, confounding variables on dPP measurements, such as ventilation parameters, pneumoperitoneum and use of norepinephrine are also mentioned.

  12. Pressure measurements in harsh environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, C.W.; Ames, E.S.

    1979-01-01

    A fluid coupled plate (FCP) gage was designed which allows pressure measurements to be made in harsh environments (including debris) using conventional pressure transducers. The pressure transducer is isolated by means of a rigid force plate which is supported by a bellows having one corrugation. This portion of the gage is machined from a single piece of material. The interior of the gage is filled with a phenol fluid which has a low compressibility

  13. Relationships between fluid pressure and capillary pressure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, the Bower's and Gardner's technique of velocity-to fluid pressure gradient methods were applied on seismic reflection data in order to predict fluid pressure of an X- oil field in Niger Delta Basin. Results show significant deflection common with fluid pressure zones . With average connate water saturation Swc ...

  14. Change in interstitial fluid pressure measurements in carcinoma of the uterine cervix as an early predictor of radioresponsiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasek, Kristina; Faul, Clare; Znati, Cindy

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) has been found to be elevated in cervical carcinomas. This study sought to evaluate IFP as a potential early measure of tumor response to radiation therapy. Identification of poor responders early in the course of treatment may allow the clinician to modify the treatment strategy early in the course of therapy. Materials and Methods: IFP was measured using the wick-in-needle technique in 42 patients undergoing definitive radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix. Measurements were taken before and after external beam radiation treatment (EBRT) in 25, after intracavitary treatment (ICT) in 7, and after both EBRT and ICT in 10 patients. An additional 10 patients had weekly measurements during radiotherapy. Tumor stage, size, hemoglobin, and clinical response were assessed and correlated with IFP readings. Results: All initial IFP readings were elevated. The extent of elevation did not correlate with outcome (p=0.76) or stage (p=0.6). Smaller tumors had a higher initial IFP (p=0.02). Tumor response correlated with change in IFP readings (p=0.01), tumor size (0.04), hemoglobin (p=0.01), and stage (0.04). On multivariate analysis, change in IFP remained an independent predictor of response. The IFP change from pretreatment to post-EBRT was - 13±3 in complete responders versus 4±11 and 18±10 in the partial and nonresponders respectively (p=0.01). In those with post-ICT readings, the change was -18±4 in complete responders versus 54±18 in the partial responders (p=0.01). In 10 patients undergoing weekly measurement, 8 complete responders had decreasing IFP measurements. An average fall of 51.6% was seen in five patients at < 1620cGy despite little or no change in tumor size, and by 2700cGy (average decrease 31%) in the remaining 3 complete responders. Nonresponders had either no change or an increase in IFP throughout EBRT. Conclusion: IFP is elevated in tumors of the uterine cervix. Decreasing IFP measurement

  15. Fluid Dynamics of Pressurized, Entrained Coal Gasifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Pressurized, entrained gasification is a promising new technology for the clean and efficient combustion of coal. Its principle is to operate a coal gasifier at a high inlet gas velocity to increase the inflow of reactants, and at an elevated pressure to raise the overall efficiency of the process. Unfortunately, because of the extraordinary difficulties involved in performing measurements in hot, pressurized, high-velocity pilot plants, its fluid dynamics are largely unknown. Thus the designer cannot predict with certainty crucial phenomena like erosion, heat transfer and solid capture. In this context, we are conducting a study of the fluid dynamics of Pressurized Entrained Coal Gasifiers (PECGs). The idea is to simulate the flows in generic industrial PECGs using dimensional similitude. To this end, we employ a unique entrained gas-solid flow facility with the flexibility to recycle--rather than discard--gases other than air. By matching five dimensionless parameters, suspensions in mixtures of helium, carbon dioxide and sulfur hexafluoride simulate the effects of pressure and scale-upon the fluid dynamics of PECGs. Because it operates under cold, atmospheric conditions, the laboratory facility is ideal for detailed measurements

  16. Gait and Balance Measures Can Identify Change From a Cerebrospinal Fluid Tap Test in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ryan; Marquez, Jodie; Osmotherly, Peter

    2018-04-25

    To identify in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) undergoing a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tap test (TT) for consideration of a ventricular peritoneal (VP) shunt: (1) gait and balance measures, which identify symptom change; (2) differences present between pre- and post-CSF TT scores between patients classified as responders and nonresponder; (3) ability of patients with iNPH to accurately quantify change in their gait and balance symptoms from a CSF TT. Prospective observational study. Post-CSF TT assessment was completed 2-4 hours post. Tertiary referral neurological and neurosurgical hospital. Patients (N=74) with iNPH receiving a 30 mL CSF TT for consideration of a VP shunt. Patients underwent a battery of gait and balance measures pre- and post-CSF TT and indicated their perceived change on a global rating of change (GRC). Patients deemed to improve and offered VP shunt insertion by a neurologist or neurosurgeon were labeled responders. Performance oriented mobility assessment (Tinetti), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), timed Up and Go (TUG), 10-meter walk test (10MWT), GRC. Forty patients were classified responders, 34 nonresponders. Significant differences were identified for responders: Tinetti (3.88 points), TUG (3.98 seconds), 10MWT (0.08 m/sec), and BBS (5.29 points). Significant differences were found for nonresponders for the Tinetti (0.91 points) and BBS (2.06 points). Change scores for responders and nonresponders were significantly different for all tests between responders and nonresponders. GRC scores for gait (+2 for responders, 0 for nonresponders) and balance (+2.5 for responders, 0 for nonresponders) were both significantly different. The Tinetti, BBS, and TUG can identify change in patients undergoing a CSF TT for iNPH. Patients appear to be able to accurately identify if change has occurred. Copyright © 2018 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  18. Fluid-flow measurements in low permeability media with high pressure gradients using neutron imaging: Application to concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehya, Mohamad; Andò, Edward; Dufour, Frédéric; Tengattini, Alessandro

    2018-05-01

    This article focuses on a new experimental apparatus for investigating fluid flow under high pressure gradients within low-permeability porous media by means of neutron imaging. A titanium Hassler cell which optimises neutron transparency while allowing high pressure confinement (up to 50 MPa) and injection is designed for this purpose and presented here. This contribution focuses on the development of the proposed methodology thanks to some preliminary results obtained using a new neutron imaging facility named NeXT on the D50 beamline at the Institute Laue Langevin (Grenoble). The preliminary test was conducted by injecting normal water into concrete sample prepared and saturated with heavy water to take advantage of the isotope sensitivity of neutrons. The front between these two types of water is tracked in space and time with a combination of neutron radiography and tomography.

  19. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and pain in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N

    1992-01-01

    A casual relation between pancreatic pressure and pain has been searched for decades but lack of appropriate methods for pressure measurements has hindered progress. During the 1980's the needle method has been used for direct intraoperative pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements and later...... for percutaneous sonographically-guided pressure measurements. Clinical and experimental evaluation of the method showed comparable results at intraoperative and percutaneous measurements and little week-to-week variation. Furthermore, comparable pressures in duct and adjacent pancreatic tissue were found, i.......e. the needle pressure mirrors the intraductal pressure. Comparisons of pain registrations, morphological and functional parameters with pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements have revealed a relation between pressure and pain which probably is causal. In patients with pain the high pressures previously...

  20. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... were compared with preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) morphology. The preoperatively elevated pressure decreased in all patients but one, to normal or slightly elevated values. The median pressure decrease was 50% (range, 0-90%; p = 0.01). The drainage anastomosis (a...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  1. Diagnostic system for measuring temperature, pressure, CO.sub.2 concentration and H.sub.2O concentration in a fluid stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jr., William P.; Jatana, Gurneesh Singh; Yoo, Ji Hyung; Parks, II, James E.

    2017-12-26

    A diagnostic system for measuring temperature, pressure, CO.sub.2 concentration and H.sub.2O concentration in a fluid stream is described. The system may include one or more probes that sample the fluid stream spatially, temporally and over ranges of pressure and temperature. Laser light sources are directed down pitch optical cables, through a lens and to a mirror, where the light sources are reflected back, through the lens to catch optical cables. The light travels through the catch optical cables to detectors, which provide electrical signals to a processer. The processer utilizes the signals to calculate CO.sub.2 concentration based on the temperatures derived from H.sub.2O vapor concentration. A probe for sampling CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2O vapor concentrations is also disclosed. Various mechanical features interact together to ensure the pitch and catch optical cables are properly aligned with the lens during assembly and use.

  2. Method and device for measuring fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, R.; Marinkovich, P.S.; Spadaro, P.R.; Stout, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    The invention is a fluid flow measuring device for determining the coolant flow at the entrance to a specific nuclear reactor fuel region. The device comprises a plurality of venturis having the upstream inlet and throat pressure of each respectively manifolded together to provide one static pressure signal for each region monitored. The device provides accurate flow measurement with low pressure losses and uniform entrance and discharge flow distribution. 1 claim, 7 figures

  3. Quantitative structure factor and density measurements of high-pressure fluids in diamond anvil cells by x-ray diffraction: Argon and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggert, Jon H.; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    We report quantitatively accurate high-pressure, structure-factor measurements of fluids in diamond anvil cells (DAC's) using x-ray diffraction. In the analysis of our diffraction data, we found it possible (and necessary) to determine the density directly. Thus, we also present a diffraction-based determination of the equation of state for fluid water. The analysis of these measurements is difficult since the diamond anvils are many times as thick as the sample and excessive care must be taken in the background subtraction. Due to the novel nature of the experiment and the complexity of the analysis, this paper is concerned primarily with a careful exposition of our analytical methods. Our analysis is applicable to both atomic and molecular fluids and glasses, and we present results for the structure factor and density of two relatively low-Z liquids: argon and water. In order to validate our methods we present an extensive comparison of our measurements on water at P≅0 in a DAC to recent state-of-the-art x-ray and neutron diffraction experiments and to first-principles simulations at ambient conditions

  4. Raman spectroscopic measurements of CO2 density: Experimental calibration with high-pressure optical cell (HPOC) and fused silica capillary capsule (FSCC) with application to fluid inclusion observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Chou, I-Ming; Hu, W.; Burruss, Robert; Sun, Q.; Song, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful method for the determination of CO2 densities in fluid inclusions, especially for those with small size and/or low fluid density. The relationship between CO2 Fermi diad split (Δ, cm−1) and CO2 density (ρ, g/cm3) has been documented by several previous studies. However, significant discrepancies exist among these studies mainly because of inconsistent calibration procedures and lack of measurements for CO2fluids having densities between 0.21 and 0.75 g/cm3, where liquid and vapor phases coexist near room temperature.In this study, a high-pressure optical cell and fused silica capillary capsules were used to prepare pure CO2 samples with densities between 0.0472 and 1.0060 g/cm3. The measured CO2 Fermi diad splits were calibrated with two well established Raman bands of benzonitrile at 1192.6 and 1598.9 cm−1. The relationship between the CO2 Fermi diad split and density can be represented by: ρ = 47513.64243 − 1374.824414 × Δ + 13.25586152 × Δ2 − 0.04258891551 × Δ3(r2 = 0.99835, σ = 0.0253 g/cm3), and this relationship was tested by synthetic fluid inclusions and natural CO2-rich fluid inclusions. The effects of temperature and the presence of H2O and CH4 on this relationship were also examined.

  5. Comparison of Intracranial Pressure and Pressure Reactivity Index Obtained Through Pressure Measurements in the Ventricle and in the Parenchyma During and Outside Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage Episodes in a Manipulation-Free Patient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Samuel Patrick; Bruyninckx, Dominike; Callebaut, Ina; Depreitere, Bart

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the effect of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage on the intracranial pressure (ICP) signal measured in the parenchyma and the ventricle as well as the effect on the pressure reactivity index (PRx) calculated from both signals.  Ten patients were included in this prospective study. All patients received a parenchymal ICP sensor and an external ventricular drain (EVD) for CSF drainage. ICP signals (ICP-p and ICP-evd) were captured. Part of the study was a period of 90 min during which the patient was free from any manipulation, consisting of 30 min of drainage (O1), 30 min EVD closed (C) and 30 min of drainage (O2).  Mean ICP-evd and mean AMP-evd increased (3.03 and 0.46 mmHg) from O1 to C and decreased (2.12 and 0.43 mmHg) from C to O2. ICP-p and AMP-p changes were less pronounced (closing EVD: +0.81 mmHg/+0.22 mmHg; opening EVD: -0.22 mmHg/-0.05 mmHg). Mean difference between PRx-evd and PRx-p was 0.12 for O1, 0.02 for C and -0.02 for O2. The intraclass correlation coefficient for absolute agreement of single measures was 0.66 for O1, 0.77 for C and 0.69 for O2. Mean PRx differences demonstrated a significant difference between O1 versus C and O1 versus O2 but not between C versus O2.  Drainage of CSF reduces ICP magnitude and amplitude through the EVD. This effect was only marginal in parenchymal ICP measurements. In manipulation-free circumstances, agreement of PRx obtained through parenchymal and ventricular measurements was moderate to good, depending on the statistical method, and was not necessarily influenced by drainage.

  6. Effect of pressure on the physical properties of magnetorheological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Spaggiari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, several applications of magnetorheological (MR fluids are present in the industrial world, nonetheless system requirements often needs better material properties. In technical literature a previous work shows that MR fluids exhibit a pressure dependency called squeeze strengthen effect. Since a lot of MR fluid based devices are rotary devices, this paper investigates the behaviour of MR fluids under pressure when a rotation is applied to shear the fluid. The system is designed in order to apply both the magnetic field and the pressure and follows a Design of Experiment approach. The experimental apparatus comprises a cylinder in which a piston is used both to apply the pressure and to shear the fluid. The magnetic circuit is designed to provide a nearly constant induction field in the MR fluid. The experimental apparatus measures the torque as a function of the variables considered and the yield shear stress is computed. The analysis of the results shows that there is a positive interaction between magnetic field and pressure, which enhances the MR fluid performances more than twice.

  7. Measurement of fast transient pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procaccia, Henri

    1978-01-01

    The accuracy, reliability and sensitivity of a pressure transducers define its principal static characteristics. When the quantity measured varies with time, the measurement carries a dynamic error and a delay depending on the frequency of this variation. Hence, when fast pressure changes in a fluid have to be determined, different kinds of pressure transducers can be used depending on their inherent dynamic characteristics which must be compared with those of the transient phenomenon to be analysed. The text describes the pressure transducers generally employed in industry for analysing such phenomenon and gives two practical applications developed in the EDF: the first submits the measurements and results of pump cavitation tests carried out at the Vitry II EDF power station; the second deals with hammer blows particularly noticed in nuclear power stations and required the use of transducers of exceptionally high performance such as strain gauge transducers and piezoelectric transducers (response time within 1m sec.) [fr

  8. Osmotic generation of 'anomalous' fluid pressures in geological environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzii, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    Osmotic pressures are generated by differences in chemical potential of a solution across a membrane. But whether osmosis can have a significant effect on the pressure of fluids in geological environments has been controversial, because the membrane properties of geological media are poorly understood. 'Anomalous' pressures - large departures from hydrostatic pressure that are not explicable in terms of topographic or fluid-density effects are widely found in geological settings, and are commonly considered to result from processes that alter the pore or fluid volume, which in turn implies crustal changes happening at a rate too slow to observe directly. Yet if osmosis can explain some anomalies, there is no need to invoke such dynamic geological processes in those cases. Here I report results of a nine- year in situ measurement of fluid pressures and solute concentrations in shale that are consistent with the generation of large (up to 20 MPa) osmotic-pressure anomalies which could persist for tens of millions of years. Osmotic pressures of this magnitude and duration can explain many of the pressure anomalies observed in geological settings. The require, however, small shale porosity and large contrasts in the amount of dissolved solids in the pore waters - criteria that may help to distinguish between osmotic and crystal-dynamic origins of anomalous pressures.

  9. Vlasov fluid model with electron pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerwin, R.

    1975-11-01

    The Vlasov-ion, fluid-electron model of Freidberg for studying the linear stability of hot-ion pinch configurations is here extended to include electron pressure. Within the framework of an adiabatic electron-gas picture, it is shown that this model is still amenable to the numerical methods described by Lewis and Freidberg

  10. Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Calculation Using Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model Flow Measurements in Primary Loop of Coolant in a Pressurized Water Reactor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Farkas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to simulate the thermohydraulic consequences of a main steam line break and to compare the obtained results with Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model (ROCOM 1.1 experimental results. The objective is to utilize data from steady-state mixing experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD calculations to determine the flow distribution and the effect of thermal mixing phenomena in the primary loops for the improvement of normal operation conditions and structural integrity assessment of pressurized water reactors. The numerical model of ROCOM was developed using the FLUENT code. The positions of the inlet and outlet boundary conditions and the distribution of detailed velocity/turbulence parameters were determined by preliminary calculations. The temperature fields of transient calculation were averaged in time and compared with time-averaged experimental data. The perforated barrel under the core inlet homogenizes the flow, and therefore, a uniform temperature distribution is formed in the pressure vessel bottom. The calculated and measured values of lowest temperature were equal. The inlet temperature is an essential parameter for safety assessment. The calculation predicts precisely the experimental results at the core inlet central region. CFD results showed a good agreement (both qualitatively and quantitatively with experimental results.

  11. Variability of hydrostatic hepatic vein and ascitic fluid pressure, and of plasma and ascitic fluid colloid osmotic pressure in patients with liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1980-01-01

    The variability of hydrostatic hepatic vein and ascitic fluid pressures and of plasma and ascitic fluid colloid osmotic (oncotic) pressures was assessed during hepatic venous catheterization by repeated measurements on different days and at different locations in patients with cirrhosis...... of the liver. Furthermore, calculation of oncotic pressure from protein determinations was compared to the directly measured value of plasma and ascitic fluid samples. Repeated measurements of hydrostatic pressure in the same hepatic vein within 15 min showed a standard deviation (SD) below 1 mm......Hg. The variation in hydrostatic hepatic vein pressures, pressure differences and ascitic fluid pressures (when measured at different locations within the liver and peritoneal space during a single examination) was 1.5, 1.0 and 1.0 mmHg (SD), respectively. When measured on different days, the variation...

  12. Pressure Measurement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    System 8400 is an advanced system for measurement of gas and liquid pressure, along with a variety of other parameters, including voltage, frequency and digital inputs. System 8400 offers exceptionally high speed data acquisition through parallel processing, and its modular design allows expansion from a relatively inexpensive entry level system by the addition of modular Input Units that can be installed or removed in minutes. Douglas Juanarena was on the team of engineers that developed a new technology known as ESP (electronically scanned pressure). The Langley ESP measurement system was based on miniature integrated circuit pressure-sensing transducers that communicated pressure information to a minicomputer. In 1977, Juanarena formed PSI to exploit the NASA technology. In 1978 he left Langley, obtained a NASA license for the technology, introduced the first commercial product, the 780B pressure measurement system. PSI developed a pressure scanner for automation of industrial processes. Now in its second design generation, the DPT-6400 is capable of making 2,000 measurements a second and has 64 channels by addition of slave units. New system 8400 represents PSI's bid to further exploit the 600 million U.S. industrial pressure measurement market. It is geared to provide a turnkey solution to physical measurement.

  13. Effect of portal hypertension and duct ligature on pancreatic fluid pressures in cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Heyeraas, K J

    1990-01-01

    measured before and after acutely induced portal hypertension; in the other group of cats the pressures were measured after an overnight ligature of the pancreatic main duct. At rest the needle pressure was equal to duct pressure but significantly lower than interstitial fluid pressure and portal pressure...

  14. Line pressure effects on differential pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, G.G.; Evans, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of differential pressure transducers in experimental pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems was evaluated. Transient differential pressure measurements made using a simple calibration proportionality relating differential pressure to output voltage could have large measurement uncertainties. A more sophisticated calibration equation was derived to incorporate the effects of zero shifts and sensitivity shifts as pressure in the pressure sensing line changes with time. A comparison made between the original calibration proportionality equation and the derived compensation equation indicates that potential measurement uncertainties can be reduced

  15. Osmotic pressure of the cutaneous surface fluid of Rana esculenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid Larsen, Erik; Ramløv, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The osmotic pressure of the cutaneous surface fluid (CSF) in vivo was measured for investigating whether evaporative water loss (EWL) derives from water diffusing through the skin or fluid secreted by exocrine subepidermal mucous glands. EWL was stimulated by subjecting R. esculenta to 30–34 °C....../Kg, n = 16. Osmolality of lymph was, 239 ± 4 mosmol/Kg, n = 8. Thus the flow of water across the epidermis would be in the direction from CSF to the interstitial fluid driven by the above osmotic gradients and/or coupled to the inward active Na+ flux via the slightly hyperosmotic paracellular...... compartment [EH Larsen et al. (2009) Acta Physiologica 195: 171–186]. It is concluded that the source of EWL of the frog on land is the fluid secreted by the mucous glands and not water diffusing through the skin. The study supports the hypothesis [EH Larsen (2011) Acta Physiologica 202: 435–464] that volume...

  16. MRI contrast agent concentration and tumor interstitial fluid pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L J; Schlesinger, M

    2016-10-07

    The present work describes the relationship between tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) and the concentration of contrast agent for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). We predict the spatial distribution of TIFP based on that of contrast agent concentration. We also discuss the cases for estimating tumor interstitial volume fraction (void fraction or porosity of porous medium), ve, and contrast volume transfer constant, K(trans), by measuring the ratio of contrast agent concentration in tissue to that in plasma. A linear fluid velocity distribution may reflect a quadratic function of TIFP distribution and lead to a practical method for TIFP estimation. To calculate TIFP, the parameters or variables should preferably be measured along the direction of the linear fluid velocity (this is in the same direction as the gray value distribution of the image, which is also linear). This method may simplify the calculation for estimating TIFP. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Intraperitoneal pressure: ascitic fluid and splanchnic vascular pressures, and their role in prevention and formation of ascites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Stage, J G; Schlichting, P

    1980-01-01

    Seventeen patients with ascites due to cirrhosis underwent hepatic venous catheterization and pressure measurement in the ascitic fluid. Intraperitoneal fluid hydrostatic pressure (IFP) ranged 3.5-22, mean 11.2 mm Hg, and correlated closely to the pressure in the inferior vena cava (r = 0.97, P ... that ascitic fluid stems the pressures in the splanchnic venous vascular bed up to a higher level, but that the transmural hydrostatic pressure difference decreases simultaneously. The results are discussed in relation to the local 'oedema-preventing' mechanisms: (a) increased interstitial hydrostatic fluid.......001), which was on average 1.8 mmHg above that of ascitic fluid (P pressure (WHVP) (range 19-43, mean 32 mmHg) correlated directly to IFP (0.89, P

  18. Reducing pressure oscillations in discrete fluid power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Hedegaard; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2016-01-01

    Discrete fluid power systems featuring transmission lines inherently include pressure oscillations. Experimental verification of a discrete fluid power power take off system for wave energy converters has shown the cylinder pressure to oscillate as force shifts are performed. This article investi...... investigates how cylinder pressure oscillations may be reduced by shaping the valve opening trajectory without the need for closed loop pressure feedback. Furthermore the energy costs of reducing pressure oscillations are investigated....

  19. Serial blood pressure measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.R. Koehler

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to study the effects of a 60-s interval of venous congestion between two noninvasive measurements of arterial blood pressure (ABP on the fluctuation of ABP, assessed by the standard deviation of the differences between two readings. ABP was measured in 345 successive patients, at rest, four times each. For 269 participants, one pair of readings was obtained with a 60-s interval and the other pair without an interval. For 76 patients, the first pair was read at the same interval, and the second pair had venous congestion interposed and there was no waiting interval. There was no increased ABP oscillation, either when there was no interval between ABP readings, or when venous congestion was interposed compared to pairs of ABP measurements performed with a 60-s interval. There was no increase in ABP oscillations when successive ABP readings were taken without an interval or even with venous congestion interposed. Contrary to the present belief, there seems to be no loss of reliability when blood pressure recordings are taken immediately one after another, in the clinical setting.

  20. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. Influences on cerebral hemodynamic and cerebrospinal fluid pressure--chemical autoregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.S.; Tachibana, H.; Hardenberg, J.P.; Dowell, R.E. Jr.; Kitagawa, Y.; Mortel, K.F.

    1984-01-01

    Blood flow in the cerebral gray matter was measured in normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease by 133Xe inhalation. Flow values in the frontal and temporal gray matter increased after lowering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure by lumbar puncture in normal pressure hydrocephalus (p less than 0.05) and also after shunting. One case with cerebral complications did not improve clinically. In Alzheimer disease the reverse (decreases in flow in the gray matter) occurred after removal of CSF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus was associated with impaired cerebral vasomotor responsiveness during 100% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide inhalation. This complication was restored toward normal after CSF removal and/or shunting. Cerebral blood flow measurements appear to be useful for confirming the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and predicting the clinical benefit from shunting

  1. Instrumentation, measurements, and experiments in fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Rathakrishnan, E

    2007-01-01

    NEED AND OBJECTIVE OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDY Some Fluid Mechanics MeasurementsMeasurement SystemsSome of the Important Quantities Associated with FluidFlow MeasurementsFUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID MECHANICSProperties of FluidsThermodynamic PropertiesSurface TensionAnalysis of Fluid FlowBasic and Subsidiary Laws for Continuous MediaKinematics of Fluid FlowStreamlinesPotential FlowViscous FlowsGas DynamicsWIND TUNNELSLow-Speed Wind TunnelsPower Losses in a Wind TunnelHigh-Speed Wind TunnelsHypersonic TunnelsInstrume

  2. Pressure Measurement Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    FFPI Industries Inc. is the manufacturer of fiber-optic sensors that furnish accurate pressure measurements in internal combustion chambers. Such an assessment can help reduce pollution emitted by these engines. A chief component in the sensor owes its seven year- long development to Lewis Research Center funding to embed optical fibers and sensors in metal parts. NASA support to Texas A&M University played a critical role in developing this fiber optic technology and led to the formation of FFPI Industries and the production of fiber sensor products. The simple, rugged design of the sensor offers the potential for mass production at low cost. Widespread application of the new technology is forseen, from natural gas transmission, oil refining and electrical power generation to rail transport and the petrochemical paper product industry.

  3. Bernoulli's Principle Applied to Brain Fluids: Intracranial Pressure Does Not Drive Cerebral Perfusion or CSF Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eric; Ros, Maxime; Moyse, Emmanuel; Lorthois, Sylvie; Swider, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    In line with the first law of thermodynamics, Bernoulli's principle states that the total energy in a fluid is the same at all points. We applied Bernoulli's principle to understand the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) and intracranial fluids. We analyzed simple fluid physics along a tube to describe the interplay between pressure and velocity. Bernoulli's equation demonstrates that a fluid does not flow along a gradient of pressure or velocity; a fluid flows along a gradient of energy from a high-energy region to a low-energy region. A fluid can even flow against a pressure gradient or a velocity gradient. Pressure and velocity represent part of the total energy. Cerebral blood perfusion is not driven by pressure but by energy: the blood flows from high-energy to lower-energy regions. Hydrocephalus is related to increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resistance (i.e., energy transfer) at various points. Identification of the energy transfer within the CSF circuit is important in understanding and treating CSF-related disorders. Bernoulli's principle is not an abstract concept far from clinical practice. We should be aware that pressure is easy to measure, but it does not induce resumption of fluid flow. Even at the bedside, energy is the key to understanding ICP and fluid dynamics.

  4. Do Arthroscopic Fluid Pumps Display True Surgical Site Pressure During Hip Arthroscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeremy A; Marland, Jennifer D; Payne, Brayden; Whiting, Daniel R; West, Hugh S

    2018-01-01

    To report on the accuracy of 5 commercially available arthroscopic fluid pumps to measure fluid pressure at the surgical site during hip arthroscopy. Patients undergoing hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement were block randomized to the use of 1 of 5 arthroscopic fluid pumps. A spinal needle inserted into the operative field was used to measure surgical site pressure. Displayed pump pressures and surgical site pressures were recorded at 30-second intervals for the duration of the case. Mean differences between displayed pump pressures and surgical site pressures were obtained for each pump group. Of the 5 pumps studied, 3 (Crossflow, 24K, and Continuous Wave III) reflected the operative field fluid pressure within 11 mm Hg of the pressure readout. In contrast, 2 of the 5 pumps (Double Pump RF and FMS/DUO+) showed a difference of greater than 59 mm Hg between the operative field fluid pressure and the pressure readout. Joint-calibrated pumps more closely reflect true surgical site pressure than gravity-equivalent pumps. With a basic understanding of pump design, either type of pump can be used safely and efficiently. The risk of unfamiliarity with these differences is, on one end, the possibility of pump underperformance and, on the other, potentially dangerously high operating pressures. Level II, prospective block-randomized study. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Sensing line effects on PWR-based differential pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.P.; Neff, G.G.

    1982-01-01

    An incorrrect configuration of the fluid-filled pressure sensing lines connecting differential pressure transducers to the pressure taps in a pressurized water reactor system can cause errors in the measurement and, during rapid pressure transients, could cause the transducer to fail. Testing was performed in both static and dynamic modes to experimentally determine the effects of sensing lines of various lengths, diameters, and materials. Testing was performed at ambient temperature with absolute line pressures at about 17 MPa using water as the pressure transmission fluid

  6. Comparison of regional pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and endoscopic retrograde pancreatographic morphology in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measured by the needle method and pancreatic duct morphology was studied in 16 patients with chronic pancreatitis. After preoperative endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) the patients were submitted to a drainage operation. The predrain......The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measured by the needle method and pancreatic duct morphology was studied in 16 patients with chronic pancreatitis. After preoperative endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) the patients were submitted to a drainage operation...

  7. Effect of tilting on blood pressure and interstitial fluid pressures of bluefish and smooth dogfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvy, C S; DuBois, A B

    1982-01-01

    Tolerance of the circulatory system of fish for gravitational stress has not been measured previously. We examined this in bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) and smooth dogfish (Mustelus canis) by placing them horizontally on a V-board in air while their gills were perfused with aerated seawater, then tilting them head up for 0.5 h, and finally returning them to horizontal. Meanwhile, we recorded the blood pressure, pulse pressure, and heart rate in the ventral aorta, and interstitial fluid pressure in the head and tail. All four bluefish tolerated a 30 degrees tilt or even a 60 degrees tilt with little change in blood pressure or interstitial pressure in the anterior and posterior regions. All recovered afterward. However, in the seven dogfish examined, the posterior interstitial fluid pressure increased from 2.8 +/- 1.0 cmH2O before tilting to 11.8 +/- 3.3 cmH2O toward the end of a 30 degrees tilt lasting 30 min. The blood pressure decreased as the pulse pressure approached zero, showing that circulatory insufficiency had developed due to insufficient venous return to the heart. Most of the dogfish died within a few hours after the experiment. These findings are in keeping with the conclusion that the vasculature of bluefish has more rigidity, less permeability, and perhaps more compensatory tone than that of smooth dogfish. We speculate that bluefish may have evolved their circulatory tolerance for gravity as a cross-adaptation to the stresses imposed on the circulation by forward acceleration and by regional differences of transcutaneous pressure occurring during fast carangiform swimming.

  8. CT study in primary low spinal fluid pressure syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Moritoshi; Okayama, Kenji; Kubo, Hiromasa; Watanabe, Hiromi; Endou, Riuko (Ohmiya Red Cross Hospital, Yono, Saitama (Japan))

    1991-02-01

    CT findings in primary low spinal fluid pressure syndrome were studied on the basis of 3 cases. Case 1 was a 43-year-old male with a complicated bilateral isodense subdural hematoma (SDH). Case 2 was a 45-year-old female with a complicated bilateral high dense SDH. Case 3 was a 36-year-old female discharged without any complications after spinal fluid pressure normalized. Slight downward displacement of the brain under low spinal fluid pressure was shown as the narrowing of a Sylvian fissures and infratentorial cisterns on CT. On the other hand, in this syndrome with a complicated bilateral isodense SDH, in addition to this finding, CT revealed distortion and narrowing of body lateral ventricles, which might be differential findings from this syndrome without complicated SDH. Under low spinal fluid pressure, bridging veins are more stretched by a downward displacement of the brain. And consequently they were easily injured and SDH was developed. (author).

  9. On-line pressure measurement using scanning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morss, A.G.; Watson, A.P.

    1978-08-01

    Data collection methods can be improved significantly by using pressure scanning systems in conjunction with transducers for the measurement of pressure distribution in fluid flow rigs. However, the response of pressure transducers to the slight random pressure fluctuations that occur in practice can cause some measurement problems, especially for accurate work. The nature of these pressure fluctuations is examined and suitable analysis techniques are recommended. Results obtained using these techniques are presented. It is concluded that by using the correct techniques pressure transducer systems can be used to measure pressure distributions accurately and are sufficiently sensitive to measure very small systematic effects with great precision. (author)

  10. Magnetic measurements under pressure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zentková, M.; Arnold, Zdeněk; Mihalik, M.; Mihalik, M.; Zentko, A.; Kamarád, Jiří; Mitróová, Z.; Mat`aš, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 57, 8/S (2006), s. 29-32 ISSN 1335-3632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : hydrostatic pressure * Prussian blue analogues * AC susceptibility * intermetallic compound * ferromagnetism * errimagnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  11. Temperature and Pressure Effects on Drilling Fluid Rheology and ECD in Very Deep Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rommetveit, R.; Bjoerkvoll, K.S.

    1997-12-31

    The rheological properties of drilling fluids are usually approximated to be independent of pressure and temperature. In many cases this is a good approximation. However, for wells with small margins between pore and fracture pressure, careful evaluations and analysis of the effects of temperature and pressure on well bore hydraulics and kick probability are needed. In this publication the effects of pressure and temperature are discussed and described for typical HPHT (High Pressure High Temperature) wells. Laboratory measurements show that rheology is very pressure and temperature dependent. The practical implications of these observations are illustrated through a series of calculations with an advanced pressure and temperature simulator. 10 refs., 15 figs.

  12. Predicting and measuring fluid responsiveness with echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Miller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Echocardiography is ideally suited to guide fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients. It can be used to assess fluid responsiveness by looking at the left ventricle, aortic outflow, inferior vena cava and right ventricle. Static measurements and dynamic variables based on heart–lung interactions all combine to predict and measure fluid responsiveness and assess response to intravenous fluid esuscitation. Thorough knowledge of these variables, the physiology behind them and the pitfalls in their use allows the echocardiographer to confidently assess these patients and in combination with clinical judgement manage them appropriately.

  13. Experimental Pressure Measurements on Hydropower Turbine Runners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, Samuel F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2017-04-28

    The range of hydrodynamic operating conditions to which the turbine is exposed results in significant pressure fluctuations on both the pressure and suction sides of the blades. Understanding these dynamic pressures has a range of applications. Structurally, the resulting dynamic loads are significant in understanding the design life and maintenance schedule of the bearing, shafts and runner components. The pulsing pressures have also been seen to have a detrimental effect on the surface condition of the blades. Biologically, the pressure gradients and pressure extremes are the primary driver of barotrauma for fish passing through hydroturbines. Improvements in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to simulate such unsteady pressures in the regions of concern. High frequency model scale and prototype measurements of pressures at the blade are important in the validation of these models. Experimental characterization of pressure fields over hydroturbine blades has been demonstrated by a number of studies which using multiple pressure transducers to map the pressure contours on the runner blades. These have been performed at both model and prototype scales, often to validate computational models of the pressure and flow fields over the blades. This report provides a review of existing studies in which the blade pressure was measured in situ. The report assesses the technology for both model and prototype scale testing. The details of the primary studies in this field are reported and used to inform the types of hardware required for similar experiments based on the Ice Harbor Dam owned by the US Corps of Engineers on the Snake River, WA, USA. Such a study would be used to validate the CFD performed for the BioPA.

  14. High-pressure fluid phase equilibria phenomenology and computation

    CERN Document Server

    Deiters, Ulrich K

    2012-01-01

    The book begins with an overview of the phase diagrams of fluid mixtures (fluid = liquid, gas, or supercritical state), which can show an astonishing variety when elevated pressures are taken into account; phenomena like retrograde condensation (single and double) and azeotropy (normal and double) are discussed. It then gives an introduction into the relevant thermodynamic equations for fluid mixtures, including some that are rarely found in modern textbooks, and shows how they can they be used to compute phase diagrams and related properties. This chapter gives a consistent and axiomatic approach to fluid thermodynamics; it avoids using activity coefficients. Further chapters are dedicated to solid-fluid phase equilibria and global phase diagrams (systematic search for phase diagram classes). The appendix contains numerical algorithms needed for the computations. The book thus enables the reader to create or improve computer programs for the calculation of fluid phase diagrams. introduces phase diagram class...

  15. Generation and maintenance of low effective pressures due to fluid flow in fractured rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garagash, D.; Brantut, N.; Schubnel, A.; Bhat, H. S.

    2017-12-01

    The pore fluid pressure is expected to increase with increasing depth in the crust, primarily due to gravity forces. Because direct measurements are impossible beyond a few kilometers depths, the pore pressure gradient is often assumed to be linear (e.g., hydrostatic). However, a number of processes can severely modify the fluid pressure distribution in the crust. Here, we investigate the effect of fluid flow coupled to nonlinear permeability-effective pressure relationship. We performed a set of laboratory fluid flow experiments on thermally cracked Westerly granite at confining pressures up to 200 MPa and pore fluid pressures up to 120 MPa. Fluid flow was generated by imposing very strong pore pressure differences, up to 120 MPa, between the ends of the sample. The vertical fluid pressure distribution inside the sample was inferred by a set of 8 radial strain gauges, and an array of 10 P- and S-wave transducers. When the effective stress is kept near zero at one end of the sample and maintained high at the other end, the steady-state pore pressure profile is nonlinear. The effective stress, as inferred from the strain gauge array, remains close to zero through 2/3 of the sample, and increases sharply near the drained end of the sample. The ultrasonic data are used to build a vertical P- and S-wave velocity structure. The wave velocity profiles are consistent with a nonlinear relationship between wave velocity and effective pressure, as expected in thermally cracked granite. Taken together, our experimental data confirm the theoretical prediction that near zero effective stress can be generated through significant sections of rocks as a response to an imposed fluid flow. This has strong implications for the state of stress of the Earth's crust, especially around major continental transform faults that act as conduits for deep volatiles.

  16. LOFT fuel rod pressure measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billeter, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    Pressure sensors selected for measuring fuel rod pressure within the LOFT reactor exhibited stable, repeatable operating characteristics during calibrations at temperatures up to 800 0 F and pressures to 2500 psig. All sensors have a nominal sensitivity of .5 millivolts per psi, decreasing monotonically with temperature. Output signal increases linearly with increasing pressure up to 2000 psig. For imposed slow and rapid temperature variations and for pressure applied during these tests, the sensor indicates a pressure at variance with the actual value by up to 15% of reading. However, the imposed temperature rates of change often exceeded the value of -10 0 F/sec. specified for LOFT. The series of tests in an autoclave permit creation of an environment most closely resembling sensor operating conditions within LOFT. For multiple blowdowns and for longtime durations the sensor continued to provide pressure-related output signals. For temperature rates up to -87 0 F/sec, the indicated pressure measurement error remained less than 13% of reading. Adverse effects caused by heating the 1/16 inch O.D. signal cable to 800 0 F contributed only insignificantly to the noted pressure measurement error

  17. Advances in fluid modeling and turbulence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Akira; Ninokata, Hisashi; Tanaka, Nobukazu

    2002-01-01

    The context of this book consists of four fields: Environmental Fluid Mechanics; Industrial Fluid Mechanics; Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics; and Turbulence Measurements. Environmental Fluid Mechanics includes free surface flows in channels, rivers, seas, and estuaries. It also discusses wind engineering issues, ocean circulation model and dispersion problems in atmospheric, water and ground water environments. In Industrial Fluid Mechanics, fluid phenomena in energy exchanges, modeling of turbulent two- or multi-phase flows, swirling flows, flows in combustors, variable density flows and reacting flows, flows in turbo-machines, pumps and piping systems, and fluid-structure interaction are discussed. In Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, progress in modeling turbulent flows and heat/mass transfers, computational fluid dynamics/numerical techniques, parallel computing algorithms, applications of chaos/fractal theory in turbulence are reported. In Turbulence Measurements, experimental studies of turbulent flows, experimental and post-processing techniques, quantitative and qualitative flow visualization techniques are discussed. Separate abstracts were presented for 15 of the papers in this issue. The remaining 89 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  18. Pressure measurement using thermal properties of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Pessoa, Jose Dalton; Calbo, Adonai Gimenes

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a design and two methods, one isothermal and one isovolumetric, for pressure measurements based on the compressibility coefficient (κ) and thermal expansibility (α) of the fluid under test. The setup and relevant construction details are described. To demonstrate the applicability of the isovolumetric measurement method, the setup was calibrated with respect to a Bourdon-type manometer; the other isothermic method was analyzed to determine construction details that could realize resolution requirements. The authors determined the effect of ambient temperature on device operation and the time response of the isovolumetric method. The device can be used to estimate the compressibility of a fluid and, in addition, could become an alternative for direct plant cell turgor measurement

  19. The Role of Interstitial Fluid Pressurization in Articular Cartilage Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been reported in the field of cartilage mechanics that impacts our understanding of the role of interstitial fluid pressurization on cartilage lubrication. Theoretical and experimental studies have demonstrated that the interstitial fluid of cartilage pressurizes considerably under loading, potentially supporting most of the applied load under various transient or steady-state conditions. The fraction of the total load supported by fluid pressurization has been called the fluid load support. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the friction coefficient of cartilage correlates negatively with this variable, achieving remarkably low values when the fluid load support is greatest. A theoretical framework that embodies this relationship has been validated against experiments, predicting and explaining various outcomes, and demonstrating that a low friction coefficient can be maintained for prolonged loading durations under normal physiological function. This paper reviews salient aspects of this topic, as well as its implications for improving our understanding of boundary lubrication by molecular species in synovial fluid and the cartilage superficial zone. Effects of cartilage degeneration on its frictional response are also reviewed. PMID:19464689

  20. Device for regulating and controlling of fluid pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, H.N.; Singleton, N.R.; Frisch, E.; Stein, P.C.

    1972-01-01

    A pressure regulating valve for high pressures, suitable for PWR pressurisers, is based on controlled leakage. The valve may also function as a safety valve. The valve and seat surfaces are machined such that an annular space is formed towards the inner edge, and into this space cold fluid may be injected, thus preventing crud deposition and hindering steam formation. Fluid also leaks into the annular space between two bellows, which exert a closing force on the valve, in addition to the closing force provided by springs, whose force is adjustable by means of a screw arrangement. (JIW)

  1. Breakdown pressures and characteristic flaw sizes during fluid injection experiments in shale at elevated confining pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, M.; Mecklenburgh, J.; Rutter, E. H.; Taylor, R.; Fauchille, A. L.; Ma, L.; Lee, P. D.

    2017-12-01

    Fracture propagation trajectories in gas-bearing shales depend on the interaction between the anisotropic mechanical properties of the shale and the anisotropic in-situ stress field. However, there is a general paucity of available experimental data on their anisotropic mechanical, physical and fluid-flow properties, especially at elevated confining pressures. A suite of mechanical, flow and elastic measurements have been made on two shale materials, the Whitby mudrock and the Mancos shale (an interbedded silt and mudstone), as well as Pennant sandstone, an isotropic baseline and tight-gas sandstone analogue. Mechanical characterization includes standard triaxial experiments, pressure-dependent permeability, brazilian disk tensile strength, and fracture toughness determined using double-torsion experiments. Elastic characterisation was performed through ultrasonic velocities determined using a cross-correlation method. Additionally, we report the results of laboratory-scale fluid injection experiments for the same materials. Injection experiments involved the pressurisation of a blind-ending central hole in a dry cylindrical sample. Pressurisation is conducted under constant volume-rate control, using silicon oils of varying viscosities. Breakdown pressure is not seen to exhibit a strong dependence on rock type or orientation, and increases linearly with confining pressure. In most experiments, a small drop in the injection pressure record is observed at what is taken to be fracture initiation, and in the Pennant sandstone this is accompanied by a small burst of acoustic energy. The shale materials were acoustically quiet. Breakdown is found to be rapid and uncontrollable after initiation if injection is continued. A simplified 2-dimensional model for explaining this is presented in terms of the stress intensities at the tip of a pressurised crack, and is used alongside the triaxial data to derive a characteristic flaw size from which the fractures have initiated

  2. Fluid Pressures at the Shoe-Floor-Contaminant Interface During Slips: Effects of Tread & Implications on Slip Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beschorner, Kurt E.; Albert, Devon L.; Chambers, April J.; Redfern, Mark S.

    2018-01-01

    Previous research on slip and fall accidents has suggested that pressurized fluid between the shoe and floor is responsible for initiating slips yet this effect has not been verified experimentally. This study aimed to 1) measure hydrodynamic pressures during slipping for treaded and untreaded conditions; 2) determine the effects of fluid pressure on slip severity; and 3) quantify how fluid pressures vary with instantaneous resultant slipping speed, position on the shoe surface, and throughout the progression of the slip. Eighteen subjects walked on known dry and unexpected slippery floors, while wearing treaded and untreaded shoes. Fluid pressure sensors, embedded in the floor, recorded hydrodynamic pressures during slipping. The maximum fluid pressures (mean+/−standard deviation) were significantly higher for the untreaded conditions (124 +/−75 kPa) than the treaded conditions (1.1 +/−0.29 kPa). Maximum fluid pressures were positively correlated with peak slipping speed (r = 0.87), suggesting that higher fluid pressures, which are associated with untreaded conditions, resulted in more severe slips. Instantaneous resultant slipping speed and position of sensor relative to the shoe sole and walking direction explained 41% of the fluid pressure variability. Fluid pressures were primarily observed for untreaded conditions. This study confirms that fluid pressures are relevant to slipping events, consistent with fluid dynamics theory (i.e. the Reynolds equation), and can be modified with shoe tread design. The results suggest that the occurrence and severity of unexpected slips can be reduced by designing shoes/floors that reduce underfoot fluid pressures. PMID:24267270

  3. Pressure sensor for use in the Loss-of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billeter, T.R.

    1979-07-01

    Tests at temperatures up to 800 0 F and pressures up to 2500 psig were conducted at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) to qualify an instrument for measurement of fuel-rod pressure in the Loss-of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) reactor. Operational characteristics of the selected pressure transducers are summarized for a series of static, quasi-static, and transient tests conducted for a period of about 700 hours

  4. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid pressure in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fellmann Jere

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF production and turnover, seen in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH and in Alzheimer's disease (AD, may be an important cause of amyloid retention in the brain and may relate the two diseases. There is a high incidence of AD pathology in patients being shunted for NPH, the AD-NPH syndrome. We now report elevated CSF pressure (CSFP, consistent with very early hydrocephalus, in a subset of AD patients enrolled in a clinical trial of chronic low-flow CSF drainage. Our objective was to determine the frequency of elevated CSFP in subjects meeting National Institutes of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke – Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for AD, excluding those with signs of concomitant NPH. Methods AD subjects by NINCDS-ADRDA criteria (n = 222, were screened by history, neurological examination, and radiographic imaging to exclude those with clinical or radiographic signs of NPH. As part of this exclusion process, opening CSFP was measured supine under general anesthesia during device implantation surgery at a controlled pCO2 of 40 Torr (40 mmHg. Results Of the 222 AD subjects 181 had pressure measurements recorded. Seven subjects (3.9% enrolled in the study had CSFP of 220 mmH20 or greater, mean 249 ± 20 mmH20 which was significantly higher than 103 ± 47 mmH2O for the AD-only group. AD-NPH patients were significantly younger and significantly less demented on the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS. Conclusion Of the AD subjects who were carefully screened to exclude those with clinical NPH, 4% had elevated CSFP. These subjects were presumed to have the AD-NPH syndrome and were withdrawn from the remainder of the study.

  5. Fluid challenge: tracking changes in cardiac output with blood pressure monitoring (invasive or non-invasive).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhal, Karim; Ehrmann, Stephan; Perrotin, Dominique; Wolff, Michel; Boulain, Thierry

    2013-11-01

    To assess whether invasive and non-invasive blood pressure (BP) monitoring allows the identification of patients who have responded to a fluid challenge, i.e., who have increased their cardiac output (CO). Patients with signs of circulatory failure were prospectively included. Before and after a fluid challenge, CO and the mean of four intra-arterial and oscillometric brachial cuff BP measurements were collected. Fluid responsiveness was defined by an increase in CO ≥10 or ≥15% in case of regular rhythm or arrhythmia, respectively. In 130 patients, the correlation between a fluid-induced increase in pulse pressure (Δ500mlPP) and fluid-induced increase in CO was weak and was similar for invasive and non-invasive measurements of BP: r² = 0.31 and r² = 0.29, respectively (both p area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) of 0.82 (0.74-0.88), similar (p = 0.80) to that of non-invasive Δ500mlPP [AUC of 0.81 (0.73-0.87)]. Outside large gray zones of inconclusive values (5-23% for invasive Δ500mlPP and 4-35% for non-invasive Δ500mlPP, involving 35 and 48% of patients, respectively), the detection of responsiveness or unresponsiveness to fluid was reliable. Cardiac arrhythmia did not impair the performance of invasive or non-invasive Δ500mlPP. Other BP-derived indices did not outperform Δ500mlPP. As evidenced by large gray zones, BP-derived indices poorly reflected fluid responsiveness. However, in our deeply sedated population, a high increase in invasive pulse pressure (>23%) or even in non-invasive pulse pressure (>35%) reliably detected a response to fluid. In the absence of a marked increase in pulse pressure (<4-5%), a response to fluid was unlikely.

  6. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.E.; Thomas, D.G.

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  7. Earthquakes, fluid pressures and rapid subduction zone metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viete, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    High-pressure/low-temperature (HP/LT) metamorphism is commonly incomplete, meaning that large tracts of rock can remain metastable at blueschist- and eclogite-facies conditions for timescales up to millions of years [1]. When HP/LT metamorphism does take place, it can occur over extremely short durations (the role of fluids in providing heat for metamorphism [2] or catalyzing metamorphic reactions [1]. Earthquakes in subduction zone settings can occur to depths of 100s of km. Metamorphic dehydration and the associated development of elevated pore pressures in HP/LT metamorphic rocks has been identified as a cause of earthquake activity at such great depths [3-4]. The process of fracturing/faulting significantly increases rock permeability, causing channelized fluid flow and dissipation of pore pressures [3-4]. Thus, deep subduction zone earthquakes are thought to reflect an evolution in fluid pressure, involving: (1) an initial increase in pore pressure by heating-related dehydration of subduction zone rocks, and (2) rapid relief of pore pressures by faulting and channelized flow. Models for earthquakes at depth in subduction zones have focussed on the in situ effects of dehydration and then sudden escape of fluids from the rock mass following fracturing [3-4]. On the other hand, existing models for rapid and incomplete metamorphism in subduction zones have focussed only on the effects of heating and/or hydration with the arrival of external fluids [1-2]. Significant changes in pressure over very short timescales should result in rapid mineral growth and/or disequilibrium texture development in response to overstepping of mineral reaction boundaries. The repeated process of dehydration-pore pressure development-earthquake-pore pressure relief could conceivably produce a record of episodic HP/LT metamorphism driven by rapid pressure pulses. A new hypothesis is presented for the origins of HP/LT metamorphism: that HP/LT metamorphism is driven by effective pressure

  8. An improved apparatus for pressure-injecting fluid into trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garold F. Gregory; Thomas W. Jones

    1975-01-01

    Our original tree-injection apparatus was modified to be more convenient and efficient. The fluid reservoir consists of high-pressure plastic plumbing components. Quick couplers are used for all hose connections. Most important, the injector heads were modified for a faster and more convenient and secure attachment with double-headed nails.

  9. Energy Cost of Avoiding Pressure Oscillations in a Discrete Fluid Power Force System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Hedegaard; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2015-01-01

    In secondary valve controlled discrete fluid power force systems the valve opening trajectory greatly influences the pressure dynamics in the actuator chambers. For discrete fluid power systems featuring hoses of significant length pressure oscillations due to fast valve switching is well......-known. This paper builds upon theoretical findings on how shaping of the valve opening may reduce the cylinder pressure oscillations. The current paper extents the work by implementing the valve opening characteristics reducing the pressure oscillations on a full scale power take-off test-bench for wave energy...... will present measurements comparing pressure dynamics for two valve opening algorithms. In addition the paper will give a theoretical investigation of the energy loss during valve shifting and finally measurements of average power output from the power take-off system in various sea states are compared...

  10. Noninvasive microbubble-based pressure measurements: a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Michiel; Postema, M.A.B.; Bouakaz, Ayache; de Jong, N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a noninvasive method to measure local hydrostatic pressures in fluid filled cavities. The method is based on the disappearance time of a gas bubble, as the disappearance time is related to the hydrostatic pressure. When a bubble shrinks, its response to ultrasound changes. From

  11. Combined Effect of Pressure and Temperature on the Viscous Behaviour of All-Oil Drilling Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermoso J.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this research was to study the combined influence of pressure and temperature on the complex viscous behaviour of two oil-based drilling fluids. The oil-based fluids were formulated by dispersing selected organobentonites in mineral oil, using a high-shear mixer, at room temperature. Drilling fluid viscous flow characterization was performed with a controlled-stress rheometer, using both conventional coaxial cylinder and non-conventional geometries for High Pressure/High Temperature (HPHT measurements. The rheological data obtained confirm that a helical ribbon geometry is a very useful tool to characterise the complex viscous flow behaviour of these fluids under extreme conditions. The different viscous flow behaviours encountered for both all-oil drilling fluids, as a function of temperature, are related to changes in polymer-oil pair solvency and oil viscosity. Hence, the resulting structures have been principally attributed to changes in the effective volume fraction of disperse phase due to thermally induced processes. Bingham’s and Herschel-Bulkley’s models describe the rheological properties of these drilling fluids, at different pressures and temperatures, fairly well. It was found that Herschel-Bulkley’s model fits much better B34-based oil drilling fluid viscous flow behaviour under HPHT conditions. Yield stress values increase linearly with pressure in the range of temperature studied. The pressure influence on yielding behaviour has been associated with the compression effect of different resulting organoclay microstructures. A factorial WLF-Barus model fitted the combined effect of temperature and pressure on the plastic viscosity of both drilling fluids fairly well, being this effect mainly influenced by the piezo-viscous properties of the continuous phase.

  12. Permeability - Fluid Pressure - Stress Relationship in Fault Zones in Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, P.; Guglielmi, Y.; Morereau, A.; Seguy, S.; Castilla, R.; Nussbaum, C.; Dick, P.; Durand, J.; Jaeggi, D.; Donze, F. V.; Tsopela, A.

    2016-12-01

    Fault permeability is known to depend strongly on stress and fluid pressures. Exponential relationships between permeability and effective pressure have been proposed to approximate fault response to fluid pressure variations. However, the applicability of these largely empirical laws remains questionable, as they do not take into account shear stress and shear strain. A series of experiments using mHPP probes have been performed within fault zones in very low permeability (less than 10-19 m2) Lower Jurassic shale formations at Tournemire (France) and Mont Terri (Switzerland) underground laboratories. These probes allow to monitor 3D displacement between two points anchored to the borehole walls at the same time as fluid pressure and flow rate. In addition, in the Mont-Terri experiment, passive pressure sensors were installed in observation boreholes. Fracture transmissivity was estimated from single borehole pulse test, constant pressure injection tests, and cross-hole tests. It is found that the transmissivity-pressure dependency can be approximated with an exponential law, but only above a pressure threshold that we call the Fracture Opening Threshold (F.O.P). The displacement data show a change of the mechanical response across the F.O.P. The displacement below the F.O.P. is dominated by borehole response, which is mostly elastic. Above F.O.P., the poro-elasto-plastic response of the fractures dominates. Stress determinations based on previous work and on the analysis of slip data from mHPPP probe indicate that the F.O.P. is lower than the least principal stress. Below the F.O.P., uncemented fractures retain some permeability, as pulse tests performed at low pressures yield diffusivities in the range 10-2 to 10-5 m2/s. Overall, this dual behavior appears consistent with the results of CORK experiments performed in accretionary wedge decollements. Results suggest (1) that fault zones become highly permeable when approaching the critical Coulomb threshold (2

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of High Injection Pressure Blended Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Amir; Jaat, Norrizam; Faisal Hushim, Mohd; Manshoor, Bukhari; Zaman, Izzuddin; Sapit, Azwan; Razali, Azahari

    2017-08-01

    Biodiesel have great potential for substitution with petrol fuel for the purpose of achieving clean energy production and emission reduction. Among the methods that can control the combustion properties, controlling of the fuel injection conditions is one of the successful methods. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of high injection pressure of biodiesel blends on spray characteristics using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Injection pressure was observed at 220 MPa, 250 MPa and 280 MPa. The ambient temperature was kept held at 1050 K and ambient pressure 8 MPa in order to simulate the effect of boost pressure or turbo charger during combustion process. Computational Fluid Dynamics were used to investigate the spray characteristics of biodiesel blends such as spray penetration length, spray angle and mixture formation of fuel-air mixing. The results shows that increases of injection pressure, wider spray angle is produced by biodiesel blends and diesel fuel. The injection pressure strongly affects the mixture formation, characteristics of fuel spray, longer spray penetration length thus promotes the fuel and air mixing.

  14. Subchannel analysis with turbulent mixing rate of supercritical pressure fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianhui; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Subchannel analysis with turbulent mixing rate law of supercritical pressure fluid (SPF) is carried out. • Turbulent mixing rate is enhanced, compared with that calculated by the law of pressurized water reactor (PWR). • Increase in maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) is smaller comparing with PWR model. • The sensitivities of MCST on non-uniformity of subchannel area and power peaking are reduced by using SPF model. - Abstract: The subchannel analysis with turbulent mixing rate law of supercritical pressure fluid (SPF) is carried out for supercritical-pressurized light water cooled and moderated reactor (Super LWR). It is different from the turbulent mixing rate law of pressurized water reactor (PWR), which is widely adopted in Super LWR subchannel analysis study, the density difference between adjacent subchannels is taken into account for turbulent mixing rate law of SPF. MCSTs are evaluated on three kinds of fuel assemblies with different pin power distribution patterns, gap spacings and mass flow rates. Compared with that calculated by employing turbulent mixing rate law of PWR, the increase in MCST is smaller even when peaking factor is large and gap spacing is uneven. The sensitivities of MCST on non-uniformity of the subchannel area and power peaking are reduced

  15. Pressure Enhancement in Confined Fluids: Effect of Molecular Shape and Fluid-Wall Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepti; Santiso, Erik E; Gubbins, Keith E

    2017-10-24

    Recently, several experimental and simulation studies have found that phenomena that normally occur at extremely high pressures in a bulk phase can occur in nanophases confined within porous materials at much lower bulk phase pressures, thus providing an alternative route to study high-pressure phenomena. In this work, we examine the effect on the tangential pressure of varying the molecular shape, strength of the fluid-wall interactions, and pore width, for carbon slit-shaped pores. We find that, for multisite molecules, the presence of additional rotational degrees of freedom leads to unique changes in the shape of the tangential pressure profile, especially in larger pores. We show that, due to the direct relationship between the molecular density and the fluid-wall interactions, the latter have a large impact on the pressure tensor. The molecular shape and pore size have a notable impact on the layering of molecules in the pore, greatly influencing both the shape and scale of the tangential pressure profile.

  16. Coupled fluid-structure method for pressure suppression analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster, W.H.; Norris, D.M. Jr.; Goudreau, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    We have coupled an incompressible Eulerian hydrodynamic algorithm to a Lagrangian finite-element shell algorithm for the analysis of pressure suppression in boiling water reactors. The computer program calculates loads and structural response from air and steam blowdown and the oscillating condensation of steam bubbles in a water pool. The fluid, structure, and coupling algorithms have been verified by the calculation of solved problems from the literature and from air and steam blowdown experiments. The foundation of the program is the semi-implicit, two-dimensional SOLA algorithm. The shell structure algorithm uses conventional thin-shell theory with transverse shear. The finite-element spatial discretization employs piecewise-linear interpolation functions and one-point quadrature applied to conical frustra. We use the Newmark implicit time-integration method implemented as a one-step module. The algorithms are strongly coupled in the iteration loop using the iterated pressure in the fluid to drive the structure. The coupling algorithm requires normal velocity compatibility at the fluid-structure interface and incompressibility of the computational Eulerian zone overlaid by the structure. This is accomplished by iterating on the pressure field which is applied to the structure during each iteration until both conditions are satisfied

  17. Fluid mechanics of needle valves with rounded components Part III: Pressure distributions on walls

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 248, September (2016), s. 138-147 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : needle valves * pressure measurements * valves Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.499, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924424716303417

  18. Pressure-driven flow of a Herschel-Bulkley fluid with pressure-dependent rheological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaseti, Pandelitsa; Damianou, Yiolanda; Georgiou, Georgios C.; Housiadas, Kostas D.

    2018-03-01

    The lubrication flow of a Herschel-Bulkley fluid in a symmetric long channel of varying width, 2h(x), is modeled extending the approach proposed by Fusi et al. ["Pressure-driven lubrication flow of a Bingham fluid in a channel: A novel approach," J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 221, 66-75 (2015)] for a Bingham plastic. Moreover, both the consistency index and the yield stress are assumed to be pressure-dependent. Under the lubrication approximation, the pressure at zero order depends only on x and the semi-width of the unyielded core is found to be given by σ(x) = -(1 + 1/n)h(x) + C, where n is the power-law exponent and the constant C depends on the Bingham number and the consistency-index and yield-stress growth numbers. Hence, in a channel of constant width, the width of the unyielded core is also constant, despite the pressure dependence of the yield stress, and the pressure distribution is not affected by the yield-stress function. With the present model, the pressure is calculated numerically solving an integro-differential equation and then the position of the yield surface and the two velocity components are computed using analytical expressions. Some analytical solutions are also derived for channels of constant and linearly varying widths. The lubrication solutions for other geometries are calculated numerically. The implications of the pressure-dependence of the material parameters and the limitations of the method are discussed.

  19. X-ray Compton scattering experiments for fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, K., E-mail: kazuhiro-matsuda@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fukumaru, T.; Kimura, K.; Yao, M. [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Tamura, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Katoh, M. [A.L.M.T. Corp., Iwasekoshi-Machi 2, Toyama 931-8543 (Japan); Kajihara, Y.; Inui, M. [Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    We have developed a high-pressure vessel and a cell for x-ray Compton scattering measurements of fluid alkali metals. Measurements have been successfully carried out for alkali metal rubidium at elevated temperatures and pressures using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. The width of Compton profiles (CPs) of fluid rubidium becomes narrow with decreasing fluid density, which indicates that the CPs sensitively detect the effect of reduction in the valence electron density. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 10 September 2015. The original article supplied to AIP Publishing was not the final version and contained PDF conversion errors in Formulas (1) and (2). The errors have been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  20. Asymmetric fluid criticality. I. Scaling with pressure mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young C; Fisher, Michael E; Orkoulas, G

    2003-06-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of a fluid near a vapor-liquid and, hence, asymmetric critical point is discussed within a general "complete" scaling theory incorporating pressure mixing in the nonlinear scaling fields as well as corrections to scaling. This theory allows for a Yang-Yang anomaly in which mu(")(sigma)(T), the second temperature derivative of the chemical potential along the phase boundary, diverges like the specific heat when T-->T(c); it also generates a leading singular term, /t/(2beta), in the coexistence curve diameter, where t[triple bond](T-T(c))/T(c). The behavior of various special loci, such as the critical isochore, the critical isotherm, the k-inflection loci, on which chi((k))[triple bond]chi(rho,T)/rho(k) (with chi=rho(2)k(B)TK(T)) and C((k))(V)[triple bond]C(V)(rho,T)/rho(k) are maximal at fixed T, is carefully elucidated. These results are useful for analyzing simulations and experiments, since particular, nonuniversal values of k specify loci that approach the critical density most rapidly and reflect the pressure-mixing coefficient. Concrete illustrations are presented for the hard-core square-well fluid and for the restricted primitive model electrolyte. For comparison, a discussion of the classical (or Landau) theory is presented briefly and various interesting loci are determined explicitly and illustrated quantitatively for a van der Waals fluid.

  1. Mounting Pressure in the Microenvironment: Fluids, Solids, and Cells in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuFort, Christopher C; DelGiorno, Kathleen E; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2016-06-01

    The microenvironment influences the pathogenesis of solid tumors and plays an outsized role in some. Our understanding of the stromal response to cancers, particularly pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, has evolved from that of host defense to tumor offense. We know that most, although not all, of the factors and processes in the microenvironment support tumor epithelial cells. This reappraisal of the roles of stromal elements has also revealed potential vulnerabilities and therapeutic opportunities to exploit. The high concentration in the stroma of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, together with the large gel-fluid phase and pressures it generates, were recently identified as primary sources of treatment resistance in pancreas cancer. Whereas the relatively minor role of free interstitial fluid in the fluid mechanics and perfusion of tumors has been long appreciated, the less mobile, gel-fluid phase has been largely ignored for historical and technical reasons. The inability of classic methods of fluid pressure measurement to capture the gel-fluid phase, together with a dependence on xenograft and allograft systems that inaccurately model tumor vascular biology, has led to an undue emphasis on the role of free fluid in impeding perfusion and drug delivery and an almost complete oversight of the predominant role of the gel-fluid phase. We propose that a hyaluronan-rich, relatively immobile gel-fluid phase induces vascular collapse and hypoperfusion as a primary mechanism of treatment resistance in pancreas cancers. Similar properties may be operant in other solid tumors as well, so revisiting and characterizing fluid mechanics with modern techniques in other autochthonous cancers may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Automated Office Blood Pressure Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Martin G

    2018-04-01

    Manual blood pressure (BP) recorded in routine clinical practice is relatively inaccurate and associated with higher readings compared to BP measured in research studies in accordance with standardized measurement guidelines. The increase in routine office BP is the result of several factors, especially the presence of office staff, which tends to make patients nervous and also allows for conversation to occur. With the disappearance of the mercury sphygmomanometer because of environmental concerns, there is greater use of oscillometric BP recorders, both in the office setting and elsewhere. Although oscillometric devices may reduce some aspects of observer BP measurement error in the clinical setting, they are still associated with higher BP readings, known as white coat hypertension (for diagnosis) or white coat effect (with treated hypertension). Now that fully automated sphygmomanometers are available which are capable of recording several readings with the patient resting quietly, there is no longer any need to have office staff present when BP is being recorded. Such readings are called automated office blood pressure (AOBP) and they are both more accurate than conventional manual office BP and not associated with the white coat phenomena. AOBP readings are also similar to the awake ambulatory BP and home BP, both of which are relatively good predictors of cardiovascular risk. The available evidence suggests that AOBP should now replace manual or electronic office BP readings when screening patients for hypertension and also after antihypertensive drug therapy is initiated. Copyright © 2018. The Korean Society of Cardiology.

  3. On-line fast response device and method for measuring dissolved gas in a fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutu, Narinder Kumar [Manorville, NY

    2011-01-11

    A method and device for the measurement of dissolved gas within a fluid. The fluid, substantially a liquid, is pumped into a pipe. The flow of the fluid is temporally restricted, creating one or more low pressure regions. A measurement indicative of trapped air is taken before and after the restriction. The amount of dissolved air is calculated from the difference between the first and second measurements. Preferably measurements indicative of trapped air is obtained from one or more pressure transducers, capacitance transducers, or combinations thereof. In the alternative, other methods such as those utilizing x-rays or gamma rays may also be used to detect trapped air. Preferably, the fluid is a hydraulic fluid, whereby dissolved air in the fluid is detected.

  4. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure in chronic pancreatitis. Relation to pain, morphology, and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Bülow, J

    1990-01-01

    The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and pain, morphology, and function was studied in a cross-sectional investigation. Pressure measurements were performed by percutaneous fine-needle puncture. Thirty-nine patients with chronic pancreatitis were included, 25 with pain and 14...... without (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0003, respectively). The pressure was significantly related (inversely) to pancreatic duct diameter only in the group of 19 patients with earlier pancreatic surgery (R = -0.57, p = 0.02). The pressure was not related to functional factors or the presence of pancreatic...... without pain. The pressure was higher in patients with pain than in patients without pain (p = 0.000001), and this was significantly related to a pain score from a visual analogue scale (p less than 0.001). Patients with pancreatic pseudocysts had both higher pressure and higher pain score than patients...

  5. Modelling of heat transfer to fluids at a supercritical pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuisheng, He

    2014-01-01

    A key feature of Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) is that, by raising the pressure of the reactor coolant fluid above the critical value, a phase change crisis is avoided. However, the changes in water density as it flows through the core of an SCWR are actually much higher than in the current water-cooled reactors. In a typical design, the ratio of the density of water at the core inlet to that at exit is as high as 7:1. Other fluid properties also vary significantly, especially around the pseudo-critical temperature (at which the specific heat capacity peaks). As a result, turbulent flow and heat transfer behaviour in the core is extremely complex and under certain conditions, significant heat transfer deterioration can potentially occur. Consequently, understanding and being able to predict flow and heat transfer phenomena under normal steady operation conditions and in start-up and hypothetical fault conditions are fundamental to the design of SCWR. There have been intensive studies on flow and heat transfer to fluids at supercritical pressure recently and several excellent review papers have been published. In the talk, we will focus on some turbulence modelling issues encountered in CFD simulations. The talk will first discuss some flow and heat transfer issues related to fluids at supercritical pressures and their potential implications in SCWR, and some recent developments in the understanding and modelling techniques of such problems, which will be followed by an outlook for some future developments.Factors which have a major influence on the flow and will be discussed are buoyancy and flow acceleration due to thermal expansion (both are due to density variations but involve different mechanisms) and the nonuniformity of other fluid properties. In addition, laminar-turbulent flow transition coupled with buoyancy and flow acceleration plays an important role in heat transfer effectiveness and wall temperature in the entrance region but such

  6. Analytical solution for dynamic pressurization of viscoelastic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemabadi, S.H.; Etemad, S.Gh.; Thibault, J.; Golkar Naranji, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    The flow of simplified Phan-Thien-Tanner model fluid between parallel plates is studied analytically for the case where the upper plate moves at constant velocity. Two forms of the stress coefficient, linear and exponential, are used in the constitutive equation. For the linear stress coefficient, the dimensionless pressure gradient, the velocity profile and the product of friction factor and Reynolds number are obtained for a wide range of flow rate, Deborah number and elongational parameter. The results indicate the strong effects of the viscoelastic parameter on the velocity profile, the extremum of the velocity, and the friction factor. A correlation for the maximum pressure rise in single screw extruders is proposed. For the exponential stress coefficient, only velocity profiles were obtained and compared with velocity profiles obtained with the linear stress coefficient

  7. Plastic reactor suitable for high pressure and supercritical fluid electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branch, Jack; Alibouri, Mehrdad; Cook, David A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes a reactor suitable for high pressure, particularly supercritical fluid, electrochemistry and electrodeposition at pressures up to 30 MPa at 115◦C. The reactor incorporates two key, new design concepts; a plastic reactor vessel and the use of o-ring sealed brittle electrodes...... by the deposition of Bi. The application of the reactor to the production of nanostructures is demonstrated by the electrodeposition of ∼80 nm diameter Te nanowires into an anodic alumina on silicon template. Key advantages of the new reactor design include reduction of the number of wetted materials, particularly...... glues used for insulating electrodes, compatability with reagents incompatible with steel, compatability with microfabricated planar multiple electrodes, small volume which brings safety advantages and reduced reagent useage, and a significant reduction in experimental time....

  8. Modeling Study of High Pressure and High Temperature Reservoir Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varzandeh, Farhad

    properties like saturation pressures, densities at reservoir temperature and Stock TankviOil (STO) densities, while keeping the n-alkane limit of the correlations unchanged. Apart from applying this general approach to PC-SAFT, we have also shown that the approach can be applied to classical cubic models...... approach to characterizing reservoir fluids for any EoS. The approach consists in developing correlations of model parameters first with a database for well-defined components and then adjusting the correlations with a large PVT database. The adjustment is made to minimize the deviation in key PVT...... method to SRK and PR improved the saturation pressure calculation in comparisonto the original characterization method for SRK and PR. Using volume translationtogether with the new characterization approach for SRK and PR gives comparable results for density and STO density to that of original...

  9. Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, quantitative EEG findings, and the cerebrospinal fluid tap test: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jong-Geun; Kang, Kyunghun; Jung, Ji-Young; Park, Sung-Pa; Lee, Maan-Gee; Lee, Ho-Won

    2014-12-01

    In this pilot study, we analyzed relationships between quantitative EEG measurements and clinical parameters in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus patients, along with differences in these quantitative EEG markers between cerebrospinal fluid tap test responders and nonresponders. Twenty-six idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus patients (9 cerebrospinal fluid tap test responders and 17 cerebrospinal fluid tap test nonresponders) constituted the final group for analysis. The resting EEG was recorded and relative powers were computed for seven frequency bands. Cerebrospinal fluid tap test nonresponders, when compared with responders, showed a statistically significant increase in alpha2 band power at the right frontal and centrotemporal regions. Higher delta2 band powers in the frontal, central, parietal, and occipital regions and lower alpha1 band powers in the right temporal region significantly correlated with poorer cognitive performance. Higher theta1 band powers in the left parietal and occipital regions significantly correlated with gait dysfunction. And higher delta1 band powers in the right frontal regions significantly correlated with urinary disturbance. Our findings may encourage further research using quantitative EEG in patients with ventriculomegaly as a potential electrophysiological marker for predicting cerebrospinal fluid tap test responders. This study additionally suggests that the delta, theta, and alpha bands are statistically correlated with the severity of symptoms in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus patients.

  10. Measurement and Prediction of Volumetric and Transport Properties of Reservoir Fluids At High Pressure Mesure et prédiction des propriétés volumétriques et des propriétés de transport des fluides de gisement à haute pression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Sant'ana H. B.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Discoveries of oil and gas fields under severe conditions of temperature (above 150°C or pressure (in excess of 50 MPa have been made in various regions of the world. In the North Sea, production is scheduled from deep reservoirs at 190°C and 110 MPa. This brings with it important challenges for predicting the properties of reservoir fluids, both from an experimental and a theoretical standpoint. In order to perform fluid studies for these reservoir conditions, IFP has developed a specific mercury-free high pressure apparatus with sapphire windows, a phase sampling device and viscosity determination by the capillary tube method. Its application is illustrated here using examples of real fluids and model mixtures. This equipment was first used to measure volumetric properties for gases. It has been shown that very high compressibility factors can be found with HP-HT gas condensates. This has a strong influence on recovery factors during primary depletion. In order to predict more accurately the volumetric properties of mixtures under these conditions, we propose to use a conventional equation of state, such as Peng-Robinson, with two improvements :- a modified temperature-dependent volume translation method, calibrated for high pressure density data; the method is simple, more accurate than other volume translation methods and fully consistent with lumping procedures;- a quadratic mixing rule on the covolume. Specific phase behavior can also be found. At low temperatures, wax crystallization can occur from a fluid which is a gas condensate at reservoir temperature. This feature is due to the simultaneous presence of abundant methane and heavy paraffins. A study of model fluids in a sapphire cell has allowed us to identify the possible types of phase diagrams. Although generally not considered to be an important parameter, gas viscosity may have some importance in the production of HP-HT accumulations, because of high flow rates. Viscosity

  11. Pressure and compressibility factor of bidisperse magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minina, Elena S.; Blaak, Ronald; Kantorovich, Sofia S.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the pressure and compressibility factors of bidisperse magnetic fluids with relatively weak dipolar interactions and different granulometric compositions. In order to study these properties, we employ the method of diagram expansion, taking into account two possible scenarios: (1) dipolar particles repel each other as hard spheres; (2) the polymer shell on the surface of the particles is modelled through a soft-sphere approximation. The theoretical predictions of the pressure and compressibility factors of bidisperse ferrofluids at different granulometric compositions are supported by data obtained by means of molecular dynamics computer simulations, which we also carried out for these systems. Both theory and simulations reveal that the pressure and compressibility factors decrease with growing dipolar correlations in the system, namely with an increasing fraction of large particles. We also demonstrate that even if dipolar interactions are too weak for any self-assembly to take place, the interparticle correlations lead to a qualitative change in the behaviour of the compressibility factors when compared to that of non-dipolar spheres, making the dependence monotonic.

  12. Pressures Detector Calibration and Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2156315

    2016-01-01

    This is report of my first and second projects (of 3) in NA61. I did data taking and analysis in order to do calibration of pressure detectors and verified it. I analyzed the data by ROOT software using the C ++ programming language. The first part of my project was determination of calibration factor of pressure sensors. Based on that result, I examined the relation between pressure drop, gas flow rate of in paper filter and its diameter.

  13. Coherent Raman scattering in high-pressure/high-temperature fluids: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    The present understanding of high-pressure/high-temperature dense-fluid behavior is derived almost exclusively from hydrodynamic and thermodynamic measurements. Such results average over the microscopic aspects of the materials and are, therefore, insufficient for a complete understanding of fluid behavior. At the present, dense-fluid models can be verified only to the extend that they agree with the macroscopic measurements. Recently, using stimulated Raman scattering, Raman induced Kerr effect scattering, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, we have been able to probe some of the microscopic phenomenology of these dense fluids. In this paper, we discuss primarily the use of CARS in conjunction with a two-stage light-gas gun to obtain vibrational spectra of shock-compressed liquid N 2 , O 2 , CO, their mixtures, CH 3 NO 2 , and N 2 O. These experimental spectra are compared to synthetic spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities and best fit vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities, and Raman linewidths. For O 2 , the possibility of resonance enhancement from collision-induced absorption is addressed. Shifts in the vibrational frequencies reflect the influence of increased density and temperature on the intramolecular motion. The derived parameters suggest thermal equilibrium of the vibrational levels is established less than a few nanoseconds after shock passage. Vibrational temperatures are obtained that agree with those derived from equation-of-state calculations. Measured linewidths suggest that vibrational dephasing times have decreased to subpicosecond values at the highest shock pressures

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid volume measurements in hydrocephalic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basati, Sukhraaj; Desai, Bhargav; Alaraj, Ali; Charbel, Fady; Linninger, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Object Experimental data about the evolution of intracranial volume and pressure in cases of hydrocephalus are limited due to the lack of available monitoring techniques. In this study, the authors validate intracranial CSF volume measurements within the lateral ventricle, while simultaneously using impedance sensors and pressure transducers in hydrocephalic animals. Methods A volume sensor was fabricated and connected to a catheter that was used as a shunt to withdraw CSF. In vitro bench-top calibration experiments were created to provide data for the animal experiments and to validate the sensors. To validate the measurement technique in a physiological system, hydrocephalus was induced in weanling rats by kaolin injection into the cisterna magna. At 28 days after induction, the sensor was implanted into the lateral ventricles. After sealing the skull using dental cement, an acute CSF drainage/infusion protocol consisting of 4 sequential phases was performed with a pump. Implant location was confirmed via radiography using intraventricular iohexol contrast administration. Results Controlled CSF shunting in vivo with hydrocephalic rats resulted in precise and accurate sensor measurements (r = 0.98). Shunting resulted in a 17.3% maximum measurement error between measured volume and actual volume as assessed by a Bland-Altman plot. A secondary outcome confirmed that both ventricular volume and intracranial pressure decreased during CSF shunting and increased during infusion. Ventricular enlargement consistent with successful hydrocephalus induction was confirmed using imaging, as well as postmortem. These results indicate that volume monitoring is feasible for clinical cases of hydrocephalus. Conclusions This work marks a departure from traditional shunting systems currently used to treat hydrocephalus. The overall clinical application is to provide alternative monitoring and treatment options for patients. Future work includes development and testing of a chronic

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure: Revisiting Factors Influencing Optic Nerve Head Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yi; Voorhees, Andrew P.; Sigal, Ian A.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To model the sensitivity of the optic nerve head (ONH) biomechanical environment to acute variations in IOP, cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), and central retinal artery blood pressure (BP). Methods We extended a previously published numerical model of the ONH to include 24 factors representing tissue anatomy and mechanical properties, all three pressures, and constraints on the optic nerve (CON). A total of 8340 models were studied to predict factor influences on 98 responses in a two-step process: a fractional factorial screening analysis to identify the 16 most influential factors, followed by a response surface methodology to predict factor effects in detail. Results The six most influential factors were, in order: IOP, CON, moduli of the sclera, lamina cribrosa (LC) and dura, and CSFP. IOP and CSFP affected different aspects of ONH biomechanics. The strongest influence of CSFP, more than twice that of IOP, was on the rotation of the peripapillary sclera. CSFP had similar influence on LC stretch and compression to moduli of sclera and LC. On some ONHs, CSFP caused large retrolamina deformations and subarachnoid expansion. CON had a strong influence on LC displacement. BP overall influence was 633 times smaller than that of IOP. Conclusions Models predict that IOP and CSFP are the top and sixth most influential factors on ONH biomechanics. Different IOP and CSFP effects suggest that translaminar pressure difference may not be a good parameter to predict biomechanics-related glaucomatous neuropathy. CON may drastically affect the responses relating to gross ONH geometry and should be determined experimentally. PMID:29332130

  16. Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. We measured the blood pressures of 650 healthy, randomly ... In addition, blood pressure measurement should be a part of the routine clinical examination of children. ... familial risk factors.2 ... common cause of elevated blood pressure in children.4 They ... sphygmomanometer (Accoson, hospital model BS 274,.

  17. Vapor pressure measured with inflatable plastic bag

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Deflated plastic bag in a vacuum chamber measures initial low vapor pressures of materials. The bag captures the test sample vapors and visual observation of the vapor-inflated bag under increasing external pressures yields pertinent data.

  18. Method of measuring the degree of fluid pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortensen, A.; Hammer, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to an method and device for measuring the degree of pollution from particulates in fluids. The device consists of an emitter sending out green and red light in succession through the fluid to a light recorder. The recorder itself includes a unit designed for comparing the measured intensity of light with the values of known pollution degree in fluids. 2 figs

  19. A microwave pressure sounder. [for remote measurement of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, G. E.; Flower, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for the remote measurement of atmospheric surface pressure will be described. Such measurements could be made from a satellite in polar orbit and would cover many areas for which conventional meteorological data are not available. An active microwave instrument is used to measure the strength of return echoes from the ocean surface at a number of frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. Factors which affect the accuracy with which surface pressure can be deduced from these measurements will be discussed and an instrument designed to test the method by making measurements from an aircraft will be described.

  20. Pressure drop effects on selectivity and resolution in packed-column supercritical fluid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, X.W.; Janssen, J.G.M.; Snijders, H.M.J.; Cramers, C.A.M.G.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of pressure drop on retention, selectivity, plate height and resolution was investigated systematically in packed supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) using pure carbon dioxide as the mobile phase. Numerical methods developed previously which enabled the prediction of pressure

  1. Properties of planetary fluids at high pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellis, W.J.; Hamilton, D.C.; Holmes, N.C.; Radousky, H.B.; Ree, F.H.; Ross, M.; Young, D.A.; Nicol, M.

    1987-01-01

    In order to derive models of the interiors of Uranus, Neptune, Jupiter and Saturn, researchers studied equations of state and electrical conductivities of molecules at high dynamic pressures and temperatures. Results are given for shock temperature measurements of N 2 and CH 4 . Temperature data allowed demonstration of shock induced cooling in the the transition region and the existence of crossing isotherms in P-V space

  2. The enhanced local pressure model for the accurate analysis of fluid pressure driven fracture in porous materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remij, E.W.; Remmers, J.J.C.; Huyghe, J.M.R.J.; Smeulders, D.M.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an enhanced local pressure model for modelling fluid pressure driven fractures in porous saturated materials. Using the partition-of-unity property of finite element shape functions, we describe the displacement and pressure fields across the fracture as a strong

  3. Measurement of intraocular pressure with pressure phosphene tonometry in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dorothy S P; Chiu, Thomas Y H; Congdon, Nathan; Chan, Jeffrey C W; Cheung, Eva Y Y; Lam, Dennis S C

    2011-01-01

    To study the accuracy and acceptability of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement by the pressure phosphene tonometer, non-contact tonometer, and Goldmann tonometer in children. Fifty children (5 to 14 years old) participated in this prospective comparative study. IOP was measured with the pressure phosphene tonometer, non-contact tonometer, and Goldmann tonometer by three different examiners who were masked to the results. The children were also asked to grade the degree of discomfort from 0 to 5 (0 = no discomfort; 5 = most discomfort). The mean IOPs measured by the Goldmann tonometer, pressure phosphene tonometer, and non-contact tonometer were 15.9 mm Hg (standard deviation [SD]: = 5.5 mm Hg; range: 10 to 36 mm Hg), 16.0 mm Hg (SD: 2.9 mm Hg; range: 12 to 25 mm Hg), and 15.7 mm Hg (SD = 5.1 mm Hg; range: 8 to 32 mm Hg), respectively (P = .722). The mean difference between pressure phosphene tonometer and Goldmann tonometer readings was 2.9 mm Hg and that between non-contact tonometer and Goldmann tonometer readings was 2.1 mm Hg. The 95% confidence interval of the mean difference between pressure phosphene tonometer and Goldmann tonometer readings was -1.07 and 1.19, and that between non-contact tonometer and Goldmann tonometer readings was -1.07 and 0.53. The mean discomfort ratings for the pressure phosphene tonometer, non-contact tonometer, and Goldmann tonometer were 0.6, 2.0, and 2.3, respectively (P tonometer was less accurate than the non-contact tonometer compared with Goldmann tonometer, it gave a reasonably close estimate and had a high specificity of raised IOP. In addition, measurement by the pressure phosphene tonometer is most acceptable to children. The pressure phosphene tonometer can be considered as an alternative method of IOP measurement in children. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Effect of pressurization on helical guided wave energy velocity in fluid-filled pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuc, Brennan; Ebrahimkhanlou, Arvin; Salamone, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    The effect of pressurization stresses on helical guided waves in a thin-walled fluid-filled pipe is studied by modeling leaky Lamb waves in a stressed plate bordered by fluid. Fluid pressurization produces hoop and longitudinal stresses in a thin-walled pipe, which corresponds to biaxial in-plane stress in a plate waveguide model. The effect of stress on guided wave propagation is accounted for through nonlinear elasticity and finite deformation theory. Emphasis is placed on the stress dependence of the energy velocity of the guided wave modes. For this purpose, an expression for the energy velocity of leaky Lamb waves in a stressed plate is derived. Theoretical results are presented for the mode, frequency, and directional dependent variations in energy velocity with respect to stress. An experimental setup is designed for measuring variations in helical wave energy velocity in a thin-walled water-filled steel pipe at different levels of pressure. Good agreement is achieved between the experimental variations in energy velocity for the helical guided waves and the theoretical leaky Lamb wave solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Commentary on differential-pressure measurements at high reference pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasbrouck, R.T.; Noyes, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    Some practical approaches to the difficult problems in calibrating and implementing differential-pressure measurements are discussed. The data presented were gathered several years ago in separate investigations. An attempt is made to compare the results of these investigations to the common mode concept as described by Peter K. Stein in his publication, The Measurement of Differential Quantities - Problems and Approaches. Although one of these investigations involed a 10,000- to 20,000-psi reference-pressure gas measured at an ambient temperature and the other a classic /sup Δ/P flow measurement of cryogenic temperature, the problems encountered were the same

  6. Computer program TMOC for calculating of pressure transients in fluid filled piping networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siikonen, T.

    1978-01-01

    The propagation of a pressure wave in fluid filles tubes is significantly affected by the pipe wall motion and vice versa. A computer code TMOC (Transients by the Method of Characteristics) is being developed for the analysis of the coupled fluid and pipe wall transients. Because of the structural feedback, the pressure can be calculated more accurately than in the programs commonly used. (author)

  7. Oscillometric blood pressure measurements: differences between measured and calculated mean arterial pressure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, H.D.; Hofstra, J.M.; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Mean arterial pressure (MAP) is often used as an index of overall blood pressure. In recent years, the use of automated oscillometric blood pressure measurement devices is increasing. These devices directly measure and display MAP; however, MAP is often calculated from systolic blood pressure (SBP)

  8. Pirani pressure sensor with distributed temperature measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, B.R.; Bula, W.P.; Zalewski, D.R.; van Baar, J.J.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2003-01-01

    Surface micro-machined distributed Pirani pressure gauges, with designed heater-to-heat sink distances (gap-heights) of 0.35 μm and 1.10 μm, are successfully fabricated, modeled and characterized. Measurements and model response correspond within 5% of the measured value in a pressure range of 10 to

  9. Palpatory method of measuring diastolic blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Sahu

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion: The palpatory method would be very useful where frequent blood pressure measurement are being done manually like in wards, in busy OPD, patient on treadmill and also whenever stethoscope is not available. The blood pressure can be measured in noisy environment too.

  10. Micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiong; Yao Yan; Ma Jiahao; Zhang Zhaohua; Zhang Yanhang; Wang Qian; Ren Tianling

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement which belongs to BioMEMS. It can be used in lumbar puncture surgery to measure intracranial pressure. Miniaturization is key for lumbar puncture surgery because the sensor must be small enough to allow it be placed in the reagent chamber of the lumbar puncture needle. The size of the sensor is decided by the size of the sensor chip and package. Our sensor chip is based on silicon piezoresistive effect and the size is 400 × 400 μm 2 . It is much smaller than the reported polymer intracranial pressure sensors such as liquid crystal polymer sensors. In terms of package, the traditional dual in-line package obviously could not match the size need, the minimal size of recently reported MEMS-based intracranial pressure sensors after packaging is 10 × 10 mm 2 . In this work, we are the first to introduce a quad flat no-lead package as the package form of piezoresistive intracranial pressure sensors, the whole size of the sensor is minimized to only 3 × 3 mm 2 . Considering the liquid measurement environment, the sensor is gummed and waterproof performance is tested; the sensitivity of the sensor is 0.9 × 10 −2 mV/kPa. (paper)

  11. Fast Neutral Pressure Measurements in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; T. Provost; R. Gernhardt; T.R. Jarboe; M.G. Bell

    2002-01-01

    Several fast neutral pressure gauges have been installed on NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] to measure the vessel and divertor pressure during inductive and coaxial helicity injected (CHI) plasma operations. Modified, PDX [Poloidal Divertor Experiment]-type Penning gauges have been installed on the upper and lower divertors. Neutral pressure measurements during plasma operations from these and from two shielded fast Micro ion gauges at different toroidal locations on the vessel mid-plane are described. A new unshielded ion gauge, referred to as the In-vessel Neutral Pressure (INP) gauge is under development

  12. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  13. Measuring Vapor Pressure with an Isoteniscope: A Hands-on Introduction to Thermodynamic Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenqian; Haslam, Andrew J.; Macey, Andrew; Shah, Umang V.; Brechtelsbauer, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the vapor pressure of a volatile liquid or azeotropic mixture, and its fluid phase diagram, can be achieved with an isoteniscope and an industrial grade digital pressure sensor using the experimental method reported in this study. We describe vapor-pressure measurements of acetone and n-hexane and their azeotrope, and how the…

  14. Reducing Fatigue Loading Due to Pressure Shift in Discrete Fluid Power Force Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Hedegaard; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2016-01-01

    power force system. The current paper investigates the correlation between pressure oscillations in the cylinder chambers and valve flow in the manifold. Furthermore, the correlation between the pressure shifting time and the pressure overshoot is investigated. The study therefore focus on how to shape......Discrete Fluid Power Force Systems is one of the topologies gaining focus in the pursuit of lowering energy losses in fluid power transmission systems. The cylinder based Fluid Power Force System considered in this article is constructed with a multi-chamber cylinder, a number of constant pressure...... oscillations in the cylinder chamber, especially for systems with long connections between the cylinder and the valve manifold. Hose pressure oscillations will induce oscillations in the produced piston force. Hence, pressure oscillations may increase the fatigue loading on systems employing a discrete fluid...

  15. Amniotic Fluid β2- Microglobulin Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Aydın

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine β2-microglobulin levels in amniotic fluid during the course of second trimester. STUDY DESIGN: One hundred patient’s amniotic fluid β2-microglobulin levels had been evaluated retrospectively (March-October 2009. The most common amniocentesis indication was advanced maternal age (33.3%. Others were; high risk result for triple test (18.5%, high risk result for double test (6.48%, ventriculomegaly (5.55%, obstetric history for fetus with down syndrome (4.62%, the presence of soft markers on ultrasound (13.8%, others (17.8%. Patients average gravida was 2.66 (range: 1-6, parity was 0.75 (range: 0-3, abortion was 0.65 (range: 0-3. RESULTS: All patients were at second trimester and the average gestational week was 17.7 (range 15- 22. Patients were divided into four groups (15th, 16th, 17-18th and 19-20th gestational weeks. We have demonstrated that amniotic fluid β2-microglobulin levels are increased progressively throughout the second trimester. We have specified normal β2-microglobulin values of each gestational week/period in order to be used in clinical practice. CONCLUSION: We have demonstrated that amnionic fluid β2-microglobulin levels are increased progressively throughout the second trimester.

  16. Fluid and rock interactions in silicate and aluminosilicate systems at elevated pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mary Kathleen

    Understanding fluid chemistry in the subduction zone environment is key to unraveling the details of element transport from the slab to the surface. Solubilities of cations, such as silicon, in water strongly affect both the physical and chemical properties of supercritical metamorphic fluids. Modeling the thermodynamics of fluid-rock interactions requires therefore a profound understanding of cation dissolution and aqueous speciation. In situ Raman experiments of the silica-water, alumina-water, and alumina water systems were performed in an externally heated Bassett-type diamond-anvil cell at the Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan. Natural quartz samples and synthetic ruby samples were used in the experiments. Samples were loaded in the sample chamber with a water pressure medium. All experiments used rhenium gaskets of uniform thickness with a 500 mum drill hole for the sample chamber. Temperature was measured using K-type thermocouples encompassing both the upper and lower diamond anvils. Pressures are obtained on the basis of the Raman shift of the 464 cm-1 quartz mode where possible or the Raman shift of the tips of the diamond anvils according to a method developed in this work. This work characterizes the state of stress in the diamond anvil cell, which is used as the basis for the pressure calibration using only the diamond anvils. Raman measurements of silicate fluid confirm the presence of H4 SiO4 and H6Si2O7 in solution and expand the pressure range for in-situ structural observations in the silica-water system. Additionally, we identify the presence of another silica species present at mantle conditions, which occurs at long time scales in the diamond cell. This study provides the first in situ data in the alumina-water and alumina-silica-water systems at pressures and temperatures relevant to the slab environment. Al(OH) 3 appears to be the dominant form of alumina present under these conditions and in the alumina

  17. Noninvasive pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation to predict fluid responsiveness at multiple thresholds : a prospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Jaap Jan; Poterman, Marieke; Papineau Salm, Pieternel; Van Amsterdam, Kai; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Kalmar, Alain F.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse pressure variation (PPV) and stroke volume variation (SVV) are dynamic preload variables that can be measured noninvasively to assess fluid responsiveness (FR) in anesthetized patients with mechanical ventilation. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of predicting FR according to the

  18. MRI measurements of intracranial pressure in the upright posture: The effect of the hydrostatic pressure gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Noam; Lee, Sang H; Bagci, Ahmet M

    2015-10-01

    To add the hydrostatic component of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements in the upright posture for derivation of pressure value in a central cranial location often used in invasive ICP measurements. Additional analyses were performed using data previously collected from 10 healthy subjects scanned in supine and sitting positions with a 0.5T vertical gap MRI scanner (GE Medical). Pulsatile blood and CSF flows to and from the brain were quantified using cine phase-contrast. Intracranial compliance and pressure were calculated using a previously described method. The vertical distance between the location of the CSF flow measurement and a central cranial location was measured manually in the mid-sagittal T1 -weighted image obtained in the upright posture. The hydrostatic pressure gradient of a CSF column with similar height was then added to the MR-ICP value. After adjustment for the hydrostatic component, the mean ICP value was reduced by 7.6 mmHg. Mean ICP referenced to the central cranial level was -3.4 ± 1.7 mmHg compared to the unadjusted value of +4.3 ± 1.8 mmHg. In the upright posture, the hydrostatic pressure component needs to be added to the MRI-derived ICP values for compatibility with invasive ICP at a central cranial location. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Intelligent pressure measurement in multiple sensor arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Pressure data acquisition has typically consisted of a group of sensors scanned by an electronic or mechanical multiplexer. The data accuracy was dependent upon the temperature stability of the sensors. This paper describes a new method of pressure measurement that combines individual temperature compensated pressure sensors, a microprocessor, and an A/D converter in one module. Each sensor has its own temperature characteristics stored in a look-up table to minimize sensor thermal errors. The result is an intelligent pressure module that can output temperature compensated engineering units over an Ethernet interface. Calibration intervals can be dramatically extended depending upon system accuracy requirements and calibration techniques used

  20. Nucleation of frictional instability caused by fluid pressurization in subducted blueschist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawai, M.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Plümper, O.; Hirose, T.; Spiers, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    Pore pressure is an important factor in controlling the slip instability of faults and thus the generation of earthquakes. Particularly slow earthquakes are widespread in subduction zones and usually linked to the occurrence of high pore pressure. Yet the influence of fluid pressure and effective

  1. Thermogravimetric measurements of liquid vapor pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Yunhong; Gregson, Christopher M.; Parker, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Rapid determination of vapor pressure by TGA. ► Demonstration of limitations of currently available approaches in literature. ► New model for vapor pressure assessment of small size samples in TGA. ► New model accounts for vapor diffusion and sample geometry and measures vapor pressure normally within 10%. - Abstract: A method was developed using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the vapor pressure of volatile liquids. This is achieved by measuring the rate of evaporation (mass loss) of a pure liquid contained within a cylindrical pan. The influence of factors like sample geometry and vapor diffusion on evaporation rate are discussed. The measurement can be performed across a wide range of temperature yielding reasonable results up to 10 kPa. This approach may be useful as a rapid and automatable method for measuring the volatility of flavor and fragrance raw materials.

  2. Non-Newtonian fluids: Frictional pressure loss prediction for fully-developed flow in straight pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    ESDU 91025 discusses models used to describe the rheology of time independent pseudohomogeneous non-Newtonian fluids (power-law, Bingham, Herschel-Bulkley and a generalized model due to Metzner and Reed); they are used to calculate the laminar flow pressure drop (which is independent of pipe roughness in this regime). Values of a generalized Reynolds number are suggested to define transitional and turbulent flow. For turbulent flow in smooth pipes, pressure loss is estimated on the basis of an experimentally determined rheogram using either the Dodge-Metzner or Bowen approach depending on the available measurements. Bowen requires results for at least two pipe diameters. The choice of Dodge-Metzner when data are limited is discussed; seven possible methods are assessed against five sets of experimental results drawn from the literature. No method is given for transitional flow, which it is suggested should be avoided, but the turbulent correlation is recommended because it will yield an overestimate. Suggestions are made for the treatment of roughness effects. Several worked examples illustrate the use of the methods and a flowchart guides the user through the process from experimentally characterizing the behavior of the fluid to determining the pressure drop. A computer program, ESDUpac A9125, is also provided.

  3. Fast intraslab fluid-flow events linked to pulses of high pore fluid pressure at the subducted plate interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taetz, Stephan; John, Timm; Bröcker, Michael; Spandler, Carl; Stracke, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    A better understanding of the subduction zone fluid cycle and its chemical-mechanical feedback requires in-depth knowledge about how fluids flow within and out of descending slabs. Relicts of fluid-flow systems in exhumed rocks of fossil subduction zones allow for identification of the general relationships between dehydration reactions, fluid pathway formation, the dimensions and timescales of distinct fluid flow events; all of which are required for quantitative models for fluid-induced subduction zone processes. Two types of garnet-quartz-phengite veins can be distinguished in an eclogite-facies mélange block from the Pouébo Eclogite Mélange, New Caledonia. These veins record synmetamorphic internal fluid release by mineral breakdown reactions (type I veins), and infiltration of an external fluid (type II veins) with the associated formation of a reaction selvage. The dehydration and fluid migration documented by the type I veins likely occurred on a timescale of 105-106 years, based on average subduction rates and metamorphic conditions required for mineral dehydration and fluid flow. The timeframe of fluid-rock interaction between the external fluid and the wall-rock of the type II veins is quantified using a continuous bulk-rock Li-diffusion profile perpendicular to a vein and its metasomatic selvage. Differences in Li concentration between the internal and external fluid reservoirs resulted in a distinct diffusion profile (decreasing Li concentration and increasing δ7 Li) as the reaction front propagated into the host rock. Li-chronometric constraints indicate that the timescales of fluid-rock interaction associated with type II vein formation are on the order of 1 to 4 months (0.150-0.08+0.14 years). The short-lived, pulse-like character of this process is consistent with the notion that fluid flow caused by oceanic crust dehydration at the blueschist-to-eclogite transition contributes to or even dominates episodic pore fluid pressure increases at the

  4. An evaluation and comparison of intraventricular, intraparenchymal, and fluid-coupled techniques for intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vender, John; Waller, Jennifer; Dhandapani, Krishnan; McDonnell, Dennis

    2011-08-01

    Intracranial pressure measurements have become one of the mainstays of traumatic brain injury management. Various technologies exist to monitor intracranial pressure from a variety of locations. Transducers are usually placed to assess pressure in the brain parenchyma and the intra-ventricular fluid, which are the two most widely accepted compartmental monitoring sites. The individual reliability and inter-reliability of these devices with and without cerebrospinal fluid diversion is not clear. The predictive capability of monitors in both of these sites to local, regional, and global changes also needs further clarification. The technique of monitoring intraventricular pressure with a fluid-coupled transducer system is also reviewed. There has been little investigation into the relationship among pressure measurements obtained from these two sources using these three techniques. Eleven consecutive patients with severe, closed traumatic brain injury not requiring intracranial mass lesion evacuation were admitted into this prospective study. Each patient underwent placement of a parenchymal and intraventricular pressure monitor. The ventricular catheter tubing was also connected to a sensor for fluid-coupled measurement. Pressure from all three sources was measured hourly with and without ventricular drainage. Statistically significant correlation within each monitoring site was seen. No monitoring location was more predictive of global pressure changes or more responsive to pressure changes related to patient stimulation. However, the intraventricular pressure measurements were not reliable in the presence of cerebrospinal fluid drainage whereas the parenchymal measurements remained unaffected. Intraparenchymal pressure monitoring provides equivalent, statistically similar pressure measurements when compared to intraventricular monitors in all care and clinical settings. This is particularly valuable when uninterrupted cerebrospinal fluid drainage is desirable.

  5. Evaluating measurement uncertainty in fluid phase equilibrium calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Adriaan M. H.

    2018-04-01

    The evaluation of measurement uncertainty in accordance with the ‘Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement’ (GUM) has not yet become widespread in physical chemistry. With only the law of the propagation of uncertainty from the GUM, many of these uncertainty evaluations would be cumbersome, as models are often non-linear and require iterative calculations. The methods from GUM supplements 1 and 2 enable the propagation of uncertainties under most circumstances. Experimental data in physical chemistry are used, for example, to derive reference property data and support trade—all applications where measurement uncertainty plays an important role. This paper aims to outline how the methods for evaluating and propagating uncertainty can be applied to some specific cases with a wide impact: deriving reference data from vapour pressure data, a flash calculation, and the use of an equation-of-state to predict the properties of both phases in a vapour-liquid equilibrium. The three uncertainty evaluations demonstrate that the methods of GUM and its supplements are a versatile toolbox that enable us to evaluate the measurement uncertainty of physical chemical measurements, including the derivation of reference data, such as the equilibrium thermodynamical properties of fluids.

  6. Isobaric thermal expansivity behaviour against temperature and pressure of associating fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navia, Paloma; Troncoso, Jacobo [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias de Ourense, Campus As Lagoas, 32004 Ourense (Spain); Romani, Luis, E-mail: romani@uvigo.e [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias de Ourense, Campus As Lagoas, 32004 Ourense (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    In order to study the influence of association on the isobaric thermal expansivity, this magnitude has been experimentally determined for a set of associating fluids within the temperature and pressure intervals (278.15 to 348.15) K and (5 to 55) MPa by means of calorimetric measurements. The 1-alcohol series, from methanol to 1-decanol, 2-pentanol, 3-pentanol, and 1-pentylamine were selected. With a view on checking the quality of the experimental data, they are compared with available literature values; good coherence was obtained for most of the studied liquids. The analysis of the experimental results reveals that the association capability presents a strong influence not only on the value of the isobaric thermal expansivity itself, but also on its behaviour against temperature and pressure.

  7. Isobaric thermal expansivity behaviour against temperature and pressure of associating fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navia, Paloma; Troncoso, Jacobo; Romani, Luis

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the influence of association on the isobaric thermal expansivity, this magnitude has been experimentally determined for a set of associating fluids within the temperature and pressure intervals (278.15 to 348.15) K and (5 to 55) MPa by means of calorimetric measurements. The 1-alcohol series, from methanol to 1-decanol, 2-pentanol, 3-pentanol, and 1-pentylamine were selected. With a view on checking the quality of the experimental data, they are compared with available literature values; good coherence was obtained for most of the studied liquids. The analysis of the experimental results reveals that the association capability presents a strong influence not only on the value of the isobaric thermal expansivity itself, but also on its behaviour against temperature and pressure.

  8. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  9. Pressure measurements in magnetic-fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.

    1981-11-01

    Accurate pressure measurements are important in magnetic fusion devices for: (1) plasma diagnostic measurements of particle balance and ion temperature; (2) discharge cleaning optimization; (3) vacuum system performance; and (4) tritium accountability. This paper reviews the application, required accuracy, and suitable instrumentation for these measurements. Demonstrated uses of ionization-type and capacitance-diaphragm gauges for various pressure and gas-flow measurements in tokamaks are presented, with specific reference to the effects of magnetic fields on gauge performance and the problems associated with gauge calibration

  10. On output measurements via radiation pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeman, S.; Healey, A.J.; Forsberg, F.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown, by simple physical argument, that measurements of intensity with a radiation pressure balance should not agree with those based on calorimetric techniques. The conclusion is ultimately a consequence of the circumstance that radiation pressure measurements relate to wave momentum, while...... calorimetric methods relate to wave energy. Measurements with some typical ultrasound fields are performed with a novel type of hydrophone, and these allow an estimate to be made of the magnitude of the discrepancy to be expected between the two types of output measurement in a typical case....

  11. Pressure measurements in magnetic-fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dylla, H.F.

    1981-11-01

    Accurate pressure measurements are important in magnetic fusion devices for: (1) plasma diagnostic measurements of particle balance and ion temperature; (2) discharge cleaning optimization; (3) vacuum system performance; and (4) tritium accountability. This paper reviews the application, required accuracy, and suitable instrumentation for these measurements. Demonstrated uses of ionization-type and capacitance-diaphragm gauges for various pressure and gas-flow measurements in tokamaks are presented, with specific reference to the effects of magnetic fields on gauge performance and the problems associated with gauge calibration.

  12. Method of calibrating a fluid-level measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of calibrating a fluid-level measurement system is provided. A first response of the system is recorded when the system's sensor(s) is (are) not in contact with a fluid of interest. A second response of the system is recorded when the system's sensor(s) is (are) fully immersed in the fluid of interest. Using the first and second responses, a plurality of expected responses of the system's sensor(s) is (are) generated for a corresponding plurality of levels of immersion of the sensor(s) in the fluid of interest.

  13. Measuring viscosity with a levitating magnet: application to complex fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even, C; Bouquet, F; Deloche, B; Remond, J

    2009-01-01

    As an experimental project proposed to students in fourth year of university, a viscometer was developed, consisting of a small magnet levitating in a viscous fluid. The viscous force acting on the magnet is directly measured: viscosities in the range 10-10 6 mPa s are obtained. This experiment is used as an introduction to complex fluids and soft matter physics

  14. [Contemporary possibilities of intraocular pressure measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornová, J; Baxant, A

    2013-10-01

    Authors introduced current possibilities of measuring intraocular pressure (IOP). A list of available methods of monitoring IOP is published; contact measurement method IOP directly on the cornea, but also over upper lid, methodology of minimal contact and non-contact measurement. Following contact methods are described; former measurements of IOP by impression Schiotz tonometer and the current methodology applanation. So far as the gold standard measurement Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT) is considered, another methodology with applanation measurements are compared: Pascal dynamic contoured tonometer (DCT ), BioResonator - resonant applanation tonometer (ART ), digital applanation tonometer Tonopen and last hit: continuous measurement of IOP by Sensimed Triggerfish. Orientation and rapid assessment is palpation pressure control over the lid and measuring by tonometer Diaton. Rebound tonometer (RBT) iCare belongs to measurements with minimal contact, no need anesthetic drops and fluorescein, therefore a self - home version of IOP measurements (Icare ONE) is developed. Non-contact measurement of IOP by different pneumotonometers is popular for screening assessment of IOP. Reichert Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) is a non-contact applanation IOP measurement and reveals additional properties of the cornea. In the discussion of a range methodology is evaluated, the experience of other authors and their own experience is compared. For monitoring of patients is necessary to select the most suitable methodology, measure repeatedly and accurately to allow long-term monitoring of intraocular pressure.

  15. Modeling the Effect of Fluid-Structure Interaction on the Impact Dynamics of Pressurized Tank Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-13

    This paper presents a computational framework that : analyzes the effect of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) on the : impact dynamics of pressurized commodity tank cars using the : nonlinear dynamic finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit. : There exist...

  16. Automated intracranial pressure-controlled cerebrospinal fluid external drainage with LiquoGuard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsler, Stefan; Schmidtke, Mareike; Steudel, Wolf Ingo; Kiefer, Michael; Oertel, Joachim

    2013-08-01

    LiquoGuard is a new device for intracranial pressure (ICP)-controlled drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This present study evaluates the accuracy of ICP measurement via the LiquoGuard device in comparison with Spiegelberg. Thus, we compared data ascertained from simultaneous measurement of ICP using tip-transducer and tip-sensor devices. A total of 1,764 monitoring hours in 15 patients (range, 52-219 h) were analysed. All patients received an intraventricular Spiegelberg III probe with the drainage catheter connected to the LiquoGuard system. ICP reading of both devices was performed on an hourly basis. Statistical analysis was done by applying Pearson correlation and Wilcoxon-matched pair test (p drainage. However, LiquoGuard tends to provide misleading results in slit ventricles. Thus, before these drawbacks are further analysed, the authors recommend additional ICP measurement with internal tip-sensor devices to avoid dangerous erroneous interpretation of ICP data.

  17. Measurement of pressure pulsations in Francis turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobro, Einar

    2010-11-15

    The work presented in this thesis involves preparation and execution of measurements on Francis runners. The measurements were performed by means of onboard measuring equipment both in model runners and full-scale prototype runners. Also, analysis of the measured data, and the discussion of the results, is presented. The measurements resulted in large data sets. These data sets were used by the author to investigate the dynamic pressure and strain in the runners. The results of the analysis can be used as input in future turbine design. Andritz Hydro AG has used the data for verification of their numerical simulation tools. In connection with the refurbishment of Tokke power plant, two model runners were made available for onboard pressure measurements. To investigate the dynamic pressure in these runners, methods for integration of pressure transducers in the runner blades needed to be developed. After initial difficulties during the preparation, successful measurements were obtained from both model runners. At Tokke power plant, both the original and replacement runners were made accessible for onboard pressure and strain gauge measurements. On the original Kvaerner Brug AS runner, the test was prepared and performed by the author. This test failed, due to water intrusion in the logging chain. The second test was performed on the Andritz Hydro AG replacement runner. This test was prepared and performed by the author in close cooperation with Andritz Hydro AG, and the results were successful. The analysis results from both model and prototype runners show that the wake leaving the guide vanes is the most severe source of dynamic pressure in the runner. The draft tube vortex rope pulsation propagates upstream the runner, but does not appear as a significant frequency in the runner strain measurements. (Author)

  18. Retrograde mineral and fluid evolution in high-pressure metapelites (Schistes Lustres unit, Western Alps).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agard, Ph.; Goffe, B.; Touret, J.L.R.; Vidal, O.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid inclusions have been analysed in successive generations of syn-metamorphic segregations within low-grade, high-pressure, low-temperature (HP-LT) metapelites from the Western Alps. Fluid composition was then compared to mass transfer deduced from outcrop-scale retrograde mineral reactions. Two

  19. Initial boundary-value problem for the spherically symmetric Einstein equations with fluids with tangential pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Irene; Mena, Filipe C

    2017-08-01

    We prove that, for a given spherically symmetric fluid distribution with tangential pressure on an initial space-like hypersurface with a time-like boundary, there exists a unique, local in time solution to the Einstein equations in a neighbourhood of the boundary. As an application, we consider a particular elastic fluid interior matched to a vacuum exterior.

  20. Strain measurements during pressurized thermal shock experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarso Vida Gomes, P. de; Julio Ricardo Barreto Cruz; Tanius Rodrigues Mansur; Denis Henrique Bianchi Scaldaferri; Miguel Mattar Neto

    2005-01-01

    For the life extension of nuclear power plants, the residual life of most of their components must be evaluated along all their operating time. Concerning the reactor pressure vessel, the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) is a very important event to be considered. For better understanding the effects of this kind of event, tests are made. The approach described here consisted of building a simplified in-scale physical model of the reactor pressure vessel, submitting it to the actual operating temperature and pressure conditions and provoking a thermal shock by means of cold water flow in its external surface. To conduct such test, the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) has been conducting several studies related to PTS and has also built a laboratory that has made possible the simulation of the PTS loading conditions. Several cracks were produced in the external surface of the reactor pressure vessel model. Strain gages were fixed by means of electrical discharge welding over the cracks regions in both external and internal surfaces. The temperature was monitored in 10 points across the vessel wall. The internal pressure was manually controlled and monitored using a pressure transducer. Two PTS experiments were conducted and this paper presents the strain measurement procedures applied to the reactor pressure vessel model, during the PTS, using strain gages experimental methodology. (authors)

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers profile of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirinzi, Tommaso; Sancesario, Giulia Maria; Di Lazzaro, Giulia; D'Elia, Alessio; Imbriani, Paola; Scalise, Simona; Pisani, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a disabling neurological disorder whose potential treatability is significantly limited by diagnostic uncertainty. In fact, typical clinical presentation occurs at late phases of disease, when CSF shunting could be ineffective. In recent years, measurement of different CSF proteins, whose concentration directly reflects neuropathological changes of CNS, has significantly improved both diagnostic timing and accuracy of neurodegenerative disease. Unfortunately iNPH lacks neuropathological hallmarks allowing the identification of specific disease biomarkers. However, neuropathology of iNPH is so rich and heterogeneous that many processes can be tracked in CSF, including Alzheimer's disease core pathology, subcortical degeneration, neuroinflammation and vascular dysfunction. Indeed, a huge number of CSF biomarkers have been analyzed in iNPH patients, but a unifying profile has not been provided yet. In this brief survey, we thus attempted to summarize the main findings in the field of iNPH CSF biomarkers, aimed at outlining a synthetic model. Although defined cut-off values for biomarkers are not available, a better knowledge of CSF characteristics may definitely assist in diagnosing the disease.

  2. A gas thermometer for vapor pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusin, A. D.

    2008-08-01

    The pressure of an inert gas over the range 400 1000 K was measured on a tensimetric unit with a quartz membrane pressure gauge of enhanced sensitivity. It was shown that a reactor with a membrane null gauge could be used as a gas thermometer. The experimental confidence pressure and temperature intervals were 0.07 torr and 0.1 K at a significance level of 0.05. A Pt-Pt/10% Rh thermocouple was calibrated; the results were approximated by a polynomial of degree five. The error in temperature calculations was 0.25 K.

  3. Uncertainties for pressure-time efficiency measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Ramdal, Jørgen; Jonsson, Pontus; Dahlhaug, Ole Gunnar; Nielsen, Torbjørn; Cervantes, Michel

    2010-01-01

     In connection with the pressure-time project at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Luleå University of Technology, a number of tests with the pressure-time method have been performed at the Waterpower Laboratory in Trondheim, Norway. The aim is to lower the uncertainty and improve usability of the method. Also a field test at the Anundsjoe power plant in Sweden has been performed. The pressure-time measurement is affected by random uncertainty. To minimize the effect of t...

  4. Pressure in an exactly solvable model of active fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Maggi, Claudio; Paoluzzi, Matteo

    2017-07-01

    We consider the pressure in the steady-state regime of three stochastic models characterized by self-propulsion and persistent motion and widely employed to describe the behavior of active particles, namely, the Active Brownian particle (ABP) model, the Gaussian colored noise (GCN) model, and the unified colored noise approximation (UCNA) model. Whereas in the limit of short but finite persistence time, the pressure in the UCNA model can be obtained by different methods which have an analog in equilibrium systems, in the remaining two models only the virial route is, in general, possible. According to this method, notwithstanding each model obeys its own specific microscopic law of evolution, the pressure displays a certain universal behavior. For generic interparticle and confining potentials, we derive a formula which establishes a correspondence between the GCN and the UCNA pressures. In order to provide explicit formulas and examples, we specialize the discussion to the case of an assembly of elastic dumbbells confined to a parabolic well. By employing the UCNA we find that, for this model, the pressure determined by the thermodynamic method coincides with the pressures obtained by the virial and mechanical methods. The three methods when applied to the GCN give a pressure identical to that obtained via the UCNA. Finally, we find that the ABP virial pressure exactly agrees with the UCNA and GCN results.

  5. pressure analysis and fluid contact prediction for alpha reservoir

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    a pressure gradient profile such that the oil gradient line will intersect the hydrostatic line above the Water-Up-To. (WUT) line to define the OWC if present. The model was also calibrated with data from reservoirs with established contacts in the field. 3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. In the field, pressure typically increases ...

  6. Estimates of fluid pressure and tectonic stress in hydrothermal/volcanic areas:a methodological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vilardo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available An analytical approach to estimate the relative contribution of the fluid pressure and tectonic stress in hydrothermal/ volcanic areas is proposed assuming a Coulomb criterion of failure. The analytical procedure requires the coefficient of internal friction, cohesion, rock density, and thickness of overburden to be known from geological data. In addition, the orientation of the principal stress axes and the stress ratio must be determined from the inversion of fault-slip or seismic data (focal mechanisms. At first, the stress magnitude is calculated assuming that faulting occurs in 'dry' conditions (fluid pressure=0. In a second step, the fluid pressure is introduced performing a grid search over the orientation of 1 fault planes that slip by shear failure or 2 cracks that open under different values of fluid pressure and calculating the consistency with the observed fault planes (i.e. strike and dip of faults, cracks, nodal planes from focal mechanisms. The analytical method is applied using fault-slip data from the Solfatara volcano (Campi Flegrei, Italy and seismic data (focal mechanisms from the Vesuvius volcano (Italy. In these areas, the fluid pressure required to activate faults (shear fractures and cracks (open fractures is calculated. At Solfatara, the ratio between the fluid pressure and the vertical stress ?is very low for faults ( ?=0.16 and relatively high for cracks ( ?=0.5. At Vesuvius, ?=0.6. Limits and uncertainties of the method are also discussed.

  7. Influence of Pore-Fluid Pressure on Elastic Wave Velocity and Electrical Conductivity in Water-Saturated Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, A.; Watanabe, T.

    2013-12-01

    Pore-fluid pressure in seismogenic zones can play a key role in the occurrence of earthquakes (e.g., Sibson, 2009). Its evaluation via geophysical observations can lead to a good understanding of seismic activities. The evaluation requires a thorough understanding of the influence of the pore-fluid pressure on geophysical observables like seismic velocity and electrical conductivity. We have studied the influence of pore-fluid pressure on elastic wave velocity and electrical conductivity in water-saturated rocks. Fine grained (100-500μm) biotite granite (Aji, Kagawa pref., Japan) was used as rock samples. The density is 2.658-2.668 g/cm3, and the porosity 0.68-0.87%. The sample is composed of 52.8% plagioclase, 36.0% Quartz, 3.0% K-feldspar, 8.2% biotite. SEM images show that a lot of grain boundaries are open. Few intracrystalline cracks were observed. Following the method proposed by David and Zimmerman (2012), the distribution function of crack aspect ratio was evaluated from the pressure dependence of compressional and shear wave velocities in a dry sample. Cylindrical sample has dimensions of 25 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, and saturated with 0.01 mol/l KCl aqueous solution. Compressional and shear wave velocities were measured with the pulse transmission technique (PZT transducers, f=2 MHz), and electrical conductivity the two-electrode method (Ag-AgCl electrodes, f=1 Hz-100 kHz). Simultaneous measurements of velocities and conductivity were made using a 200 MPa hydrostatic pressure vessel, in which confining and pore-fluid pressures can be separately controlled. The pore-fluid is electrically insulated from the metal work of the pressure vessel by using a newly designed plastic device (Watanabe and Higuchi, 2013). The confining pressure was progressively increased up to 25 MPa, while the pore-fluid pressure was kept at 0.1 MPa. It took five days or longer for the electrical conductivity to become stationary after increasing the confining pressure

  8. Thallium pulmonary scintigraphy. Relationship to pulmonary fluid volumes during left atrial hypertension and the acute release of pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutsky, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between thallium-201 lung activity and pulmonary fluid volumes, we compared thallium pulmonary scintigrams with measures of intravascular (PBV), extravascular (EVLW) and total lung water (TLW) during gradual left atrial (LA) hypertension and then serially after the acute release of pressure. The study group was composed of nine mongrel dogs who were each studied at seven levels of elevated LA pressure, and then every 15 minutes for 2 hours after the acute release of pressure. During LA pressure (congestion phase) elevation, lung counts (normalized for myocardial activity), correlated best with TLW (r . .91), rather than PBV (r . .84) or EVLW (r . .81). After the release of pressure (recovery phase), lung counts correlated well with EVLW (r . .92) and TLW (r . .82), but not with PBV (r . .28). Postmortem lung counts from 197 separate lung sections correlated well with the corresponding wet weight/dry weight ratio from that section (r . .81). Thus, we conclude that changes in pulmonary thallium emissions during cardiogenic pulmonary edema relate to corresponding changes in pulmonary fluid volumes. During congestion, the confounding effects of nonlinear increases in EVLW and PBV make thallium emissions more a marker of TLW than either the intravascular or extravascular pulmonary fluid compartment. After pressure release, PBV immediately returns to normal, at which time EVLW and pulmonary emissions correlate closely. These latter data, more applicable to postexercise stress thallium data, lend support to the hypothesis that elevated pulmonary emissions during postexercise thallium scintigrams reflect elevations in EVLW that develop during exercise

  9. Pressure-surge mitigation methods in fluid-conveying piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.W.; Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    Pressure surges in the heat transport system of nuclear reactor plants can affect the safety and reliability of the plants. Hence the pressure surges must be considered in the design, operation, and maintenance of the plants in order to minimize their occurrence and impacts. The objectives of this paper are to review various methods to control or mitigate the pressure surges, to analyze these methods to gain understanding of the mitigation mechanisms, and examine applicability of the methods to nuclear power plants. 6 refs., 13 figs

  10. Measuring the osmotic pressure of active colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael; Soni, Vishal; Magkiriadou, Sofia; Ferrari, Melissa; Youssef, Mina; Driscoll, Michelle; Sacanna, Stefano; Chaikin, Paul; Irvine, William

    We study the behavior of a system of colloidal spinners, consisting of weakly magnetic colloids driven by a rotating magnetic field. First the particles are allowed to sediment to an equilibrium density profile in a gravitational field, from which we measure the equilibrium equation of state. By spinning the particles at various frequencies, we introduce activity into the system through the hydrodynamic interactions between particles. We observe that the activity expands the sedimentation profile to a new steady state, from which we measure the pressure as a function of the density and activity. We compare the effects of activity on the pressure and mean-squared displacement of spinners and tracer particles.

  11. Model of pulmonary fluid traffic homeostasis based on respiratory cycle pressure, bidirectional bronchiolo-pulmonar shunting and water evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Sven; Kurbel, Beatrica; Gulam, Danijela; Spajić, Borislav

    2010-06-01

    The main puzzle of the pulmonary circulation is how the alveolar spaces remain dry over a wide range of pulmonary vascular pressures and blood flows. Although normal hydrostatic pressure in pulmonary capillaries is probably always below 10 mmHg, well bellow plasma colloid pressure of 25 mmHg, most textbooks state that some fluid filtration through capillary walls does occur, while the increased lymph drainage prevents alveolar fluid accumulation. The lack of a measurable pressure drop along pulmonary capillaries makes the classic description of Starling forces unsuitable to the low pressure, low resistance pulmonary circulation. Here presented model of pulmonary fluid traffic describes lungs as a matrix of small vascular units, each consisting of alveoli whose capillaries are anastomotically linked to the bronchiolar capillaries perfused by a single bronchiolar arteriole. It proposes that filtration and absorption in pulmonary and in bronchiolar capillaries happen as alternating periods of low and of increased perfusion pressures. The model is based on three levels of filtration control: short filtration phases due to respiratory cycle of the whole lung are modulated by bidirectional bronchiolo-pulmonar shunting independently in each small vascular unit, while fluid evaporation from alveolar groups further tunes local filtration. These mechanisms are used to describe a self-sustaining regulator that allows optimal fluid traffic in different settings. The proposed concept is used to describe development of pulmonary edema in several clinical entities (exercise in wet or dry climate, left heart failure, people who rapidly move to high altitudes, acute cyanide and carbon monoxide poisoning, large pulmonary embolisms). .

  12. On modelling, simulation and measurement of fluid power pumps and pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weddfelt, K.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure ripple in fluid power systems is often considered to be a nuisance. It is a major reason for vibrations and noise emission but can also cause functional problems, in extreme causes even fatigue and breakdown of pipes and connections. In order to examine this problem both the sources of pressure ripple and its transmission properties must be considered. A major source of pressure ripple in fluid power systems is positive displacement pumps, a component which is actually a source of flow ripple. A positive displacement pump can be characterized and modelled as a flow source with an internal source impedance. Special measurement techniques must be developed in order to determine these source properties experimentally. Pressure and flow ripple propagate through the pipeline of a fluid power system as waves. When the impedance of the system changes, part of the energy in the wave is being transmitted while the remaining part is reflected. Therefore, the mechanism for standing waves to occur is present, causing resonances and possibly very large pressure pulsations at certain frequencies. Destructive interference between these waves can be used to design so-called reactive attenuators, similar to an automobile muffler, which can be used to acoustically separate the source of flow ripple from the rest of the fluid power system. A mathematical model of wave transmission in pipelines is of fundamental importance to the design of acoustical sound systems. It is of equal importance when modelling and measuring the source characteristics of fluid power pumps. Such a mathematical model must include the transmission and reflection of waves as well as the frequency-dependent losses from viscous friction in the fluid. (au)

  13. Radiotracer techniques for measuring fluid flow and calibrating flow meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, E.L.

    1987-08-01

    Radiotracer techniques can be used to measure accurately both gas and liquid flow rates under operating conditions in a wide range of flow systems. They are ideally suited for calibrating flow meters as well as for measuring unmetered flows in industrial plants. Applications of these techniques range from measuring the flows of fuels and process fluids for energy and mass balance studies to measuring the flows of liquid and airborne effluents for pollution control. This report describes the various radiotracer techniques which can be used to measure fluid flows. The range of application and inherent accuracy of each technique is discussed

  14. Density functional study of the pressure tensor for inhomogeneous Lennard—Jones fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zong-Li; Liu Zhi-Cheng; Kang Yan-Shuang; Ma Heng-Xin; Kang Yan-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Based on classical density functional theory, an expression of the pressure tensor for inhomogeneous fluids is presented. This takes into account greater correlation between particles, especially for systems that are geometrically confined or involve an interface. The density and pressure components of Lennard-Jones fluids confined in hard and softened nano-cavities are calculated. A comparison between the results of this work and IK expression suggests that the agreement depends on temperature. The interfacial tension for hard sphere fluids agrees well with the Monte Carlo result when the bulk density is not too large. The results of the solid-fluid interfacial tension for Lennard—Jones fluids demonstrate that different types of external potentials modulate the interfacial tension in different manners. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  15. Porphyry-Copper Ore Shells Form at Stable Pressure-Temperature Fronts Within Dynamic Fluid Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, P.; Driesner, T.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Porphyry-type ore deposits are major resources of copper and gold, precipitated from fluids expelled by crustal magma chambers. The metals are typically concentrated in confined ore shells within vertically extensive vein networks, formed through hydraulic fracturing of rock by ascending fluids. Numerical modeling shows that dynamic permeability responses to magmatic fluid expulsion can stabilize a front of metal precipitation at the boundary between lithostatically pressured up-flow of hot magmatic fluids and hydrostatically pressured convection of cooler meteoric fluids. The balance between focused heat advection and lateral cooling controls the most important economic characteristics, including size, shape, and ore grade. This self-sustaining process may extend to epithermal gold deposits, venting at active volcanoes, and regions with the potential for geothermal energy production.

  16. Side abutment pressure distribution by field measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian-guo Wang; Yang Song; Xing-hua He; Jian Zhang [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, Xuzhou (China)

    2008-12-15

    Given the 7123 working face in the Qidong Coal Mine of the Wanbei Mining Group, nine dynamic roof monitors were installed in the crossheading to measure the amount and velocity of roof convergence in different positions and at different times and three steel bored stress sensors were installed in the return airway to measure rock stress at depth. On the basis of this arrangement, the rule of change of the distribution of the side abutment pressure with the advance of the working face and movement of overlying strata was studied. The rule of change and the stability of rock stress at depth were measured. Secondly, the affected area and stability time of the side abutment pressure were also studied. The results show that: 1) During working, the face advanced distance was from 157 m to 99 m, the process was not effected by mining induced pressure. When the distance was 82 m, the position of peak stress was 5 m away from the coal wall. When the distance was 37 m, the position of peak stress away from the coal wall was about 15 m to 20 m and finally reached a steady state; 2) the time and the range of the peak of side rock pressure obtained from stress sensors were consistent with the results from the dynamic roof monitors; 3) the position of the peak pressure was 25 m away from the coal wall. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Eccentric pressurized tube for measuring creep rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwab, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Creep rupture is a long term failure mode in structural materials that occurs at high temperatures and moderate stress levels. The deterioration of the material preceding rupture, termed creep damage, manifests itself in the formation of small cavities on grain boundaries. To measure creep damage, sometimes uniaxial tests are performed, sometimes density measurements are made, and sometimes the grain boundary cavities are measured by microscopy techniques. The purpose of the present research is to explore a new method of measuring creep rupture, which involves measuring the curvature of eccentric pressurized tubes. Theoretical investigations as well as the design, construction, and operation of an experimental apparatus are included in this research

  18. Modelling the fluid structure interaction produced by a waterhammer during shutdown of high-pressure pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erath, W.; Nowotny, B.; Maetz, J.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of an experiment in a pipe system with pump shutdown and valve closing have been performed in the nuclear power plant KRB II (Gundremmingen, Germany). Comparative calculations of fluid and structure including interaction show an excellent agreement with the measured results. Theory and implementation of the fluid structure interaction (FSI) and the results of the comparison are described. The following measurements have been compared with calculations: (1) experiments in Delft, Netherlands to analyse the FSI; and (2) experiment with pump shutdown and valve closing in the nuclear power plant KRB II has been performed. It turns out, that the consideration of the FSI is necessary for an exact calculation of 'soft' piping systems. It has significant application in current waterhammer problems. For example, water column closure, vapour collapse, check valve slamming continues to create waterhammers in the energy industry. An important consequence of the FSI is mostly a significant increase of the effective structural damping. This mitigates - so far in all KED's calculations the FSI has taken into account - an amplification of pipe movements due to pressure waves in resonance with structural eigenvalues. To investigate the integrity of pipe systems pipe stresses are calculated. Taking FSI into account they are reduced by 10-40% in the actual case. (orig.)

  19. Skeletal nutrient vascular adaptation induced by external oscillatory intramedullary fluid pressure intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yi-Xian

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial fluid flow induced by loading has demonstrated to be an important mediator for regulating bone mass and morphology. It is shown that the fluid movement generated by the intramedullary pressure (ImP provides a source for pressure gradient in bone. Such dynamic ImP may alter the blood flow within nutrient vessel adjacent to bone and directly connected to the marrow cavity, further initiating nutrient vessel adaptation. It is hypothesized that oscillatory ImP can mediate the blood flow in the skeletal nutrient vessels and trigger vasculature remodeling. The objective of this study was then to evaluate the vasculature remodeling induced by dynamic ImP stimulation as a function of ImP frequency. Methods Using an avian model, dynamics physiological fluid ImP (70 mmHg, peak-peak was applied in the marrow cavity of the left ulna at either 3 Hz or 30 Hz, 10 minutes/day, 5 days/week for 3 or 4 weeks. The histomorphometric measurements of the principal nutrient arteries were done to quantify the arterial wall area, lumen area, wall thickness, and smooth muscle cell layer numbers for comparison. Results The preliminary results indicated that the acute cyclic ImP stimuli can significantly enlarge the nutrient arterial wall area up to 50%, wall thickness up to 20%, and smooth muscle cell layer numbers up to 37%. In addition, 3-week of acute stimulation was sufficient to alter the arterial structural properties, i.e., increase of arterial wall area, whereas 4-week of loading showed only minimal changes regardless of the loading frequency. Conclusions These data indicate a potential mechanism in the interrelationship between vasculature adaptation and applied ImP alteration. Acute ImP could possibly initiate the remodeling in the bone nutrient vasculature, which may ultimately alter blood supply to bone.

  20. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  1. Computation of the effect of pipe plasticity on pressure-pulse propagation in a fluid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Kot, C.A.

    1975-04-01

    A simple computational model is developed for incorporating the effect of elastic-plastic deformation of piping on pressure-transient propagation in a fluid system. A computer program (PLWV) is described that incorporates this structural interaction model into a one-dimensional method-of-characteristics procedure for fluid-hammer analysis. Computed results are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data. The most significant effect of plastic deformation is to limit the peak pressure of a pulse leaving a pipe to approximately the yield pressure of the pipe, if the pipe is sufficiently long. 7 references. (U.S.)

  2. Measurement of synovial fluid volume using urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; Stabler, T V; Kong, S Y; Varju, G; McDaniel, G

    2007-10-01

    To examine the utility of using urea concentrations for determining Synovial Fluid (SF) joint volume in effused and non-effused joints. Knee joint SF was aspirated from 159 human study participants with symptomatic osteoarthritis of at least one knee either directly (165 knees) or by lavage (110 knees). Serum was obtained immediately prior to SF aspiration. Participants were asked to rate individual knee pain, aching or stiffness. SF and serum urea levels were determined using a specific enzymatic method run on an automated CMA600 analyzer. Cell counts were performed on direct SF aspirates when volume permitted. The formula for calculating SF joint volume was as follows: V(j)=C(D)(V(I))/(C-C(D)) with V(j)=volume of SF in entire joint, C(D)=concentration of urea in diluted (lavage) SF, V(I)=volume of saline injected into joint, and C=concentration of urea in undiluted (neat) SF derived below where C=0.897(C(S)) and C(s)=concentration of urea in serum. There was an excellent correlation (r(2)=0.8588) between SF and serum urea in the direct aspirates with a ratio of 0.897 (SF/serum). Neither urea levels nor the SF/serum ratio showed any correlation with Kellgren Lawrence (KL) grade, or cell count. While urea levels increased with age there was no change in the ratio. Intraarticular SF volumes calculated for the lavaged knees ranged from 0.555 to 71.71ml with a median volume of 3.048ml. There was no correlation of SF volume to KL grade but there was a positive correlation (P=0.001) between SF volume and self-reported individual knee pain. Our urea results for direct aspirates indicate an equilibrium state between serum and SF with regard to the water fraction. This equilibrium exists regardless of disease status (KL grade), inflammation (cell count), or age, making it possible to calculate intraarticular volume of lavaged joints based upon this urea method. Most of the joint volumes we calculated fell within the previously reported range for normal knees of 0.5-4.0ml

  3. Turbine airfoil cooling system with cooling systems using high and low pressure cooling fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jan H.; Messmann, Stephen John; Scribner, Carmen Andrew

    2017-10-25

    A turbine airfoil cooling system including a low pressure cooling system and a high pressure cooling system for a turbine airfoil of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. In at least one embodiment, the low pressure cooling system may be an ambient air cooling system, and the high pressure cooling system may be a compressor bleed air cooling system. In at least one embodiment, the compressor bleed air cooling system in communication with a high pressure subsystem that may be a snubber cooling system positioned within a snubber. A delivery system including a movable air supply tube may be used to separate the low and high pressure cooling subsystems. The delivery system may enable high pressure cooling air to be passed to the snubber cooling system separate from low pressure cooling fluid supplied by the low pressure cooling system to other portions of the turbine airfoil cooling system.

  4. Wireless Fluid-Level Measurement System Equips Boat Owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    While developing a measurement acquisition system to be used to retrofit aging aircraft with vehicle health monitoring capabilities, Langley Research Center developed an innovative wireless fluid-level measurement system. The NASA technology was of interest to Tidewater Sensors LLC, of Newport News, Virginia, because of its many advantages over conventional fuel management systems, including its ability to provide an accurate measurement of volume while a boat is experiencing any rocking motion due to waves or people moving about on the boat. These advantages led the company to license this novel fluid-level measurement system from NASA for marine applications.

  5. Proteomic Assessment of Fluid Shifts and Association with Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure in Twin Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Brinda K.; Stenger, Michael B.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Macias, Brandon R.; Siamwala, Jamila; Piening, Brian Donald; Hook, Vivian; Ebert, Doug; Patel, Hemal; Smith, Scott; hide

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Astronauts participating in long duration space missions are at an increased risk of physiological disruptions. The development of visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome is one of the leading health concerns for crew members on long-duration space missions; microgravity-induced fluid shifts and chronic elevated cabin CO2 may be contributing factors. By studying physiological and molecular changes in one identical twin during his 1-year ISS mission and his ground-based co-twin, this work extends a current NASA-funded investigation to assess space flight induced "Fluid Shifts" in association with the development of VIIP. This twin study uniquely integrates physiological and -omic signatures to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying space flight-induced VIIP. We are: (i) conducting longitudinal proteomic assessments of plasma to identify fluid regulation-related molecular pathways altered by long-term space flight; and (ii) integrating physiological and proteomic data with genomic data to understand the genomic mechanism by which these proteomic signatures are regulated. PURPOSE: We are exploring proteomic signatures and genomic mechanisms underlying space flight-induced VIIP symptoms with the future goal of developing early biomarkers to detect and monitor the progression of VIIP. This study is first to employ a male monozygous twin pair to systematically determine the impact of fluid distribution in microgravity, integrating a comprehensive set of structural and functional measures with proteomic, metabolomic and genomic data. This project has a broader impact on Earth-based clinical areas, such as traumatic brain injury-induced elevations of intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus, and glaucoma. HYPOTHESIS: We predict that the space-flown twin will experience a space flight-induced alteration in proteins and peptides related to fluid balance, fluid control and brain injury as compared to his pre-flight protein

  6. Labyrinth and cerebral-spinal fluid pressure changes in guinea pigs and monkeys during simulated zero G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore the hypothesis that shifts of body fluids from the legs and torso toward the head contribute to the motion sickness experienced by astronauts and cosmonauts. The shifts in body fluids observed during zero-G exposure were simulated by elevating guinea pigs' and monkeys' torsos and hindquarters. Cerebral-spinal fluid pressure was recorded from a transducer located in a brain ventricle; labyrinth fluid pressure was recorded from a pipette cemented in a hole in a semicircular canal. An anticipated divergence in cerebral-spinal fluid pressure and labyrinth fluid pressure during torso elevation was not observed. The results of this study do not support a fluid shift mechanism of zero-G-induced motion sickness. However, a more complete test of the fluid shift mechanism would be obtained if endolymph and perilymph pressure changes were determined separately; we have been unable to perform this test to date.

  7. Equipment for liquid metal pressure measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J.

    1977-01-01

    Equipment is proposed for measuring liquid metal pressure in piping or a tank. An auxiliary piping is connected to the piping or tank at the measuring point. The auxiliary piping transports liquid metal to a container by means of an electromagnetic pump. The piping also houses an electromagnetic flow ratemeter connected to an electric comparator. The comparator and the electromagnetic pump are connected to the pump output generator. (Z.M.)

  8. Using an expiratory resistor, arterial pulse pressure variations predict fluid responsiveness during spontaneous breathing: an experimental porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Michael K; Vistisen, Simon T; Koefoed-Nielsen, Jacob; Larsson, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Fluid responsiveness prediction is difficult in spontaneously breathing patients. Because the swings in intrathoracic pressure are minor during spontaneous breathing, dynamic parameters like pulse pressure variation (PPV) and systolic pressure variation (SPV) are usually small. We hypothesized that during spontaneous breathing, inspiratory and/or expiratory resistors could induce high arterial pressure variations at hypovolemia and low variations at normovolemia and hypervolemia. Furthermore, we hypothesized that SPV and PPV could predict fluid responsiveness under these conditions. Eight prone, anesthetized and spontaneously breathing pigs (20 to 25 kg) were subjected to a sequence of 30% hypovolemia, normovolemia, and 20% and 40% hypervolemia. At each volemic level, the pigs breathed in a randomized order either through an inspiratory and/or an expiratory threshold resistor (7.5 cmH2O) or only through the tracheal tube without any resistor. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables were measured during the breathing modes. Fluid responsiveness was defined as a 15% increase in stroke volume (DeltaSV) following fluid loading. Stroke volume was significantly lower at hypovolemia compared with normovolemia, but no differences were found between normovolemia and 20% or 40% hypervolemia. Compared with breathing through no resistor, SPV was magnified by all resistors at hypovolemia whereas there were no changes at normovolemia and hypervolemia. PPV was magnified by the inspiratory resistor and the combined inspiratory and expiratory resistor. Regression analysis of SPV or PPV versus DeltaSV showed the highest R2 (0.83 for SPV and 0.52 for PPV) when the expiratory resistor was applied. The corresponding sensitivity and specificity for prediction of fluid responsiveness were 100% and 100%, respectively, for SPV and 100% and 81%, respectively, for PPV. Inspiratory and/or expiratory threshold resistors magnified SPV and PPV in spontaneously breathing pigs during hypovolemia

  9. Measurement bias of fluid velocity in molecular simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tysanner, Martin W.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2004-01-01

    In molecular simulations of fluid flow, the measurement of mean fluid velocity is considered to be a straightforward computation, yet there is some ambiguity in its definition. We show that in systems far from equilibrium, such as those with large temperature or velocity gradients, two commonly used definitions give slightly different results. Specifically, a bias can arise when computing the mean fluid velocity by measuring the mean particle velocity in a cell and averaging this mean over samples. We show that this bias comes from the correlation of momentum and density fluctuations in non-equilibrium fluids, obtain an analytical expression for predicting it, and discuss what system characteristics (e.g., number of particles per cell, temperature gradients) reduce or magnify the error. The bias has a physical origin so although we demonstrate it by direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) computations, the same effect will be observed with other particle-based simulation methods, such as molecular dynamics and lattice gases

  10. Phase-resolved fluid dynamic forces of a flapping foil energy harvester based on PIV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liburdy, James

    2017-11-01

    Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry measurements are performed in a wind tunnel to evaluate the spatial and temporal fluid dynamic forces acting on a flapping foil operating in the energy harvesting regime. Experiments are conducted at reduced frequencies (k = fc/U) of 0.05 - 0.2, pitching angle of, and heaving amplitude of A / c = 0.6. The phase-averaged pressure field is obtained by integrating the pressure Poisson equation. Fluid dynamic forces are then obtained through the integral momentum equation. Results are compared with a simple force model based on the concept of flow impulse. These results help to show the detailed force distributions, their transient nature and aide in understanding the impact of the fluid flow structures that contribute to the power production.

  11. Measuring Rock-Fluid Adhesion Directly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmor, R.

    2017-12-01

    We show how to measure directly solid-liquid adhesion. We consider the normal adhesion, the work adhesion, and the lateral adhesion. The technique at the center of the method is Centrifugal Adhesion Balance (CAB) which allows coordinated manipulation of normal and lateral forces. For example: 1. It allows to induce an increase in the normal force which pulls on a liquid drop while keeping zero lateral force. This method mimics a drop that is subjected to a gravitational force that is gradually increasing. 2. It allows to increase the lateral force at zero normal force, mimicking zero gravity. From this one can obtain additional solid-liquid interaction parameters. When performing work of adhesion measurements, the values obtained are independent of drop size and are in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  12. A lattice Boltzmann investigation of steady-state fluid distribution, capillary pressure and relative permeability of a porous medium: Effects of fluid and geometrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi; Galindo-Torres, Sergio; Yan, Guanxi; Scheuermann, Alexander; Li, Ling

    2018-06-01

    Simulations of simultaneous steady-state two-phase flow in the capillary force-dominated regime were conducted using the state-of-the-art Shan-Chen multi-component lattice Boltzmann model (SCMC-LBM) based on two-dimensional porous media. We focused on analyzing the fluid distribution (i.e., WP fluid-solid, NP fluid-solid and fluid-fluid interfacial areas) as well as the capillary pressure versus saturation curve which was affected by fluid and geometrical properties (i.e., wettability, adhesive strength, pore size distribution and specific surface area). How these properties influenced the relative permeability versus saturation relation through apparent effective permeability and threshold pressure gradient was also explored. The SCMC-LBM simulations showed that, a thin WP fluid film formed around the solid surface due to the adhesive fluid-solid interaction, resulting in discrete WP fluid distributions and reduction of the WP fluid mobility. Also, the adhesive interaction provided another source of capillary pressure in addition to capillary force, which, however, did not affect the mobility of the NP fluid. The film fluid effect could be enhanced by large adhesive strength and fine pores in heterogeneous porous media. In the steady-state infiltration, not only the NP fluid but also the WP fluid were subjected to the capillary resistance. The capillary pressure effect could be alleviated by decreased wettability, large average pore radius and improved fluid connectivity in heterogeneous porous media. The present work based on the SCMC-LBM investigations elucidated the role of film fluid as well as capillary pressure in the two-phase flow system. The findings have implications for ways to improve the macroscopic flow equation based on balance of force for the steady-state infiltration.

  13. Flow rate impacts on capillary pressure and interface curvature of connected and disconnected fluid phases during multiphase flow in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Anna L.; Middleton, Jill; Walsh, Rick; Kingston, Andrew; Sheppard, Adrian

    2017-09-01

    We investigate capillary pressure-saturation (PC-S) relationships for drainage-imbibition experiments conducted with air (nonwetting phase) and brine (wetting phase) in Bentheimer sandstone cores. Three different flow rate conditions, ranging over three orders of magnitude, are investigated. X-ray micro-computed tomographic imaging is used to characterize the distribution and amount of fluids and their interfacial characteristics. Capillary pressure is measured via (1) bulk-phase pressure transducer measurements, and (2) image-based curvature measurements, calculated using a novel 3D curvature algorithm. We distinguish between connected (percolating) and disconnected air clusters: curvatures measured on the connected phase interfaces are used to validate the curvature algorithm and provide an indication of the equilibrium condition of the data; curvature and volume distributions of disconnected clusters provide insight to the snap-off processes occurring during drainage and imbibition under different flow rate conditions.

  14. Basic principles for measurement of intramuscular pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, A. R.; Ballard, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    We review historical and methodological approaches to measurements of intramuscular pressure (IMP) in humans. These techniques provide valuable measures of muscle tone and activity as well as diagnostic criteria for evaluation of exertional compartment syndrome. Although the wick and catheter techniques provide accurate measurements of IMP at rest, their value for exercise studies and diagnosis of exertional compartment syndrome is limited because of low frequency response and hydrostatic (static and inertial) pressure artifacts. Presently, most information on diagnosis of exertional compartment syndromes during dynamic exercise is available using the Myopress catheter. However, future research and clinical diagnosis using IMP can be optimized by the use of a miniature transducer-tipped catheter such as the Millar Mikro-tip.

  15. The Balance of Fluid and Osmotic Pressures across Active Biological Membranes with Application to the Corneal Endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Cheng

    Full Text Available The movement of fluid and solutes across biological membranes facilitates the transport of nutrients for living organisms and maintains the fluid and osmotic pressures in biological systems. Understanding the pressure balances across membranes is crucial for studying fluid and electrolyte homeostasis in living systems, and is an area of active research. In this study, a set of enhanced Kedem-Katchalsky (KK equations is proposed to describe fluxes of water and solutes across biological membranes, and is applied to analyze the relationship between fluid and osmotic pressures, accounting for active transport mechanisms that propel substances against their concentration gradients and for fixed charges that alter ionic distributions in separated environments. The equilibrium analysis demonstrates that the proposed theory recovers the Donnan osmotic pressure and can predict the correct fluid pressure difference across membranes, a result which cannot be achieved by existing KK theories due to the neglect of fixed charges. The steady-state analysis on active membranes suggests a new pressure mechanism which balances the fluid pressure together with the osmotic pressure. The source of this pressure arises from active ionic fluxes and from interactions between solvent and solutes in membrane transport. We apply the proposed theory to study the transendothelial fluid pressure in the in vivo cornea, which is a crucial factor maintaining the hydration and transparency of the tissue. The results show the importance of the proposed pressure mechanism in mediating stromal fluid pressure and provide a new interpretation of the pressure modulation mechanism in the in vivo cornea.

  16. Measurement of local void fraction at elevated temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.; Trabold, T.A.

    1993-03-01

    Significant advances have recently been made in analytical and computational methods for the prediction of local thermal-hydraulic conditions in gas/liquid two-phase flows. There is, however, a need for extensive experimental data, for the dual purposes of constitutive relation development and code qualification. There is especially true of systems involving complicated geometries and/or extreme flow conditions for which little, if any, applicable information exists in the open literature. For the tests described in the present paper, a novel electrical probe has been applied to measure the void fraction in atmospheric pressure air/water flows, and steam/water mixtures at high temperature and pressure. The data acquired in the latter experiments are compared with the results of a one-dimensional two-fluid computational analysis

  17. Prevention of Pressure Oscillations in Modeling a Cavitating Acoustic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Klenow

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation effects play an important role in the UNDEX loading of a structure. For far-field UNDEX, the structural loading is affected by the formation of local and bulk cavitation regions, and the pressure pulses resulting from the closure of the cavitation regions. A common approach to numerically modeling cavitation in far-field underwater explosions is Cavitating Acoustic Finite Elements (CAFE and more recently Cavitating Acoustic Spectral Elements (CASE. Treatment of cavitation in this manner causes spurious pressure oscillations which must be treated by a numerical damping scheme. The focus of this paper is to investigate the severity of these oscillations on the structural response and a possible improvement to CAFE, based on the original Boris and Book Flux-Corrected Transport algorithm on structured meshes [6], to limit oscillations without the energy loss associated with the current damping schemes.

  18. Pressure and fluid saturation prediction in a multicomponent reservoir, using combined seismic and electromagnetic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John; Daley, Tom

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a method for combining seismic and electromagnetic measurements to predict changes in water saturation, pressure, and CO 2 gas/oil ratio in a reservoir undergoing CO 2 flood. Crosswell seismic and electromagnetic data sets taken before and during CO 2 flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to produce crosswell images of the change in compressional velocity, shear velocity, and electrical conductivity during a CO 2 injection pilot study. A rock properties model is developed using measured log porosity, fluid saturations, pressure, temperature, bulk density, sonic velocity, and electrical conductivity. The parameters of the rock properties model are found by an L1-norm simplex minimization of predicted and observed differences in compressional velocity and density. A separate minimization, using Archie's law, provides parameters for modeling the relations between water saturation, porosity, and the electrical conductivity. The rock-properties model is used to generate relationships between changes in geophysical parameters and changes in reservoir parameters. Electrical conductivity changes are directly mapped to changes in water saturation; estimated changes in water saturation are used along with the observed changes in shear wave velocity to predict changes in reservoir pressure. The estimation of the spatial extent and amount of CO 2 relies on first removing the effects of the water saturation and pressure changes from the observed compressional velocity changes, producing a residual compressional velocity change. This velocity change is then interpreted in terms of increases in the CO 2 /oil ratio. Resulting images of the CO 2 /oil ratio show CO 2 -rich zones that are well correlated to the location of injection perforations, with the size of these zones also correlating to the amount of injected CO 2 . The images produced by this process are better correlated to the location and amount of injected CO 2 than are any of the individual

  19. Fluid Flow Technology that Measures Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    From 1994 to 1996, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a Center Director's Discretionary Fund research effort to apply artificial intelligence technologies to the health management of plant equipment and space propulsion systems. Through this effort, NASA established a business relationship with Quality Monitoring and Control (QMC), of Kingwood, Texas, to provide hardware modeling and artificial intelligence tools. Very detailed and accurate Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) analysis and algorithms were jointly created, which identified several missing, critical instrumentation needs for adequately evaluating the engine health status. One of the missing instruments was a liquid oxygen (LOX) flow measurement. This instrument was missing since the original SSME included a LOX turbine flow meter that failed during a ground test, resulting in considerable damage for NASA. New balanced flow meter technology addresses this need with robust, safe, and accurate flow metering hardware.

  20. Study of high-pressure adsorption from supercritical fluids by the potential theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monsalvo, Matias Alfonso; Shapiro, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The multicomponent potential theory of adsorption (MPTA), which has been previously used to study low-pressure adsorption of subcritical fluids, is extended to adsorption equilibria from supercritical fluids up to high pressures. The MPTA describes an adsorbed phase as an inhomogeneous fluid...... the adsorbed and the gas phases. We have also evaluated the performance of the classical Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) EoS. The fluid-solid interactions are described by simple Dubinin-Radushkevich-Astakhov (DRA) potentials. In addition, we test the performance of the 10-4-3 Steele potential. It is shown...... that application of sPC-SAFT slightly improves the performance of the MPTA and that in spite of its simplicity, the DRA model can be considered as an accurate potential, especially, for mixture adsorption. We show that, for the sets of experimental data considered in this work, the MPTA is capable of predicting...

  1. Fluid-structure interaction dynamic simulation of spring-loaded pressure relief valves under seismic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Dongwei; Zhang, Jian; Yu, Xinhai

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a fluid-structure interaction dynamic simulation method of spring-loaded pressure relief valve was established. The dynamic performances of the fluid regions and the stress and strain of the structure regions were calculated at the same time by accurately setting up the contact pairs between the solid parts and the coupling surfaces between the fluid regions and the structure regions. A two way fluid-structure interaction dynamic simulation of a simplified pressure relief valve model was carried out. The influence of vertical sinusoidal seismic waves on the performance of the pressure relief valve was preliminarily investigated by loading sine waves. Under vertical seismic waves, the pressure relief valve will flutter, and the reseating pressure was affected by the amplitude and frequency of the seismic waves. This simulation method of the pressure relief valve under vertical seismic waves can provide effective means for investigating the seismic performances of the valves, and make up for the shortcomings of the experiment.

  2. Effect of initial fluid-system pressures on the behavior of a rupture-disc pressure-relief device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, B.J.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    Rupture disc assemblies are used in piping network systems as a pressure-relief device to protect the system from being exposed to excess pressures. Among the various disc assemblies, the reverse-buckling type is chosen for application in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor. This rupture-disc assembly consists of a portion of a thin spherical shell with its convex side subjected to the fluid system. The reverse-buckling type rupture disc assemblies have been used successfully in environments where the fluid is gas, i.e. highly compressible, and their performances have been judged as adequate in the liquid environment. To analyze the piping system, an analysis method is needed taking into consideration of the fluid/disc interaction, the nonlinear dynamic buckling phenomenon of the disc, and the possible cavitation of the fluid. A computer code SWAAM-I had been written at the Components Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory. Among its many functions, one is to compute the response of 1-dimensional pressure pulse propagation including the effects of many different types of boundary conditions and possible pipe plasticity

  3. Measurements of Pressure of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripter Using Pressure-Sensitive Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inose, Naoto; Ide, Masao

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes measurements of pressures at the focal region of the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL) using pressure-sensitive papers. At the focal region of ESWL, ordinary hydrophones are quickly damaged, because of very high pressures. Recently, measurements of pressure at the focal region of ESWL using pressure-sensitive paper have been advised. Therefore, we have studied the effectiveness of pressure-sensitive papers in the measurement of high acoustic pressures at the focal region of ESWL.

  4. VHBORE: A code to compute borehole fluid conductivity profiles with pressure changes in the borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, F.V.; Tsang, C.F.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the code VHBORE which can be used to model fluid electric conductivity profiles in a borehole intersecting fractured rock under conditions of changing pressure in the well bore. Pressure changes may be due to water level variations caused by pumping or fluid density effects as formation fluid is drawn into the borehole. Previous reports describe the method of estimating the hydrologic behavior of fractured rock using a time series of electric conductivity logs and an earlier code, BORE, to generate electric conductivity logs under constant pressure and flow rate conditions. The earlier model, BORE, assumed a constant flow rate, q i , for each inflow into the well bore. In the present code the user supplies the location, constant pressure, h i , transmissivity, T i , and storativity, S i , for each fracture, as well as the initial water level in the well, h w (0), In addition, the input data contains changes in the water level at later times, Δh w (t), typically caused by turning a pump on or off. The variable density calculation also requires input of the density of each of the inflow fluids, ρ i , and the initial uniform density of the well bore fluid, ρ w (0). These parameters are used to compute the flow rate for each inflow point at each time step. The numerical method of Jacob and Lohman (1952) is used to compute the flow rate into or out of the fractures based on the changes in pressure in the wellbore. A dimensionless function relates flow rate as a function of time in response to an imposed pressure change. The principle of superposition is used to determine the net flow rate from a time series of pressure changes. Additional reading on the relationship between drawdown and flow rate can be found in Earlougher (1977), particularly his Section 4.6, open-quotes Constant-Pressure Flow Testingclose quotes

  5. Signal quality measures for unsupervised blood pressure measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Sukor, J; Redmond, S J; Lovell, N H; Chan, G S H

    2012-01-01

    Accurate systolic and diastolic pressure estimation, using automated blood pressure measurement, is difficult to achieve when the transduced signals are contaminated with noise or interference, such as movement artifact. This study presents an algorithm for automated signal quality assessment in blood pressure measurement by determining the feasibility of accurately detecting systolic and diastolic pressures when corrupted with various levels of movement artifact. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared to a manually annotated reference scoring (RS). Based on visual representations and audible playback of Korotkoff sounds, the creation of the RS involved two experts identifying sections of the recorded sounds and annotating sections of noise contamination. The experts determined the systolic and diastolic pressure in 100 recorded Korotkoff sound recordings, using a simultaneous electrocardiograph as a reference signal. The recorded Korotkoff sounds were acquired from 25 healthy subjects (16 men and 9 women) with a total of four measurements per subject. Two of these measurements contained purposely induced noise artifact caused by subject movement. Morphological changes in the cuff pressure signal and the width of the Korotkoff pulse were extracted features which were believed to be correlated with the noise presence in the recorded Korotkoff sounds. Verification of reliable Korotkoff pulses was also performed using extracted features from the oscillometric waveform as recorded from the inflatable cuff. The time between an identified noise section and a verified Korotkoff pulse was the key feature used to determine the validity of possible systolic and diastolic pressures in noise contaminated Korotkoff sounds. The performance of the algorithm was assessed based on the ability to: verify if a signal was contaminated with any noise; the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of this noise classification, and the systolic and diastolic pressure

  6. Measurement and calculation of gas compressibility factor for condensate gas and natural gas under pressure up to 116 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Ke-Le; Liu, Huang; Sun, Chang-Yu; Ma, Qing-Lan; Chen, Guang-Jin; Shen, De-Ji; Xiao, Xiang-Jiao; Wang, Hai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Volumetric properties of two reservoir fluid samples were measured with pressure up to 116 MPa. • Dew point pressures at four temperatures for condensate gas sample are obtained. • Correlations and thermodynamic model for describing gas compressibility factor under high pressure were compared. • The thermodynamic model recommended is most suitable for fluids produced from reservoirs with a wide pressure range. -- Abstract: The volumetric properties of two reservoir fluid samples collected from one condensate gas well and one natural gas well were measured under four groups of temperatures, respectively, with pressure up to 116 MPa. For the two samples examined, the experimental results show that the gas compressibility factor increases with the increase of pressure. But the influence of the temperature is related to the range of the experimental pressure. It approximately decreases with the increase of temperature when the pressure is larger than (45 to 50) MPa, while there is the opposite trend when the pressure is lower than (45 to 50) MPa. The dew point pressure was also determined for the condensate gas sample, which decreases with the increase of temperature. The capabilities of four empirical correlations and a thermodynamic model based on equation of state for describing gas compressibility factor of reservoir fluids under high pressure were investigated. The comparison results show that the thermodynamic model recommended is the most suitable for fluids whatever produced from high-pressure reservoirs or conventional mild-pressure reservoirs

  7. Slip behaviour of experimental faults subjected to fluid pressure stimulation: carbonates vs. shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collettini, C.; Scuderi, M. M.; Marone, C.

    2017-12-01

    Fluid overpressure is one of the primary mechanisms for triggering tectonic fault slip and human-induced seismicity. This mechanism has been invoked to explain the dramatic increase in seismicity associated with waste water disposal in intra-plate setting, and it is appealing because fluids lubricate the fault and reduce the effective normal stress that holds the fault in place. Although, this basic physical mechanism is well understood, several fundamental questions remain including the apparent delay between fluid injection and seismicity, the role of fault zone rheology, and the relationship between injection volume and earthquake size. Moreover, models of earthquake nucleation predict that a reduction in normal stress, as expected for fluid overpressure, should stabilize fault slip. Here, we address these questions using laboratory experiments, conducted in the double direct shear configuration in a true-triaxial machine on carbonates and shale fault gouges. In particular, we: 1) evaluate frictional strength and permeability, 2) characterize the rate- and state- friction parameters and 3) study fault slip evolution during fluid pressure stimulations. With increasing fluid pressure, when shear and effective normal stresses reach the failure condition, in calcite gouges, characterized by slightly velocity strengthening behaviour, we observe an acceleration of slip that spontaneously evolves into dynamic failure. For shale gouges, with a strong rate-strengthening behaviour, we document complex fault slip behavior characterized by periodic accelerations and decelerations with slip velocity that remains slow (i.e. v 200 µm/s), never approaching dynamic slip rates. Our data indicate that fault rheology and fault stability is controlled by the coupling between fluid pressure and rate- and state- friction parameters suggesting that their comprehensive characterization is fundamental for assessing the role of fluid pressure in natural and human induced earthquakes.

  8. A Brief Review on the Baer-Nunziato type Multi-pressure Multi-fluid Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Yong; Park, Chan Eok; Lee, Gyu Cheon

    2010-01-01

    Single pressure two-fluid flow equations have complex characteristics. This causes ill-posedness problem. Even though some authors show that the numerical solutions are well behaved if the number of mesh points is sufficiently small, the stability of the solution is always challenged. There have been several attempts to overcome these problems. Multi-pressure multi-fluid models are one of them. Among them, Baer and Nunziato (BN) derived an interesting two-fluid model. BN model has independent phase pressures. It is closed by inserting volume fraction evolution equation. In this paper, several aspects of the BN type model will be reviewed and some suggestion for the future study will be made

  9. Automatic Blood Pressure Measurements During Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Charles S.

    1985-01-01

    Microprocessor circuits and a computer algorithm for automatically measuring blood pressure during ambulatory monitoring and exercise stress testing have been under development at SRI International. A system that records ECG, Korotkov sound, and arm cuff pressure for off-line calculation of blood pressure has been delivered to NASA, and an LSLE physiological monitoring system that performs the algorithm calculations in real-time is being constructed. The algorithm measures the time between the R-wave peaks and the corresponding Korotkov sound on-set (RK-interval). Since the curve of RK-interval versus cuff pressure during deflation is predictable and slowly varying, windows can be set around the curve to eliminate false Korotkov sound detections that result from noise. The slope of this curve, which will generally decrease during exercise, is the inverse of the systolic slope of the brachial artery pulse. In measurements taken during treadmill stress testing, the changes in slopes of subjects with coronary artery disease were markedly different from the changes in slopes of healthy subjects. Measurements of slope and O2 consumption were also made before and after ten days of bed rest during NASA/Ames Research Center bed rest studies. Typically, the maximum rate of O2 consumption during the post-bed rest test is less than the maximum rate during the pre-bed rest test. The post-bed rest slope changes differ from the pre-bed rest slope changes, and the differences are highly correlated with the drop in the maximum rate of O2 consumption. We speculate that the differences between pre- and post-bed rest slopes are due to a drop in heart contractility.

  10. Thermal fluid mixing behavior during medium break LOCA in evaluation of pressurized thermal shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jae Won; Bang, Young Seok; Seul, Kwang Won; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Thermal fluid mixing behavior during a postulated medium-size hot leg break loss of coolant accident is analyzed for the international comparative assessment study on pressurized thermal shock (PTS-ICAS) proposed by OECD-NEA. The applicability of RELAP5 code to analyze the thermal fluid mixing behavior is evaluated through a simple modeling relevant to the problem constraints. Based on the calculation result, the onset of thermal stratification is investigated using Theofanous`s empirical correlation. Sensitivity calculations using a fine node model and crossflow model are also performed to evaluate the modeling capability on multi-dimensional characteristics related to thermal fluid mixing. 6 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  11. Thermal fluid mixing behavior during medium break LOCA in evaluation of pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jae Won; Bang, Young Seok; Seul, Kwang Won; Kim, Hho Jung

    1998-01-01

    Thermal fluid mixing behavior during a postulated medium-size hot leg break loss of coolant accident is analyzed for the international comparative assessment study on pressurized thermal shock (PTS-ICAS) proposed by OECD-NEA. the applicability of RELAP5 code to analyze the thermal fluid mixing behavior is evaluated through a simple modeling relevant to the problem constraints. Based on the calculation result, the onset of thermal stratification is investigated using Theofanous's empirical correlation. Sensitivity calculations using a fine node model and crossflow model are also performed to evaluate the modeling capability on multi-dimensional characteristics related to thermal fluid mixing

  12. Simultaneous measurement of a fluid flow and the fluid's free surface using PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philip, O.G.; Hassan, Y.A.; Okamoto, K.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to study the interaction between a fluid flow and its free surface with an improved application of the flow measurement technique, particle image velocimetry (PIV). In this study, improvements in the data acquisition and tracking method of the PIV technique were developed

  13. Retinal vessel diameter and estimated cerebrospinal fluid pressure in arterial hypertension: the Beijing Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jost B; Wang, Ningli; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Ya Xing; You, Qi Sheng; Yang, Diya; Wei, Wen Bin; Xu, Liang

    2014-09-01

    Hypertensive retinal microvascular abnormalities include an increased retinal vein-to-artery diameter ratio. Because central retinal vein pressure depends on cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), we examined whether the retinal vein-to-artery diameter ratio and other retinal hypertensive signs are associated with CSFP. Participants of the population-based Beijing Eye Study (n = 1,574 subjects) underwent measurement of the temporal inferior and superior retinal artery and vein diameter. CSFP was calculated as 0.44 × body mass index (kg/m(2)) + 0.16 × diastolic blood pressure (mm Hg) - 0.18 × age (years) - 1.91. Larger retinal vein diameters and higher vein-to-artery diameter ratios were significantly associated with higher estimated CSFP (P = 0.001) in multivariable analysis. In contrast, temporal inferior retinal arterial diameter was marginally associated (P = 0.03) with estimated CSFP, and temporal superior artery diameter was not significantly associated (P = 0.10) with estimated CSFP; other microvascular abnormalities, such as arteriovenous crossing signs, were also not significantly associated with estimated CSFP. In a reverse manner, higher estimated CSFP as a dependent variable in the multivariable analysis was associated with wider retinal veins and higher vein-to-artery diameter ratio. In the same model, estimated CSFP was not significantly correlated with retinal artery diameters or other retinal microvascular abnormalities. Correspondingly, arterial hypertension was associated with retinal microvascular abnormalities such as arteriovenous crossing signs (P = 0.003), thinner temporal retinal arteries (P arterial hypertension, an increased retinal vein-to-artery diameter ratio depends on elevated CSFP, which is correlated with blood pressure. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Kitchen Physics: Lessons in Fluid Pressure and Error Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieyra, Rebecca Elizabeth; Vieyra, Chrystian; Macchia, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    Although the advent and popularization of the "flipped classroom" tends to center around at-home video lectures, teachers are increasingly turning to at-home labs for enhanced student engagement. This paper describes two simple at-home experiments that can be accomplished in the kitchen. The first experiment analyzes the density of four liquids using a waterproof case and a smartphone barometer in a container, sink, or tub. The second experiment determines the relationship between pressure and temperature of an ideal gas in a constant volume container placed momentarily in a refrigerator freezer. These experiences provide a ripe opportunity both for learning fundamental physics concepts as well as to investigate a variety of error analysis techniques that are frequently overlooked in introductory physics courses.

  15. New intraocular pressure measurement method using reflected pneumatic pressure from cornea deformed by air puff of ring-type nozzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Seo, Yeong Ho; Kim, Byeong Hee

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a non-contact type intraocular pressure (IOP) measuring system using reflected pneumatic pressure is proposed to overcome the disadvantages of existing measurement systems. A ring-type nozzle, a key component in the proposed system, is designed via computational fluid analysis. It predicts the reflected pneumatic pressure based on the nozzle exit angle and inner and outer diameters of the nozzle, which are 30°, 7 mm, and 9 mm, respectively. Performance evaluation is conducted using artificial eyes fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane with the specifications of human eyes. The IOP of the fabricated artificial eyes is adjusted to 10, 30, and 50 mm Hg, and the reflected pneumatic pressure is measured as a function of the distance between the ring-type nozzle and artificial eye. The measured reflected pneumatic pressure is high when the measurement distance is short and eye pressure is low. The cornea of an artificial eye is significantly deformed at a low IOP, and the applied pneumatic pressure is more concentrated in front of the ring-type nozzle because of the deformed cornea. Thus, the reflected pneumatic pressure at a low IOP has more inflows into the pressure sensor inserted inside the nozzle. The sensitivity of the output based on the IOP at measurement distances between 3-5 mm is -0.0027, -0.0022, -0.0018, -0.0015, and -0.0012. Sensitivity decreases as the measurement distance increases. In addition, the reflected pneumatic pressure owing to the misalignment at the measurement distances of 3-5 mm is not affected within a range of 0.5 mm. Therefore, the measurement range is acceptable up to a 1 mm diameter from the center of an artificial eye. However, the accuracy gradually decreases as the reflected pneumatic pressure from a misalignment of 1 mm or more decreases by 26% or more.

  16. High pressure sample container for thermal neutron spectroscopy and diffraction on strongly scattering fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkerk, P.; Pruisken, A.M.M.

    1979-01-01

    A description is presented of the construction and performance of a container for thermal neutron scattering on a fluid sample with about 1.5 cm -1 macroscopic cross section (neglecting absorption). The maximum pressure is about 900 bar. The container is made of 5052 aluminium capillary with inner diameter 0.75 mm and wall thickness 0.25 mm; it covers a neutron beam with a cross section of 9 X 2.5 cm 2 . The container has been successfully used in neutron diffraction and time-of-flight experiments on argon-36 at 120 K and several pressures up to 850 bar. It is shown that during these measurements the temperature gradient over the sample as well as the error in the absolute temperature were both less than 0.05 K. Subtraction of the Bragg peaks due to container scattering in diffraction experiments may be dfficult, but seems feasible because of the small amount of aluminium in the neutron beam. Correction for container scattering and multiple scattering in time-of-flight experiments may be difficult only in the case of coherently scattering samples and small scattering angles. (Auth.)

  17. Measuring Viscosity with a Levitating Magnet: Application to Complex Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, C.; Bouquet, F.; Remond, J.; Deloche, B.

    2009-01-01

    As an experimental project proposed to students in fourth year of university, a viscometer was developed, consisting of a small magnet levitating in a viscous fluid. The viscous force acting on the magnet is directly measured: viscosities in the range 10-10[superscript 6] mPa s are obtained. This experiment is used as an introduction to complex…

  18. Scaling of two-phase flow transients using reduced pressure system and simulant fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; Ishii, M.

    1987-01-01

    Scaling criteria for a natural circulation loop under single-phase flow conditions are derived. Based on these criteria, practical applications for designing a scaled-down model are considered. Particular emphasis is placed on scaling a test model at reduced pressure levels compared to a prototype and on fluid-to-fluid scaling. The large number of similarty groups which are to be matched between modell and prototype makes the design of a scale model a challenging tasks. The present study demonstrates a new approach to this clasical problen using two-phase flow scaling parameters. It indicates that a real time scaling is not a practical solution and a scaled-down model should have an accelerated (shortened) time scale. An important result is the proposed new scaling methodology for simulating pressure transients. It is obtained by considerung the changes of the fluid property groups which appear within the two-phase similarity parameters and the single-phase to two-phase flow transition prameters. Sample calculations are performed for modeling two-phase flow transients of a high pressure water system by a low-pressure water system or a Freon system. It is shown that modeling is possible for both cases for simulation pressure transients. However, simulation of phase change transitions is not possible by a reduced pressure water system without distortion in either power or time. (orig.)

  19. Accurate fluid force measurement based on control surface integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentink, David

    2018-01-01

    Nonintrusive 3D fluid force measurements are still challenging to conduct accurately for freely moving animals, vehicles, and deforming objects. Two techniques, 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) and a new technique, the aerodynamic force platform (AFP), address this. Both rely on the control volume integral for momentum; whereas PIV requires numerical integration of flow fields, the AFP performs the integration mechanically based on rigid walls that form the control surface. The accuracy of both PIV and AFP measurements based on the control surface integration is thought to hinge on determining the unsteady body force associated with the acceleration of the volume of displaced fluid. Here, I introduce a set of non-dimensional error ratios to show which fluid and body parameters make the error negligible. The unsteady body force is insignificant in all conditions where the average density of the body is much greater than the density of the fluid, e.g., in gas. Whenever a strongly deforming body experiences significant buoyancy and acceleration, the error is significant. Remarkably, this error can be entirely corrected for with an exact factor provided that the body has a sufficiently homogenous density or acceleration distribution, which is common in liquids. The correction factor for omitting the unsteady body force, {{{ {ρ f}} {1 - {ρ f} ( {{ρ b}+{ρ f}} )}.{( {{{{ρ }}b}+{ρ f}} )}}} , depends only on the fluid, {ρ f}, and body, {{ρ }}b, density. Whereas these straightforward solutions work even at the liquid-gas interface in a significant number of cases, they do not work for generalized bodies undergoing buoyancy in combination with appreciable body density inhomogeneity, volume change (PIV), or volume rate-of-change (PIV and AFP). In these less common cases, the 3D body shape needs to be measured and resolved in time and space to estimate the unsteady body force. The analysis shows that accounting for the unsteady body force is straightforward to non

  20. Density and Viscosity Measurement of Diesel Fuels at Combined High Pressure and Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Schaschke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the measurement of the viscosity and density of various diesel fuels, obtained from British refineries, at elevated pressures up to 500 MPa and temperatures in the range 298 K to 373 K. The measurement and prediction procedures of fluid properties under high pressure conditions is of increasing interest in many processes and systems including enhanced oil recovery, automotive engine fuel injection, braking, and hydraulic systems. Accurate data and understanding of the fluid characteristic in terms of pressure, volume and temperature is required particularly where the fluid is composed of a complex mixture or blend of aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbons. In this study, high pressure viscosity data was obtained using a thermostatically-controlled falling sinker-type high pressure viscometer to provide reproducible and reliable viscosity data based on terminal velocity sinker fall times. This was supported with density measurements using a micro-pVT device. Both high-pressure devices were additionally capable of illustrating the freezing points of the hydrocarbon mixtures. This work has, thus, provided data that can extend the application of mixtures of commercially available fuels and to test the validity of available predictive density and viscosity models. This included a Tait-style equation for fluid compressibility prediction. For complex diesel fuel compositions, which have many unidentified components, the approach illustrates the need to apply appropriate correlations, which require accurate knowledge or prediction of thermodynamic properties.

  1. Hybrid Optical Unobtrusive Blood Pressure Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangfei Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure (BP is critical in diagnosing certain cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. Some previous studies have proved that BP can be estimated by pulse transit time (PTT calculated by a pair of photoplethysmography (PPG signals at two body sites. Currently, contact PPG (cPPG and imaging PPG (iPPG are two feasible ways to obtain PPG signals. In this study, we proposed a hybrid system (called the ICPPG system employing both methods that can be implemented on a wearable device, facilitating the measurement of BP in an inconspicuous way. The feasibility of the ICPPG system was validated on a dataset with 29 subjects. It has been proved that the ICPPG system is able to estimate PTT values. Moreover, the PTT measured by the new system shows a correlation on average with BP variations for most subjects, which could facilitate a new generation of BP measurement using wearable and mobile devices.

  2. Intraocular pressure measurements after conductive keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kymionis, George D; Naoumidi, Tatiana L; Aslanides, Ioannis M; Kumar, Vinod; Astyrakakis, Nikolaos I; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis; Pallikaris, Ioannis G

    2005-01-01

    To determine the possible impact of conductive keratoplasty (CK) on intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements. A prospective, single-center, noncomparative interventional case series was performed. Baseline and postoperative IOPs were measured by Goldmann applanation tonometry in 32 eyes of 18 patients who underwent CK for hyperopia correction. Mean follow-up was 11.9 months (range: 8 to 18 months). After CK, a statistically significant decrease in the measured IOP was observed (before CK: 14.22+/-1.64 vs after CK: 12.66+/-2.21, P<.001). The change in IOP readings postoperatively was not correlated with age, sex, keratometric readings, or attempted correction. Despite the limitations due to the small number of patients enrolled in this study, the applanation tonometer appears to underestimate the true IOP after CK.

  3. Towards a smart non-invasive fluid loss measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadevara, N K; Mukhopadhyay, S C; Barrack, L

    2015-04-01

    In this article, a smart wireless sensing non-invasive system for estimating the amount of fluid loss, a person experiences while physical activity is presented. The system measures three external body parameters, Heart Rate, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR, or skin conductance), and Skin Temperature. These three parameters are entered into an empirically derived formula along with the user's body mass index, and estimation for the amount of fluid lost is determined. The core benefit of the developed system is the affluence usage in combining with smart home monitoring systems to care elderly people in ambient assisted living environments as well in automobiles to monitor the body parameters of a motorist.

  4. Intracochlear pressure measurements in scala media inform models of cochlear mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Sushrut; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2015-12-01

    In the classic view of cochlear mechanics, the cochlea is comprised of two identical fluid chambers separated by the cochlear partition (CP). In this view the traveling wave pressures in the two chambers mirror each other; they are equal in magnitude and opposite in phase. A fast pressure mode adds approximately uniformly. More recent models of cochlear mechanics take into account the structural complexity of the CP and the resulting additional mechanical modes would lead to distinct (non-symmetric) patterns of pressure and motion on the two sides of the CP. However, there was little to no physiological data that explored these predictions. To this aim, we measured intracochlear fluid pressure in scala media (SM), including measurements close to the sensory tissue, using miniaturized pressure sensors (˜ 80 μm outer diameter). Measurements were made in-vivo from the basal cochlear turn in gerbils. SM pressure was measured at two longitudinal locations in different preparations. In a subset of the experiments SM and ST (scala tympani) pressures were measured at the same longitudinal location. Traveling wave pressures were observed in both SM and ST, and showed the relative phase predicted by the classical theory. In addition, SM pressure showed spatial variations that had not been observed in ST, which points to a relatively complex CP motion on the SM side. These data both underscore the first-order validity of the classic cochlear traveling wave model, and open a new view to CP mechanics.

  5. A thermodynamically consistent model for granular-fluid mixtures considering pore pressure evolution and hypoplastic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Julian; Wang, Yongqi

    2016-11-01

    A new mixture model for granular-fluid flows, which is thermodynamically consistent with the entropy principle, is presented. The extra pore pressure described by a pressure diffusion equation and the hypoplastic material behavior obeying a transport equation are taken into account. The model is applied to granular-fluid flows, using a closing assumption in conjunction with the dynamic fluid pressure to describe the pressure-like residual unknowns, hereby overcoming previous uncertainties in the modeling process. Besides the thermodynamically consistent modeling, numerical simulations are carried out and demonstrate physically reasonable results, including simple shear flow in order to investigate the vertical distribution of the physical quantities, and a mixture flow down an inclined plane by means of the depth-integrated model. Results presented give insight in the ability of the deduced model to capture the key characteristics of granular-fluid flows. We acknowledge the support of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for this work within the Project Number WA 2610/3-1.

  6. Changes in myocardial fluid filtration are reflected in epicardial lymph pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanTeeffelen, J. W.; Merkus, D.; Vergroesen, I.; Spaan, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of increased fluid filtration on stopped-flow epicardial lymph pressure (P(lymph)), used as an indicator of myocardial interstitial volume, was investigated in the anesthetized open-chest dog. Histamine infusion resulted in an increased systolic peak in the P(lymph) signal together with

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid flow and production in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus studied by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    An interleaved velocity-sensitised fast low-angle shot pulse sequence was used to study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the cerebral aqueduct, and supratentorial CSF production in 9 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and 9 healthy volunteers. The peak aqueduct CSF flow, both caudal...

  8. Carbon capture from coal fired power plant using pressurized fluid bed technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dennis; Christensen, Tor

    2010-09-15

    This presentation will discuss the use of a pressurized fluid bed boiler system and specialized carbon capture system to burn coal and generagte clean electricity. The paper will present the existing boiler and carbon capture technology and present economics, thermal performance and emissions reduction for a 100Mw module.

  9. Polynomial analysis of ambulatory blood pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwinderman, A. H.; Cleophas, T. A.; Cleophas, T. J.; van der Wall, E. E.

    2001-01-01

    In normotensive subjects blood pressures follow a circadian rhythm. A circadian rhythm in hypertensive patients is less well established, and may be clinically important, particularly with rigorous treatments of daytime blood pressures. Polynomial analysis of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

  10. Novel cavitation fluid jet polishing process based on negative pressure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fengjun; Wang, Hui; Tang, Yu; Yin, Shaohui; Huang, Shuai; Zhang, Guanghua

    2018-04-01

    Traditional abrasive fluid jet polishing (FJP) is limited by its high-pressure equipment, unstable material removal rate, and applicability to ultra-smooth surfaces because of the evident air turbulence, fluid expansion, and a large polishing spot in high-pressure FJP. This paper presents a novel cavitation fluid jet polishing (CFJP) method and process based on FJP technology. It can implement high-efficiency polishing on small-scale surfaces in a low-pressure environment. CFJP uses the purposely designed polishing equipment with a sealed chamber, which can generate a cavitation effect in negative pressure environment. Moreover, the collapse of cavitation bubbles can spray out a high-energy microjet and shock wave to enhance the material removal. Its feasibility is verified through researching the flow behavior and the cavitation results of the negative pressure cavitation machining of pure water in reversing suction flow. The mechanism is analyzed through a computational fluid dynamics simulation. Thus, its cavitation and surface removal mechanisms in the vertical CFJP and inclined CFJP are studied. A series of polishing experiments on different materials and polishing parameters are conducted to validate its polishing performance compared with FJP. The maximum removal depth increases, and surface roughness gradually decreases with increasing negative outlet pressures. The surface becomes smooth with the increase of polishing time. The experimental results confirm that the CFJP process can realize a high material removal rate and smooth surface with low energy consumption in the low-pressure environment, together with compatible surface roughness to FJP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluid Distribution in Synthetic Wet Halite Rocks : Inference from Measured Elastic Wave Velocity and Electrical Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T.; Kitano, M.

    2011-12-01

    Intercrystalline fluid can significantly affect rheological and transport properties of rocks. Its influences are strongly dependent on its distribution. The dihedral angle between solid and liquid phases has been widely accepted as a key parameter that controls solid-liquid textures. The liquid phase is not expected to be interconnected if the dihedral angle is larger than 60 degree. However, observations contradictory to dihedral angle values have been reported. Watanabe (2010) suggested the coexistence of grain boundary fluid with a positive dihedral angle. For good understanding of fluid distribution, it is thus critical to study the nature of grain boundary fluid. We have developed a high pressure and temperature apparatus for study of intercrystalline fluid distribution. It was specially designed for measurements of elastic wave velocities and electrical conductivity. The apparatus mainly consists of a conventional cold-seal vessel with an external heater. The pressure medium is silicon oil of the viscosity of 0.1 Pa s. The pressure and temperature can be controlled from 0 to 200 MPa and from 20 to 200 C, respectively. Dimensions of a sample are 9 mm in diameter, and 15 mm in length. Halite-water system is used as an analog for crustal rocks. The dihedral angle has been studied systematically at various pressure and temperature conditions [Lewis and Holness, 1996]. The dihedral angle is larger than 60 degree at lower pressure and temperature. It decreases to be smaller than 60 degree with increasing pressure and temperature. A sample is prepared by cold-pressing and annealing of wet NaCl powder. Optical examination has shown that synthesized samples are microstructurally homogeneous. Grains are polygonal and equidimensional with a mean diameter of 100 micrometer. Grain boundaries vary from straight to bowed and 120 degree triple junctions are common. Gas and fluid bearing inclusions are visible on the grain boundaries. There are spherical inclusions or

  12. Nonlinear fluid/structure interaction relating a rupture-disc pressure-relief device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, B.J.; Kot, C.A.; Shin, Y.W.; Youngdahl, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    Rupture disc assemblies are used in piping network systems as a pressure-relief device. The reverse-buckling type is chosen for application in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. This assembly is used successfully in systems in which the fluid is highly compressible, such as air; the opening up of the disc by the knife setup is complete. However, this is not true for a liquid system; it had been observed experimentally that the disc may open up only partially or not at all. Therefore, to realistically understand and represent a rupture disc assembly in a liquid environment, the fluid-structure interactions between the liquid medium and the disc assembly must be considered. The methods for analyzing the fluid and the disc and the mechanism interconnecting them are presented. The fluid is allowed to cavitate through a column-cavitation model and the disc is allowed to become plastically deformed through the classic Von Mises' yield criteria, when necessary

  13. Two-fluid effects on pressure-driven modes in a heliotron device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, H.; Ito, A.; Sato, M.; Goto, R.; Hatori, T.

    2014-10-01

    Two-fluid effects on the ballooning or pressure-driven unstable modes are studied numerically to understand physics in linear and nonlinear evolution of them in a heliotron device. Full 3D simulations for β 0 = 5% unstable magnetic configuration of the large helical device show that the introduction of the two-fluid term brings about broader radial profile and higher growth rate in the linear stage of the evolution, weakened parallel heat conduction, and lead to a saturation profile worse than that in the single-fluid MHD simulation. The numerical results show that suppression of high wave-number modes enhance the growth of low wave-number modes. The two-fluid effects and a plausible mild saturation of ballooning modes is discussed. (author)

  14. Multi-solid model modified to predict paraffin in petroleum fluids at high temperatures and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Remolina, Juan Carlos M; Barrios Ortiz, Wilson; Santoyo Ramirez Gildardo

    2009-01-01

    A thermodynamic structure has been modified in order to calculate cloud point, fluidity and amount of precipitated wax under a wide range of temperature conditions, composition, and high pressures. The model is based on a combination of ideal solution concepts, fluid characterization, and formation of multiple solid phases using Cubic State Equations. The experimental data utilized for testing the prediction capacity and potentiality of a model exhibit different characteristics: continuous series synthetic systems of heavy alkanes, discontinuous series, and dead or living petroleum fluids with indefinite fractions such as C7+, C10+, C20+, and C30+. The samples were taken from the literature, petroleum fluids from the main Colombian reservoirs, and some samples of Bolivian fluids. Results presented in this paper show the minimum standard deviations between experimental data and data calculated with a model. This allows a progress in decision-making processes for flow assurance in reservoirs, wells, and surface facilities in the petroleum industry.

  15. Computational fluid dynamic simulation of pressurizer safety valve loop seal purge phenomena in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon

    2012-01-01

    In Korean 3 Loop plants a water loop seal pipe is installed containing condensed water upstream of a pressurizer safety valve to protect the valve disk from the hot steam environment. The loop seal water purge time is a key parameter in safety analyses for overpressure transients, because it delays valve opening. The loop seal purge time is uncertain to measure by test and thus 3-dimensional realistic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed in this paper to predict the seal water purge time before full opening of the valve which is driven by steam after water purge. The CFD model for a typical pressurizer safety valve with a loop seal pipe is developed using the computer code of ANSYS CFX 11. Steady-state simulations are performed for full discharge of steam at the valve full opening. Transient simulations are performed for the loop seal dynamics and to estimate the loop seal purge time. A sudden pressure drop higher than 2,000 psia at the tip of the upper nozzle ring is expected from the steady-state calculation. Through the transient simulation, almost loop seal water is discharged within 1.2 second through the narrow opening between the disk and the nozzle of the valve. It can be expected that the valve fully opens at least before 1.2 second because constant valve opening is assumed in this CFX simulation, which is conservative because the valve opens fully before the loop seal water is completely discharged. The predicted loop seal purge time is compared with previous correlation. (orig.)

  16. Computational fluid dynamic simulation of pressurizer safety valve loop seal purge phenomena in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Woon [Dongguk Univ., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of). Nuclear and Energy Engineering Dept.

    2012-11-15

    In Korean 3 Loop plants a water loop seal pipe is installed containing condensed water upstream of a pressurizer safety valve to protect the valve disk from the hot steam environment. The loop seal water purge time is a key parameter in safety analyses for overpressure transients, because it delays valve opening. The loop seal purge time is uncertain to measure by test and thus 3-dimensional realistic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed in this paper to predict the seal water purge time before full opening of the valve which is driven by steam after water purge. The CFD model for a typical pressurizer safety valve with a loop seal pipe is developed using the computer code of ANSYS CFX 11. Steady-state simulations are performed for full discharge of steam at the valve full opening. Transient simulations are performed for the loop seal dynamics and to estimate the loop seal purge time. A sudden pressure drop higher than 2,000 psia at the tip of the upper nozzle ring is expected from the steady-state calculation. Through the transient simulation, almost loop seal water is discharged within 1.2 second through the narrow opening between the disk and the nozzle of the valve. It can be expected that the valve fully opens at least before 1.2 second because constant valve opening is assumed in this CFX simulation, which is conservative because the valve opens fully before the loop seal water is completely discharged. The predicted loop seal purge time is compared with previous correlation. (orig.)

  17. Pressure Dependence of the Radial Breathing Mode of Carbon Nanotubes: The Effect of Fluid Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, M. J.; Quirke, N.

    2007-04-01

    The pressure dependence of shifts in the vibrational modes of individual carbon nanotubes is strongly affected by the nature of the pressure transmitting medium as a result of adsorption at the nanotube surface. The adsorbate is treated as an elastic shell which couples with the radial breathing mode (RBM) of the nanotube via van der Waal interactions. Using analytical methods as well as molecular simulation, we observe a low frequency breathing mode for the adsorbed fluid at ˜50cm-1, as well as diameter dependent upshifts in the RBM frequency with pressure, suggesting metallic nanotubes may wet more than semiconducting ones.

  18. Facial Soft Tissue Measurement in Microgravity-induces Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshburn, Thomas; Cole, Richard; Pavela, James; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot

    2014-01-01

    Fluid shifts are a well-known phenomenon in microgravity, and one result is facial edema. Objective measurement of tissue thickness in a standardized location could provide a correlate with the severity of the fluid shift. Previous studies of forehead tissue thickness (TTf) suggest that when exposed to environments that cause fluid shifts, including hypergravity, head-down tilt, and high-altitude/lowpressure, TTf changes in a consistent and measurable fashion. However, the technique in past studies is not well described or standardized. The International Space Station (ISS) houses an ultrasound (US) system capable of accurate sub-millimeter measurements of TTf. We undertook to measure TTf during long-duration space flight using a new accurate, repeatable and transferable technique. Methods: In-flight and post-flight B-mode ultrasound images of a single astronaut's facial soft tissues were obtained using a Vivid-q US system with a 12L-RS high-frequency linear array probe (General Electric, USA). Strictly mid-sagittal images were obtained involving the lower frontal bone, the nasofrontal angle, and the osseo-cartilaginous junction below. Single images were chosen for comparison that contained identical views of the bony landmarks and identical acoustical interface between the probe and skin. Using Gingko CADx DICOM viewing software, soft tissue thickness was measured at a right angle to the most prominent point of the inferior frontal bone to the epidermis. Four independent thickness measurements were made. Conclusions: Forehead tissue thickness measurement by ultrasound in microgravity is feasible, and our data suggest a decrease in tissue thickness upon return from microgravity environment, which is likely related to the cessation of fluid shifts. Further study is warranted to standardize the technique with regard to the individual variability of the local anatomy in this area.

  19. Local heat transfer measurement and thermo-fluid characterization of a pulsating heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mameli, Mauro; Marengo, Marco; Khandekar, Sameer

    2014-01-01

    A compact Closed Loop Pulsating Heat Pipe (CLPHP), filled with ethanol (65% v/v), made of four transparent glass tubes forming the adiabatic section and connected with copper U-turns in the evaporator and condenser sections respectively, is designed in order to perform comprehensive thermal-hydraulic performance investigation. Local heat transfer coefficient is estimated by measurement of tube wall and internal fluid temperatures in the evaporator section. Simultaneously, fluid pressure oscillations are recorded together with the corresponding flow patterns. The thermal performances are measured for different heat input levels and global orientation of the device with respect to gravity. One exploratory test is also done with azeotropic mixture of ethanol and water. Results show that a stable device operation is achieved (i.e. evaporator wall temperatures can reach a pseudo-steady-state) only when a circulating flow mode is established superimposed on local pulsating flow. The heat transfer performance strongly depends on the heat input level and the inclination angle, which, in turn, also affect the ensuing flow pattern. The spectral analysis of the pressure signal reveals that even during the stable performance regimes, characteristic fluid oscillation frequencies are not uniquely recognizable. Equivalent thermal conductivities of the order of 10-15 times that of pure copper are achieved. Due to small number of turns horizontal mode operation is not feasible. Preliminary results indicate that filling azeotropic mixture of ethanol and water as working fluid does not alter the thermal performance as compared to pure ethanol case. (authors)

  20. Partial pressure measurements with an active spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, N.H.; Jensen, T.H.; Colchin, R.J.; Maingi, R.; Wade, M.R.; Finkenthal, D.F.; Naumenko, N.; Tugarinov, S.

    1998-07-01

    Partial pressure neutral ga measurements have been made using a commercial Penning gauge in conjunction with an active spectrometer. In prior work utilizing bandpass filters and conventional spectrometers, trace concentrations of the hydrogen isotopes H, D, T and of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar were determined from characteristic spectral lines in the light emitted by the neutral species of these elements. For all the elements mentioned, the sensitivity was limited by spectral contamination from a pervasive background of molecular hydrogen radiation. The active spectrometer overcomes this limitations by means of a digital lock-in method and correlation with reference spectra. Preliminary measurements of an admixture containing a trace amount of neon in deuterium show better than a factor of 20 improvement in sensitivity over conventional techniques. This can be further improved by correlating the relative intensities of multiple lines to sets of reference spectra

  1. Estimating fault stability and sustainable fluid pressures for underground storage of CO2 in porous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, J.E.; Hillis, R.R.

    2004-01-01

    Geomechanical modelling of fault stability is an integral part of Australia's GEODISC research program to ensure the safe storage of carbon dioxide in subsurface reservoirs. Storage of CO 2 in deep saline formations or depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs requires estimates of sustainable fluid pressures that will not induce fracturing or create fault permeability that could lead to CO 2 escape. Analyses of fault stability require the determination of fault orientations, ambient pore fluid pressures and in situ stresses in a potential storage site. The calculation of effective stresses that act on faults and reservoir rocks lead then to estimates of fault slip tendency and fluid pressures sustainable during CO 2 storage. These parameters can be visualized on 3D images of fault surfaces or in 2D projections. Faults that are unfavourably oriented for reactivation can be identified from failure plots. In depleted oil and gas fields, modelling of fault and rock stability needs to incorporate changes of the pre-production stresses that were induced by hydrocarbon production and associated pore pressure depletion. Such induced stress changes influence the maximum sustainable formation pressures and CO 2 storage volumes. Hence, determination of in situ stresses and modelling of fault stability are essential prerequisites for the safe engineering of subsurface CO 2 injection and the modelling of storage capacity. (author)

  2. Smart monitoring of fluid intake and bladder voiding using pressure sensitive mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-McFarlane, Madison; Green, James R; Knoefel, Frank; Goubran, Rafik

    2016-08-01

    Pressure sensitive mats have been used in noninvasive smart monitoring for a variety of problems including breathing rate monitoring, sleep monitoring, mobility, and weight. This paper describes a proof of concept application of pressure mats to monitor fluid intake/output (fluid cycle) events during the night. The ability to more accurately track such events has potential implications for monitoring those individuals who have nocturia, a condition where a person wakes at night to urinate. Data were collected from a healthy young female subject instructed to drink as much water as was comfortable (700mL) and lie in a supine position on a mattress located directly on three pressure mats. This was compared to an initial data set collected immediately after voiding but before drinking, 30 minutes after drinking, 60 minutes after drinking and a final data set after again voiding the bladder. The additional pressure from the 700mL of water was detectible and tracked over the course of the hour-long testing session under idealized conditions. This provides a proof-of-concept that nocturnal fluid intake and bladder voiding events can be tracked using non-invasive pressure-sensitive mats, however additional testing and development is required to achieve a deployable monitoring system.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Pressurization of Cryogenic Propellant Tank for Integrated Vehicle Fluid System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; LeClair, Andre C.; Hedayat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of pressurization of a cryogenic propellant tank for the Integrated Vehicle Fluid (IVF) system using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The IVF propulsion system, being developed by United Launch Alliance, uses boiloff propellants to drive thrusters for the reaction control system as well as to run internal combustion engines to develop power and drive compressors to pressurize propellant tanks. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been running tests to verify the functioning of the IVF system using a flight tank. GFSSP, a finite volume based flow network analysis software developed at MSFC, has been used to develop an integrated model of the tank and the pressurization system. This paper presents an iterative algorithm for converging the interface boundary conditions between different component models of a large system model. The model results have been compared with test data.

  4. The effect of pressure on open-framework silicates: elastic behaviour and crystal-fluid interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, G. D.; Lotti, P.; Tabacchi, G.

    2018-02-01

    The elastic behaviour and the structural evolution of microporous materials compressed hydrostatically in a pressure-transmitting fluid are drastically affected by the potential crystal-fluid interaction, with a penetration of new molecules through the zeolitic cavities in response to applied pressure. In this manuscript, the principal mechanisms that govern the P-behaviour of zeolites with and without crystal-fluid interaction are described, on the basis of previous experimental findings and computational modelling studies. When no crystal-fluid interaction occurs, the effects of pressure are mainly accommodated by tilting of (quasi-rigid) tetrahedra around O atoms that behave as hinges. Tilting of tetrahedra is the dominant mechanism at low-mid P-regime, whereas distortion and compression of tetrahedra represent the mechanisms which usually dominate the mid-high P regime. One of the most common deformation mechanisms in zeolitic framework is the increase of channels ellipticity. The deformation mechanisms are dictated by the topological configuration of the tetrahedral framework; however, the compressibility of the cavities is controlled by the nature and bonding configuration of the ionic and molecular content, resulting in different unit-cell volume compressibility in isotypic structures. The experimental results pertaining to compression in "penetrating" fluids, and thus with crystal-fluid interaction, showed that not all the zeolites experience a P-induced intrusion of new monoatomic species or molecules from the P-transmitting fluids. For example, zeolites with well-stuffed channels at room conditions (e.g. natural zeolites) tend to hinder the penetration of new species through the zeolitic cavities. Several variables govern the sorption phenomena at high pressure, among those: the "free diameters" of the framework cavities, the chemical nature and the configuration of the extra-framework population, the partial pressure of the penetrating molecule in the

  5. The effect of ascitic fluid hydrostatic pressure on albumin extravasation rate in patients with cirrhosis of the liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Parving, H H; Lassen, N A

    1981-01-01

    and pigs with posthepatic portal hypertension and intraperitoneally instilled fluid were studied before and after abdominal paracentesis in order to evaluate the effect of ascitic fluid hydrostatic pressure on the transvascular escape rate of albumin. TERalb of the ascitic patients (n = 6) were on average......, TERalb rose significantly to an average of 24.3% IVMalb.h-1. The increased albumin extravasation rate after removal of ascites is best explained by an increased sinusoidal-tissue pressure difference caused by a decreased hydrostatic fluid pressure in the liver interstitium (portal and subcapsular spaces......) due to the hydrostatic effect of the removed ascitic fluid....

  6. The use of paleo-thermo-barometers and coupled thermal, fluid flow and pore fluid pressure modelling for hydrocarbon and reservoir prediction in fold and thrust belts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roure, F.; Andriessen, P.A.M.; Callot, J.P.; Ferket, H.; Gonzales, E.; Guilhaumou, N.; Hardebol, N.J.; Lacombe, O.; Malandain, J.; Mougin, P.; Muska, K.; Ortuno, S.; Sassi, W.; Swennen, R.; Vilasi, N.

    2010-01-01

    Basin modelling tools are now more efficient to reconstruct palinspastic structural cross sections and compute the history of temperature, pore-fluid pressure and fluid flow circulations in complex structural settings. In many cases and especially in areas where limited erosion occurred, the use of

  7. Automatic Volumetry of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Space in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunari Ishii

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To measure the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF space volume in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH, we developed a software that allows us to automatically measure the regional CSF space and compared the volumes of the ventricle systems (VS, Sylvian fissures (SF and sulci at high convexity and midline (SHM among INPH patients, Alzheimer's disease (AD patients and healthy volunteers (HVs. Methods: Fifteen INPH patients, 15 AD patients and 15 HVs were retrospectively selected for this study. 3D-T1 MR images were obtained. We improved upon an automatic gray matter volume system to measure CSF spaces, adopting new regions for the template of INPH-characteristic CSF spaces and measured them. The VS, SF and SHM volumes were calculated relative to the intracranial volume. Results: The relative SHM volume of the INPH group (0.0237 ± 0.0064 was the smallest among the 3 groups (AD: 0.0477 ± 0.0109, HV: 0.0542 ± 0.0045. The VS (0.0499 ± 0.0135 and SF (0.0187 ± 0.0037 volumes of the INPH group were significantly larger than those of the AD (VS: 0.0311 ± 0.0075, SF: 0.0146 ± 0.0026 and HV groups (VS: 0.0167 ± 0.0065, SF: 0.0111 ± 0.017. Conclusion: Automatic volume measurement can be used to delineate the characteristic changes in CSF space in patients with INPH and is useful in the diagnosis of INPH.

  8. Finite element approximation of flow of fluids with shear-rate- and pressure-dependent viscosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirn, A.; Lanzendörfer, Martin; Stebel, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 4 (2012), s. 1604-1634 ISSN 0272-4979 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917; GA AV ČR IAA100300802; GA MŠk LC06052 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504; CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : non-Newtonian fluid * shear-rate- and pressure-dependent viscosity * finite element method * error analysis Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.326, year: 2012

  9. Hydrostatic fluid pressure in the vestibular organ of the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Jonas J. -H.; Boeven, Jahn J.; Vogel, Stefan; Leonhardt, Steffen; Wit, Hero P.; Westhofen, Martin

    Since inner ear hair cells are mechano-electric transducers the control of hydrostatic pressure in the inner ear is crucial. Most studies analyzing dynamics and regulation of inner ear hydrostatic pressure performed pressure measurements in the cochlea. The present study is the first one reporting

  10. Porous media fracturing dynamics: stepwise crack advancement and fluid pressure oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Toan D.; Hussain, Fazle; Schrefler, Bernhard A.

    2018-02-01

    We present new results explaining why fracturing in saturated porous media is not smooth and continuous but is a distinct stepwise process concomitant with fluid pressure oscillations. All exact solutions and almost all numerical models yield smooth fracture advancement and fluid pressure evolution, while recent experimental results, mainly from the oil industry, observation from geophysics and a very few numerical results for the quasi-static case indeed reveal the stepwise phenomenon. We summarize first these new experiments and these few numerical solutions for the quasi-static case. Both mechanical loading and pressure driven fractures are considered because their behaviours differ in the direction of the pressure jumps. Then we explore stepwise crack tip advancement and pressure fluctuations in dynamic fracturing with a hydro-mechanical model of porous media based on the Hybrid Mixture Theory. Full dynamic analyses of examples dealing with both hydraulic fracturing and mechanical loading are presented. The stepwise fracture advancement is confirmed in the dynamic setting as well as in the pressure fluctuations, but there are substantial differences in the frequency contents of the pressure waves in the two loading cases. Comparison between the quasi-static and fully dynamic solutions reveals that the dynamic response gives much more information such as the type of pressure oscillations and related frequencies and should be applied whenever there is a doubt about inertia forces playing a role - the case in most fracturing events. In the absence of direct relevant dynamic tests on saturated media some experimental results on dynamic fracture in dry materials, a fast hydraulic fracturing test and observations from geophysics confirm qualitatively the obtained results such as the type of pressure oscillations and the substantial difference in the behaviour under the two loading cases.

  11. The determination of the pressure-viscosity coefficient of two traction oils using film thickness measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The pressure-viscosity coefficients of two commercial traction fluids are determined by fitting calculation results on accurate film thickness measurements, obtained at a wide range of speeds, and different temperatures. Film thickness values are calculated using a numerical method and approximation

  12. Development and optimization of a device for diferencial pressure measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarine, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The measurements of reduced values of diferencial pressure, are studied. Several situations are described where the diferencial pressure accurate measurement is necessary in routine works in the Thermohydraulic Laboratory, as well as, the major pressure measurement devices and their respective range are studied. The development of a device for diferencial pressure measurement followed by the design development of the calibration bench covering the foreseen range, start up tests realization, optimization, calibration, performance analysis and conclusions, is showed. (Author) [pt

  13. Fluid flow measurements by means of vibration monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campagna, Mauro M; Dinardo, Giuseppe; Fabbiano, Laura; Vacca, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    The achievement of accurate fluid flow measurements is fundamental whenever the control and the monitoring of certain physical quantities governing an industrial process are required. In that case, non-intrusive devices are preferable, but these are often more sophisticated and expensive than those which are more common (such as nozzles, diaphrams, Coriolis flowmeters and so on). In this paper, a novel, non-intrusive, simple and inexpensive methodology is presented to measure the fluid flow rate (in a turbulent regime) whose physical principle is based on the acquisition of transversal vibrational signals induced by the fluid itself onto the pipe walls it is flowing through. Such a principle of operation would permit the use of micro-accelerometers capable of acquiring and transmitting the signals, even by means of wireless technology, to a control room for the monitoring of the process under control. A possible application (whose feasibility will be investigated by the authors in a further study) of this introduced technology is related to the employment of a net of micro-accelerometers to be installed on pipeline networks of aqueducts. This apparatus could lead to the faster and easier detection and location of possible leaks of fluid affecting the pipeline network with more affordable costs. The authors, who have previously proven the linear dependency of the acceleration harmonics amplitude on the flow rate, here discuss an experimental analysis of this functional relation with the variation in the physical properties of the pipe in terms of its diameter and constituent material, to find the eventual limits to the practical application of the measurement methodology. (paper)

  14. Fluid flow measurements by means of vibration monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Mauro M.; Dinardo, Giuseppe; Fabbiano, Laura; Vacca, Gaetano

    2015-11-01

    The achievement of accurate fluid flow measurements is fundamental whenever the control and the monitoring of certain physical quantities governing an industrial process are required. In that case, non-intrusive devices are preferable, but these are often more sophisticated and expensive than those which are more common (such as nozzles, diaphrams, Coriolis flowmeters and so on). In this paper, a novel, non-intrusive, simple and inexpensive methodology is presented to measure the fluid flow rate (in a turbulent regime) whose physical principle is based on the acquisition of transversal vibrational signals induced by the fluid itself onto the pipe walls it is flowing through. Such a principle of operation would permit the use of micro-accelerometers capable of acquiring and transmitting the signals, even by means of wireless technology, to a control room for the monitoring of the process under control. A possible application (whose feasibility will be investigated by the authors in a further study) of this introduced technology is related to the employment of a net of micro-accelerometers to be installed on pipeline networks of aqueducts. This apparatus could lead to the faster and easier detection and location of possible leaks of fluid affecting the pipeline network with more affordable costs. The authors, who have previously proven the linear dependency of the acceleration harmonics amplitude on the flow rate, here discuss an experimental analysis of this functional relation with the variation in the physical properties of the pipe in terms of its diameter and constituent material, to find the eventual limits to the practical application of the measurement methodology.

  15. Use of piezoelectric multicomponent force measuring devices in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A.; Stefan, K.

    1979-01-01

    The characterisitics of piezoelectric multicomponent transducers are discussed, giving attention to the advantages of quartz over other materials. The main advantage of piezoelectric devices in aerodynamic studies is their ability to indicate rapid changes in the values of physical parameters. Problems in the accuracy of measurments by piezoelectric devices can be overcome by suitable design approaches. A practical example is given of how such can be utilized to measure rapid fluctuations of fluid forces exerted on a circular cylinder mounted in a water channel.

  16. Laser metrology in fluid mechanics granulometry, temperature and concentration measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Boutier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    In fluid mechanics, non-intrusive measurements are fundamental in order to improve knowledge of the behavior and main physical phenomena of flows in order to further validate codes.The principles and characteristics of the different techniques available in laser metrology are described in detail in this book.Velocity, temperature and concentration measurements by spectroscopic techniques based on light scattered by molecules are achieved by different techniques: laser-induced fluorescence, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using lasers and parametric sources, and absorption sp

  17. Physics based simulation of seismicity induced in the vicinity of a high-pressure fluid injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, J.; NicBhloscaidh, M.; Murphy, S.; O'Brien, G. S.; Bean, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    High-pressure fluid injection into subsurface is known, in some cases, to induce earthquakes in the surrounding volume. The increasing importance of ';fracking' as a potential source of hydrocarbons has made the seismic hazard from this effect an important issue the adjudication of planning applications and it is likely that poor understanding of the process will be used as justification of refusal of planning in Ireland and the UK. Here we attempt to understand some of the physical controls on the size and frequency of induced earthquakes using a physics-based simulation of the process and examine resulting earthquake catalogues The driver for seismicity in our simulations is identical to that used in the paper by Murphy et al. in this session. Fluid injection is simulated using pore fluid movement throughout a permeable layer from a high-pressure point source using a lattice Boltzmann scheme. Diffusivities and frictional parameters can be defined independently at individual nodes/cells allowing us to reproduce 3-D geological structures. Active faults in the model follow a fractal size distribution and exhibit characteristic event size, resulting in a power-law frequency-size distribution. The fluid injection is not hydraulically connected to the fault (i.e. fluid does not come into physical contact with the fault); however stress perturbations from the injection drive the seismicity model. The duration and pressure-time function of the fluid injection can be adjusted to model any given injection scenario and the rate of induced seismicity is controlled by the local structures and ambient stress field as well as by the stress perturbations resulting from the fluid injection. Results from the rate and state fault models of Murphy et al. are incorporated to include the effect of fault strengthening in seismically quite areas. Initial results show similarities with observed induced seismic catalogues. Seismicity is only induced where the active faults have not been

  18. Influence of intermittent pressure, fluid flow, and mixing on the regenerative properties of articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, S E; Heath, C A

    1999-11-05

    Equine articular chondrocytes, embedded within a polyglycolic acid nonwoven mesh, were cultured with various combinations of intermittent pressure, fluid flow, and mixing to examine the effects of different physical stimuli on neochondrogenesis from young cells. The cell/polymer constructs were cultured first in 125 ml spinner flasks for 1, 2, or 4 weeks and then in a perfusion system with intermittent pressure for a total of up to 6 weeks. Additional constructs were either cultured for all 6 weeks in the spinner flasks or for 1 week in spinners followed by 5 weeks in the perfusion system without intermittent pressure. Tissue constructs cultivated for 2 or 4 weeks in spinner flasks followed by perfusion with intermittent pressure had significantly higher concentrations of both sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen than constructs cultured entirely in spinners or almost entirely in the pressure/perfusion system. Initial cultivation in the spinner flasks, with turbulent mixing, enhanced both cell attachment and early development of the extracellular matrix. Subsequent culture with perfusion and intermittent pressure appeared to accelerate matrix formation. While the correlation was much stronger in the pressurized constructs, the compressive modulus was directly proportional to the concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycan in all physically stressed constructs. Constructs that were not stressed beyond the 1-week seeding period lost mechanical integrity upon harvest, suggesting that physical stimulation, particularly with intermittent pressure, of immature tissue constructs during their development may contribute to their ultimate biomechanical functionality. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. An optimal control method for fluid structure interaction systems via adjoint boundary pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirco, L.; Da Vià, R.; Manservisi, S.

    2017-11-01

    In recent year, in spite of the computational complexity, Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems have been widely studied due to their applicability in science and engineering. Fluid-structure interaction systems consist of one or more solid structures that deform by interacting with a surrounding fluid flow. FSI simulations evaluate the tensional state of the mechanical component and take into account the effects of the solid deformations on the motion of the interior fluids. The inverse FSI problem can be described as the achievement of a certain objective by changing some design parameters such as forces, boundary conditions and geometrical domain shapes. In this paper we would like to study the inverse FSI problem by using an optimal control approach. In particular we propose a pressure boundary optimal control method based on Lagrangian multipliers and adjoint variables. The objective is the minimization of a solid domain displacement matching functional obtained by finding the optimal pressure on the inlet boundary. The optimality system is derived from the first order necessary conditions by taking the Fréchet derivatives of the Lagrangian with respect to all the variables involved. The optimal solution is then obtained through a standard steepest descent algorithm applied to the optimality system. The approach presented in this work is general and could be used to assess other objective functionals and controls. In order to support the proposed approach we perform a few numerical tests where the fluid pressure on the domain inlet controls the displacement that occurs in a well defined region of the solid domain.

  20. Numerical Modeling of an Integrated Vehicle Fluids System Loop for Pressurizing a Cryogenic Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeClair, A. C.; Hedayat, A.; Majumdar, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of the pressurization loop of the Integrated Vehicle Fluids (IVF) system using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The IVF propulsion system, being developed by United Launch Alliance to reduce system weight and enhance reliability, uses boiloff propellants to drive thrusters for the reaction control system as well as to run internal combustion engines to develop power and drive compressors to pressurize propellant tanks. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted tests to verify the functioning of the IVF system using a flight-like tank. GFSSP, a finite volume based flow network analysis software developed at MSFC, has been used to support the test program. This paper presents the simulation of three different test series, comparison of numerical prediction and test data and a novel method of presenting data in a dimensionless form. The paper also presents a methodology of implementing a compressor map in a system level code.

  1. Electrical impedance measured changes in thoracic fluid content during thoracentesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J R; Jensen, B V; Drabaek, H

    1994-01-01

    In patients (seven females and 11 males) with pleural effusion due to pulmonary (n = 13) or cardiac disease (n = 5) the change in baseline transthoracic impedance (Z0) was measured by electrical impedance (BoMed's NCCOM-3, 70 kHz) during thoracentesis. Data were obtained before and after withdrawal...... of each 500 ml, and at the end of the thoracentesis. We found a close linear correlation (r = 0.97) between changes in Z0 and the volume of aspirated pleural effusion (y = 0.415.x+0.093). The variability of the estimated thoracic fluid volumes was analysed with a plot of the residuals from the regression...... line, and we found that changes in thoracic fluid volume estimated by impedance technique would be within +/- 302 ml (= 2 SD). However, the absolute value of Z0 before thoracentesis could not differentiate the group of patients with pleural effusion from normal subjects (n = 28)....

  2. Phase Envelope Calculations for Reservoir Fluids in the Presence of Capillary Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemus, Diego; Yan, Wei; Michelsen, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    the bubble and dew point curves but also other quality lines with vapor fractions between 0 and 1. The algorithm has been used to calculate the phase envelopes of binary, multicomponent and reservoir fluid systems for pore radius from 10 to 50 nm. The presence of capillary pressure changes the saturation...... pressures in the whole phase envelope except at the critical point. The bubble point curve shows a negative change while the dew point curve shows positive and negative changes in the upper dew point branch and the lower dew point branch, respectively. In particular, the cricondentherm is also shifted...

  3. Relaxation and Numerical Approximation of a Two-Fluid Two-Pressure Diphasic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambroso, A.; Chalons, Ch.; Galie, Th.; Chalons, Ch.; Coquel, F.; Coquel, F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the numerical approximation of the solutions of a two-fluid two-pressure model used in the modelling of two-phase flows. We present a relaxation strategy for easily dealing with both the nonlinearities associated with the pressure laws and the nonconservative terms that are inherently present in the set of convective equations and that couple the two phases. In particular, the proposed approximate Riemann solver is given by explicit formulas, preserves the natural phase space, and exactly captures the coupling waves between the two phases. Numerical evidences are given to corroborate the validity of our approach. (authors)

  4. Pressure Feedback in Fluid Power Systems--Active Damping Explained and Exemplified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Andersen, Torben O.

    2018-01-01

    Fluid power systems are inherently nonlinear and typically suffer from very poor damping. Despite these characteristics, it is not uncommon that traditional linear type controllers are applied. This typically results in conservative adjustment of the controllers, or when more advanced controllers...... a given system, and how to adjust the parameters of the pressure feedback to obtain the best results. This is done for both a traditional symmetric cylinder servo system and a system with a differential cylinder using both pressure and nonpressure compensated proportional valves. Based on the presented...

  5. Patient-ventilator asynchrony affects pulse pressure variation prediction of fluid responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Antonio; Colombo, Davide; Cammarota, Gianmaria; De Lucia, Marta; Cecconi, Maurizio; Antonelli, Massimo; Corte, Francesco Della; Navalesi, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    During partial ventilatory support, pulse pressure variation (PPV) fails to adequately predict fluid responsiveness. This prospective study aims to investigate whether patient-ventilator asynchrony affects PPV prediction of fluid responsiveness during pressure support ventilation (PSV). This is an observational physiological study evaluating the response to a 500-mL fluid challenge in 54 patients receiving PSV, 27 without (Synch) and 27 with asynchronies (Asynch), as assessed by visual inspection of ventilator waveforms by 2 skilled blinded physicians. The area under the curve was 0.71 (confidence interval, 0.57-0.83) for the overall population, 0.86 (confidence interval, 0.68-0.96) in the Synch group, and 0.53 (confidence interval, 0.33-0.73) in the Asynch group (P = .018). Sensitivity and specificity of PPV were 78% and 89% in the Synch group and 36% and 46% in the Asynch group. Logistic regression showed that the PPV prediction was influenced by patient-ventilator asynchrony (odds ratio, 8.8 [2.0-38.0]; P < .003). Of the 27 patients without asynchronies, 12 had a tidal volume greater than or equal to 8 mL/kg; in this subgroup, the rate of correct classification was 100%. Patient-ventilator asynchrony affects PPV performance during partial ventilatory support influencing its efficacy in predicting fluid responsiveness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Loss-of-Fluid Test findings in pressurized water reactor core's thermal-hydraulic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core's thermal-hydraulic behavior findings from experiments performed at the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The potential impact of these findings on the safety and economics of PWR's generation of electricity is also discussed. Reviews of eight important findings in the core's physical behavior and in experimental methods are presented with supporting evidence

  7. Non-Invasive Measurement of Intracranial Pressure Pulsation using Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, R. E.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity causes a cephalad fluid shift which may elevate intracranial pressure (ICP). Elevation in ICP may affect cerebral hemodynamics in astronauts during space flight. ICP is, however, a difficult parameter to measure due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We already reported our development of a non-invasive ultrasound device for measurement of ICP. We recently modified the device so that we might reproducibly estimate ICP changes in association with cardiac cycles. In the first experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance with the ultrasound device in cadavera while changing ICP by infusing saline into the lateral ventricle. In the second experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance in five healthy volunteers while placing them in 60 deg, 30 deg head-up tilt, supine, and 10 deg head-down tilt position. In the cadaver study, fast Fourier transformation revealed that cranial pulsation is clearly associated with ICP pulsation. The ratio of cranial distance and ICP pulsation is 1.3microns/mmHg. In the tilting study, the magnitudes of cranial pulsation are linearly correlated to tilt angles (r=0.87). The ultrasound device has sufficient sensitivity to detect cranial pulsation in association with cardiac cycles. By analyzing the magnitude of cranial pulsation, estimates of ICP during space flight are possible.

  8. Fluid temperature measurement technique by using Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Jeong Soo; Yang, Sun Kyu; Min, Kyung Ho; Chung, Moon Ki; Choi, Young Don

    1999-06-01

    Temperature measurement technique by using Raman scattering was developed for the liquid water at temperature of 20 - 90 degree C and atmospheric pressure. Strong relationship between Raman scattering characteristics and liquid temperature change was observed. Various kinds of measurement techniques, such as Peak Intensity, Peak Wavelength, FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum), PMCR ( Polymer Monomer Concentration RAte), TSIR (Temperature Sensitive Intensity Ratio), IDIA (Integral Difference Intensity Area) were tested. TSIR has the highest accuracy in mean error or 0.1 deg C and standard deviation of 0.1248 deg C. This report is one of the results in developing process of Raman temperature measurement technique. Next research step is to develop Raman temperature measurement technique at the high temperature and high pressure conditions in single or two phase flows. (author). 13 refs., 3 tabs., 38 figs

  9. Organic Electroluminescent Sensor for Pressure Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohide Niimi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a novel concept of a pressure sensor called electroluminescent pressure sensor (ELPS based on oxygen quenching of electroluminescence. The sensor was fabricated as an organic light-emitting device (OLED with phosphorescent dyes whose phosphorescence can be quenched by oxygenmolecules, and with a polymer electrode which permeates oxygen molecules. The sensor was a single-layer OLED with Platinum (II octaethylporphine (PtOEP doped into poly(vinylcarbazole (PVK as an oxygen sensitive emissive layer and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene mixed with poly(styrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS as an oxygen permeating polymer anode. The pressure sensitivity of the fabricated ELPS sample was equivalent to that of the sensor excited by an illumination light source. Moreover, the pressure sensitivity of the sensor is equivalent to that of conventional pressure-sensitive paint (PSP, which is an optical pressure sensor based on photoluminescence.

  10. Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen in a high-pressure fluid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jy-An; Feng, Zhili; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Liu, Kenneth C

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides fatigue testing of a material specimen while the specimen is disposed in a high pressure fluid environment. A specimen is placed between receivers in an end cap of a vessel and a piston that is moveable within the vessel. Pressurized fluid is provided to compression and tension chambers defined between the piston and the vessel. When the pressure in the compression chamber is greater than the pressure in the tension chamber, the specimen is subjected to a compression force. When the pressure in the tension chamber is greater than the pressure in the compression chamber, the specimen is subjected to a tension force. While the specimen is subjected to either force, it is also surrounded by the pressurized fluid in the tension chamber. In some examples, the specimen is surrounded by hydrogen.

  11. Measuring the collateral network pressure to minimize paraplegia risk in thoracoabdominal aneurysm resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etz, Christian D; Zoli, Stefano; Bischoff, Moritz S; Bodian, Carol; Di Luozzo, Gabriele; Griepp, Randall B

    2010-12-01

    To minimize paraplegia during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair, the concept of the collateral network was developed. That is, spinal cord perfusion is provided by an interconnecting complex of vessels in the intraspinal, paraspinous, and epidural space and in the paravertebral muscles, including intercostal and lumbar segmental as well as subclavian and hypogastric arteries. Collateral network pressure was measured with a catheter in the distal end of a ligated segmental artery in pigs and human beings. In the pig, collateral network pressure was 75% of the simultaneous mean aortic pressure. With complete segmental arterial ligation, it fell to 27% of baseline, recovering to 40% at 24 hours and 90% at 120 hours. Spinal cord injury occurred in approximately 50% of animals. When all segmental arteries were taken in 2 stages a week apart, collateral network pressure fell only to 50% to 70% of baseline, and spinal cord injury was rare. In human beings, baseline collateral network pressure also was 75% of mean aortic pressure, fell in proportion to the number of segmental arteries ligated, and began recovery within 24 hours. Collateral network pressure was lower with nonpulsatile distal bypass than with pulsatile perfusion. After subtraction of a measure of spinal cord outflow pressure (cerebrospinal fluid pressure or central venous pressure), collateral network pressure provides a clinically useful estimate of spinal cord perfusion pressure. Copyright © 2010. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  12. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Paul E.; Abdalla, Mohamed; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk for target organ damage and hypertension related morbidity and mortality. Measuring home blood pressures may lead to more active participation in health care by patients and has the potential to improve blood pressure control. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring enables the measuring nighttime blood pressures and diurnal changes, which may be the most accurate predictors of risk associated with elevated blood pressure. Additionally, reducing nighttime blood pressure is feasible and may be an important component of effective antihypertensive therapy. Finally, estimating central aortic pressures and pulse wave velocity are two of the newer methods for assessing blood pressure and hypertension related target organ damage. PMID:22521624

  13. Hip chondrolabral mechanics during activities of daily living: Role of the labrum and interstitial fluid pressurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Jocelyn N; Maak, Travis G; Ateshian, Gerard A; Maas, Steve A; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2018-03-01

    Osteoarthritis of the hip can result from mechanical factors, which can be studied using finite element (FE) analysis. FE studies of the hip often assume there is no significant loss of fluid pressurization in the articular cartilage during simulated activities and approximate the material as incompressible and elastic. This study examined the conditions under which interstitial fluid load support remains sustained during physiological motions, as well as the role of the labrum in maintaining fluid load support and the effect of its presence on the solid phase of the surrounding cartilage. We found that dynamic motions of gait and squatting maintained consistent fluid load support between cycles, while static single-leg stance experienced slight fluid depressurization with significant reduction of solid phase stress and strain. Presence of the labrum did not significantly influence fluid load support within the articular cartilage, but prevented deformation at the cartilage edge, leading to lower stress and strain conditions in the cartilage. A morphologically accurate representation of collagen fibril orientation through the thickness of the articular cartilage was not necessary to predict fluid load support. However, comparison with simplified fibril reinforcement underscored the physiological importance. The results of this study demonstrate that an elastic incompressible material approximation is reasonable for modeling a limited number of cyclic motions of gait and squatting without significant loss of accuracy, but is not appropriate for static motions or numerous repeated motions. Additionally, effects seen from removal of the labrum motivate evaluation of labral reattachment strategies in the context of labral repair. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Interstitial fluid pressure, vascularity and metastasis in ectopic, orthotopic and spontaneous tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunt, Sarah Jane; Kalliomaki, Tuula MK; Brown, Allison; Yang, Victor X; Milosevic, Michael; Hill, Richard P

    2008-01-01

    High tumour interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) has been adversely linked to poor drug uptake in patients, and to treatment response following radiotherapy in cervix cancer patients. In this study we measured IFP values in a selection of murine and xenograft models, spontaneously arising or transplanted either intramuscularly (i/m) or orthotopically and analysed their relationship to tumour vascularity and metastatic spread. KHT-C murine fibrosarcoma, ME180 and SiHa human cervix carcinoma were grown either intramuscularly (i/m), sub-cutaneously (s/c) or orthotopically. Polyoma middle-T (MMTV-PyMT) transgenic spontaneous mammary tumours were studied either as spontaneous tumours or following orthotopic or i/m transplantation. IFP was measured in all tumours using the wick-in-needle method. Spontaneous metastasis formation in the lungs or lymph nodes was assessed in all models. An immunohistochemical analysis of tumour hypoxia, vascular density, lymphatic vascular density and proliferation was carried out in ME180 tumours grown both i/m and orthotopically. Blood flow was also assessed in the ME180 model using high-frequency micro-ultrasound functional imaging. Tumour IFP was heterogeneous in all the models irrespective of growth site: KHT-C i/m: 2–42 mmHg, s/c: 1–14 mmHg, ME180: i/m 5–68 mmHg, cervix 4–21 mmHg, SiHa: i/m 20–56 mmHg, cervix 2–26 mmHg, MMTV-PyMT: i/m: 13–45 mmHg, spontaneous 2–20 mmHg and transplanted 2–22 mmHg. Additionally, there was significant variation between individual tumours growing in the same mouse, and there was no correlation between donor and recipient tumour IFP values. Metastatic dissemination to the lungs or lymph nodes demonstrated no correlation with tumour IFP. Tumour hypoxia, proliferation, and lymphatic or blood vessel density also showed no relationship with tumour IFP. Speckle variance analysis of ultrasound images showed no differences in vascular perfusion between ME180 tumours grown i/m versus orthotopically

  15. Effects of Constant Flow vs. Constant Pressure Perfusion on Fluid Filtration in Severe Hypothermic Isolated Blood-Perfused Rat Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsøy, Kathrine; Kondratiev, Timofey; Tveita, Torkjel; Bjertnaes, Lars J

    2016-01-01

    Victims of severe accidental hypothermia are prone to fluid extravasation but rarely develop lung edema. We hypothesize that combined hypothermia-induced increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and a concomitant fall in cardiac output protect the lungs against edema development. Our aim was to explore in hypothermic-isolated blood-perfused rat lungs whether perfusion at constant pressure influences fluid filtration differently from perfusion at constant flow. Isolated blood-perfused rat lungs were hanging freely in a weight transducer for measuring weight changes (ΔW). Fluid filtration coefficient (Kfc), was determined by transiently elevating left atrial pressure (Pla) by 5.8 mmHg two times each during normothermia (37°C) and during hypothermia (15°C). The lung preparations were randomized to two groups. One group was perfused with constant flow (Constant flow group) and the other group with constant pulmonary artery pressure (Constant PPA group). Microvascular pressure (Pmv) was determined before and during elevation of Pla (ΔPmv) by means of the double occlusion technique. Kfc was calculated with the formula Kfc = ΔW/ΔPmv/min. All Kfc values were normalized to predicted lung weight (P LW ), which was based on body weight (BW) according to the formula: P LW  = 0.0053 BW - 0.48 and presented as Kfc PLW in mg/min/mmHg/g. At cessation, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid/perfusate protein concentration (B/P) ratio was determined photometrically. Data were analyzed with parametric or non-parametric tests as appropriate. p  Kfc PLW and B/P ratio increased significantly by more than 10-fold during hypothermia concerted by visible signs of edema in the trachea. Hemoglobin and hematocrit increased within the Constant flow group and between the groups at cessation of the experiments. In hypothermic rat lungs perfused at constant flow, fluid filtration coefficient per gram P LW and B/P ratio increased more than 10-fold concerted by increased

  16. LOFT experimental measurements uncertainty analyses. Volume XX. Fluid-velocity measurement using pulsed-neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassahn, G.D.; Taylor, D.J.N.

    1982-08-01

    Analyses of uncertainty components inherent in pulsed-neutron-activation (PNA) measurements in general and the Loss-of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) system in particular are given. Due to the LOFT system's unique conditions, previously-used techniques were modified to make the volocity measurement. These methods render a useful, cost-effective measurement with an estimated uncertainty of 11% of reading

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid pressures resulting from experimental traumatic spinal cord injuries in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Claire F; Lee, Jae H T; Burstyn, Uri; Okon, Elena B; Kwon, Brian K; Cripton, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Despite considerable effort over the last four decades, research has failed to translate into consistently effective treatment options for spinal cord injury (SCI). This is partly attributed to differences between the injury response of humans and rodent models. Some of this difference could be because the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer of the human spine is relatively large, while that of the rodents is extremely thin. We sought to characterize the fluid impulse induced in the CSF by experimental SCIs of moderate and high human-like severity, and to compare this with previous studies in which fluid impulse has been associated with neural tissue injury. We used a new in vivo pig model (n = 6 per injury group, mean age 124.5 days, 20.9 kg) incorporating four miniature pressure transducers that were implanted in pairs in the subarachnoid space, cranial, and caudal to the injury at 30 mm and 100 mm. Tissue sparing was assessed with Eriochrome Cyanine and Neutral Red staining. The median peak pressures near the injury were 522.5 and 868.8 mmHg (range 96.7-1430.0) and far from the injury were 7.6 and 36.3 mmHg (range 3.8-83.7), for the moderate and high injury severities, respectively. Pressure impulse (mmHg.ms), apparent wave speed, and apparent attenuation factor were also evaluated. The data indicates that the fluid pressure wave may be sufficient to affect the severity and extent of primary tissue damage close to the injury site. However, the CSF pressure was close to normal physiologic values at 100 mm from the injury. The high injury severity animals had less tissue sparing than the moderate injury severity animals; this difference was statistically significant only within 1.6 mm of the epicenter. These results indicate that future research seeking to elucidate the mechanical origins of primary tissue damage in SCI should consider the effects of CSF. This pig model provides advantages for basic and preclinical SCI research due to its

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring underground fluid flow characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paap, H.J.; Richter, A.P.; Peelman, H.E.; Arnold, D.M.; Scot, H.D.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to the use of neutron activation techniques to measure the azimuth and speed of the horizontal fluid flow in earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole and the analysis of the resultant gamma radiation based on count rate data obtained as functions of horizontal direction and time. The apparatus consisting of a sonde (a downhole well logging tool) equipped with a neutron source, a gamma detector and a rotatable shield with collimator slot and the data processing equipment located at the surface, are described. (UK)

  19. Pars-plana fluid aspiration for positive vitreous cavity pressure in anterior segment surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kuriakose

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive vitreous pressure due to misdirection of aqueous or choroidal effusion leads to shallowing of the anterior chamber (AC before or during anterior segment surgeries. This shallow AC if not addressed makes surgery difficult and increases the risk of surgical complications. Methods to prevent and manage this condition described in literature are not without problems. We describe a minimally invasive technique of passing a 30G needle through the pars-plana to aspirate misdirected fluid from vitreous cavity either as a prophylaxis just before surgery or during it, thereby decreasing positive vitreous pressure. This technique, used in 12 eyes, seems to be effective in patients with angle-closure glaucoma, malignant glaucoma, and per-operative sudden increase in vitreous pressure during surgery. Small-incision surgeries are ideally suited for this procedure. This minimally invasive technique is simple to perform and complications are unlikely to be more than what is seen with intravitreal injections.

  20. Simultaneous Rheoelectric Measurements of Strongly Conductive Complex Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Ahmed; Divoux, Thibaut; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce an modular fixture designed for stress-controlled rheometers to perform simultaneous rheological and electrical measurements on strongly conductive complex fluids under shear. By means of a nontoxic liquid metal at room temperature, the electrical connection to the rotating shaft is completed with minimal additional mechanical friction, allowing for simultaneous stress measurements at values as low as 1 Pa. Motivated by applications such as flow batteries, we use the capabilities of this design to perform an extensive set of rheoelectric experiments on gels formulated from attractive carbon-black particles, at concentrations ranging from 4 to 15 wt %. First, experiments on gels at rest prepared with different shear histories show a robust power-law scaling between the elastic modulus G0' and the conductivity σ0 of the gels—i.e., G0'˜σ0α, with α =1.65 ±0.04 , regardless of the gel concentration. Second, we report conductivity measurements performed simultaneously with creep experiments. Changes in conductivity in the early stage of the experiments, also known as the Andrade-creep regime, reveal for the first time that plastic events take place in the bulk, while the shear rate γ ˙ decreases as a weak power law of time. The subsequent evolution of the conductivity and the shear rate allows us to propose a local yielding scenario that is in agreement with previous velocimetry measurements. Finally, to establish a set of benchmark data, we determine the constitutive rheological and electrical behavior of carbon-black gels. Corrections first introduced for mechanical measurements regarding shear inhomogeneity and wall slip are carefully extended to electrical measurements to accurately distinguish between bulk and surface contributions to the conductivity. As an illustrative example, we examine the constitutive rheoelectric properties of five different grades of carbon-black gels and we demonstrate the relevance of this rheoelectric apparatus as a

  1. The scaling of burnout data for a single fluid at a fixed pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, G.J.

    1966-12-01

    The success of the scaling factor concept in linking burnout measurements made in two different fluids has been amply demonstrated. This memorandum investigates the possibility of linking measurements made on two different systems in the same fluid. It seems that good accuracy may be obtained for systems whose linear dimensions differ by as much as a factor of two; this offers the possibility of saving very substantial amounts of power in testing reactor fuel element. A novel conclusion is that systems do not need to be geometrically similar in order to be linked by scaling factors. (author)

  2. Auscultatory versus oscillometric measurement of blood pressure in octogenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Jens-Ulrik; Pedersen, Sidsel Arnspang; Matzen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Auscultatory measurement using a sphygmomanometer has been the predominant method for clinical estimation of blood pressure, but it is now rapidly being replaced by oscillometric measurement.......Auscultatory measurement using a sphygmomanometer has been the predominant method for clinical estimation of blood pressure, but it is now rapidly being replaced by oscillometric measurement....

  3. Blood pressure measurements in the ankle are not equivalent to blood pressure measurements in the arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Lara Nicole; Wells, Mike; Sliwa, Karen

    2014-07-25

    Blood pressure (BP) is often measured on the ankle in the emergency department (ED), but this has never been shown to be an acceptable alternative to measurements performed on the arm. To establish whether the differences between arm and ankle non-invasive BP measurements were clinically relevant (i.e. a difference of ≥10 mmHg). This was a prospective cross-sectional study in an urban ED making use of a convenience sample of 201 patients (18 - 50 years of age) who were not in need of emergency medical treatment. BP was measured in the supine position on both arms and ankles with the correct size cuff according to the manufacturer's guidelines. The arm and ankle BP measurements were compared. There was a clinically and statistically significant difference between arm and ankle systolic BP (SBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) (-13 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -28 - 1 mmHg and -5 mmHg, 95% CI -13 - 4 mmHg, respectively), with less difference in diastolic BP (DBP) (2 mmHg, 95% CI -7 - 10 mmHg). Only 37% of SBP measurements and 83% of MAP measurements were within an error range of 10 mmHg, while 95% of DBP measurements agreed within 10 mmHg. While the average differences (or the bias) were generally not large, large variations in individual patients (indicating poor precision) made the prediction of arm BP from ankle measurements unreliable. Ankle BP cannot be used as a substitute for arm BP in the ED.

  4. Measuring N2 Pressure Using Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, S. N.; Kopf, S.; Gordon, R.; Bebout, B.; Som, S.

    2017-11-01

    We have shown that cyanobacteria can record information about N2 partial pressure both morphologically and isotopically, and thus may serve as useful geobarometers to help us better understand Earth's ancient atmosphere.

  5. PIEZOELECTRIC WAVEGUIDE SENSOR FOR MEASURING PULSE PRESSURE IN CLOSED LIQUID VOLUMES AT HIGH VOLTAGE ELECTRIC DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Zhekul

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Investigations of the characteristics of pressure waves presuppose the registration of the total profile of the pressure wave at a given point in space. For these purposes, various types of «pressure to the electrical signal» transmitters (sensors are used. Most of the common sensors are unsuitable for measuring the pulse pressure in a closed water volume at high hydrostatic pressures, in particular to study the effect of a powerful high-voltage pulse discharge on increasing the inflow of minerals and drinking water in wells. The purpose of the work was to develop antijamming piezoelectric waveguide sensor for measuring pulse pressure at a close distance from a high-voltage discharge channel in a closed volume of a liquid. Methodology. We have applied the calibration method as used as a secondary standard, the theory of electrical circuits. Results. We have selected the design and the circuit solution of the waveguide pressure sensor. We have developed a waveguide pulse-pressure sensor DTX-1 with a measuring loop. This sensor makes it possible to study the spectral characteristics of pressure waves of high-voltage pulse discharge in closed volumes of liquid at a hydrostatic pressure of up to 20 MPa and a temperature of up to 80 °C. The sensor can be used to study pressure waves with a maximum amplitude value of up to 150 MPa and duration of up to 80 µs. According to the results of the calibration, the sensitivity of the developed sensor DTX-1 with a measuring loop is 0.0346 V/MPa. Originality. We have further developed the theory of designing the waveguide piezoelectric pulse pressure sensors for measuring the pulse pressure at a close distance from a high-voltage discharge channel in a closed fluid volume by controlling the attenuation of the amplitude of the pressure signal. Practical value. We have developed, created, calibrated, used in scientific research waveguide pressure pulse sensors DTX-1. We propose sensors DTX-1 for sale

  6. Impact of cerebrospinal fluid shunting for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus on the amyloid cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Moriya

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether the improvement of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF flow dynamics by CSF shunting, can suppress the oligomerization of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ, by measuring the levels of Alzheimer's disease (AD-related proteins in the CSF before and after lumboperitoneal shunting. Lumbar CSF from 32 patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH (samples were obtained before and 1 year after shunting, 15 patients with AD, and 12 normal controls was analyzed for AD-related proteins and APLP1-derived Aβ-like peptides (APL1β (a surrogate marker for Aβ. We found that before shunting, individuals with iNPH had significantly lower levels of soluble amyloid precursor proteins (sAPP and Aβ38 compared to patients with AD and normal controls. We divided the patients with iNPH into patients with favorable (improvement ≥ 1 on the modified Rankin Scale and unfavorable (no improvement on the modified Rankin Scale outcomes. Compared to the unfavorable outcome group, the favorable outcome group showed significant increases in Aβ38, 40, 42, and phosphorylated-tau levels after shunting. In contrast, there were no significant changes in the levels of APL1β25, 27, and 28 after shunting. After shunting, we observed positive correlations between sAPPα and sAPPβ, Aβ38 and 42, and APL1β25 and 28, with shifts from sAPPβ to sAPPα, from APL1β28 to 25, and from Aβ42 to 38 in all patients with iNPH. Our results suggest that Aβ production remained unchanged by the shunt procedure because the levels of sAPP and APL1β were unchanged. Moreover, the shift of Aβ from oligomer to monomer due to the shift of Aβ42 (easy to aggregate to Aβ38 (difficult to aggregate, and the improvement of interstitial-fluid flow, could lead to increased Aβ levels in the CSF. Our findings suggest that the shunting procedure can delay intracerebral deposition of Aβ in patients with iNPH.

  7. Fluid mechanics of needle valves with rounded components. Part II: Preliminary measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 251, November (2016), s. 52-58 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : needle valves * pressure measurements * valves Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.499, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S092442471630440X/1-s2.0-S092442471630440X-main.pdf?_tid=45acccf4-951f-11e6-a831-00000aab0f02&acdnat=1476787402_bf349ff3cfc7a824c1a01397a9a5b8b3

  8. Development and validation of spectroscopic methods for monitoring density changes in pressurized gaseous and supercritical fluid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchford, Marc A; Wallen, Scott L

    2002-04-15

    The further development of new processes utilizing liquid or supercritical CO2 as a solvent will benefit from the rational design of new CO2-philes. Understanding solvation structures and mechanisms of these molecules is an important part of this process. In such studies, determining the change in density as a function of the measured thermodynamic conditions (pressure and temperature) provides an excellent means of directly monitoring the solution conditions in the detection volume for a given technique. By integrating spectroscopic peaks, changes in area can be used to determine changes in analyte concentration in the detection volume, and thus, it should be possible to monitor the system density in situ. In the present study, we examine the utility of Raman and NMR spectroscopy as a means of following changes in solution density conditions and validate this approach in pure fluids and gases (N2 and CO2) and supercritical fluid mixtures (acetaldehyde vapor in N2). In addition, we present the design of a simple, inexpensive cell for conducting Raman and NMR measurements under moderate pressure conditions.

  9. The effect of intraocular gas and fluid volumes on intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, J N; Whitacre, M M

    1990-02-01

    Large increases in the intraocular pressure (IOP) of postoperative gas-containing eyes may require the removal of gas or fluid to reduce the IOP to the normal range. Application of the ideal gas law to Friedenwald's equation provides a mathematical model of the relationship between IOP, intraocular gas and fluid volumes, and the coefficient of scleral rigidity. This mathematic model shows that removal of a given volume of gas or fluid produces an identical decrease in IOP and that the more gas an eye contains, the greater the volume reduction necessary to reduce the pressure. Application of the model shows that the effective coefficient of scleral rigidity is low (mean K, 0.0021) in eyes with elevated IOP that have undergone vitrectomy and retinal cryopexy and very low (mean K, 0.0013) in eyes with elevated IOP that have undergone placement of a scleral buckle and band. By using the appropriate mean coefficient of rigidity, the volume of material to be aspirated to produce a given decrease in IOP can be predicted with clinically useful accuracy.

  10. Ionic conductivity measurements of zirconia under pressure using impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takebe, H; Sakamoto, D; Ohtaka, O; Fukui, H; Yoshiasa, A; Yamanaka, T; Ota, K; Kikegawa, T

    2002-01-01

    We have set up an electrical conductivity measurement system under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions with a multi-anvil high-pressure apparatus using an AC complex impedance method. With this system, we have successfully measured the electrical conductivity of stabilized ZrO 2 (Y 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 solid solution) under pressures up to 5 GPa in the temperature range from 300 to 1200 K. The electrical conductivities obtained under pressure are compatible with those of previous results measured at ambient pressure

  11. Automated measurement of pressure injury through image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Mathews, Carol

    2017-11-01

    To develop an image processing algorithm to automatically measure pressure injuries using electronic pressure injury images stored in nursing documentation. Photographing pressure injuries and storing the images in the electronic health record is standard practice in many hospitals. However, the manual measurement of pressure injury is time-consuming, challenging and subject to intra/inter-reader variability with complexities of the pressure injury and the clinical environment. A cross-sectional algorithm development study. A set of 32 pressure injury images were obtained from a western Pennsylvania hospital. First, we transformed the images from an RGB (i.e. red, green and blue) colour space to a YC b C r colour space to eliminate inferences from varying light conditions and skin colours. Second, a probability map, generated by a skin colour Gaussian model, guided the pressure injury segmentation process using the Support Vector Machine classifier. Third, after segmentation, the reference ruler - included in each of the images - enabled perspective transformation and determination of pressure injury size. Finally, two nurses independently measured those 32 pressure injury images, and intraclass correlation coefficient was calculated. An image processing algorithm was developed to automatically measure the size of pressure injuries. Both inter- and intra-rater analysis achieved good level reliability. Validation of the size measurement of the pressure injury (1) demonstrates that our image processing algorithm is a reliable approach to monitoring pressure injury progress through clinical pressure injury images and (2) offers new insight to pressure injury evaluation and documentation. Once our algorithm is further developed, clinicians can be provided with an objective, reliable and efficient computational tool for segmentation and measurement of pressure injuries. With this, clinicians will be able to more effectively monitor the healing process of pressure

  12. Unsteady pressures on a blunt trailing edge measured with an embedded pressure scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Jonathan; Nikoueeyan, Pourya; Hind, Michael; Strike, John; Dahland, Matz; Keeter, Steven

    2017-11-01

    Development of direct-mount pressure scanners can decrease the pneumatic tubing length required to connect the measurement ports to the scanner manifold resulting in improved dynamic range for unsteady pressure measurements. In this work, the performance of a direct-mount pressure scanner for time-resolved pressure measurement is demonstrated in a well-established flow; the pressure fluctuations near the base of flat plate is considered. The additive manufactured model is instrumented with a pressure scanner and flush-mounted high-speed pressure transducers. The configuration of the ports on the model allows for side-by-side comparison of the pressures measured via embedded pneumatic tubing routed to a pressure scanner with that measured by high-speed transducers. Prior to testing, the dynamic response of each embedded pressure port is dynamically calibrated via an in-situ calibration technique. Pressure data is then acquired for fixed angle-of-attack and different dynamic pitching conditions. The dynamic range of the measurements acquired via direct-mount scanner will be compared to those acquired by the high speed transducers for both static and dynamic pitching configurations. The uncertainties associated with Weiner deconvolution are also quantified for the measurements.

  13. Risk Associated With The Decompression Of High Pressure High Temperature Fluids - Study On Black Oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, D. C.; Fosbøl, P. L.; Thomsen, K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluids produced from deep underground reservoirs may result in exponential increase in temperature. It is a consequence of adiabatic fluid decompression from the inverse Joule Thomson Effect (JTE). The phenomenon requires analysis in order to avoid any operational risks. This study evaluates...... the JTE upon decompression of black oil in high pressure-high temperature reservoirs. Also the effect caused by the presence of water and brine on the black oil is studied. The final temperature is calculated from the corresponding energy balance at isenthalpic and non-isenthalpic conditions. It is found...... that the final temperature of black oil increases upon adiabatic decompression. In the case of the isenthalpic process at initial conditions of the reservoir, e.g. 150°C and 1000 bars, it is found that the final temperature can increase to 173.7°C. At non-isenthalpic conditions the final temperature increases...

  14. Estimating thermodynamic properties by molecular dynamics simulations: The properties of fluids at high pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, D.G.; Refson, K.

    1992-01-01

    The molecular dynamics calculations reported above give calculated P-V-T properties for H 2 O up to 1500 K and 100 GPa, which agree remarkably well with the available experimental data. We also observe the phase transition to a crystalline, orientationally disordered cubic ice structure. No account was taken of molecular flexibility in these calculations nor of potential dissociation at high pressures as suggested by Hamman (1981). However, we note that the closest next-nearest-neighbour O-H approach remains significantly greater than the TIP4P fixed O-H bond length within the water molecule for all pressures studied. The equation of state proposed here should be useful for estimating the properties of H 2 O at up to 1500 K and 100 G Pa (1 Mbar) and is much easier to use in practice than modified Redlich Kwong equations. Extension of these methods to the studies of other fluids and of fluid mixtures at high temperatures and pressures will require good potential models for the species involved, and this is likely to involve a combination of good ab initio work and semiempirical modelling. Once developed, these models should allow robust predictions of thermodynamic properties beyond the range of the experimental data on the basis of fundamental molecular information

  15. Equivalent isentropic expansion efficiency of real fluid subject to concurrent pressure drop and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.

    2017-12-01

    Concurrent pressure drop and cooling of a super-critical or sub-cooled liquid stream can have the same effect as adiabatic expansion even though there is no work extraction. A practical implementation is as straight forward as counter-flow heat exchange with a colder fluid. The concurrent pressure drop need not be continuous with respect to the heat exchange, but may occur in a step-wise manner, in between heat exchange. Two aspects of this effect of pressure drop with heat transfer are examined; a thermodynamic and a practical process equivalent isentropic expansion efficiency. This real fluid phenomenon is useful to understand in applications where work extraction is either not practical or has not been developed. A super-critical helium supply, often around 3 bar and 4.5 K, being ultimately used as a superfluid (usually around 1.8 to 2.1 K) to cool a Niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity or a superconducting magnet is one such particular application. This paper examines the thermodynamic nature of this phenomenon.

  16. Various high precision measurements of pressure in atomic energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori; Inoue, Akira; Hosoma, Takashi; Tanaka, Izumi; Gabane, Tsunemichi.

    1987-01-01

    As for the pressure measurement in atomic energy industry, it is mostly the measurement using differential pressure transmitters and pressure transmitters for process measurement with the general accuracy of measurement of 0.2 - 0.5 % FS/year. However, recently for the development of nuclear fusion reactors and the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle accompanying new atomic energy technology, there are the needs of the pressure measurement having higher accuracy of 0.01 % FS/year and high resolution, and quartz vibration type pressure sensors appeared. New high accuracy pressure measurement techniques were developed by the advance of data processing and the rationalization of data transmission. As the results, the measurement of the differential pressure of helium-lithium two-phase flow in the cooling system of nuclear fusion reactors, the high accuracy measuring system for the level of plutonium nitrate and other fuel substance in tanks in fuel reprocessing and conversion, the high accuracy measurement of atmospheric pressure and wind velocity in ducts, chimneys and tunnels in nuclear facilities and so on became feasible. The principle and the measured data of quartz vibration type pressure sensors are shown. (Kako, I.)

  17. Acoustic sensor for remote measuring of pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataev V. F.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with sensors based on delay lines on surface acoustic waves (SAW, having a receiving-emitting and a reflective interdigital transducers (IDT. The dependence of the reflection coefficient of SAW on type and intensity of the load was studied. The authors propose a composite delay line in which the phase of the reflection coefficient depends on the pressure. Pressure leads to a shift of the reflective IDT relative to the transceiver, because they are located on different substrates. The paper also presents functional diagrams of the interrogator.

  18. Measuring infrared contributions to the QCD pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Kajantie, Keijo; Rummukainen, K; Schröder, Y

    2002-01-01

    For the pressure (or free energy) of QCD, four-dimensional (4d) lattice data is available at zero baryon density up to a few times the critical temperature $T_c$. Perturbation theory, on the other hand, has serious convergence problems even at very high temperatures. In a combined analytical and three-dimensional (3d) lattice method, we show that it is possible to compute the QCD pressure from about $2 T_c$ to infinity. The numerical accuracy is good enough to resolve in principle, e.g., logarithmic contributions related to 4-loop perturbation theory.

  19. Hydrostatic fluid pressure in the vestibular organ of the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonas J-H; Boeven, Jahn J; Vogel, Stefan; Leonhardt, Steffen; Wit, Hero P; Westhofen, Martin

    2012-07-01

    Since inner ear hair cells are mechano-electric transducers the control of hydrostatic pressure in the inner ear is crucial. Most studies analyzing dynamics and regulation of inner ear hydrostatic pressure performed pressure measurements in the cochlea. The present study is the first one reporting about absolute hydrostatic pressure values in the labyrinth. Hydrostatic pressure of the endolymphatic system was recorded in all three semicircular canals. Mean pressure values were 4.06 cmH(2)O ± 0.61 in the posterior, 3.36 cmH(2)O ± 0.94 in the anterior and 3.85 cmH(2)O ± 1.38 in the lateral semicircular canal. Overall hydrostatic pressure in the vestibular organ was 3.76 cmH(2)O ± 0.36. Endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure in all three semicircular canals is the same (p = 0.310). With regard to known endolymphatic pressure values in the cochlea from past studies vestibular pressure values are comparable to cochlear values. Until now it is not known whether the reuniens duct and the Bast's valve which are the narrowest passages in the endolymphatic system are open or closed. Present data show that most likely the endolymphatic system is a functionally open entity.

  20. Pressure field in measurement section of wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hnidka Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Defence in Brno has a new low-speed wind tunnel. In order to confirm the quality of the wind inside of the measurement section, several measurements of the dynamic pressure have been performed with the Pitot-static tube. The pressure fields are then analysed and quality of the field is evaluated. Measurement of a pressure drop on the body of a standing helicopter was conducted.

  1. Solving the Fluid Pressure Poisson Equation Using Multigrid-Evaluation and Improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Christian; Rogowsky, Marcus; Westermann, Rudiger

    2016-11-01

    In many numerical simulations of fluids governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, the pressure Poisson equation needs to be solved to enforce mass conservation. Multigrid solvers show excellent convergence in simple scenarios, yet they can converge slowly in domains where physically separated regions are combined at coarser scales. Moreover, existing multigrid solvers are tailored to specific discretizations of the pressure Poisson equation, and they cannot easily be adapted to other discretizations. In this paper we analyze the convergence properties of existing multigrid solvers for the pressure Poisson equation in different simulation domains, and we show how to further improve the multigrid convergence rate by using a graph-based extension to determine the coarse grid hierarchy. The proposed multigrid solver is generic in that it can be applied to different kinds of discretizations of the pressure Poisson equation, by using solely the specification of the simulation domain and pre-assembled computational stencils. We analyze the proposed solver in combination with finite difference and finite volume discretizations of the pressure Poisson equation. Our evaluations show that, despite the common assumption, multigrid schemes can exploit their potential even in the most complicated simulation scenarios, yet this behavior is obtained at the price of higher memory consumption.

  2. Hybrid optical unobtrusive blood pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, G.; Shan, C.; Kirenko, I.; Long, X.; Aarts, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is critical in diagnosing certain cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. Some previous studies have proved that BP can be estimated by pulse transit time (PTT) calculated by a pair of photoplethysmography (PPG) signals at two body sites. Currently, contact PPG (cPPG) and

  3. A checking device for pipes in which a high pressure fluid is circulated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauerle, R.D.; Pitt, W.A.; White, M.A.

    1974-01-01

    A checking device for restricting the movements of a pipe in which a high pressure fluid is circulated, should said pipe happen to be ruptured. That device comprises a U-shaped checking, or retaining bar surrounding the pipe, and slightly spaced therefrom at each end of said bar a support member fixed to a frame member of the steam generator and an articulated connection between each of said ends and its respective support-member. That device can be applied to nuclear steam boilers [fr

  4. A computational method to predict fluid-structure interaction of pressure relief valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S. K.; Lee, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Hong, S. R. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    An effective CFD (Computational fluid dynamics) method to predict important performance parameters, such as blowdown and chattering, for pressure relief valves in NPPs is provided in the present study. To calculate the valve motion, 6DOF (six degree of freedom) model is used. A chimera overset grid method is utilized to this study for the elimination of grid remeshing problem, when the disk moves. Further, CFD-Fastran which is developed by CFD-RC for compressible flow analysis is applied to an 1' safety valve. The prediction results ensure the applicability of the presented method in this study.

  5. Numerical prediction of pressure loss of fluid in a T-junction

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Abdulwahhab, Niranjan Kumar Injeti, Sadoun Fahad Dakhi

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a prediction of pressure loss of fluid with turbulent incompressible flow through a 90° tee junction was carried out and compared with analytical and experimental results. One turbulence model was used in the numerical simulations: k-ε model for two different values of area ratio between the main pipe and the branch pipe were 1.0 and 4.0, and flow rate ratios. The continuity, momentum and energy equations were discredited by means of a finite volume technique and the SIMPLE...

  6. Second-order perturbations of cosmological fluids: Relativistic effects of pressure, multicomponent, curvature, and rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2007-01-01

    We present general relativistic correction terms appearing in Newton's gravity to the second-order perturbations of cosmological fluids. In our previous work we have shown that to the second-order perturbations, the density and velocity perturbation equations of general relativistic zero-pressure, irrotational, single-component fluid in a spatially flat background coincide exactly with the ones known in Newton's theory without using the gravitational potential. We also have shown the effect of gravitational waves to the second order, and pure general relativistic correction terms appearing in the third-order perturbations. Here, we present results of second-order perturbations relaxing all the assumptions made in our previous works. We derive the general relativistic correction terms arising due to (i) pressure, (ii) multicomponent, (iii) background spatial curvature, and (iv) rotation. In the case of multicomponent zero-pressure, irrotational fluids under the flat background, we effectively do not have relativistic correction terms, thus the relativistic equations expressed in terms of density and velocity perturbations again coincide with the Newtonian ones. In the other three cases we generally have pure general relativistic correction terms. In the case of pressure, the relativistic corrections appear even in the level of background and linear perturbation equations. In the presence of background spatial curvature, or rotation, pure relativistic correction terms directly appear in the Newtonian equations of motion of density and velocity perturbations to the second order; to the linear order, without using the gravitational potential (or metric perturbations), we have relativistic/Newtonian correspondences for density and velocity perturbations of a single-component fluid including the rotation even in the presence of background spatial curvature. In the small-scale limit (far inside the horizon), to the second-order, relativistic equations of density and

  7. A Poroelasticity Theory Approach to Study the Mechanisms Leading to Elevated Interstitial Fluid Pressure in Solid Tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burazin, Andrijana; Drapaca, Corina S; Tenti, Giuseppe; Sivaloganathan, Siv

    2018-05-01

    Although the mechanisms responsible for elevated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in tumours remain obscure, it seems clear that high IFP represents a barrier to drug delivery (since the resulting adverse pressure gradient implies a reduction in the driving force for transvascular exchange of both fluid and macromolecules). R. Jain and co-workers studied this problem, and although the conclusions drawn from their idealized mathematical models offered useful insights into the causes of elevated IFP, they by no means gave a definitive explanation for this phenomenon. In this paper, we use poroelasticity theory to also develop a macroscopic mathematical model to describe the time evolution of a solid tumour, but focus our attention on the mechanisms responsible for the rise of the IFP, from that for a healthy interstitium to that measured in malignant tumours. In particular, we discuss a number of possible time scales suggested by our mathematical model and propose a tumour-dependent time scale that leads to results in agreement with experimental observations. We apply our mathematical model to simulate the effect of "vascular normalization" (as proposed by Jain in Nat Med 7:987-989, 2001) on the IFP profile and discuss and contrast our conclusions with those of previous work in the literature.

  8. Heat transfer and pressure measurements for the SSME fuel turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Michael G.; Kim, Jungho

    1991-01-01

    A measurement program is underway using the Rocketdyne two-stage Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) fuel turbine. The measurements use a very large shock tunnel to produce a short-duration source of heated and pressurized gas which is subsequently passed through the turbine. Within this environment, the turbine is operated at the design values of flow function, stage pressure ratio, stage temperature ratio, and corrected speed. The first stage vane row and the first stage blade row are instrumented in both the spanwise and chordwise directions with pressure transducers and heat flux gages. The specific measurements to be taken include time averaged surface pressure and heat flux distributions on the vane and blade, flow passage static pressure, flow passage total pressure and total temperature distributions, and phase resolved surface pressure and heat flux on the blade.

  9. A method enabling simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement using a single piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantlović, Miloš; Stanković, Srđan; Jokić, Ivana; Lazić, Žarko; Smiljanić, Milče; Obradov, Marko; Vukelić, Branko; Jakšić, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a high-performance, simple and low-cost method for simultaneous measurement of pressure and temperature using a single piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor. The proposed measurement method utilizes the parasitic temperature sensitivity of the sensing element for both pressure measurement correction and temperature measurement. A parametric mathematical model of the sensor was established and its parameters were calculated using the obtained characterization data. Based on the model, a real-time sensor correction for both pressure and temperature measurements was implemented in a target measurement system. The proposed method was verified experimentally on a group of typical industrial-grade piezoresistive sensors. The obtained results indicate that the method enables the pressure measurement performance to exceed that of typical digital industrial pressure transmitters, achieving at the same time the temperature measurement performance comparable to industrial-grade platinum resistance temperature sensors. The presented work is directly applicable in industrial instrumentation, where it can add temperature measurement capability to the existing pressure measurement instruments, requiring little or no additional hardware, and without adverse effects on pressure measurement performance. (paper)

  10. Discussion of heat transfer phenomena in fluids at supercritical pressure with the aid of CFD models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharabi, Medhat; Ambrosini, Walter

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses heat transfer enhancement and deterioration phenomena observed in experimental data for fluids at supercritical pressure. The results obtained by the application of various CFD turbulence models in the prediction of experimental data for water and carbon dioxide flowing in circular tubes are firstly described. On this basis, the capabilities of the addressed models in predicting the observed phenomena are shortly discussed. Then, the analysis focuses on further results obtained by a low-Reynolds number k - ε model addressing one of the considered experimental apparatuses by changing the operating conditions. In particular, the usual imposed heat flux boundary condition is changed to assigned wall temperature, in order to highlight effects otherwise impossible to point out. The obtained results, supported by considerations drawn from experimental information, allow comparing the trends observed for heat transfer deterioration at supercritical pressure with those typical of the thermal crisis in boiling systems, clarifying old concepts of similarity among them

  11. Properties of molecular solids and fluids at high pressures and temperatures. [Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etters, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Equilibrium structures and orientations, lattice vibrational and librational model frequencies, intramolecular vibron mode frequencies, sound velocities, equations of state, compressibilities, and structural and orientational phase transitions in molecular solids are determined over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. In the high temperature fluid phase the equations of state, vibron frequencies, the melting transition, specific heats, compressibilities, second virial coefficients, viscosities and other transport properties, and the nature of orientational and magnetic correlations are determined. The techniques used include several strategies to optimize multi-dimensional functions as a means to determine equilibrium structures and orientations, self consistent phonon lattice dynamics methods, constant pressure and constant volume Monte-Carlo strategies with continuously deformable boundary conditions, mean field approximations, and classical perturbation methods. Systems studied include N 2 , O 2 , CO, CO 2 , F 2 , N 2 O, benzine, nitromethane, HCL, HBr, and H 2 . 50 refs., 4 figs

  12. Assessing pharmacy students' ability to accurately measure blood pressure using a blood pressure simulator arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottenberg, Michelle M; Bryant, Ginelle A; Haack, Sally L; North, Andrew M

    2013-06-12

    To compare student accuracy in measuring normal and high blood pressures using a simulator arm. In this prospective, single-blind, study involving third-year pharmacy students, simulator arms were programmed with prespecified normal and high blood pressures. Students measured preset normal and high diastolic and systolic blood pressure using a crossover design. One hundred sixteen students completed both blood pressure measurements. There was a significant difference between the accuracy of high systolic blood pressure (HSBP) measurement and normal systolic blood pressure (NSBP) measurement (mean HSBP difference 8.4 ± 10.9 mmHg vs NSBP 3.6 ± 6.4 mmHg; pdifference between the accuracy of high diastolic blood pressure (HDBP) measurement and normal diastolic blood pressure (NDBP) measurement (mean HDBP difference 6.8 ± 9.6 mmHg vs. mean NDBP difference 4.6 ± 4.5 mmHg; p=0.089). Pharmacy students may need additional instruction and experience with taking high blood pressure measurements to ensure they are able to accurately assess this important vital sign.

  13. Assessing Pharmacy Students’ Ability to Accurately Measure Blood Pressure Using a Blood Pressure Simulator Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Ginelle A.; Haack, Sally L.; North, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare student accuracy in measuring normal and high blood pressures using a simulator arm. Methods. In this prospective, single-blind, study involving third-year pharmacy students, simulator arms were programmed with prespecified normal and high blood pressures. Students measured preset normal and high diastolic and systolic blood pressure using a crossover design. Results. One hundred sixteen students completed both blood pressure measurements. There was a significant difference between the accuracy of high systolic blood pressure (HSBP) measurement and normal systolic blood pressure (NSBP) measurement (mean HSBP difference 8.4 ± 10.9 mmHg vs NSBP 3.6 ± 6.4 mmHg; pdifference between the accuracy of high diastolic blood pressure (HDBP) measurement and normal diastolic blood pressure (NDBP) measurement (mean HDBP difference 6.8 ± 9.6 mmHg vs. mean NDBP difference 4.6 ± 4.5 mmHg; p=0.089). Conclusions. Pharmacy students may need additional instruction and experience with taking high blood pressure measurements to ensure they are able to accurately assess this important vital sign. PMID:23788809

  14. Measuring sub-bandage pressure: comparing the use of pressure monitors and pulse oximeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, A; Hayes, S; Dodds, S R

    2006-03-01

    To test the use of low-cost sub-bandage pressure monitors and pulse oximeters as part of a quality-control measure for graduated compression bandaging in leg ulcer clinics. Twenty-five healthy volunteers (mean age 40 years) providing 50 limbs were bandaged with a four-layer compression bandaging system. The ankle systolic pressure (ASP) was measured using a pulse oximeter (Nellcor NBP-40) before applying the graduated compression bandages. Interface pressure was measured by placing pressure sensors on the skin at three points (2cm above the medial malleolus; the widest part of the calf; and a point midway between them) in the supine and standing positions. The ASP was measured again with the pulse oximeter after the bandage had been applied, and the effect of the bandage on the ASP was recorded. The actual pressure created by the bandage was compared with the required pressure profile. Interface pressures varied with change of position and movement. With the operator blinded to the pressure monitors while applying the bandages, the target pressure of 35-40mmHg at the ankle was achieved in only 36% of limbs ([mean +/- 95% confidence interval]; 32.3 +/- 1.6mmHg [supine]; 38.4 +/- 2.4mmHg [standing position]). With the help of the pressure monitors, the target pressure was achieved in 78% of the limbs. There was no correlation between the pressure monitors and pulse oximeter pressures, demonstrating that the pulse oximeter is not a useful tool for measuring sub-bandage pressures. The results suggest a tool (interface pressure monitors) that is easy to operate should be available as part of quality assurance for treatment, training of care providers and education.

  15. An optical method for measuring exhaust gas pressure from an internal combustion engine at high speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Felix C P; Davy, Martin H; Siskin, Dmitrij; Pechstedt, Ralf; Richardson, David

    2017-12-01

    Measurement of exhaust gas pressure at high speed in an engine is important for engine efficiency, computational fluid dynamics analysis, and turbocharger matching. Currently used piezoresistive sensors are bulky, require cooling, and have limited lifetimes. A new sensor system uses an interferometric technique to measure pressure by measuring the size of an optical cavity, which varies with pressure due to movement of a diaphragm. This pressure measurement system has been used in gas turbine engines where the temperatures and pressures have no significant transients but has never been applied to an internal combustion engine before, an environment where both temperature and pressure can change rapidly. This sensor has been compared with a piezoresistive sensor representing the current state-of-the-art at three engine operating points corresponding to both light load and full load. The results show that the new sensor can match the measurements from the piezoresistive sensor except when there are fast temperature swings, so the latter part of the pressure during exhaust blowdown is only tracked with an offset. A modified sensor designed to compensate for these temperature effects is also tested. The new sensor has shown significant potential as a compact, durable sensor, which does not require external cooling.

  16. An optical method for measuring exhaust gas pressure from an internal combustion engine at high speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Felix C. P.; Davy, Martin H.; Siskin, Dmitrij; Pechstedt, Ralf; Richardson, David

    2017-12-01

    Measurement of exhaust gas pressure at high speed in an engine is important for engine efficiency, computational fluid dynamics analysis, and turbocharger matching. Currently used piezoresistive sensors are bulky, require cooling, and have limited lifetimes. A new sensor system uses an interferometric technique to measure pressure by measuring the size of an optical cavity, which varies with pressure due to movement of a diaphragm. This pressure measurement system has been used in gas turbine engines where the temperatures and pressures have no significant transients but has never been applied to an internal combustion engine before, an environment where both temperature and pressure can change rapidly. This sensor has been compared with a piezoresistive sensor representing the current state-of-the-art at three engine operating points corresponding to both light load and full load. The results show that the new sensor can match the measurements from the piezoresistive sensor except when there are fast temperature swings, so the latter part of the pressure during exhaust blowdown is only tracked with an offset. A modified sensor designed to compensate for these temperature effects is also tested. The new sensor has shown significant potential as a compact, durable sensor, which does not require external cooling.

  17. Pressure History Measurement in a Microwave Beaming Thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Ushio, Masato; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2006-01-01

    In a microwave beaming thruster with a 1-dimensional nozzle, plasma and shock wave propagates in the nozzle absorbing microwave power. In this study, pressure histories in the thruster are measured using pressure gauges. Measured pressure history at the thruster wall shows constant pressure during plasma propagation in the nozzle. The result of measurement of the propagating velocities of shock wave and plasma shows that both propagate in the same velocity. These result shows that thrust producing model of analogy of pulse detonation engine is successful for the 1D thruster

  18. Stroke Volume estimation using aortic pressure measurements and aortic cross sectional area: Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, S; Pretty, C G; Chiew, Y S; Pironet, A; Davidson, S; Desaive, T; Shaw, G M; Chase, J G

    2015-08-01

    Accurate Stroke Volume (SV) monitoring is essential for patient with cardiovascular dysfunction patients. However, direct SV measurements are not clinically feasible due to the highly invasive nature of measurement devices. Current devices for indirect monitoring of SV are shown to be inaccurate during sudden hemodynamic changes. This paper presents a novel SV estimation using readily available aortic pressure measurements and aortic cross sectional area, using data from a porcine experiment where medical interventions such as fluid replacement, dobutamine infusions, and recruitment maneuvers induced SV changes in a pig with circulatory shock. Measurement of left ventricular volume, proximal aortic pressure, and descending aortic pressure waveforms were made simultaneously during the experiment. From measured data, proximal aortic pressure was separated into reservoir and excess pressures. Beat-to-beat aortic characteristic impedance values were calculated using both aortic pressure measurements and an estimate of the aortic cross sectional area. SV was estimated using the calculated aortic characteristic impedance and excess component of the proximal aorta. The median difference between directly measured SV and estimated SV was -1.4ml with 95% limit of agreement +/- 6.6ml. This method demonstrates that SV can be accurately captured beat-to-beat during sudden changes in hemodynamic state. This novel SV estimation could enable improved cardiac and circulatory treatment in the critical care environment by titrating treatment to the effect on SV.

  19. Paleostress and fluid-pressure regimes inferred from the orientations of Hishikari low sulfidation epithermal gold veins in southern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Guillaume D.; Yamaji, Atsushi; Yonezu, Kotaro; Tindell, Thomas; Watanabe, Koichiro

    2018-05-01

    The orientation distribution of dilational fractures is affected by the state of stress around the fractures and by the pressure of the fluid that opened the fractures. Thus, the distribution can be inverted to determine not only the stress but also the pressure condition at the time of vein formation. However, epithermal ore veins that we observe today are the results of a great number of intermittent upwelling of overpressured fluids with different pressures. Here, we define driving pressure index (DPI) as the representative non-dimensionalized fluid pressure for the fluids. We collected the orientations of ∼1000 ore veins in the Hishikari gold mine, which were deposited at around 1 Ma, in southern Kyushu, Japan. It was found that the majority of the veins were deposited under an extensional stress with a NW-SE-trending σ3-axis and a northeasterly-inclined σ1-axis with relatively high stress ratio. The representative driving pressure ratio was ∼0.2. Data sets obtained at different depths in the mine indicated a positive correlation of representative driving pressure ratios with the depths. The correlation suggests repeated formation and break of pressure seals during the mineralization. Our compilation of the Pliocene-Quaternary stress regimes in southern Kyushu, including the result of the present study, suggests that epithermal gold mineralization was associated with distributed extensional deformations in southern Kyushu, and strain localization into an intra-arc rift seems to have terminated the mineralization.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Combustion Instability in Solid Rocket Motor : Implementation of Pressure Coupled Response Function

    OpenAIRE

    S. Saha; D. Chakraborty

    2016-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid propellant rocket motor is numerically simulated by implementing propellant response function with quasi steady homogeneous one dimensional formulation. The convolution integral of propellant response with pressure history is implemented through a user defined function in commercial computational fluid dynamics software. The methodology is validated against literature reported motor test and other simulation results. Computed amplitude of pressure fluctuations ...

  1. Numerical prediction of pressure loss of fluid in a T-junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulwahhab, Mohammed; Kumar Injeti, Niranjan [Department of Marin Engineering, Andhra University, AP (India); Fahad Dakhil, Sadoun [Department of Fuel and Energy, Basrah Technical College (Iraq)

    2013-07-01

    This work presents a prediction of pressure loss of fluid with turbulent incompressible flow through a 90° tee junction was carried out and compared with analytical and experimental results. One turbulence model was used in the numerical simulations: {kappa}-{epsilon} model for two different values of area ratio between the main pipe and the branch pipe were 1.0 and 4.0, and flow rate ratios. The continuity, momentum and energy equations were discredited by means of a finite volume technique and the SIMPLE algorithm scheme was applied to link the pressure and velocity fields inside the domain. A three dimensional steady state flow was solving by using CFX 5 code ANSYS FLUENT13. The effect of the flow rate ratio q (ratio between the flow rate in the branch and outlet pipes) on pressure drop and velocity profile was predicted at different Reynolds numbers. The results show that increasing the flow rate ratio the pressure and total energy losses increase because the presence of recirculation and the strong streamline curvature.

  2. Visualization and measurement of fluid phenomena using neutron radiography techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Hibiki, Takashi; Fujine, Shigenori; Yoneda, Kenji; Kanda, Keiji; Nishihara, Hideaki; Tsuruno, Akira; Matsubayashi, Masahito; Sobajima, Makoto; Ohtomo, Shoichi.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some of the results from recent work performed on the application of neutron radiography to visualization and measurement of fluid phenomena at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University. Experiments have been performed on the following subjects with use of the NR systems at the Japan Research Reactor 3 and the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute as well as the Kyoto University Research Reactor: air-water flow in rectangular ducts with 1.0 and 2.4 mm gaps, air-water flow and steam-water flow in a round tube with 4.0 mm inner diameter. The void fraction was measured by processing the images taken by the neutron radiography. The effect of several corrections in image processing was also discussed previously. It was shown that the proposed method could be useful in observing the flow regimes and measuring the void fraction of gas-liquid two-phase flow in narrow channels. (author)

  3. Fluid-structure interaction analysis for pressurizer surge line subjected to thermal stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Gu; Jhung, Myung Jo; Chang, Soon Heung

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Temperature of surge line due to stratified flow is defined using CFD analysis. → Fluid-structure interaction analysis is performed to investigate the response characteristics due to thermal stress. → Fatigue usage factors due to thermal stratification are relatively low. → Simplifying temperature distribution in surge line is not always conservative. - Abstract: Serious mechanical damages such as cracks and plastic deformations due to excessive thermal stress caused by thermal stratification have been experienced in several nuclear power plants. In particular, the thermal stratification in the pressurizer surge line has been addressed as one of the significant safety and technical issues. In this study, a detailed unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis involving conjugate heat transfer analysis is performed to obtain the transient temperature distributions in the wall of the pressurizer surge line subjected to stratified internal flows either during out-surge or in-surge operation. The thermal loads from CFD calculations are transferred to the structural analysis code which is employed for the thermal stress analysis to investigate the response characteristics, and the fatigue analysis is ultimately performed. In addition, the thermal stress and fatigue analysis results obtained by applying the realistic temperature distributions from CFD calculations are compared with those by assuming the simplified temperature distributions to identify some requirements for a realistic and conservative thermal stress analysis from a safety point of view.

  4. Development of a dual-sinker densimeter for high-accuracy fluid P-V-T measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLinden, M.O.; Frederick, N.V.

    1993-01-01

    A dual-sinker densimeter to very accurately measure the pressure-volume-temperature (P-V-T) properties of fluids over a temperature range of 80 K to 520 K and at pressures up to 35 MPa is in the final stages of development at NIST. The density of a fluid is determined by measuring the difference in the buoyancy forces experienced by two sinkers of identical mass, surface area, and surface material, but very different volumes. The buoyancy forces on the sinkers are transmitted to a semi-microbalance by means of a magnetic suspension coupling. This paper reviews the principle of the measurement and describes the overall design of the system

  5. Pressurized transient otoacoustic emissions measured using click and chirp stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas H; Patrick Feeney, M; Hunter, Lisa L; Fitzpatrick, Denis F; Sanford, Chris A

    2018-01-01

    Transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) responses were measured in normal-hearing adult ears over frequencies from 0.7 to 8 kHz, and analyzed with reflectance/admittance data to measure absorbed sound power and the tympanometric peak pressure (TPP). The mean TPP was close to ambient. TEOAEs were measured in the ear canal at ambient pressure, TPP, and fixed air pressures from 150 to -200 daPa. Both click and chirp stimuli were used to elicit TEOAEs, in which the incident sound pressure level was constant across frequency. TEOAE levels were similar at ambient and TPP, and for frequencies from 0.7 to 2.8 kHz decreased with increasing positive and negative pressures. At 4-8 kHz, TEOAE levels were larger at positive pressures. This asymmetry is possibly related to changes in mechanical transmission through the ossicular chain. The mean TEOAE group delay did not change with pressure, although small changes were observed in the mean instantaneous frequency and group spread. Chirp TEOAEs measured in an adult ear with Eustachian tube dysfunction and TPP of -165 daPa were more robust at TPP than at ambient. Overall, results demonstrate the feasibility and clinical potential of measuring TEOAEs at fixed pressures in the ear canal, which provide additional information relative to TEOAEs measured at ambient pressure.

  6. Innovations in plantar pressure and foot temperature measurements in diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Plantar pressure and temperature measurements in the diabetic foot primarily contribute to identifying abnormal values that increase risk for foot ulceration, and they are becoming increasingly more integrated in clinical practice and daily life of the patient. While plantar pressure measurements

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamic Pressure Drop Estimation of Flow between Parallel Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hyung Min; Yang, Soo Hyung; Park, Jong Hark [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Many pool type reactors have forced downward flows inside the core during normal operation; there is a chance of flow inversion when transients occur. During this phase, the flow undergo transition between turbulent and laminar regions where drastic changes take place in terms of momentum and heat transfer, and the decrease in safety margin is usually observed. Additionally, for high Prandtl number fluids such as water, an effect of the velocity profile inside the channel on the temperature distribution is more pronounced over the low Prandtl number ones. This makes the checking of its pressure drop estimation accuracy less important, assuming the code verification is complete. With an advent of powerful computer hardware, engineering applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have become quite common these days. Especially for a fully-turbulent and single phase convective heat transfer, the predictability of the commercial codes has matured enough so that many well-known companies adopt those to accelerate a product development cycle and to realize an increased profitability. In contrast to the above, the transition models for the CFD code are still under development, and the most of the models show limited generality and prediction accuracy. Unlike the system codes, the CFD codes estimate the pressure drop from the velocity profile which is obtained by solving momentum conservation equations, and the resulting friction factor can be a representative parameter for a constant cross section channel flow. In addition, the flow inside a rectangular channel with a high span to gap ratio can be approximated by flow inside parallel plates. The computational fluid dynamics simulation on the flow between parallel plates showed reasonable prediction capability for the laminar and the turbulent regime.

  8. Experimental density and viscosity measurements of di(2ethylhexyl)sebacate at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, Xavier; Fandino, Olivia; Pensado, Alfonso S.; Comunas, Maria J.P.; Fernandez, Josefa

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → We measure viscosities for di(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate from (298.15 to 398.15) K and up to 60 MPa. → We measure densities for DEHS from (298.15 to 373.15) K and from (0.1 to 60) MPa. → The reported and lit. data were used in a viscosity correlation from (273 to 491) K and up to 1.1 GPa. → This correlation could be used in industrial equipment that operate at high pressures. - Abstract: Experimental densities and dynamic viscosities of di(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate (DEHS) are the object of study in this work. DEHS could be a useful industrial reference fluid for moderately high viscosity at high pressures as it is often used as a pressure transmitting fluid. At atmospheric pressure the density and viscosity measurements have been performed in a rotational SVM 3000 Stabinger viscometer from (273.15 to 373.15) K, whereas from (0.1 to 60) MPa and from (298.15 to 398.15) K an automated Anton Paar DMA HPM vibrating-tube densimeter, and a high-pressure rolling-ball viscometer were used. Several Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann type equations were used to fit the experimental values of viscosity to the pressure and temperature. The measured viscosity data have been used together with previous data found in the literature to establish a correlation of the viscosity surface η(T, p) of DEHS, covering a temperature range from (273 to 491) K and pressure up to 1.1 GPa. This correlation could be used in industrial equipment like viscometers and other devices that operate at high pressures. Our viscosity data have also been fitted as a function of temperature and volume to the thermodynamic scaling model of Roland et al. [C.M. Roland, S. Bair, R. Casalini, J. Chem. Phys. 125 (2006) 124508].

  9. Fluid Micro-Reservoirs Array Design with Auto-Pressure Regulation for High-Speed 3D Printers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Einat

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional (3D printing technology is rapidly evolving such that printing speed is now a crucial factor in technological developments and future applications. For printing heads based on the inkjet concept, the number of nozzles on the print head is a limiting factor of printing speed. This paper offers a method to practically increase the number of nozzles unlimitedly, and thus to dramatically ramp up printing speed. Fluid reservoirs are used in inkjet print heads to supply fluid through a manifold to the jetting chambers. The pressure in the reservoir’s outlet is important and influences device performance. Many efforts have been made to regulate pressure inside the fluid reservoirs so as to obtain a constant pressure in the chambers. When the number of nozzles is increased too much, the regulation of uniform pressure among all the nozzles becomes too complicated. In this paper, a different approach is taken. The reservoir is divided into an array of many micro-reservoirs. Each micro-reservoir supports one or a few chambers, and has a unique structure with auto-pressure regulation, where the outlet pressure is independent of the fluid level. The regulation is based on auto-compensation of the gravity force and a capillary force having the same dependence on the fluid level; this feature is obtained by adding a wedge in the reservoir with a unique shape. When the fluid level drops, the gravitational force and the capillary force decrease with it, but at similar rates. Terms for the force balance are derived and, consequently, a constant pressure in the fluid micro-reservoir segment is obtained automatically, with each segment being autonomous. This micro reservoir array is suggested for the enlargement of an inkjet print head and the achievement of high-speed 3D printing.

  10. Differential Intracochlear Sound Pressure Measurements in Normal Human Temporal Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.; Merchant, Saumil N.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2009-02-01

    We present the first simultaneous sound pressure measurements in scala vestibuli and scala tympani of the cochlea in human cadaveric temporal bones. Micro-scale fiberoptic pressure sensors enabled the study of differential sound pressure at the cochlear base. This differential pressure is the input to the cochlear partition, driving cochlear waves and auditory transduction. Results showed that: pressure of scala vestibuli was much greater than scala tympani except at low and high frequencies where scala tympani pressure affects the input to the cochlea; the differential pressure proved to be an excellent measure of normal ossicular transduction of sound (shown to decrease 30-50 dB with ossicular disarticulation, whereas the individual scala pressures were significantly affected by non-ossicular conduction of sound at high frequencies); the middle-ear gain and differential pressure were generally bandpass in frequency dependence; and the middle-ear delay in the human was over twice that of the gerbil. Concurrent stapes velocity measurements allowed determination of the differential impedance across the partition and round-window impedance. The differential impedance was generally resistive, while the round-window impedance was consistent with a compliance in conjunction with distributed inertia and damping. Our techniques can be used to study inner-ear conductive pathologies (e.g., semicircular dehiscence), as well as non-ossicular cochlear stimulation (e.g., round-window stimulation) - situations that cannot be completely quantified by measurements of stapes velocity or scala-vestibuli pressure by themselves.

  11. Full scale measurement of wind induced pressures : 1 configuration of wind induced pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, C.P.W.; Wijen, H.L.M.

    1994-01-01

    A research project 10 the spectral characteristics of wind induced pressures is in progress in Eindhoven. This project includes both wind tunnel and full scale measurements. Wind induced pressures are measured in full scale at the main building of Eindhoven University of Technology. This paper

  12. The optimal scheme of self blood pressure measurement as determined from ambulatory blood pressure recordings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberk, Willem J.; Kroon, Abraham A.; Kessels, Alfons G. H.; Lenders, Jacques W. M.; Thien, Theo; van Montfrans, Gert A.; Smit, Andries J.; de Leeuw, Peter W.

    Objective To determine how many self-measurements of blood pressure (BP) should be taken at home in order to obtain a reliable estimate of a patient's BP. Design Participants performed self blood pressure measurement (SBPM) for 7 days (triplicate morning and evening readings). In all of them, office

  13. Velocity-pressure correlation measurements in complex free shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naka, Yoshitsugu; Obi, Shinnosuke

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of fluctuating velocity and pressure were performed in various turbulent free shear flows including a turbulent mixing layer and the wing-tip vortex trailing from a NACA0012 half-wing. Two different methods for fluctuating static pressure measurement were considered: a direct method using a miniature Pitot tube and an indirect method where static pressure was calculated from total pressure. The pressure obtained by either of these methods was correlated with the velocity measured by an X-type hot-wire probe. The results from these two techniques agreed with each other in the turbulent mixing layer. In the wing-tip vortex case, however, some discrepancies were found, although overall characteristics of the pressure-related statistics were adequately captured by both methods.

  14. Modern gas-based temperature and pressure measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pavese, Franco

    2013-01-01

    This 2nd edition volume of Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements follows the first publication in 1992. It collects a much larger set of information, reference data, and bibliography in temperature and pressure metrology of gaseous substances, including the physical-chemical issues related to gaseous substances. The book provides solutions to practical applications where gases are used in different thermodynamic conditions. Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements, 2nd edition is the only comprehensive survey of methods for pressure measurement in gaseous media used in the medium-to-low pressure range closely connected with thermometry. It assembles current information on thermometry and manometry that involve the use of gaseous substances which are likely to be valid methods for the future. As such, it is an important resource for the researcher. This edition is updated through the very latest scientific and technical developments of gas-based temperature and pressure measurem...

  15. Intraocular pressure measurement in patients with previous LASIK surgery using pressure phosphene tonometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Arthur C K; Leung, Dexter Y L; Cheung, Eva Y Y; Fan, Dorothy S P; Law, Ricky W K; Lam, Dennis S C

    2005-04-01

    To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) assessment in post-LASIK patients using non-contact tonometry, pressure phosphene tonometry and applanation tonometry. Sixty-two consecutive LASIK patients were analysed preoperatively and postoperatively with non-contact, pressure phosphene and applanation tonometry. Comparisons among these values were assessed with paired sample Student t-test, Pearson's correlation test and Bland-Altman plotting. There was no significant difference for preoperative IOP measurement between non-contact, pressure phosphene and applanation tonometry. The mean +/-SD difference between the preoperative non-contact tonometry and postoperative pressure phosphene tonometry IOP measurements was 0.80 +/- 2.77 mmHg (P contact tonometry significantly underestimated IOP measurement by 9.96 +/- 2.25 mmHg (P < 0.001). Pressure phosphene tonometry may provide an alternative method for the assessment of IOP in post-LASIK patients.

  16. Pressurized fluid extraction of essential oil from Lavandula hybrida using a modified supercritical fluid extractor and a central composite design for optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Hossein; Jalilvand, Mohammad Reza; Aminimoghadamfarouj, Noushin

    2012-06-01

    Essential oil components were extracted from lavandin (Lavandula hybrida) flowers using pressurized fluid extraction. A central composite design was used to optimize the effective extraction variables. The chemical composition of extracted samples was analyzed by a gas chromatograph-flame ionization detector column. For achieving 100% extraction yield, the temperature, pressure, extraction time, and the solvent flow rate were adjusted at 90.6°C, 63 bar, 30.4 min, and 0.2 mL/min, respectively. The results showed that pressurized fluid extraction is a practical technique for separation of constituents such as 1,8-cineole (8.1%), linalool (34.1%), linalyl acetate (30.5%), and camphor (7.3%) from lavandin to be applied in the food, fragrance, pharmaceutical, and natural biocides industries. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Measurements of the Exerted Pressure by Pelvic Circumferential Compression Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knops, Simon P; van Riel, Marcel P.J.M; Goossens, Richard H.M; van Lieshout, Esther M.M; Patka, Peter; Schipper, Inger B

    2010-01-01

    Background: Data on the efficacy and safety of non-invasive Pelvic Circumferential Compression Devices (PCCDs) is limited. Tissue damage may occur if a continuous pressure on the skin exceeding 9.3 kPa is sustained for more than two or three hours. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the pressure build-up at the interface, by measuring the PCCD-induced pressure when applying pulling forces to three different PCCDs (Pelvic Binder® , SAM-Sling ® and T-POD® ) in a simplified model. Methods: The resulting exerted pressures were measured at four ‘anatomical’ locations (right, left, posterior and anterior) in a model using a pressure measurement system consisting of pressure cuffs. Results: The exerted pressure varied substantially between the locations as well as between the PCCDs. Maximum pressures ranged from 18.9-23.3 kPa and from 19.2-27.5 kPa at the right location and left location, respectively. Pressures at the posterior location stayed below 18 kPa. At the anterior location pressures varied markedly between the different PCCDs. Conclusion: The circumferential compression by the different PCCDs showed high pressures measured at the four locations using a simplified model. Difference in design and functional characteristics of the PCCDs resulted in different pressure build-up at the four locations. When following the manufacturer’s instructions, the exerted pressure of all three PCCDs tested exceeded the tissue damaging level (9.3 kPa). In case of prolonged use in a clinical situation this might put patients at risk for developing tissue damage. PMID:20361001

  18. Optimization and simulation of tandem column supercritical fluid chromatography separations using column back pressure as a unique parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlei; Tymiak, Adrienne A; Zhang, Yingru

    2014-04-15

    Tandem column supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) has demonstrated to be a useful technique to resolve complex mixtures by serially coupling two columns of different selectivity. The overall selectivity of a tandem column separation is the retention time weighted average of selectivity from each coupled column. Currently, the method development merely relies on extensive screenings and is often a hit-or-miss process. No attention is paid to independently adjust retention and selectivity contributions from individual columns. In this study, we show how tandem column SFC selectivity can be optimized by changing relative dimensions (length or inner diameter) of the coupled columns. Moreover, we apply column back pressure as a unique parameter for SFC optimization. Continuous tuning of tandem column SFC selectivity is illustrated through column back pressure adjustments of the upstream column, for the first time. In addition, we show how and why changing coupling order of the columns can produce dramatically different separations. Using the empirical mathematical equation derived in our previous study, we also demonstrate a simulation of tandem column separations based on a single retention time measurement on each column. The simulation compares well with experimental results and correctly predicts column order and back pressure effects on the separations. Finally, considerations on instrument and column hardware requirements are discussed.

  19. [Comparison of invasive blood pressure measurement in the aorta with indirect oscillometric blood pressure measurement at the wrist and forearm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, F; Aristidou, Y; Klaus, D; Wiemeyer, A; Lösse, B

    1995-09-01

    Indirectly measured blood pressure at the wrist or upper arm was compared with directly measured values in the aortic arch during routinely performed diagnostic cardiac catheterization in 100 patients (31-80 years, mean 59.3 years, 60% males). The noninvasive measurements were carried out by oscillometric devices, NAiS Blood Pressure Watch for measurements at the wrist, and Hestia OZ80 at the upper arm. Systolic blood pressure measured at the wrist was 4.3 +/- 14.1 mm Hg, and the diastolic value 6.0 +/- 8.9 mm Hg higher than when measured at the aortic arch; the difference was significant in both cases. Correlation coefficients were 0.85 for systolic and 0.71 for diastolic blood pressure. In 16% of the patients the systolic blood pressure at the wrist differed more than +/- 20 mm Hg. The diastolic blood pressure at the wrist measured more than +/- 20 mm Hg higher than in the aorta in 5% of the patients. At the upper arm mean systolic values were not different to the aorta. The diastolic pressure was 9.3 +/- 9.8 mm Hg higher in the aorta than at the upper arm. To verify the accuracy of values measured with the NAiS Blood Pressure Watch compared with the standard technique at the upper arm, sequential measurements were made at wrist and ipsilateral upper arm in the same group of 100 patients. The systolic blood pressure at the left wrist was 3.4 +/- 13.3 mm Hg higher and the diastolic pressure 3.8 +/- 9.5 mm Hg lower than at the upper arm. Only 53% of systolic values lay within a range of +/- 10 mm Hg. The correspondence between wrist and upper arm values was better for diastolic blood pressure, the values differing by less than +/- 10 mm Hg in two-thirds of patients. Self-measurement of arterial blood pressure with an oscillometric device at the wrist can be recommended only in individual cases with a difference of simultaneously measured values at the upper arm of less than +/- 10 mm Hg for systolic and diastolic blood pressures. The standard method for indirectly

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulation of Single Bubble Growth under High-Pressure Pool Boiling Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janani Murallidharan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Component-scale modeling of boiling is predominantly based on the Eulerian–Eulerian two-fluid approach. Within this framework, wall boiling is accounted for via the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI model and, within this model, the bubble is characterized using three main parameters: departure diameter (D, nucleation site density (N, and departure frequency (f. Typically, the magnitudes of these three parameters are obtained from empirical correlations. However, in recent years, efforts have been directed toward mechanistic modeling of the boiling process. Of the three parameters mentioned above, the departure diameter (D is least affected by the intrinsic uncertainties of the nucleate boiling process. This feature, along with its prominence within the RPI boiling model, has made it the primary candidate for mechanistic modeling ventures. Mechanistic modeling of D is mostly carried out through solving of force balance equations on the bubble. Forces incorporated in these equations are formulated as functions of the radius of the bubble and have been developed for, and applied to, low-pressure conditions only. Conversely, for high-pressure conditions, no mechanistic information is available regarding the growth rates of bubbles and the forces acting on them. In this study, we use direct numerical simulation coupled with an interface tracking method to simulate bubble growth under high (up to 45 bar pressure, to obtain the kind of mechanistic information required for an RPI-type approach. In this study, we compare the resulting bubble growth rate curves with predictions made with existing experimental data.

  1. The relationship between elevated interstitial fluid pressure and blood flow in tumors: a bioengineering analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, Michael F.; Fyles, Anthony W.; Hill, Richard P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the hypothesis that elevated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is a cause of reduced blood flow in tumors. Materials and Methods: A physiologic model of tumor blood flow was developed based on a semipermeable, compliant capillary in the center of a spherical tumor. The model incorporates the interaction between the tumor vasculature and the interstitium, as mediated by IFP. It also incorporates the dynamic behavior of the capillary wall in response to changes in transmural pressure, and the effect of viscosity on blood flow. Results: The model predicted elevated tumor IFP in the range of 0 to 56 mmHg. The capillary diameter in the setting of elevated IFP was greatest at the arterial end, and constricted to between 3.2 and 4.4 μm at the venous end. This corresponded to a 2.4- to 3.5-fold reduction in diameter along the length of the capillary. The IFP exceeded the intravascular pressure distally in the capillary, but vascular collapse did not occur. Capillary diameter constriction resulted in a 2.3- to 9.1-fold steady-state reduction in tumor blood flow relative to a state of near-zero IFP. Conclusion: The results suggest that steady-state vascular constriction occurs in the setting of elevated IFP, and leads to reduced tumor blood flow. This may in turn contribute to the development of hypoxia, which is an important cause of radiation treatment failure in many tumors

  2. Measurements of mixtures with carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions using commercial high pressure equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Luciana L.P.R. de; Rutledge, Luis Augusto Medeiros; Moreno, Eesteban L.; Hovell, Ian; Rajagopal, Krishnaswamy [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (LATCA-EQ-UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica. Lab. de Termodinamica e Cinetica Aplicada

    2012-07-01

    There is a growing interest in studying physical properties of binary and multicomponent fluid mixtures with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) over an extended range of temperature and pressure. The estimation of properties such as density, viscosity, saturation pressure, compressibility, solubility and surface tension of mixtures is important in design, operation and control as well as optimization of chemical processes especially in extractions, separations, catalytic and enzymatic reactions. The phase behaviour of binary and multicomponent mixtures with supercritical CO{sub 2} is also important in the production and refining of petroleum where mixtures of paraffin, naphthene and aromatics with supercritical fluids are often encountered. Petroleum fluids can present a complex phase behaviour in the presence of CO{sub 2}, where two-phase (VLE and LLE) and three phase regions (VLLE) might occur within ranges of supercritical conditions of temperature and pressure. The objective of this study is to develop an experimental methodology for measuring the phase behaviour of mixtures containing CO{sub 2} in supercritical regions, using commercial high-pressure equipment. (author)

  3. Equation-of-state for fluids at high densities-hydrogen isotope measurements and thermodynamic derivations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebenberg, D.H.; Mills, R.L.; Bronson, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes play an important role in energy technologies, in particular, the compression to high densities for initiation of controlled thermonuclear fusion energy. At high densities the properties of the compressed hydrogen isotopes depart drastically from ideal thermodynamic predictions. The measurement of accurate data including the author's own recent measurements of n-H 2 and n-D 2 in the range 75 to 300 K and 0.2 to 2.0 GPa (2 to 20 kbar) is reviewed. An equation-of-state of the Benedict type is fit to these data with a double-process least-squares computer program. The results are reviewed and compared with existing data and with a variety of theoretical work reported for fluid hydrogens. A new heuristic correlation is presented for simplicity in predicting volumes and sound velocity at high pressures. 9 figures, 1 table

  4. Comparison of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and office blood pressure measurements in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, Rahime

    2018-04-01

    Obesity in adults has been related to hypertension and abnormal nocturnal dipping of blood pressure, which are associated with poor cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Here, we aimed to resolve the relationship between the degree of obesity, the severity of hypertension and dipping status on ambulatory blood pressure in obese children. A total 72 patients with primary obesity aged 7 to 18 years (mean: 13.48 ± 3.25) were selected. Patients were divided into three groups based on body mass index (BMİ) Z-score. Diagnosis and staging of ambulatory hypertension based on 24-h blood pressure measurements, obtained from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Based on our ambulatory blood pressure data, 35 patients (48.6%) had hypertension, 7 (20%) had ambulatory prehypertension, 21 (60%) had hypertension, and 7 patients (20%) had severe ambulatory hypertension. There was a significant relationship between severity of hypertension and the degree of obesity (p lood pressure results and loads were similar between groups. Diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure levels during the night, diastolic blood pressure loads, and heart rate during the day were significantly higher in Group 3 (p lood pressure at night, mean arterial pressure at night, diastolic blood pressure loads and heart rate at day. Increase in BMI Z-score does not a significant impact on daytime blood pressure and nocturnal dipping status.

  5. On axial temperature gradients due to large pressure drops in dense fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate, Sam O; Berger, Terry A

    2015-03-13

    The effect of energy degradation (Degradation is the creation of net entropy resulting from irreversibility.) accompanying pressure drops across chromatographic columns is examined with regard to explaining axial temperature gradients in both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The observed effects of warming and cooling can be explained equally well in the language of thermodynamics or fluid dynamics. The necessary equivalence of these treatments is reviewed here to show the legitimacy of using whichever one supports the simpler determination of features of interest. The determination of temperature profiles in columns by direct application of the laws of thermodynamics is somewhat simpler than applying them indirectly by solving the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. Both disciplines show that the preferred strategy for minimizing the reduction in peak quality caused by temperature gradients is to operate columns as nearly adiabatically as possible (i.e. as Joule-Thomson expansions). This useful fact, however, is not widely familiar or appreciated in the chromatography community due to some misunderstanding of the meaning of certain terms and expressions used in these disciplines. In fluid dynamics, the terms "resistive heating" or "frictional heating" have been widely used as synonyms for the dissipation function, Φ, in the NS energy equation. These terms have been widely used by chromatographers as well, but often misinterpreted as due to friction between the mobile phase and the column packing, when in fact Φ describes the increase in entropy of the system (dissipation, ∫TdSuniv>0) due to the irreversible decompression of the mobile phase. Two distinctly different contributions to the irreversibility are identified; (1) ΔSext, viscous dissipation of work done by the external surroundings driving the flow (the pump) contributing to its warming, and (2) ΔSint, entropy change accompanying decompression of

  6. Electrochemical noise measurements under pressurized water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R.

    2000-01-01

    Electrochemical potential noise measurements on sensitized stainless steel pressure tubes under pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions were performed for the first time. Very short potential spikes, believed to be associated to crack initiation events, were detected when stressing the sample above the yield strength and increased in magnitude until the sample broke. Sudden increases of plastic deformation, as induced by an increased tube pressure, resulted in slower, high-amplitude potential transients, often accompanied by a reduction in noise level

  7. Using pressure square-like wave to measure the dynamic characteristics of piezoelectric pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, L-L; Tsung, T-T; Chen, L-C; Chang Ho; Jwo, C-S

    2005-01-01

    Piezoelectric pressure sensors are commonly used to measuring the dynamic characteristics in a hydraulic system. The dynamic measurements require a pressure sensor which has a high response rate. In this paper, we proposed use of a pressure square wave to excite the piezoelectric pressure sensor. Experimental frequencies are 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 kHz at 10, 15, 20 bar, respectively. Results show that the waveform of time-domain and frequencydomain response are quite different under above testing conditions. The higher the frequencies tested, the faster the pressure-rise speeds obtained. Similarly, the higher the testing pressure, the shorter the rise time attained

  8. [Invasive arterial blood pressure measurement using an aneroid pressure system in cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosing, M; Franz, S; Iff, I; Schwendenwein, I

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results of invasive arterial blood pressure measurement using an electronic pressure transducer (EPT) or an aneroid pressure system (APS) in cattle. A catheter was placed in the auricular artery of 11 adult cattle and connected to a pressure transducer via pressure line. The aneroid system was connected to the same catheter using a three-way stop-cock in the pressure line. On five occasions three consecutive measurements were performed with the APS. The mean blood pressure values of the EPT were recorded before each individual measurement. Values from each device were compared using Passing and Bablok regression of agreement and a Bland and Altman difference plot. One hundred and forty-seven paired measurements were analysed. The average bias between the two methods (EPT vs. APS) was -1.6 mmHg (95 % confidence interval [CI]: -3.0 to -0.2 mmHg). The coefficient of correlation was 1.0084. The aneroid system showed an almost perfect agreement with the EPT. This study shows that it can be used in a clinical setting as well as under field conditions to measure arterial blood pressure in cattle.

  9. A note on measurement of sound pressure with intensity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter; Jacobsen, Finn

    2004-01-01

    be improved under a variety of realistic sound field conditions by applying a different weighting of the two pressure signals from the probe. The improved intensity probe can measure the sound pressure more accurately at high frequencies than an ordinary sound intensity probe or an ordinary sound level meter......The effect of scattering and diffraction on measurement of sound pressure with "two-microphone" sound intensity probes is examined using an axisymmetric boundary element model of the probe. Whereas it has been shown a few years ago that the sound intensity estimated with a two-microphone probe...... is reliable up to 10 kHz when using 0.5 in. microphones in the usual face-to-face arrangement separated by a 12 mm spacer, the sound pressure measured with the same instrument will typically be underestimated at high frequencies. It is shown in this paper that the estimate of the sound pressure can...

  10. TREATMENT OF HYPERTENSION USING TELEMEDICAL HOME BLOOD PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Petersen, N; Lauritzen, T; Bech, J N

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Telemonitoring of home blood pressure measurements (TBPM) is a new and promising supplement to diagnosis, control and treatment of hypertension. We wanted to compare the outcome of antihypertensive treatment based on TBPM and conventional monitoring of blood pressure. DESIGN AND METHOD...... of the measurements and subsequent communication by telephone or E-mail. In the control group, patients received usual care. Primary outcome was reduction in daytime ambulatory blood pressure measurements (ABPM) from baseline to 3 months' follow-up. RESULTS: In both groups, daytime ABPM decreased significantly....../181), p = 0.34. Blood pressure reduction in the TBPM group varied with the different practices. CONCLUSIONS: No further reduction in ABPM or number of patients reaching blood pressure targets was observed when electronic transmission of TBPM was applied in the treatment of hypertension by GPs. Thus...

  11. Blood pressure measurement: one arm or both arm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Prasad K; Shekhar, Susheela; Reddy, B N; Nirmala, B C

    2011-09-01

    Guidelines for measuring blood pressure includes measurement of blood pressure on both arms but it is often ignored. Our case report aims at highlighting the need follow the guidelines. A 60 year old 59 kg weighing male asymptomatic patient without any comobidities was posted for bilateral inguinal hernia repair. The interarm blood pressure difference was discovered incidentally during his preanaesthetic evalution. On further evaluation patient was found to be having subclavian stenosis on left side which was asymptomatic. Intraoperative and post operative period was uneventful. Blood pressure measurement should be done in accordance with the stipulated guidelines. Inter arm blood pressure difference should be noted in all patients as not only for diagnosis and treatment of hypertension but also as a tool to diagnose asymptomatic peripheral vascular disesase.

  12. Pico gauges for minimally invasive intracellular hydrostatic pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, Jan; Mullendore, Daniel L.; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pressure has a multitude of functions in cells surrounded by a cell wall or similar matrix in all kingdoms of life. The functions include cell growth, nastic movements, and penetration of tissue by parasites. The precise measurement of intracellular pressure in the majority of cells......, however, remains difficult or impossible due to their small size and/or sensitivity to manipulation. Here, we report on a method that allows precise measurements in basically any cell type over all ranges of pressure. It is based on the compression of nanoliter and picoliter volumes of oil entrapped...... in the tip of microcapillaries, which we call pico gauges. The production of pico gauges can be accomplished with standard laboratory equipment, and measurements are comparably easy to conduct. Example pressure measurements are performed on cells that are difficult or impossible to measure with other methods....

  13. Avoidance of Pressure Oscillations in Discrete Fluid Power Systems with Transmission Lines - An Analytical Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Hedegaard; Pedersen, Henrik C.

    2014-01-01

    Discrete fluid power technology attracts great attention because it enables energy efficiency and robust system architectures. However, the discrete nature of this technology naturally brings shifting phenomenons into the picture. For fluid power system the relative high inductance of fluid...

  14. A research program: The investigation of heat transfer and fluid flow at low pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Philbin, Jeffrey S.; Foushee, Fabian C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a multiyear joint research program being conducted at the University of New Mexico (UNM) with support from Sandia National Laboratories and GA Technologies. This research focuses on heat removal and fluid dynamics in flow regimes characterized by low pressure and low Reynolds number. The program was motivated by a desire to characterize and analyze cooling in a broad class of TRIGA-type reactors under: a) typical operating conditions, b) anticipated, new operating regimes, and c) postulated accident conditions. It has also provided experimental verification of analytical tools used in design analysis. The paper includes descriptions of the UNM thermal-hydraulics test facility and the experimental test sections. During the first two years experiments were conducted using single, electrically heated rod in water and air annuli. This configuration provides an observable and serviceable simulation of a fuel rod and its coolant channel. (author)

  15. Small-Scale Metal Tanks for High Pressure Storage of Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Adam (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Small scale metal tanks for high-pressure storage of fluids having tank factors of more than 5000 meters and volumes of ten cubic inches or less featuring arrays of interconnected internal chambers having at least inner walls thinner than gage limitations allow. The chambers may be arranged as multiple internal independent vessels. Walls of chambers that are also portions of external tank walls may be arcuate on the internal and/or external surfaces, including domed. The tanks may be shaped adaptively and/or conformally to an application, including, for example, having one or more flat outer walls and/or having an annular shape. The tanks may have dual-purpose inlet/outlet conduits of may have separate inlet and outlet conduits. The tanks are made by fusion bonding etched metal foil layers patterned from slices of a CAD model of the tank. The fusion bonded foil stack may be further machined.

  16. Stroke volume variation compared with pulse pressure variation and cardiac index changes for prediction of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa Aly Soliman

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Baseline stroke volume variation ⩾8.15% predicted fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with acute circulatory failure. The study also confirmed the ability of pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness.

  17. Prediction of wall friction for fluids at supercritical pressure with CFD models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelucci, M.; Ambrosini, W.; Forgione, N.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the STAR-CCM+ CFD code is used in the attempt to reproduce the values of friction factor observed in experimental data at supercritical pressures at various operating conditions. A short survey of available data and correlations for smooth pipe friction in circular pipes puts the basis for the discussion, reporting observed trends of friction factor in the liquid-like and the gas-like regions and within the transitional region around the pseudo-critical temperature. For smooth pipes, a general decrease of the friction factor in the transitional region is reported, constituting one of the relevant effects to be predicted by the computational fluid-dynamic models. A limited number of low-Reynolds number models is adopted, making use of refined near-wall discretisations as required by the constraint y + < 1 at the wall. In particular, the Lien k-ε and the SST k-ω models are considered. The values of the wall shear stress calculated by the code are then post-processed on the basis of bulk fluid properties to obtain the Fanning and then the Darcy-Weisbach friction factors, basing on their classical definitions. The obtained values are compared with those provided by experimental tests and correlations, finding a reasonable qualitative agreement. Expectedly, the agreement is better in the gas-like and liquid-like regions, where fluid property changes are moderate, than in the transitional region, where the trends provided by available correlations are reproduced only in a qualitative way. (author)

  18. Maximum respiratory pressure measuring system : calibration and evaluation of uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, J.L.; Pereira, N.C.; Oliveira Júnior, M.; Vasconcelos, F.H.; Parreira, V.F.; Tierra-Criollo, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a methodology for the evaluation of uncertainties in the measurements results obtained during the calibration of a digital manovacuometer prototype (DM) with a load cell sensor pressure device incorporated. Calibration curves were obtained for both pressure

  19. Definition-consistent measurement of exchange market pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, F.; Jager, H.

    2011-01-01

    Currencies can be under severe pressure, but in a managed exchange rate regime that is not fully visible via the change in the exchange rate. The literature has proposed a way to measure such exchange market pressure (EMP) indirectly, by adding interest rate changes and forex interventions to the

  20. Blood pressure self-measurement in the obstetric waiting room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stefan; Kamper, Christina H.; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg

    2013-01-01

    a reliable blood pressure reading. Results: We found that the patients did not adhere to given instructions when performing blood pressure self-measurement in the waiting room. None of the 81 patients adhered to all six inves- tigated recommendations, while around a quarter adhered to five out of six...

  1. New Technique of Direct Intra-abdominal Pressure Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Risin

    2006-10-01

    Conclusion: Direct measurement of intra-abdominal pressure using 14-Fr PVC round drain is a newly described technique that is simple, fast and credible. Future investigation will be needed to confirm the reliability of this method during postoperative follow-up of intra-abdominal pressures in selected patients.

  2. Gain measurements in CO2 CW low pressure lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, N.A.S.; Chanes Junior, J.B.; Jayaram, K.

    1983-01-01

    A series of gain measurements in low pressure CO 2 CW laser were performed in order to study the behaviour of a CO 2 laser ampliflier as a function of pressure and discharge current. A theoretical model, based on rate equations is also presented to describe the laser behaviour and the experimental procedure adopted. (C.L.B.) [pt

  3. Interstitial hydraulic conductivity and interstitial fluid pressure for avascular or poorly vascularized tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L J; Schlesinger, M

    2015-09-07

    A correct description of the hydraulic conductivity is essential for determining the actual tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) distribution. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the hydraulic conductivities both in a tumor and normal tissue are constant, and that a tumor has a much larger interstitial hydraulic conductivity than normal tissue. The abrupt transition of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface leads to non-physical results (the hydraulic conductivity and the slope of the TIFP are not continuous at tumor surface). For the sake of simplicity and the need to represent reality, we focus our analysis on avascular or poorly vascularized tumors, which have a necrosis that is mostly in the center and vascularization that is mostly on the periphery. We suggest that there is an intermediary region between the tumor surface and normal tissue. Through this region, the interstitium (including the structure and composition of solid components and interstitial fluid) transitions from tumor to normal tissue. This process also causes the hydraulic conductivity to do the same. We introduce a continuous variation of the hydraulic conductivity, and show that the interstitial hydraulic conductivity in the intermediary region should be monotonically increasing up to the value of hydraulic conductivity in the normal tissue in order for the model to correspond to the actual TIFP distribution. The value of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface should be the lowest in value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of ascitic fluid hydrostatic pressure on albumin extravasation rate in patients with cirrhosis of the liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Parving, H H; Christiansen, Lasse

    1981-01-01

    Overall transvascular escape rate of albumin [TERalb, i.e. the fraction of intravascular mass of albumin (IVMalb) passing to the extravascular space per unit time] was determined from the disappearance of i.v. injected radioiodinated serum albumin. Patients with tense ascites due to liver cirrhosis...... and pigs with posthepatic portal hypertension and intraperitoneally instilled fluid were studied before and after abdominal paracentesis in order to evaluate the effect of ascitic fluid hydrostatic pressure on the transvascular escape rate of albumin. TERalb of the ascitic patients (n = 6) were on average......, TERalb rose significantly to an average of 24.3% IVMalb.h-1. The increased albumin extravasation rate after removal of ascites is best explained by an increased sinusoidal-tissue pressure difference caused by a decreased hydrostatic fluid pressure in the liver interstitium (portal and subcapsular spaces...

  5. Unified fluid flow model for pressure transient analysis in naturally fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, Petro; Azaiez, Jalel

    2015-01-01

    Naturally fractured reservoirs present special challenges for flow modeling with regards to their internal geometrical structure. The shape and distribution of matrix porous blocks and the geometry of fractures play key roles in the formulation of transient interporosity flow models. Although these models have been formulated for several typical geometries of the fracture networks, they appeared to be very dissimilar for different shapes of matrix blocks, and their analysis presents many technical challenges. The aim of this paper is to derive and analyze a unified approach to transient interporosity flow models for slightly compressible fluids that can be used for any matrix geometry and fracture network. A unified fractional differential transient interporosity flow model is derived using asymptotic analysis for singularly perturbed problems with small parameters arising from the assumption of a much smaller permeability of the matrix blocks compared to that of the fractures. This methodology allowed us to unify existing transient interporosity flow models formulated for different shapes of matrix blocks including bounded matrix blocks, unbounded matrix cylinders with any orthogonal crossection, and matrix slabs. The model is formulated using a fractional order diffusion equation for fluid pressure that involves Caputo derivative of order 1/2 with respect to time. Analysis of the unified fractional derivative model revealed that the surface area-to-volume ratio is the key parameter in the description of the flow through naturally fractured media. Expressions of this parameter are presented for matrix blocks of the same geometrical shape as well as combinations of different shapes with constant and random sizes. Numerical comparisons between the predictions of the unified model and those obtained from existing transient interporosity ones for matrix blocks in the form of slabs, spheres and cylinders are presented for linear, radial and spherical flow types for

  6. Non-invasive measurements of pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation in anesthetized patients using the Nexfin blood pressure monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stens, Jurre; Oeben, Jeroen; Van Dusseldorp, Ab A; Boer, Christa

    2016-10-01

    Nexfin beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure monitoring enables continuous assessment of hemodynamic indices like cardiac index (CI), pulse pressure variation (PPV) and stroke volume variation (SVV) in the perioperative setting. In this study we investigated whether Nexfin adequately reflects alterations in these hemodynamic parameters during a provoked fluid shift in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated patients. The study included 54 patients undergoing non-thoracic surgery with positive pressure mechanical ventilation. The provoked fluid shift comprised 15° Trendelenburg positioning, and fluid responsiveness was defined as a concomitant increase in stroke volume (SV) >10 %. Nexfin blood pressure measurements were performed during supine steady state, Trendelenburg and supine repositioning. Hemodynamic parameters included arterial blood pressure (MAP), CI, PPV and SVV. Trendelenburg positioning did not affect MAP or CI, but induced a decrease in PPV and SVV by 3.3 ± 2.8 and 3.4 ± 2.7 %, respectively. PPV and SVV returned back to baseline values after repositioning of the patient to baseline. Bland-Altman analysis of SVV and PPV showed a bias of -0.3 ± 3.0 % with limits of agreement ranging from -5.6 to 6.2 %. The SVV was more superior in predicting fluid responsiveness (AUC 0.728) than the PVV (AUC 0.636), respectively. The median bias between PPV and SVV was different for patients younger [-1.5 % (-3 to 0)] or older [+2 % (0-4.75)] than 55 years (P < 0.001), while there were no gender differences in the bias between PPV and SVV. The Nexfin monitor adequately reflects alterations in PPV and SVV during a provoked fluid shift, but the level of agreement between PPV and SVV was low. The SVV tended to be superior over PPV or Eadyn in predicting fluid responsiveness in our population.

  7. Automatic noninvasive measurement of systolic blood pressure using photoplethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glik Zehava

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automatic measurement of arterial blood pressure is important, but the available commercial automatic blood pressure meters, mostly based on oscillometry, are of low accuracy. Methods In this study, we present a cuff-based technique for automatic measurement of systolic blood pressure, based on photoplethysmographic signals measured simultaneously in fingers of both hands. After inflating the pressure cuff to a level above systolic blood pressure in a relatively slow rate, it is slowly deflated. The cuff pressure for which the photoplethysmographic signal reappeared during the deflation of the pressure-cuff was taken as the systolic blood pressure. The algorithm for the detection of the photoplethysmographic signal involves: (1 determination of the time-segments in which the photoplethysmographic signal distal to the cuff is expected to appear, utilizing the photoplethysmographic signal in the free hand, and (2 discrimination between random fluctuations and photoplethysmographic pattern. The detected pulses in the time-segments were identified as photoplethysmographic pulses if they met two criteria, based on the pulse waveform and on the correlation between the signal in each segment and the signal in the two neighboring segments. Results Comparison of the photoplethysmographic-based automatic technique to sphygmomanometry, the reference standard, shows that the standard deviation of their differences was 3.7 mmHg. For subjects with systolic blood pressure above 130 mmHg the standard deviation was even lower, 2.9 mmHg. These values are much lower than the 8 mmHg value imposed by AAMI standard for automatic blood pressure meters. Conclusion The photoplethysmographic-based technique for automatic measurement of systolic blood pressure, and the algorithm which was presented in this study, seems to be accurate.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid clearance in Alzheimer disease measured with dynamic PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Leon, Mony J.; Li, Yi; Okamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Evidence supporting the hypothesis that reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD) comes primarily from rodent models. However, unlike rodents, in which predominant extracranial CSF egress is via olfactory nerves traversing the cribrif......Evidence supporting the hypothesis that reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD) comes primarily from rodent models. However, unlike rodents, in which predominant extracranial CSF egress is via olfactory nerves traversing...

  9. Means and Method for Measurement of Drilling Fluid Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysyannikov, A.; Kondrashov, P.; Pavlova, P.

    2016-06-01

    The paper addresses the problem on creation of a new design of the device for determining rheological parameters of drilling fluids and the basic requirements which it must meet. The key quantitative parameters that define the developed device are provided. The algorithm of determining the coefficient of the yield point from the rheological Shvedov- Bingam model at a relative speed of rotation of glasses from the investigated drilling fluid of 300 and 600 rpm is presented.

  10. Development of a Blood Pressure Measurement Instrument with Active Cuff Pressure Control Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsien Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an oscillometric blood pressure (BP measurement approach based on the active control schemes of cuff pressure. Compared with conventional electronic BP instruments, the novelty of the proposed BP measurement approach is to utilize a variable volume chamber which actively and stably alters the cuff pressure during inflating or deflating cycles. The variable volume chamber is operated with a closed-loop pressure control scheme, and it is activated by controlling the piston position of a single-acting cylinder driven by a screw motor. Therefore, the variable volume chamber could significantly eliminate the air turbulence disturbance during the air injection stage when compared to an air pump mechanism. Furthermore, the proposed active BP measurement approach is capable of measuring BP characteristics, including systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP, during the inflating cycle. Two modes of air injection measurement (AIM and accurate dual-way measurement (ADM were proposed. According to the healthy subject experiment results, AIM reduced 34.21% and ADM reduced 15.78% of the measurement time when compared to a commercial BP monitor. Furthermore, the ADM performed much consistently (i.e., less standard deviation in the measurements when compared to a commercial BP monitor.

  11. Home blood pressure measurement in elderly patients with cognitive impairment: comparison of agreement between relative-measured blood pressure and automated blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plichart, Matthieu; Seux, Marie-Laure; Caillard, Laure; Chaussade, Edouard; Vidal, Jean-Sébastien; Boully, Clémence; Hanon, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    Home blood pressure measurement (HBPM) is recommended by guidelines for hypertension management. However, this method might be difficult to use in elderly individuals with cognitive disorders. Our aim was to assess the agreement and the feasibility of HBPM by a relative as compared with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in elderly patients with dementia. Sixty outpatients with dementia aged 75 years and older with office hypertension (≥140/90 mmHg) were subjected successively to HBPM by a trained relative and 24-h ABPM. The order of the two methods was randomized. Current guidelines' thresholds for the diagnosis of hypertension were used. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 80.8 (6.1) years (55% women) and the mean (SD) mini-mental state examination score was 20.1 (6.9). The feasibility of relative-HBPM was very high, with a 97% success rate (defined by ≥12/18 measurements reported). The blood pressure measurements were highly correlated between the two methods (r=0.75 and 0.64 for systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, respectively; Pmethods for the diagnosis of sustained hypertension and white-coat hypertension was excellent (overall agreement, 92%; κ coefficient, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.61-0.93). Similar results were found for daytime-ABPM. In cognitively impaired elderly patients, HBPM by a relative using an automated device was a good alternative to 24-h ABPM.

  12. Pressure fluctuations induced by fluid flow in singular points of industrial circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, R.J.; Villard, B.

    1977-01-01

    Flow singularities (enlargements, bards, valves, tees,...) generate in the circuits of industrial plants wall pressure fluctuations which are the main cause of vibration. Two types of pressure fluctuations can be considered. - 'Local ' fluctuations: They are associated to the unsteadiness downstream from the singularity. These fluctuations may be characterized by frequency spectra, correlation length and phase lags. These parameters are used to calculate forces on the walls of the circuit. - 'Acoustic' fluctuations: The singularity acts as an acoustical source; its frequency spectrum and the acoustical transfer function of the circuit are needed to evaluate the acoustical level at any point. A methodical study of the most current singularities has been performed at C.E.A./D.E.M.T.: - On one hand a theory of noise generation by unsteady flow in internal acoustics has been developed. This theory uses the basic idea initiated by LIGHTILL. As a result it is shown that the plane wave propagation is a valid assumption and that a singularity can be acoustically modelled by a pressure and a mass-flow-rate discontinuities. Both are random functions of time, the spectra of which are determined from the local fluctuations characteristics. - On the other hand, characteristics of several singularities have been measured: (i) Intercorrelation spectra of local pressure fluctuations. (ii) Autocorrelation spectra of associated acoustical sources (the measure of the acoustical pressures in the experimental circuit are interpreted by using the D.E.M.T. computer code VIBRAPHONE which gives the acoustical response of a complex circuit). (Auth.)

  13. Cardiovascular fluid dynamics. Methods for flow and pressure field analysis from magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbers, T.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular blood flow is highly complex and incompletely understood. Blood flow patterns are expected to influence the opening and closing of normal and prosthetic heart valves, the efficiency of cardiac filling and ejection, and the resistance to thrombus formation within the heart. Conventional diagnostic techniques are poorly suited to the study of the three-dimensional (3D) blood flow patterns in the heart chambers and large vessels. Noninvasive methods have also been inadequate in studying intracardiac pressure differences, which are the driving force of flow and are critical in the evaluation of many cardiovascular abnormalities. This thesis focuses on the development of non-invasive methods for analysis of 3D cardiovascular blood flow. Simultaneous study of cardiovascular fluid dynamics allowed knowledge exchange across the two disciplines, facilitating the development process and broadening the applicability of the methods. A time-resolved 3D phase-contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique was used to acquire the velocity vector field in a 3D volume encompassing the entire heart or a large vessel. Cardiovascular blood flow patterns were visualized by use of particle traces, which revealed, for instance, vortical flow patterns in the left atrium. By applying the Navier-Stokes equation along a user-defined line in the 3D velocity vector field, the relative pressure could be obtained as an excellent supplement to the flow pattern visualization. Using a delineation of the blood pool, the time-varying 3D relative pressure field in the human left ventricle was obtained from the velocity field by use of the pressure Poisson equation. A delineation of the heart muscle, a task that is almost impossible to perform on 3D MRI either automatically or manually, was also achieved by usage of particle traces. This segmentation allows automatic calculation of the 3D relative pressure field, as well as calculation of well-established parameters such as

  14. Cardiovascular fluid dynamics. Methods for flow and pressure field analysis from magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbers, T

    2001-05-01

    Cardiovascular blood flow is highly complex and incompletely understood. Blood flow patterns are expected to influence the opening and closing of normal and prosthetic heart valves, the efficiency of cardiac filling and ejection, and the resistance to thrombus formation within the heart. Conventional diagnostic techniques are poorly suited to the study of the three-dimensional (3D) blood flow patterns in the heart chambers and large vessels. Noninvasive methods have also been inadequate in studying intracardiac pressure differences, which are the driving force of flow and are critical in the evaluation of many cardiovascular abnormalities. This thesis focuses on the development of non-invasive methods for analysis of 3D cardiovascular blood flow. Simultaneous study of cardiovascular fluid dynamics allowed knowledge exchange across the two disciplines, facilitating the development process and broadening the applicability of the methods. A time-resolved 3D phase-contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique was used to acquire the velocity vector field in a 3D volume encompassing the entire heart or a large vessel. Cardiovascular blood flow patterns were visualized by use of particle traces, which revealed, for instance, vortical flow patterns in the left atrium. By applying the Navier-Stokes equation along a user-defined line in the 3D velocity vector field, the relative pressure could be obtained as an excellent supplement to the flow pattern visualization. Using a delineation of the blood pool, the time-varying 3D relative pressure field in the human left ventricle was obtained from the velocity field by use of the pressure Poisson equation. A delineation of the heart muscle, a task that is almost impossible to perform on 3D MRI either automatically or manually, was also achieved by usage of particle traces. This segmentation allows automatic calculation of the 3D relative pressure field, as well as calculation of well-established parameters such as

  15. Non-invasive measurement of pressure gradients using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Traberg, Marie Sand; Pihl, Michael Johannes

    2013-01-01

    for isotropic fluids to the estimated velocity fields. The velocity fields were measured for a steady flow on a carotid bifurcation phantom (Shelley Medical, Canada) with a 70% constriction on the internal branch. Scanning was performed with a BK8670 linear transducer (BK Medical, Denmark) connected to a BK...

  16. Thermopower measurement under high pressure using 'seesaw heating method'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedo, M; Nakamura, D; Takaesu, Y; Yagasaki, K; Nakama, T; Fujiwara, T; Uchima, K

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a set-up with modified 'seesaw heating method' for the thermopower measurement under pressures P up to 3 GPa at the temperature range between 2 K and 300 K. By using this set-up, the thermopower and electrical resistivity of the single crystalline YbMn 2 Ge 2 under high pressure were measured with enough accuracy. S(T) curve shows the characteristic feature at the magnetic transition in all pressure range, while no evidence of the magnetic phase transition is observed in ρ(T) at P > 1.25 GPa. The measurement results indicate that the simultaneous measurement of the thermopower and electrical resistivity is a useful tool to study the pressure-induced phase transitions.

  17. Radiation Pressure Measurements on Micron-Size Individual Dust Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Witherow, W. K.; West, E. A.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.; Fishman, G. J.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic radiation pressure have been made on individual silica (SiO2) particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance. These measurements were made by inserting single charged particles of known diameter in the 0.2- to 6.82-micron range and irradiating them from above with laser radiation focused to beam widths of approximately 175- 400 microns at ambient pressures particle due to the radiation force is balanced by the electrostatic force indicated by the compensating dc potential applied to the balance electrodes, providing a direct measure of the radiation force on the levitated particle. Theoretical calculations of the radiation pressure with a least-squares fit to the measured data yield the radiation pressure efficiencies of the particles, and comparisons with Mie scattering theory calculations provide the imaginary part of the refractive index of SiO2 and the corresponding extinction and scattering efficiencies.

  18. Measurement of the differential pressure of liquid metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, H.J.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to an improved means for measuring the differential pressure between any two points in a process liquid metal coolant loop, wherein the flow of liquid metal in a pipe is opposed by a permanent magnet liquid metal pump until there is almost zero flow shown by a magnetic type flowmeter. The pressure producing the liquid metal flow is inferred from the rate of rotation of the permanent magnet pump. In an alternate embodiment, a differential pressure transducer is coupled to a process pipeline by means of high-temperature bellows or diaphragm seals, and a permanent magnet liquid metal pump in the high-pressure transmission line to the pressure transducer can be utilized either for calibration of the transducer or for determining the process differential pressure as a function of the magnet pump speed. (auth)

  19. Measurement of the differential pressure of liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved means for measuring the differential pressure between any two points in a process liquid metal coolant loop, wherein the flow of liquid metal in a pipe is opposed by a permanent magnet liquid metal pump until there is almost zero flow shown by a magnetic type flowmeter. The pressure producing the liquid metal flow is inferred from the rate of rotation of the permanent magnet pump. In an alternate embodiment, a differential pressure transducer is coupled to a process pipeline by means of high-temperature bellows or diaphragm seals, and a permanent magnet liquid metal pump in the high-pressure transmission line to the pressure transducer can be utilized either for calibration of the transducer or for determining the process differential pressure as a function of the magnet pump speed

  20. Aluminum speciation in aqueous fluids at deep crustal pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookherjee, Mainak; Keppler, Hans; Manning, Craig E.

    2014-05-01

    We investigated aluminum speciation in aqueous fluids in equilibrium with corundum using in situ Raman spectroscopy in hydrothermal diamond anvil cells to 20 kbar and 1000 °C. We have studied aluminum species in (a) pure H2O, (b) 5.3 m KOH solution, and (c) 1 m KOH solution. In order to better understand the spectral features of the aqueous fluids, we used ab initio simulations based on density functional theory to calculate and predict the energetics and vibrational spectra for various aluminum species that are likely to be present in aqueous solutions. The Raman spectra of pure water in equilibrium with Al2O3 are devoid of any characteristic spectral features. In contrast, aqueous fluids with 5.3 m and 1 m KOH solution in equilibrium with Al2O3 show a sharp band at ˜620 cm-1 which could be attributed to the [ species. The band grows in intensity with temperature along an isochore. A shoulder on the high-frequency side of this band may be due to a hydrated, charge neutral Al(OH)3·H2O species. In the limited pressure, temperature and density explored in the present study, we do not find any evidence for the polymerization of the [ species to dimers [(OH)2-Al-(OH)2-Al(OH)2] or [(OH)3-Al-O-Al(OH)3]2-. This is likely due to the relatively low concentration of Al in the solutions and does not rule out significant polymerization at higher pressures and temperatures. Upon cooling of Al-bearing solutions to room temperatures, Raman bands indicating the precipitation of diaspore (AlOOH) were observed in some experiments. The Raman spectra of the KOH solutions (with or without dissolved alumina) showed a sharp OH stretching band at ˜3614 cm-1 and an in-plane OH bending vibration at ˜1068 cm-1, likely related to an OH- ion with the oxygen atom attached to a water molecule by hydrogen bonding. A weak feature at ˜935 cm-1 may be related to the out-of-plane bending vibration of the same species or to an OH species with a different environment.

  1. Stability analysis of fluid at supercritical pressure in a heated channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallaway, T.; Podowski, M. Z.

    2010-01-01

    The Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) is one of several reactor design concepts included in the Generation IV International Advanced Reactor Design Program. This reactor design is based upon current light water reactors and supercritical fossil-fuel power plants. Water at supercritical pressures is used as the reactor coolant. At these conditions, there is no phase change in the coolant; however the fluid properties undergo significant variation, particularly in the pseudo-critical region. The fluid density may decrease by a factor of six with increasing temperature. It has been seen before that variations in fluid density can lead to density-wave oscillations in two-phase flow systems in general and boiling water reactors in particular. Such instabilities may cause many undesired problems for reactor operation and safety. Similar issues must be addressed in the design and safety analysis of SCWRs. The objective of the present work has been the development of a detailed one-dimensional model of instabilities in a heated channel corresponding to the geometry and flow conditions in the proposed typical SCWRs. The new model is capable of analyzing in detail transient effects of local property variations in parallel channels subject to a constant pressure drop boundary condition. In particular, such a model can be used to establish SCWR power limits imposed by the onset of instabilities in the hot channel of the reactor. Both time and frequency-domain methods of stability analysis have been developed. The latter method is particularly important since it is not associated with any numerical issues, is very accurate, and allows for establishing general stability boundaries in a computationally effective manner. Model testing has included a study of dependence of the proposed spatial discretization scheme on the accuracy of calculations. A parametric study has also been performed on the effect of channel operating conditions on flow oscillations. Finally, a stability map

  2. Magnetic particle translation as a surrogate measure for synovial fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Yash Y; Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena; Patel, Neal S; Biedrzycki, Adam H; Yarmola, Elena G; Dobson, Jon; Rinaldi, Carlos; Allen, Kyle D

    2017-07-26

    The mechanics of synovial fluid vary with disease progression, but are difficult to quantify quickly in a clinical setting due to small sample volumes. In this study, a novel technique to measure synovial fluid mechanics using magnetic nanoparticles is introduced. Briefly, microspheres embedded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, termed magnetic particles, are distributed through a 100μL synovial fluid sample. Then, a permanent magnet inside a protective sheath is inserted into the synovial fluid sample. Magnetic particles translate toward the permanent magnet and the percentage of magnetic particles collected by the magnet in a given time can be related to synovial fluid viscosity. To validate this relationship, magnetic particle translation was demonstrated in three phases. First, magnetic particle translation was assessed in glycerol solutions with known viscosities, demonstrating that as fluid viscosity increased, magnetic particle translation decreased. Next, the relationship between magnetic particle translation and synovial fluid viscosity was assessed using bovine synovial fluid that was progressively degenerated via ultrasonication. Here, particle collection in a given amount of time increased as fluid degenerated, demonstrating that the relationship between particle collection and fluid mechanics holds in non-Newtonian synovial fluid. Finally, magnetic particle translation was used to assess differences between healthy and OA affected joints in equine synovial fluid. Here, particle collection in a given time was higher in OA joints relative to healthy horses (pfluid mechanics in limited volumes of synovial fluid sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of SSME alternate high pressure fuel turbopump lift-off seal fluid and structural dynamic interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, David A.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate turbopump development program (ATD) high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) design utilizes an innovative lift-off seal (LOS) design that is located in close proximity to the turbine end bearing. Cooling flow exiting the bearing passes through the lift-off seal during steady state operation. The potential for fluid excitation of lift-off seal structural resonances is investigated. No fluid excitation of LOS resonances is predicted. However, if predicted LOS natural frequencies are significantly lowered by the presence of the coolant, pressure oscillations caused by synchronous whirl of the HPFTP rotor may excite a resonance.

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Clearance in Alzheimer Disease Measured with Dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Mony J; Li, Yi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Tsui, Wai H; Saint-Louis, Les A; Glodzik, Lidia; Osorio, Ricardo S; Fortea, Juan; Butler, Tracy; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Fossati, Silvia; Kim, Hee-Jin; Carare, Roxana O; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Rusinek, Henry

    2017-09-01

    Evidence supporting the hypothesis that reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD) comes primarily from rodent models. However, unlike rodents, in which predominant extracranial CSF egress is via olfactory nerves traversing the cribriform plate, human CSF clearance pathways are not well characterized. Dynamic PET with 18 F-THK5117, a tracer for tau pathology, was used to estimate the ventricular CSF time-activity as a biomarker for CSF clearance. We tested 3 hypotheses: extracranial CSF is detected at the superior turbinates; CSF clearance is reduced in AD; and CSF clearance is inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Methods: Fifteen subjects, 8 with AD and 7 normal control volunteers, were examined with 18 F-THK5117. Ten subjects additionally underwent 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B ( 11 C-PiB) PET scanning, and 8 were 11 C-PiB-positive. Ventricular time-activity curves of 18 F-THK5117 were used to identify highly correlated time-activity curves from extracranial voxels. Results: For all subjects, the greatest density of CSF-positive extracranial voxels was in the nasal turbinates. Tracer concentration analyses validated the superior nasal turbinate CSF signal intensity. AD patients showed ventricular tracer clearance reduced by 23% and 66% fewer superior turbinate CSF egress sites. Ventricular CSF clearance was inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Conclusion: The human nasal turbinate is part of the CSF clearance system. Lateral ventricle and superior nasal turbinate CSF clearance abnormalities are found in AD. Ventricular CSF clearance reductions are associated with increased brain amyloid depositions. These data suggest that PET-measured CSF clearance is a biomarker of potential interest in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  5. Pressure and Relative Humidity Measurement Devices for Mars 2020 Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieta, M.; Genzer, M.; Nikkanen, T.; Haukka, H.; Harri, A.-M.; Polkko, J.; Rodriguez-Manfredi, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    One of the scientific payloads onboard the NASA Mars 2020 rover mission is Mars Environmental Dynamic Analyzer (MEDA): a set of environmental sensors for Mars surface weather measurements. Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) provides a pressure measurement device (MEDA PS) and a relative humidity measurement device (MEDA HS) for MEDA.

  6. Blood pressure measurements in the ankle are not equivalent to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Blood pressure (BP) is often measured on the ankle in the emergency department (ED), but this has never been shown to be an acceptable alternative to measurements performed on the arm. Objective. To establish whether the differences between arm and ankle non-invasive BP measurements were clinically ...

  7. TMX-U neutral pressure measurement diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickles, W.L.; Allen, S.L.; Hill, D.N.; Hunt, A.L.; Simonen, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) has a large and complex system of Baird Alpert, magnetron, and Penning gauges, in addition to mass spectrometers (RGA), all of which measure neutral pressures in the many internal regions of TMX-U. These pressure measurements are used as part of the confinement physics data base as well as for management of the TMX-U vacuum system. Dynamic pressures are modeled by a coupled-volumes simulation code, which includes wall reflus, getter pumping, and plasma pumping

  8. A human cadaver fascial compartment pressure measurement model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Frank C; Cooper, Dylan; Huffman, Gretchen; Bartkus, Edward; Wilbur, Lee

    2013-10-01

    Fresh human cadavers provide an effective model for procedural training. Currently, there are no realistic models to teach fascial compartment pressure measurement. We created a human cadaver fascial compartment pressure measurement model and studied its feasibility with a pre-post design. Three faculty members, following instructions from a common procedure textbook, used a standard handheld intra-compartment pressure monitor (Stryker(®), Kalamazoo, MI) to measure baseline pressures ("unembalmed") in the anterior, lateral, deep posterior, and superficial posterior compartments of the lower legs of a fresh human cadaver. The right femoral artery was then identified by superficial dissection, cannulated distally towards the lower leg, and connected to a standard embalming machine. After a 5-min infusion, the same three faculty members re-measured pressures ("embalmed") of the same compartments on the cannulated right leg. Unembalmed and embalmed readings for each compartment, and baseline readings for each leg, were compared using a two-sided paired t-test. The mean baseline compartment pressures did not differ between the right and left legs. Using the embalming machine, compartment pressure readings increased significantly over baseline for three of four fascial compartments; all in mm Hg (±SD): anterior from 40 (±9) to 143 (±44) (p = 0.08); lateral from 22 (±2.5) to 160 (±4.3) (p cadaver using a standard embalming machine. Set-up is minimal and the model can be incorporated into teaching curricula. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dehydration studies using a novel multichamber microscale fluid bed dryer with in-line near-infrared measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räsänen, Eetu; Rantanen, Jukka; Mannermaa, Jukka-Pekka

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effect of two process parameters (temperature and moisture content) on dehydration behavior of different materials using a novel multichamber microscale fluid bed dryer with a process air control unit and in-line near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy....... The materials studied were disodium hydrogen phosphates with three different levels of hydrate water and wet theophylline granules. Measured process parameters of fluid bed drying were logged, including in-line NIR signals. Off-line analyses consisted of X-ray powder diffraction patterns, Fourier transform NIR...... spectra and moisture contents of studied materials. During fluid bed drying, the stepwise dehydration of materials was observed by the water content difference of inlet and outlet air, the pressure difference over the bed, and the in-line NIR spectroscopy. The off-line analysis confirmed the state...

  10. Pore Characterization of Shale Rock and Shale Interaction with Fluids at Reservoir Pressure-Temperature Conditions Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M.; Hjelm, R.; Watkins, E.; Xu, H.; Pawar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Oil/gas produced from unconventional reservoirs has become strategically important for the US domestic energy independence. In unconventional realm, hydrocarbons are generated and stored in nanopores media ranging from a few to hundreds of nanometers. Fundamental knowledge of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes that control fluid flow and propagation within nano-pore confinement is critical for maximizing unconventional oil/gas production. The size and confinement of the nanometer pores creates many complex rock-fluid interface interactions. It is imperative to promote innovative experimental studies to decipher physical and chemical processes at the nanopore scale that govern hydrocarbon generation and mass transport of hydrocarbon mixtures in tight shale and other low permeability formations at reservoir pressure-temperature conditions. We have carried out laboratory investigations exploring quantitative relationship between pore characteristics of the Wolfcamp shale from Western Texas and the shale interaction with fluids at reservoir P-T conditions using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). We have performed SANS measurements of the shale rock in single fluid (e.g., H2O and D2O) and multifluid (CH4/(30% H2O+70% D2O)) systems at various pressures up to 20000 psi and temperature up to 150 oF. Figure 1 shows our SANS data at different pressures with H2O as the pressure medium. Our data analysis using IRENA software suggests that the principal changes of pore volume in the shale occurred on smaller than 50 nm pores and pressure at 5000 psi (Figure 2). Our results also suggest that with increasing P, more water flows into pores; with decreasing P, water is retained in the pores.

  11. Use of an Ethanol-Driven Pressure Cell to Measure Hydrostatic Pressure Response of Protein-Stabilized Gold Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ARL-TR-7577 ● JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Use of an Ethanol-Driven Pressure Cell to Measure Hydrostatic Pressure ...ARL-TR-7577 ● JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Use of an Ethanol-Driven Pressure Cell to Measure Hydrostatic Pressure Response of...DATES COVERED (From - To) May 2014–September 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Use of an Ethanol-Driven Pressure Cell to Measure Hydrostatic Pressure

  12. Study and modeling of fluctuating fluid forces exerted on fuel rods in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, Saptarshi

    2016-01-01

    Flow-induced vibrations in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core can cause fretting wear in the fuel rods. Due to friction, wear occurs at the contact locations between the spacer grid and the fuel rod. This could compromise the first safety barrier of the nuclear reactor by damaging the fuel rod cladding. In order to ensure the integrity of the cladding, it is necessary to know the random fluctuating forces acting on the rods. However, the spectra for these fluid forces are not well known. The goal of this PhD thesis was to use simple geometrical elements to check the reproducibility of realistic pressurized water reactor spacer grids. As a first step, large eddy simulations were performed on a concentric annular pipe for different mesh refinements using the CFD code Trio CFD (previously Trio U) developed by CEA. A mesh sensitivity study was performed to obtain an acceptable mesh for reproducing standard literature results. This information on mesh resolution was used when carrying out simulations using various geometric obstacles inside the pipe, namely, mixing vanes, circular spacer grid and a combination of square spacer grid with mixing vanes. The last of the three configurations is the closest to a realistic PWR fuel assembly. Structured mesh was generated for the annular pipe case and circular grid case. An innovative hybrid mesh was used for the two remaining cases of the mixing vanes and the square grid: keeping unstructured mesh around the obstacles and structured mesh in the rest of the domain. The inner wall of the domain was representative of the fuel rod cladding. Both hydraulic and wall pressure characteristics were analyzed for each case. The results for the square grid case were found to be an approximate combination of the mixing vane case and circular grid case. Simulation results were compared with experiments performed at CEA Cadarache. Some preliminary comparisons were also made with classical semi-empirical models. (author) [fr

  13. Model for the radionuclide measurement of ascitic fluid volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, W.D.; Davis, M.A.; Uren, R.F.; Wisotsky, T.; LaTegola, M.

    1978-01-01

    Technetium-99m phytate colloids formed in vitro and in vivo were examined as radioindicators for estimation of the volume of third-space fluid in an ovarian ascites model using C3HeB/FeJ mice. In double-label experiments, the accuracy of the colloids for dilution analysis was found to be equal or superior to that of I-125 HSA. Sampling times 3 to 5 min after intraperitoneal administration were found to produce the best volume estimates. Four needle-stopcock assemblies inserted sequentially into the quadrants of the peritoneal cavity were used for administration and sampling of the radioindicators. The stopcocks could be closed to prevent leakage of ascitic fluid during the procedure. In contrast to radiolabeled albumin, Tc-99m phytate colloids have clinical use for simultaneous imaging of radiotracer migration to assess potential occlusion of diaphragmatic lymphatics by neoplastic cells, and for dilution analysis to estimate volume of ascitic fluid

  14. Hepatic venous pressure gradients measured by duplex ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasu, J.-P.; Rocher, L.; Peletier, G.; Kuoch, V.; Kulh, E.; Miquel, A.; Buffet, C.; Biery, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: The hepatic venous pressure gradient is a major prognostic factor in portal hypertension but its measurement is complex and requires invasive angiography. This study investigated the relationship between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and a number of Doppler measurements, including the arterial acceleration index. METHOD: We measured the hepatic venous pressure gradient in 50 fasting patients at hepatic venography. Immediately afterwards, a duplex sonographic examination of the liver was performed at which multiple measurements and indices of the venous and arterial hepatic vasculature were made. RESULTS: Hepatic arterial acceleration was correlated directly with the hepatic venous pressure gradient (r = 0.83, P -2 provided a positive predictive value of 95%, a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 95% for detecting patients with severe portal hypertension (hepatic venous pressure gradient > 12 mmHg). A correlation between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and the congestion index of the portal vein velocity (r = 0.45,P = 0.01) and portal vein velocity (r = 0.40,P = 0.044), was also noted. CONCLUSION: Measuring the hepatic arterial acceleration index may help in the non-invasive evaluation of portal hypertension. Tasu, J.-P. et al. (2002)

  15. Hepatic venous pressure gradients measured by duplex ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasu, J.-P.; Rocher, L.; Peletier, G.; Kuoch, V.; Kulh, E.; Miquel, A.; Buffet, C.; Biery, M

    2002-08-01

    AIMS: The hepatic venous pressure gradient is a major prognostic factor in portal hypertension but its measurement is complex and requires invasive angiography. This study investigated the relationship between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and a number of Doppler measurements, including the arterial acceleration index. METHOD: We measured the hepatic venous pressure gradient in 50 fasting patients at hepatic venography. Immediately afterwards, a duplex sonographic examination of the liver was performed at which multiple measurements and indices of the venous and arterial hepatic vasculature were made. RESULTS: Hepatic arterial acceleration was correlated directly with the hepatic venous pressure gradient (r = 0.83, P < 0.0001) and with the Child-Pugh score (r = 0.63, P < 0.0001). An acceleration index cut-off value of 1 m.s{sup -2} provided a positive predictive value of 95%, a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 95% for detecting patients with severe portal hypertension (hepatic venous pressure gradient > 12 mmHg). A correlation between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and the congestion index of the portal vein velocity (r = 0.45,P = 0.01) and portal vein velocity (r = 0.40,P = 0.044), was also noted. CONCLUSION: Measuring the hepatic arterial acceleration index may help in the non-invasive evaluation of portal hypertension. Tasu, J.-P. et al. (2002)

  16. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Siewenie, Joan [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Xu, Hongwu [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Zhu, Jinlong [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154, USA and National Lab for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Page, Katharine, E-mail: pagekl@ornl.gov [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO{sub 2} measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H{sub 2} and natural gas uptake/storage.

  17. Variability of computational fluid dynamics solutions for pressure and flow in a giant aneurysm: the ASME 2012 Summer Bioengineering Conference CFD Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, David A; Hoi, Yiemeng; Fahy, Paul; Morris, Liam; Walsh, Michael T; Aristokleous, Nicolas; Anayiotos, Andreas S; Papaharilaou, Yannis; Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C; Berg, Philipp; Janiga, Gábor; Bols, Joris; Segers, Patrick; Bressloff, Neil W; Cibis, Merih; Gijsen, Frank H; Cito, Salvatore; Pallarés, Jordi; Browne, Leonard D; Costelloe, Jennifer A; Lynch, Adrian G; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Fu, Wenyu; Qiao, Aike; Hodis, Simona; Kallmes, David F; Kalsi, Hardeep; Long, Quan; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Finol, Ender A; Kono, Kenichi; Malek, Adel M; Lauric, Alexandra; Menon, Prahlad G; Pekkan, Kerem; Esmaily Moghadam, Mahdi; Marsden, Alison L; Oshima, Marie; Katagiri, Kengo; Peiffer, Véronique; Mohamied, Yumnah; Sherwin, Spencer J; Schaller, Jens; Goubergrits, Leonid; Usera, Gabriel; Mendina, Mariana; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Habets, Damiaan F; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Yu, Yue; Karniadakis, George E; Shaffer, Nicholas; Loth, Francis

    2013-02-01

    Stimulated by a recent controversy regarding pressure drops predicted in a giant aneurysm with a proximal stenosis, the present study sought to assess variability in the prediction of pressures and flow by a wide variety of research groups. In phase I, lumen geometry, flow rates, and fluid properties were specified, leaving each research group to choose their solver, discretization, and solution strategies. Variability was assessed by having each group interpolate their results onto a standardized mesh and centerline. For phase II, a physical model of the geometry was constructed, from which pressure and flow rates were measured. Groups repeated their simulations using a geometry reconstructed from a micro-computed tomography (CT) scan of the physical model with the measured flow rates and fluid properties. Phase I results from 25 groups demonstrated remarkable consistency in the pressure patterns, with the majority predicting peak systolic pressure drops within 8% of each other. Aneurysm sac flow patterns were more variable with only a few groups reporting peak systolic flow instabilities owing to their use of high temporal resolutions. Variability for phase II was comparable, and the median predicted pressure drops were within a few millimeters of mercury of the measured values but only after accounting for submillimeter errors in the reconstruction of the life-sized flow model from micro-CT. In summary, pressure can be predicted with consistency by CFD across a wide range of solvers and solution strategies, but this may not hold true for specific flow patterns or derived quantities. Future challenges are needed and should focus on hemodynamic quantities thought to be of clinical interest.

  18. Pressure-temperature-fluid constraints for the Emmaville-Torrington emerald deposit, New South Wales, Australia: Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughrey, Lara; Marshall, Dan; Jones, Peter; Millsteed, Paul; Main, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    The Emmaville-Torrington emeralds were first discovered in 1890 in quartz veins hosted within a Permian metasedimentary sequence, consisting of meta-siltstones, slates and quartzites intruded by pegmatite and aplite veins from the Moule Granite. The emerald deposit genesis is consistent with a typical granite-related emerald vein system. Emeralds from these veins display colour zonation alternating between emerald and clear beryl. Two fluid inclusion types are identified: three-phase (brine+vapour+halite) and two-phase (vapour+liquid) fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusion studies indicate the emeralds were precipitated from saline fluids ranging from approximately 33 mass percent NaCl equivalent. Formational pressures and temperatures of 350 to 400 °C and approximately 150 to 250 bars were derived from fluid inclusion and petrographic studies that also indicate emerald and beryl precipitation respectively from the liquid and vapour portions of a two-phase (boiling) system. The distinct colour zonations observed in the emerald from these deposits is the first recorded emerald locality which shows evidence of colour variation as a function of boiling. The primary three-phase and primary two-phase FITs are consistent with alternating chromium-rich `striped' colour banding. Alternating emerald zones with colourless beryl are due to chromium and vanadium partitioning in the liquid portion of the boiling system. The chemical variations observed at Emmaville-Torrington are similar to other colour zoned emeralds from other localities worldwide likely precipitated from a boiling system as well.

  19. Peripheral vascular effects on auscultatory blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbany, S Y; Drzewiecki, G M; Noordergraaf, A

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the accuracy of the conventional auscultatory method of blood pressure measurement. The influence of the physiologic state of the vascular system in the forearm distal to the site of Korotkoff sound recording and its impact on the precision of the measured blood pressure is discussed. The peripheral resistance in the arm distal to the cuff was changed noninvasively by heating and cooling effects and by induction of reactive hyperemia. All interventions were preceded by an investigation of their effect on central blood pressure to distinguish local effects from changes in central blood pressure. These interventions were sufficiently moderate to make their effect on central blood pressure, recorded in the other arm, statistically insignificant (i.e., changes in systolic [p cooling experiments was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Moreover, both measured systolic (p < 0.004) and diastolic (p < 0.001) pressure decreases during the reactive hyperemia experiments were statistically significant. The findings demonstrate that alteration in vascular state generates perplexing changes in blood pressure, hence confirming experimental observations by earlier investigators as well as predictions by our model studies.

  20. Pressure fluctuations induced by fluid flow in singular points of industrial circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, R.J.; Villard, B.

    1977-01-01

    Flow singularities (enlargements, bards, valves, tees, ...) generate in the circuits of industrial plants wall pressure fluctuations which are the main cause of vibration. A methodical study of the most current singularities has been performed at C.E.A./D.E.M.T. On one hand a theory of noise generation by unsteady flow in internal acoustics has been developed. This theory uses the basic ideas initiated by LIGHTILL. As a result it is shown that the plane wave propagation is a valid assumption and that a singularity can be acoustically modelled by a pressure and a mass-flow-rate discontinuities. Both are random functions of time, the spectra of which are determined from the local fluctuations characteristics. On other hand, characteristics of several singularities have been measured: intercorrelation spectra of local pressure fluctuations. Autocorrelation spectra of associated acoustical sources (the measure of the acoustical pressures in the experimental circuit are interpreted by using the D.E.M.T. computer code VIBRAPHONE which gives the acoustical response of a complex circuit. Experimental atmospheric air and water loops have been used. The Reynolds number has been changed between about 10 5 and 10 6 ; the Mach number between about 0,01 and 0,5. Simple laws with dimensionless parameters are formulated and can be used for the estimation of the acoustical and mechanical vibration level of a circuit with given singularities

  1. MEASUREMENT OF FRICTIONAL PRESSURE DIFFERENTIALS DURING A VENTILATION SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.S. Prosser, PE; I.M. Loomis, PE, PhD

    2003-01-01

    During the course of a ventilation survey, both airflow quantity and frictional pressure losses are measured and quantified. The measurement of airflow has been extensively studied as the vast majority of ventilation standards/regulations are tied to airflow quantity or velocity. However, during the conduct of a ventilation survey, measurement of airflow only represents half of the necessary parameters required to directly calculate the airway resistance. The measurement of frictional pressure loss is an often misunderstood and misapplied part of the ventilation survey. This paper compares the two basic methods of frictional pressure drop measurements; the barometer and the gauge and tube. Personal experiences with each method will be detailed along with the authors' opinions regarding the applicability and conditions favoring each method

  2. Dew-point measurements at high water vapour pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomperski, S.; Dreier, J.

    1996-05-01

    A dew-point meter capable of measuring humidity at high vapour pressure and high temperature has been constructed and tested. Humidity measurements in pure steam were made over the temperature range 100 - 1500957-0233/7/5/003/img1C and a vapour pressure range of 1 - 4 bar. The dew-point meter performance was assessed by comparing measurements with a pressure transmitter and agreement between the two was within 0957-0233/7/5/003/img2% relative humidity. Humidity measurements in steam - air mixtures were also made and the dew-point meter readings were compared to those of a zirconia oxygen sensor. For these tests the dew-point meter readings were generally within 0957-0233/7/5/003/img2% relative humidity of the oxygen sensor measurements.

  3. The influence of body position on cerebrospinal fluid pressure gradient and movement in cats with normal and impaired craniospinal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarica, Marijan; Radoš, Milan; Erceg, Gorislav; Petošić, Antonio; Jurjević, Ivana; Orešković, Darko

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a severe therapeutic problem, as there is insufficient knowledge about the physiology of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. In this paper a new CSF pressure regulation hypothesis is proposed. According to this hypothesis, the CSF pressure depends on the laws of fluid mechanics and on the anatomical characteristics inside the cranial and spinal space, and not, as is today generally believed, on CSF secretion, circulation and absorption. The volume and pressure changes in the newly developed CSF model, which by its anatomical dimensions and basic biophysical features imitates the craniospinal system in cats, are compared to those obtained on cats with and without the blockade of craniospinal communication in different body positions. During verticalization, a long-lasting occurrence of negative CSF pressure inside the cranium in animals with normal cranio-spinal communication was observed. CSF pressure gradients change depending on the body position, but those gradients do not enable unidirectional CSF circulation from the hypothetical site of secretion to the site of absorption in any of them. Thus, our results indicate the existence of new physiological/pathophysiological correlations between intracranial fluids, which opens up the possibility of new therapeutic approaches to intracranial hypertension.

  4. The influence of body position on cerebrospinal fluid pressure gradient and movement in cats with normal and impaired craniospinal communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijan Klarica

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypertension is a severe therapeutic problem, as there is insufficient knowledge about the physiology of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure. In this paper a new CSF pressure regulation hypothesis is proposed. According to this hypothesis, the CSF pressure depends on the laws of fluid mechanics and on the anatomical characteristics inside the cranial and spinal space, and not, as is today generally believed, on CSF secretion, circulation and absorption. The volume and pressure changes in the newly developed CSF model, which by its anatomical dimensions and basic biophysical features imitates the craniospinal system in cats, are compared to those obtained on cats with and without the blockade of craniospinal communication in different body positions. During verticalization, a long-lasting occurrence of negative CSF pressure inside the cranium in animals with normal cranio-spinal communication was observed. CSF pressure gradients change depending on the body position, but those gradients do not enable unidirectional CSF circulation from the hypothetical site of secretion to the site of absorption in any of them. Thus, our results indicate the existence of new physiological/pathophysiological correlations between intracranial fluids, which opens up the possibility of new therapeutic approaches to intracranial hypertension.

  5. Correction of static pressure on a research aircraft in accelerated flight using differential pressure measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Rodi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A method is described that estimates the error in the static pressure measurement on an aircraft from differential pressure measurements on the hemispherical surface of a Rosemount model 858AJ air velocity probe mounted on a boom ahead of the aircraft. The theoretical predictions for how the pressure should vary over the surface of the hemisphere, involving an unknown sensitivity parameter, leads to a set of equations that can be solved for the unknowns – angle of attack, angle of sideslip, dynamic pressure and the error in static pressure – if the sensitivity factor can be determined. The sensitivity factor was determined on the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft by comparisons with the error measured with a carefully designed sonde towed on connecting tubing behind the aircraft – a trailing cone – and the result was shown to have a precision of about ±10 Pa over a wide range of conditions, including various altitudes, power settings, and gear and flap extensions. Under accelerated flight conditions, geometric altitude data from a combined Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS and inertial measurement unit (IMU system are used to estimate acceleration effects on the error, and the algorithm is shown to predict corrections to a precision of better than ±20 Pa under those conditions. Some limiting factors affecting the precision of static pressure measurement on a research aircraft are discussed.

  6. 16 CFR 500.10 - Units of fluid measure, how expressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Units of fluid measure, how expressed. 500... UNDER SECTION 4 OF THE FAIR PACKAGING AND LABELING ACT § 500.10 Units of fluid measure, how expressed. (a) Use of the terms “net” or “net contents” is optional. (b) Declaration of net quantity of contents...

  7. Carbonation by fluid-rock interactions at high-pressure conditions: Implications for carbon cycling in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Francesca; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Beyssac, Olivier; Martinez, Isabelle; Ague, Jay J.; Chaduteau, Carine

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate-bearing lithologies are the main carbon carrier into subduction zones. Their evolution during metamorphism largely controls the fate of carbon, regulating its fluxes between shallow and deep reservoirs. Recent estimates predict that almost all subducted carbon is transferred into the crust and lithospheric mantle during subduction metamorphism via decarbonation and dissolution reactions at high-pressure conditions. Here we report the occurrence of eclogite-facies marbles associated with metasomatic systems in Alpine Corsica (France). The occurrence of these marbles along major fluid-conduits as well as textural, geochemical and isotopic data indicating fluid-mineral reactions are compelling evidence for the precipitation of these carbonate-rich assemblages from carbonic fluids during metamorphism. The discovery of metasomatic marbles brings new insights into the fate of carbonic fluids formed in subducting slabs. We infer that rock carbonation can occur at high-pressure conditions by either vein-injection or chemical replacement mechanisms. This indicates that carbonic fluids produced by decarbonation reactions and carbonate dissolution may not be directly transferred to the mantle wedge, but can interact with slab and mantle-forming rocks. Rock-carbonation by fluid-rock interactions may have an important impact on the residence time of carbon and oxygen in subduction zones and lithospheric mantle reservoirs as well as carbonate isotopic signatures in subduction zones. Furthermore, carbonation may modulate the emission of CO2 at volcanic arcs over geological time scales.

  8. Evaluation of steady flow torques and pressure losses in a rotary flow control valve by means of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okhotnikov, Ivan; Noroozi, Siamak; Sewell, Philip; Godfrey, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel design of a rotary flow control valve driven by a stepper motor is proposed. • The intended use of the valve in the high flow rate independent metering hydraulic system is suggested. • Pressure drops, steady flow torques of the valve for various flow rates and orifice openings are studied by means of computational fluid dynamics. • The discharge coefficient and flow jet angles dependencies on the orifice opening are obtained. • A design method to decrease the flow forces without reducing the flow rate in single-staged valves is demonstrated. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel design of a rotary hydraulic flow control valve has been presented for high flow rate fluid power systems. High flow rates in these systems account for substantial flow forces acting on the throttling elements of the valves and cause the application of mechanically sophisticated multi-staged servo valves for flow regulation. The suggested design enables utilisation of single-stage valves in power hydraulics operating at high flow rates regimes. A spool driver and auxiliary mechanisms of the proposed valve design were discussed and selection criteria were suggested. Analytical expressions for metering characteristics as well as steady flow torques have been derived. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of steady state flow regimes was conducted to evaluate the hydraulic behaviour of the proposed valve. This study represents a special case of an independent metering concept applied to the design of power hydraulic systems with direct proportional valve control operating at flow rates above 150 litres per minute. The result gained using parametric CFD simulations predicted the induced torque and the pressure drops due to a steady flow. Magnitudes of these values prove that by minimising the number of spool's mobile metering surfaces it is possible to reduce the flow-generated forces in the new generation of hydraulic valves proposed in this study

  9. Repeatability of oral fluid collection methods for THC measurement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, S. Smink, B.E. Legrand, S.-A. Mathijssen, M.P.M. Verstraete, A.G. & Brookhuis, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The study objective was to determine the influence of sample collection for two different collection methods on THC concentrations and to compare THC concentrations collected by both methods. A total of 136 pairs of oral fluid samples from subjects who had recently smoked Cannabis were obtained by

  10. Repeatability of oral fluid collection methods for THC measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, Sjoerd; Smink, Beitske E.; Legrand, Sara-Ann; Mathijssen, Rene P. M.; Verstraete, Alain G.; Brookhuis, Karel A.

    2012-01-01

    Study objectives: To determine the influence of sample collection for two different collection methods on THC concentrations and to compare THC concentrations collected by both methods. Methods: A total of 136 pairs of oral fluid samples from subjects who had recently smoked Cannabis were obtained

  11. High-pressure behavior and crystal–fluid interaction under extreme conditions in paulingite [PAU-topology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gatta, G. D.; Scheidl, K. S.; Pippinger, T.; Skála, Roman; Lee, J.; Miletich, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 206, April (2015), s. 34-41 ISSN 1387-1811 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : paulingite * high pressure * X-ray diffraction * compressibility * crystal–fluid interaction Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.349, year: 2015

  12. Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, Alan; Dulchavsky, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Future human space travel will primarily consist of long duration missions onboard the International Space Station or exploration class missions to Mars, its moons, or nearby asteroids. Current evidence suggests that long duration missions might increase risk of permanent ocular structural and functional changes, possibly due to increased intracranial pressure resulting from a spaceflight-induced cephalad (headward) fluid shift.

  13. Beneficial effects of intermittent fluid pressure of low physiological magnitude on cartilage and inflammation in osteoarthritis. An in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Valburg, A. A.; van Roy, H. L.; Lafeber, F. P.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the in vitro effects of low physiological levels of intermittent fluid pressure (0-13 kPa; 0.33 Hz), in the absence of mechanical stress, on articular cartilage, inflammatory cells, and on the combination of these components, present in the osteoarthritic (OA) joint. Normal and OA

  14. Fluid transport properties of rock fractures at high pressure and temperature. Progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelder, T.; Scholz, C.

    1980-04-01

    Flow rates and thus permeability were measured for a variety of effective pressures on artificially prepared joints in Cheshire quartzite. Permeabilities calculated from constant head tests compare with permeabilities calculated from pulse decay tests. Measurement of the change in aperture with effective pressure shows that at effective pressures of less than 20 MPa changes in confining pressure have a larger influence on the aperture than changes in pore pressure. Joint permeability changes with aperture; thus changes in confining pressure are more influential on permeability than changes in pore pressure. Although a cubic law model for flow along a joint gives a rough estimate of joint permeability, measurements of the changes in flow rate with aperture suggest that the cubic law is inadequate for smooth joints at high pressure. This is so because the effective cross section available for flow changes with pressure in a nonlinear manner.

  15. Thermodynamic and fluid mechanic analysis of rapid pressurization in a dead-end tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Ian H.

    1989-01-01

    Three models have been applied to very rapid compression of oxygen in a dead-ended tube. Pressures as high as 41 MPa (6000 psi) leading to peak temperatures of 1400 K are predicted. These temperatures are well in excess of the autoignition temperature (750 K) of teflon, a frequently used material for lining hoses employed in oxygen service. These findings are in accord with experiments that have resulted in ignition and combustion of the teflon, leading to the combustion of the stainless steel braiding and catastrophic failure. The system analyzed was representative of a capped off-high-pressure oxygen line, which could be part of a larger system. Pressurization of the larger system would lead to compression in the dead-end line, and possible ignition of the teflon liner. The model consists of a large plenum containing oxygen at the desired pressure (500 to 6000 psi). The plenum is connected via a fast acting valve to a stainless steel tube 2 cm inside diameter. Opening times are on the order of 15 ms. Downstream of the valve is an orifice sized to increase filling times to around 100 ms. The total length from the valve to the dead-end is 150 cm. The distance from the valve to the orifice is 95 cm. The models describe the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of the flow, and do not include any combustion phenomena. A purely thermodynamic model assumes filling to be complete upstream of the orifice before any gas passes through the orifice. This simplification is reasonable based on experiment and computer modeling. Results show that peak temperatures as high as 4800 K can result from recompression of the gas after expanding through the orifice. An approximate transient model without an orifice was developed assuming an isentropic compression process. An analytical solution was obtained. Results indicated that fill times can be considerably shorter than valve opening times. The third model was a finite difference, 1-D transient compressible flow model. Results from

  16. Validation of two-phase CFD models for propellant tank self-pressurization: Crossing fluid types, scales, and gravity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Kartuzova, Olga; Hylton, Sonya

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines our computational ability to capture the transport and phase change phenomena that govern cryogenic storage tank pressurization and underscores our strengths and weaknesses in this area in terms of three computational-experimental validation case studies. In the first study, 1g pressurization of a simulant low-boiling point fluid in a small scale transparent tank is considered in the context of the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiment to showcase the relatively strong capability that we have developed in modelling the coupling between the convective transport and stratification in the bulk phases with the interfacial evaporative and condensing heat and mass transfer that ultimately control self-pressurization in the storage tank. Here, we show that computational predictions exhibit excellent temporal and spatial fidelity under the moderate Ra number - high Bo number convective-phase distribution regimes. In the second example, we focus on 1g pressurization and pressure control of the large-scale K-site liquid hydrogen tank experiment where we show that by crossing fluid types and physical scales, we enter into high Bo number - high Ra number flow regimes that challenge our ability to predict turbulent heat and mass transfer and their impact on the tank pressurization correctly, especially, in the vapor domain. In the final example, we examine pressurization results from the small scale simulant fluid Tank Pressure Control Experiment (TCPE) performed in microgravity to underscore the fact that in crossing into a low Ra number - low Bo number regime in microgravity, the temporal evolution of the phase front as affected by the time-dependent residual gravity and impulse accelerations becomes an important consideration. In this case detailed acceleration data are needed to predict the correct rate of tank self-pressurization.

  17. Foldable micro coils for a transponder system measuring intraocular pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullerich, S.; Schnakenberg, U. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. of Materials in Electrical Engineering 1; Mokwa, W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. of Materials in Electrical Engineering 1]|[Fraunhofer Inst. of Microelectronic Circuits and Systems, Duisburg (Germany); Boegel, G. vom [Fraunhofer Inst. of Microelectronic Circuits and Systems, Duisburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    A foldable transponder system consisting of a chip and a micro coil for measuring intraocular pressure continuously is presented. The system will be integrated in the haptic of a soft artificial intraocular lens. Calculations of planar micro coils with 6 mm and 10.3 mm in diameter show the limits for planar coils with an outer diameter of 6 mm. For the realisation of the transponder system a 20 {mu}m thick coil with an outer diameter of 10.3 mm, an inner diameter of 7.7 mm, 16 turns and a gap of 20 {mu}m between the windings was selected. Measurements show a good agreement between calculated and measured values. Wireless pressure measurements were carried out showing a linear behaviour of the output signal with respect to the applied pressure. (orig.)

  18. Measurement of rock properties at elevated pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pincus, H.J.; Hoskins, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    The papers in this volume were presented at an ASTM symposium held on 20 June 1983 in conjunction with the 24th Annual Rock Mechanics Symposium at Texas A and M University, College Station, TX. The purpose of these papers is to present recent developments in the measurement of rock properties at elevated pressures and temperatures, and to examine and interpret the data produced by such measurement. The need for measuring rock properties at elevated pressures and temperatures has become increasingly important in recent years. Location and design of nuclear waste repositories, development of geothermal energy sites, and design and construction of deep excavations for civil, military, and mining engineering require significantly improved capabilities for measuring rock properties under conditions substantially different from those prevailing in most laboratory and in situ work. The development of high-pressure, high-temperature capabilities is also significant for the analysis of tectonic processes

  19. Predictive value of pulse pressure variation for fluid responsiveness in septic patients using lung-protective ventilation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, F G R; Bafi, A T; Nascente, A P M; Assunção, M; Mazza, B; Azevedo, L C P; Machado, F R

    2013-03-01

    The applicability of pulse pressure variation (ΔPP) to predict fluid responsiveness using lung-protective ventilation strategies is uncertain in clinical practice. We designed this study to evaluate the accuracy of this parameter in predicting the fluid responsiveness of septic patients ventilated with low tidal volumes (TV) (6 ml kg(-1)). Forty patients after the resuscitation phase of severe sepsis and septic shock who were mechanically ventilated with 6 ml kg(-1) were included. The ΔPP was obtained automatically at baseline and after a standardized fluid challenge (7 ml kg(-1)). Patients whose cardiac output increased by more than 15% were considered fluid responders. The predictive values of ΔPP and static variables [right atrial pressure (RAP) and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP)] were evaluated through a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Thirty-four patients had characteristics consistent with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome and were ventilated with high levels of PEEP [median (inter-quartile range) 10.0 (10.0-13.5)]. Nineteen patients were considered fluid responders. The RAP and PAOP significantly increased, and ΔPP significantly decreased after volume expansion. The ΔPP performance [ROC curve area: 0.91 (0.82-1.0)] was better than that of the RAP [ROC curve area: 0.73 (0.59-0.90)] and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure [ROC curve area: 0.58 (0.40-0.76)]. The ROC curve analysis revealed that the best cut-off for ΔPP was 6.5%, with a sensitivity of 0.89, specificity of 0.90, positive predictive value of 0.89, and negative predictive value of 0.90. Automatized ΔPP accurately predicted fluid responsiveness in septic patients ventilated with low TV.

  20. Fluid responsiveness predicted by transcutaneous partial pressure of oxygen in patients with circulatory failure: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyuan; Peng, Xiao; Pan, Chun; Cai, Shixia; Zhang, Xiwen; Xue, Ming; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Haibo

    2017-12-01

    Significant effort has been devoted to defining parameters for predicting fluid responsiveness. Our goal was to study the feasibility of predicting fluid responsiveness by transcutaneous partial pressure of oxygen (PtcO 2 ) in the critically ill patients. This was a single-center prospective study conducted in the intensive care unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Shock patients who presented with at least one clinical sign of inadequate tissue perfusion, defined as systolic blood pressure 40 mmHg in previously hypertensive patients or the need for vasopressive drugs; urine output 4 mmol/l, for less than 24 h in the absence of a contraindication for fluids were eligible to participate in the study. PtcO 2 was continuously recorded before and during a passive leg raising (PLR) test, and then before and after a 250 ml rapid saline infusion in 10 min. Fluid responsiveness is defined as a change in the stroke volume ≥10% after 250 ml of volume infusion. Thirty-four patients were included, and 14 responded to volume expansion. In the responders, the mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, cardiac output, stroke volume and PtcO 2 increased significantly, while the heart rate decreased significantly by both PLR and volume expansion. Changes in the stroke volume induced either by PLR or volume expansion were significantly greater in responders than in non-responders. The correlation between the changes in PtcO 2 and stroke volume induced by volume expansion was significant. Volume expansion induced an increase in the PtcO 2 of 14% and PLR induced an increase in PtcO 2 of 13% predicted fluid responsiveness. This study suggested the changes in PtcO 2 induced by volume expansion and a PLR test predicted fluid responsiveness in critically ill patients. Trial registration NCT02083757.

  1. Direct measurements of the enthalpy of solution of solid solute in supercritical fluids: study on the CO2-naphthalene system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Han, B; Zhang, J; Li, H; He, J; Yan, H

    2001-10-01

    A setup for a calorimeter for simultaneously measuring the solubility and the solution enthalpy of solid solutes in supercritical fluids (SCFs) has been established. The enthalpy of solution of naphthalene in supercritical CO2 was measured at 308.15 K in the pressure range from 8.0-11.0 MPa. It was found that the enthalpy of solution (deltaH) was negative in the pressure range from 8.0 to 9.5 MPa, and the absolute value decreased with increasing pressure. In this pressure range, the dissolution of the solute was enthalpy driven. However, the deltaH became positive at pressures higher than 9.5 MPa, and the dissolution was entropy driven. Monte Carlo simulation was performed to analyze the local structural environment of the solvated naphthalene molecules in supercritical CO2 under the experimental conditions for the calorimetric measurements. By combining the enthalpy data and the simulation results, it can be deduced that the energy level of CO2 in the high compressible region is higher than that at higher pressures, which results in the large negative enthalpy of solution and the larger degree of solvent-solute clustering in the high compressible region.

  2. Standard values of maximum tongue pressure taken using newly developed disposable tongue pressure measurement device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utanohara, Yuri; Hayashi, Ryo; Yoshikawa, Mineka; Yoshida, Mitsuyoshi; Tsuga, Kazuhiro; Akagawa, Yasumasa

    2008-09-01

    It is clinically important to evaluate tongue function in terms of rehabilitation of swallowing and eating ability. We have developed a disposable tongue pressure measurement device designed for clinical use. In this study we used this device to determine standard values of maximum tongue pressure in adult Japanese. Eight hundred fifty-three subjects (408 male, 445 female; 20-79 years) were selected for this study. All participants had no history of dysphagia and maintained occlusal contact in the premolar and molar regions with their own teeth. A balloon-type disposable oral probe was used to measure tongue pressure by asking subjects to compress it onto the palate for 7 s with maximum voluntary effort. Values were recorded three times for each subject, and the mean values were defined as maximum tongue pressure. Although maximum tongue pressure was higher for males than for females in the 20-49-year age groups, there was no significant difference between males and females in the 50-79-year age groups. The maximum tongue pressure of the seventies age group was significantly lower than that of the twenties to fifties age groups. It may be concluded that maximum tongue pressures were reduced with primary aging. Males may become weaker with age at a faster rate than females; however, further decreases in strength were in parallel for male and female subjects.

  3. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  4. Temperature measurement in the liquid helium range at pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itskevich, E.S.; Krajdenov, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    The use of bronze and germanium resistance thermometers and the use of a (Au + 0.07 % Fe)-Cu thermocouple for temperature measurements from 1.5 to 4.2 K in the hydrostatic compression of up to 10 kbar are considered. To this aim, the thermometer resistance as a function of temperature and pressure is measured. It is revealed that pressure does not change the thermometric response of the bronze resistance thermometer but only shifts it to the region of lower temperatures. The identical investigations of the germanium resistance thermometer shows that strong temperature dependence and the shift of its thermometric response under the influence of pressure make the use of germanium resistance thermometers in high-pressure chambers very inconvenient. The results of the analysis of the (Au + 0.07 % Fe) - Cu thermocouple shows that with a 2 per cent accuracy the thermocouple Seebeck coefficient does not depend on pressure. It permits to use this thermocouple for temperature measurements at high pressures

  5. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) round robin benchmark for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Shin K., E-mail: paengki1@tamu.edu; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The capabilities of steady RANS models were directly assessed for full axial scale experiment. • The importance of mesh and conjugate heat transfer was reaffirmed. • The rod inner-surface temperature was directly compared. • The steady RANS calculations showed a limitation in the prediction of circumferential distribution of the rod surface temperature. - Abstract: This study examined the capabilities and limitations of steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) approach for pressurized water reactor (PWR) rod bundle problems, based on the round robin benchmark of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes against the NESTOR experiment for a 5 × 5 rod bundle with typical split-type mixing vane grids (MVGs). The round robin exercise against the high-fidelity, broad-range (covering multi-spans and entire lateral domain) NESTOR experimental data for both the flow field and the rod temperatures enabled us to obtain important insights into CFD prediction and validation for the split-type MVG PWR rod bundle problem. It was found that the steady RANS turbulence models with wall function could reasonably predict two key variables for a rod bundle problem – grid span pressure loss and the rod surface temperature – once mesh (type, resolution, and configuration) was suitable and conjugate heat transfer was properly considered. However, they over-predicted the magnitude of the circumferential variation of the rod surface temperature and could not capture its peak azimuthal locations for a central rod in the wake of the MVG. These discrepancies in the rod surface temperature were probably because the steady RANS approach could not capture unsteady, large-scale cross-flow fluctuations and qualitative cross-flow pattern change due to the laterally confined test section. Based on this benchmarking study, lessons and recommendations about experimental methods as well as CFD methods were also provided for the future research.

  6. A Manganin Thin Film Ultra-High Pressure Sensor for Microscale Detonation Pressure Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of energetic materials (EMs and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS initiating explosive devices, the measurement of detonation pressure generated by EMs in the microscale has become a pressing need. This paper develops a manganin thin film ultra-high pressure sensor based on MEMS technology for measuring the output pressure from micro-detonator. A reliable coefficient is proposed for designing the sensor’s sensitive element better. The sensor employs sandwich structure: the substrate uses a 0.5 mm thick alumina ceramic, the manganin sensitive element with a size of 0.2 mm × 0.1 mm × 2 μm and copper electrodes of 2 μm thick are sputtered sequentially on the substrate, and a 25 μm thick insulating layer of polyimide is wrapped on the sensitive element. The static test shows that the piezoresistive coefficient of manganin thin film is 0.0125 GPa−1. The dynamic experiment indicates that the detonation pressure of micro-detonator is 12.66 GPa, and the response time of the sensor is 37 ns. In a word, the sensor developed in this study is suitable for measuring ultra-high pressure in microscale and has a shorter response time than that of foil-like manganin gauges. Simultaneously, this study could be beneficial to research on ultra-high-pressure sensors with smaller size.

  7. Investigation of the effects of time periodic pressure and engpotential gradients on viscoelastic fluid flow in circular narrow confinements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Trieu; van der Meer, Devaraj; van den Berg, Albert

    2017-01-01

    -Boltzmann equation, together with the incompressible Cauchy momentum equation under no-slip boundary conditions for viscoelastic fluid in the case of a combination of time periodic pressure-driven and electro-osmotic flow. The resulting solutions allow us to predict the electrical current and solution flow rate...... conversion applications. We also found that time periodic electro-osmotic flow in many cases is much stronger enhanced than time periodic pressure-driven flow when comparing the flow profiles of oscillating PDF and EOF in micro-and nanochannels. The findings advance our understanding of time periodic......In this paper we present an in-depth analysis and analytical solution for time periodic hydrodynamic flow (driven by a time-dependent pressure gradient and electric field) of viscoelastic fluid through cylindrical micro-and nanochannels. Particularly, we solve the linearized Poisson...

  8. Dynamic tire pressure sensor for measuring ground vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; McDaniel, James Gregory; Wang, Ming L

    2012-11-07

    This work presents a convenient and non-contact acoustic sensing approach for measuring ground vibration. This approach, which uses an instantaneous dynamic tire pressure sensor (DTPS), possesses the capability to replace the accelerometer or directional microphone currently being used for inspecting pavement conditions. By measuring dynamic pressure changes inside the tire, ground vibration can be amplified and isolated from environmental noise. In this work, verifications of the DTPS concept of sensing inside the tire have been carried out. In addition, comparisons between a DTPS, ground-mounted accelerometer, and directional microphone are made. A data analysis algorithm has been developed and optimized to reconstruct ground acceleration from DTPS data. Numerical and experimental studies of this DTPS reveal a strong potential for measuring ground vibration caused by a moving vehicle. A calibration of transfer function between dynamic tire pressure change and ground acceleration may be needed for different tire system or for more accurate application.

  9. A Computer Controlled Precision High Pressure Measuring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, S.; Yadav, S.; Jha, N.; Gupta, V. K.; Agarwal, R.; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Saxena, T. K.

    2011-01-01

    A microcontroller (AT89C51) based electronics has been designed and developed for high precision calibrator based on Digiquartz pressure transducer (DQPT) for the measurement of high hydrostatic pressure up to 275 MPa. The input signal from DQPT is converted into a square wave form and multiplied through frequency multiplier circuit over 10 times to input frequency. This input frequency is multiplied by a factor of ten using phased lock loop. Octal buffer is used to store the calculated frequency, which in turn is fed to microcontroller AT89C51 interfaced with a liquid crystal display for the display of frequency as well as corresponding pressure in user friendly units. The electronics developed is interfaced with a computer using RS232 for automatic data acquisition, computation and storage. The data is acquired by programming in Visual Basic 6.0. This system is interfaced with the PC to make it a computer controlled system. The system is capable of measuring the frequency up to 4 MHz with a resolution of 0.01 Hz and the pressure up to 275 MPa with a resolution of 0.001 MPa within measurement uncertainty of 0.025%. The details on the hardware of the pressure measuring system, associated electronics, software and calibration are discussed in this paper.

  10. Extremely-high vacuum pressure measurement by laser ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubun, Kiyohide

    1991-01-01

    Laser ionization method has the very high sensitivity for detecting atoms and molecules. Hurst et al. successfully detected a single Cs atom by means of resonance ionization spectroscopy developed by them. Noting this high sensitivity, the authors have attempted to apply the laser ionization method to measure gas pressure, particularly in the range down to extremely high vacuum. At present, hot cathode ionization gauges are used for measuring gas pressure down to ultrahigh vacuum, however, those have a number of disadvantages. The pressure measurement using lasers does not have such disadvantages. The pressure measurement utilizing the laser ionization method is based on the principle that when laser beam is focused through a lens, the amount of atom or molecule ions generated in the focused space region is proportional to gas pressure. In this paper, the experimental results are presented on the nonresonant multiphoton ionization characteristics of various kinds of gases, the ion detection system with high sensitivity and an extremely high vacuum system prepared for the laser ionization experiment. (K.I.)

  11. Noninvasive blood pressure measurement scheme based on optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianxuan; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Yangan

    2016-10-01

    Optical fiber sensing has many advantages, such as volume small, light quality, low loss, strong in anti-jamming. Since the invention of the optical fiber sensing technology in 1977, optical fiber sensing technology has been applied in the military, national defense, aerospace, industrial, medical and other fields in recent years, and made a great contribution to parameter measurement in the environment under the limited condition .With the rapid development of computer, network system, the intelligent optical fiber sensing technology, the sensor technology, the combination of computer and communication technology , the detection, diagnosis and analysis can be automatically and efficiently completed. In this work, we proposed a noninvasive blood pressure detection and analysis scheme which uses optical fiber sensor. Optical fiber sensing system mainly includes the light source, optical fiber, optical detector, optical modulator, the signal processing module and so on. wavelength optical signals were led into the optical fiber sensor and the signals reflected by the human body surface were detected. By comparing actual testing data with the data got by traditional way to measure the blood pressure we can establish models for predicting the blood pressure and achieve noninvasive blood pressure measurement by using spectrum analysis technology. Blood pressure measurement method based on optical fiber sensing system is faster and more convenient than traditional way, and it can get accurate analysis results in a shorter period of time than before, so it can efficiently reduce the time cost and manpower cost.

  12. Dynamics of mineral crystallization from precipitated slab-derived fluid phase: first in situ synchrotron X-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Nadia; Alvaro, Matteo; Campione, Marcello; Wilhelm, Heribert; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-03-01

    Remnants of the fluid phase at ultrahigh pressure (UHP) in subduction environments may be preserved as primary multiphase inclusions in UHP minerals. The mode of crystallization of daughter minerals during precipitation within the inclusion and/or the mechanism of interaction between the fluid at supercritical conditions and the host mineral are still poorly understood from a crystallographic point of view. A case study is represented by garnet-orthopyroxenites from the Maowu Ultramafic Complex (China) deriving from harzburgite precursors metasomatized at ~4 GPa, 750 °C by a silica- and incompatible trace element-rich fluid phase. This metasomatism produced poikilitic orthopyroxene and inclusion-rich garnet porphyroblasts. Solid multiphase primary inclusions in garnet display a size within a few tens of micrometres and negative crystal shapes. Infilling minerals (spinel: 10-20 vol%; amphibole, chlorite, talc, mica: 80-90 vol%) occur with constant volume proportions and derive from trapped solute-rich aqueous fluids. To constrain the possible mode of precipitation of daughter minerals, we performed for the first time a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment by synchrotron radiation at Diamond Light Source. In combination with electron probe microanalyses, this measurement allowed the unique identification of each mineral phase and reciprocal orientations. We demonstrated the epitaxial relationship between spinel and garnet and between some hydrous minerals. Such information is discussed in relation to the physico-chemical aspects of nucleation and growth, shedding light on the mode of mineral crystallization from a fluid phase trapped at supercritical conditions.

  13. Fiber optic pressure sensors in skin-friction measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, R.

    1985-01-01

    Fiber optic lever pressure sensors intended for use in a low speed wind tunnel environment were designed, constructed and tested for the measurement of normal and shear displacements associated with the pressures acting on a flat aluminum plate. On-site tests performed along with several static and dynamic measurements made have established that, with proper modifications and improvements, the design concepts are acceptable and can be utilized for their intended use. Several elastomers were investigated for use in sensors and for their incorporation into these sensors. Design and assembly techniques for probes and complete sensors were developed.

  14. Indications for portal pressure measurement in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Lise; Bendtsen, Flemming; Møller, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Portal hypertension leads to development of serious complications such as esophageal varices, ascites, renal and cardiovascular dysfunction. The importance of the degree of portal hypertension has been substantiated within recent years. Measurement of the portal pressure is simple and safe...... and the hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) independently predicts survival and development of complications such as ascites, HCC and bleeding from esophageal varices. Moreover, measurements of HVPG can be used to guide pharmacotherapy for primary and secondary prophylaxis for variceal bleeding. Assessment...... of HVPG should therefore be considered as a part of the general characterization of patients with portal hypertension in departments assessing and treating this condition....

  15. Measurement of digital blood pressure after local cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    A double-inlet plastic cuff was designed for local cooling and systolic blood pressure measurement on the middle phalanx of the fingers. With a tourniquet on the proximal phalanx of one finger, cooling for 5 min made the digital artery temperature equal the skin temperature. The difference between...... the systolic pressure in a control finger and in the cooled finger give the reopening pressure in the digital arteries. At 30, 25, 20, 15, and 10 degrees C, respectively the percent decrease of the finger pressure was 0.2 (0.2), 1.5 (2.5), 8.5 (3.7), 11.4 (3.4), and 15.3 (3.1) in normal young women...

  16. Measuring element for determining the internal pressure in fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deckers, H.; Drexler, H.; Reiser, H.

    1983-01-01

    A pressure cell is situated inside the fuel rod, which contains a magnetic core or a core influenced by magnetism, whose position relative to an outer front surface of an end stopper of the fuel rod can vary. The fuel rod contains a pressure cell directly above the lower end stopper or connected to it. This can consist of closed bellows, where if the internal pressure in the fuel rod rises, a ferrite core moves axially. When the pressure drops, this returns to the initial position, which is precisely defined by a stop. To detect a rod defect, the position of the soft iron core relative to the lower edge of the end stopper is scanned by a special measuring device. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Successive measurements of streaming potential and electroosmotic pressure with the same core-holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chenggang; Hu, Hengshan; Yu, Chunhao; Wang, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Successive measurements of the streaming potential and electroosmotic pressure of each core sample are important for understanding the mechanisms of electrokinetic effects. In previous studies, one plug of the core-holder needs to be replaced in these two experiments, which causes the change of the fluid parameters and the boundary conditions in the core. We design a new core-holder to permit successive experiments without plug replacement, which ensures the consistency of the measurement environment. A two-direction harmonic pressure-driving source is accordingly designed. Using this new equipment, electrokinetic experiments conducted ten core samples at 0.4 mol/L NaCl solution. The results show good agreement between the electrokinetically deduced permeability and premeasured gas permeability. For high salinity saturated samples, the permeability can be inverted from electroosmotic effect instead of the streaming potential.

  18. Boiling point measurement of a small amount of brake fluid by thermocouple and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogami, Kazunari

    2002-09-01

    This study describes a new method for measuring the boiling point of a small amount of brake fluid using a thermocouple and a pear shaped flask. The boiling point of brake fluid was directly measured with an accuracy that was within approximately 3 C of that determined by the Japanese Industrial Standards method, even though the sample volume was only a few milliliters. The method was applied to measure the boiling points of brake fluid samples from automobiles. It was clear that the boiling points of brake fluid from some automobiles dropped to approximately 140 C from about 230 C, and that one of the samples from the wheel cylinder was approximately 45 C lower than brake fluid from the reserve tank. It is essential to take samples from the wheel cylinder, as this is most easily subjected to heating.

  19. Microwave measurements of water vapor partial pressure at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latorre, V.R.

    1991-01-01

    One of the desired parameters in the Yucca Mountain Project is the capillary pressure of the rock comprising the repository. This parameter is related to the partial pressure of water vapor in the air when in equilibrium with the rock mass. Although there are a number of devices that will measure the relative humidity (directly related to the water vapor partial pressure), they generally will fail at temperatures on the order of 150C. Since thee author has observed borehole temperatures considerably in excess of this value in G-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a different scheme is required to obtain the desired partial pressure data at higher temperatures. This chapter presents a microwave technique that has been developed to measure water vapor partial pressure in boreholes at temperatures up to 250C. The heart of the system is a microwave coaxial resonator whose resonant frequency is inversely proportional to the square root of the real part of the complex dielectric constant of the medium (air) filling the resonator. The real part of the dielectric constant of air is approximately equal to the square of the refractive index which, in turn, is proportional to the partial pressure of the water vapor in the air. Thus, a microwave resonant cavity can be used to measure changes in the relative humidity or partial pressure of water vapor in the air. Since this type of device is constructed of metal, it is able to withstand very high temperatures. The actual limitation is the temperature limit of the dielectric material in the cable connecting the resonator to its driving and monitoring equipment-an automatic network analyzer in our case. In the following sections, the theory of operation, design, construction, calibration and installation of the microwave diagnostics system is presented. The results and conclusions are also presented, along with suggestions for future work

  20. A novel approach to office blood pressure measurement: 30-minute office blood pressure vs daytime ambulatory blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, M.C. van der; Buunk, I.E.; Weel, C. van; Thien, Th.; Bakx, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Current office blood pressure measurement (OBPM) is often not executed according to guidelines and cannot prevent the white-coat effect. Serial, automated, oscillometric OBPM has the potential to overcome both these problems. We therefore developed a 30-minute OBPM method that we compared

  1. Visualization and measurement of thermo-fluid phenomena by using neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, Kaichiro [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1998-03-01

    Recently, neutron radiography is rapidly expanding its application to various fields incollaboration with the development of electronic imaging techniques. Particularly, in the field of thermal and fluid engineering, it has drawn much attention as an innovative and non-intrusive method for fluid-visualization and measurement using neutron beam as a probe. In this paper, some examples of applications are introduced on the high frame-rate imaging, quantification method (especially, determination of void fraction), and multidimensional measurement which are much interested in fluid measurement in relation to light water reactor safety and thermohydraulics. (author)

  2. Visualization and measurement of thermo-fluid phenomena by using neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro

    1998-01-01

    Recently, neutron radiography is rapidly expanding its application to various fields incollaboration with the development of electronic imaging techniques. Particularly, in the field of thermal and fluid engineering, it has drawn much attention as an innovative and non-intrusive method for fluid-visualization and measurement using neutron beam as a probe. In this paper, some examples of applications are introduced on the high frame-rate imaging, quantification method (especially, determination of void fraction), and multidimensional measurement which are much interested in fluid measurement in relation to light water reactor safety and thermohydraulics. (author)

  3. Experimental viscosity measurements of biodiesels at high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaschke C.J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The viscosity of biodiesels of soybean and rapeseed biodiesels blended with mineral diesel fuel were measured at pressures of up to 200 MPa. Using a falling sinker-type viscometer reproducible viscosity data were obtained based on the time taken for a sinker to descend a fixed distance down an enclosed tube under the influence of gravity. Measurements were taken using pressures which correspond to those of interest in automotive common rail diesel engines, and at temperatures of between 25ºC and 80ºC. In all cases, the viscosity of the biodiesel blends were found to increase exponentially for which the blends were noted as being more viscous than pure mineral fuels. A pressure-freezing effect was not observed for the blends.

  4. Exhaust pressure pulsation observation from turbocharger instantaneous speed measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macián, V.; Luján, J. M.; Bermúdez, V.; Guardiola, C.

    2004-06-01

    In internal combustion engines, instantaneous exhaust pressure measurements are difficult to perform in a production environment. The high temperature of the exhaust manifold and its pulsating character make its application to exhaust gas recirculation control algorithms impossible. In this paper an alternative method for estimating the exhaust pressure pulsation is presented. A numerical model is built which enables the exhaust pressure pulses to be predicted from instantaneous turbocharger speed measurements. Although the model is data based, a theoretical description of the process is also provided. This combined approach makes it possible to export the model for different engine operating points. Also, compressor contribution in the turbocharger speed pulsation is discussed extensively. The compressor contribution is initially neglected, and effects of this simplified approach are analysed.

  5. Pressure drop and arterial compliance - Two arterial parameters in one measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotman, Oren M; Zaretsky, Uri; Shitzer, Avraham; Einav, Shmuel

    2017-01-04

    Coronary artery pressure-drop and distensibility (compliance) are two major, seemingly unrelated, parameters in the cardiovascular clinical setting, which are indicative of coronary arteries patency and atherosclerosis severity. While pressure drop is related to flow, and therefore serves as a functional indicator of a stenosis severity, the arterial distensibility is indicative of the arterial stiffness, and hence the arterial wall composition. In the present study, we hypothesized that local pressure drops are dependent on the arterial distensibility, and hence can provide information on both indices. The clinical significance is that a single measurement of pressure drop could potentially provide both functional and bio-mechanical metrics of lesions, and thus assist in real-time decision making prior to stenting. The goal of the current study was to set the basis for understanding this relationship, and define the accuracy and sensitivity required from the pressure measurement system. The investigation was performed using numerical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations, validated experimentally using our high accuracy differential pressure measurement system. Simplified silicone mock coronary arteries with zero to intermediate size stenoses were used, and various combinations of arterial distensibility, diameter, and flow rate were simulated. Results of hyperemic flow cases were also compared to fractional flow reserve (FFR). The results indicate the potential clinical superiority of a high accuracy pressure drop-based parameter over FFR, by: (i) being more lesion-specific, (ii) the possibility to circumvent the FFR dependency on pharmacologically-induced hyperemia, and, (iii) by providing both functional and biomechanical lesion-specific information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Low temperature measurement of the vapor pressures of planetary molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, George F.

    1989-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary observations and proper modeling of planetary atmospheres are critically upon accurate laboratory data for the chemical and physical properties of the constitutes of the atmospheres. It is important that these data are taken over the appropriate range of parameters such as temperature, pressure, and composition. Availability of accurate, laboratory data for vapor pressures and equilibrium constants of condensed species at low temperatures is essential for photochemical and cloud models of the atmospheres of the outer planets. In the absence of such data, modelers have no choice but to assume values based on an educated guess. In those cases where higher temperature data are available, a standard procedure is to extrapolate these points to the lower temperatures using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Last summer the vapor pressures of acetylene (C2H2) hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and cyanoacetylene (HC3N) was measured using two different methods. At the higher temperatures 1 torr and 10 torr capacitance manometers were used. To measure very low pressures, a technique was used which is based on the infrared absorption of thin film (TFIR). This summer the vapor pressure of acetylene was measured the TFIR method. The vapor pressure of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was measured using capacitance manometers. Results for H2O agree with literature data over the common range of temperature. At the lower temperatures the data lie slightly below the values predicted by extrapolation of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Thin film infrared (TFIR) data for acetylene lie significantly below the values predicted by extrapolation. It is hoped to bridge the gap between the low end of the CM data and the upper end of the TFIR data in the future using a new spinning rotor gauge.

  7. Intrathecal pressure monitoring and cerebrospinal fluid drainage in acute spinal cord injury: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Brian K; Curt, Armin; Belanger, Lise M; Bernardo, Arlene; Chan, Donna; Markez, John A; Gorelik, Stephen; Slobogean, Gerard P; Umedaly, Hamed; Giffin, Mitch; Nikolakis, Michael A; Street, John; Boyd, Michael C; Paquette, Scott; Fisher, Charles G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2009-03-01

    Ischemia is an important factor in the pathophysiology of secondary damage after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and, in the setting of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair, can be the primary cause of paralysis. Lowering the intrathecal pressure (ITP) by draining CSF is routinely done in thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm surgery but has not been evaluated in the setting of acute traumatic SCI. Additionally, while much attention is directed toward maintaining an adequate mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in the acute postinjury phase, little is known about what is happening to the ITP during this period when spinal cord perfusion pressure (MABP - ITP) is important. The objectives of this study were to: 1) evaluate the safety and feasibility of draining CSF to lower ITP after acute traumatic SCI; 2) evaluate changes in ITP before and after surgical decompression; and 3) measure neurological recovery in relation to the drainage of CSF. Twenty-two patients seen within 48 hours of injury were prospectively randomized to a drainage or no-drainage treatment group. In all cases a lumbar intrathecal catheter was inserted for 72 hours. Acute complications of headache/nausea/vomiting, meningitis, or neurological deterioration were carefully monitored. Acute Spinal Cord Injury motor scores were documented at baseline and at 6 months postinjury. On insertion of the catheter, mean ITP was 13.8 +/- 1.3 mm Hg (+/- SD), and it increased to a mean peak of 21.7 +/- 1.5 mm Hg intraoperatively. The difference between the starting ITP on catheter insertion and the observed peak intrathecal pressure after decompression was, on average, an increase of 7.9 +/- 1.6 mm Hg (p drainage group was 30.6 +/- 2.3 mm Hg, which was significantly higher than the peak intraoperative ITP (p = 0.0098). During the same period, the peak recorded ITP in patients randomized to receive drainage was 28.1 +/- 2.8 mm Hg, which was not statistically higher than the peak intraoperative ITP (p = 0.15). The

  8. Ultrasonic fluid quantity measurement in dynamic vehicular applications a support vector machine approach

    CERN Document Server

    Terzic, Jenny; Nagarajah, Romesh; Alamgir, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Accurate fluid level measurement in dynamic environments can be assessed using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) approach. SVM is a supervised learning model that analyzes and recognizes patterns. It is a signal classification technique which has far greater accuracy than conventional signal averaging methods. Ultrasonic Fluid Quantity Measurement in Dynamic Vehicular Applications: A Support Vector Machine Approach describes the research and development of a fluid level measurement system for dynamic environments. The measurement system is based on a single ultrasonic sensor. A Support Vector Machines (SVM) based signal characterization and processing system has been developed to compensate for the effects of slosh and temperature variation in fluid level measurement systems used in dynamic environments including automotive applications. It has been demonstrated that a simple ν-SVM model with Radial Basis Function (RBF) Kernel with the inclusion of a Moving Median filter could be used to achieve the high levels...

  9. Radiation Pressure Measurements on Micron Size Individual Dust Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P.D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; Witherow, W. K.; LeClair, A.; West, E.; Sheldon, R.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic radiation pressure have been made on individual silica (SiO2) particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance. These measurements were made by inserting single charged particles of known diameter in the 0.2 micron to 6.82 micron range and irradiating them from above with laser radiation focused to beam-widths of approx. 175-400 micron, at ambient pressures approx. 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -4) torr. The downward displacement of the particle due to the radiation force is balanced by the electrostatic force indicated by the compensating dc potential applied to the balance electrodes, providing a direct measure of the radiation force on the levitated particle. Theoretical calculations of the radiation pressure with a least-squares fit to the measured data yield the radiation pressure efficiencies of the particles, and comparisons with Mie scattering theory calculations provide the imaginary part of the refractive index of silica and the corresponding extinction and scattering efficiencies.

  10. Combination of phlebography and sanguinous measurement of venous blood pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.

    1988-01-01

    Phlebographic visualisation offers the highest spatial resolution of all imaging methods both in respect of veins of the leg and pelvis and of the abdomen. Phlebography offers optimal conditions for assessing morphological changes at the veins and in their direct neighbourhood. No quantitative information is available via phlebography if haemodynamics are disturbed; qualitative information is yielded merely to a restricted extent (by assessing flow velocity and collaterals). Direct sanguinous measurement of venous blood pressure is particularly suitable for the quantitative and qualitative assessment of disturbed haemodynamic conditions; in this respect it stands out among the function tests based on the employment of apparatures. If it is combined with phlebography, it is possible not only to optimise the diagnostic yield in the hands of one investigator, but also to reduce the invasiveness of both methods to one single puncture, since the puncture needle is at the same time also an instrument to measure the pressure. The article points out the possibilities and limitations of combining a) ascending phlebography of the leg and pelvis with peripheral venous pressure measurement (phlebodynamometry) and b) visualisation of the veins of the pelvis and vena cava inferior with central sanguinous venous pressure measurement (CP). Indicatious and technical execution are described. (orig.) [de

  11. Measurements and modeling of VLLE at elevated pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben

    and pure component calibration. Samples from the different liquid phases in the high-pressure cell is taken using a moveable needle. The systems investigated have been a combination of the components: CO2, N2, di-methyl ether (DME), water, methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol. 41 isotherms have been measured...

  12. Deformation measurement of a pressure vessel flange by holographic interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves Junior, Armando A.; Schneider, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    An automatic metodology used for the measurement of displacement through the holographic interferometry is presented. In order to shown its performance and potentiality, the displacement field from a pipe's and flange, when submited to an internal pressure, is experimentally found. Holography's results are compared with other technique's results. (Author) [pt

  13. When and how should we measure intra- abdominal pressure?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-11

    Nov 11, 2008 ... developing intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and. ACS. This may be ... the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) ... of this technique are that it places the patient at increased risk for .... 9. Malbrain ML. Different techniques to measure intra-abdominal pressure (IAP): time for a.

  14. Measuring occupational stress: development of the pressure management indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S; Cooper, C L

    1998-10-01

    The study of occupational stress is hindered by the lack of compact and comprehensive standardized measurement tools. The Pressure Management Indicator (PMI) is a 120-item self-report questionnaire developed from the Occupational Stress Indicator (OSI). The PMI is more reliable, more comprehensive, and shorter than the OSI. It provides an integrated measure of the major dimensions of occupational stress. The outcome scales measure job satisfaction, organizational satisfaction, organizational security, organizational commitment, anxiety--depression, resilience, worry, physical symptoms, and exhaustion. The stressor scales cover pressure from workload, relationships, career development, managerial responsibility, personal responsibility, home demands, and daily hassles. The moderator variables measure drive, impatience, control, decision latitude, and the coping strategies of problem focus, life work balance, and social support.

  15. Negative-pressure and low-pressure hydrocephalus: the role of cerebrospinal fluid leaks resulting from surgical approaches to the cranial base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippidis, Aristotelis S; Kalani, M Yashar S; Nakaji, Peter; Rekate, Harold L

    2011-11-01

    Negative-pressure and low-pressure hydrocephalus are rare clinical entities that are frequently misdiagnosed. They are characterized by recurrent episodes of shunt failure because the intracranial pressure is lower than the opening pressure of the valve. In this report the authors discuss iatrogenic CSF leaks as a cause of low- or negative-pressure hydrocephalus after approaches to the cranial base. The authors retrospectively reviewed cases of low-pressure or negative-pressure hydrocephalus presenting after cranial approaches complicated with a CSF leak at their institution. Three patients were identified. Symptoms of high intracranial pressure and ventriculomegaly were present, although the measured pressures were low or negative. A blocked communication between the ventricles and the subarachnoid space was documented in 2 of the cases and presumed in the third. Shunt revisions failed repeatedly. In all cases, temporary clinical and radiographic improvement resulted from external ventricular drainage at subatmospheric pressures. The CSF leaks were sealed and CSF communication was reestablished operatively. In 1 case, neck wrapping was used with temporary success. Negative-pressure or low-pressure hydrocephalus associated with CSF leaks, especially after cranial base approaches, is difficult to treat. The solution often requires the utilization of subatmospheric external ventricular drains to establish a lower ventricular drainage pressure than the drainage pressure created in the subarachnoid space, where the pressure is artificially lowered by the CSF leak. Treatment involves correction of the CSF leak, neck wrapping to increase brain turgor and allow the pressure in the ventricles to rise to the level of the opening pressure of the valve, and reestablishing the CSF route.

  16. A study of dynamic foot pressure measurement in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka D Madhale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic foot ulcer is a major source of morbidity and a leading cause of hospitalization. It is estimated that approximately 20% of hospital admissions among patients with diabetes mellitus are due to diabetic foot ulcer. It can lead to infection, gangrene, amputation, and even death if appropriate care is not provided. Overall, the lower limb amputation in diabetic patients is 15 times higher than in non-diabetics. In the majority of cases, the cause for the foot ulcer is the altered architecture of the foot due to neuropathy resulting in abnormal pressure points on the soles. Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner and check its reliability and validity which can help to prevent foot ulceration. Design/Methodology/Approach: In the present study, a low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner is developed, and dynamic plantar pressures in a group of 110 Indian patients with diabetes with or without neuropathy and foot ulcers are measured. Practical Implications: If these pressure points can be detected, ulcers can be prevented by providing offloading footwear. Originality/Value: Differences are found in dynamic foot pressures in different study groups, namely, diabetic patients, patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, patients with foot ulcers, and nondiabetics. The differences are significant (P < 0.01, which showed the validity of the tool. Reliability and consistency of the tool was checked by test–retest method. Paper Type: Original Research work. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, it is concluded that the scanner is successfully developed and it can measure foot pressures. It is a novel device to proactively monitor foot health in diabetics in an effort to prevent and reduce diabetic foot complications.

  17. Fiber optic pressure sensors in skin-friction measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    A fiber optic lever sensing technique that can be used to measure normal pressure as well as shear stresses is discussed. This method uses three unequal fibers combining small size and good sensitivity. Static measurements appear to confirm the theoretical models predicted by geometrical optics and dynamic tests performed at frequencies up to 10 kHz indicate a flat response within this frequency range. These sensors are intended for use in a low speed wind tunnel environment.

  18. Convection measurement package for space processing sounding rocket flights. [low gravity manufacturing - fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spradley, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The effects on heated fluids of nonconstant accelerations, rocket vibrations, and spin rates, was studied. A system is discussed which can determine the influence of the convective effects on fluid experiments. The general suitability of sounding rockets for performing these experiments is treated. An analytical investigation of convection in an enclosure which is heated in low gravity is examined. The gravitational body force was taken as a time-varying function using anticipated sounding rocket accelerations, since accelerometer flight data were not available. A computer program was used to calculate the flow rates and heat transfer in fluids with geometries and boundary conditions typical of space processing configurations. Results of the analytical investigation identify the configurations, fluids and boundary values which are most suitable for measuring the convective environment of sounding rockets. A short description of fabricated fluid cells and the convection measurement package is given. Photographs are included.

  19. Simultaneous compared with sequential blood pressure measurement results in smaller inter-arm blood pressure differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoeven, Niels V.; Lodestijn, Sophie; Nanninga, Stephanie; van Montfrans, Gert A.; van den Born, Bert-Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    There are currently few recommendations on how to assess inter-arm blood pressure (BP) differences. The authors compared simultaneous with sequential measurement on mean BP, inter-arm BP differences, and within-visit reproducibility in 240 patients stratified according to age ( <50 or ≥60 years) and

  20. Acoustic emission measurements at the pressure vessel ZB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirbonod, B.; Hanacek, L.

    1990-01-01

    The work presented here is the Swiss contribution to the project 'Zwischenbehaelter 2 (ZB2)' hosted by the 'Bundesministerium fuer Forschung und Technologie' of the Federal Republic of Germany. One of the crack-like defects introduced at the inside surface of the thick-walled pressure vessel ZB2 was locally monitored by acoustic emission. The measurement system was broadband (0.5 - 5 MHz) and allowed a threedimensional location of the source. The vessel was subjected to different tests. Signals were recorded during the second series of hydrotests, fast pressure cycles and fatigue test at 50 C. About 1 signal per hydrotest or cycle was recorded. For the hydrotests the signals were recorded generally at loading in the intermediate range of pressure; the sources were located in the artificial defect. Recurrent and non recurrent signals were recorded during the fatigue test. At loading, signals were captured up to the maximum pressure and for the recurrent signals at well defined pressure ranges. All the sources (except one, located in the base material ahead of the artificial defect) were situated in the artificial defect. The pressure and location depended on the loading phase and on the cycle range. The measurements were discussed by describing the signals by measurement, signal and source parameters. The goal was to identify the source mechanism and to assess the growth of the defect. For the hydrotests the identification of the mechanism at loading remains open. For the fatigue test the source situated in the base material was attributed to a primary mechanism; this source could assess the growth of the defect on the basis of linear elastic fracture mechanics. A secondary mechanism was suggested for recurrent sources active at loading. For all the tests, the sources active at unloading were attributed to a secondary mechanism. (author)

  1. A quantitative index of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution in normal pressure hydrocephalus using an MRI-based processing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, A; Mitsuoka, H; Sato, K; Kanayama, S

    2000-06-01

    Our purpose was to quantify the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume components using an original MRI-based segmentation technique and to investigate whether a CSF volume index is useful for diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). We studied 59 subjects: 16 patients with NPH, 14 young and 13 elderly normal volunteers, and 16 patients with cerebrovascular disease. Images were acquired on a 1.5-T system, using a 3D-fast asymmetrical spin-echo (FASE) method. A region-growing method (RGM) was used to extract the CSF spaces from the FASE images. Ventricular volume (VV) and intracranial CSF volume (ICV) were measured, and a VV/ICV ratio was calculated. Mean VV and VV/ICV ratio were higher in the NPH group than in the other groups, and the differences were statistically significant, whereas the mean ICV value in the NPH group was not significantly increased. Of the 16 patients in the NPH group, 13 had VV/ICV ratios above 30%. In contrast, no subject in the other groups had a VV/ICV ratios higher than 30%. We conclude that these CSF volume parameters, especially the VV/ICV ratio, are useful for the diagnosis of NPH.

  2. A quantitative index of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution in normal pressure hydrocephalus using an MRI-based processing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, A.; Mitsuoka, H.; Sato, K.; Kanayama, S.

    2000-01-01

    Our purpose was to quantify the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume components using an original MRI-based segmentation technique and to investigate whether a CSF volume index is useful for diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). We studied 59 subjects: 16 patients with NPH, 14 young and 13 elderly normal volunteers, and 16 patients with cerebrovascular disease. Images were acquired on a 1.5-T system, using a 3D-fast asymmetrical spin- echo (FASE) method. A region-growing method (RGM) was used to extract the CSF spaces from the FASE images. Ventricular volume (VV) and intracranial CSF volume (ICV) were measured, and a VV/ICV ratio was calculated. Mean VV and VV/ICV ratio were higher in the NPH group than in the other groups, and the differences were statistically significant, whereas the mean ICV value in the NPH group was not significantly increased. Of the 16 patients in the NPH group, 13 had VV/ICV ratios above 30%. In contrast, no subject in the other groups had a VV/ICV ratios higher than 30%. We conclude that these CSF volume parameters, especially the VV/ICV ratio, are useful for the diagnosis of NPH. (orig.)

  3. A quantitative index of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution in normal pressure hydrocephalus using an MRI-based processing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunoda, A. [Department of Neurosurgery, Koshigaya Municipal Hospital, 10-47-1 Higashikoshigaya, Koshigaya City, Saitama 343-0023 (Japan); Mitsuoka, H.; Sato, K. [Department of Neurosurgery, Juntendo University (Japan); Kanayama, S. [Research and Development Centre, Toshiba Corporation (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    Our purpose was to quantify the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume components using an original MRI-based segmentation technique and to investigate whether a CSF volume index is useful for diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). We studied 59 subjects: 16 patients with NPH, 14 young and 13 elderly normal volunteers, and 16 patients with cerebrovascular disease. Images were acquired on a 1.5-T system, using a 3D-fast asymmetrical spin- echo (FASE) method. A region-growing method (RGM) was used to extract the CSF spaces from the FASE images. Ventricular volume (VV) and intracranial CSF volume (ICV) were measured, and a VV/ICV ratio was calculated. Mean VV and VV/ICV ratio were higher in the NPH group than in the other groups, and the differences were statistically significant, whereas the mean ICV value in the NPH group was not significantly increased. Of the 16 patients in the NPH group, 13 had VV/ICV ratios above 30%. In contrast, no subject in the other groups had a VV/ICV ratios higher than 30%. We conclude that these CSF volume parameters, especially the VV/ICV ratio, are useful for the diagnosis of NPH. (orig.)

  4. Measurement of the local void fraction at high pressures in a heating channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.

    1969-01-01

    Void fraction measurements were made in two phase flow boiling systems at high pressures in a uniformly heated, rectangular channel with a high aspect ratio. The local void fraction values were calculated from measurements of the absorption of a thin collimated X-ray beam (2 mm x 0.05 mm). The mean void fraction in a horizontal section results from integration of the local values across the section. At a fixed measuring station the quality and- void fraction were varied by changing the heat flux, flow rate and pressure systematically. Two channels were used differing in length and thickness (150.8 cm x 5.3 cm x 0.2 cm and the significant features of this study are: -1) The void fraction measurements are among the first obtained at such high pressure (80 to 140 kg/cm 2 ); -2) In the experimental region under consideration the measurements are systematic and numerous enough to allow accurate interpolations: mass velocity from 50 to 220 g/cm 2 .s, heat flux from 40 to 170 W/cm 2 and calculated steam quality from -0.2 to 0.2; -3) Many tests were performed under local boiling conditions with the mean temperature of the fluid below the saturation temperature; and -4) These results were compared to the predictions of certain models presented in the literature and simple empirical formulae were developed to fit the experimental results. (author) [fr

  5. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepa, M. W., E-mail: mkepa@staffmail.ed.ac.uk; Huxley, A. D. [SUPA, Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Ridley, C. J.; Kamenev, K. V. [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe{sub 2}.

  6. Seat pressure measurement technologies: considerations for their evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyi, D E; Porter, J M; Robertson, N K

    1998-04-01

    Interface pressure measurement has generated interest in the automotive industry as a technique which could be used in the prediction of driver discomfort for various car seat designs, and provide designers and manufacturers with rapid information early on in the design process. It is therefore essential that the data obtained are of the highest quality, relevant and have some quantitative meaning. Exploratory experimental work carried out with the commercially available Talley Pressure Monitor is outlined. This led to a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of this system and the re-design of the sensor matrix. Such evaluation, in the context of the actual experimental environment, is considered essential.

  7. Video measurements of fluid velocities and water levels in breaking waves

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cost-effective measurement of the velocity flow fields in breaking water waves, using particle and correlation image velocimetry, is described. The fluid velocities are estimated by tracking the motion of neutrally buoyant particles and aeration...

  8. [Parkinson gait analysis using in-shoe plantar pressure measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihet, D; Moretto, P; Defebvre, L; Thevenon, A

    2006-02-01

    The literature reports some studies describing the walking pattern of patients with Parkinson's disease, its deterioration with disease severity and the effects of various treatments. Other studies concerned the plantar pressure distribution when walking. The aim of this study was to validate the use of baropodometric measurements for gait analysis of parkinsonian patients at various stages of disease severity and in on and off phases. Fifteen normal control subjects and fifteen parkinsonian patients equipped with a plantar pressure measurement system performed walking tests. The parkinsonian patients performed the walking tests in off phase then in on phase. A clinical examination was performed to score the motor handicap on the UPDRS scale. Analysis of the plantar pressures of the parkinsonian subjects under various footprint areas detected significant baropodometric differences compared with controls, between groups with different UPDRS scores, and before and after L-Dopa treatment. Plantar pressures measurements allow a sufficiently fine discrimination for using it to detect parkinsonism and monitor patients with Parkinson's disease.

  9. Measurement of pressure on a surface using bubble acoustic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldham, Ben; Manasseh, Richard; Liffman, Kurt; Šutalo, Ilija D; Illesinghe, Suhith; Ooi, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The frequency response of gas bubbles as a function of liquid ambient pressure was measured and compared with theory. A bubble size with equivalent spherical radius of 2.29 mm was used over a frequency range of 1000–1500 Hz. The ultimate aim is to develop an acoustic sensor that can measure static pressure and is sensitive to variations as small as a few kPa. The classical bubble resonance frequency is known to vary with ambient pressure. Experiments were conducted with a driven bubble in a pressurizable tank with a signal processing system designed to extract the resonant peak. Since the background response of the containing tank is significant, particularly near tank-modal resonances, it must be carefully removed from the bubble response signal. A dual-hydrophone method was developed to allow rapid and reliable real-time measurements. The expected pressure dependence was found. In order to obtain a reasonable match with theory, the classical theory was modified by the introduction of a 'mirror bubble' to account for the influence of a nearby surface. (technical design note)

  10. Method of measuring the mass flow rate of a substance entering a cocurrent fluid stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, H.D. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An improved method of monitoring the mass flow rate of a substance entering a coherent fluid stream is described. The method very basically consists of heating equal sections of the fluid stream above and below the point of entry of the substance to be monitored, and measuring and comparing the resulting change in temperature of the sections. Advantage is taken of the difference in thermal characteristics of the fluid and the substance to be measured to correlate temperature differences in the sections above and below the substance feed point for providing an indication of the mass flow rate of the substance

  11. Two-fluid and nonlinear effects of tearing and pressure-driven resistive modes in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirnov, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    Large-scale tearing instabilities have long been considered to underlie transport and dynamo processes in the reversed field pinch (RFP). The vast majority of theoretical and computational RFP work has focused on pressureless, single-fluid MHD in cylindrical plasmas driven solely by a toroidal electric field. We report results of five investigations covering two-fluid dynamos, toroidal nonlinear MHD computation, nonlinear computation of Oscillating Field Current Drive (OFCD), the effect of shear flow on tearing instability, and the effect of pressure on resistive instability. The key findings are: (1) two-fluid dynamo arising from the Hall term is much larger than the standard MHD dynamo present in a single-fluid treatment, (2) geometric coupling from toroidicity precludes the occurrence of laminar single helicity states, except for nonreversed plasmas, (3) OFCD, a form of AC helicity injection, can sustain the RFP plasma current, although magnetic fluctuations are enhanced, (4) edge shear flow can destabilize the edge resonant m=0 modes, which occur as spikes in experiment, and (5) pressure driven modes are resistive at low beta, only becoming ideal at extremely high beta. (author)

  12. Model validation and parametric study of fluid flows and heat transfer of aviation kerosene with endothermic pyrolysis at supercritical pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keke Xu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The regenerative cooling technology is a promising approach for effective thermal protection of propulsion and power-generation systems. A mathematical model has been used to examine fluid flows and heat transfer of the aviation kerosene RP-3 with endothermic fuel pyrolysis at a supercritical pressure of 5 MPa. A pyrolytic reaction mechanism, which consists of 18 species and 24 elementary reactions, is incorporated to account for fuel pyrolysis. Detailed model validations are conducted against a series of experimental data, including fluid temperature, fuel conversion rate, various product yields, and chemical heat sink, fully verifying the accuracy and reliability of the model. Effects of fuel pyrolysis and inlet flow velocity on flow dynamics and heat transfer characteristics of RP-3 are investigated. Results reveal that the endothermic fuel pyrolysis significantly improves the heat transfer process in the high fluid temperature region. During the supercritical-pressure heat transfer process, the flow velocity significantly increases, caused by the drastic variations of thermophysical properties. Under all the tested conditions, the Nusselt number initially increases, consistent with the increased flow velocity, and then slightly decreases in the high fluid temperature region, mainly owing to the decreased heat absorption rate from the endothermic pyrolytic chemical reactions.

  13. Pressure pulsation measurements in pipe and cluster flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benemann, A.; Voj, P.

    1976-01-01

    Measuring and evaluation techniques of pressure pulsations in pipe and cluster flows are described. The measurements were made on a 1 m long SNR rod-cluster and its feed and drain pipes. At Reynolds numbers in the cluster of 8.9 x 10 4 flow velocities of 14 m/sec were achieved. With the aid of a block diagram recording of the measured values by piezoelectric crystal and piezo-resistive strain gange as well as data processing are explained. For the analytical treatment of the pressure pulsation signals characterizing the turbulence field computer codes of a digital computer and a fast-fourier analyzer (Hewlett-Packard 5450 A) were used. The results show good agreement with theoretical curves on the behaviour of turbulent boundary layers of cluster and pipe flows at high Reynolds numbers. (TK) [de

  14. Pressure drop ana velocity measurements in KMRR fuel rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagn, Sun Kyu; Chung, Heung June; Chung, Chang Whan; Chun, Se Young; Song, Chul Wha; Won, Soon Yeun; Chung, Moon Ki

    1990-01-01

    The detailed hydraulic characteristic measurements in subchannels of longitudinally finned rod bundles using one-component LDV(Laser Doppler Velocimeter) were performed. Time mean axial velocity, turbulent intensity, and turbulent micro scales, such as time auto-correlation, Eulerian integral and micro scale, Kolmogorov length and time scale, and Taylor micro length scale were measured. The signals from LDV are inherently more or less discontinuous. The spectra of signals having such intermittent defects can be obtained by the fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of the auto-correlation function. The turbulent crossflow mixing rate between neighboring subchannels and dominant frequencies were evaluated from the measured data. Pressure drop data were obtained for the typical 36-element and 18-element fuel rod bundles fabricated by the design requirement of KMRR fuel and for other type of fuels assembled with 6-fin rods to investigate the fin effects on the pressure drop characteristics

  15. Absolute measurement of the viscosity of classical and quantum fluids by rotating-cylinder viscometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.; LaMar, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss the use of rotating-cylinder viscometers to determine absolute shear viscosities of classical fluids and of helium II in the context of past and current knowledge of the stability and flow of these fluids between concentric cylinders. We identify a problem in measuring the absolute viscosity when the inner cylinder is rotating and the outer cylinder is at rest. We conclude by discussing the design of viscometers for absolute viscosity measurements in helium I and helium II

  16. Offline combination of pressurized fluid extraction and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy for antioxidant activity of grape skin extracts assessment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polovka, M.; Šťavíková, Lenka; Hohnová, Barbora; Karásek, Pavel; Roth, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1217, č. 51 (2010), s. 7990-8000 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/1536; GA MŠk LC06023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : pressurized fluid extraction * electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy * antioxidant activity Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.194, year: 2010

  17. Skeletal Adaptation to Intramedullary Pressure-Induced Interstitial Fluid Flow Is Enhanced in Mice Subjected to Targeted Osteocyte Ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Ronald Y.; Meays, Diana R.; Meilan, Alexander S.; Jones, Jeremiah; Miramontes, Rosa; Kardos, Natalie; Yeh, Jiunn-Chern; Frangos, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow (IFF) is a potent regulatory signal in bone. During mechanical loading, IFF is generated through two distinct mechanisms that result in spatially distinct flow profiles: poroelastic interactions within the lacunar-canalicular system, and intramedullary pressurization. While the former generates IFF primarily within the lacunar-canalicular network, the latter generates significant flow at the endosteal surface as well as within the tissue. This gives rise to the intrigu...

  18. Blood pressure measurement in obese patients: comparison between upper arm and forearm measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierin, Angela M G; Alavarce, Débora C; Gusmão, Josiane L; Halpern, Alfredo; Mion, Décio

    2004-06-01

    It is well known that blood pressure measurement with a standard 12-13 cm wide cuff is erroneous for large arms. To compare arm blood pressure measurements with an appropriate cuff and forearm blood pressure measurements (BPM) with a standard cuff, and both measurements by the Photopletismography (Finapres) method. One hundred and twenty-nine obese patients were studied (body mass index=40+/-7 kg/m2). The patients had three arm BPM taken by an automatic oscillometric device using an appropriate cuff and three forearm BPM with a standard cuff in the sitting position after a five-minute rest. Data were analysed by the analysis of variance. The correction values were obtained by the linear regression test. Systolic and diastolic arm BPM with an appropriate cuff were significantly lower (pforearm BPM with a standard cuff. The measurements obtained by Finapres were significantly lower (pforearm systolic and diastolic blood pressures and upper arm diastolic blood pressure. The equation to correct BPM in forearm in obese patients with arm circumference between 32-44 cm was: systolic BPM=33.2+/-0.68 x systolic forearm BPM, and diastolic BPM=25.2+0.59 x forearm diastolic BPM. This study showed that forearm blood pressure measurement overestimates the values of arm blood pressure measurement. In addition, it is possible to correct forearm BPM with an equation.

  19. Speciation of High-Pressure Carbon-Saturated COH Fluids at Buffered fO2 Conditions: An Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumiati, S.; Tiraboschi, C.; Recchia, S.; Poli, S.

    2014-12-01

    The quantitative assessment of species in COH fluids is crucial in modelling mantle processes. For instance, H2O/CO2 ratio in the fluid phase influences the location of the solidus and of carbonation/decarbonation reactions in peridotitic systems . In the scientific literature, the speciation of COH fluids has been generally assumed on the basis of thermodynamic calculations using equations of state of simple H2O-non-polar gas systems (e.g., H2O-CO2-CH4). Only few authors dealt with the experimental determination of high-pressure COH fluid species at different conditions, using diverse experimental and analytical approaches (e.g., piston cylinder+capsule-piercing+gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry; cold-seal+silica glass capsules+Raman). We performed experiments on COH fluids using a capsule-piercing device coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometry. This type of analyzer ensures superior performances in terms of selectivity of molecules to be detected, high acquisition rates and extended linear response range. Experiments were carried out in a rocking piston cylinder apparatus at pressure of 1 GPa and temperatures from 800 to 900°C. Carbon-saturated fluids were generated through the addition of oxalic acid dihydrate and graphite. Single/double capsules and different packing materials (BN and MgO) were used to evaluate the divergence from the thermodynamic speciation model. Moreover, to assess the effect of solutes on COH fluid speciation we also performed a set of experiments adding synthetic forsterite to the charge. To determine the speciation we assembled a capsule-piercing device that allows to puncture the capsule in a gas-tight vessel at 80°C. The extraction Teflon vessel is composed of a base part, where the capsule is allocated on a steel support, and a top part where a steel drill is mounted. To release the quenched fluids from the capsule, the base part of vessel is hand-tighten to the top part, allowing the steel pointer to pierce the capsule. The

  20. Spreading of Non-Newtonian and Newtonian Fluids on a Solid Substrate under Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Moutushi Dutta; Chandra, Subrata; Nag, Soma; Tarafdar, Sujata [Condensed Matter Physics Research Centre, Physics Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Das, Shantanu, E-mail: mou15july@gmail.com [Reactor Control Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2011-09-15

    Strongly non-Newtonian fluids namely, aqueous gels of starch, are shown to exhibit visco-elastic behavior, when subjected to a load. We study arrowroot and potato starch gels. When a droplet of the fluid is sandwiched between two glass plates and compressed, the area of contact between the fluid and plates increases in an oscillatory manner. This is unlike Newtonian fluids, where the area increases monotonically in a similar situation. The periphery moreover, develops an instability, which looks similar to Saffman Taylor fingers. This is not normally seen under compression. The loading history is also found to affect the manner of spreading. We attempt to describe the non-Newtonian nature of the fluid through a visco-elastic model incorporating generalized calculus. This is shown to reproduce qualitatively the oscillatory variation in the surface strain.

  1. Microfluidic device and methods for focusing fluid streams using electroosmotically induced pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Stephen C.; Ramsey, J. Michael

    2010-06-01

    A microfabricated device employing a bridging membrane and methods for electrokinetic transport of a liquid phase biological or chemical material using the same are described. The bridging membrane is deployed in or adjacent to a microchannel and permits either electric current flow or the transport of gas species, while inhibiting the bulk flow of material. The use of bridging membranes in accordance with this invention is applicable to electrokinetically inducing fluid flow to confine a selected material in a region of a microchannel that is not influenced by an electric field. Other structures for inducing fluid flow in accordance with this invention include nanochannel bridging membranes and alternating current fluid pumping devices. Applications of the bridging membranes according to this invention include the separation of species from a sample material, valving of fluids in a microchannel network, mixing of different materials in a microchannel, and the pumping of fluids.

  2. System for Rapid, Precise Modulation of Intraocular Pressure, toward Minimally-Invasive In Vivo Measurement of Intracranial Pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max A Stockslager

    Full Text Available Pathologic changes in intracranial pressure (ICP are commonly observed in a variety of medical conditions, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, brain tumors, and glaucoma. However, current ICP measurement techniques are invasive, requiring a lumbar puncture or surgical insertion of a cannula into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-filled ventricles of the brain. A potential alternative approach to ICP measurement leverages the unique anatomy of the central retinal vein, which is exposed to both intraocular pressure (IOP and ICP as it travels inside the eye and through the optic nerve; manipulating IOP while observing changes in the natural pulsations of the central retinal vein could potentially provide an accurate, indirect measure of ICP. As a step toward implementing this technique, we describe the design, fabrication, and characterization of a system that is capable of manipulating IOP in vivo with <0.1 mmHg resolution and settling times less than 2 seconds. In vitro tests were carried out to characterize system performance. Then, as a proof of concept, we used the system to manipulate IOP in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri while video of the retinal vessels was recorded and the caliber of a selected vein was quantified. Modulating IOP using our system elicited a rapid change in the appearance of the retinal vein of interest: IOP was lowered from 10 to 3 mmHg, and retinal vein caliber sharply increased as IOP decreased from 7 to 5 mmHg. Another important feature of this technology is its capability to measure ocular compliance and outflow facility in vivo, as demonstrated in tree shrews. Collectively, these proof-of-concept demonstrations support the utility of this system to manipulate IOP for a variety of useful applications in ocular biomechanics, and provide a framework for further study of the mechanisms of retinal venous pulsation.

  3. Body mass index and blood pressure measurement during pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, Jennifer L

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The accurate measurement of blood pressure requires the use of a large cuff in subjects with a high mid-arm circumference (MAC). This prospective study examined the need for a large cuff during pregnancy and its correlation with maternal obesity. METHODS: Maternal body mass index (BMI), fat mass, and MAC were measured. RESULTS: Of 179 women studied, 15.6% were obese. With a BMI of level 1 obesity, 44% needed a large cuff and with a BMI of level 2 obesity 100% needed a large cuff. CONCLUSION: All women booking for antenatal care should have their MAC measured to avoid the overdiagnosis of pregnancy hypertension.

  4. Measurements of acoustic pressure at high amplitudes and intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, L A; Bailey, M R; Kaczkowski, P; McAteer, J A; Pishchalnikov, Y A; Sapozhnikov, O A

    2004-01-01

    In our research group, we desire measurements of the large pressure amplitudes generated by the shock waves used in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and the large acoustic intensities used in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Conventional piezoelectric or PVDF hydrophones can not be used for such measurements as they are damaged either by cavitation, in SWL applications, or heat, in HIFU applications. In order to circumvent these difficulties, we have utilized optical fiber hydrophones in SWL that do not cavitate, and small glass probes and a scattering technique for measurements of large HIFU intensities. Descriptions of these techniques will be given as well as some typical data

  5. Measurement of carotid bifurcation pressure gradients using the Bernoulli principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illig, K A; Ouriel, K; DeWeese, J A; Holen, J; Green, R M

    1996-04-01

    Current randomized prospective studies suggest that the degree of carotid stenosis is a critical element in deciding whether surgical or medical treatment is appropriate. Of potential interest is the actual pressure drop caused by the blockage, but no direct non-invasive means of quantifying the hemodynamic consequences of carotid artery stenoses currently exists. The present prospective study examined whether preoperative pulsed-Doppler duplex ultrasonographic velocity (v) measurements could be used to predict pressure gradients (delta P) caused by carotid artery stenoses, and whether such measurements could be used to predict angiographic percent diameter reduction. Preoperative Doppler velocity and intraoperative direct pressure measurements were obtained, and per cent diameter angiographic stenosis measured in 76 consecutive patients who underwent 77 elective carotid endarterectomies. Using the Bernoulli principle (delta P = 4v(2), pressure gradients across the stenoses were calculated. The predicted delta P, as well as absolute velocities and internal carotid artery/common carotid velocity ratios were compared with the actual delta P measured intraoperatively and with preoperative angiography and oculopneumoplethysmography (OPG) results. An end-diastolic velocity of > or = 1 m/s and an end-diastolic internal carotid artery/common carotid artery velocity ratio of > or = 10 predicted a 50% diameter angiographic stenosis with 100% specificity. Although statistical significance was reached, preoperative pressure gradients derived from the Bernoulli equation could not predict actual individual intraoperative pressure gradients with enough accuracy to allow decision making on an individual basis. Velocity measurements were as specific and more sensitive than OPG results. Delta P as predicted by the Bernoulli equation is not sufficiently accurate at the carotid bifurcation to be useful for clinical decision making on an individual basis. However, end

  6. Propagation of Radiosonde Pressure Sensor Errors to Ozonesonde Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, R. M.; Morris, G.A.; Thompson, A. M.; Joseph, E.; Coetzee, G. J. R.; Nalli, N. R.

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies highlight pressure (or equivalently, pressure altitude) discrepancies between the radiosonde pressure sensor and that derived from a GPS flown with the radiosonde. The offsets vary during the ascent both in absolute and percent pressure differences. To investigate this problem further, a total of 731 radiosonde-ozonesonde launches from the Southern Hemisphere subtropics to Northern mid-latitudes are considered, with launches between 2005 - 2013 from both longer-term and campaign-based intensive stations. Five series of radiosondes from two manufacturers (International Met Systems: iMet, iMet-P, iMet-S, and Vaisala: RS80-15N and RS92-SGP) are analyzed to determine the magnitude of the pressure offset. Additionally, electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes from three manufacturers (Science Pump Corporation; SPC and ENSCI-Droplet Measurement Technologies; DMT) are analyzed to quantify the effects these offsets have on the calculation of ECC ozone (O3) mixing ratio profiles (O3MR) from the ozonesonde-measured partial pressure. Approximately half of all offsets are 0.6 hPa in the free troposphere, with nearly a third 1.0 hPa at 26 km, where the 1.0 hPa error represents 5 persent of the total atmospheric pressure. Pressure offsets have negligible effects on O3MR below 20 km (96 percent of launches lie within 5 percent O3MR error at 20 km). Ozone mixing ratio errors above 10 hPa (30 km), can approach greater than 10 percent ( 25 percent of launches that reach 30 km exceed this threshold). These errors cause disagreement between the integrated ozonesonde-only column O3 from the GPS and radiosonde pressure profile by an average of +6.5 DU. Comparisons of total column O3 between the GPS and radiosonde pressure profiles yield average differences of +1.1 DU when the O3 is integrated to burst with addition of the McPeters and Labow (2012) above-burst O3 column climatology. Total column differences are reduced to an average of -0.5 DU when

  7. How Pore-Fluid Pressure due to Heavy Rainfall Influences Volcanic Eruptions, Example of 1998 and 2008 Eruptions of Cerro Azul (Galapagos)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, F.; Amelung, F.; Gregg, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    About 30 worldwide seismic studies have shown a strong correlation between rainfall and earthquakes in the past 22 years (e.g. Costain and Bollinger, 2010). Such correlation has been explained by the phenomenon of hydro-seismicity via pore pressure diffusion: an increase of pore-fluid in the upper crust reduces the normal stress on faults, which can trigger shear failure. Although this pore pressure effect is widely known for earthquakes, this phenomenon and more broadly poro-elasticity process are not widely studied on volcanoes. However, we know from our previous works that tensile failures that open to propagate magma through the surface are also pore pressure dependent. We have demonstrated that an increase of pore pressure largely reduces the overpressure required to rupture the magma reservoir. We have shown that the pore pressure has more influence on reservoir stability than other parameters such as the reservoir depth or the edifice loading. Here, we investigate how small pore-fluid changes due to hydrothermal or aquifer refill during heavy rainfall may perturb the conditions of failure around magma reservoirs and, what is more, if these perturbations are enough to trigger magma intrusions. We quantify the pore pressure effect on magmatic system by combining 1) 1D pore pressure diffusion model to quantify how pore pressure changes from surface to depth after heavy rainfall events and 2) 2D poro-elastic numerical model to provide the evolution of failure conditions of the reservoir as a consequence of these pore pressure changes. Sensitivity analysis is also performed to characterize the influence on our results of the poro-elastic parameters (hydraulic diffusivity, permeability and porosity) and the geometry of the magma reservoir and the aquifer (depth, size, shape). Finally, we apply our methodology to Cerro Azul volcano (Galapagos) where both last eruptions (1998 and 2008) occurred just after heavy rainfall events, without any pre-eruptive inflation. In

  8. Falls event detection using triaxial accelerometry and barometric pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Federico; Redmond, Stephen J; Narayanan, Michael R; Cerutti, Sergio; Celler, Branko G; Lovell, Nigel H

    2009-01-01

    A falls detection system, employing a Bluetooth-based wearable device, containing a triaxial accelerometer and a barometric pressure sensor, is described. The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of barometric pressure measurement, as a surrogate measure of altitude, to augment previously reported accelerometry-based falls detection algorithms. The accelerometry and barometric pressure signals obtained from the waist-mounted device are analyzed by a signal processing and classification algorithm to discriminate falls from activities of daily living. This falls detection algorithm has been compared to two existing algorithms which utilize accelerometry signals alone. A set of laboratory-based simulated falls, along with other tasks associated with activities of daily living (16 tests) were performed by 15 healthy volunteers (9 male and 6 female; age: 23.7 +/- 2.9 years; height: 1.74 +/- 0.11 m). The algorithm incorporating pressure information detected falls with the highest sensitivity (97.8%) and the highest specificity (96.7%).

  9. Research and development of thermal-fluid measuring instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuzla, K.; Chen, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this program is to develop an instrument to measure the time-fraction of liquid contact in the transition and film boiling regimes for flow within a vertical tube. The work was carried out at Lehigh University between February 15, 1989 to February 15, 1991. The instrument to measure time-fraction of liquid contact was successfully developed and tested

  10. Numerical prediction of pressure loss in tight-lattice rod bundle by use of 3-dimensional two-fluid model simulation code ACE-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    Two-fluid model can simulate two-phase flow by computational cost less than detailed two-phase flow simulation method such as interface tracking method or particle interaction method. Therefore, two-fluid model is useful for thermal hydraulic analysis in large-scale domain such as a rod bundle. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) develops three dimensional two-fluid model analysis code ACE-3D that adopts boundary fitted coordinate system in order to simulate complex shape flow channel. In this paper, boiling two-phase flow analysis in a tight-lattice rod bundle was performed by the ACE-3D. In the results, the void fraction, which distributes in outermost region of rod bundle, is lower than that in center region of rod bundle. The tendency of void fraction distribution agreed with the measurement results by neutron radiography qualitatively. To evaluate effects of two-phase flow model used in the ACE-3D, numerical simulation of boiling two-phase in tight-lattice rod bundle with no lift force model was also performed. In the results, the lift force model has direct effects on void fraction concentration in gap region, and pressure distribution in horizontal plane induced by void fraction distribution cause of bubble movement from the gap region to the subchannel region. The predicted pressure loss in the section that includes no spacer accorded with experimental results with around 10% of differences. The predicted friction pressure loss was underestimated around 20% of measured values, and the effect of the turbulence model is considered as one of the causes of this underestimation. (author)

  11. Microstructures Indicate Large Influence of Temperature and Fluid Pressure on the Reactivation of the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, B.; Janssen, C.; Schleicher, A.; Toy, V.; Dresen, G.

    2017-12-01

    The transpressional Alpine Fault within New Zealand's South Island is the major structure that accommodates relative motion between the Pacific and the Australian Plates. It has been intensively studied, because it is late in its 291-year seismic cycle (Cochran et al., 2017; doi: 10.1016/j.epsl.2017.02.026), is likely to generate large (i.e. MW > 8) earthquakes, thus presents the biggest seismic hazard in the region. However, because it is severely misoriented in the present-day stress field for reactivation (Boese et al., 2013; doi: 10.1016/j.epsl.2013.06.030), supra-lithostatic fluid-pressures are required for rupture nucleation. We have analyzed microstructures (SEM and TEM), geochemistry (ICP-OES) and mineralogy (XRD) of outcrop samples of the fault core to investigate the influence of fluids on the geomechanical behavior of the fault. Fluid-related alteration is pervasive within 20 m of the principal slip zone (PSZ) (Sutherland et al., 2012; doi: 10.1130/G33614.1), which is an incohesive, cemented and repeatedly reworked fault gouge mostly consisting of a fine-grained matrix composed of comminuted detrital quartz and feldspar as well as authigenic chlorite and calcite. Authigenic phases seal the PSZ for interseismic cross-fault fluid flow and enable fluid pressure to build-up. Notable, smectite, previously considered to significantly influence propagation of Alpine Fault ruptures, is not present in these samples. Undeformed, euhedral chlorite grains suggest that the processes leading to fault sealing are not only active at greater depths but also close to the surface. The absence of smectite and the presence of undeformed chlorite at very shallow depths can be attributed to the fault's high geothermal gradient of > 120 °C km-1 (Sutherland et al., 2012; doi:10.1038/nature22355), which gives temperature conditions unfavorable for smectite to be stable and fostering chlorite growth. A pervasive network of anastomosing calcite veins in the fault core, depicting

  12. Noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow using an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Thomas; Yi, Juneyoung L; Kaufman, Bruce A; Krishnamurthy, Satish

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Mechanical failure-which is the primary cause of CSF shunt malfunction-is not readily diagnosed, and the specific reasons for mechanical failure are not easily discerned. Prior attempts to measure CSF flow noninvasively have lacked the ability to either quantitatively or qualitatively obtain data. To address these needs, this preliminary study evaluates an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor in pediatric and adult patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs). One goal was to confirm the stated accuracy of the sensor in a clinical setting. A second goal was to observe the sensor's capability to record real-time continuous CSF flow. The final goal was to observe recordings during instances of flow blockage or lack of flow in order to determine the sensor's ability to identify these changes. METHODS A total of 5 pediatric and 11 adult patients who had received EVDs for the treatment of hydrocephalus were studied in a hospital setting. The primary EVD was connected to a secondary study EVD that contained a fluid-filled pressure transducer and an in-line transit time flow sensor. Comparisons were made between the weight of the drainage bag and the flow measured via the sensor in order to confirm its accuracy. Data from the pressure transducer and the flow sensor were recorded continuously at 100 Hz for a period of 24 hours by a data acquisition system, while the hourly CSF flow into the drip chamber was recorded manually. Changes in the patient's neurological status and their time points were noted. RESULTS The flow sensor demonstrated a proven accuracy of ± 15% or ± 2 ml/hr. The flow sensor allowed real-time continuous flow waveform data recordings. Dynamic analysis of CSF flow waveforms allowed the calculation of the pressure-volume index. Lastly, the sensor was able to diagnose a blocked catheter and distinguish between the blockage and lack of flow. CONCLUSIONS The Transonic flow sensor accurately measures CSF output within ± 15% or ± 2 ml

  13. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  14. Mutual Solubility of MEG, Water and Reservoir Fluid: Experimental Measurements and Modeling using the CPA Equation of State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents new experimental phase equilibrium data of binary MEG-reservoir fluid and ternary MEG-water-reservoir fluid systems at temperatures 275-326 K and at atmospheric pressure. The reservoir fluid consists of a natural gas condensate from a Statoil operated gas field in the North Sea...... compounds. It has also been extended to reservoir fluids in presence of water and polar chemicals using a Pedersen like characterization method with modified correlations for critical temperature, pressure and acentric factor. In this work CPA is applied to the prediction of mutual solubility of reservoir...

  15. How important is the recommended slow cuff pressure deflation rate for blood pressure measurement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dingchang; Amoore, John N; Mieke, Stephan; Murray, Alan

    2011-10-01

    Cuff pressure deflation rate influences blood pressure (BP) measurement. However, there is little quantitative clinical evidence on its effect. Oscillometric pulses recorded from 75 subjects at the recommended deflation rate of 2-3 mmHg per second were analyzed. Some pulses were removed to realize six faster rates (2-7 times faster than the original). Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures (SBP, DBP, MAP) were determined from the original and six reconstructed oscillometric waveforms. Manual measurement was based on the appearance of oscillometric pulse peaks, and automatic measurement on two model envelopes (linear and polynomial) fitted to the sequence of oscillometric pulse amplitudes. The effects of deflation rate on BP determination and within-subject BP variability were analyzed. For SBP and DBP determined from the manual measurement, different deflation rates resulted in significant changes (both p deflation rate effect (all p > 0.3). Faster deflation increased the within-subject BP variability (all p deflation rate, and for the automatic model-based techniques, the deflation rate had little effect.

  16. Field demonstration of an active reservoir pressure management through fluid injection and displaced fluid extractions at the Rock Springs Uplift, a priority geologic CO2 storage site for Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zunsheng [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2017-04-05

    This report provides the results from the project entitled Field Demonstration of Reservoir Pressure Management through Fluid Injection and Displaced Fluid Extraction at the Rock Springs Uplift, a Priority Geologic CO2 Storage Site for Wyoming (DE-FE0026159 for both original performance period (September 1, 2015 to August 31, 2016) and no-cost extension (September 1, 2016 to January 6, 2017)).

  17. Pressure-temperature condition and hydrothermal-magmatic fluid evolution of the Cu-Mo Senj deposit, Central Alborz: fluid inclusion evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Tale Fazel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Senj deposit has significant potential for different types of mineralization, particularly porphyry-like Cu deposits, associated with subduction-related Eocene–Oligocene calc-alkaline porphyritic volcano-plutonic rocks. The study of fluid inclusions in hydrothermal ore deposits aims to identify and characterize the pressure, temperature, volume and fluid composition, (PTX conditions of fluids under which they were trapped (Heinrich et al., 1999; Ulrich and Heinrich, 2001; Redmond et al., 2004. Different characteristics of the deposit such as porphyrtic nature, alteration assemblage and the quartz-sulfide veins of the stockwork were poorly known. In this approach on the basis of alterations, vein cutting relationship and field distribution of fluid inclusions, the physical and chemical evolution of the hydrothermal system forming the porphyry Cu-Mo (±Au-Ag deposit in Senj is reconstructed. Materials and Methods Over 1000 m of drill core was logged at a scale of 1:1000 by Pichab Kavosh Co. and samples containing various vein and alteration types from different depths were collected for laboratory analyses. A total of 14 samples collected from the altered and least altered igneous rocks in the Senj deposit were analyzed for their major oxide concentrations by X-ray fluorescence in the SGS Mineral Services (Toronto, Canada. The detection limit for major oxide analysis is 0.01%. Trace and rare earth elements (REE were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometery (ICP-MS, in the commercial laboratory of SGS Mineral Services. The analytical error for most elements is less than 2%. The detection limit for trace elements and REEs analysis is 0.01 to 0.1 ppm. Fluid inclusion microthermometry was conducted using a Linkam THMS600 heating–freezing stage (-190 °C to +600 °C mounted on a ZEISS Axioplan2 microscope in the fluid inclusion laboratory of the Iranian Mineral Processing Research Center (Karaj, Iran. Results

  18. Direct Optical Measurement of Vorticity in Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-11

    Rotational Doppler Effect ( RDE ) and Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) light beams that possess orbital angular momentum (OAM). The approach has been implemented...Analogously, but much less utilized, the Rotational Doppler Effect ( RDE ) can be used to measure the angular velocity of a rotating object [4-5...Measuring with RDE requires the use of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) light beams that possess orbital angular momentum (OAM) l , a spatial (azimuthal

  19. Measurement of sound velocity profiles in fluids for process monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, M; Kühnicke, E; Lenz, M; Bock, M

    2012-01-01

    In ultrasonic measurements, the time of flight to the object interface is often the only information that is analysed. Conventionally it is only possible to determine distances or sound velocities if the other value is known. The current paper deals with a novel method to measure the sound propagation path length and the sound velocity in media with moving scattering particles simultaneously. Since the focal position also depends on sound velocity, it can be used as a second parameter. Via calibration curves it is possible to determine the focal position and sound velocity from the measured time of flight to the focus, which is correlated to the maximum of averaged echo signal amplitude. To move focal position along the acoustic axis, an annular array is used. This allows measuring sound velocity locally resolved without any previous knowledge of the acoustic media and without a reference reflector. In previous publications the functional efficiency of this method was shown for media with constant velocities. In this work the accuracy of these measurements is improved. Furthermore first measurements and simulations are introduced for non-homogeneous media. Therefore an experimental set-up was created to generate a linear temperature gradient, which also causes a gradient of sound velocity.

  20. Liquid–liquid equilibria for reservoir fluids+monoethylene glycol and reservoir fluids+monoethylene glycol+water: Experimental measurements and modeling using the CPA EoS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Michael; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2013-01-01

    for critical temperature, pressure and acentric factor.This work presents new phase equilibrium data for binary MEG/reservoir fluid and ternary MEG/water/reservoir fluid systems, where two reservoir fluids from Statoil operated fields are used. The solubility data are reported over a range of temperatures......The complex phase equilibrium between reservoir fluids and associating compounds like water and glycols has become more and more important as the increasing global energy demand pushes the oil industry to use advanced methods to increase oil recovery, such as increasing the use of various chemicals...... to ensure a constant and safe production. The CPA equation of state has been successfully applied in the past to well defined systems and gas condensates, containing associating compounds. It has also been extended to reservoir fluids in presence of water and polar chemicals using modified correlations...

  1. Comparison of current tonometry techniques in measurement of intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchaki, Behrooz; Hashemi, Hassan; Yekta, Abbasali; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2017-06-01

    To compare four tonometry techniques: Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT), Dynamic contour tonometer (DCT), Non-contact tonometer (NCT), and Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) in the measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) and the impact of some corneal biomechanical factors on their performance. In this cross-sectional study, volunteers with normal ophthalmic examination and no history of eye surgery (except for uncomplicated cataract surgery) or trauma were selected. Twenty-five subjects were male, and 21 were female. The mean age was 48 ± 19.2 years. Anterior segment parameters were measured with Scheimpflug imaging. IOP was measured with GAT, DCT, NCT, and ORA in random order. A 95% limit of agreement of IOPs was analyzed. The impact of different parameters on the measured IOP with each device was evaluated by regression analysis. The average IOP measured with GAT, DCT, NCT, and ORA was 16.4 ± 3.5, 18.1 ± 3.4, 16.2 ± 3.9, and 17.3 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively. The difference of IOP measured with NCT and GAT was not significant ( P  = 0.382). Intraocular pressure was significantly different between GAT with DCT and IOP CC ( P  tonometers.

  2. Measurement of viscosity of gaseous mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    Coefficients of viscosity of various types of gas mixtures, including simulated natural-gas samples, have been measured at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a modified capillary tube method. Pressure drops across the straight capillary tube section of a thermal mass flowmeter were measured for small, well-defined, volume flow rates for the test gases and for standard air. In this configuration, the flowmeter provides the volumetric flow rates as well as a well-characterized capillary section for differential pressure measurements across it. The coefficients of viscosity of the test gases were calculated using the reported value of 185.6 micro P for the viscosity of air. The coefficients of viscosity for the test mixtures were also calculated using Wilke's approximation of the Chapman-Enskog (C-E) theory. The experimental and calculated values for binary mixtures are in agreement within the reported accuracy of Wilke's approximation of the C-E theory. However, the agreement for multicomponent mixtures is less satisfactory, possible because of the limitations of Wilkes's approximation of the classical dilute-gas state model.

  3. Seismicity-based estimation of the driving fluid pressure in the case of swarm activity in Western Bohemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainzl, S.; Fischer, T.; Dahm, T.

    2012-10-01

    Two recent major swarms in Western Bohemia occurred in the years 2000 and 2008 within almost the same portion of a fault close to Novy Kostel. Previous analysis of the year 2000 earthquake swarm revealed that fluid intrusion seemed to initiate the activity whereas stress redistribution by the individual swarm earthquakes played a major role in the further swarm evolution. Here we analyse the new swarm, which occurred in the year 2008, with regard to its correlation to the previous swarm as well its spatiotemporal migration patterns. We find that (i) the main part of the year 2008 activity ruptured fault patches adjacent to the main activity of the swarm 2000, but that also (ii) a significant overlap exists where earthquakes occurred in patches in which stress had been already released by precursory events; (iii) the activity shows a clear migration which can be described by a 1-D (in up-dip direction) diffusion process; (iv) the migration pattern can be equally well explained by a hydrofracture growth, which additionally explains the faster migration in up-dip compared to the down-dip direction as well as the maximum up-dip extension of the activity. We use these observations to estimate the underlying fluid pressure change in two different ways: First, we calculate the stress changes induced by precursory events at the location of each swarm earthquake assuming that observed stress deficits had to be compensated by pore pressure increases; and secondly, we estimate the fluid overpressure by fitting a hydrofracture model to the asymmetric seismicity patterns. Both independent methods indicate that the fluid pressure increase was initially up to 30 MPa.

  4. Method and Apparatus for Predicting Unsteady Pressure and Flow Rate Distribution in a Fluid Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Alok K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and apparatus for analyzing steady state and transient flow in a complex fluid network, modeling phase changes, compressibility, mixture thermodynamics, external body forces such as gravity and centrifugal force and conjugate heat transfer. In some embodiments, a graphical user interface provides for the interactive development of a fluid network simulation having nodes and branches. In some embodiments, mass, energy, and specific conservation equations are solved at the nodes, and momentum conservation equations are solved in the branches. In some embodiments, contained herein are data objects for computing thermodynamic and thermophysical properties for fluids. In some embodiments, the systems of equations describing the fluid network are solved by a hybrid numerical method that is a combination of the Newton-Raphson and successive substitution methods.

  5. The use of gamma radiation in fluid flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjugum, S.A.; Johansen, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    The use of gamma radiation in densitometry measurements is a well known principle. These measurements are often used in the oil industry where there is a need for finding the gas fraction of an oil/water/gas flow. The traditional gamma densitometer has a simple construction, where the measured parameter is the attenuation of a single gamma beam. High reliability, robustness and the clamp-on possibility are advantages that this type of instruments offer. More information can be found by studying how radiation is scattered and absorbed by matter. This information is needed in new multiphase flow meters. Problems to be solved in these instruments are how to find volume fractions of more than two components, how to handle different flow regimes in non-homogeneous flow, and how to do measurements independent of the salinity of the water. The new technology involves multi-energy, multi-mode and multi-sensor systems. At the University of Bergen the focus has been on how to do flow regime and salinity independent measurements by using multi-sensor and multi-mode systems. This paper gives an overview of the different techniques, and presents the latest results within this field of research at the University of Bergen. (author)

  6. Direct measurement of the ballistic motion of a freely floating colloid in Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Andrew P; Corwin, Eric I

    2017-10-01

    A thermal colloid suspended in a liquid will transition from a short-time ballistic motion to a long-time diffusive motion. However, the transition between ballistic and diffusive motion is highly dependent on the properties and structure of the particular liquid. We directly observe a free floating tracer particle's ballistic motion and its transition to the long-time regime in both a Newtonian fluid and a viscoelastic Maxwell fluid. We examine the motion of the free particle in a Newtonian fluid and demonstrate a high degree of agreement with the accepted Clercx-Schram model for motion in a dense fluid. Measurements of the functional form of the ballistic-to-diffusive transition provide direct measurements of the temperature, viscosity, and tracer radius. We likewise measure the motion in a viscoelastic Maxwell fluid and find a significant disagreement between the theoretical asymptotic behavior and our measured values of the microscopic properties of the fluid. We observe a greatly increased effective mass for a freely moving particle and a decreased plateau modulus.

  7. Measurement of temperature and pressure on the surface of a blunt cone using FBG sensor in hypersonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, A. S. Guru; Sharath, U.; Nagarjun, V.; Hegde, G. M.; Asokan, S.

    2013-09-01

    Measurement of temperature and pressure exerted on the leeward surface of a blunt cone specimen has been demonstrated in the present work in a hypersonic wind tunnel using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The experiments were conducted on a 30° apex-angle blunt cone with 51 mm base diameter at wind flow speeds of Mach 6.5 and 8.35 in a 300 mm hypersonic wind tunnel of Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. A special pressure insensitive temperature sensor probe along with the conventional bare FBG sensors was used for explicit temperature and aerodynamic pressure measurement respectively on the leeward surface of the specimen. computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the flow field around the blunt cone specimen has also been carried out to obtain the temperature and pressure at conditions analogous to experiments. The results obtained from FBG sensors and the CFD simulations are found to be in good agreement with each other.

  8. Measurement of temperature and pressure on the surface of a blunt cone using FBG sensor in hypersonic wind tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guru Prasad, A S; Sharath, U; Asokan, S; Nagarjun, V; Hegde, G M

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of temperature and pressure exerted on the leeward surface of a blunt cone specimen has been demonstrated in the present work in a hypersonic wind tunnel using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The experiments were conducted on a 30° apex-angle blunt cone with 51 mm base diameter at wind flow speeds of Mach 6.5 and 8.35 in a 300 mm hypersonic wind tunnel of Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. A special pressure insensitive temperature sensor probe along with the conventional bare FBG sensors was used for explicit temperature and aerodynamic pressure measurement respectively on the leeward surface of the specimen. computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the flow field around the blunt cone specimen has also been carried out to obtain the temperature and pressure at conditions analogous to experiments. The results obtained from FBG sensors and the CFD simulations are found to be in good agreement with each other. (paper)

  9. Critical heat flux near the critical pressure in heater rod bundle cooled by R-134A fluid: Effects of unheated rods and spacer grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Se-Y.; Shin, C.W.; Hong, S. D.; Moon, S. K.

    2007-01-01

    A supercritical-pressure light water reactor (SCWR) is currently investigated as the next generation nuclear reactors. The SCWR, which is operated above the thermodynamic critical point of water (647 K, 22.1 MPa), have advantages over conventional light water reactors in terms of thermal efficiency as well as in compactness and simplicity. Many experimental studies have been performed on heat transfer in the boiler tubes of supercritical fossil fire power plants (FPPs). However, the thermal-hydraulic conditions of the SCWR core are different from those of the FPP boiler. In the SCWR core, the heat transfer to the cooling water occurs on the outside surface of fuel rods in rod bundle with spacers. In addition, the experimental studies in which the critical heat flux (CHF) has been carefully measured near the critical pressure have never yet been carried out, as far as we know. Therefore, we have recently conducted the CHF experiments with a vertical 5x5 heater rod bundle cooled by R- 134a fluid. The purpose of this work is to find out some novel knowledge for the CHF near the critical pressure, based on more careful experiments. The outer diameter, heated length and rod pitch of the heater rods are 9.5, 2000 and 12.85 mm, respectively. The critical power has been measured in a range of the pressure of 2.474.03 MPa (the critical pressure of R-134a is 4.059 MPa), the mass flux 502000 kg/m 2 s, and the inlet subcooling 4084 kJ/kg. For the mass fluxes of not less than 550 kg/m 2 s, the critical power decreases monotonously up to the pressure of about 3.63.8 MPa with increasing pressure, and then fall sharply at about 3.83.9 MPa as if the values of the critical power converge on zero at the critical pressure. For the low mass fluxes of 50 to 250 kg/m 2 , the sharp decreasing trend of the critical power near the critical pressure is not observed. The CHF phenomenon near the critical pressure no longer leads to an inordinate increase in the heated wall temperature such as

  10. A Neural Network Approach to Fluid Quantity Measurement in Dynamic Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Terzic, Edin; Nagarajah, Romesh; Alamgir, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Sloshing causes liquid to fluctuate, making accurate level readings difficult to obtain in dynamic environments. The measurement system described uses a single-tube capacitive sensor to obtain an instantaneous level reading of the fluid surface, thereby accurately determining the fluid quantity in the presence of slosh. A neural network based classification technique has been applied to predict the actual quantity of the fluid contained in a tank under sloshing conditions.   In A neural network approach to fluid quantity measurement in dynamic environments, effects of temperature variations and contamination on the capacitive sensor are discussed, and the authors propose that these effects can also be eliminated with the proposed neural network based classification system. To examine the performance of the classification system, many field trials were carried out on a running vehicle at various tank volume levels that range from 5 L to 50 L. The effectiveness of signal enhancement on the neural network base...

  11. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Medryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A.; Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available.

  12. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Mędryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A.; Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available

  13. Executive functioning in schizophrenia: Unique and shared variance with measures of fluid intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A K; Mowry, B; Reutens, D; Robinson, G A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with schizophrenia often display deficits on tasks thought to measure "executive" processes. Recently, it has been suggested that reductions in fluid intelligence test performance entirely explain deficits reported for patients with focal frontal lesions on classical executive tasks. For patients with schizophrenia, it is unclear whether deficits on executive tasks are entirely accountable by fluid intelligence and representative of a common general process or best accounted for by distinct contributions to the cognitive profile of schizophrenia. In the current study, 50 patients with schizophrenia and 50 age, sex and premorbid intelligence matched controls were assessed using a broad neuropsychological battery, including tasks considered sensitive to executive abilities, namely the Hayling Sentence Completion Test (HSCT), word fluency, Stroop test, digit-span backwards, and spatial working memory. Fluid intelligence was measured using both the Matrix reasoning subtest from the Weschler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) and a composite score derived from a number of cognitive tests. Patients with schizophrenia were impaired on all cognitive measures compared with controls, except smell identification and the optimal betting and risk-taking measures from the Cambridge Gambling Task. After introducing fluid intelligence as a covariate, significant differences remained for HSCT suppression errors, and classical executive function tests such as the Stroop test and semantic/phonemic word fluency, regardless of which fluid intelligence measure was included. Fluid intelligence does not entirely explain impaired performance on all tests considered as reflecting "executive" processes. For schizophrenia, these measures should remain part of a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment alongside a measure of fluid intelligence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative approach to measuring the cerebrospinal fluid space with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeumer, H.; Hacke, W.; Hartwich, P.

    1982-01-01

    A method for measuring the subarachnoid space by using an independent CT evaluation unit is described. The normal values have been calculated for patients, according to age, and three examples are presented demonstrating reversible decrease of brain volume in patients suffering anorexia nervosa and chronic alcoholism.

  15. Prospective blood pressure measurement in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, V G; Yadav, B; Jeyaseelan, L; Deborah, M N; Jacob, S; Alexander, S; Varughese, S; John, G T

    2014-05-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control at home is difficult when managed only with office blood pressure monitoring (OBPM). In this prospective study, the reliability of BP measurements in renal transplant patients with OBPM and home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) was compared with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) as the gold standard. Adult patients who had living-related renal transplantation from March 2007 to February 2008 had BP measured by two methods; OBPM and ABPM at pretransplantation, 2(nd), 4(th), 6(th), and 9(th) months and all the three methods: OBPM, ABPM, and HBPM at 6 months after transplantation. A total of 49 patients, age 35 ± 11 years, on prednisolone, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate were evaluated. A total of 39 were males (79.6%). Systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) measured by OBPM were higher than HBPM when compared with ABPM. When assessed using OBPM and awake ABPM, both SBP and DBP were significantly overestimated by OBPM with mean difference of 3-12 mm Hg by office SBP and 6-8 mm Hg for office DBP. When HBPM was compared with mean ABPM at 6 months both the SBP and DBP were overestimated by and 7 mm Hg respectively. At 6 months post transplantation, when compared with ABPM, OBPM was more specific than HBPM in diagnosing hypertension (98% specificity, Kappa: 0.88 vs. 89% specificity, Kappa: 0.71). HBPM was superior to OBPM in identifying patients achieving goal BP (89% specificity, Kappa: 0.71 vs. 50% specificity Kappa: 0.54). In the absence of a gold standard for comparison the latent class model analysis still showed that ABPM was the best tool for diagnosing hypertension and monitoring patients reaching targeted control. OBPM remains an important tool for the diagnosis and management of hypertension in renal transplant recipients. HBPM and ABPM could be used to achieve BP control.

  16. Prospective blood pressure measurement in renal transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V G David

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure (BP control at home is difficult when managed only with office blood pressure monitoring (OBPM. In this prospective study, the reliability of BP measurements in renal transplant patients with OBPM and home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM was compared with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM as the gold standard. Adult patients who had living-related renal transplantation from March 2007 to February 2008 had BP measured by two methods; OBPM and ABPM at pretransplantation, 2 nd , 4 th , 6 th , and 9 th months and all the three methods : OBPM, ABPM, and HBPM at 6 months after transplantation. A total of 49 patients, age 35 ± 11 years, on prednisolone, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate were evaluated. A total of 39 were males (79.6%. Systolic BP (SBP and diastolic BP (DBP measured by OBPM were higher than HBPM when compared with ABPM. When assessed using OBPM and awake ABPM, both SBP and DBP were significantly overestimated by OBPM with mean difference of 3-12 mm Hg by office SBP and 6-8 mm Hg for office DBP. When HBPM was compared with mean ABPM at 6 months both the SBP and DBP were overestimated by and 7 mm Hg respectively. At 6 months post transplantation, when compared with ABPM, OBPM was more specific than HBPM in diagnosing hypertension (98% specificity, Kappa : 0.88 vs. 89% specificity, Kappa : 0.71. HBPM was superior to OBPM in identifying patients achieving goal BP (89% specificity, Kappa : 0.71 vs. 50% specificity Kappa : 0.54. In the absence of a gold standard for comparison the latent class model analysis still showed that ABPM was the best tool for diagnosing hypertension and monitoring patients reaching targeted control. OBPM remains an important tool for the diagnosis and management of hypertension in renal transplant recipients. HBPM and ABPM could be used to achieve BP control.

  17. New calibration method for I-scan sensors to enable the precise measurement of pressures delivered by 'pressure garments'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintyre, Lisa

    2011-11-01

    Accurate measurement of the pressure delivered by medical compression products is highly desirable both in monitoring treatment and in developing new pressure inducing garments or products. There are several complications in measuring pressure at the garment/body interface and at present no ideal pressure measurement tool exists for this purpose. This paper summarises a thorough evaluation of the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements taken following both of Tekscan Inc.'s recommended calibration procedures for I-scan sensors; and presents an improved method for calibrating and using I-scan pressure sensors. The proposed calibration method enables accurate (±2.1 mmHg) measurement of pressures delivered by pressure garments to body parts with a circumference ≥30 cm. This method is too cumbersome for routine clinical use but is very useful, accurate and reproducible for product development or clinical evaluation purposes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. A noncontact intraocular pressure measurement device using a micro reflected air pressure sensor for the prediagnosis of glaucoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Hwan; Kim, Byeong Hee; Seo, Young Ho

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates a novel, portable tonometer using a micro reflected air pressure sensor for the prediagnosis of glaucoma. Because glaucoma progresses slowly and is not painful, glaucoma patients require a portable prediagnosis system to periodically measure intraocular pressure at home. Conventionally, intraocular pressure is measured by an air-puff tonometer whereby the cornea is deformed by a short pulse of air pressure and the magnitude of the corneal deformation is measured by optic systems such as a combination of laser- and photodiodes. In this study, a micro reflected air pressure sensor was designed, fabricated, and tested in order to measure the magnitude of corneal deformation without optic systems. In an experimental study, artificial eyes with different internal pressures were fabricated and these pressures were measured by the aforementioned system. (paper)

  19. Fluid Distribution Pattern in Adult-Onset Congenital, Idiopathic, and Secondary Normal-Pressure Hydrocephalus: Implications for Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Masatsune; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    In spite of growing evidence of idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), a viewpoint about clinical care for idiopathic NPH is still controversial. A continuous divergence of viewpoints might be due to confusing classifications of idiopathic and adult-onset congenital NPH. To elucidate the classification of NPH, we propose that adult-onset congenital NPH should be explicitly distinguished from idiopathic and secondary NPH. On the basis of conventional CT scan or MRI, idiopathic NPH was defined as narrow sulci at the high convexity in concurrent with enlargement of the ventricles, basal cistern and Sylvian fissure, whereas adult-onset congenital NPH was defined as huge ventricles without high-convexity tightness. We compared clinical characteristics and cerebrospinal fluid distribution among 85 patients diagnosed with idiopathic NPH, 17 patients with secondary NPH, and 7 patients with adult-onset congenital NPH. All patients underwent 3-T MRI examinations and tap-tests. The volumes of ventricles and subarachnoid spaces were measured using a 3D workstation based on T2-weighted 3D sequences. The mean intracranial volume for the patients with adult-onset congenital NPH was almost 100 mL larger than the volumes for patients with idiopathic and secondary NPH. Compared with the patients with idiopathic or secondary NPH, patients with adult-onset congenital NPH exhibited larger ventricles but normal sized subarachnoid spaces. The mean volume ratio of the high-convexity subarachnoid space was significantly less in idiopathic NPH than in adult-onset congenital NPH, whereas the mean volume ratio of the basal cistern and Sylvian fissure in idiopathic NPH was >2 times larger than that in adult-onset congenital NPH. The symptoms of gait disturbance, cognitive impairment, and urinary incontinence in patients with adult-onset congenital NPH tended to progress more slowly compared to their progress in patients with idiopathic NPH. Cerebrospinal fluid distributions and

  20. Viability and adaptation potential of indigenous microorganisms from natural gas field fluids in high pressure incubations with supercritical CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Janin; Rakoczy, Jana; Ostertag-Henning, Christian; Krüger, Martin

    2014-01-21

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is currently under debate as large-scale solution to globally reduce emissions of the greenhouse gas CO2. Depleted gas or oil reservoirs and saline aquifers are considered as suitable reservoirs providing sufficient storage capacity. We investigated the influence of high CO2 concentrations on the indigenous bacterial population in the saline formation fluids of a natural gas field. Bacterial community changes were closely examined at elevated CO2 concentrations under near in situ pressures and temperatures. Conditions in the high pressure reactor systems simulated reservoir fluids i) close to the CO2 injection point, i.e. saturated with CO2, and ii) at the outer boundaries of the CO2 dissolution gradient. During the incubations with CO2, total cell numbers remained relatively stable, but no microbial sulfate reduction activity was detected. After CO2 release and subsequent transfer of the fluids, an actively sulfate-respiring community was re-established. The predominance of spore-forming Clostridiales provided evidence for the resilience of this taxon against the bactericidal effects of supercritical (sc)CO2. To ensure the long-term safety and injectivity, the viability of fermentative and sulfate-reducing bacteria has to be considered in the selection, design, and operation of CCS sites.