WorldWideScience

Sample records for fluid flow modelling

  1. Tracer technology modeling the flow of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Levenspiel, Octave

    2012-01-01

    A vessel’s behavior as a heat exchanger, absorber, reactor, or other process unit is dependent upon how fluid flows through the vessel.  In early engineering, the designer would assume either plug flow or mixed flow of the fluid through the vessel.  However, these assumptions were oftentimes inaccurate, sometimes being off by a volume factor of 100 or more.  The result of this unreliable figure produced ineffective products in multiple reaction systems.   Written by a pioneering researcher in the field of chemical engineering, the tracer method was introduced to provide more accurate flow data.  First, the tracer method measured the actual flow of fluid through a vessel.  Second, it developed a suitable model to represent the flow in question.  Such models are used to follow the flow of fluid in chemical reactors and other process units, like in rivers and streams, or solid and porous structures.  In medicine, the tracer method is used to study the flow of chemicals—harmful  and harmless—in the...

  2. Modeling Fluid Flow in Faulted Basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faille I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a basin simulator designed to better take faults into account, either as conduits or as barriers to fluid flow. It computes hydrocarbon generation, fluid flow and heat transfer on the 4D (space and time geometry obtained by 3D volume restoration. Contrary to classical basin simulators, this calculator does not require a structured mesh based on vertical pillars nor a multi-block structure associated to the fault network. The mesh follows the sediments during the evolution of the basin. It deforms continuously with respect to time to account for sedimentation, erosion, compaction and kinematic displacements. The simulation domain is structured in layers, in order to handle properly the corresponding heterogeneities and to follow the sedimentation processes (thickening of the layers. In each layer, the mesh is unstructured: it may include several types of cells such as tetrahedra, hexahedra, pyramid, prism, etc. However, a mesh composed mainly of hexahedra is preferred as they are well suited to the layered structure of the basin. Faults are handled as internal boundaries across which the mesh is non-matching. Different models are proposed for fault behavior such as impervious fault, flow across fault or conductive fault. The calculator is based on a cell centered Finite Volume discretisation, which ensures conservation of physical quantities (mass of fluid, heat at a discrete level and which accounts properly for heterogeneities. The numerical scheme handles the non matching meshes and guaranties appropriate connection of cells across faults. Results on a synthetic basin demonstrate the capabilities of this new simulator.

  3. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  4. A computer model for dispersed fluid-solid turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.H.; Tulig, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    A computer model is being developed to simulate two-phase turbulent flow phenomena in fluids containing finely dispersed solids. The model is based on a dual-continuum picture of the individual phases and an extension of a two-equation turbulence closure theory. The resulting set of nonlinear partial differential equations are solved using a finite difference procedure with special treatment to promote convergence. The model has been checked against a number of idealized flow problems with known solutions. The authors are currently comparing model predictions with measurements to determine a proper set of turbulence parameters needed for simulating two-phase turbulent flows

  5. Lattice Boltzmann model for three-phase viscoelastic fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chiyu; Lei, Wenhai; Wang, Moran

    2018-02-01

    A lattice Boltzmann (LB) framework is developed for simulation of three-phase viscoelastic fluid flows in complex geometries. This model is based on a Rothman-Keller type model for immiscible multiphase flows which ensures mass conservation of each component in porous media even for a high density ratio. To account for the viscoelastic effects, the Maxwell constitutive relation is correctly introduced into the momentum equation, which leads to a modified lattice Boltzmann evolution equation for Maxwell fluids by removing the normal but excess viscous term. Our simulation tests indicate that this excess viscous term may induce significant errors. After three benchmark cases, the displacement processes of oil by dispersed polymer are studied as a typical example of three-phase viscoelastic fluid flow. The results show that increasing either the polymer intrinsic viscosity or the elastic modulus will enhance the oil recovery.

  6. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  7. Fluid flow modeling in complex areas*, **

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poullet Pascal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We show first results of 3D simulation of sea currents in a realistic context. We use the full Navier–Stokes equations for incompressible viscous fluid. The problem is solved using a second order incremental projection method associated with the finite volume of the staggered (MAC scheme for the spatial discretization. After validation on classical cases, it is used in a numerical simulation of the Pointe à Pitre harbour area. The use of the fictious domain method permits us to take into account the complexity of bathymetric data and allows us to work with regular meshes and thus preserves the efficiency essential for a 3D code. Dans cette étude, nous présentons les premiers résultats de simulation d’un écoulement d’un fluide incompressible visqueux dans un contexte environnemental réel. L’approche utilisée utilise une méthode de domaines fictifs pour une prise en compte d’un domaine physique tridimensionnel très irrégulier. Le schéma numérique combine un schéma de projection incrémentale et des volumes finis utilisant des volumes de contrôle adaptés à un maillage décalé. Les tests de validation sont menés pour les cas tests de la cavité double entraînée ainsi que l’écoulement dans un canal avec un obstacle placé de manière asymmétrique.

  8. Leaback of Pulsatile Flow of Particle Fluid Suspension Model of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaback of Pulsatile Flow of Particle Fluid Suspension Model of Blood Under Periodic Body Acceleration. ... The variation in body acceleration amplitude though affects the velocity profile in the capillary tubes, it has no effect on the leakback in the tubes. Leakback is mainly determined by the balance of the viscous drag and ...

  9. Mathematical Modelling of Fluid Flow in Cone and Cavitation Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milada KOZUBKOVÁ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Problem of cavitation is the undesirable phenomena occuring in the fluid flow in many hydraulic application (pumps, turbines, valves, etc.. Therefore this is in the focus of interest using experimental and mathematical methods. Based on cavitation modelling in Laval nozzle results and experience [1], [2], [4], following problem described as the water flow at the outlet from turbine blade wheel was solved. Primarily the problem is simplified into modelling of water flow in cone. Profiles of axial, radial and tangential velocity are defined on inlet zone. The value of pressure is defined on the outlet. Boundary conditions were defined by main investigator of the grant project – Energy Institute, Victor Kaplan’s Department of Fluid Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology. The value of air volume was insignificant. Cavitation was solved by Singhal model of cavitation.

  10. Multiscale Modeling of Multiphase Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    was compared to the original equilibrium volume of the neat solvent as a measure of the solubility of carbon dioxide and ammonia in pure water and...temperature and two-temperature models has been used, in which either local thermal equilibrium ( LTE ) between PCM and foams was assumed, or the...solved in the simulations. 6.2.2 Direct Numerical Simulation of PCM in Foam Without the need for extra ad hoc assumptions such as LTE , direct

  11. Beyond Poiseuille: Preservation Fluid Flow in an Experimental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Poiseuille’s equation describes the relationship between fluid viscosity, pressure, tubing diameter, and flow, yet it is not known if cold organ perfusion systems follow this equation. We investigated these relationships in an ex vivo model and aimed to offer some rationale for equipment selection. Increasing the cannula size from 14 to 20 Fr increased flow rate by a mean (SD of 13 (12%. Marshall’s hyperosmolar citrate was three times less viscous than UW solution, but flows were only 45% faster. Doubling the bag pressure led to a mean (SD flow rate increase of only 19 (13%, not twice the rate. When external pressure devices were used, 100 mmHg of continuous pressure increased flow by a mean (SD of 43 (17% when compared to the same pressure applied initially only. Poiseuille’s equation was not followed; this is most likely due to “slipping” of preservation fluid within the plastic tubing. Cannula size made little difference over the ranges examined; flows are primarily determined by bag pressure and fluid viscosity. External infusor devices require continuous pressurisation to deliver high flow. Future studies examining the impact of perfusion variables on graft outcomes should include detailed equipment descriptions.

  12. Fluid flow and heat transfer modeling for castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, H.M.; Liu, Y.Y.; Sha, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Casting is fundamental to manufacturing of many types of equipment and products. Although casting is a very old technology that has been in existence for hundreds of years, it remains a highly empirical technology, and production of new castings requires an expensive and time-consuming trial-and-error approach. In recent years, mathematical modeling of casting has received increasing attention; however, a majority of the modeling work has been in the area of heat transfer and solidification. Very little work has been done in modeling fluid flow of the liquid melt. This paper presents a model of fluid flow coupled with heat transfer of a liquid melt for casting processes. The model to be described in this paper is an extension of the COMMIX code and is capable of handling castings with any shape, size, and material. A feature of this model is the ability to track the liquid/gas interface and liquid/solid interface. The flow of liquid melt through the sprue and runners and into the mold cavity is calculated as well as three-dimensional temperature and velocity distributions of the liquid melt throughout the casting process. 14 refs., 13 figs

  13. Multiscale modeling of fluid flow and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Bijeljic, B.; Lin, Q.; Blunt, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, there are some reports on a simulation of fluid flow in pore spaces of rocks using Navier-Stokes equations. These studies mostly adopt a X-ray CT to create 3-D numerical grids of the pores in micro-scale. However, results may be of low accuracy when the rock has a large pore size distribution, because pores, whose size is smaller than resolution of the X-ray CT may be neglected. We recently found out by tracer tests in a laboratory using a brine saturated Ryukyu limestone and inject fresh water that a decrease of chloride concentration took longer time. This phenomenon can be explained due to weak connectivity of the porous networks. Therefore, it is important to simulate entire pore spaces even those of very small sizes in which diffusion is dominant. We have developed a new methodology for multi-level modeling for pore scale fluid flow in porous media. The approach is to combine pore-scale analysis with Darcy-flow analysis using two types of X-ray CT images in different resolutions. Results of the numerical simulations showed a close match with the experimental results. The proposed methodology is an enhancement for analyzing mass transport and flow phenomena in rocks with complicated pore structure.

  14. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    A general two-fluid model is derived and applied in CFD computations to various test cases of important industrial multiphase flows. It is general in the sense of its applicability to dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flows. The model is limited to isothermal flow without mass transfer and only one particle phase is described. The instantaneous fluid phase equations, including the phase interaction terms, are derived from a volume averaging technique, and the instantaneous particle phase equations are derived from the kinetic theory of granular material. Whereas the averaging procedure, the treatment of the interaction terms, and the kinetic theory approach have been reported in literature prior to this work the combination of the approaches is new. The resulting equations are derived without ambiguity in the interpretation of the particle phase pressure (equation-of-state of particle phase). The basic modeling for the particle phase is improved in two steps. Because in the basic modeling only stresses due to kinetic and collisional interactions are included, a simple model for an effective viscosity is developed in order to allow also frictional stresses within the particle phase. Moreover, turbulent stresses and turbulent dispersion of particles play often an important role for the transport processes. Therefore in a second step, a two-equation turbulence model for both fluid and particle phase turbulence is derived by applying the phasic average to the instantaneous equations. The resulting k-{epsilon}-k{sup d}-{epsilon}{sup d} model is new. Mathematical closure is attempted such that the resulting set of equations is valid for both dilute arid dense flows. During the development of the closure relations a clear distinction is made between granular or ''viscous'' microscale fluctuations and turbulent macro scale fluctuations (true particle turbulence) within the particle phase. The set of governing equations is discretized by using a

  15. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    A general two-fluid model is derived and applied in CFD computations to various test cases of important industrial multiphase flows. It is general in the sense of its applicability to dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flows. The model is limited to isothermal flow without mass transfer and only one particle phase is described. The instantaneous fluid phase equations, including the phase interaction terms, are derived from a volume averaging technique, and the instantaneous particle phase equations are derived from the kinetic theory of granular material. Whereas the averaging procedure, the treatment of the interaction terms, and the kinetic theory approach have been reported in literature prior to this work the combination of the approaches is new. The resulting equations are derived without ambiguity in the interpretation of the particle phase pressure (equation-of-state of particle phase). The basic modeling for the particle phase is improved in two steps. Because in the basic modeling only stresses due to kinetic and collisional interactions are included, a simple model for an effective viscosity is developed in order to allow also frictional stresses within the particle phase. Moreover, turbulent stresses and turbulent dispersion of particles play often an important role for the transport processes. Therefore in a second step, a two-equation turbulence model for both fluid and particle phase turbulence is derived by applying the phasic average to the instantaneous equations. The resulting k-{epsilon}-k{sup d}-{epsilon}{sup d} model is new. Mathematical closure is attempted such that the resulting set of equations is valid for both dilute arid dense flows. During the development of the closure relations a clear distinction is made between granular or ''viscous'' microscale fluctuations and turbulent macro scale fluctuations (true particle turbulence) within the particle phase. The set of governing equations is discretized by using a finite volume method

  16. Flow modelling of a newtonian fluid by two regions- the region of pure fluid and porous region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampaio, R.; Gama, R.M.S. da

    1983-01-01

    A model of flow with two regions is presented using mixture theory. One region contains only pure fluid and the other a mixture of fluid and porous rigid solid. Compatibility conditons on the pure fluid-mixture interface are carefully discussed. The theory is used to solve a problem of a flow induced by pressure gradient and helicoidal motion of an impermeable cylinder on two rings one of pure fluid and another of mixture. (Author) [pt

  17. Two-Fluid Mathematical Models for Blood Flow in Stenosed Arteries: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar DS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulsatile flow of blood through stenosed arteries is analyzed by assuming the blood as a two-fluid model with the suspension of all the erythrocytes in the core region as a non-Newtonian fluid and the plasma in the peripheral layer as a Newtonian fluid. The non-Newtonian fluid in the core region of the artery is assumed as a (i Herschel-Bulkley fluid and (ii Casson fluid. Perturbation method is used to solve the resulting system of non-linear partial differential equations. Expressions for various flow quantities are obtained for the two-fluid Casson model. Expressions of the flow quantities obtained by Sankar and Lee (2006 for the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model are used to get the data for comparison. It is found that the plug flow velocity and velocity distribution of the two-fluid Casson model are considerably higher than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. It is also observed that the pressure drop, plug core radius, wall shear stress and the resistance to flow are significantly very low for the two-fluid Casson model than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. Hence, the two-fluid Casson model would be more useful than the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model to analyze the blood flow through stenosed arteries.

  18. Extended two-fluid model for simulating magneto-rheological fluid flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivaram, A C

    2011-01-01

    The current practice of designing magneto-rheological (MR) fluid-based devices is, to a large extent, based on simple phenomenological models like the Bingham model. Though useful for initial force or torque estimation and sizing, these models lack the capability to predict performance degradation due to changes in the particle volume fraction distribution. The present work demonstrates the use of the two-fluid model for predicting the particle volume fraction distribution inside a device in the absence of a field and proposes a novel modeling scheme which can simulate the fluid flow in the presence of a field. This modeling scheme can be used to (a) visualize flow patterns inside a device under various operating conditions, (b) predict the spatial distribution of particles inside a device after multiple operating cycles, (c) assist in estimating the extent of performance degradation due to non-uniform particle distribution and (d) enable testing of various design strategies to mitigate such performance issues using simulations. This is illustrated through numerical examples of a few case studies of typical MR device configurations

  19. The model coupling fluid flow in reservoir with flow in horizontal wellbore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiangping; Jiang, Zhixiang [RIPED-TEXACO Horizontal Well Technology Laboratory (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Three-dimensional pressure distributions of oil flow in a reservoir with horizontal well were derived, and a new formula to calculate pressure drop along the horizontal wellbore was developed based on the principle of conservation of matter and momentum. The formula considers the effect of influx into the horizontal wellbore from the reservoir on pressure drop in the wellbore. A mathematical model to couple fluid flow in the reservoir with flow in the horizontal wellbore is presented. Model results and experimental data showed good correspondence. Results showed the influence of pressure drop on well performance. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  20. Advanced Fluid Reduced Order Models for Compressible Flow.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tezaur, Irina Kalashnikova [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Fike, Jeffrey A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carlberg, Kevin Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Barone, Matthew F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maddix, Danielle [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mussoni, Erin E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Balajewicz, Maciej [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report summarizes fiscal year (FY) 2017 progress towards developing and implementing within the SPARC in-house finite volume flow solver advanced fluid reduced order models (ROMs) for compressible captive-carriage flow problems of interest to Sandia National Laboratories for the design and qualification of nuclear weapons components. The proposed projection-based model order reduction (MOR) approach, known as the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD)/Least- Squares Petrov-Galerkin (LSPG) method, can substantially reduce the CPU-time requirement for these simulations, thereby enabling advanced analyses such as uncertainty quantification and de- sign optimization. Following a description of the project objectives and FY17 targets, we overview briefly the POD/LSPG approach to model reduction implemented within SPARC . We then study the viability of these ROMs for long-time predictive simulations in the context of a two-dimensional viscous laminar cavity problem, and describe some FY17 enhancements to the proposed model reduction methodology that led to ROMs with improved predictive capabilities. Also described in this report are some FY17 efforts pursued in parallel to the primary objective of determining whether the ROMs in SPARC are viable for the targeted application. These include the implemen- tation and verification of some higher-order finite volume discretization methods within SPARC (towards using the code to study the viability of ROMs on three-dimensional cavity problems) and a novel structure-preserving constrained POD/LSPG formulation that can improve the accuracy of projection-based reduced order models. We conclude the report by summarizing the key takeaways from our FY17 findings, and providing some perspectives for future work.

  1. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow in the Tape Casting Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    The flow behavior of the fluid in the tape casting process is analyzed. A simple geometry is assumed for running the numerical calculations in ANSYS Fluent and the main parameters are expressed in non-dimensional form. The effect of different values for substrate velocity and pressure force...

  2. Numerical Modeling of Porous Structure of Biomaterial and Fluid Flowing Through Biomaterial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A Cellular Automata model of simulating body fluid flowing into porous bioceramic implants generated with stochastic methods is described, of which main parameters and evolvement rule are determined in terms of flow behavior of body fluid in porous biomaterials. The model is implemented by GUI( Graphical User Interface) program in MATLAB, and the results of numerical modeling show that the body fluid percolation is related to the size of pores and porosity.

  3. Mathematical modeling for laminar flow of power law fluid in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Renato A.; Mesquita, Maximilian S. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Sao Mateus, ES (Brazil). Centro Universitario Norte do Espirito Santo. Dept. de Engenharias e Computacao

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, the macroscopic equations for laminar power-law fluid flow is obtained for a porous medium starting from traditional equations (Navier-Stokes). Then, the volume averaging is applied in traditional transport equations with the power-law fluid model. This procedure leads to macroscopic transport equations set for non-Newtonian fluid. (author)

  4. Two-fluid model with droplet size distribution for condensing steam flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wróblewski, Włodzimierz; Dykas, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    The process of energy conversion in the low pressure part of steam turbines may be improved using new and more accurate numerical models. The paper presents a description of a model intended for the condensing steam flow modelling. The model uses a standard condensation model. A physical and a numerical model of the mono- and polydispersed wet-steam flow are presented. The proposed two-fluid model solves separate flow governing equations for the compressible, inviscid vapour and liquid phase. The method of moments with a prescribed function is used for the reconstruction of the water droplet size distribution. The described model is presented for the liquid phase evolution in the flow through the de Laval nozzle. - Highlights: • Computational Fluid Dynamics. • Steam condensation in transonic flows through the Laval nozzles. • In-house CFD code – two-phase flow, two-fluid monodispersed and polydispersed model.

  5. Models for fluid flows with heat transfer in mixed convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mompean Munhoz da Cruz, G.

    1989-06-01

    Second order models were studied in order to predict turbulent flows with heat transfer. The equations used correspond to the characteristic scale of turbulent flows. The order of magnitude of the terms of the equation is analyzed by using Reynolds and Peclet numbers. The two-equation model (K-ε) is applied in the hydrodynamic study. Two models are developed for the heat transfer analysis: the Prt + teta 2 and the complete model. In the first model, the turbulent thermal diffusivity is calculated by using the Prandtl number for turbulent flow and an equation for the variance of the temperature fluctuation. The second model consists of three equations concerning: the turbulent heat flow, the variance of the temperature fluctuation and its dissipation ratio. The equations were validated by four experiments, which were characterized by the analysis of: the air flow after passing through a grid of constant average temperature and with temperature gradient, an axysymmetric air jet submitted to high and low heating temperature, the mixing (cold-hot) of two coaxial jets of sodium at high Peclet number. The complete model is shown to be the most suitable for the investigations presented [fr

  6. Cellular-automation fluids: A model for flow in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    Because the intrinsic inhomogeneity of porous media makes the application of proper boundary conditions difficult, fluid flow through microgeometric models has typically been achieved with idealized arrays of geometrically simple pores, throats, and cracks. The author proposes here an attractive alternative, capable of freely and accurately modeling fluid flow in grossly irregular geometries. This new method numerically solves the Navier-Stokes equations using the cellular-automation fluid model introduced by Frisch, Hasslacher, and Pomeau. The cellular-automation fluid is extraordinarily simple - particles of unit mass traveling with unit velocity reside on a triangular lattice and obey elementary collisions rules - but capable of modeling much of the rich complexity of real fluid flow. The author shows how cellular-automation fluids are applied to the study of porous media. In particular, he discusses issues of scale on the cellular-automation lattice and present the results of 2-D simulations, including numerical estimation of permeability and verification of Darcy's law

  7. Shaded computer graphic techniques for visualizing and interpreting analytic fluid flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, F. I.

    1981-01-01

    Mathematical models which predict the behavior of fluid flow in different experiments are simulated using digital computers. The simulations predict values of parameters of the fluid flow (pressure, temperature and velocity vector) at many points in the fluid. Visualization of the spatial variation in the value of these parameters is important to comprehend and check the data generated, to identify the regions of interest in the flow, and for effectively communicating information about the flow to others. The state of the art imaging techniques developed in the field of three dimensional shaded computer graphics is applied to visualization of fluid flow. Use of an imaging technique known as 'SCAN' for visualizing fluid flow, is studied and the results are presented.

  8. Simulation of horizontal pipe two-phase slug flows using the two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega Malca, Arturo J. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Nucleo de Simulacao Termohidraulica de Dutos (SIMDUT); Nieckele, Angela O. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2005-07-01

    Slug flow occurs in many engineering applications, mainly in the transport of hydrocarbon fluids in pipelines. The intermittency of slug flow causes severe unsteady loading on the pipelines carrying the fluids, which gives rise to design problems. Therefore, it is important to be able to predict the onset and development of slug flow as well as slug characteristics. The present work consists in the simulation of two-phase flow in slug pattern through horizontal pipes using the two-fluid model in its transient and one-dimensional form. The advantage of this model is that the flow field is allowed to develop naturally from a given initial conditions as part of the transient calculation; the slug evolves automatically as a product of the computed flow development. Simulations are then carried out for a large number of flow conditions that lead a slug flow. (author)

  9. Validation of model predictions of pore-scale fluid distributions during two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultreys, Tom; Lin, Qingyang; Gao, Ying; Raeini, Ali Q.; AlRatrout, Ahmed; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2018-05-01

    Pore-scale two-phase flow modeling is an important technology to study a rock's relative permeability behavior. To investigate if these models are predictive, the calculated pore-scale fluid distributions which determine the relative permeability need to be validated. In this work, we introduce a methodology to quantitatively compare models to experimental fluid distributions in flow experiments visualized with microcomputed tomography. First, we analyzed five repeated drainage-imbibition experiments on a single sample. In these experiments, the exact fluid distributions were not fully repeatable on a pore-by-pore basis, while the global properties of the fluid distribution were. Then two fractional flow experiments were used to validate a quasistatic pore network model. The model correctly predicted the fluid present in more than 75% of pores and throats in drainage and imbibition. To quantify what this means for the relevant global properties of the fluid distribution, we compare the main flow paths and the connectivity across the different pore sizes in the modeled and experimental fluid distributions. These essential topology characteristics matched well for drainage simulations, but not for imbibition. This suggests that the pore-filling rules in the network model we used need to be improved to make reliable predictions of imbibition. The presented analysis illustrates the potential of our methodology to systematically and robustly test two-phase flow models to aid in model development and calibration.

  10. Mathematical modeling of fluid flow in aluminum ladles for degasification with impeller - injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gómez, E.; González-Rivera, C.; Ramírez-Argáez, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    In this work a fundamental Eulerian mathematical model was developed to simulate fluid flow in a water physical model of an aluminum ladle equipped with impeller for degassing treatment. The effect of critical process parameters such as rotor speed, gas flow rate on the fluid flow and vortex formation was analyzed with this model. Commercial CFD code PHOENICS 3.4 was used to solve all conservation equations governing the process for this twophase fluid flow system. The mathematical model was successfully validated against experimentally measured liquid velocity and turbulent profiles in a physical model. From the results it was concluded that the angular speed of the impeller is the most important parameter promoting better stirred baths. Pumping effect of the impeller is increased as impeller rotation speed increases. Gas flow rate is detrimental on bath stirring and diminishes pumping effect of impeller.

  11. Modeling of flow of particles in a non-Newtonian fluid using lattice Boltzmann method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skocek, Jan; Svec, Oldrich; Spangenberg, Jon

    2011-01-01

    is necessary. In this contribution, the model at the scale of aggregates is introduced. The conventional lattice Boltzmann method for fluid flow is enriched with the immersed boundary method with direct forcing to simulate the flow of rigid particles in a non- Newtonian liquid. Basic ingredients of the model...

  12. Numerical Modelling of Three-Fluid Flow Using The Level-set Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongying; Lou, Jing; Shang, Zhi

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a numerical model for simulation of three-fluid flow involving two different moving interfaces. These interfaces are captured using the level-set method via two different level-set functions. A combined formulation with only one set of conservation equations for the whole physical domain, consisting of the three different immiscible fluids, is employed. Numerical solution is performed on a fixed mesh using the finite volume method. Surface tension effect is incorporated using the Continuum Surface Force model. Validation of the present model is made against available results for stratified flow and rising bubble in a container with a free surface. Applications of the present model are demonstrated by a variety of three-fluid flow systems including (1) three-fluid stratified flow, (2) two-fluid stratified flow carrying the third fluid in the form of drops and (3) simultaneous rising and settling of two drops in a stationary third fluid. The work is supported by a Thematic and Strategic Research from A*STAR, Singapore (Ref. #: 1021640075).

  13. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soltani

    Full Text Available Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor's surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy's law for tissue, and simplified Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling's law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, M; Chen, P

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor's surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy's law for tissue, and simplified Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries) are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling's law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model.

  15. Fluid flow control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rion, Jacky.

    1982-01-01

    Fluid flow control system featuring a series of grids placed perpendicular to the fluid flow direction, characterized by the fact that it is formed of a stack of identical and continuous grids, each of which consists of identical meshes forming a flat lattice. The said meshes are offset from one grid to the next. This system applies in particular to flow control of the coolant flowing at the foot of an assembly of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor [fr

  16. Computational modelling of the flow of viscous fluids in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosravian, N [Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, Department of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafii-Tabar, H [Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, Department of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-11-21

    Carbon nanotubes will have extensive application in all areas of nano-technology, and in particular in the field of nano-fluidics, wherein they can be used for molecular separation, nano-scale filtering and as nano-pipes for conveying fluids. In the field of nano-medicine, nanotubes can be functionalized with various types of receptors to act as bio-sensors for the detection and elimination of cancer cells, or be used as bypasses and even neural connections. Modelling fluid flow inside nanotubes is a very challenging problem, since there is a complex interplay between the motion of the fluid and the stability of the walls. A critical issue in the design of nano-fluidic devices is the induced vibration of the walls, due to the fluid flow, which can promote structural instability. It has been established that the resonant frequencies depend on the flow velocity. We have studied, for the first time, the flow of viscous fluids through multi-walled carbon nanotubes, using the Euler-Bernoulli classical beam theory to model the nanotube as a continuum structure. Our aim has been to compute the effect of the fluid flow on the structural stability of the nanotubes, without having to consider the details of the fluid-walls interaction. The variations of the resonant frequencies with the flow velocity are obtained for both unembedded nanotubes, and when they are embedded in an elastic medium. It is found that a nanotube conveying a viscous fluid is more stable against vibration-induced buckling than a nanotube conveying a non-viscous fluid, and that the aspect ratio plays the same role in both cases.

  17. Computational modelling of the flow of viscous fluids in carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khosravian, N; Rafii-Tabar, H

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes will have extensive application in all areas of nano-technology, and in particular in the field of nano-fluidics, wherein they can be used for molecular separation, nano-scale filtering and as nano-pipes for conveying fluids. In the field of nano-medicine, nanotubes can be functionalized with various types of receptors to act as bio-sensors for the detection and elimination of cancer cells, or be used as bypasses and even neural connections. Modelling fluid flow inside nanotubes is a very challenging problem, since there is a complex interplay between the motion of the fluid and the stability of the walls. A critical issue in the design of nano-fluidic devices is the induced vibration of the walls, due to the fluid flow, which can promote structural instability. It has been established that the resonant frequencies depend on the flow velocity. We have studied, for the first time, the flow of viscous fluids through multi-walled carbon nanotubes, using the Euler-Bernoulli classical beam theory to model the nanotube as a continuum structure. Our aim has been to compute the effect of the fluid flow on the structural stability of the nanotubes, without having to consider the details of the fluid-walls interaction. The variations of the resonant frequencies with the flow velocity are obtained for both unembedded nanotubes, and when they are embedded in an elastic medium. It is found that a nanotube conveying a viscous fluid is more stable against vibration-induced buckling than a nanotube conveying a non-viscous fluid, and that the aspect ratio plays the same role in both cases

  18. Two-phase flow modeling for low concentration spherical particle motion through a Newtonian fluid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit GJF

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available the necessity to model the discrete nature of sep- cite this article in press as: G.J.F. Smit et al., Two-phase flow modeling for low concentration spherical particle motion through a ian fluid, Appl. Math. Comput. (2010), doi:10.1016/j.amc.2010.07.055 2... and Ribberin large-scale and long term morphologica Please cite this article in press as: G.J.F. Smit Newtonian fluid, Appl. Math. Comput. (2010), � 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. modeling of multiphase flow has increasingly become the subject...

  19. Modeling of magnetorheological fluid in quasi-static squeeze flow mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Wojciech

    2018-06-01

    This work presents a new nonlinear model to describe MR fluid behavior in the squeeze flow mode. The basis for deriving the model were the principles of continuum mechanics and the theory of tensor transformation. The analyzed case concerned quasi-static squeeze with a constant area, between two parallel plates with non-slip boundary conditions. The developed model takes into account the rheological properties or MR fluids as a viscoplastic material for which yield stress increases due to compression. The model also takes into account the formation of normal force in the MR fluid as a result of the magnetic field impact. Moreover, a new parameter has been introduced which characterizes the behavior of MR fluid subjected to compression. The proposed model has been experimentally validated and the obtained results suggest that the assumptions made in the model development are reasonable, as good model compatibility with the experiments was obtained.

  20. Two-Fluid Models for Simulating Dispersed Multiphase Flows-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.X. Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of two-fluid models for simulating dispersed multiphase flows (gas-particle, gas-droplet, bubble-liquid, liquid-particle flows by the present author within the last 20 years is systematically reviewed. The two-fluid models based on Reynolds expansion, time averaging and mass-weighed averaging, and also PDF transport equations are described. Different versions of two-phase turbulence models, including the unified second-order moment (USM and k-ε-kp models, the DSM-PDF model, the SOM-MC model, the nonlinear k-e-kp model, and the USM-Θ model for dense gas-particle flows and their application and experimental validation are discussed.

  1. Optimization of a new flow design for solid oxide cells using computational fluid dynamics modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duhn, Jakob Dragsbæk; Jensen, Anker Degn; Wedel, Stig

    2016-01-01

    Design of a gas distributor to distribute gas flow into parallel channels for Solid Oxide Cells (SOC) is optimized, with respect to flow distribution, using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling. The CFD model is based on a 3d geometric model and the optimized structural parameters include...... the width of the channels in the gas distributor and the area in front of the parallel channels. The flow of the optimized design is found to have a flow uniformity index value of 0.978. The effects of deviations from the assumptions used in the modelling (isothermal and non-reacting flow) are evaluated...... and it is found that a temperature gradient along the parallel channels does not affect the flow uniformity, whereas a temperature difference between the channels does. The impact of the flow distribution on the maximum obtainable conversion during operation is also investigated and the obtainable overall...

  2. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models of lava flow simulation for hazard assessment, forecasting, and risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi; Richardson, Jacob A.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, designing flow mitigation measures, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, COMSOL, and MOLASSES. We model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal planes, sloping surfaces, and into topographic obstacles. We compare model results to physical observations made during well-controlled analogue and molten basalt experiments, and to analytical theory when available. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and OpenFOAM and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We assess the goodness-of-fit of the simulation results and the computational cost. Our results guide the selection of numerical simulation codes for different applications, including inferring emplacement conditions of past lava flows, modeling the temporal evolution of ongoing flows during eruption, and probabilistic assessment of lava flow hazard prior to eruption. Finally, we outline potential experiments and desired key observational data from future flows that would extend existing benchmarking data sets.

  3. Fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow model for nonliner geologic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    A single model is presented which describes fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow behavior of highly nonlinear, dynamic or quasistatic, porous geologic systems. The mathematical formulation for the model utilizes the continuum theory of mixtures to describe the multiphase nature of the system, and incremental linear constitutive theory to describe the path dependency of nonlinear material behavior. The model, incorporated in an explicit finite difference numerical procedure, was implemented in two different computer codes. A special-purpose one-dimensional code, SNEAKY, was written for initial validation of the coupling mechanisms and testing of the coupled model logic. A general purpose commercially available code, STEALTH, developed for modeling dynamic nonlinear thermomechanical processes, was modified to include fluid flow behavior and the coupling constitutive model. The fully explicit approach in the coupled calculation facilitated the inclusion of the coupling mechanisms and complex constitutive behavior. Analytical solutions pertaining to consolidation theory for soils, thermoelasticity for solids, and hydrothermal convection theory provided verification of stress and fluid flow, stress and conductive heat transfer, and heat transfer and fluid flow couplings, respectively, in the coupled model. A limited validation of the adequacy of the coupling constitutive assumptions was also performed by comparison with the physical response from two laboratory tests. Finally, the full potential of the coupled model is illustrated for geotechnical applications in energy-resource related areas. Examples in the areas of nuclear waste isolation and cut-and-fill mining are cited

  4. Fluid simulation of tokamak ion temperature gradient turbulence with zonal flow closure model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagishi, Osamu, E-mail: yamagisi@nifs.ac.jp; Sugama, Hideo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Nonlinear fluid simulation of turbulence driven by ion temperature gradient modes in the tokamak fluxtube configuration is performed by combining two different closure models. One model is a gyrofluid model by Beer and Hammett [Phys. Plasmas 3, 4046 (1996)], and the other is a closure model to reproduce the kinetic zonal flow response [Sugama et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 022502 (2007)]. By including the zonal flow closure, generation of zonal flows, significant reduction in energy transport, reproduction of the gyrokinetic transport level, and nonlinear upshift on the critical value of gradient scale length are observed.

  5. Fluid simulation of tokamak ion temperature gradient turbulence with zonal flow closure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Osamu; Sugama, Hideo

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear fluid simulation of turbulence driven by ion temperature gradient modes in the tokamak fluxtube configuration is performed by combining two different closure models. One model is a gyrofluid model by Beer and Hammett [Phys. Plasmas 3, 4046 (1996)], and the other is a closure model to reproduce the kinetic zonal flow response [Sugama et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 022502 (2007)]. By including the zonal flow closure, generation of zonal flows, significant reduction in energy transport, reproduction of the gyrokinetic transport level, and nonlinear upshift on the critical value of gradient scale length are observed.

  6. A critical review of the data requirements for fluid flow models through fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priest, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    The report is a comprehensive critical review of the data requirements for ten models of fluid flow through fractured rock, developed in Europe and North America. The first part of the report contains a detailed review of rock discontinuities and how their important geometrical properties can be quantified. This is followed by a brief summary of the fundamental principles in the analysis of fluid flow through two-dimensional discontinuity networks and an explanation of a new approach to the incorporation of variability and uncertainty into geotechnical models. The report also contains a review of the geological and geotechnical properties of anhydrite and granite. Of the ten fluid flow models reviewed, only three offer a realistic fracture network model for which it is feasible to obtain the input data. Although some of the other models have some valuable or novel features, there is a tendency to concentrate on the simulation of contaminant transport processes, at the expense of providing a realistic fracture network model. Only two of the models reviewed, neither of them developed in Europe, have seriously addressed the problem of analysing fluid flow in three-dimensional networks. (author)

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Pulsatile Blood Flow Behavior in Modelled Stenosed Vessels with Different Severities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehrabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the behavior of blood flow in the stenosed vessels. Blood is modelled as an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid which is based on the power law viscosity model. A numerical technique based on the finite difference method is developed to simulate the blood flow taking into account the transient periodic behaviour of the blood flow in cardiac cycles. Also, pulsatile blood flow in the stenosed vessel is based on the Womersley model, and fluid flow in the lumen region is governed by the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equations. In this study, the stenosis shape is cosine by using Tu and Devil model. Comparing the results obtained from three stenosed vessels with 30%, 50%, and 75% area severity, we find that higher percent-area severity of stenosis leads to higher extrapressure jumps and higher blood speeds around the stenosis site. Also, we observe that the size of the stenosis in stenosed vessels does influence the blood flow. A little change on the cross-sectional value makes vast change on the blood flow rate. This simulation helps the people working in the field of physiological fluid dynamics as well as the medical practitioners.

  8. Predictions of bubbly flows in vertical pipes using two-fluid models in CFDS-FLOW3D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B.; Unrau, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study exploring the performance of two sets of two-fluid closure relationships applied to the simulation of turbulent air-water bubbly upflows through vertical pipes. Predictions obtained with the default CFDS-FLOW3D model for dispersed flows were compared with the predictions of a new model (based on the work of Lee), and with the experimental data of Liu. The new model, implemented in the CFDS-FLOW3D code, included additional source terms in the open-quotes standardclose quotes κ-ε transport equations for the liquid phase, as well as modified model coefficients and wall functions. All simulations were carried out in a 2-D axisymmetric format, collapsing the general multifluid framework of CFDS-FLOW3D to the two-fluid (air-water) case. The newly implemented model consistently improved predictions of radial-velocity profiles of both phases, but failed to accurately reproduce the experimental phase-distribution data. This shortcoming was traced to the neglect of anisotropic effects in the modelling of liquid-phase turbulence. In this sense, the present investigation should be considered as the first step toward the ultimate goal of developing a theoretically sound and universal CFD-type two-fluid model for bubbly flows in channels

  9. Predictions of bubbly flows in vertical pipes using two-fluid models in CFDS-FLOW3D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B. [Chalk River Laboratories (Canada); Unrau, D. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)

    1995-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study exploring the performance of two sets of two-fluid closure relationships applied to the simulation of turbulent air-water bubbly upflows through vertical pipes. Predictions obtained with the default CFDS-FLOW3D model for dispersed flows were compared with the predictions of a new model (based on the work of Lee), and with the experimental data of Liu. The new model, implemented in the CFDS-FLOW3D code, included additional source terms in the {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} {kappa}-{epsilon} transport equations for the liquid phase, as well as modified model coefficients and wall functions. All simulations were carried out in a 2-D axisymmetric format, collapsing the general multifluid framework of CFDS-FLOW3D to the two-fluid (air-water) case. The newly implemented model consistently improved predictions of radial-velocity profiles of both phases, but failed to accurately reproduce the experimental phase-distribution data. This shortcoming was traced to the neglect of anisotropic effects in the modelling of liquid-phase turbulence. In this sense, the present investigation should be considered as the first step toward the ultimate goal of developing a theoretically sound and universal CFD-type two-fluid model for bubbly flows in channels.

  10. The assessment of two-fluid models using critical flow data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shome, B.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of two-phase flow is governed by the thermal-hydraulic transfers occurring across phasic interfaces. If correctly formulated, two-fluid models should yield all conceivable evolutions. Moreover, some experiments may be uniquely qualified for model assessment if they can isolate important closure models. This paper is primarily concerned with the possible assessment of the virtual mass force using air-water critical flow data, in which phase-change effects do not take place. The following conclusions can be drawn from this study: (1) The closure parameters, other than those for cirtual mass, were found to have an insignificant effect on critical flow. In contrast, the void fraction profile and the slip ratio were observed to be sensitive to the virtual mass model. (2) It appears that air-water critical flow experiments may be effectively used for the assessment of the virtual mass force used in two-fluid models. In fact, such experiments are unique in their ability to isolate the spatial gradients in a vm models. It is hoped that this study will help stimulate the conduct of further critical flow experiments for the assessment of two fluid models

  11. Bifurcation and stability of an improved time-delayed fluid flow model in internet congestion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Liang, Liu; Jie, Zhu; Xiao-Shu, Luo

    2009-01-01

    Based on the fluid flow time-delayed model proposed by Misra et al in internet congestion control, one modified time-delayed model is presented, where the influence of the communication delay on the router queue length is investigated in detail. The main advantage of the new model is that its stability domain is larger even without an extra controller. By linear stability analysis and numerical simulation, the effectiveness and feasibility of the novel model in internet congestion control are verified

  12. Bifurcation and stability of an improved time-delayed fluid flow model in internet congestion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Jie; Luo, Xiao-Shu

    2009-09-01

    Based on the fluid flow time-delayed model proposed by Misra et al in internet congestion control, one modified time-delayed model is presented, where the influence of the communication delay on the router queue length is investigated in detail. The main advantage of the new model is that its stability domain is larger even without an extra controller. By linear stability analysis and numerical simulation, the effectiveness and feasibility of the novel model in internet congestion control are verified.

  13. An artificial compressibility CBS method for modelling heat transfer and fluid flow in heterogeneous porous materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malan, AG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available to modelling both forced convection as well as heat transfer and fluid flow through heterogeneous saturated porous materials via an edge-based finite volume discretization scheme. A volume-averaged set of local thermal disequilibrium governing equations...

  14. Experimental and modeling hydraulic studies of foam drilling fluid flowing through vertical smooth pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Saxena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Foam has emerged as an efficient drilling fluid for the drilling of low pressure, fractured and matured reservoirs because of its the ability to reduce formation damage, fluid loss, differential sticking etc. However the compressible nature along with its complicated rheology has made its implementation a multifaceted task. Knowledge of the hydrodynamic behavior of drilling fluid within the borehole is the key behind successful implementation of drilling job. However, little effort has been made to develop the hydrodynamic models for the foam flowing with cuttings through pipes of variable diameter. In the present study, hydrodynamics of the foam fluid was investigated through the vertical smooth pipes of different pipe diameters, with variable foam properties in a flow loop system. Effect of cutting loading on pressure drop was also studied. Thus, the present investigation estimates the differential pressure loss across the pipe. The flow loop permits foam flow through 25.4 mm, 38.1 mm and 50.8 mm diameter pipes. The smaller diameter pipes are used to replicate the annular spaces between the drill string and wellbore. The developed model determines the pressure loss along the pipe and the results are compared with a number of existing models. The developed model is able to predict the experimental results more accurately.

  15. Analysis of time integration methods for the compressible two-fluid model for pipe flow simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Sanderse (Benjamin); I. Eskerud Smith (Ivar); M.H.W. Hendrix (Maurice)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we analyse different time integration methods for the two-fluid model and propose the BDF2 method as the preferred choice to simulate transient compressible multiphase flow in pipelines. Compared to the prevailing Backward Euler method, the BDF2 scheme has a significantly

  16. Modeling and analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities in two-phase flow using two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J.; Podowski, M.Z.

    2001-01-01

    Because of the practical importance of two-phase flow instabilities, especially in boiling water nuclear reactor technology, substantial efforts have been made to date to understand the physical phenomena governing such instabilities and to develop computational tools to model the dynamics of marginally-stable/unstable boiling systems. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrated methodology for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in boiling channels and systems. The major novel aspects of the proposed approach are: (a) it is based on the combined frequency-domain and time-domain methods, the former used to quantify stability margins and to determine the onset of instability conditions, the latter to study the nonlinear system response outside the stability boundaries identified using the nearly-exact results of the frequency-domain analysis; (b) the two-fluid model of two-phase flow has been used for the first time to analytically derive the boiling channel transfer functions for the parallel-channel and channel-to-channel instability modes. In this way, the major characteristics of a boiling system, including the onset-of-instability conditions, can be readily evaluated by using the qualitative frequency-domain approach, whereas the explicit time-domain integration is performed, if necessary, only for the operating conditions that have already been identified as unstable. Both methods use the same physical two-fluid model that, in one case, is linearized and used to derive a rigorous analytical solution in the complex domain, and, in the other case, is solved numerically using an algorithm developed especially for this purpose. The results using both methods have been compared against each other and extensively tested. The testing and validation of the new model included comparisons of the predicted steady-state distributions of major parameters and of the transient channel response against experimental data

  17. Magnetic field effect on blood flow of Casson fluid in axisymmetric cylindrical tube: A fractional model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Farhad, E-mail: farhadaliecomaths@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, City University of Science and Information Technology, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); Sheikh, Nadeem Ahmad [Department of Mathematics, City University of Science and Information Technology, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); Khan, Ilyas [Basic Engineering Sciences Department, College of Engineering Majmaah University, Majmaah 11952 (Saudi Arabia); Saqib, Muhammad [Department of Mathematics, City University of Science and Information Technology, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan)

    2017-02-01

    The effects of magnetohydrodynamics on the blood flow when blood is represented as a Casson fluid, along with magnetic particles in a horizontal cylinder is studied. The flow is due to an oscillating pressure gradient. The Laplace and finite Hankel transforms are used to obtain the closed form solutions of the fractional partial differential equations. Effects of various parameters on the flow of both blood and magnetic particles are shown graphically. The analysis shows that, the model with fractional order derivatives bring a remarkable changes as compared to the ordinary model. The study highlights that applied magnetic field reduces the velocities of both the blood and magnetic particles.

  18. Magnetic field effect on blood flow of Casson fluid in axisymmetric cylindrical tube: A fractional model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Farhad; Sheikh, Nadeem Ahmad; Khan, Ilyas; Saqib, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    The effects of magnetohydrodynamics on the blood flow when blood is represented as a Casson fluid, along with magnetic particles in a horizontal cylinder is studied. The flow is due to an oscillating pressure gradient. The Laplace and finite Hankel transforms are used to obtain the closed form solutions of the fractional partial differential equations. Effects of various parameters on the flow of both blood and magnetic particles are shown graphically. The analysis shows that, the model with fractional order derivatives bring a remarkable changes as compared to the ordinary model. The study highlights that applied magnetic field reduces the velocities of both the blood and magnetic particles.

  19. A PISO-like algorithm to simulate superfluid helium flow with the two-fluid model

    CERN Document Server

    Soulaine, Cyprien; Allain, Hervé; Baudouy, Bertrand; Van Weelderen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a segregated algorithm to solve numerically the superfluid helium (He II) equations using the two-fluid model. In order to validate the resulting code and illustrate its potential, different simulations have been performed. First, the flow through a capillary filled with He II with a heated area on one side is simulated and results are compared to analytical solutions in both Landau and Gorter–Mellink flow regimes. Then, transient heat transfer of a forced flow of He II is investigated. Finally, some two-dimensional simulations in a porous medium model are carried out.

  20. Validation of a multidimensional computational fluid dynamics model for subcooled flow boiling analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Caldeira, Alexandre D.; Borges, Eduardo M., E-mail: fbraz@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: alexdc@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: eduardo@ieav.cta.b [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    In a heated vertical channel, the subcooled flow boiling regime occurs when the bulk fluid temperature is lower than the saturation temperature, but the fluid temperature reaches the saturation point near the channel wall. This phenomenon produces a significant increase in heat flux, limited by the critical heat flux. This study is particularly important to the thermal-hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactors. The purpose of this work is the validation of a multidimensional model to analyze the subcooled flow boiling comparing the results with experimental data found in literature. The computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT was used with Eulerian multiphase model option. The calculated values of wall temperature in the liquid-solid interface presented an excellent agreement when compared to the experimental data. Void fraction calculations presented satisfactory results in relation to the experimental data in pressures of 15, 30 and 45 bars. (author)

  1. Fluid friction and wall viscosity of the 1D blood flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Nishi, Shohei; Matsukawa, Mami; Ghigo, Arthur; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria

    2016-02-29

    We study the behavior of the pulse waves of water into a flexible tube for application to blood flow simulations. In pulse waves both fluid friction and wall viscosity are damping factors, and difficult to evaluate separately. In this paper, the coefficients of fluid friction and wall viscosity are estimated by fitting a nonlinear 1D flow model to experimental data. In the experimental setup, a distensible tube is connected to a piston pump at one end and closed at another end. The pressure and wall displacements are measured simultaneously. A good agreement between model predictions and experiments was achieved. For amplitude decrease, the effect of wall viscosity on the pulse wave has been shown as important as that of fluid viscosity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Validation of a multidimensional computational fluid dynamics model for subcooled flow boiling analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Caldeira, Alexandre D.; Borges, Eduardo M.

    2011-01-01

    In a heated vertical channel, the subcooled flow boiling regime occurs when the bulk fluid temperature is lower than the saturation temperature, but the fluid temperature reaches the saturation point near the channel wall. This phenomenon produces a significant increase in heat flux, limited by the critical heat flux. This study is particularly important to the thermal-hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactors. The purpose of this work is the validation of a multidimensional model to analyze the subcooled flow boiling comparing the results with experimental data found in literature. The computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT was used with Eulerian multiphase model option. The calculated values of wall temperature in the liquid-solid interface presented an excellent agreement when compared to the experimental data. Void fraction calculations presented satisfactory results in relation to the experimental data in pressures of 15, 30 and 45 bars. (author)

  3. Computational modeling for fluid flow and interfacial transport

    CERN Document Server

    Shyy, Wei

    2006-01-01

    Practical applications and examples highlight this treatment of computational modeling for handling complex flowfields. A reference for researchers and graduate students of many different backgrounds, it also functions as a text for learning essential computation elements.Drawing upon his own research, the author addresses both macroscopic and microscopic features. He begins his three-part treatment with a survey of the basic concepts of finite difference schemes for solving parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations. The second part concerns issues related to computati

  4. A Constitutive Model for Flow-Induced Anisotropic Behavior of Viscoelastic Complex Fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, H.; De Kee, D.

    2008-01-01

    Flow-induced structural anisotropy could result when a complex fluid system is removed from equilibrium by means of hydrodynamic forces. In this paper, a general theory is developed to model flow induced anisotropic behavior of complex viscoelastic systems, e.g. polymer solutions/melts and suspensions. The rheological properties are characterized by viscosity and relaxation time tensors. We consider a second-rank tensor as a measure of the microstructure. We consider the effect of the flow on the structural changes: i.e. the evolution of the microstructure tensor is governed by a relaxation-type differential equation. We also propose that the viscosity and the relaxation time tensors depend on the second-rank microstructure tensor. That is as the microstructure tensor changes with the applied rate of deformation, the viscosity and relaxation time tensors evolve accordingly. As an example we consider elongational flow of two complex fluids

  5. Numerical simulation of countercurrent flow based on two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.D. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai 519082 (China); School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang, X.Y., E-mail: zxiaoying@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai 519082 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Using one-dimensional two-fluid model to help understanding counter-current flow two-phase flows. • Using surface tension model to make the one-dimensional two-fluid flow model well-posed. • Solving the governing equations with a modified SIMPLE algorithm. • Validating code with experimental data and applying it to vertical air/steam countercurrent flow condition - Abstract: In order to improve the understanding of counter-current two-phase flows, a transient analysis code is developed based on one-dimensional two-fluid model. A six equation model has been established and a two phase pressure model with surface tension term, wall drag force and interface shear terms have been used. Taking account of transport phenomenon, heat and mass transfer models of interface were incorporated. The staggered grids have been used in discretization of equations. For validation of the model and code, a countercurrent air-water problem in one experimental horizontal stratified flow has been considered firstly. Comparison of the computed results and the experimental one shows satisfactory agreement. As the full problem for investigation, one vertical pipe with countercurrent flow of steam-water and air-water at same boundary condition has been taken for study. The transient distribution of liquid fraction, liquid velocity and gas velocity for selected positions of steam-water and air-water problem were presented and discussed. The results show that these two simulations have similar transient behavior except that the distribution of gas velocity for steam-water problem have larger oscillation than the one for air-water. The effect of mesh size on wavy characteristics of interface surface was also investigated. The mesh size has significant influence on the simulated results. With the increased refinement, the oscillation gets stronger.

  6. Modeling of turbulent flows in porous media and at the interface with a free fluid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandesris, M.

    2006-12-01

    This work deals with the numerical simulation of turbulent flows in the whole nuclear reactor core, using multi-scale approaches. First, a macroscopic turbulence model is built, based on a porous media approach, to describe the flow in the fuel assemblies part of the nuclear core. Then, we study the jump conditions that have to be applied at a free fluid/porous interface. A thorough analytical study is carried out for laminar flows. This study allows to answer some fundamental questions about the physical meaning of the jump conditions, the values of the jump parameters and the location of the interface. Using these results, jump conditions for turbulent flows are proposed. The model is then applied to the simulation of a turbulent flow in a simplified model of a reactor core. (author)

  7. Dynamic analysis of electro- and magneto-rheological fluid dampers using duct flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteki, Kambiz; Bagchi, Ashutosh; Sedaghati, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) and electro-rheological (ER) fluid dampers provide a semi-active control mechanism for suppressing vibration responses of a structure. MR and ER fluids change their viscosity under the influence of magnetic and electrical fields, respectively, which facilitates automatic control when these fluids are used in damping devices. The existing models, namely the phenomenological models for simulating the behavior of MR and ER dampers, rely on various parameters determined experimentally by the manufacturers for each damper configuration. It is of interest to develop mechanistic models of these dampers which can be applied to various configurations so that their fundamental characteristics can be studied to develop flexible design solutions for smart structures. This paper presents a formulation for dynamic analysis of electro-rheological (ER) and magneto-rheological (MR) fluid dampers in flow and mix mode configurations under harmonic and random excitations. The procedure employs the vorticity transport equation and the regularization function to deal with the unsteady flow and nonlinear behavior of ER/MR fluid in general motion. The finite difference method has been used to solve the governing differential equations. Using the developed approach, the damping force of ER/MR dampers can be calculated under any type of excitation. (paper)

  8. Mechanics of fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Basniev, Kaplan S; Chilingar, George V 0

    2012-01-01

    The mechanics of fluid flow is a fundamental engineering discipline explaining both natural phenomena and human-induced processes, and a thorough understanding of it is central to the operations of the oil and gas industry.  This book, written by some of the world's best-known and respected petroleum engineers, covers the concepts, theories, and applications of the mechanics of fluid flow for the veteran engineer working in the field and the student, alike.  It is a must-have for any engineer working in the oil and gas industry.

  9. A coupled model on fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification in continuous casting mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-bin Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification of steel in the mold are so complex but crucial, determining the surface quality of the continuous casting slab. In the current study, a 2D numerical model was established by Fluent software to simulate the fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification of the steel in the mold. The VOF model and k-ε model were applied to simulate the flow field of the three phases (steel, slag and air, and solidification model was used to simulate the solidification process. The phenomena at the meniscus were also explored through interfacial tension between the liquid steel and slag as well as the mold oscillation. The model included a 20 mm thick mold to clarify the heat transfer and the temperature distribution of the mold. The simulation results show that the liquid steel flows as upper backflow and lower backflow in the mold, and that a small circulation forms at the meniscus. The liquid slag flows away from the corner at the meniscus or infiltrates into the gap between the mold and the shell with the mold oscillating at the negative strip stage or at the positive strip stage. The simulated pitch and the depth of oscillation marks approximate to the theoretical pitch and measured depth on the slab.

  10. Unified fluid flow model for pressure transient analysis in naturally fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, Petro; Azaiez, Jalel

    2015-01-01

    Naturally fractured reservoirs present special challenges for flow modeling with regards to their internal geometrical structure. The shape and distribution of matrix porous blocks and the geometry of fractures play key roles in the formulation of transient interporosity flow models. Although these models have been formulated for several typical geometries of the fracture networks, they appeared to be very dissimilar for different shapes of matrix blocks, and their analysis presents many technical challenges. The aim of this paper is to derive and analyze a unified approach to transient interporosity flow models for slightly compressible fluids that can be used for any matrix geometry and fracture network. A unified fractional differential transient interporosity flow model is derived using asymptotic analysis for singularly perturbed problems with small parameters arising from the assumption of a much smaller permeability of the matrix blocks compared to that of the fractures. This methodology allowed us to unify existing transient interporosity flow models formulated for different shapes of matrix blocks including bounded matrix blocks, unbounded matrix cylinders with any orthogonal crossection, and matrix slabs. The model is formulated using a fractional order diffusion equation for fluid pressure that involves Caputo derivative of order 1/2 with respect to time. Analysis of the unified fractional derivative model revealed that the surface area-to-volume ratio is the key parameter in the description of the flow through naturally fractured media. Expressions of this parameter are presented for matrix blocks of the same geometrical shape as well as combinations of different shapes with constant and random sizes. Numerical comparisons between the predictions of the unified model and those obtained from existing transient interporosity ones for matrix blocks in the form of slabs, spheres and cylinders are presented for linear, radial and spherical flow types for

  11. A discontinuous finite element approach to cracking in coupled poro-elastic fluid flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. R.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Evans, O.; Ulven, O. I.; Sun, W.

    2016-12-01

    Reaction-driven cracking is a coupled process whereby fluid-induced reactions drive large volume changes in the host rock which produce stresses leading to crack propagation and failure. This in turn generates new surface area and fluid-flow pathways for subsequent reaction in a potentially self-sustaining system. This mechanism has has been proposed for the pervasive serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite, as well as applications to mineral carbon sequestration and hydrocarbon extraction. The key computational issue in this problem is implementing algorithms that adequately model the formation of discrete fractures. Here we present models using a discontinuous finite element method for modeling fracture formation (Radovitsky et al., 2011). Cracks are introduced along facets of the mesh by the relaxation of penalty parameters once a failure criterion is met. It is fully described in the weak form of the equations, requiring no modification of the underlying mesh structure and allowing fluid properties to be easily adjusted along cracked facets. To develop and test the method, we start by implementing the algorithm for the simplified Biot equations for poro-elasticity using the finite element model assembler TerraFERMA. We consider hydro-fracking around a borehole (Grassl et al., 2015), where elevated fluid pressure in the poro-elastic solid causes it to fail radially in tension. We investigate the effects of varying the Biot coefficient and adjusting the fluid transport properties in the vicinity of the crack and compare our results to related dual-graph models (Ulven & Sun, submitted). We discuss issues arising from this method, including the formation of null spaces and appropriate preconditioning and solution strategies. Initial results suggest that this method provides a promising way to incorporate cracking into our reactive fluid flow models and future work aims to integrate the mechanical and chemical aspects of this process.

  12. Nonlinear modeling and testing of magneto-rheological fluids in low shear rate squeezing flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farjoud, Alireza; Ahmadian, Mehdi; Craft, Michael; Mahmoodi, Nima; Zhang, Xinjie

    2011-01-01

    A novel analytical investigation of magneto-rheological (MR) fluids in squeezing flows is performed and the results are validated with experimental test data. The squeeze flow of MR fluids has recently been of great interest to researchers. This is due to the large force capacity of MR fluids in squeeze mode compared to other modes (valve and shear modes), which makes the squeeze mode appropriate for a wide variety of applications such as impact dampers and engine mounts. Tested MR fluids were capable of providing a large range of controllable force along a short stroke in squeeze mode. A mathematical model was developed using perturbation techniques to predict closed-form solutions for velocity field, shear rate distribution, pressure distribution and squeeze force. Therefore, the obtained solutions greatly help with the design process of intelligent devices that use MR fluids in squeeze mode. The mathematical model also reduces the need for complicated and computationally expensive numerical simulations. The analytical results are validated by performing experimental tests on a novel MR device called an 'MR pouch' in an MR squeeze mode rheometer, both designed and built at CVeSS

  13. a Matlab Toolbox for Basin Scale Fluid Flow Modeling Applied to Hydrology and Geothermal Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcanie, M.; Lupi, M.; Carrier, A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent boosts in the development of geothermal energy were fostered by the latest oil crises and by the need of reducing CO2 emissions generated by the combustion of fossil fuels. Various numerical codes (e.g. FEHM, CSMP++, HYDROTHERM, TOUGH) have thus been implemented for the simulation and quantification of fluid flow in the upper crust. One possible limitation of such codes is the limited accessibility and the complex structure of the simulators. For this reason, we began to develop a Hydrothermal Fluid Flow Matlab library as part of MRST (Matlab Reservoir Simulation Toolbox). MRST is designed for the simulation of oil and gas problems including carbon capture storage. However, a geothermal module is still missing. We selected the Geneva Basin as a natural laboratory because of the large amount of data available in the region. The Geneva Basin has been intensely investigated in the past with exploration wells, active seismic and gravity surveys. In addition, the energy strategy of Switzerland promotes the development of geothermal energy that lead to recent geophysical prospections. Previous and ongoing projects have shown the geothermal potential of the Geneva Basin but a consistent fluid flow model assessing the deep circulation in the region is yet to be defined. The first step of the study was to create the basin-scale static model. We integrated available active seismic, gravity inversions and borehole data to describe the principal geologic and tectonic features of the Geneva Basin. Petrophysical parameters were obtained from available and widespread well logs. This required adapting MRST to standard text format file imports and outline a new methodology for quick static model creation in an open source environment. We implemented several basin-scale fluid flow models to test the effects of petrophysical properties on the circulation dynamics of deep fluids in the Geneva Basin. Preliminary results allow the identification of preferential fluid flow

  14. Collisionless kinetic-fluid model of zonal flows in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Horton, W.

    2006-12-01

    A novel kinetic-fluid model is presented, which describes collisionless time evolution of zonal flows in tokamaks. In the new zonal-flow closure relations, the parallel heat fluxes are written by the sum of short- and long-time-evolution parts. The former part is given in the dissipative form of the parallel heat diffusion and relates to collisionless damping processes. The latter is derived from the long-time-averaged gyrocenter distribution and plays a major role in describing low-frequency or stationary zonal flows, for which the parallel heat fluxes are expressed in terms of the parallel flow as well as the nonlinear-source and initial-condition terms. It is shown analytically and numerically that, when applied to the zonal flow driven by either ion or electron temperature gradient turbulence, the kinetic-fluid equations including the new closure relations can reproduce the same long-time zonal-flow responses to the initial condition and to the turbulence source as those obtained from the gyrokinetic model. (author)

  15. Numerical modelling of thermal and fluid flow phenomena in the mould channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sowa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a mathematical and a numerical model of the solidification of a cylindrical slender shaped casting, which take into account the process of filling the mould cavity with molten metal, has been proposed. Pressure and velocity fields were obtained by solving the momentum equations and the continuity equation, while the thermal fields were obtained by solving the heat conduction equation containing the convection term. Next, the numerical analysis of the solidification process of metals alloy in a cylindrical mould channel has been made. In the model one takes into account interdependence the heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena. Coupling of the thermal and fluid flow phenomena has been taken into consideration by the changes of the fluidity function and thermophysical parameters of alloy with respect to the temperature. The influence of the pressure and the temperature of metal pouring on the solid phase growth kinetics were estimated. The problem has been solved by the finite element method.

  16. Modeling fluid forces and response of a tube bundle in cross-flow induced vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khushnood, Shahab; Khan, Zaffar M.; Malik, M. Afzaal; Koreshi, Zafarullah; Khan, Mahmood Anwar

    2003-01-01

    Flow induced vibrations occur in process heat exchangers, condensers, boilers and nuclear steam generators. Under certain flow conditions and fluid velocities, the fluid forces result in tube vibrations and possible damage of tube, tube sheet or baffle due to fretting and fatigue. Prediction of these forces is an important consideration. The characteristics of vibration depend greatly on the fluid dynamic forces and structure of the tube bundle. It is undesirable for the tube bundles to vibrate excessively under normal operating conditions because tubes wear and eventual leakage can occur leading to costly shutdowns. In this paper modeling of fluid forces and vibration response of a tube in a heat exchanger bundle has been carried out. Experimental validation has been performed on an existing refinery heat exchanger tube bundle. The target tube has been instrumented with an accelerometer and strain gages. The bundle has been studied for pulse, sinusoidal and random excitations. Natural frequencies and damping of the tubes have also been computed. Experimental fluid forces and response shows a reasonable agreement with the predictions. (author)

  17. Hydraulic Fracturing and Production Optimization in Eagle Ford Shale Using Coupled Geomechanics and Fluid Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppachoknirun, Theerapat; Tutuncu, Azra N.

    2017-12-01

    With increasing production from shale gas and tight oil reservoirs, horizontal drilling and multistage hydraulic fracturing processes have become a routine procedure in unconventional field development efforts. Natural fractures play a critical role in hydraulic fracture growth, subsequently affecting stimulated reservoir volume and the production efficiency. Moreover, the existing fractures can also contribute to the pressure-dependent fluid leak-off during the operations. Hence, a reliable identification of the discrete fracture network covering the zone of interest prior to the hydraulic fracturing design needs to be incorporated into the hydraulic fracturing and reservoir simulations for realistic representation of the in situ reservoir conditions. In this research study, an integrated 3-D fracture and fluid flow model have been developed using a new approach to simulate the fluid flow and deliver reliable production forecasting in naturally fractured and hydraulically stimulated tight reservoirs. The model was created with three key modules. A complex 3-D discrete fracture network model introduces realistic natural fracture geometry with the associated fractured reservoir characteristics. A hydraulic fracturing model is created utilizing the discrete fracture network for simulation of the hydraulic fracture and flow in the complex discrete fracture network. Finally, a reservoir model with the production grid system is used allowing the user to efficiently perform the fluid flow simulation in tight formations with complex fracture networks. The complex discrete natural fracture model, the integrated discrete fracture model for the hydraulic fracturing, the fluid flow model, and the input dataset have been validated against microseismic fracture mapping and commingled production data obtained from a well pad with three horizontal production wells located in the Eagle Ford oil window in south Texas. Two other fracturing geometries were also evaluated to optimize

  18. Modeling studies for multiphase fluid and heat flow processes in nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.

    1988-07-01

    Multiphase fluid and heat flow plays an important role in many problems relating to the disposal of nuclear wastes in geologic media. Examples include boiling and condensation processes near heat-generating wastes, flow of water and formation gas in partially saturated formations, evolution of a free gas phase from waste package corrosion in initially water-saturated environments, and redistribution (dissolution, transport, and precipitation) of rock minerals in non-isothermal flow fields. Such processes may strongly impact upon waste package and repository design considerations and performance. This paper summarizes important physical phenomena occurring in multiphase and nonisothermal flows, as well as techniques for their mathematical modeling and numerical simulation. Illustrative applications are given for a number of specific fluid and heat flow problems, including: thermohydrologic conditions near heat-generating waste packages in the unsaturated zone; repository-wide convection effects in the unsaturated zone; effects of quartz dissolution and precipitation for disposal in the saturated zone; and gas pressurization and flow corrosion of low-level waste packages. 34 refs; 7 figs; 2 tabs

  19. Modeling studies of multiphase fluid and heat flow processes in nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.

    1989-01-01

    Multiphase fluid and heat flow plays an important role in many problems relating to the disposal of nuclear wastes in geologic media. Examples include boiling and condensation processes near heat-generating wastes, flow of water and formation gas in partially saturated formations, evolution of a free gas phase from waste package corrosion in initially water-saturated environments, and redistribution (dissolution, transport and precipitation) of rock minerals in non-isothermal flow fields. Such processes may strongly impact upon waste package and repository design considerations and performance. This paper summarizes important physical phenomena occurring in multiphase and nonisothermal flows, as well as techniques for their mathematical modeling and numerical simulation. Illustrative applications are given for a number of specific fluid and heat flow problems, including: thermohydrologic conditions near heat-generating waste packages in the unsaturated zone; repositorywide convection effects in the unsaturated zone; effects of quartz dissolution and precipitation for disposal in the saturated zone; and gas pressurization and flow effects from corrosion of low-level waste packages

  20. Mathematical modeling and exact solutions to rotating flows of a Burgers' fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayat, T.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to provide the modeling and exact analytic solutions for hydromagnetic oscillatory rotating flows of an incompressible Burgers' fluid bounded by a plate. The governing time-dependent equation for the Burgers' fluid is different than those from the Navier-Stokes' equation. The entire system is assumed to rotate around an axis normal to the plate. The governing equations for this investigation are solved analytically for two physical problems. The solutions for the three cases, when the two times angular velocity is greater than the frequency of oscillation or it is smaller than the frequency or it is equal to the frequency (resonant case), are discussed in second problem. In Burgers' fluid, it is also found that hydromagnetic solution in the resonant case satisfies the boundary condition at infinity. Moreover, the obtained analytical results reduce to several previously published results as the special cases. (author)

  1. Experiments and Simulations of Fluid Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoir Models - Emphasis on Impacts from Crossbeds and Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerresen, Knut Arne

    1996-12-31

    Hydrocarbon recovery from subsurface reservoirs has become increasingly dependent on advanced recovery techniques that require improved understanding of the physics of fluid flow within and across geological units including small-scale heterogeneities and fractures. In this thesis, impacts from heterogeneities on local fluid flow are studied experimentally by means of imaging techniques to visualize fluid flow in two dimensions during flooding of larger reservoir models. Part 1 reflects the multi-disciplinary collaboration, by briefly introducing the relevant geology, the literature on experiments on fluid flow in bedded structures, and outlining the applied numerical simulator and imaging techniques applied to visualize fluid flow. The second part contains a synopsis of displacement experiments in naturally laminated sandstones and in crossbed laboratory models, and of the impact from incipient shear fractures on oil recovery. The detailed results obtained from the experiments and simulations are described in six papers, all included. 215 refs., 108 figs., 16 tabs.

  2. Experiments and Simulations of Fluid Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoir Models - Emphasis on Impacts from Crossbeds and Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerresen, Knut Arne

    1997-12-31

    Hydrocarbon recovery from subsurface reservoirs has become increasingly dependent on advanced recovery techniques that require improved understanding of the physics of fluid flow within and across geological units including small-scale heterogeneities and fractures. In this thesis, impacts from heterogeneities on local fluid flow are studied experimentally by means of imaging techniques to visualize fluid flow in two dimensions during flooding of larger reservoir models. Part 1 reflects the multi-disciplinary collaboration, by briefly introducing the relevant geology, the literature on experiments on fluid flow in bedded structures, and outlining the applied numerical simulator and imaging techniques applied to visualize fluid flow. The second part contains a synopsis of displacement experiments in naturally laminated sandstones and in crossbed laboratory models, and of the impact from incipient shear fractures on oil recovery. The detailed results obtained from the experiments and simulations are described in six papers, all included. 215 refs., 108 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. Williamson Fluid Model for the Peristaltic Flow of Chyme in Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Nadeem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical model for the peristaltic flow of chyme in small intestine along with inserted endoscope is considered. Here, chyme is treated as Williamson fluid, and the flow is considered between the annular region formed by two concentric tubes (i.e., outer tube as small intestine and inner tube as endoscope. Flow is induced by two sinusoidal peristaltic waves of different wave lengths, traveling down the intestinal wall with the same speed. The governing equations of Williamson fluid in cylindrical coordinates have been modeled. The resulting nonlinear momentum equations are simplified using long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The resulting problem is solved using regular perturbation method in terms of a variant of Weissenberg number We. The numerical solution of the problem is also computed by using shooting method, and comparison of results of both solutions for velocity field is presented. The expressions for axial velocity, frictional force, pressure rise, stream function, and axial pressure gradient are obtained, and the effects of various emerging parameters on the flow characteristics are illustrated graphically. Furthermore, the streamlines pattern is plotted, and it is observed that trapping occurs, and the size of the trapped bolus varies with varying embedded flow parameters.

  4. Modelling of fluid flow in tape casting of thin ceramics: Analytical approaches and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    Tape casting has been used to produce thin layers of ceramics that can be used as single layers or can be stacked and laminated into multilayered structures. Many startup products such as multilayered inductors, multilayered varistors, piezoelectrics, ceramic fuel cells and lithium ion battery...... components are dependent upon tape casting technology. One of the growing sciences in the processing of ceramics by tape casting is the use of fluid flow analysis to control and enhance the final tapes. The fluid dynamics analysis of the ceramic slurries during tape casting is an efficient mean to elucidate...... the physical parameters crucial to the process. A review of the development of the tape casting process with particular focus on modelling the material flow is presented and in this context the current status is examined and future potential discussed....

  5. Evaluation of Interfacial Heat Transfer Models for Flashing Flow with Two-Fluid CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixiang Liao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of flashing flows is increased vastly by the interphase heat transfer as well as its coupling with mass and momentum transfers. A reliable heat transfer coefficient is the key in the modelling of such kinds of flows with the two-fluid model. An extensive literature survey on computational modelling of flashing flows has been given in previous work. The present work is aimed at giving a brief review on available theories and correlations for the estimation of interphase heat transfer coefficient, and evaluating them quantitatively based on computational fluid dynamics simulations of bubble growth in superheated liquid. The comparison of predictions for bubble growth rate obtained by using different correlations with the experimental as well as direct numerical simulation data reveals that the performance of the correlations is dependent on the Jakob number and Reynolds number. No generally applicable correlations are available. Both conduction and convection are important in cases of bubble rising and translating in stagnant liquid at high Jakob numbers. The correlations combining the analytical solution for heat diffusion and the theoretical relation for potential flow give the best agreement.

  6. Numerical study on modeling of liquid film flow under countercurrent flow limitation in volume of fluid method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Taro, E-mail: watanabe_t@qe.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-7895 (Japan); Takata, Takashi, E-mail: takata.takashi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-chou, Oarai-machi, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 331-1393 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Akira, E-mail: yamaguchi@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Thin liquid film flow under CCFL was modeled and coupled with the VOF method. • The difference of the liquid flow rate in experiments of CCFL was evaluated. • The proposed VOF method can quantitatively predict CCFL with low computational cost. - Abstract: Countercurrent flow limitation (CCFL) in a heat transfer tube at a steam generator (SG) of pressurized water reactor (PWR) is one of the important issues on the core cooling under a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In order to improve the prediction accuracy of the CCFL characteristics in numerical simulations using the volume of fluid (VOF) method with less computational cost, a thin liquid film flow in a countercurrent flow is modeled independently and is coupled with the VOF method. The CCFL characteristics is evaluated analytically in condition of a maximizing down-flow rate as a function of a void fraction or a liquid film thickness considering a critical thickness. Then, we have carried out numerical simulations of a countercurrent flow in a vertical tube so as to investigate the CCFL characteristics and compare them with the previous experimental results. As a result, it has been concluded that the effect of liquid film entrainment by upward gas flux will cause the difference in the experiments.

  7. Problems in fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasch, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical and mineral engineering students require texts which give guidance to problem solving to complement their main theoretical texts. This book has a broad coverage of the fluid flow problems which these students may encounter. The fundamental concepts and the application of the behaviour of liquids and gases in unit operation are dealt with. The book is intended to give numerical practice; development of theory is undertaken only when elaboration of treatments available in theoretical texts is absolutely necessary

  8. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of a lithium/thionyl chloride battery with electrolyte flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, W.B.; Wang, C.Y.; Weidner, J.W.; Jungst, R.G.; Nagasubramanian, G.

    2000-02-01

    A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery. As in earlier one-dimensional models, the model accounts for transport of species and charge, and electrode porosity variations and electrolyte flow induced by the volume reduction caused by electrochemical reactions. Numerical simulations are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves for various temperatures show good agreement with published experimental data, and are essentially identical to results published for one-dimensional models. The detailed two-dimensional flow simulations show that the electrolyte is replenished from the cell head space predominantly through the separator into the front of the cathode during most parts of the discharge, especially for higher cell temperatures.

  9. Fluid dynamics characterization of riser in a FCC cold flow model using gas radiotracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Valdemir A. dos; Lima, Emerson A.O.

    2013-01-01

    Was carried out the characterization of a diameter small riser of a cold flow model of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB), with aid of a radioactive tracer. Compressed air and catalytic cracking of petroleum flow through solids pneumatic transport regime, made of transparent material (glass, acrylic, PVC, polycarbonate) for study of problems in Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) unit and development of methods of measurement of fluid dynamic parameters. The CFB model consisted of a mixer component solid-gas (compressed air at 25 deg C and 200 kN/m 2 ; cracking catalyst with an average diameter of 72μm and specific mass of 1,500 kg/m 3 ), comprising a riser pipe glass 0.02m internal diameter and 1.8m height, a gas solid separation vessel by flash effect, with the filter in the gas outlet, and a return column (a glass tube with an internal diameter of 0.0254m) to redirect the catalyst for the riser base. Recorded data allowed studies on residence time distribution of the gaseous phase in the riser, with the identification and characterization of the flow of gas-solid components in the CFB riser of small diameter. A plug flow type with deviations due to back mixing of catalyst close to the walls, associated with the density difference between this component was observed. (author)

  10. The use of paleo-thermo-barometers and coupled thermal, fluid flow and pore fluid pressure modelling for hydrocarbon and reservoir prediction in fold and thrust belts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roure, F.; Andriessen, P.A.M.; Callot, J.P.; Ferket, H.; Gonzales, E.; Guilhaumou, N.; Hardebol, N.J.; Lacombe, O.; Malandain, J.; Mougin, P.; Muska, K.; Ortuno, S.; Sassi, W.; Swennen, R.; Vilasi, N.

    2010-01-01

    Basin modelling tools are now more efficient to reconstruct palinspastic structural cross sections and compute the history of temperature, pore-fluid pressure and fluid flow circulations in complex structural settings. In many cases and especially in areas where limited erosion occurred, the use of

  11. A Two-Phase Solid/Fluid Model for Dense Granular Flows Including Dilatancy Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, Francois; Fernandez-Nieto, Enrique; Narbona-Reina, Gladys

    2015-04-01

    We propose a thin layer depth-averaged two-phase model to describe solid-fluid mixtures such as debris flows. It describes the velocity of the two phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure, that itself modifies the friction within the granular phase (Iverson et al., 2010). The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by Jackson (2000) based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work (Bouchut et al., 2014). In particular, Pitman and Le replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's equations. We close the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation involving a critical density, or equivalently a critical pressure. Moreover, we relax one boundary condition, making it possible for the fluid to escape the granular media when compression of the granular mass occurs. Furthermore, we introduce second order terms in the equations making it possible to describe the evolution of the pore fluid pressure in response to the compression/dilatation of the granular mass without prescribing an extra ad-hoc equation for the pore pressure. We prove that the energy balance associated with this Jackson closure is dissipative, as well as its thin layer associated model. We present several numerical tests for the 1D case that are compared to the

  12. Analysis and Modeling of Structure Formation in Granular and Fluid-Solid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Eric

    Granular and multiphase flows are encountered in a number of industrial processes with particular emphasis in this manuscript given to the particular applications in cement pumping, pneumatic conveying, fluid catalytic cracking, CO2 capture, and fast pyrolysis of bio-materials. These processes are often modeled using averaged equations that may be simulated using computational fluid dynamics. Closure models are then required that describe the average forces that arise from both interparticle interactions, e.g. shear stress, and interphase interactions, such as mean drag. One of the biggest hurdles to this approach is the emergence of non-trivial spatio-temporal structures in the particulate phase, which can significantly modify the qualitative behavior of these forces and the resultant flow phenomenology. For example, the formation of large clusters in cohesive granular flows is responsible for a transition from solid-like to fluid-like rheology. Another example is found in gas-solid systems, where clustering at small scales is observed to significantly lower in the observed drag. Moreover, there remains the possibility that structure formation may occur at all scales, leading to a lack of scale separation required for traditional averaging approaches. In this context, several modeling problems are treated 1) first-principles based modeling of the rheology of cement slurries, 2) modeling the mean solid-solid drag experienced by polydisperse particles undergoing segregation, and 3) modeling clustering in homogeneous gas-solid flows. The first and third components are described in greater detail. In the study on the rheology of cements, several sub-problems are introduced, which systematically increase in the number and complexity of interparticle interactions. These interparticle interactions include inelasticity, friction, cohesion, and fluid interactions. In the first study, the interactions between cohesive inelastic particles was fully characterized for the

  13. Optimization of a Two-Fluid Hydrodynamic Model of Churn-Turbulent Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2009-07-01

    A hydrodynamic model of two-phase, churn-turbulent flows is being developed using the computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) code, NPHASE-CMFD. The numerical solutions obtained by this model are compared with experimental data obtained at the TOPFLOW facility of the Institute of Safety Research at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The TOPFLOW data is a high quality experimental database of upward, co-current air-water flows in a vertical pipe suitable for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. A five-field CMFD model was developed for the continuous liquid phase and four bubble size groups using mechanistic closure models for the ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Mechanistic models for the drag and non-drag interfacial forces are implemented to include the governing physics to describe the hydrodynamic forces controlling the gas distribution. The closure models provide the functional form of the interfacial forces, with user defined coefficients to adjust the force magnitude. An optimization strategy was devised for these coefficients using commercial design optimization software. This paper demonstrates an approach to optimizing CMFD model parameters using a design optimization approach. Computed radial void fraction profiles predicted by the NPHASE-CMFD code are compared to experimental data for four bubble size groups.

  14. Stochastic Geometric Models with Non-stationary Spatial Correlations in Lagrangian Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Holm, Darryl D.

    2018-01-01

    Inspired by spatiotemporal observations from satellites of the trajectories of objects drifting near the surface of the ocean in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's "Global Drifter Program", this paper develops data-driven stochastic models of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) with non-stationary spatial correlations representing the dynamical behaviour of oceanic currents. Three models are considered. Model 1 from Holm (Proc R Soc A 471:20140963, 2015) is reviewed, in which the spatial correlations are time independent. Two new models, called Model 2 and Model 3, introduce two different symmetry breaking mechanisms by which the spatial correlations may be advected by the flow. These models are derived using reduction by symmetry of stochastic variational principles, leading to stochastic Hamiltonian systems, whose momentum maps, conservation laws and Lie-Poisson bracket structures are used in developing the new stochastic Hamiltonian models of GFD.

  15. Stochastic Geometric Models with Non-stationary Spatial Correlations in Lagrangian Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Holm, Darryl D.

    2018-06-01

    Inspired by spatiotemporal observations from satellites of the trajectories of objects drifting near the surface of the ocean in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's "Global Drifter Program", this paper develops data-driven stochastic models of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) with non-stationary spatial correlations representing the dynamical behaviour of oceanic currents. Three models are considered. Model 1 from Holm (Proc R Soc A 471:20140963, 2015) is reviewed, in which the spatial correlations are time independent. Two new models, called Model 2 and Model 3, introduce two different symmetry breaking mechanisms by which the spatial correlations may be advected by the flow. These models are derived using reduction by symmetry of stochastic variational principles, leading to stochastic Hamiltonian systems, whose momentum maps, conservation laws and Lie-Poisson bracket structures are used in developing the new stochastic Hamiltonian models of GFD.

  16. Integrated geophysical and hydrothermal models of flank degassing and fluid flow at Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Ward E.; Pearson, S.C.P.; Kiyosugi, K.; Lehto, H.L.; Saballos, J.A.; Connor, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate geologic controls on circulation in the shallow hydrothermal system of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, and their relationship to surface diffuse degassing. On a local scale (~250 m), relatively impermeable normal faults dipping at ~60° control the flowpath of water vapor and other gases in the vadose zone. These shallow normal faults are identified by modeling of a NE-SW trending magnetic anomaly of up to 2300 nT that corresponds to a topographic offset. Elevated SP and CO2 to the NW of the faults and an absence of CO2 to the SE suggest that these faults are barriers to flow. TOUGH2 numerical models of fluid circulation show enhanced flow through the footwalls of the faults, and corresponding increased mass flow and temperature at the surface (diffuse degassing zones). On a larger scale, TOUGH2 modeling suggests that groundwater convection may be occurring in a 3-4 km radial fracture zone transecting the entire flank of the volcano. Hot water rising uniformly into the base of the model at 1 x 10-5 kg/m2s results in convection that focuses heat and fluid and can explain the three distinct diffuse degassing zones distributed along the fracture. Our data and models suggest that the unusually active surface degassing zones at Masaya volcano can result purely from uniform heat and fluid flux at depth that is complicated by groundwater convection and permeability variations in the upper few km. Therefore isolating the effects of subsurface geology is vital when trying to interpret diffuse degassing in light of volcanic activity.

  17. Prediction of subcooled flow boiling characteristics using two-fluid Eulerian CFD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Ribeiro, Guilherme B., E-mail: gbribeiro@ieav.cta.br; Caldeira, Alexandre D.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • CFD multiphase model is used to predict subcooled flow boiling characteristics. • Better agreement is achieved for higher saturation pressures. • Onset of nucleate boiling and saturated boiling are well predicted. • CFD multiphase model tends to underestimate the void fraction. • Factors were adjusted in order to improve the void fraction results. - Abstract: The present study concerns a detailed analysis of flow boiling phenomena under high pressure systems using a two-fluid Eulerian approach provided by a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver. For this purpose, a vertical heated pipe made of stainless steel with an internal diameter of 15.4 mm was considered as the modeled domain. Two different uniform heat fluxes and three saturation pressures were applied to the channel wall, whereas water mass flux of 900 kg/m{sup 2} s was considered for all simulation cases. The model was validated against a set of experimental data and results have indicated a promising use of the CFD technique for estimation of the wall temperature, the liquid bulk temperature and the location of the departure of nucleate boiling. Changes in factors applied in the modeling of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and bubble departure frequency were suggested, allowing a better prediction of the void fraction along the heated channel. The commercial CFD solver FLUENT 14.5 was used for the model implementation.

  18. Prediction of subcooled flow boiling characteristics using two-fluid Eulerian CFD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Ribeiro, Guilherme B.; Caldeira, Alexandre D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CFD multiphase model is used to predict subcooled flow boiling characteristics. • Better agreement is achieved for higher saturation pressures. • Onset of nucleate boiling and saturated boiling are well predicted. • CFD multiphase model tends to underestimate the void fraction. • Factors were adjusted in order to improve the void fraction results. - Abstract: The present study concerns a detailed analysis of flow boiling phenomena under high pressure systems using a two-fluid Eulerian approach provided by a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver. For this purpose, a vertical heated pipe made of stainless steel with an internal diameter of 15.4 mm was considered as the modeled domain. Two different uniform heat fluxes and three saturation pressures were applied to the channel wall, whereas water mass flux of 900 kg/m"2 s was considered for all simulation cases. The model was validated against a set of experimental data and results have indicated a promising use of the CFD technique for estimation of the wall temperature, the liquid bulk temperature and the location of the departure of nucleate boiling. Changes in factors applied in the modeling of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and bubble departure frequency were suggested, allowing a better prediction of the void fraction along the heated channel. The commercial CFD solver FLUENT 14.5 was used for the model implementation.

  19. A general coarse and fine mesh solution scheme for fluid flow modeling in VHTRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, I; Ivanov, K; Avramova, M.

    2011-01-01

    Coarse mesh Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods offer several advantages over traditional coarse mesh methods for the safety analysis of helium-cooled graphite-moderated Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs). This relatively new approach opens up the possibility for system-wide calculations to be carried out using a consistent set of field equations throughout the calculation, and subsequently the possibility for hybrid coarse/fine mesh or hierarchical multi scale CFD simulations. To date, a consistent methodology for hierarchical multi-scale CFD has not been developed. This paper describes work carried out in the initial development of a multi scale CFD solver intended to be used for the safety analysis of VHTRs. The VHTR is considered on any scale to consist of a homogenized two-phase mixture of fluid and stationary solid material of varying void fraction. A consistent set of conservation equations was selected such that they reduce to the single-phase conservation equations for the case where void fraction is unity. The discretization of the conservation equations uses a new pressure interpolation scheme capable of capturing the discontinuity in pressure across relatively large changes in void fraction. Based on this, a test solver was developed which supports fully unstructured meshes for three-dimensional time-dependent compressible flow problems, including buoyancy effects. For typical VHTR flow phenomena the new solver shows promise as an effective candidate for predicting the flow behavior on multiple scales, as it is capable of modeling both fine mesh single phase flows as well as coarse mesh flows in homogenized regions containing both fluid and solid materials. (author)

  20. Assessment of fluid-to-fluid modelling of critical heat flux in horizontal 37-element bundle flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    Fluid-to-fluid modelling laws of critical heat flux (CHF) available in the literature were reviewed. The applicability of the fluid-to-fluid modelling laws was assessed using available data ranging from low to high mass fluxes in horizontal 37-element bundles simulating a CANDU fuel string. Correlations consisting of dimensionless similarity groups were derived using modelling fluid data (Freon-12) to predict water CHF data in horizontal 37-element bundles with uniform and non-uniform axial-heat flux distribution (AFD). The results showed that at mass fluxes higher than ∼4,000 kg/m 2 s (water equivalent value), the vertical fluid-to-fluid modelling laws of Ahmad (1973) and Katto (1979) predict water CHF in horizontal 37-element bundles with non-uniform AFD with average errors of 1.4% and 3.0% and RMS errors of 5.9% and 6.1%, respectively. The Francois and Berthoud (2003) fluid-to-fluid modelling law predicts CHF in non-uniformly heated 37-element bundles in the horizontal orientation with an average error of 0.6% and an RMS error of 10.4% over the available range of 2,000 to 6,200 kg/m 2 s. (author)

  1. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrey Ioilev; Maskhud Samigulin; Vasily Ustinenko; Simon Lo; Adrian Tentner

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The goal of this project is to develop an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer code (CFD-BWR) that allows the detailed analysis of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundle under various operating conditions. This code will include more fundamental physical models than the current generation of sub-channel codes and advanced numerical algorithms for improved computational accuracy, robustness, and speed. It is highly desirable to understand the detailed two-phase flow phenomena inside a BWR fuel bundle. These phenomena include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for the analysis of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is still too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Recent progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), coupled with the rapidly increasing computational power of massively parallel computers, shows promising potential for the fine-mesh, detailed simulation of fuel assembly two-phase flow phenomena. However, the phenomenological models available in the commercial CFD programs are not as advanced as those currently being used in the sub-channel codes used in the nuclear industry. In particular, there are no models currently available which are able to reliably predict the nature of the flow regimes, and use the appropriate sub-models for those flow regimes. The CFD-BWR code is being developed as a customized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD Code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. The paper describes the model development strategy which has been adopted by the development team for the

  2. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of mixed convection flows in buildings enclosures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayne, Alexander; Agarwal, Ramesh K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In recent years Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are increasingly used to model the air circulation and temperature environment inside the rooms of residential and office buildings to gain insight into the relative energy consumptions of various HVAC systems for cooling/heating for climate control and thermal comfort. This requires accurate simulation of turbulent flow and heat transfer for various types of ventilation systems using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations of fluid dynamics. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) or Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of Navier-Stokes equations is computationally intensive and expensive for simulations of this kind. As a result, vast majority of CFD simulations employ RANS equations in conjunction with a turbulence model. In order to assess the modeling requirements (mesh, numerical algorithm, turbulence model etc.) for accurate simulations, it is critical to validate the calculations against the experimental data. For this purpose, we use three well known benchmark validation cases, one for natural convection in 2D closed vertical cavity, second for forced convection in a 2D rectangular cavity and the third for mixed convection in a 2D square cavity. The simulations are performed on a number of meshes of different density using a number of turbulence models. It is found that k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model with a second-order algorithm on a reasonable mesh gives the best results. This information is then used to determine the modeling requirements (mesh, numerical algorithm, turbulence model etc.) for flows in 3D enclosures with different ventilation systems. In particular two cases are considered for which the experimental data is available. These cases are (1) air flow and heat transfer in a naturally ventilated room and (2) airflow and temperature distribution in an atrium. Good agreement with the experimental data and computations of other investigators is obtained.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, W.B.; Jungst, Rudolph G.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Wang, C.Y.; Weidner, John.

    1999-06-11

    A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery. The model accounts for not only transport of species and charge, but also the electrode porosity variations and the electrolyte flow induced by the volume reduction caused by electrochemical reactions. Numerical simulations are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves for various temperatures are compared to the experimental data with excellent agreement. Moreover, the simulation results. in conjunction with computer visualization and animation techniques, confirm that cell utilization in the temperature and current range of interest is limited by pore plugging or clogging of the front side of the cathode as a result of LiCl precipitation. The detailed two-dimensional flow simulation also shows that the electrolyte is replenished from the cell header predominantly through the separator into the front of the cathode during most parts of the discharge, especially for higher cell temperatures.

  4. A non-traditional fluid problem: transition between theoretical models from Stokes’ to turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Horacio D.; Olivieri, Néstor A.; Véliz, Maximiliano E.; Raviola, Lisandro A.

    2018-05-01

    In the context of fluid mechanics courses, it is customary to consider the problem of a sphere falling under the action of gravity inside a viscous fluid. Under suitable assumptions, this phenomenon can be modelled using Stokes’ law and is routinely reproduced in teaching laboratories to determine terminal velocities and fluid viscosities. In many cases, however, the measured physical quantities show important deviations with respect to the predictions deduced from the simple Stokes’ model, and the causes of these apparent ‘anomalies’ (for example, whether the flow is laminar or turbulent) are seldom discussed in the classroom. On the other hand, there are various variable-mass problems that students tackle during elementary mechanics courses and which are discussed in many textbooks. In this work, we combine both kinds of problems and analyse—both theoretically and experimentally—the evolution of a system composed of a sphere pulled by a chain of variable length inside a tube filled with water. We investigate the effects of different forces acting on the system such as weight, buoyancy, viscous friction and drag force. By means of a sequence of mathematical models of increasing complexity, we obtain a progressive fit that accounts for the experimental data. The contrast between the various models exposes the strengths and weaknessess of each one. The proposed experience can be useful for integrating concepts of elementary mechanics and fluids, and is suitable as laboratory practice, stressing the importance of the experimental validation of theoretical models and showing the model-building processes in a didactic framework.

  5. Linear analysis of sheared flow stabilization of global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities based on the Hall fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotnikov, V.I.; Paraschiv, I.; Makhin, V.; Bauer, B.S.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Dawson, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A systematic study of the linear stage of sheared flow stabilization of Z-pinch plasmas based on the Hall fluid model with equilibrium that contains sheared flow and an axial magnetic field is presented. In the study we begin with the derivation of a general set of equations that permits the evaluation of the combined effect of sheared flow and axial magnetic field on the development of the azimuthal mode number m=0 sausage and m=1 kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities, with the Hall term included in the model. The incorporation of sheared flow, axial magnetic field, and the Hall term allows the Z-pinch system to be taken away from the region in parameter space where ideal MHD is applicable to a regime where nonideal effects tend to govern stability. The problem is then treated numerically by following the linear development in time of an initial perturbation. The numerical results for linear growth rates as a function of axial sheared flow, an axial magnetic field, and the Hall term are reported

  6. Multi-fluid modelling of pulsed discharges for flow control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggie, J.

    2015-02-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that short-pulse dielectric barrier discharge actuators are effective for speeds corresponding to take-off and approach of large aircraft, and thus are a fruitful direction for flow control technology development. Large-eddy simulations have reproduced some of the main fluid dynamic effects. The plasma models used in such simulations are semi-empirical, however, and need to be tuned for each flowfield under consideration. In this paper, the discharge physics is examined in more detail with multi-fluid modelling, comparing a five-moment model (continuity, momentum, and energy equations) to a two-moment model (continuity and energy equations). A steady-state, one-dimensional discharge was considered first, and the five-moment model was found to predict significantly lower ionisation rates and number densities than the two-moment model. A two-dimensional, transient discharge problem with an elliptical cathode was studied next. Relative to the two-moment model, the five-moment model predicted a slower response to the activation of the cathode, and lower electron velocities and temperatures as the simulation approached steady-state. The primary reason for the differences in the predictions of the two models can be attributed to the effects of particle inertia, particularly electron inertia in the cathode layer. The computational cost of the five-moment model is only about twice that of the simpler variant, suggesting that it may be feasible to use the more sophisticated model in practical calculations for flow control actuator design.

  7. A two-dimensional continuum model of biofilm growth incorporating fluid flow and shear stress based detachment

    KAUST Repository

    Duddu, Ravindra; Chopp, David L.; Moran, Brian

    2009-01-01

    of the biofilm. The model considers fluid flow around the biofilm surface, the advection-diffusion and reaction of substrate, variable biomass volume fraction and erosion due to the interfacial shear stress at the biofilm-fluid interface. The key assumptions

  8. A mathematical model of fluid and gas flow in nanoporous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Paulo J M; Rycroft, Chris H; Barenblatt, Grigory Isaakovich

    2012-12-11

    The mathematical modeling of the flow in nanoporous rocks (e.g., shales) becomes an important new branch of subterranean fluid mechanics. The classic approach that was successfully used in the construction of the technology to develop oil and gas deposits in the United States, Canada, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics becomes insufficient for deposits in shales. In the present article a mathematical model of the flow in nanoporous rocks is proposed. The model assumes the rock consists of two components: (i) a matrix, which is more or less an ordinary porous or fissurized-porous medium, and (ii) specific organic inclusions composed of kerogen. These inclusions may have substantial porosity but, due to the nanoscale of pores, tubes, and channels, have extremely low permeability on the order of a nanodarcy (~109-²¹ m² ) or less. These inclusions contain the majority of fluid: oil and gas. Our model is based on the hypothesis that the permeability of the inclusions substantially depends on the pressure gradient. At the beginning of the development of the deposit, boundary layers are formed at the boundaries of the low-permeable inclusions, where the permeability is strongly increased and intensive flow from inclusions to the matrix occurs. The resulting formulae for the production rate of the deposit are presented in explicit form. The formulae demonstrate that the production rate of deposits decays with time following a power law whose exponent lies between -1/2 and -1. Processing of experimental data obtained from various oil and gas deposits in shales demonstrated an instructive agreement with the prediction of the model.

  9. Contribution to the modeling of particulate hypersonic flows. Study and validation of a discrete two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papin, M.

    2005-06-01

    This work dedicated to the study of the hypersonic re-entry of vehicles in the atmosphere crossing clouds of particles implies the study of two-fluid flow and it is shown that some developments can be applied to the two-fluid models used to describe the phase transformation occurring in a target irradiated by laser beams. The calculation of wall fluxes on hypersonic re-entry vehicles requires the modeling of the interactions with clouds. Two-fluid flows posing many physical and mathematical problems, one studies an alternative model due to Abgrall and Saurel: the discrete equation method (DEM). Three axis are chosen. The first proposes a finite volume discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations on hybrid grids adapted to the context. The second extends the DEM within a multi-fluid not-structured N-D framework. A limit study associates an original continuous model to him: it allows to modify usual two-fluid seven equations models to obtain a phasic entropy principle. In spite of good properties, the continuous description of the particles is unsuited to the problem. The last axis is a study of the follow-up of pointwise particles which does not allow realistic calculation of parietal fluxes. An original model, extending the usual hydro-erosion models, however makes it possible to evaluate rebounds, erosion of the body and wall fluxes. The appendices expose approximate and exact Riemann solvers between pure fluids, discretization of the Baer and Nunziato model, and relations describing the atmosphere, water and heat fluxes

  10. Numerical Modeling and Investigation of Fluid-Driven Fracture Propagation in Reservoirs Based on a Modified Fluid-Mechanically Coupled Model in Two-Dimensional Particle Flow Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is a useful tool for enhancing rock mass permeability for shale gas development, enhanced geothermal systems, and geological carbon sequestration by the high-pressure injection of a fracturing fluid into tight reservoir rocks. Although significant advances have been made in hydraulic fracturing theory, experiments, and numerical modeling, when it comes to the complexity of geological conditions knowledge is still limited. Mechanisms of fluid injection-induced fracture initiation and propagation should be better understood to take full advantage of hydraulic fracturing. This paper presents the development and application of discrete particle modeling based on two-dimensional particle flow code (PFC2D. Firstly, it is shown that the modeled value of the breakdown pressure for the hydraulic fracturing process is approximately equal to analytically calculated values under varied in situ stress conditions. Furthermore, a series of simulations for hydraulic fracturing in competent rock was performed to examine the influence of the in situ stress ratio, fluid injection rate, and fluid viscosity on the borehole pressure history, the geometry of hydraulic fractures, and the pore-pressure field, respectively. It was found that the hydraulic fractures in an isotropic medium always propagate parallel to the orientation of the maximum principal stress. When a high fluid injection rate is used, higher breakdown pressure is needed for fracture propagation and complex geometries of fractures can develop. When a low viscosity fluid is used, fluid can more easily penetrate from the borehole into the surrounding rock, which causes a reduction of the effective stress and leads to a lower breakdown pressure. Moreover, the geometry of the fractures is not particularly sensitive to the fluid viscosity in the approximate isotropic model.

  11. Computer modeling of fluid flow and combustion in the ISV [In Situ Vitrification] confinement hood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.W.; Paik, S.

    1990-09-01

    Safety and suitability objectives for the application of the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) technology at the INEL require that the physical processes involved in ISVV be modeled to determine their operational behavior. The mathematical models that have been determined to address the modeling needs adequately for the ISV analysis package are detailed elsewhere. The present report is concerned with the models required for simulating the reacting flow that occurs in the ISV confinement hood. An experimental code named COYOTE has been secured that appears adequate to model the combustion in the confinement hood. The COYOTE code is a two-dimensional, transient, compressible, Eulerian, gas dynamics code for modeling reactive flows. It recognizes nonuniform Cartesian and cylindrical geometry and is based on the ICE (Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian) family of solution methods. It includes models for chemical reactions based on chemical kinetics as well as equilibrium chemistry. The mathematical models contained in COYOTE, their discrete analogs, the solution procedure, code structure and some test problems are presented in the report. 12 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  12. Quantification of Lacunar-Canalicular Interstitial Fluid Flow Through Computational Modeling of Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ronald Y; Frangos, John A

    2010-09-01

    Skeletal adaptation to mechanical loading has been widely hypothesized to involve the stimulation of osteocytes by interstitial fluid flow (IFF). However, direct investigation of this hypothesis has been difficult due in large part to the inability to directly measure IFF velocities within the lacunar-canalicular system. Measurements of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) within individual lacunae could be used to quantify lacunar-canalicular IFF when combined with mathematical modeling. In this study, we used a computational transport model to characterize the relationship between flow frequency (0.5-10 Hz), peak flow velocity (0-300 μm/s), tracer diffusion coefficient (100-300 μm(2)/s), and transport enhancement (i.e., (k/k(0)) - 1, where k and k(0) are the transport rates in the presence/absence of flow) during lacunar FRAP investigations. We show that this relationship is well described by a simple power law with frequency-dependent coefficients, and is relatively insensitive to variations in lacunar geometry. Using this power law relationship, we estimated peak IFF velocities in hindlimb mice subjected to intramedullary pressurization using values of k and k(0) previously obtained from ex vivo lacunar FRAP investigations. Together, our findings suggest that skeletal adaptation in hindlimb suspended mice subjected to dynamic intramedullary pressure occurred in the presence of IFF at levels associated with physiological loading.

  13. Quantification of Lacunar–Canalicular Interstitial Fluid Flow Through Computational Modeling of Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ronald Y.; Frangos, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal adaptation to mechanical loading has been widely hypothesized to involve the stimulation of osteocytes by interstitial fluid flow (IFF). However, direct investigation of this hypothesis has been difficult due in large part to the inability to directly measure IFF velocities within the lacunar–canalicular system. Measurements of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) within individual lacunae could be used to quantify lacunar–canalicular IFF when combined with mathematical modeling. In this study, we used a computational transport model to characterize the relationship between flow frequency (0.5–10 Hz), peak flow velocity (0–300 μm/s), tracer diffusion coefficient (100–300 μm2/s), and transport enhancement (i.e., (k/k0) − 1, where k and k0 are the transport rates in the presence/absence of flow) during lacunar FRAP investigations. We show that this relationship is well described by a simple power law with frequency-dependent coefficients, and is relatively insensitive to variations in lacunar geometry. Using this power law relationship, we estimated peak IFF velocities in hindlimb mice subjected to intramedullary pressurization using values of k and k0 previously obtained from ex vivo lacunar FRAP investigations. Together, our findings suggest that skeletal adaptation in hindlimb suspended mice subjected to dynamic intramedullary pressure occurred in the presence of IFF at levels associated with physiological loading. PMID:21076644

  14. Approach to uncertainty assessment for fluid flow and contaminant transport modeling in heterogeneous groundwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.W.; Jacobson, E.A.; Conbere, W.

    1985-06-01

    There is a growing awareness of the need to quantify uncertainty in groundwater flow and transport model results. Regulatory organizations are beginning to request the statistical distributions of predicted contaminant arrival to the biosphere, so that realistic confidence intervals can be obtained for the modeling results. To meet these needs, methods are being developed to quantify uncertainty in the subsurface flow and transport analysis sequence. A method for evaluating this uncertainty, described in this paper, considers uncertainty in material properties and was applied to an example field problem. Our analysis begins by using field measurements of transmissivity and hydraulic head in a regional, parameter estimation method to obtain a calibrated fluid flow model and a covariance matrix of the parameter estimation errors. The calibrated model and the covariance matrix are next used in a conditional simulation mode to generate a large number of 'head realizations.' The specific pore water velocity distribution for each realization is calculated from the effective porosity, the aquifer parameter realization, and the associated head values. Each velocity distribution is used to obtain a transport solution for a contaminant originating from the same source for all realizations. The results are the statistical distributions for the outflow arrival times. The confidence intervals for contamination reaching the biosphere are obtained from the outflow statistical distributions. 20 refs., 12 figs

  15. Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

    2008-05-29

    Successful exploitation of the vast amount of heat stored beneath the earth’s surface in hydrothermal and fluid-limited, low permeability geothermal resources would greatly expand the Nation’s domestic energy inventory and thereby promote a more secure energy supply, a stronger economy and a cleaner environment. However, a major factor limiting the expanded development of current hydrothermal resources as well as the production of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is insufficient knowledge about the chemical processes controlling subsurface fluid flow. With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350°C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350°C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earth’s crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earth’s crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and

  16. Calibration of a Numerical Model for Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in an Extruder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; Pedersen, David Bue; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses experiments performed in order to validate simulations on a fused deposition modelling (FDM) extruder. The nozzle has been simulated in terms of heat transfer and fluid flow. In order to calibrate and validate these simulations, experiments were performed giving a significant...... look into the physical behaviour of the nozzle, heating and cooling systems. Experiments on the model were performed at different sub-mm diameters of the extruder. Physical parameters of the model – especially temperature dependent parameters – were set into analytical relationships in order to receive...... dynamical parameters. This research sets the foundation for further research within melted extrusion based additive manufacturing. The heating process of the extruder will be described and a note on the material feeding will be given....

  17. Interstitial fluid flow and drug delivery in vascularized tumors: a computational model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Welter

    Full Text Available Interstitial fluid is a solution that bathes and surrounds the human cells and provides them with nutrients and a way of waste removal. It is generally believed that elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP is partly responsible for the poor penetration and distribution of therapeutic agents in solid tumors, but the complex interplay of extravasation, permeabilities, vascular heterogeneities and diffusive and convective drug transport remains poorly understood. Here we consider-with the help of a theoretical model-the tumor IFP, interstitial fluid flow (IFF and its impact upon drug delivery within tumor depending on biophysical determinants such as vessel network morphology, permeabilities and diffusive vs. convective transport. We developed a vascular tumor growth model, including vessel co-option, regression, and angiogenesis, that we extend here by the interstitium (represented by a porous medium obeying Darcy's law and sources (vessels and sinks (lymphatics for IFF. With it we compute the spatial variation of the IFP and IFF and determine its correlation with the vascular network morphology and physiological parameters like vessel wall permeability, tissue conductivity, distribution of lymphatics etc. We find that an increased vascular wall conductivity together with a reduction of lymph function leads to increased tumor IFP, but also that the latter does not necessarily imply a decreased extravasation rate: Generally the IF flow rate is positively correlated with the various conductivities in the system. The IFF field is then used to determine the drug distribution after an injection via a convection diffusion reaction equation for intra- and extracellular concentrations with parameters guided by experimental data for the drug Doxorubicin. We observe that the interplay of convective and diffusive drug transport can lead to quite unexpected effects in the presence of a heterogeneous, compartmentalized vasculature. Finally we discuss

  18. Interstitial fluid flow and drug delivery in vascularized tumors: a computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Michael; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial fluid is a solution that bathes and surrounds the human cells and provides them with nutrients and a way of waste removal. It is generally believed that elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is partly responsible for the poor penetration and distribution of therapeutic agents in solid tumors, but the complex interplay of extravasation, permeabilities, vascular heterogeneities and diffusive and convective drug transport remains poorly understood. Here we consider-with the help of a theoretical model-the tumor IFP, interstitial fluid flow (IFF) and its impact upon drug delivery within tumor depending on biophysical determinants such as vessel network morphology, permeabilities and diffusive vs. convective transport. We developed a vascular tumor growth model, including vessel co-option, regression, and angiogenesis, that we extend here by the interstitium (represented by a porous medium obeying Darcy's law) and sources (vessels) and sinks (lymphatics) for IFF. With it we compute the spatial variation of the IFP and IFF and determine its correlation with the vascular network morphology and physiological parameters like vessel wall permeability, tissue conductivity, distribution of lymphatics etc. We find that an increased vascular wall conductivity together with a reduction of lymph function leads to increased tumor IFP, but also that the latter does not necessarily imply a decreased extravasation rate: Generally the IF flow rate is positively correlated with the various conductivities in the system. The IFF field is then used to determine the drug distribution after an injection via a convection diffusion reaction equation for intra- and extracellular concentrations with parameters guided by experimental data for the drug Doxorubicin. We observe that the interplay of convective and diffusive drug transport can lead to quite unexpected effects in the presence of a heterogeneous, compartmentalized vasculature. Finally we discuss various

  19. Development of a numerical model for fluid-structure interaction analysis of flow through and around an aquaculture net cage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hao; Christensen, Erik Damgaard

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we developed a numerical model for fluid-structure interaction analysis of flow through and around an aquaculture net cage. The numerical model is based on the coupling between the porous media model and the lumped mass structural model. A novel interface was implemented...

  20. Computational fluid dynamics incompressible turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kajishima, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents numerical solution techniques for incompressible turbulent flows that occur in a variety of scientific and engineering settings including aerodynamics of ground-based vehicles and low-speed aircraft, fluid flows in energy systems, atmospheric flows, and biological flows. This book encompasses fluid mechanics, partial differential equations, numerical methods, and turbulence models, and emphasizes the foundation on how the governing partial differential equations for incompressible fluid flow can be solved numerically in an accurate and efficient manner. Extensive discussions on incompressible flow solvers and turbulence modeling are also offered. This text is an ideal instructional resource and reference for students, research scientists, and professional engineers interested in analyzing fluid flows using numerical simulations for fundamental research and industrial applications. • Introduces CFD techniques for incompressible flow and turbulence with a comprehensive approach; • Enr...

  1. Analysis of two-phase flow inter-subchannel mass and momentum exchanges by the two-fluid model approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninokata, H. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Deguchi, A. [ENO Mathematical Analysis, Tokyo (Japan); Kawahara, A. [Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    A new void drift model for the subchannel analysis method is presented for the thermohydraulics calculation of two-phase flows in rod bundles where the flow model uses a two-fluid formulation for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. A void drift model is constructed based on the experimental data obtained in a geometrically simple inter-connected two circular channel test sections using air-water as working fluids. The void drift force is assumed to be an origin of void drift velocity components of the two-phase cross-flow in a gap area between two adjacent rods and to overcome the momentum exchanges at the phase interface and wall-fluid interface. This void drift force is implemented in the cross flow momentum equations. Computational results have been successfully compared to experimental data available including 3x3 rod bundle data.

  2. On Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model for Carreau fluid flow over a slendering sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim; Khan, Masood

    The underlying intentions of this article are to investigate the impact of non-Fourier heat flux model on the stagnation-point flow of non-Newtonian Carreau fluid. In this study, the innovative Cattaneo-Christov constitutive model is introduced to study the characteristics of thermal relaxation time. The flow is impelled by a slendering surface which is of the variable thickness. In the model, the physical mechanism responsible for homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions are further taken into account. Also, the diffusion coefficients of the reactant and auto catalyst are considered to be equal. The governing non-linear partial differential equations consisting of the momentum, energy and concentration equations are reduced to the coupled ordinary differential equations by means of local similarity transformations. The transformed ODEs are tackled numerically by employing an effective shooting algorithm along with the Runge-Kutta Fehlberg scheme. The physical characteristics of the fluid velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are illuminated with the variation of numerous governing factors and are presented graphically. For instance, our result indicates that the temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness are lower in case of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model when compared to classical Fourier's heat model. Meanwhile, the rate of heat transfer is significantly improved by a high wall thickness parameter and an opposite influence is found due to the thermal relaxation parameter. We further noticed that a higher value of homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction parameter corresponds to a deceleration in the concentration field and it shows an inverse relation for the Schmidt number. A correlation with accessible results for specific cases is found with fabulous consent.

  3. Simple interphase drag model for numerical two-fluid modeling of two-phase flow systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, H.; Ransom, V.H.

    1984-01-01

    The interphase drag model that has been developed for RELAP5/MOD2 is based on a simple formulation having flow regime maps for both horizontal and vertical flows. The model is based on a conventional semi-empirical formulation that includes the product of drag coefficient, interfacial area, and relative dynamic pressure. The interphase drag model is implemented in the RELAP5/MOD2 light water reactor transient analysis code and has been used to simulate a variety of separate effects experiments to assess the model accuracy. The results from three of these simulations, the General Electric Company small vessel blowdown experiment, Dukler and Smith's counter-current flow experiment, and a Westinghouse Electric Company FLECHT-SEASET forced reflood experiment, are presented and discussed

  4. Geometric analysis of the solutions of two-phase flows: two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestin, J.; Zeng, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This report contains a lightly edited draft of a study of the two-fluid model in two-phase flow. The motivation for the study stems from the authors' conviction that the construction of a computer code for any model should be preceded by a geometrical analysis of the pattern of trajectories in the phase space appropriate for the model. Such a study greatly facilitates the understanding of the phenomenon of choking and anticipates the computational difficulties which arise from the existence of singularities. The report contains a derivation of the six conservation equations of the model which includes a consideration of the simplifications imposed on a one-dimensional treatment by the presence of boundary layers at the wall and between the phases. The model is restricted to one-dimensional adiabatic flows of a single substance present in two phases, but thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases is not assumed. The role of closure conditions is defined but no specific closure conditions, or explicit equations of state, are introduced

  5. Busy period analysis, rare events and transient behavior in fluid flow models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Asmussen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a process {(Jt,Vt}t≥0 on E×[0,∞, such that {Jt} is a Markov process with finite state space E, and {Vt} has a linear drift ri on intervals where Jt=i and reflection at 0. Such a process arises as a fluid flow model of current interest in telecommunications engineering for the purpose of modeling ATM technology. We compute the mean of the busy period and related first passage times, show that the probability of buffer overflow within a busy cycle is approximately exponential, and give conditioned limit theorems for the busy cycle with implications for quick simulation. Further, various inequalities and approximations for transient behavior are given. Also explicit expressions for the Laplace transform of the busy period are found. Mathematically, the key tool is first passage probabilities and exponential change of measure for Markov additive processes.

  6. A Well-Posed Two Phase Flow Model and its Numerical Solutions for Reactor Thermal-Fluids Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadioglu, Samet Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Berry, Ray [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    A 7-equation two-phase flow model and its numerical implementation is presented for reactor thermal-fluids applications. The equation system is well-posed and treats both phases as compressible flows. The numerical discretization of the equation system is based on the finite element formalism. The numerical algorithm is implemented in the next generation RELAP-7 code (Idaho National Laboratory (INL)’s thermal-fluids code) built on top of an other INL’s product, the massively parallel multi-implicit multi-physics object oriented code environment (MOOSE). Some preliminary thermal-fluids computations are presented.

  7. A Well-Posed Two Phase Flow Model and its Numerical Solutions for Reactor Thermal-Fluids Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadioglu, Samet Y.; Berry, Ray; Martineau, Richard

    2016-01-01

    A 7-equation two-phase flow model and its numerical implementation is presented for reactor thermal-fluids applications. The equation system is well-posed and treats both phases as compressible flows. The numerical discretization of the equation system is based on the finite element formalism. The numerical algorithm is implemented in the next generation RELAP-7 code (Idaho National Laboratory (INL)'s thermal-fluids code) built on top of an other INL's product, the massively parallel multi-implicit multi-physics object oriented code environment (MOOSE). Some preliminary thermal-fluids computations are presented.

  8. Implicit approximate Riemann solver for two fluid two phase flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, P.; Toumi, I.; Kumbaro, A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the description of new numerical methods developed for the numerical treatment of two phase flow models with two velocity fields which are now widely used in nuclear engineering for design or safety calculations. These methods are finite volumes numerical methods and are based on the use of Approximate Riemann Solver's concepts in order to define convective flux versus mean cell quantities. The first part of the communication will describe the numerical method for a three dimensional drift flux model and the extensions which were performed to make the numerical scheme implicit and to have fast running calculations of steady states. Such a scheme is now implemented in the FLICA-4 computer code devoted to 3-D steady state and transient core computations. We will present results obtained for a steady state flow with rod bow effect evaluation and for a Steam Line Break calculation were the 3-D core thermal computation was coupled with a 3-D kinetic calculation and a thermal-hydraulic transient calculation for the four loops of a Pressurized Water Reactor. The second part of the paper will detail the development of an equivalent numerical method based on an approximate Riemann Solver for a two fluid model with two momentum balance equations for the liquid and the gas phases. The main difficulty for these models is due to the existence of differential modelling terms such as added mass effects or interfacial pressure terms which make hyperbolic the model. These terms does not permit to write the balance equations system in a conservative form, and the classical theory for discontinuity propagation for non-linear systems cannot be applied. Meanwhile, the use of non-conservative products theory allows the study of discontinuity propagation for a non conservative model and this will permit the construction of a numerical scheme for two fluid two phase flow model. These different points will be detailed in that section which will be illustrated by

  9. The primary cilium as sensor of fluid flow: new building blocks to the model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Helle

    2015-01-01

    functionally as an organelle that makes cells more susceptible to changes in fluid flow. Thus the primary cilium was suggested to function as a flow-sensing device. This characterization has been substantiated for many epithelial cell types over the years. Nevertheless, part of the central mechanism of signal...

  10. Interface model coupling in fluid dynamics: application to two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galie, Th.

    2009-03-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of interface model coupling problems in space between different models of compressible flows. We consider one-dimensional problems where the interface is sharp, fixed and separating two regions of space corresponding to the two coupled models. Our goal is to define a coupling condition at the interface and to solve numerically the coupling problem with this condition. After a state of art on the interface model coupling of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, we propose a new coupling condition by adding in the equations of the coupled problem a measure source term at the interface. We first suppose a given constant weight associated to this source term. Two Riemann solvers are developed and one of them is based on a relaxation approach preserving equilibrium solutions of the coupled problem. This relaxation method is then used in an optimization problem, defined by several motivations at the interface, which permits to calculate a time dynamical weight. In a second part, we develop an approached Riemann solver for a two-phase two-pressure model in the particular case of a two-phase isentropic flow. Such a model contains non conservative terms that we write under the form of measure source terms. The previous relaxation method is thus extended to the case of the two-phase two-pressure model with an a priori estimation of the non conservative term contributions. The method allows us to solve, in the next and last chapter, the coupling problem of a two-fluid two-pressure model with a drift-flux model thanks to the father model approach. (authors)

  11. Simultaneous effects of slip and MHD on peristaltic blood flow of Jeffrey fluid model through a porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Bhatti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the simultaneous effects of slip and Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD on peristaltic blood flow of Jeffrey fluid model have been investigated in a non-uniform porous channel. The governing equation of blood flow for Jeffrey fluid model is solved with the help of long wavelength and creeping flow regime. The solution of the resulting differential equation is solved analytically and a closed form solution is presented. The impact of all the physical parameters is plotted for velocity profile and pressure rise. Nowadays, Magnetohydrodynamics is applicable in various magnetic drug targeting for cancer diseases and also very helpful to control the flow. The present analysis is also described for Newtonian fluid (λ1→0 as a special case of our study. It is observed that magnitude of the velocity is opposite near the walls due to slip effects whereas similar behavior has been observed for magnetic field.

  12. Second order numerical method of two-fluid model of air-water flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiselj, I.; Petelin, S.

    1995-01-01

    Model considered in this paper is six-equation two-fluid model used in computer code RELAP5. Air-water equations were taken in a code named PDE to avoid additional problems caused by condensation or vaporization. Terms with space derivatives were added in virtual mass term in momentum equations to ensure the hyperbolicity of the equations. Numerical method in PDE code is based on approximate Riemann solvers. Equations are solved on non-staggered grid with explicit time advancement and with upwind discretization of the convective terms in characteristic form of the equations. Flux limiters are used to find suitable combinations of the first (upwind) and the second order (Lax-Wendroff) discretization s which ensure second order accuracy on smooth solutions and damp oscillations around the discontinuities. Because of the small time steps required and because of its non-dissipative nature the scheme is suitable for the prediction of the fast transients: pressure waves, shock and rarefaction waves, water hammer or critical flow. Some preliminary results are presented for a shock tube problem and for Water Faucet problem - problems usually used as benchmarks for two-fluid computer codes. (author)

  13. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael D.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  14. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael W.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2017-08-15

    Disclosed herein is a acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow that includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  15. Modelling of fluid flow in fractured porous media by the singular integral equations method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, M.N.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis aims to develop a method for numerical modelling of fluid flow through fractured porous media and for determination of their effective permeability by taking advantage of recent results based on formulation of the problem by Singular Integral Equations. In parallel, it was also an occasion to continue on the theoretical development and to obtain new results in this area. The governing equations for flow in such materials are reviewed first and mass conservation at the fracture intersections is expressed explicitly. Using the theory of potential, the general potential solutions are proposed in the form of a singular integral equation that describes the steady-state flow in and around several fractures embedded in an infinite porous matrix under a far-field pressure condition. These solutions represent the pressure field in the whole body as functions of the infiltration in the fractures, which fully take into account the fracture interaction and intersections. Closed-form solutions for the fundamental problem of fluid flow around a single fracture are derived, which are considered as the benchmark problems to validate the numerical solutions. In particular, the solution obtained for the case of an elliptical disc-shaped crack obeying to the Poiseuille law has been compared to that obtained for ellipsoidal inclusions with Darcy law.The numerical programs have been developed based on the singular integral equations method to resolve the general potential equations. These allow modeling the fluid flow through a porous medium containing a great number of fractures. Besides, this formulation of the problem also allows obtaining a semi-analytical infiltration solution over a single fracture depending on the matrice permeability, the fracture conductivity and the fracture geometry. This result is the important key to up-scaling the effective permeability of a fractured porous medium by using different homogenisation schemes. The results obtained by the self

  16. Three-dimensional granular model of semi-solid metallic alloys undergoing solidification: Fluid flow and localization of feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sistaninia, M.; Phillion, A.B.; Drezet, J.-M.; Rappaz, M.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) granular model which simulates fluid flow within solidifying alloys with a globular microstructure, such as that found in grain refined Al alloys, is presented. The model geometry within a representative volume element (RVE) consists of a set of prismatic triangular elements representing the intergranular liquid channels. The pressure field within the liquid channels is calculated using a finite elements (FEs) method assuming a Poiseuille flow within each channel and flow conservation at triple lines. The fluid flow is induced by solidification shrinkage and openings at grain boundaries due to deformation of the coherent solid. The granular model predictions are validated against bulk data calculated with averaging techniques. The results show that a fluid flow simulation of globular semi-solid materials is able to reproduce both a map of the 3-D intergranular pressure and the localization of feeding within the mushy zone. A new hot cracking sensitivity coefficient is then proposed. Based on a mass balance performed over a solidifying isothermal volume element, this coefficient accounts for tensile deformation of the semi-solid domain and for the induced intergranular liquid feeding. The fluid flow model is then used to calculate the pressure drop in the mushy zone during the direct chill casting of aluminum alloy billets. The predicted pressure demonstrates that deep in the mushy zone where the permeability is low the local pressure can be significantly lower than the pressure predicted by averaging techniques.

  17. Fluid dynamics of bubbly flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegenhein, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bubbly flows can be found in many applications in chemical, biological and power engineering. Reliable simulation tools of such flows that allow the design of new processes and optimization of existing one are therefore highly desirable. CFD-simulations applying the multi-fluid approach are very promising to provide such a design tool for complete facilities. In the multi-fluid approach, however, closure models have to be formulated to model the interaction between the continuous and dispersed phase. Due to the complex nature of bubbly flows, different phenomena have to be taken into account and for every phenomenon different closure models exist. Therefore, reliable predictions of unknown bubbly flows are not yet possible with the multi-fluid approach. A strategy to overcome this problem is to define a baseline model in which the closure models including the model constants are fixed so that the limitations of the modeling can be evaluated by validating it on different experiments. Afterwards, the shortcomings are identified so that the baseline model can be stepwise improved without losing the validity for the already validated cases. This development of a baseline model is done in the present work by validating the baseline model developed at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf mainly basing on experimental data for bubbly pipe flows to bubble columns, bubble plumes and air-lift reactors that are relevant in chemical and biological engineering applications. In the present work, a large variety of such setups is used for validation. The buoyancy driven bubbly flows showed thereby a transient behavior on the scale of the facility. Since such large scales are characterized by the geometry of the facility, turbulence models cannot describe them. Therefore, the transient simulation of bubbly flows with two equation models based on the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is investigated. In combination with the before mentioned baseline model these

  18. Fluid dynamics of bubbly flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegenhein, Thomas

    2016-07-08

    Bubbly flows can be found in many applications in chemical, biological and power engineering. Reliable simulation tools of such flows that allow the design of new processes and optimization of existing one are therefore highly desirable. CFD-simulations applying the multi-fluid approach are very promising to provide such a design tool for complete facilities. In the multi-fluid approach, however, closure models have to be formulated to model the interaction between the continuous and dispersed phase. Due to the complex nature of bubbly flows, different phenomena have to be taken into account and for every phenomenon different closure models exist. Therefore, reliable predictions of unknown bubbly flows are not yet possible with the multi-fluid approach. A strategy to overcome this problem is to define a baseline model in which the closure models including the model constants are fixed so that the limitations of the modeling can be evaluated by validating it on different experiments. Afterwards, the shortcomings are identified so that the baseline model can be stepwise improved without losing the validity for the already validated cases. This development of a baseline model is done in the present work by validating the baseline model developed at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf mainly basing on experimental data for bubbly pipe flows to bubble columns, bubble plumes and air-lift reactors that are relevant in chemical and biological engineering applications. In the present work, a large variety of such setups is used for validation. The buoyancy driven bubbly flows showed thereby a transient behavior on the scale of the facility. Since such large scales are characterized by the geometry of the facility, turbulence models cannot describe them. Therefore, the transient simulation of bubbly flows with two equation models based on the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is investigated. In combination with the before mentioned baseline model these

  19. Biorheological Model on Flow of Herschel-Bulkley Fluid through a Tapered Arterial Stenosis with Dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadharshini, S; Ponalagusamy, R

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of blood flow through a tapered artery with stenosis and dilatation has been carried out where the blood is treated as incompressible Herschel-Bulkley fluid. A comparison between numerical values and analytical values of pressure gradient at the midpoint of stenotic region shows that the analytical expression for pressure gradient works well for the values of yield stress till 2.4. The wall shear stress and flow resistance increase significantly with axial distance and the increase is more in the case of converging tapered artery. A comparison study of velocity profiles, wall shear stress, and flow resistance for Newtonian, power law, Bingham-plastic, and Herschel-Bulkley fluids shows that the variation is greater for Herschel-Bulkley fluid than the other fluids. The obtained velocity profiles have been compared with the experimental data and it is observed that blood behaves like a Herschel-Bulkley fluid rather than power law, Bingham, and Newtonian fluids. It is observed that, in the case of a tapered stenosed tube, the streamline pattern follows a convex pattern when we move from r/R = 0 to r/R = 1 and it follows a concave pattern when we move from r/R = 0 to r/R = -1. Further, it is of opposite behaviour in the case of a tapered dilatation tube which forms new information that is, for the first time, added to the literature.

  20. Biorheological Model on Flow of Herschel-Bulkley Fluid through a Tapered Arterial Stenosis with Dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Priyadharshini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of blood flow through a tapered artery with stenosis and dilatation has been carried out where the blood is treated as incompressible Herschel-Bulkley fluid. A comparison between numerical values and analytical values of pressure gradient at the midpoint of stenotic region shows that the analytical expression for pressure gradient works well for the values of yield stress till 2.4. The wall shear stress and flow resistance increase significantly with axial distance and the increase is more in the case of converging tapered artery. A comparison study of velocity profiles, wall shear stress, and flow resistance for Newtonian, power law, Bingham-plastic, and Herschel-Bulkley fluids shows that the variation is greater for Herschel-Bulkley fluid than the other fluids. The obtained velocity profiles have been compared with the experimental data and it is observed that blood behaves like a Herschel-Bulkley fluid rather than power law, Bingham, and Newtonian fluids. It is observed that, in the case of a tapered stenosed tube, the streamline pattern follows a convex pattern when we move from r/R=0 to r/R=1 and it follows a concave pattern when we move from r/R=0 to r/R=-1. Further, it is of opposite behaviour in the case of a tapered dilatation tube which forms new information that is, for the first time, added to the literature.

  1. Computational modelling of a non-viscous fluid flow in a multi-walled carbon nanotube modelled as a Timoshenko beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khosravian, N; Rafii-Tabar, H

    2008-01-01

    In the design of nanotube-based fluidic devices, a critical issue is the effect of the induced vibrations in the nanotube arising from the fluid flow, since these vibrations can promote structural instabilities, such as buckling transitions. It is known that the induced resonant frequencies depend on the fluid flow velocity in a significant manner. We have studied, for the first time, the flow of a non-viscous fluid in stubby multi-walled carbon nanotubes, using the Timoshenko classical beam theory to model the nanotubes as a continuum structure. We have obtained the variations of the resonant frequencies with the fluid flow velocity under several experimentally interesting boundary conditions and aspect ratios of the nanotube. The main finding from our work is that, compared to an Euler-Bernoulli classical beam model of a nanotube, the Timoshenko beam predicts the loss of stability at lower fluid flow velocities

  2. Computational modelling of a non-viscous fluid flow in a multi-walled carbon nanotube modelled as a Timoshenko beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosravian, N; Rafii-Tabar, H [Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, Department of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: rafii-tabar@nano.ipm.ac.ir

    2008-07-09

    In the design of nanotube-based fluidic devices, a critical issue is the effect of the induced vibrations in the nanotube arising from the fluid flow, since these vibrations can promote structural instabilities, such as buckling transitions. It is known that the induced resonant frequencies depend on the fluid flow velocity in a significant manner. We have studied, for the first time, the flow of a non-viscous fluid in stubby multi-walled carbon nanotubes, using the Timoshenko classical beam theory to model the nanotubes as a continuum structure. We have obtained the variations of the resonant frequencies with the fluid flow velocity under several experimentally interesting boundary conditions and aspect ratios of the nanotube. The main finding from our work is that, compared to an Euler-Bernoulli classical beam model of a nanotube, the Timoshenko beam predicts the loss of stability at lower fluid flow velocities.

  3. Analysis of the laminar Newtonian fluid flow through a thin fracture modelled as a fluid-saturated sparsely packed porous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazanin, Igor [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Dept. of Mathematics; Siddheshwar, Pradeep G. [Bangalore Univ., Bengaluru (India). Dept. of Mathematics

    2017-06-01

    In this article we investigate the fluid flow through a thin fracture modelled as a fluid-saturated porous medium. We assume that the fracture has constrictions and that the flow is governed by the prescribed pressure drop between the edges of the fracture. The problem is described by the Darcy-Lapwood-Brinkman model acknowledging the Brinkman extension of the Darcy law as well as the flow inertia. Using asymptotic analysis with respect to the thickness of the fracture, we derive the explicit higher-order approximation for the velocity distribution. We make an error analysis to comment on the order of accuracy of the method used and also to provide rigorous justification for the model.

  4. Fluid flow in porous media using image-based modelling to parametrize Richards' equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, L J; Daly, K R; Hallett, P D; Naveed, M; Koebernick, N; Bengough, A G; George, T S; Roose, T

    2017-11-01

    The parameters in Richards' equation are usually calculated from experimentally measured values of the soil-water characteristic curve and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The complex pore structures that often occur in porous media complicate such parametrization due to hysteresis between wetting and drying and the effects of tortuosity. Rather than estimate the parameters in Richards' equation from these indirect measurements, image-based modelling is used to investigate the relationship between the pore structure and the parameters. A three-dimensional, X-ray computed tomography image stack of a soil sample with voxel resolution of 6 μm has been used to create a computational mesh. The Cahn-Hilliard-Stokes equations for two-fluid flow, in this case water and air, were applied to this mesh and solved using the finite-element method in COMSOL Multiphysics. The upscaled parameters in Richards' equation are then obtained via homogenization. The effect on the soil-water retention curve due to three different contact angles, 0°, 20° and 60°, was also investigated. The results show that the pore structure affects the properties of the flow on the large scale, and different contact angles can change the parameters for Richards' equation.

  5. Stress dependent fluid flow in porous rock: experiments and network modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flornes, Olav

    2005-07-01

    During the lifetime of a hydrocarbon reservoir, the pore pressure decreases because fluids are drained. Changed pore pressure causes a deformation of the reservoir rock, and the flow channels may be narrowed by the increased weight carried by the rock matrix. Knowledge of how the rocks ability to transport fluids, the permeability, is changed by increased stress can be important for effective reservoir management. In this work, we present experimental results for how permeability changes with applied stress. The materials tested are several different sandstones and one limestone, all having porosities higher than 19 percent. Application of stress is done in a number of different ways. We subject the sample to an isotropic stress, and see how changing this applied stress affects permeability as opposed to changing the pore fluid pressure. This allows for investigating the effective stress law for permeability. Permeability decreased by 10 to 20 percent, when we deformed the materials hydro statically within the elastic regime. For all of our samples, we observed a higher permeability change than predicted by a conventional model for relating porosity and permeability, the Kozeny Carman model. For Red Wildmoor, a sandstone having some clay content, we observed that a change in pore pressure was slightly more important for permeability than a change in the applied stress with the same amount. A sandstone with no clay content, Bad Durckheim, showed the opposite behavior, with applied stress slightly more important than pore pressure. We present a new method for measuring permeability in two directions in the same experiment. We apply different anisotropic stresses, and see if a high stress in one direction causes a difference in permeability changes parallel and perpendicular to maximum stress. We observe that deforming the sample axially, causes a larger decrease in axial permeability than in the radial at low confining pressure. At high confining pressure, the

  6. Using FlowLab, an educational computational fluid dynamics tool, to perform a comparative study of turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parihar, A.; Kulkarni, A.; Stern, F.; Xing, T.; Moeykens, S.

    2005-01-01

    Flow over an Ahmed body is a key benchmark case for validating the complex turbulent flow field around vehicles. In spite of the simple geometry, the flow field around an Ahmed body retains critical features of real, external vehicular flow. The present study is an attempt to implement such a real life example into the course curriculum for undergraduate engineers. FlowLab, which is a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool developed by Fluent Inc. for use in engineering education, allows students to conduct interactive application studies. This paper presents a synopsis of FlowLab, a description of one FlowLab exercise, and an overview of the educational experience gained by students through using FlowLab, which is understood through student surveys and examinations. FlowLab-based CFD exercises were implemented into 57:020 Mechanics of Fluids and Transport Processes and 58:160 Intermediate Mechanics of Fluids courses at the University of Iowa in the fall of 2004, although this report focuses only on experiences with the Ahmed body exercise, which was used only in the intermediate-level fluids class, 58:160. This exercise was developed under National Science Foundation funding by the authors of this paper. The focus of this study does not include validating the various turbulence models used for the Ahmed body simulation, because a two-dimensional simplification was applied. With the two-dimensional simplification, students may setup, run, and post process this model in a 50 minute class period using a single-CPU PC, as required for the 58:160 class at the University of Iowa. It is educational for students to understand the implication of a two- dimensional approximation for essentially a three-dimensional flow field, along with the consequent variation in both qualitative and quantitative results. Additionally, through this exercise, students may realize that the choice of the respective turbulence model will affect simulation prediction. (author)

  7. Flow Characterization of Vapor Phase of Geothermal Fluid in Pipe Using Isotope 85Kr and Residence Time Distribution Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sugiharto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of vapor flow in geothermal pipe faces great challenges due to fast fluids flow in high-temperature and high-pressure environment. In present study the flow rate measurement has been performed to characterization the geothermal vapor flow in a pipe. The experiment was carried out in a pipe which is connected to a geothermal production well, KMJ-14. The pipe has a 10” outside diameter and contains dry vapor at a pressure of 8 kg/cm2 and a temperature of 170 oC. Krypton-85 gas isotope (85Kr has been injected into the pipe. Three collimated radiation detectors positioned respectively at 127, 177 and 227m from injection point were used to obtain experimental data which represent radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD in the pipe. The last detector at the position of 227 m did not respond, which might be due to problems in cable connections. Flow properties calculated using mean residence time (MRT shows that the flow rate of the vapor in pipe is 10.98 m/s, much faster than fluid flow commonly found in various industrial process plants. Best fitting evaluated using dedicated software developed by IAEA expert obtained the Péclet number Pe as 223. This means that the flow of vapor of geothermal fluids in pipe is plug flow in character. The molecular diffusion coefficient is 0.45 m2/s, calculated from the axial dispersion model.

  8. Analysis of the two-fluid model in fully-developed two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azpitarte, Osvaldo Enrique

    2003-01-01

    The two fluid model is analysed and applied to solve vertical fully-developed bubbly two-phase flows, both in laminar and turbulent conditions.The laminar model is reduced to two differential equations to solve the gas fraction (ε G ) and the velocity (υ L ).For the turbulent condition, a k - ε model for low Reynolds number is implemented, resulting in a set of differential equations to solve the four variables (ε G , υ L , k and ε) along the whole radial domain (including the laminar sub layer).For laminar condition, the system is initially reduced to a single non-dimensional ordinary equation (O D E) to solve ε G in the central region of the duct, without considering the effect of the wall.The equation is solved using Mathematic a.Analysing the solutions it can be concluded that an exact compensation of the applied pressure gradient with the hydrostatic force ρ e ff g occurs (ρ e ff : effective density of the mixture).This compensation implies that the value of ε G at the center of the duct only depends on the applied pressure gradient (dependency is linear), and that the ε G and υ L profiles are necessarily fl ato The complete problem is dealt numerically through the implementation of a finite element co deo The effect of the walls is included via a model of wall force.When the code is applied to a laminar condition, the conclusions previously obtained solving the O D E are confirmed.It is also possible to analyse the regime in which the pressure gradient is greater than the weight of the pure liquid, in which case a region of strictly zero void fraction develops surrounding the axis of the duct (in upward flow).When the code is applied to a turbulent condition, it is shown that the conclusions obtained for laminar condition can also be applied, but within a range of pressure gradient limited by two transition values (θ 1 and θ 2 ).An analysis of transitions θ 1 and θ 2 allows u s to conclude that their origin is a sudden increase of lateral

  9. Investigation of heat transfer and fluid flow in activating TIG welding by numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xinxin; Huang, Jiankang; Huang, Yong; Fan, Ding; Guo, Yanning

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The heat input to the anode and subsequent thermal efficiency is almost equal for TIG and A-TIG welding. • Dominant effect heat convection and reversion of molten metal flow in weld pool causes significant increase in weld penetration. - Abstract: Heat transfer and fluid flow of arc plasma and weld pool in tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding of SUS 304 stainless steel are investigated comparatively though a 3D unified model. The model differs from the previous ones in that it considers the arc length more realistic for welding production. Tungsten electrode, anode (work piece) and arc plasma are all included. The effects of buoyance, plasma drag force, Lorentz force and Marangoni force on the weld pool flow are taken into account. By solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy as well as Maxwell equations, the distributions of temperature and velocity of arc plasma and weld pool are obtained for TIG and A-TIG welding. The heat flux, current density and shear stress at the weld pool are presented. Dimensionless numbers are employed to compare the relative importance of the driven forces and that of convection and conduction in heat transfer of the weld pool. It is demonstrated that there is no significant difference in the heat flux at the weld pool, and total heat input to the anode and thermal efficiency is almost equal for TIG and A-TIG welding. The current density and the heat flux at the weld pool are more concentrated in more realistic welding condition. As a result, both of the temperature of the weld pool for TIG welding and A-TIG welding increases, while the latter is more significant. Marangoni force ranges from zero to 100 Pa and dominant the weld pool flow. Compared with the conventional TIG welding, the reversion of the Marangoni force results in inward flow and thus causes inward heat convection in weld pool of A-TIG welding. Heat convection was the main mechanism of

  10. A model to analyse the flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid through a rigid, homogeneous, isotropic and infinite porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gama, R.M.S. da; Sampaio, R.

    1985-01-01

    The flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid through a rigid, homogeneous, isotropic and infinite porous medium which has a given inicial distribuition of the mentioned fluid, is analyzed. It is proposed a model that assumes that the motion is caused by concentration gradient, but it does not consider the friction between the porous medium and the fluid. We solve an onedimensional case where the mathematical problem is reduced to the solution of a non-linear hyperbolic system of differential equations, subjected to an inicial condition given by a step function, called 'Riemann Problem'. (Author) [pt

  11. Model validation and parametric study of fluid flows and heat transfer of aviation kerosene with endothermic pyrolysis at supercritical pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keke Xu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The regenerative cooling technology is a promising approach for effective thermal protection of propulsion and power-generation systems. A mathematical model has been used to examine fluid flows and heat transfer of the aviation kerosene RP-3 with endothermic fuel pyrolysis at a supercritical pressure of 5 MPa. A pyrolytic reaction mechanism, which consists of 18 species and 24 elementary reactions, is incorporated to account for fuel pyrolysis. Detailed model validations are conducted against a series of experimental data, including fluid temperature, fuel conversion rate, various product yields, and chemical heat sink, fully verifying the accuracy and reliability of the model. Effects of fuel pyrolysis and inlet flow velocity on flow dynamics and heat transfer characteristics of RP-3 are investigated. Results reveal that the endothermic fuel pyrolysis significantly improves the heat transfer process in the high fluid temperature region. During the supercritical-pressure heat transfer process, the flow velocity significantly increases, caused by the drastic variations of thermophysical properties. Under all the tested conditions, the Nusselt number initially increases, consistent with the increased flow velocity, and then slightly decreases in the high fluid temperature region, mainly owing to the decreased heat absorption rate from the endothermic pyrolytic chemical reactions.

  12. Modelling of hydrothermal fluid flow and structural architecture in an extensional basin, Ngakuru Graben, Taupo Rift, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissling, W. M.; Villamor, P.; Ellis, S. M.; Rae, A.

    2018-05-01

    Present-day geothermal activity on the margins of the Ngakuru graben and evidence of fossil hydrothermal activity in the central graben suggest that a graben-wide system of permeable intersecting faults acts as the principal conduit for fluid flow to the surface. We have developed numerical models of fluid and heat flow in a regional-scale 2-D cross-section of the Ngakuru Graben. The models incorporate simplified representations of two 'end-member' fault architectures (one symmetric at depth, the other highly asymmetric) which are consistent with the surface locations and dips of the Ngakuru graben faults. The models are used to explore controls on buoyancy-driven convective fluid flow which could explain the differences between the past and present hydrothermal systems associated with these faults. The models show that the surface flows from the faults are strongly controlled by the fault permeability, the fault system architecture and the location of the heat source with respect to the faults in the graben. In particular, fault intersections at depth allow exchange of fluid between faults, and the location of the heat source on the footwall of normal faults can facilitate upflow along those faults. These controls give rise to two distinct fluid flow regimes in the fault network. The first, a regular flow regime, is characterised by a nearly unchanging pattern of fluid flow vectors within the fault network as the fault permeability evolves. In the second, complex flow regime, the surface flows depend strongly on fault permeability, and can fluctuate in an erratic manner. The direction of flow within faults can reverse in both regimes as fault permeability changes. Both flow regimes provide insights into the differences between the present-day and fossil geothermal systems in the Ngakuru graben. Hydrothermal upflow along the Paeroa fault seems to have occurred, possibly continuously, for tens of thousands of years, while upflow in other faults in the graben has

  13. A two-fluid model for vertical flow applied to CO2 injection wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linga, Gaute; Lund, Halvor

    2016-01-01

    Flow of CO2 in wells is associated with substantial variations in thermophysical properties downhole, due to the coupled transient processes involved: complex flow patterns, density changes, phase transitions, and heat transfer to and from surroundings. Large temperature variations can lead...... the well, including tubing, packer fluid, casing, cement or drilling mud, and rock formation. This enables prediction of the temperature in the well fluid and in each layer of the well. The model is applied to sudden shut-in and blowout cases of a CO2 injection well, where we employ the highly accurate...

  14. Analysis and Calculation of the Fluid Flow and the Temperature Field by Finite Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamodaran, M.; Jegadeesan, S.; Kumar, R. Praveen

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a fundamental and accurate approach to study numerical analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer inside a channel. In this study, the Finite Element Method is used to analyze the channel, which is divided into small subsections. The small subsections are discretized using higher number of domain elements and the corresponding number of nodes. MATLAB codes are developed to be used in the analysis. Simulation results showed that the analyses of fluid flow and temperature are influenced significantly by the changing entrance velocity. Also, there is an apparent effect on the temperature fields due to the presence of an energy source in the middle of the domain. In this paper, the characteristics of flow analysis and heat analysis in a channel have been investigated.

  15. Robust and general method for determining surface fluid flow boundary conditions in articular cartilage contact mechanics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawaskar, Sainath Shrikant; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-01

    Contact detection in cartilage contact mechanics is an important feature of any analytical or computational modeling investigation when the biphasic nature of cartilage and the corresponding tribology are taken into account. The fluid flow boundary conditions will change based on whether the surface is in contact or not, which will affect the interstitial fluid pressurization. This in turn will increase or decrease the load sustained by the fluid phase, with a direct effect on friction, wear, and lubrication. In laboratory experiments or clinical hemiarthroplasty, when a rigid indenter or metallic prosthesis is used to apply load to the cartilage, there will not be any fluid flow normal to the surface in the contact region due to the impermeable nature of the indenter/prosthesis. In the natural joint, on the other hand, where two cartilage surfaces interact, flow will depend on the pressure difference across the interface. Furthermore, in both these cases, the fluid would flow freely in non-contacting regions. However, it should be pointed out that the contact area is generally unknown in advance in both cases and can only be determined as part of the solution. In the present finite element study, a general and robust algorithm was proposed to decide nodes in contact on the cartilage surface and, accordingly, impose the fluid flow boundary conditions. The algorithm was first tested for a rigid indenter against cartilage model. The algorithm worked well for two-dimensional four-noded and eight-noded axisymmetric element models as well as three-dimensional models. It was then extended to include two cartilages in contact. The results were in excellent agreement with the previous studies reported in the literature.

  16. Computational modeling of unsteady third-grade fluid flow over a vertical cylinder: A study of heat transfer visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, G. Janardhana; Hiremath, Ashwini; Kumar, Mahesh

    2018-03-01

    The present paper aims to investigate the effect of Prandtl number for unsteady third-grade fluid flow over a uniformly heated vertical cylinder using Bejan's heat function concept. The mathematical model of this problem is given by highly time-dependent non-linear coupled equations and are resolved by an efficient unconditionally stable implicit scheme. The time histories of average values of momentum and heat transport coefficients as well as the steady-state flow variables are displayed graphically for distinct values of non-dimensional control parameters arising in the system. As the non-dimensional parameter value gets amplified, the time taken for the fluid flow variables to attain the time-independent state is decreasing. The dimensionless heat function values are closely associated with an overall rate of heat transfer. Thermal energy transfer visualization implies that the heat function contours are compact in the neighborhood of the leading edge of the hot cylindrical wall. It is noticed that the deviations of flow-field variables from the hot wall for a non-Newtonian third-grade fluid flow are significant compared to the usual Newtonian fluid flow.

  17. Probability model of solid to liquid-like transition of a fluid suspension after a shear flow onset

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nouar, C.; Říha, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 5 (2008), s. 477-483 ISSN 0301-9322 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200600803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : laminar suspension flow * liquid-liquid interface * probability model Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.497, year: 2008

  18. Bifurcated SEN with Fluid Flow Conditioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rivera-Perez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates the performance of a novel design for a bifurcated submerged entry nozzle (SEN used for the continuous casting of steel slabs. The proposed design incorporates fluid flow conditioners attached on SEN external wall. The fluid flow conditioners impose a pseudosymmetric pattern in the upper zone of the mold by inhibiting the fluid exchange between the zones created by conditioners. The performance of the SEN with fluid flow conditioners is analyzed through numerical simulations using the CFD technique. Numerical results were validated by means of physical simulations conducted on a scaled cold water model. Numerical and physical simulations confirmed that the performance of the proposed SEN is superior to a traditional one. Fluid flow conditioners reduce the liquid free surface fluctuations and minimize the occurrence of vortexes at the free surface.

  19. Fluid flow modeling at the Lusi mud eruption, East java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Marine; Schmid, Daniel; Mazzini, Adriano

    2016-04-01

    The 29th of may 2006, gas water and mud breccia started to erupt at several localities along the Watukosek fault system, in the Sidoarjo Regency in East java, Indonesia. The most prominent eruption, named Lusi, is still active and covering a surface of nearly 7 km2, resulting in the displacement of ~ 30 000 people. Although the origin and the chemical composition of the erupted fluids have been documented, the mechanical and physical properties of the mud are poorly constrained, and many aspects still remain not understood. Very little is known about the internal dynamics of the Lusi conduit(s). In this study, conducted in the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n°308126) we use both analytical and numerical methods to better understand the flow dynamics within the main conduit and to try to explain the longevity of the edifice. The 2D numerical model considers a vertical conduit with a reservoir at its base and solves the stokes equations, discretized on a finite element mesh. Although, three phases (solid, liquid and gas) are present in nature, we only consider the liquid phase. The solid phase is treated as rigid particles in suspension in the liquid. The gaseous phase (methane and carbon dioxide) is treated in an analytical manner using the equations of state of the H2O-CO2 and H2O-CH4 systems. Here, we discuss the effects of density, viscosity, gas concentration and clasts concentration and size on the dynamics of the flow in the conduit as well as implications of the conduit stability.

  20. Insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel O.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid flow passage bridgepiece for insertion into an open-face fluid flow channel of a fluid flow plate is provided. The bridgepiece provides a sealed passage from a columnar fluid flow manifold to the flow channel, thereby preventing undesirable leakage into and out of the columnar fluid flow manifold. When deployed in the various fluid flow plates that are used in a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, bridgepieces of this invention prevent mixing of reactant gases, leakage of coolant or humidification water, and occlusion of the fluid flow channel by gasket material. The invention also provides a fluid flow plate assembly including an insertable bridgepiece, a fluid flow plate adapted for use with an insertable bridgepiece, and a method of manufacturing a fluid flow plate with an insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece.

  1. The analysis of two-phase flow and heat transfer using a multidimensional, four field, two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahey, Richard T.; Drew, Donald A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the prediction of multidimensional multiphase flow and heat transfer phenomena using a four field, two-fluid model. It is shown that accurate mechanistic computational fluid dynamic (CFD) predictions are possible for a wide variety of adiabatic and diabatic flows using this computational model. In particular, the model is able to predict the bubbly air/water upflow data of Serizawa (Serizawa, A., 1974. Fluid dynamic characteristics of two-phase flow. Ph.D. thesis, (Nuclear Engineering), Kyoto University, Japan), the downflow data of Wang et al. (Wang, S.K., Lee, S.J., Lahey Jr., R.T., Jones, O.C., 1987. 3-D turbulence structure and phase distribution measurements in bubbly two-phase flows. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 13 (3), 327-343), the isosceles triangle upflow data of Lopez de Bertodano et al. (Lopez de Bertodano, M., Lahey Jr., R.T., Jones, O.C., 1994b. Phase distribution in bubbly two-phase flow in vertical ducts. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 20 (5), 805-818), the heated annular R-113 subcooled boiling data of Velidandala, et al. (Velidandla, V., Pulta, S., Roy, P., Kaira, S.P., 1995. Velocity field in turbulent subcooled boiling flow. ASME Preprint HTD-314, 107-123) and the R-113 CHF data of Hino and Ueda (Hino, R., Ueda, T., 1985. Studies on heat transfer and flow characteristics in subcooled boiling-part 2, flow characteristics. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 11, 283-297). It can also predict external two-phase flows, such as those for spreading two-phase jets (Bonetto, F., Lahey Jr., R.T., 1993. An experimental study on air carryunder due to a plunging liquid jet. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 19 (2), 281-294) and multiphase flows around the hull of naval surface ships (Carrica, P.M., Bonetto, F., Drew, D.A., Lahey, R.T., 1999. A polydispersed model for bubbly two-phase flow around a surface ship. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 25 (2), 257-305)

  2. Mathematical Model for Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Processes in Plate Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvete B. Dimitrieska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the analytical solution of the system of equations which solve fluid flow and heat transfer processes, the elliptical and parabolic differential equations based on initial and boundary conditions is usually unfamiliar in a closed form. Numerical solution of equation system is necessarily obtained by discretization of equations. When system of equations relate to estimation of two dimensional stationary problems, the applicable method for estimation in basic two – dimensional form is recommended.

  3. Quantification of Lacunar–Canalicular Interstitial Fluid Flow Through Computational Modeling of Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Ronald Y.; Frangos, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal adaptation to mechanical loading has been widely hypothesized to involve the stimulation of osteocytes by interstitial fluid flow (IFF). However, direct investigation of this hypothesis has been difficult due in large part to the inability to directly measure IFF velocities within the lacunar–canalicular system. Measurements of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) within individual lacunae could be used to quantify lacunar–canalicular IFF when combined with mathematical ...

  4. Wave Interactions and Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, Alex D. D.

    1988-07-01

    This up-to-date and comprehensive account of theory and experiment on wave-interaction phenomena covers fluids both at rest and in their shear flows. It includes, on the one hand, water waves, internal waves, and their evolution, interaction, and associated wave-driven means flow and, on the other hand, phenomena on nonlinear hydrodynamic stability, especially those leading to the onset of turbulence. This study provide a particularly valuable bridge between these two similar, yet different, classes of phenomena. It will be of value to oceanographers, meteorologists, and those working in fluid mechanics, atmospheric and planetary physics, plasma physics, aeronautics, and geophysical and astrophysical fluid dynamics.

  5. A numerical model of two-phase flow at the micro-scale using the volume-of-fluid method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Mosayeb; Raeini, Ali Q.; Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko

    2018-03-01

    This study presents a simple and robust numerical scheme to model two-phase flow in porous media where capillary forces dominate over viscous effects. The volume-of-fluid method is employed to capture the fluid-fluid interface whose dynamics is explicitly described based on a finite volume discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations. Interfacial forces are calculated directly on reconstructed interface elements such that the total curvature is preserved. The computed interfacial forces are explicitly added to the Navier-Stokes equations using a sharp formulation which effectively eliminates spurious currents. The stability and accuracy of the implemented scheme is validated on several two- and three-dimensional test cases, which indicate the capability of the method to model two-phase flow processes at the micro-scale. In particular we show how the co-current flow of two viscous fluids leads to greatly enhanced flow conductance for the wetting phase in corners of the pore space, compared to a case where the non-wetting phase is an inviscid gas.

  6. Modeling Two-Phase Flow and Vapor Cycles Using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda D.; Majumdar, Alok K.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents three new applications for the general purpose fluid network solver code GFSSP developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: (1) cooling tower, (2) vapor-compression refrigeration system, and (3) vapor-expansion power generation system. These systems are widely used across engineering disciplines in a variety of energy systems, and these models expand the capabilities and the use of GFSSP to include fluids and features that are not part of its present set of provided examples. GFSSP provides pressure, temperature, and species concentrations at designated locations, or nodes, within a fluid network based on a finite volume formulation of thermodynamics and conservation laws. This paper describes the theoretical basis for the construction of the models, their implementation in the current GFSSP modeling system, and a brief evaluation of the usefulness of the model results, as well as their applicability toward a broader spectrum of analytical problems in both university teaching and engineering research.

  7. Bianchi type-V cosmological models with perfect fluid and heat flow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the cosmology with the power-law, the solutions correspond to a cos- mological model .... where ρ is the energy density, p is the thermodynamic pressure, uµ is the four- velocity of the fluid and ..... In the first category of models, the. Universe ...

  8. The Challenge of Fluid Flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    makes fluid flows so rich, so complex - some times so highly ordered ..... to other frequencies, which again can grow in amplitude before they also eventually decay again. On the ..... think of it as a slice of flow issuing towards this sheet of paper.

  9. 3D Printing of Fluid Flow Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Taira, Kunihiko; Sun, Yiyang; Canuto, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the use of 3D printing to physically visualize (materialize) fluid flow structures. Such 3D models can serve as a refreshing hands-on means to gain deeper physical insights into the formation of complex coherent structures in fluid flows. In this short paper, we present a general procedure for taking 3D flow field data and producing a file format that can be supplied to a 3D printer, with two examples of 3D printed flow structures. A sample code to perform this process is also prov...

  10. Mathematical modelling and numerical resolution of multi-phase compressible fluid flows problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagoutiere, Frederic

    2000-01-01

    This work deals with Eulerian compressible multi-species fluid dynamics, the species being either mixed or separated (with interfaces). The document is composed of three parts. The first parts devoted to the numerical resolution of model problems: advection equation, Burgers equation, and Euler equations, in dimensions one and two. The goal is to find a precise method, especially for discontinuous initial conditions, and we develop non dissipative algorithms. They are based on a downwind finite-volume discretization under some stability constraints. The second part treats of the mathematical modelling of fluids mixtures. We construct and analyse a set of multi-temperature and multi-pressure models that are entropy, symmetrizable, hyperbolic, not ever conservative. In the third part, we apply the ideas developed in the first part (downwind discretization) to the numerical resolution of the partial differential problems we have constructed for fluids mixtures in the second part. We present some numerical results in dimensions one and two. (author) [fr

  11. Impact of competitive flow on wall shear stress in coronary surgery: computational fluid dynamics of a LIMA-LAD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgaard, Håvard; Swillens, Abigail; Nordhaug, Dag; Kirkeby-Garstad, Idar; Van Loo, Denis; Vitale, Nicola; Segers, Patrick; Haaverstad, Rune; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2010-12-01

    Competitive flow from native coronary vessels is considered a major factor in the failure of coronary bypass grafts. However, the pathophysiological effects are not fully understood. Low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease, like atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. The aim was to investigate the impact of competitive flow on WSS in mammary artery bypass grafts. Using computational fluid dynamics, WSS was calculated in a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft to the left anterior descending artery in a three-dimensional in vivo porcine coronary artery bypass graft model. The following conditions were investigated: high competitive flow (non-significant coronary lesion), partial competitive flow (significant coronary lesion), and no competitive flow (totally occluded coronary vessel). Time-averaged WSS of LIMA at high, partial, and no competitive flow were 0.3-0.6, 0.6-3.0, and 0.9-3.0 Pa, respectively. Further, oscillatory WSS quantified as the oscillatory shear index (OSI) ranged from (maximum OSI = 0.5 equals zero net WSS) 0.15 to 0.35, OSI similar to the no competitive flow condition. Graft flow is highly dependent on the degree of competitive flow. High competitive flow was found to produce unfavourable WSS consistent with endothelial dysfunction and subsequent graft narrowing and failure. Partial competitive flow, however, may be better tolerated as it was found to be similar to the ideal condition of no competitive flow.

  12. Modelling of fluid flow and heat transfer in a reciprocating compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhovcak, J.; Hejcik, J.; Jicha, M.

    2015-08-01

    Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on several parameters. The most important are valve behaviour and heat transfer. Valves affect the flow through the suction and discharge line. Heat flow from the walls to working fluid increases the work of the cycle. Understanding of these phenomena inside the compressor is a necessary step in the development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide range of opportunities how to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor nowadays, however they are too demanding in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several approaches using various correlation equation exist to describe the heat transfer inside the cylinder, however none of them was validated by measurements due to the complicated settings. The goal of this paper is to show a comparison between these correlations using in-house code based on energy balance through the cycle.

  13. On the viscous dissipation modeling of thermal fluid flow in a porous medium

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2011-02-24

    The problem of viscous dissipation and thermal dispersion in saturated porous medium is numerically investigated for the case of non-Darcy flow regime. The fluid is induced to flow upward by natural convection as a result of a semi-infinite vertical wall that is immersed in the porous medium and is kept at constant higher temperature. The boundary layer approximations were used to simplify the set of the governing, nonlinear partial differential equations, which were then non-dimensionalized and solved using the finite elements method. The results for the details of the governing parameters are presented and investigated. It is found that the irreversible process of transforming the kinetic energy of the moving fluid to heat energy via the viscosity of the moving fluid (i.e.; viscous dissipation) resulted in insignificant generation of heat for the range of parameters considered in this study. On the other hand, thermal dispersion has shown to disperse heat energy normal to the wall more effectively compared with the normal diffusion mechanism. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Application of stereolithographic custom models for studying the impact of biofilms and mineral precipitation on fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, D L; Watson, S M; Stedtfeld, R D; Meakin, P; Griffel, L K; Tyler, T L; Pegram, L M; Barnes, J M; Deason, V A

    2005-12-01

    Here we introduce the use of transparent experimental models fabricated by stereolithography for studying the impacts of biomass accumulation, minerals precipitation, and physical configuration of flow paths on liquid flow in fracture apertures. The internal configuration of the models ranged in complexity from simple geometric shapes to those that incorporate replicated surfaces of natural fractures and computationally derived fracture surfaces. High-resolution digital time-lapse imaging was employed to qualitatively observe the migration of colloidal and soluble dyes through the flow models. In this study, a Sphingomonas sp. and Sporosarcina (Bacillus) pasteurii influenced the fluid dynamics by physically altering flow paths. Microbial colonization and calcite deposition enhanced the stagnant regions adjacent to solid boundaries. Microbial growth and calcite precipitation occurred to a greater extent in areas behind the fabricated obstacles and less in high-velocity orifices.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics model of stratified atmospheric boundary-layer flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman; Bechmann, Andreas; Sogachev, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on computational fluid dynamics models of the neutrally stratified surface-layer. So far, physical processes that are important to the whole atmospheric boundary-layer, such as the Coriolis effect, buoyancy forces and heat...

  16. Irrigant flow in the root canal: experimental validation of an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics model using high-speed imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutsioukis, C; Verhaagen, B; Versluis, M; Kastrinakis, E; van der Sluis, L W M

    2010-05-01

    To compare the results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of the irrigant flow within a prepared root canal, during final irrigation with a syringe and a needle, with experimental high-speed visualizations and theoretical calculations of an identical geometry and to evaluate the effect of off-centre positioning of the needle inside the root canal. A CFD model was created to simulate irrigant flow from a side-vented needle inside a prepared root canal. Calculations were carried out for four different positions of the needle inside a prepared root canal. An identical root canal model was made from poly-dimethyl-siloxane (PDMS). High-speed imaging of the flow seeded with particles and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) were combined to obtain the velocity field inside the root canal experimentally. Computational, theoretical and experimental results were compared to assess the validity of the computational model. Comparison between CFD computations and experiments revealed good agreement in the velocity magnitude and vortex location and size. Small lateral displacements of the needle inside the canal had a limited effect on the flow field. High-speed imaging experiments together with PIV of the flow inside a simulated root canal showed a good agreement with the CFD model, even though the flow was unsteady. Therefore, the CFD model is able to predict reliably the flow in similar domains.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.

    2009-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  18. A novel investigation of a micropolar fluid characterized by nonlinear constitutive diffusion model in boundary layer flow and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jize; Zhao, Peng; Cheng, Zhengdong; Zheng, Liancun; Zhang, Xinxin

    2017-02-01

    The rheological and heat-conduction constitutive models of micropolar fluids (MFs), which are important non-Newtonian fluids, have been, until now, characterized by simple linear expressions, and as a consequence, the non-Newtonian performance of such fluids could not be effectively captured. Here, we establish the novel nonlinear constitutive models of a micropolar fluid and apply them to boundary layer flow and heat transfer problems. The nonlinear power law function of angular velocity is represented in the new models by employing generalized "n-diffusion theory," which has successfully described the characteristics of non-Newtonian fluids, such as shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids. These novel models may offer a new approach to the theoretical understanding of shear-thinning behavior and anomalous heat transfer caused by the collective micro-rotation effects in a MF with shear flow according to recent experiments. The nonlinear similarity equations with a power law form are derived and the approximate analytical solutions are obtained by the homotopy analysis method, which is in good agreement with the numerical solutions. The results indicate that non-Newtonian behaviors involving a MF depend substantially on the power exponent n and the modified material parameter K 0 introduced by us. Furthermore, the relations of the engineering interest parameters, including local boundary layer thickness, local skin friction, and Nusselt number are found to be fitted by a quadratic polynomial to n with high precision, which enables the extraction of the rapid predictions from a complex nonlinear boundary-layer transport system.

  19. Nonlinear state-space modelling of the kinematics of an oscillating circular cylinder in a fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decuyper, J.; De Troyer, T.; Runacres, M. C.; Tiels, K.; Schoukens, J.

    2018-01-01

    The flow-induced vibration of bluff bodies is an important problem of many marine, civil, or mechanical engineers. In the design phase of such structures, it is vital to obtain good predictions of the fluid forces acting on the structure. Current methods rely on computational fluid dynamic simulations (CFD), with a too high computational cost to be effectively used in the design phase or for control applications. Alternative methods use heuristic mathematical models of the fluid forces, but these lack the accuracy (they often assume the system to be linear) or flexibility to be useful over a wide operating range. In this work we show that it is possible to build an accurate, flexible and low-computational-cost mathematical model using nonlinear system identification techniques. This model is data driven: it is trained over a user-defined region of interest using data obtained from experiments or simulations, or both. Here we use a Van der Pol oscillator as well as CFD simulations of an oscillating circular cylinder to generate the training data. Then a discrete-time polynomial nonlinear state-space model is fit to the data. This model relates the oscillation of the cylinder to the force that the fluid exerts on the cylinder. The model is finally validated over a wide range of oscillation frequencies and amplitudes, both inside and outside the so-called lock-in region. We show that forces simulated by the model are in good agreement with the data obtained from CFD.

  20. Simulation based engineering in fluid flow design

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, J S

    2017-01-01

    This volume offers a tool for High Performance Computing (HPC). A brief historical background on the subject is first given. Fluid Statics dealing with Pressure in fluids at rest, Buoyancy and Basics of Thermodynamics are next presented. The Finite Volume Method, the most convenient process for HPC, is explained in one-dimensional approach to diffusion with convection and pressure velocity coupling. Adiabatic, isentropic and supersonic flows in quasi-one dimensional flows in axisymmetric nozzles is considered before applying CFD solutions. Though the theory is restricted to one-dimensional cases, three-dimensional CFD examples are also given. Lastly, nozzle flows with normal shocks are presented using turbulence models. Worked examples and exercises are given in each chapter. Fluids transport thermal energy for its conversion to kinetic energy, thus playing a major role that is central to all heat engines. With the advent of rotating machinery in the 20th century, Fluid Engineering was developed in the form o...

  1. A direct force model for Galilean invariant lattice Boltzmann simulation of fluid-particle flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shi; He, Qing; Chen, Baiman; Yang, Xiaoping; Huang, Simin

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been widely used in the simulation of particulate flows involving complex moving boundaries. Due to the kinetic background of LBM, the bounce-back (BB) rule and the momentum exchange (ME) method can be easily applied to the solid boundary treatment and the evaluation of fluid-solid interaction force, respectively. However, recently it has been found that both the BB and ME schemes may violate the principle of Galilean invariance (GI). Some modified BB and ME methods have been proposed to reduce the GI error. But these remedies have been recognized subsequently to be inconsistent with Newton’s Third Law. Therefore, contrary to those corrections based on the BB and ME methods, a unified iterative approach is adopted to handle the solid boundary in the present study. Furthermore, a direct force (DF) scheme is proposed to evaluate the fluid-particle interaction force. The methods preserve the efficiency of the BB and ME schemes, and the performance on the accuracy and GI is verified and validated in the test cases of particulate flows with freely moving particles.

  2. Gas-liquid Two Phase Flow Modelling of Incompressible Fluid and Experimental Validation Studies in Vertical Centrifugal Casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J X; Shen, X; Yin, Y J; Guo, Z; Wang, H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Gas-liquid two phase flow mathematic models of incompressible fluid were proposed to explore the feature of fluid under certain centrifugal force in vertical centrifugal casting (VCC). Modified projection-level-set method was introduced to solve the mathematic models. To validate the simulation results, two methods were used in this study. In the first method, the simulation result of basic VCC flow process was compared with its analytic solution. The relationship between the numerical solution and deterministic analytic solution was presented to verify the correctness of numerical algorithms. In the second method, systematic water simulation experiments were developed. In this initial experiment, special experimental vertical centrifugal device and casting shapes were designed to describe typical mold-filling processes in VCC. High speed camera system and data collection devices were used to capture flow shape during the mold-filling process. Moreover, fluid characteristic at different rotation speed (from 40rpm, 60rpmand 80rpm) was discussed to provide comparative resource for simulation results. As compared with the simulation results, the proposed mathematical models could be proven and the experimental design could help us advance the accuracy of simulation and further studies for VCC. (paper)

  3. Macroscopic numerical simulation model of multi-constituent fluid flows in porous medium; Modele macroscopique de simulation numerique d'ecoulements de fluides multiconstituants en milieu poreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbois, B.

    2003-07-01

    In this work, a new model is built which allows to take into consideration the overall mass transfer phenomena (in particular convection) taking place inside a mixture of n{sub c} constituents in a porous medium. This model should allow to foresee the quantitative composition of fluids in oil fields and also to improve the knowledge of the flow of different species inside mixtures. The overall physical phenomena taking place at oil fields is explained in the first chapter. Chapter 2 recalls some thermodynamical notions at the equilibrium and outside equilibrium. These notions, necessary to understand the forecasting methods used by petroleum geologists, are described in chapter 3. This chapter includes also a bibliographic study about the methods of simulation of mass and heat transfers in porous media. In chapter 4, using the thermodynamical relations of irreversible processes described in chapter 2, a new type of macroscopic model allowing to describe the overall phenomena analyzed is developed. The numerical method used to solve this new system of equations is precised. Finally, chapter 5 proposes a set of cases for the validation of the uncoupled phenomena and some qualitative examples of modeling of coupled phenomena. (J.S.)

  4. Principal component analysis in an experimental cold flow model of a fluid catalytic cracking unit by gammametry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Janeo Severino C. de; Dantas, Carlos Costa; Santos, Valdemir A. dos; Souza, Jose Edson G. de; Luna-Finkler, Christine L.

    2009-01-01

    The fluid dynamic behavior of riser of a cold flow model of a Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit (FCCU) was investigated. The experimental data were obtained by the nuclear technique of gamma transmission. A gamma source was placed diametrically opposite to a detector in any straight section of the riser. The gas-solid flow through riser was monitored with a source of Americium-241 what allowed obtaining information of the axial solid concentration without flow disturbance and also identifying the dependence of this concentration profile with several independent variables. The MatLab R and Statistica R software were used. Statistica tool employed was the Principal Components Analysis (PCA), that consisted of the job of the data organization, through two-dimensional head offices to allow extract relevant information about the importance of the independent variables on axial solid concentration in a cold flow riser. The variables investigated were mass flow rate of solid, mass flow rate of gas, pressure in the riser base and the relative height in the riser. The first two components reached about 98 % of accumulated percentage of explained variance. (author)

  5. A site-scale model for fluid and heat flow in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Haukwa, Charles; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    1999-05-01

    A three-dimensional unsaturated-zone numerical model has been developed to simulate flow and distribution of moisture, gas and heat at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential repository site for high-level radioactive waste. The model takes into account the simultaneous flow dynamics of liquid water, vapor, air and heat in the highly heterogeneous, fractured porous rock in the unsaturated zone (UZ). This model is intended for use in the prediction of the current and future conditions in the UZ so as to aid in the assessment of the system performance of the proposed repository. The modeling approach is based on a mathematical formulation of coupled multiphase, multicomponent fluid and heat flow through porous and fractured rock. Fracture and matrix flow is treated using both dual-permeability and effective-continuum modeling approaches. The model domain covers a total area of approximately 43 km 2, and uses the land surface and the water table as its top and bottom boundaries. In addition, site-specific data, representative surface infiltration, and geothermal conditions are incorporated into the model. The reliability and accuracy of the model have been the subject of a comprehensive model calibration study, in which the model was calibrated against measured data, including liquid saturation, water potential and temperature. It has been found that the model is generally able to reproduce the overall system behavior at Yucca Mountain with respect to moisture profiles, pneumatic pressure variations in different geological units, and ambient geothermal conditions.

  6. Simulation of Two-Fluid Flows by the Least-Squares Finite Element Method Using a Continuum Surface Tension Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Yu, Sheng-Tao; Jiang, Bo-nan

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a numerical procedure for simulating two-fluid flows is presented. This procedure is based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method proposed by Hirt and Nichols and the continuum surface force (CSF) model developed by Brackbill, et al. In the VOF method fluids of different properties are identified through the use of a continuous field variable (color function). The color function assigns a unique constant (color) to each fluid. The interfaces between different fluids are distinct due to sharp gradients of the color function. The evolution of the interfaces is captured by solving the convective equation of the color function. The CSF model is used as a means to treat surface tension effect at the interfaces. Here a modified version of the CSF model, proposed by Jacqmin, is used to calculate the tension force. In the modified version, the force term is obtained by calculating the divergence of a stress tensor defined by the gradient of the color function. In its analytical form, this stress formulation is equivalent to the original CSF model. Numerically, however, the use of the stress formulation has some advantages over the original CSF model, as it bypasses the difficulty in approximating the curvatures of the interfaces. The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) is used to discretize the governing equation systems. The LSFEM has proven to be effective in solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and pure convection equations, making it an ideal candidate for the present applications. The LSFEM handles all the equations in a unified manner without any additional special treatment such as upwinding or artificial dissipation. Various bench mark tests have been carried out for both two dimensional planar and axisymmetric flows, including a dam breaking, oscillating and stationary bubbles and a conical liquid sheet in a pressure swirl atomizer.

  7. Experimental and CFD flow studies in an intracranial aneurysm model with Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, S V; Sindeev, S V; Liepsch, D; Balasso, A

    2016-05-18

    According to the clinical data, flow conditions play a major role in the genesis of intracranial aneurysms. The disorder of the flow structure is the cause of damage of the inner layer of the vessel wall, which leads to the development of cerebral aneurysms. Knowledge of the alteration of the flow field in the aneurysm region is important for treatment. The aim is to study quantitatively the flow structure in an patient-specific aneurysm model of the internal carotid artery using both experimental and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods with Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. A patient-specific geometry of aneurysm of the internal carotid artery was used. Patient data was segmented and smoothed to obtain geometrical model. An elastic true-to-scale silicone model was created with stereolithography. For initial investigation of the blood flow, the flow was visualized by adding particles into the silicone model. The precise flow velocity measurements were done using 1D Laser Doppler Anemometer with a spatial resolution of 50 μ m and a temporal resolution of 1 ms. The local velocity measurements were done at a distance of 4 mm to each other. A fluid with non-Newtonian properties was used in the experiment. The CFD simulations for unsteady-state problem were done using constructed hexahedral mesh for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Using 1D laser Doppler Anemometer the minimum velocity magnitude at the end of systole -0.01 m/s was obtained in the aneurysm dome while the maximum velocity 1 m/s was at the center of the outlet segment. On central cross section of the aneurysm the maximum velocity value is only 20% of the average inlet velocity. The average velocity on the cross-section is only 11% of the inlet axial velocity. Using the CFD simulation the wall shear stresses for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid at the end of systolic phase (t= 0.25 s) were computed. The wall shear stress varies from 3.52 mPa (minimum value) to 10.21 Pa (maximum value) for the

  8. A two-dimensional continuum model of biofilm growth incorporating fluid flow and shear stress based detachment

    KAUST Repository

    Duddu, Ravindra

    2009-05-01

    We present a two-dimensional biofilm growth model in a continuum framework using an Eulerian description. A computational technique based on the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the level set method is used to simulate the growth of the biofilm. The model considers fluid flow around the biofilm surface, the advection-diffusion and reaction of substrate, variable biomass volume fraction and erosion due to the interfacial shear stress at the biofilm-fluid interface. The key assumptions of the model and the governing equations of transport, biofilm kinetics and biofilm mechanics are presented. Our 2D biofilm growth results are in good agreement with those obtained by Picioreanu et al. (Biotechnol Bioeng 69(5):504-515, 2000). Detachment due to erosion is modeled using two continuous speed functions based on: (a) interfacial shear stress and (b) biofilm height. A relation between the two detachment models in the case of a 1D biofilm is established and simulated biofilm results with detachment in 2D are presented. The stress in the biofilm due to fluid flow is evaluated and higher stresses are observed close to the substratum where the biofilm is attached. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Modeling of Aircraft Deicing Fluid Induced Biochemical Oxygen Demand in Subsurface-Flow Constructed Treatment Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Jukka A. Rintala, Christof Holliger, and Alla N. Nozhevnikova. “Evaluation of Kinetic Coefficients Using Intergrated Monod and Haldane Models for...Rousseau, Diederik P. L., Peter A Vanrolleghem, and Niels De Pauw. “Model-Based Design of Horizontal Subsurface Flow constructed Treatment

  10. Two-Phase Acto-Cytosolic Fluid Flow in a Moving Keratocyte: A 2D Continuum Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikmaneshi, M R; Firoozabadi, B; Saidi, M S

    2015-09-01

    The F-actin network and cytosol in the lamellipodia of crawling cells flow in a centripetal pattern and spout-like form, respectively. We have numerically studied this two-phase flow in the realistic geometry of a moving keratocyte. Cytosol has been treated as a low viscosity Newtonian fluid flowing through the high viscosity porous medium of F-actin network. Other involved phenomena including myosin activity, adhesion friction, and interphase interaction are also discussed to provide an overall view of this problem. Adopting a two-phase coupled model by myosin concentration, we have found new accurate perspectives of acto-cytosolic flow and pressure fields, myosin distribution, as well as the distribution of effective forces across the lamellipodia of a keratocyte with stationary shape. The order of magnitude method is also used to determine the contribution of forces in the internal dynamics of lamellipodia.

  11. Stochastic porous media modeling and high-resolution schemes for numerical simulation of subsurface immiscible fluid flow transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantson, Eric Thompson; Ju, Binshan; Wu, Dan; Gyan, Patricia Semwaah

    2018-04-01

    This paper proposes stochastic petroleum porous media modeling for immiscible fluid flow simulation using Dykstra-Parson coefficient (V DP) and autocorrelation lengths to generate 2D stochastic permeability values which were also used to generate porosity fields through a linear interpolation technique based on Carman-Kozeny equation. The proposed method of permeability field generation in this study was compared to turning bands method (TBM) and uniform sampling randomization method (USRM). On the other hand, many studies have also reported that, upstream mobility weighting schemes, commonly used in conventional numerical reservoir simulators do not accurately capture immiscible displacement shocks and discontinuities through stochastically generated porous media. This can be attributed to high level of numerical smearing in first-order schemes, oftentimes misinterpreted as subsurface geological features. Therefore, this work employs high-resolution schemes of SUPERBEE flux limiter, weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme (WENO), and monotone upstream-centered schemes for conservation laws (MUSCL) to accurately capture immiscible fluid flow transport in stochastic porous media. The high-order schemes results match well with Buckley Leverett (BL) analytical solution without any non-oscillatory solutions. The governing fluid flow equations were solved numerically using simultaneous solution (SS) technique, sequential solution (SEQ) technique and iterative implicit pressure and explicit saturation (IMPES) technique which produce acceptable numerical stability and convergence rate. A comparative and numerical examples study of flow transport through the proposed method, TBM and USRM permeability fields revealed detailed subsurface instabilities with their corresponding ultimate recovery factors. Also, the impact of autocorrelation lengths on immiscible fluid flow transport were analyzed and quantified. A finite number of lines used in the TBM resulted into visual

  12. Two-phase pressurized thermal shock investigations using a 3D two-fluid modeling of stratified flow with condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, W.; Coste, P.; Bestion, D.; Boucker, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a local 3D two-fluid model for a turbulent stratified flow with/without condensation, which can be used to predict two-phase pressurized thermal shock, is presented. A modified turbulent K- model is proposed with turbulence production induced by interfacial friction. A model of interfacial friction based on a interfacial sublayer concept and three interfacial heat transfer models, namely, a model based on the small eddies controlled surface renewal concept (HDM, Hughes and Duffey, 1991), a model based on the asymptotic behavior of the Eddy Viscosity (EVM), and a model based on the Interfacial Sublayer concept (ISM) are implemented into a preliminary version of the NEPTUNE code based on the 3D module of the CATHARE code. As a first step to apply the above models to predict the two-phase thermal shock, the models are evaluated by comparison of calculated profiles with several experiments: a turbulent air-water stratified flow without interfacial heat transfer; a turbulent steam-water stratified flow with condensation; turbulence induced by the impact of a water jet in a water pool. The prediction results agree well with the experimental data. In addition, the comparison of three interfacial heat transfer models shows that EVM and ISM gave better prediction results while HDM highly overestimated the interfacial heat transfers compared to the experimental data of a steam water stratified flow

  13. An Extended Assessment of Fluid Flow Models for the Prediction of Two-Dimensional Steady-State Airfoil Aerodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Herbert-Acero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the analysis, application, and comparison of thirteen fluid flow models in the prediction of two-dimensional airfoil aerodynamics, considering laminar and turbulent subsonic inflow conditions. Diverse sensitivity analyses of different free parameters (e.g., the domain topology and its discretization, the flow model, and the solution method together with its convergence mechanisms revealed important effects on the simulations’ outcomes. The NACA 4412 airfoil was considered throughout the work and the computational predictions were compared with experiments conducted under a wide range of Reynolds numbers (7e5≤Re≤9e6 and angles-of-attack (-10°≤α≤20°. Improvements both in modeling accuracy and processing time were achieved by considering the RS LP-S and the Transition SST turbulence models, and by considering finite volume-based solution methods with preconditioned systems, respectively. The RS LP-S model provided the best lift force predictions due to the adequate modeling of the micro and macro anisotropic turbulence at the airfoil’s surface and at the nearby flow field, which in turn allowed the adequate prediction of stall conditions. The Transition-SST model provided the best drag force predictions due to adequate modeling of the laminar-to-turbulent flow transition and the surface shear stresses. Conclusions, recommendations, and a comprehensive research agenda are presented based on validated computational results.

  14. Experimental and Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow Processes in Continuous Casting: Results from the LIMMCAST-Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmel, K.; Kratzsch, C.; Asad, A.; Schurmann, D.; Schwarze, R.; Eckert, S.

    2017-07-01

    The present paper reports about numerical simulations and model experiments concerned with the fluid flow in the continuous casting process of steel. This work was carried out in the LIMMCAST project in the framework of the Helmholtz alliance LIMTECH. A brief description of the LIMMCAST facilities used for the experimental modeling at HZDR is given here. Ultrasonic and inductive techniques and the X-ray radioscopy were employed for flow measurements or visualizations of two-phase flow regimes occurring in the submerged entry nozzle and the mold. Corresponding numerical simulations were performed at TUBAF taking into account the dimensions and properties of the model experiments. Numerical models were successfully validated using the experimental data base. The reasonable and in many cases excellent agreement of numerical with experimental data allows to extrapolate the models to real casting configurations. Exemplary results will be presented here showing the effect of electromagnetic brakes or electromagnetic stirrers on the flow in the mold or illustrating the properties of two-phase flows resulting from an Ar injection through the stopper rod.

  15. Numerical Modeling of the Side Flow in Tape Casting of a Non-Newtonian Fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    in the tape casting process is modeled numerically with ANSYS FLUENT in combination with an Ostwald-de Waele power law constitutive equation. Based on rheometer experiments, the constants in the Ostwald-de Waele power law are identified for the considered LSM material and applied in the numerical modeling......One of the most common ways used to produce multilayer ceramics (MLC) is tape casting. In this process, the dried tape thickness is of great interest to control the desired products and applications. One of the parameters that influences the final tape thickness is the side flow factor (a) which...... is mostly measured at the end of the process by a volumetric comparison of the tape which flowed outside the casting width to the tape within the casting width. This phenomenon has not been predicted theoretically yet in the literature. In this study, the flow of (La0.85Sr0.15)0.9MnO3 (LSM) slurry...

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling to Improve Natural Flow Rate and Sweet Pepper Productivity in Greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Limtrakarn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural flow rate and sweet peppers productivity in tropical greenhouse are improved by CFD simulation is the main objective of this research work. Most of the greenhouse types today are in the arch shape. To develop an improved greenhouse structure for the region, the arch type was built and used as the control model. Mae Sar Mai agriculture research station under the royal project foundation was selected as the field test site. Temperature sensors with data logger were installed to monitor variation of temperature inside the greenhouse. The measured temperature data were used as the boundary conditions for the CFD analysis. A new greenhouse model with two-step roof shape was designed and the air flow behavior was simulated by using CFD. Regarding CFD results the air flow rate of the new model is about 39% higher than that of old model. The maximum temperature of the new model is lower than that of the old one. The sweet paper growths in both greenhouse models were measured and compared. Results show that the new model obtains 4°C lower maximum temperature in day time, 97% in number and 90% in weight higher the first grade pepper productivity than the old one.

  17. Modelling turbulent fluid flows in nuclear and fossil-fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viollet, P.L.

    1995-06-01

    The turbulent flows encountered in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic studies or fossil-fired plant thermo-aerodynamic analyses feature widely varying characteristics, frequently entailing heat transfers and two-phase flows so that modelling these phenomena tends more and more to involve coupling between several branches of engineering. Multi-scale geometries are often encountered, with complex wall shapes, such as a PWR vessel, a reactor coolant pump impeller or a circulating fluidized bed combustion chamber. When it comes to validating physical models of these flows, the analytical process highlights the main descriptive parameters of local flow conditions: tensor characterizing the turbulence anisotropy, characteristic time scales for turbulent flow particle dynamics. Cooperative procedures implemented between national or international working parties can accelerate validation by sharing and exchanging results obtained by the various organizations involved. With this principle accepted, we still have to validate the products themselves, i.e. the software used for the studies. In this context, the ESTET, ASTRID and N3S codes have been subjected to a battery of test cases covering their respective fields of application. These test cases are re-run for each new version, so that the sets of test cases systematically benefit from the gradually upgraded functionalities of the codes. (author). refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  18. Viscous Flow with Large Fluid-Fluid Interface Displacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole; Saasen, Arild

    1998-01-01

    The arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) kinematic description has been implemented in a 3D transient finite element program to simulate multiple fluid flows with fluid-fluid interface or surface displacements. The description of fluid interfaces includes variable interfacial tension, and the formulation...... is useful in the simulation of low and intermediate Reynolds number viscous flow. The displacement of two immiscible Newtonian fluids in a vertical (concentric and eccentric) annulus and a (vertical and inclined)tube is simulated....

  19. Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for MHD Three-Dimensional Flow of Maxwell Fluid over a Stretching Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubab, Khansa; Mustafa, M

    2016-01-01

    This letter investigates the MHD three-dimensional flow of upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid over a bi-directional stretching surface by considering the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model. This model has tendency to capture the characteristics of thermal relaxation time. The governing partial differential equations even after employing the boundary layer approximations are non linear. Accurate analytic solutions for velocity and temperature distributions are computed through well-known homotopy analysis method (HAM). It is noticed that velocity decreases and temperature rises when stronger magnetic field strength is accounted. Penetration depth of temperature is a decreasing function of thermal relaxation time. The analysis for classical Fourier heat conduction law can be obtained as a special case of the present work. To our knowledge, the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model law for three-dimensional viscoelastic flow problem is just introduced here.

  20. Two-fluid model for transient analysis of slug flow in oil wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazarez-Candia, O.; Benitez-Centeno, O.C.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this work it is presented a transient, one-dimensional, adiabatic model for slug flow simulation, which appears when liquid (mixture of oil and water) and gas flow simultaneously through pipes. The model is formed by space and time averaged conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy for each phase, the numerical solution is based on the finite difference technique in the implicit scheme. Velocity, pressure, volumetric fraction and temperature profiles for both phases were predicted for inclination angles from the horizontal to the vertical position (unified model) and ascendant flow. Predictions from the model were validated using field data and ten correlations commonly used in the oil industry. The effects of gas heating or cooling, due to compression and expansion processes, on the predictions and numerical stability, were studied. It was found that when these effects are taken into account, a good behavior of temperature predictions and numerical stability are obtained. The model presents deviations lower than 14% regarding field data and it presents better predictions than most of the correlations.

  1. Two-fluid model for transient analysis of slug flow in oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazarez-Candia, O., E-mail: ocazarez@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico); Instituto Tecnologico de Zacatepec, Depto. de Metal-Mecanica, Calzada Tecnologico, No. 27, Zacatepec, Morelos 62780 (Mexico); Benitez-Centeno, O.C. [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Depto. de Mecanica, Interior Internado Palmira s/n, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62490 (Mexico); Espinosa-Paredes, G. [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av San Rafael Atlixco No 186, Col. Vicentina 55-534, Mexico D.F. 09340 (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    In this work it is presented a transient, one-dimensional, adiabatic model for slug flow simulation, which appears when liquid (mixture of oil and water) and gas flow simultaneously through pipes. The model is formed by space and time averaged conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy for each phase, the numerical solution is based on the finite difference technique in the implicit scheme. Velocity, pressure, volumetric fraction and temperature profiles for both phases were predicted for inclination angles from the horizontal to the vertical position (unified model) and ascendant flow. Predictions from the model were validated using field data and ten correlations commonly used in the oil industry. The effects of gas heating or cooling, due to compression and expansion processes, on the predictions and numerical stability, were studied. It was found that when these effects are taken into account, a good behavior of temperature predictions and numerical stability are obtained. The model presents deviations lower than 14% regarding field data and it presents better predictions than most of the correlations.

  2. Porous media fluid flow, heat, and mass transport model with rock stress coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runchal, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the physical and mathematical basis of a general purpose porous media flow model, GWTHERM. The mathematical basis of the model is obtained from the coupled set of the classical governing equations for the mass, momentum and energy balance. These equations are embodied in a computational model which is then coupled externally to a linearly elastic rock-stress model. This coupling is rather exploratory and based upon empirical correlations. The coupled model is able to take account of time-dependent, inhomogeneous and anisotropic features of the hydrogeologic, thermal and transport phenomena. A number of applications of the model have been made. Illustrations from the application of the model to nuclear waste repositories are included

  3. Topology of helical fluid flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten; Brøns, Morten

    2014-01-01

    function for the topology of the streamline pattern in incompressible flows. On this basis, we perform a comprehensive study of the topology of the flow field generated by a helical vortex filament in an ideal fluid. The classical expression for the stream function obtained by Hardin (Hardin, J. C. 1982...... the zeroes of a single real function of one variable, and we show that three different flow topologies can occur, depending on a single dimensionless parameter. By including the self-induced velocity on the vortex filament by a localised induction approximation, the stream function is slightly modified...... and an extra parameter is introduced. In this setting two new flow topologies arise, but not more than two critical points occur for any combination of parameters....

  4. Numerical Model of Fluid Flow through Heterogeneous Rock for High Level Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, M.; Chiba, R.; Takahashi, T.; Hashida, T.; Fomin, S.; Chugunov, V.; Niibori, Y.

    2007-01-01

    An international consensus has emerged that deep geological disposal on land is one of the most appropriate means for high level radioactive wastes (HLW). The fluid transport is slow and radioactive elements are dangerous, so it's impossible to experiment over thousands of years. Instead, numerical model in such natural barrier as fractured underground needs to be considered. Field observations reveal that the equation with fractional derivative is more appropriate for describing physical phenomena than the equation which is based on the Fick's law. Thus, non-Fickian diffusion into inhomogeneous underground appears to be important in the assessment of HLW disposal. A solute transport equation with fractional derivative has been suggested and discussed in literature. However, no attempts were made to apply this equation for modeling of HLW disposal with account for the radioactive decay. In this study, we suggest the use of a novel fractional advection-diffusion equation which accounts for the effect of radioactive disintegration and for interactions between major, macro pores and fractal micro pores. This model is fundamentally different from previous proposed model of HLW, particularly in utilizing fractional derivative. Breakthrough curves numerically obtained by the present model are presented for a variety of rock types with respect to some important nuclides. Results of the calculation showed that for longer distance our model tends to be more conservative than the conventional Fickian model, therefore our model can be said to be safer

  5. Fluid dynamic modeling and numerical simulation of low-density hypersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H. K.; Wong, Eric Y.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of a viscous shock-layer and several related versions of continuum theories/methods are examined for their adequacy as a viable framework to study flow physics and aerothermodynamics of relevance to sustained hypersonic flights. Considering the flat plate at angle of attack, or the wedge, as a generic example for the major aerodynamic component of a hypersonic vehicle, the relative importance of the molecular-transport effects behind the shock (in the form of the 'shock slip') and the wall-slip effects are studied. In the flow regime where the shock-transition-zone thickness remains small compared to the shock radius of curvature, a quasi-one-dimensional shock structure under the Burnett/thirteen-moment approximation, as well as particulate/collisional models, can be consistently developed. The fully viscous version of the shock-layer model is shown to provide the crucial boundary condition downstream the shock in this case. The gas-kinetic basis of the continuum description for the flow behind the bow shock, and certain features affecting the non-equilibrium flow chemistry, are also discussed.

  6. An Embedded 3D Fracture Modeling Approach for Simulating Fracture-Dominated Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Henry [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wang, Cong [Colorado School of Mines; Winterfeld, Philip [Colorado School of Mines; Wu, Yu-Shu [Colorado School of Mines

    2018-02-14

    An efficient modeling approach is described for incorporating arbitrary 3D, discrete fractures, such as hydraulic fractures or faults, into modeling fracture-dominated fluid flow and heat transfer in fractured geothermal reservoirs. This technique allows 3D discrete fractures to be discretized independently from surrounding rock volume and inserted explicitly into a primary fracture/matrix grid, generated without including 3D discrete fractures in prior. An effective computational algorithm is developed to discretize these 3D discrete fractures and construct local connections between 3D fractures and fracture/matrix grid blocks of representing the surrounding rock volume. The constructed gridding information on 3D fractures is then added to the primary grid. This embedded fracture modeling approach can be directly implemented into a developed geothermal reservoir simulator via the integral finite difference (IFD) method or with TOUGH2 technology This embedded fracture modeling approach is very promising and computationally efficient to handle realistic 3D discrete fractures with complicated geometries, connections, and spatial distributions. Compared with other fracture modeling approaches, it avoids cumbersome 3D unstructured, local refining procedures, and increases computational efficiency by simplifying Jacobian matrix size and sparsity, while keeps sufficient accuracy. Several numeral simulations are present to demonstrate the utility and robustness of the proposed technique. Our numerical experiments show that this approach captures all the key patterns about fluid flow and heat transfer dominated by fractures in these cases. Thus, this approach is readily available to simulation of fractured geothermal reservoirs with both artificial and natural fractures.

  7. Modelling and simulation of compressible fluid flow in oil reservoir: a case study of the Jubilee Field, Tano Basin (Ghana)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawusu, S.

    2015-07-01

    Oil extraction represents an important investment and the control of a rational exploitation of a field means mastering various scientific techniques including the understanding of the dynamics of fluids in place. This thesis presents a theoretical investigation of the dynamic behaviour of an oil reservoir during its exploitation. The study investigated the dynamics of fluid flow patterns in a homogeneous oil reservoir using the Radial Diffusivity Equation (RDE) as well as two phase oil-water flow equations. The RDE model was solved analytically and numerically for pressure using the Constant Terminal Rate Solution (CTRS) and the fully implicit Finite Difference Method (FDM) respectively. The mathematical derivations of the models and their solution procedures were presented to allow for easy utilization of the techniques for reservoir and engineering applications. The study predicted that the initial oil reservoir pressure will be able to do the extraction for a very long time before any other recovery method will be used to aid in the extraction process depending on the rate of production. Reservoir simulation describing a one dimensional radial flow of a compressible fluid in porous media may be adequately performed using ordinary laptop computers as revealed by the study. For the simulation of MATLAB, the case of the Jubilee Fields, Tano Basin was studied, an algorithm was developed for the simulation of pressure in the reservoir. It ensues from the analysis of the plots of pressure vrs time and space that the Pressure Transient Analysis (PTA) was duly followed. The approximate solutions of the analytical and numerical solutions to the Radial Diffusivity Equation (RDE) were in excellent agreement, thus the reservoir simulation model developed can be used to describe typical pressure-time relationships that are used in conventional Pressure Transient Analysis (PTA). The study was extended to two phase oil-water flow in reservoirs. The flow of fluids in multi

  8. Free vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube containing a fluid flow using the Timoshenko beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W.-J.; Lee, H.-L.

    2009-01-01

    The flexural vibration of the fluid-conveying single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is derived by the Timoshenko beam model, including rotary inertia and transverse shear deformation. The effects of the flow velocity and the aspect ratio of length to diameter on the vibration frequency and mode shape of the SWCNT are analyzed. Results show that the effects of rotary inertia and transverse shear deformation result in a reduction of the vibration frequencies, especially for higher modes of vibration and short nanotubes. The frequency is also compared with the previous study based on Euler beam model. In addition, if the ratio of length to diameter increased to 60, the influence of the shear deformation and rotary inertia on the mode shape and the resonant frequencies can be neglected. However, the influence is very obvious when the ratio decreased to 20. As the flow velocity of the fluid increases in the vicinity of 2π, the SWCNT reveals the divergence instability. It regains stability when the flow velocity reaches about 9. As the velocity increases further, the SWCNT undergoes a coupled-mode flutter and results in a larger amplitude

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling to Improve Natural Flow Rate and Sweet Pepper Productivity in Greenhouse

    OpenAIRE

    W. Limtrakarn; P. Boonmongkol; A. Chompupoung; K. Rungprateepthaworn; J. Kruenate; P. Dechaumphai

    2012-01-01

    Natural flow rate and sweet peppers productivity in tropical greenhouse are improved by CFD simulation is the main objective of this research work. Most of the greenhouse types today are in the arch shape. To develop an improved greenhouse structure for the region, the arch type was built and used as the control model. Mae Sar Mai agriculture research station under the royal project foundation was selected as the field test site. Temperature sensors with data logger were installed to monitor ...

  10. On Cattaneo–Christov heat flux model for Carreau fluid flow over a slendering sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashim

    Full Text Available The underlying intentions of this article are to investigate the impact of non-Fourier heat flux model on the stagnation-point flow of non-Newtonian Carreau fluid. In this study, the innovative Cattaneo–Christov constitutive model is introduced to study the characteristics of thermal relaxation time. The flow is impelled by a slendering surface which is of the variable thickness. In the model, the physical mechanism responsible for homogeneous–heterogeneous reactions are further taken into account. Also, the diffusion coefficients of the reactant and auto catalyst are considered to be equal. The governing non-linear partial differential equations consisting of the momentum, energy and concentration equations are reduced to the coupled ordinary differential equations by means of local similarity transformations. The transformed ODEs are tackled numerically by employing an effective shooting algorithm along with the Runge–Kutta Fehlberg scheme. The physical characteristics of the fluid velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are illuminated with the variation of numerous governing factors and are presented graphically. For instance, our result indicates that the temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness are lower in case of Cattaneo–Christov heat flux model when compared to classical Fourier’s heat model. Meanwhile, the rate of heat transfer is significantly improved by a high wall thickness parameter and an opposite influence is found due to the thermal relaxation parameter. We further noticed that a higher value of homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction parameter corresponds to a deceleration in the concentration field and it shows an inverse relation for the Schmidt number. A correlation with accessible results for specific cases is found with fabulous consent. Keywords: Cattaneo–Christov model, Carreau fluid, Slendering sheet, Homogeneous–heterogeneous reactions, Runge–Kutta method

  11. Modeling Asymmetric Flow of Viscoelastic Fluid in Symmetric Planar Sudden Expansion Geometry Based on User-Defined Function in FLUENT CFD Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ying Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Through embedding an in-house subroutine into FLUENT code by utilizing the functionalization of user-defined function provided by the software, a new numerical simulation methodology on viscoelastic fluid flows has been established. In order to benchmark this methodology, numerical simulations under different viscoelastic fluid solution concentrations (with solvent viscosity ratio varied from 0.2 to 0.9, extensibility parameters (100≤L2≤500, Reynolds numbers (0.1 ≤ Re ≤ 100, and Weissenberg numbers (0 ≤ Wi ≤ 20 are conducted on unsteady laminar flows through a symmetric planar sudden expansion with expansion ratio of 1: 3 for viscoelastic fluid flows. The constitutive model used to describe the viscoelastic effect of viscoelastic fluid flow is FENE-P (finitely extensive nonlinear elastic-Peterlin model. The numerical simulation results show that the influences of elasticity, inertia, and concentration on the flow bifurcation characteristics are more significant than those of extensibility. The present simulation results including the critical Reynolds number for which the flow becomes asymmetric, vortex size, bifurcation diagram, velocity distribution, streamline, and pressure loss show good agreements with some published results. That means the newly established method based on FLUENT software platform for simulating peculiar flow behaviors of viscoelastic fluid is credible and suitable for the study of viscoelastic fluid flows.

  12. Transient Fluid Flow Modeling in Fractured Aquifer of Sechahoon Iron Mine Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Darabi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the fact that a large volume of iron reserve in the Sechahoon Iron Mine in Yazd Province has located under the water table, it is necessary to conduct a comprehensive study on water flow within the pit and its surroundings. The conceptual model of the aquifer was created using surface and underground geological information compared with water table data of the area of interest. In the data preparation stages, in order to create the numerical model, Logan and Lufran tests were studied to determine the hydrodynamic coefficients of the layers, precipitation and evaporation were investigated, and fractures and faults of the region, as a medium for flow channels in the hard formation, were also studied. The model was created in a transient state between 2000 and 2014. To validate its results, the water table was measured 4 times in the last 4 months of 2014. Considering the complexities in the heterogeneous fractured aquifer of the study area, numerical modeling results for the basin in a transient state present 90 percent correlation with field studies. Having investigated the water balance in the region, the boundary condition of the model was determined as the input water from the eastern south and the runoff water in the western north of the region. Since the general trend of faults in the area is north-south, variation in the water table is slight on north-south and intense on the east-west direction. On the other hand, due to the fact that the maximum flow is along the faults and fractures, the water table contour lines in different locations over the region are closed.

  13. A fluid dynamical flow model for the central peak in the rotation curve of disk galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, T.; Basu, B.

    1980-01-01

    The rotation curve of the central region in some disk galaxies shows a linear rise, terminating at a peak (primary peak) which is then vollowed by a deep minimum. The curve then again rises to another peak at more or less half-way across the galactic radius. This latter peak is considered as the peak of the rotation curve in all large-scale analysis of galactic structure. The primary peak is usually ignored for the purpose. In this work an attempt has been made to look at the primary peak as the manifestation of the post-explosion flow pattern of gas in the deep central region of galaxies. Solving hydrodynamical equations of motion, a flow model has been derived which imitates very closely the actually observed linear rotational velocity, followed by the falling branch of the curve to minimum. The theoretical flow model has been compared with observed results for nine galaxies. The agreement obtained is extremely encouraging. The distance of the primary peak from the galactic centre has been shown to be correlated with the angular velocity in the linear part of the rotation curve. Here also, agreement is very good between theoretical and observed results. It is concluded that the distance of the primary peak from the centre not only speaks of the time that has elapsed since the explosion occurred in the nucleus, it also speaks of the potential capability of the nucleus of the galaxy for repeating explosions through some efficient process of mass replenishment at the core. (orig.)

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Fluid Flow in a Water Physical Model of an Aluminum Degassing Ladle Equipped with an Impeller-Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Eudoxio Ramos; Zenit, Roberto; Rivera, Carlos González; Trápaga, Gerardo; Ramírez-Argáez, Marco A.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, a 3D numerical simulation using a Euler-Euler-based model implemented into a commercial CFD code was used to simulate fluid flow and turbulence structure in a water physical model of an aluminum ladle equipped with an impeller for degassing treatment. The effect of critical process parameters such as rotor speed, gas flow rate, and the point of gas injection (conventional injection through the shaft vs a novel injection through the bottom of the ladle) on the fluid flow and vortex formation was analyzed with this model. The commercial CFD code PHOENICS 3.4 was used to solve all conservation equations governing the process for this two-phase fluid flow system. The mathematical model was reasonably well validated against experimentally measured liquid velocity and vortex sizes in a water physical model built specifically for this investigation. From the results, it was concluded that the angular speed of the impeller is the most important parameter in promoting better stirred baths and creating smaller and better distributed bubbles in the liquid. The pumping effect of the impeller is increased as the impeller rotation speed increases. Gas flow rate is detrimental to bath stirring and diminishes the pumping effect of the impeller. Finally, although the injection point was the least significant variable, it was found that the "novel" injection improves stirring in the ladle.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid flow. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroth, G.; Klose, U.

    1992-01-01

    Cardiac- and respiration-related movements of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated by MRI in 71 patients. In most patients with arteriosclerotic occlusive vascular disease CSF pulsations are normal. Decreased pulsatile flow is detectable in those with arteriovenous malformations, intracranial air and following lumbar puncture and withdrawal of CSF. Increased pulsatile flow in the cerebral aqueduct was found in 2 patients with large aneurysms, idiopathic communicating syringomyelia and in most cases of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). CSF flow in the cervical spinal canal is, however, reduced or normal in NPH, indicating reduction of the unfolding ability of the surface of the brain and/or inhibition of rapid CSF movements in the subrachnoid space over its convexity. (orig.)

  16. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Fluid Flow in Continental Carbonate Reservoir Rocks and in Upscaled Rock Models Generated with Multiple-Point Geostatistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soete

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcomputed tomography (μCT and Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM simulations were applied to continental carbonates to quantify fluid flow. Fluid flow characteristics in these complex carbonates with multiscale pore networks are unique and the applied method allows studying their heterogeneity and anisotropy. 3D pore network models were introduced to single-phase flow simulations in Palabos, a software tool for particle-based modelling of classic computational fluid dynamics. In addition, permeability simulations were also performed on rock models generated with multiple-point geostatistics (MPS. This allowed assessing the applicability of MPS in upscaling high-resolution porosity patterns into large rock models that exceed the volume limitations of the μCT. Porosity and tortuosity control fluid flow in these porous media. Micro- and mesopores influence flow properties at larger scales in continental carbonates. Upscaling with MPS is therefore necessary to overcome volume-resolution problems of CT scanning equipment. The presented LBM-MPS workflow is applicable to other lithologies, comprising different pore types, shapes, and pore networks altogether. The lack of straightforward porosity-permeability relationships in complex carbonates highlights the necessity for a 3D approach. 3D fluid flow studies provide the best understanding of flow through porous media, which is of crucial importance in reservoir modelling.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer and Arc-Melt Interaction in Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Liu, Lichao; Motoyama, Yuichi

    2017-04-01

    The present work develops a multi-region dynamic coupling model for fluid flow, heat transfer and arc-melt interaction in tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using the dynamic mesh technique. The arc-weld pool unified model is developed on basis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations and the interface is tracked using the dynamic mesh method. The numerical model for arc is firstly validated by comparing the calculated temperature profiles and essential results with the former experimental data. For weld pool convection solution, the drag, Marangoni, buoyancy and electromagnetic forces are separately validated, and then taken into account. Moreover, the model considering interface deformation is adopted in a stationary TIG welding process with SUS304 stainless steel and the effect of interface deformation is investigated. The depression of weld pool center and the lifting of pool periphery are both predicted. The results show that the weld pool shape calculated with considering the interface deformation is more accurate.

  18. A 3D Culture Model to Study How Fluid Pressure and Flow Affect the Behavior of Aggregates of Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski-Daspit, Alexandra S; Simi, Allison K; Pang, Mei-Fong; Tien, Joe; Nelson, Celeste M

    2017-01-01

    Cells are surrounded by mechanical stimuli in their microenvironment. It is important to determine how cells respond to the mechanical information that surrounds them in order to understand both development and disease progression, as well as to be able to predict cell behavior in response to physical stimuli. Here we describe a protocol to determine the effects of interstitial fluid flow on the migratory behavior of an aggregate of epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D) culture model. This protocol includes detailed methods for the fabrication of a 3D cell culture chamber with hydrostatic pressure control, the culture of epithelial cells as an aggregate in a collagen gel, and the analysis of collective cell behavior in response to pressure-driven flow.

  19. SCDAP/RELAP5 modeling of fluid heat transfer and flow losses through porous debris in a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvego, E. A.; Siefken, L. J.

    2000-01-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 code is being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory under the primary sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide best-estimate transient simulations of light water reactor coolant systems during severe accidents. This paper describes the modeling approach used in the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to calculate fluid heat transfer and flow losses through porous debris that has accumulated in the vessel lower head and core regions during the latter stages of a severe accident. The implementation of heat transfer and flow loss correlations into the code is discussed, and calculations performed to assess the validity of the modeling approach are described. The different modes of heat transfer in porous debris include: (1) forced convection to liquid, (2) forced convection to gas, (3) nucleate boiling, (4) transition boiling, (5) film boiling, and (6) transition from film boiling to convection to vapor. The correlations for flow losses in porous debris include frictional and form losses. The correlations for flow losses were integrated into the momentum equations in the RELAP5 part of the code. Since RELAP5 is a very general non-homogeneous non-equilibrium thermal-hydraulics code, the resulting modeling methodology is applicable to a wide range of debris thermal-hydraulic conditions. Assessment of the SCDAP/RELAP5 debris bed thermal-hydraulic models included comparisons with experimental measurements and other models available in the open literature. The assessment calculations, described in the paper, showed that SCDAP/RELAP5 is capable of calculating the heat transfer and flow losses occurring in porous debris regions that may develop in a light water reactor during a severe accident

  20. Keyhole formation and thermal fluid flow-induced porosity during laser fusion welding in titanium alloys: Experimental and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panwisawas, Chinnapat; Perumal, Bama; Ward, R. Mark; Turner, Nathanael; Turner, Richard P.; Brooks, Jeffery W.; Basoalto, Hector C.

    2017-01-01

    High energy-density beam welding, such as electron beam or laser welding, has found a number of industrial applications for clean, high-integrity welds. The deeply penetrating nature of the joints is enabled by the formation of metal vapour which creates a narrow fusion zone known as a “keyhole”. However the formation of the keyhole and the associated keyhole dynamics, when using a moving laser heat source, requires further research as they are not fully understood. Porosity, which is one of a number of process induced phenomena related to the thermal fluid dynamics, can form during beam welding processes. The presence of porosity within a welded structure, inherited from the fusion welding operation, degrades the mechanical properties of components during service such as fatigue life. In this study, a physics-based model for keyhole welding including heat transfer, fluid flow and interfacial interactions has been used to simulate keyhole and porosity formation during laser welding of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. The modelling suggests that keyhole formation and the time taken to achieve keyhole penetration can be predicted, and it is important to consider the thermal fluid flow at the melting front as this dictates the evolution of the fusion zone. Processing induced porosity is significant when the fusion zone is only partially penetrating through the thickness of the material. The modelling results are compared with high speed camera imaging and measurements of porosity from welded samples using X-ray computed tomography, radiography and optical micrographs. These are used to provide a better understanding of the relationship between process parameters, component microstructure and weld integrity.

  1. Derivation of simplified basic equations of gas-liquid two-phase dispersed flow based on two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Isao; Tomiyama, Akio

    2004-01-01

    The simplified and physically reasonable basic equations for the gas-liquid dispersed flow were developed based on some appropriate assumptions and the treatment of dispersed phase as isothermal rigid particles. Based on the local instant formulation of mass, momentum and energy conservation of the dispersed flow, time-averaged equations were obtained assuming that physical quantities in the dispersed phase are uniform. These assumptions are approximately valid when phase change rate and/or chemical reaction rate are not so large at gas-liquid interface and there is no heat generation in within the dispersed phase. Detailed discussions were made on the characteristics of obtained basic equations and physical meanings of terms consisting the basic equations. It is shown that, in the derived averaged momentum equation, the terms of pressure gradient and viscous momentum diffusion do not appear and, in the energy equation, the term of molecular thermal diffusion heat flux does not appear. These characteristics of the derived equations were shown to be very consistent concerning the physical interpretation of the gas-liquid dispersed flow. Furthermore, the obtained basic equations are consistent with experiments for the dispersed flow where most of averaged physical quantities are obtained assuming that the distributions of those are uniform within the dispersed phase. Investigation was made on the problem whether the obtained basic equations are well-posed or ill-posed for the initial value problem. The eigenvalues of the simplified mass and momentum equations are calculated for basic equations obtained here and previous two-fluid basic equations with one pressure model. Well-posedness and ill-posedness are judged whether the eigenvalues are real or imaginary. The result indicated the newly developed basic equations always constitute the well-posed initial value problem while the previous two-fluid basic equations based on one pressure model constitutes ill

  2. Finite element modeling of melting and fluid flow in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Perez, N.; Rodriguez, J. F.; McWilliams, R. S.

    2017-04-01

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell is widely used in the laboratory study of materials behavior at high-pressure and high-temperature, including melting curves and liquid properties at extreme conditions. Laser heating in the diamond cell has long been associated with fluid-like motion in samples, which is routinely used to determine melting points and is often described as convective in appearance. However, the flow behavior of this system is poorly understood. A quantitative treatment of melting and flow in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell is developed here to physically relate experimental motion to properties of interest, including melting points and viscosity. Numerical finite-element models are used to characterize the temperature distribution, melting, buoyancy, and resulting natural convection in samples. We find that continuous fluid motion in experiments can be explained most readily by natural convection. Fluid velocities, peaking near values of microns per second for plausible viscosities, are sufficiently fast to be detected experimentally, lending support to the use of convective motion as a criterion for melting. Convection depends on the physical properties of the melt and the sample geometry and is too sluggish to detect for viscosities significantly above that of water at ambient conditions, implying an upper bound on the melt viscosity of about 1 mPa s when convective motion is detected. A simple analytical relationship between melt viscosity and velocity suggests that direct viscosity measurements can be made from flow speeds, given the basic thermodynamic and geometric parameters of samples are known.

  3. Quantifying Fracture Heterogeneity in Different Domains of Folded Carbonate Rocks to Improve Fractured Reservoir Analog Fluid Flow Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisdom, K.; Bertotti, G.; Gauthier, B.D.M.; Hardebol, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs is largely controlled by multiscale fracture networks. Significant variations of fracture network porosity and permeability are caused by the 3D heterogeneity of the fracture network characteristics, such as intensity, orientation and size. Characterizing fracture

  4. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in the Laser Multilayered Cladding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanrong; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2010-12-01

    The current work examines the heat-and-mass transfer process in the laser multilayered cladding of H13 tool steel powder by numerical modeling and experimental validation. A multiphase transient model is developed to investigate the evolution of the temperature field and flow velocity of the liquid phase in the molten pool. The solid region of the substrate and solidified clad, the liquid region of the melted clad material, and the gas region of the surrounding air are included. In this model, a level-set method is used to track the free surface motion of the molten pool with the powder material feeding and scanning of the laser beam. An enthalpy-porosity approach is applied to deal with the solidification and melting that occurs in the cladding process. Moreover, the laser heat input and heat losses from the forced convection and heat radiation that occurs on the top surface of the deposited layer are incorporated into the source term of the governing equations. The effects of the laser power, scanning speed, and powder-feed rate on the dilution and height of the multilayered clad are investigated based on the numerical model and experimental measurements. The results show that an increase of the laser power and powder feed rate, or a reduction of the scanning speed, can increase the clad height and directly influence the remelted depth of each layer of deposition. The numerical results have a qualitative agreement with the experimental measurements.

  5. A nonlinear model for fluid flow in a multiple-zone composite reservoir including the quadratic gradient term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiao-Lu; Fan, Xiang-Yu; Nie, Ren-Shi; Huang, Quan-Hua; He, Yong-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Based on material balance and Darcy's law, the governing equation with the quadratic pressure gradient term was deduced. Then the nonlinear model for fluid flow in a multiple-zone composite reservoir including the quadratic gradient term was established and solved using a Laplace transform. A series of standard log–log type curves of 1-zone (homogeneous), 2-zone and 3-zone reservoirs were plotted and nonlinear flow characteristics were analysed. The type curves governed by the coefficient of the quadratic gradient term (β) gradually deviate from those of a linear model with time elapsing. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were implemented to compare the solutions of the linear and nonlinear models. The results showed that differences of pressure transients between the linear and nonlinear models increase with elapsed time and β. At the end, a successful application of the theoretical model data against the field data shows that the nonlinear model will be a good tool to evaluate formation parameters more accurately. (paper)

  6. A model of the fluid temperature field in a turbulent flow parallel to heated tube bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Tofani, P. de.

    1986-01-01

    Basic understanding of thermal-hydraulic phenomena is essential to achieving reactor fuel assembly performance analysis. In this paper, a dimensionless parameter - a normalized fluid temperature - is defined and applied to fluid temperature measurements at particular positions at the exit plane of a bank of nine heated tubes, under different transverse heat flux shapes. This parameter presents an asymptotic trend to equilibrium values, which depend upon considered positions and flux shapes; when increasing the bulk Reynolds Number. Proposed correlations underlie the present approach to predict the fluid temperature field within the tube bundle. (Author) [pt

  7. Introductory study to mathematics modelling of fluid flow in the screw compressors; Einfuehrungsstudie zur mathematischen Modellierung der Stroemungen in Schraubenkompressoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svigler, J.; Vimmr, J. [Westboehmische Univ. Pilsen (Czechoslovakia). Lehrstuhl fuer Mechanik

    2000-07-01

    A fast development of the screw machines leads to the investigation of the physical processes, which take place in the work space of the screw machine and in the gaps on its boundary. These processes have a great influence on the performance of the screw machine especially with regard to its efficiency, therefore its knowledge is very important. It is necessary to turn our attention to the fluid dynamics of the screw machines. This paper deals with the preliminary analysis of the fluid flow in the screw machines. In this paper numerical computation of the compressible inviscid fluid flow in the work space of the screw machines and through the sealing gaps which are situated between the stator and the head of the female rotor tooth, is presented. The mathematical model of two- and three-dimensional inviscid compressible flow is described by the conservative system of the Euler equations. This problem was solved by the cell-centred finite volume method on a structured quadrilateral mesh. (orig.) [German] Die schnelle Entwicklung der Schraubenmaschinen fuehrt zur Notwendigkeit einer Untersuchung der physikalischen Vorgaenge, die im Arbeitsraum und in den arbeitsraumbegrenzenden Spalten der Schraubenmaschine ablaufen. Diese Vorgaenge beeinflussen nachhaltig das Betriebsverhalten sowie die Energiewandlungsguete, womit deren Kenntnis und der Information ueber die Details eine ausserordentliche Bedeutung zukommt. Einen Ausgangspunkt fuer die Analyse stellen die Kenntnisse im Bereich der kompressiblen Fluide dar. Der Zustand kann vor allem durch das Geschwindigkeits-, Druck-, und Temperaturfeld beurteilt werden. Der Beitrag beschaeftigt sich mit der Problematik der Stroemungsuntersuchungen des Gases im Arbeitsraum der Schaubenmaschine und im Gehaeusespalt. Die Aufgabe wird dreidimensional behandelt und auf eine Art und Weise formuliert, dass sie die Voraussetzung fuer die Erstellung eines raeumlichen Modells und der damit gekoppelten mathematischen Loesung schafft. Die

  8. Volumetric velocimetry for fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discetti, Stefano; Coletti, Filippo

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, several techniques have been introduced that are capable of extracting 3D three-component velocity fields in fluid flows. Fast-paced developments in both hardware and processing algorithms have generated a diverse set of methods, with a growing range of applications in flow diagnostics. This has been further enriched by the increasingly marked trend of hybridization, in which the differences between techniques are fading. In this review, we carry out a survey of the prominent methods, including optical techniques and approaches based on medical imaging. An overview of each is given with an example of an application from the literature, while focusing on their respective strengths and challenges. A framework for the evaluation of velocimetry performance in terms of dynamic spatial range is discussed, along with technological trends and emerging strategies to exploit 3D data. While critical challenges still exist, these observations highlight how volumetric techniques are transforming experimental fluid mechanics, and that the possibilities they offer have just begun to be explored.

  9. Coupled Model for CO2 Leaks from Geological Storage: Geomechanics, Fluid Flow and Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor, G.; Prevost, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deep saline aquifers are considered as a promising option for long-term storage of carbon dioxide. However, risk of CO2 leakage from the aquifers through faults, natural or induced fractures or abandoned wells cannot be disregarded. Therefore, modeling of various leakage scenarios is crucial when selecting a site for CO2 sequestration and choosing proper operational conditions. Carbon dioxide is injected into wells at supercritical conditions (t > 31.04 C, P > 73.82 bar), and these conditions are maintained in the deep aquifers (at 1-2 km depth) due to hydrostatic pressure and geothermal gradient. However, if CO2 and brine start to migrate from the aquifer upward, both pressure and temperature will decrease, and at the depth of 500-750 m, the conditions for CO2 will become subcritical. At subcritical conditions, CO2 starts boiling and the character of the flow changes dramatically due to appearance of the third (vapor) phase and latent heat effects. When modeling CO2 leaks, one needs to couple the multiphase flow in porous media with geomechanics. These capabilities are provided by Dynaflow, a finite element analysis program [1]; Dynaflow has already showed to be efficient for modeling caprock failure causing CO2 leaks [2, 3]. Currently we have extended the capabilities of Dynaflow with the phase transition module, based on two-phase and three-phase isenthalpic flash calculations [4]. We have also developed and implemented an efficient method for solving heat and mass transport with the phase transition using our flash module. Therefore, we have developed a robust tool for modeling CO2 leaks. In the talk we will give a brief overview of our method and illustrate it with the results of simulations for characteristic test cases. References: [1] J.H. Prevost, DYNAFLOW: A Nonlinear Transient Finite Element Analysis Program. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. http://www.princeton.edu/~dynaflow/ (last update 2013

  10. Transient flows of a Burgers' fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.

    2005-12-01

    An analysis is performed to develop the analytical solutions for some unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows of a Burgers' fluid between two plates. A uniform magnetic field is applied transversely to the fluid motion. The exact solutions are given for three problems. Results for the velocity fields are discussed and compared with the flows of Oldroyd-B, Maxwell, second grade and Newtonian fluids. (author)

  11. Fluid-structure interaction modeling of aneurysmal arteries under steady-state and pulsatile blood flow: a stability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharzehee, Mohammadali; Khalafvand, Seyed Saeid; Han, Hai-Chao

    2018-02-01

    Tortuous aneurysmal arteries are often associated with a higher risk of rupture but the mechanism remains unclear. The goal of this study was to analyze the buckling and post-buckling behaviors of aneurysmal arteries under pulsatile flow. To accomplish this goal, we analyzed the buckling behavior of model carotid and abdominal aorta with aneurysms by utilizing fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method with realistic waveforms boundary conditions. FSI simulations were done under steady-state and pulsatile flow for normal (1.5) and reduced (1.3) axial stretch ratios to investigate the influence of aneurysm, pulsatile lumen pressure and axial tension on stability. Our results indicated that aneurysmal artery buckled at the critical buckling pressure and its deflection nonlinearly increased with increasing lumen pressure. Buckling elevates the peak stress (up to 118%). The maximum aneurysm wall stress at pulsatile FSI flow was (29%) higher than under static pressure at the peak lumen pressure of 130 mmHg. Buckling results show an increase in lumen shear stress at the inner side of the maximum deflection. Vortex flow was dramatically enlarged with increasing lumen pressure and artery diameter. Aneurysmal arteries are more susceptible than normal arteries to mechanical instability which causes high stresses in the aneurysm wall that could lead to aneurysm rupture.

  12. Simulation of dendritic growth of magnesium alloys with fluid flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-wu Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluid flow has a significant impact on the microstructure evolution of alloys during solidification. Based on the previous work relating simulation of the dendritic growth of magnesium alloys with hcp (hexagonal close-packed structure, an extension was made to the formerly established CA (cellular automaton model with the purpose of studying the effect of fluid flow on the dendritic growth of magnesium alloys. The modified projection method was used to solve the transport equations of flow field. By coupling the flow field with the solute field, simulation results of equiaxed and columnar dendritic growth of magnesium alloys with fluid flow were achieved. The simulated results were quantitatively compared with those without fluid flow. Moreover, a comparison was also made between the present work and previous works conducted by others. It can be concluded that a deep understanding of the dendritic growth of magnesium alloys with fluid flow can be obtained by applying the present numerical model.

  13. Coupling ground penetrating radar and fluid flow modeling for oilfield monitoring applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miorali, M.; Zhou, F.; Slob, E.C.; Arts, R.

    2011-01-01

    The recent introduction of smart well technology allows for new geophysical monitoring opportunities. Smart wells, which allow zonal production control, combined with monitoring techniques capable of capturing the arrival of undesired fluids, have the potential to significantly increase the oil

  14. Modeling of Compressible Flow with Friction and Heat Transfer Using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Alak; Majumdar, Alok

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes the verification and validation of a quasi one-dimensional pressure based finite volume algorithm, implemented in Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), for predicting compressible flow with friction, heat transfer and area change. The numerical predictions were compared with two classical solutions of compressible flow, i.e. Fanno and Rayleigh flow. Fanno flow provides an analytical solution of compressible flow in a long slender pipe where incoming subsonic flow can be choked due to friction. On the other hand, Raleigh flow provides analytical solution of frictionless compressible flow with heat transfer where incoming subsonic flow can be choked at the outlet boundary with heat addition to the control volume. Nonuniform grid distribution improves the accuracy of numerical prediction. A benchmark numerical solution of compressible flow in a converging-diverging nozzle with friction and heat transfer has been developed to verify GFSSP's numerical predictions. The numerical predictions compare favorably in all cases.

  15. The boundary condition at the valve for numerical modelling of transient pipe flow with fluid structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henclik, S.

    2014-08-01

    Transient flows in pipes (water hammer = WH) do appear in various situations and the accompanying pressure waves may involve serious perturbations in system functioning. To model these effects properly in the case of elastic pipe the dynamic fluid-structure interaction (FSI) should be taken into account. Fluid-structure couplings appear in various manners and the junction coupling is considered to be the strongest. This effect can be especially significant if the pipe can move as a whole body, which is possible when all its supports are not rigid. In the current paper a similar effect is numerically modelled. The pipe is fixed rigidly, but the valve at the end has a spring-dashpot mounting system, thus its motion is possible when WH is excited by the valve closuring. The boundary condition at the moving valve is modelled as a differential equation of motion. The valve hydraulic characteristics during closuring period are assumed by a time dependence of its loss factor. Preliminary numerical tests of that algorithm were done with an own computer program and it was found that the proper valve fixing system may produce significant lowering of WH pressures.

  16. Fluid flow solidification simulation of molten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaschnitz, E.

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to minimize costs and to obtain optimum designs, computer simulation of shape casting processes is more and more used as a development tool. Accurate predictions are possible by means of three dimensional fluid flow and solidification modelling. The bases of the model are the transient laminar Navier-Stokes-equations for a Newtonian fluid including the tracking of the free surface. They are describing the melt flow pattern during the mold filling sequence. Simultaneously, the temperature development in the alloy and mold is calculated using Fourier's heat transfer equation. At OEGI, a commercial software package (MAGMAsoft) with a finite difference equation solver is used for improvement of casting processes. Different examples of industrial applications will be shown. (author)

  17. Steady laminar flow of fractal fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balankin, Alexander S., E-mail: abalankin@ipn.mx [Grupo Mecánica Fractal, ESIME, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F., 07738 (Mexico); Mena, Baltasar [Laboratorio de Ingeniería y Procesos Costeros, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Sisal, Yucatán, 97355 (Mexico); Susarrey, Orlando; Samayoa, Didier [Grupo Mecánica Fractal, ESIME, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F., 07738 (Mexico)

    2017-02-12

    We study laminar flow of a fractal fluid in a cylindrical tube. A flow of the fractal fluid is mapped into a homogeneous flow in a fractional dimensional space with metric induced by the fractal topology. The equations of motion for an incompressible Stokes flow of the Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. It is found that the radial distribution for the velocity in a steady Poiseuille flow of a fractal fluid is governed by the fractal metric of the flow, whereas the pressure distribution along the flow direction depends on the fractal topology of flow, as well as on the fractal metric. The radial distribution of the fractal fluid velocity in a steady Couette flow between two concentric cylinders is also derived. - Highlights: • Equations of Stokes flow of Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. • Pressure distribution in the Newtonian fractal fluid is derived. • Velocity distribution in Poiseuille flow of fractal fluid is found. • Velocity distribution in a steady Couette flow is established.

  18. Fluids in crustal deformation: Fluid flow, fluid-rock interactions, rheology, melting and resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Olivier; Rolland, Yann

    2016-11-01

    Fluids exert a first-order control on the structural, petrological and rheological evolution of the continental crust. Fluids interact with rocks from the earliest stages of sedimentation and diagenesis in basins until these rocks are deformed and/or buried and metamorphosed in orogens, then possibly exhumed. Fluid-rock interactions lead to the evolution of rock physical properties and rock strength. Fractures and faults are preferred pathways for fluids, and in turn physical and chemical interactions between fluid flow and tectonic structures, such as fault zones, strongly influence the mechanical behaviour of the crust at different space and time scales. Fluid (over)pressure is associated with a variety of geological phenomena, such as seismic cycle in various P-T conditions, hydrofracturing (including formation of sub-horizontal, bedding-parallel veins), fault (re)activation or gravitational sliding of rocks, among others. Fluid (over)pressure is a governing factor for the evolution of permeability and porosity of rocks and controls the generation, maturation and migration of economic fluids like hydrocarbons or ore forming hydrothermal fluids, and is therefore a key parameter in reservoir studies and basin modeling. Fluids may also help the crust partially melt, and in turn the resulting melt may dramatically change the rheology of the crust.

  19. Modeling and simulation of the fluid flow in wire electrochemical machining with rotating tool (wire ECM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, F.; Herrig, T.; Zeis, M.; Klink, A.

    2017-10-01

    Combining the working principle of electrochemical machining (ECM) with a universal rotating tool, like a wire, could manage lots of challenges of the classical ECM sinking process. Such a wire-ECM process could be able to machine flexible and efficient 2.5-dimensional geometries like fir tree slots in turbine discs. Nowadays, established manufacturing technologies for slotting turbine discs are broaching and wire electrical discharge machining (wire EDM). Nevertheless, high requirements on surface integrity of turbine parts need cost intensive process development and - in case of wire-EDM - trim cuts to reduce the heat affected rim zone. Due to the process specific advantages, ECM is an attractive alternative manufacturing technology and is getting more and more relevant for sinking applications within the last few years. But ECM is also opposed with high costs for process development and complex electrolyte flow devices. In the past, few studies dealt with the development of a wire ECM process to meet these challenges. However, previous concepts of wire ECM were only suitable for micro machining applications. Due to insufficient flushing concepts the application of the process for machining macro geometries failed. Therefore, this paper presents the modeling and simulation of a new flushing approach for process assessment. The suitability of a rotating structured wire electrode in combination with an axial flushing for electrodes with high aspect ratios is investigated and discussed.

  20. Flask fluid flow simulation using CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindlehurst, W.E.; Livesey, E.; Worthington, D.

    1989-01-01

    BNFL and its subsidiary Company, PNTL, design and operate waterfilled LWR fuel transport flasks for the international transport of irradiated fuel. Although some 150 flasks are currently in operation, new flask designs are being developed. As part of the supporting R and D program, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes are being investigated as a means of predicting fluid movements and temperatures within the complex internal geometry of flasks. The ability to simulate fluid flow is particularly important when convection heat transfer is significant. Although obviously relevant to water filled flasks, the technique is applicable to dry flask thermal assessments (where experience shows that convection heat transfer is often underestimated). Computational Fluid Dynamics has emerged in recent years as an important technique in engineering design and safety assessments. Cheaper computing and the development of general CFD codes allows complex engineering structures to be analyzed. However, because of this complexity, it is essential that the application and associated modeling assumptions are critically reviewed. To assess the ability of a CFD code to model flask internals, the code PHOENICS has been used to model the fluid movements in a BNFL Excellox-type flask and the results compared with test data

  1. A Comprehensive Prediction Model of Hydraulic Extended-Reach Limit Considering the Allowable Range of Drilling Fluid Flow Rate in Horizontal Drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Gao, Deli; Chen, Xuyue

    2017-06-08

    Hydraulic extended-reach limit (HERL) model of horizontal extended-reach well (ERW) can predict the maximum measured depth (MMD) of the horizontal ERW. The HERL refers to the well's MMD when drilling fluid cannot be normally circulated by drilling pump. Previous model analyzed the following two constraint conditions, drilling pump rated pressure and rated power. However, effects of the allowable range of drilling fluid flow rate (Q min  ≤ Q ≤ Q max ) were not considered. In this study, three cases of HERL model are proposed according to the relationship between allowable range of drilling fluid flow rate and rated flow rate of drilling pump (Q r ). A horizontal ERW is analyzed to predict its HERL, especially its horizontal-section limit (L h ). Results show that when Q min  ≤ Q r  ≤ Q max (Case I), L h depends both on horizontal-section limit based on rated pump pressure (L h1 ) and horizontal-section limit based on rated pump power (L h2 ); when Q min  drilling fluid flow rate, while L h2 keeps decreasing as the drilling fluid flow rate increases. The comprehensive model provides a more accurate prediction on HERL.

  2. Simulation of the two-fluid model on incompressible flow with Fractional Step method for both resolved and unresolved scale interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Xiaofei; Rigola, Joaquim; Lehmkuhl, Oriol; Oliva, Assensi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two phase flow with free surface is solved by means of two-fluid model (TFM). • Fractional Step method and finite volume technique is used to solve TFM. • Conservative Level Set method reduces interface sharpening diffusion problem. • Cases including high density ratios and high viscosities validate the models. - Abstract: In the present paper, the Fractional Step method usually used in single fluid flow is here extended and applied for the two-fluid model resolution using the finite volume discretization. The use of a projection method resolution instead of the usual pressure-correction method for multi-fluid flow, successfully avoids iteration processes. On the other hand, the main weakness of the two fluid model used for simulations of free surface flows, which is the numerical diffusion of the interface, is also solved by means of the conservative Level Set method (interface sharpening) (Strubelj et al., 2009). Moreover, the use of the algorithm proposed has allowed presenting different free-surface cases with or without Level Set implementation even under coarse meshes under a wide range of density ratios. Thus, the numerical results presented, numerically verified, experimentally validated and converged under high density ratios, shows the capability and reliability of this resolution method for both mixed and unmixed flows

  3. 2D numerical model of particle-bed collision in fluid-particle flows over bed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukerchenko, Nikolay; Chára, Zdeněk; Vlasák, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2006), s. 70-78 ISSN 0022-1686 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : saltation * particle-bed collision * collision angle * bed roughness Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.527, year: 2006

  4. Modeling fluid flow and heat transfer at Basin and Range faults: preliminary results for Leach hot springs, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Dina L.; Smith, Leslie; Storey, Michael L.; Nielson, Dennis L.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrothermal systems of the Basin and Range Province are often located at or near major range bounding normal faults. The flow of fluid and energy at these faults is affected by the advective transfer of heat and fluid from an to the adjacent mountain ranges and valleys, This paper addresses the effect of the exchange of fluid and energy between the country rock, the valley fill sediments, and the fault zone, on the fluid and heat flow regimes at the fault plane. For comparative purposes, the conditions simulated are patterned on Leach Hot Springs in southern Grass Valley, Nevada. Our simulations indicated that convection can exist at the fault plane even when the fault is exchanging significant heat and fluid with the surrounding country rock and valley fill sediments. The temperature at the base of the fault decreased with increasing permeability of the country rock. Higher groundwater discharge from the fault and lower temperatures at the base of the fault are favored by high country rock permabilities and fault transmissivities. Preliminary results suggest that basal temperatures and flow rates for Leach Hot Springs can not be simulated with a fault 3 km deep and an average regional heat flow of 150 mW/m2 because the basal temperature and mass discharge rates are too low. A fault permeable to greater depths or a higher regional heat flow may be indicated for these springs.

  5. Characterizing fractured rock for fluid-flow, geomechanical, and paleostress modeling: Methods and preliminary results from Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, C.C.; Larsen, E.; Page, W.R.; Howard, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    Fractures have been characterized for fluid-flow, geomechanical, and paleostress modeling at three localities in the vicinity of drill hole USW G-4 at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada. A method for fracture characterization is introduced that integrates mapping fracture-trace networks and quantifying eight fracture parameters: trace length, orientation, connectivity, aperture, roughness, shear offset, trace-length density, and mineralization. A complex network of fractures was exposed on three 214- to 260-m 2 pavements cleared of debris in the upper lithophysal unit of the Tiva Canyon Member of the Miocene Paint-brush Tuff. The pavements are two-dimensional sections through the three-dimensional network of strata-bound fractures. All fractures with trace lengths greater than 0.2 m were mapped and studied

  6. A stochastic asymptotic-preserving scheme for a kinetic-fluid model for disperse two-phase flows with uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Shi, E-mail: sjin@wisc.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Institute of Natural Sciences, School of Mathematical Science, MOELSEC and SHL-MAC, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shu, Ruiwen, E-mail: rshu2@math.wisc.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    In this paper we consider a kinetic-fluid model for disperse two-phase flows with uncertainty. We propose a stochastic asymptotic-preserving (s-AP) scheme in the generalized polynomial chaos stochastic Galerkin (gPC-sG) framework, which allows the efficient computation of the problem in both kinetic and hydrodynamic regimes. The s-AP property is proved by deriving the equilibrium of the gPC version of the Fokker–Planck operator. The coefficient matrices that arise in a Helmholtz equation and a Poisson equation, essential ingredients of the algorithms, are proved to be positive definite under reasonable and mild assumptions. The computation of the gPC version of a translation operator that arises in the inversion of the Fokker–Planck operator is accelerated by a spectrally accurate splitting method. Numerical examples illustrate the s-AP property and the efficiency of the gPC-sG method in various asymptotic regimes.

  7. Structural steady states and relaxation oscillations in a two-phase fluid under shear flow: Experiments and phenomenological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbin, L.; Benayad, A.; Panizza, P.

    2006-01-01

    By means of several rheophysics techniques, we report on an extensive study of the couplings between flow and microstructures in a two-phase fluid made of lamellar (Lα) and sponge (L3) phases. Depending on the nature of the imposed dynamical parameter (stress or shear rate) and on the experimental conditions (brine salinity or temperature), we observe several different structural steady states consisting of either multilamellar droplets (with or without a long range order) or elongated (L3) phase domains. Two different astonishing phenomena, shear-induced phase inversion and relaxation oscillations, are observed. We show that (i) phase inversion is related to a shear-induced topological change between monodisperse multilamellar droplets and elongated structures and (ii) droplet size relaxation oscillations result from a shear-induced change of the surface tension between both coexisting (Lα) and (L3) phases. To explain these relaxation oscillations, we present a phenomenological model and compare its numerical predictions to our experimental results.

  8. Numerical simulation of transient, adiabatic, two-dimensional two-phase flow using the two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves Conti, T. das.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical method is developed to simulate adiabatic, transient, two-dimensional two-phase flow. The two-fluid model is used to obtain the mass and momentum conservation equations. These are solved by an iterative algorithm emphoying a time-marching scheme. Based on the corrective procedure of Hirt and Harlow a poisson equation is derived for the pressure field. This equation is finite-differenced and solved by a suitable matrix inversion technique. In the absence of experiment results several numerical tests were made in order to chec accuracy, convergence and stability of the proposed method. Several tests were also performed to check whether the behavior of void fraction and phasic velocities conforms with previous observations. (Author) [pt

  9. Sill intrusion driven fluid flow and vent formation in volcanic basins: Modeling rates of volatile release and paleoclimate effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of mass extinction events in conjunction with climate change occur throughout the geological record and may be accompanied by pronounced negative carbon isotope excursions. The processes that trigger such globally destructive changes are still under considerable debate. These include mechanisms such as poisoning from trace metals released during large volcanic eruptions (Vogt, 1972), CO2 released from lava degassing during the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) (Courtillot and Renne, 2003) and CH4 release during the destabilization of sub-seafloor methane (Dickens et al., 1995), to name a few. Thermogenic methane derived from contact metamorphism associated with magma emplacement and cooling in sedimentary basins has been recently gaining considerable attention as a potential mechanism that may have triggered global climate events in the past (e.g. Svensen and Jamtveit, 2010). The discovery of hydrothermal vent complexes that are spatially associated with such basins also supports the discharge of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g. Jamtveit et al., 2004; Planke et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2006). A previous study that investigated this process using a fluid flow model (Iyer et al., 2013) suggested that although hydrothermal plume formation resulting from sill emplacement may indeed release large quantities of methane at the surface, the rate at which this methane is released into the atmosphere is too slow to trigger, by itself, some of the negative δ13C excursions observed in the fossil record over short time scales observed in the fossil record. Here, we reinvestigate the rates of gas release during sill emplacement in a case study from the Harstad Basin off-shore Norway with a special emphasis on vent formation. The presented study is based on a seismic line that crosses multiple sill structures emplaced around 55 Ma within the Lower Cretaceous sediments. A single well-defined vent complex is interpreted above the termination of the

  10. A computational model for viscous fluid flow, heat transfer, and melting in in situ vitrification melt pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, P.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1991-11-01

    MAGMA is a FORTRAN computer code designed to viscous flow in in situ vitrification melt pools. It models three-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flow and heat transfer. The momentum equation is coupled to the temperature field through the buoyancy force terms arising from the Boussinesq approximation. All fluid properties, except density, are assumed variable. Density is assumed constant except in the buoyancy force terms in the momentum equation. A simple melting model based on the enthalpy method allows the study of the melt front progression and latent heat effects. An indirect addressing scheme used in the numerical solution of the momentum equation voids unnecessary calculations in cells devoid of liquid. Two-dimensional calculations can be performed using either rectangular or cylindrical coordinates, while three-dimensional calculations use rectangular coordinates. All derivatives are approximated by finite differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new fully implicit iterative technique, while the energy equation is differenced explicitly in time. Spatial derivatives are written in conservative form using a uniform, rectangular, staggered mesh based on the marker and cell placement of variables. Convective terms are differenced using a weighted average of centered and donor cell differencing to ensure numerical stability. Complete descriptions of MAGMA governing equations, numerics, code structure, and code verification are provided. 14 refs

  11. Modeling and analysis of biomagnetic blood Carreau fluid flow through a stenosis artery with magnetic heat transfer: A transient study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahzadeh Jamalabadi, Mohammad Yaghoub; Daqiqshirazi, Mohammadreza; Nasiri, Hossein; Safaei, Mohammad Reza; Nguyen, Truong Khang

    2018-01-01

    We present a numerical investigation of tapered arteries that addresses the transient simulation of non-Newtonian bio-magnetic fluid dynamics (BFD) of blood through a stenosis artery in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. The current model is consistent with ferro-hydrodynamic (FHD) and magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) principles. In the present work, blood in small arteries is analyzed using the Carreau-Yasuda model. The arterial wall is assumed to be fixed with cosine geometry for the stenosis. A parametric study was conducted to reveal the effects of the stenosis intensity and the Hartman number on a wide range of flow parameters, such as the flow velocity, temperature, and wall shear stress. Current findings are in a good agreement with recent findings in previous research studies. The results show that wall temperature control can keep the blood in its ideal blood temperature range (below 40°C) and that a severe pressure drop occurs for blockages of more than 60 percent. Additionally, with an increase in the Ha number, a velocity drop in the blood vessel is experienced.

  12. Numerical approximation of a binary fluid-surfactant phase field model of two-phase incompressible flow

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Guangpu

    2018-04-17

    In this paper, we consider the numerical approximation of a binary fluid-surfactant phase field model of two-phase incompressible flow. The nonlinearly coupled model consists of two Cahn-Hilliard type equations and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Using the Invariant Energy Quadratization (IEQ) approach, the governing system is transformed into an equivalent form, which allows the nonlinear potentials to be treated efficiently and semi-explicitly. we construct a first and a second-order time marching schemes, which are extremely efficient and easy-to-implement, for the transformed governing system. At each time step, the schemes involve solving a sequence of linear elliptic equations, and computations of phase variables, velocity and pressure are totally decoupled. We further establish a rigorous proof of unconditional energy stability for the semi-implicit schemes. Numerical results in both two and three dimensions are obtained, which demonstrate that the proposed schemes are accurate, efficient and unconditionally energy stable. Using our schemes, we investigate the effect of surfactants on droplet deformation and collision under a shear flow. The increase of surfactant concentration can enhance droplet deformation and inhibit droplet coalescence.

  13. A computational model for viscous fluid flow, heat transfer, and melting in in situ vitrification melt pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, P.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1991-11-01

    MAGMA is a FORTRAN computer code designed to viscous flow in in situ vitrification melt pools. It models three-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flow and heat transfer. The momentum equation is coupled to the temperature field through the buoyancy force terms arising from the Boussinesq approximation. All fluid properties, except density, are assumed variable. Density is assumed constant except in the buoyancy force terms in the momentum equation. A simple melting model based on the enthalpy method allows the study of the melt front progression and latent heat effects. An indirect addressing scheme used in the numerical solution of the momentum equation voids unnecessary calculations in cells devoid of liquid. Two-dimensional calculations can be performed using either rectangular or cylindrical coordinates, while three-dimensional calculations use rectangular coordinates. All derivatives are approximated by finite differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new fully implicit iterative technique, while the energy equation is differenced explicitly in time. Spatial derivatives are written in conservative form using a uniform, rectangular, staggered mesh based on the marker and cell placement of variables. Convective terms are differenced using a weighted average of centered and donor cell differencing to ensure numerical stability. Complete descriptions of MAGMA governing equations, numerics, code structure, and code verification are provided. 14 refs.

  14. Numerical approximation of a binary fluid-surfactant phase field model of two-phase incompressible flow

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Guangpu; Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu; Yao, Jun; Li, Aifen

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the numerical approximation of a binary fluid-surfactant phase field model of two-phase incompressible flow. The nonlinearly coupled model consists of two Cahn-Hilliard type equations and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Using the Invariant Energy Quadratization (IEQ) approach, the governing system is transformed into an equivalent form, which allows the nonlinear potentials to be treated efficiently and semi-explicitly. we construct a first and a second-order time marching schemes, which are extremely efficient and easy-to-implement, for the transformed governing system. At each time step, the schemes involve solving a sequence of linear elliptic equations, and computations of phase variables, velocity and pressure are totally decoupled. We further establish a rigorous proof of unconditional energy stability for the semi-implicit schemes. Numerical results in both two and three dimensions are obtained, which demonstrate that the proposed schemes are accurate, efficient and unconditionally energy stable. Using our schemes, we investigate the effect of surfactants on droplet deformation and collision under a shear flow. The increase of surfactant concentration can enhance droplet deformation and inhibit droplet coalescence.

  15. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  16. Effect of fluid friction on interstitial fluid flow coupled with blood flow through solid tumor microvascular network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefidgar, Mostafa; Soltani, M; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Bazmara, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    A solid tumor is investigated as porous media for fluid flow simulation. Most of the studies use Darcy model for porous media. In Darcy model, the fluid friction is neglected and a few simplified assumptions are implemented. In this study, the effect of these assumptions is studied by considering Brinkman model. A multiscale mathematical method which calculates fluid flow to a solid tumor is used in this study to investigate how neglecting fluid friction affects the solid tumor simulation. The mathematical method involves processes such as blood flow through vessels and solute and fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. The sprouting angiogenesis model is used for generating capillary network and then fluid flow governing equations are implemented to calculate blood flow through the tumor-induced capillary network. Finally, the two models of porous media are used for modeling fluid flow in normal and tumor tissues in three different shapes of tumors. Simulations of interstitial fluid transport in a solid tumor demonstrate that the simplifications used in Darcy model affect the interstitial velocity and Brinkman model predicts a lower value for interstitial velocity than the values that Darcy model predicts.

  17. Urban Flow and Pollutant Dispersion Simulation with Multi-scale coupling of Meteorological Model with Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yushi; Poh, Hee Joo

    2014-11-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis has become increasingly important in modern urban planning in order to create highly livable city. This paper presents a multi-scale modeling methodology which couples Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with open source CFD simulation tool, OpenFOAM. This coupling enables the simulation of the wind flow and pollutant dispersion in urban built-up area with high resolution mesh. In this methodology meso-scale model WRF provides the boundary condition for the micro-scale CFD model OpenFOAM. The advantage is that the realistic weather condition is taken into account in the CFD simulation and complexity of building layout can be handled with ease by meshing utility of OpenFOAM. The result is validated against the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Field Tests in Oklahoma City and there is reasonably good agreement between the CFD simulation and field observation. The coupling of WRF- OpenFOAM provide urban planners with reliable environmental modeling tool in actual urban built-up area; and it can be further extended with consideration of future weather conditions for the scenario studies on climate change impact.

  18. Application of the θ-method to a telegraphic model of fluid flow in a dual-porosity medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Calderón, Alfredo; Vivas-Cruz, Luis X.; Herrera-Hernández, Erik César

    2018-01-01

    This work focuses mainly on the study of numerical solutions, which are obtained using the θ-method, of a generalized Warren and Root model that includes a second-order wave-like equation in its formulation. The solutions approximately describe the single-phase hydraulic head in fractures by considering the finite velocity of propagation by means of a Cattaneo-like equation. The corresponding discretized model is obtained by utilizing a non-uniform grid and a non-uniform time step. A simple relationship is proposed to give the time-step distribution. Convergence is analyzed by comparing results from explicit, fully implicit, and Crank-Nicolson schemes with exact solutions: a telegraphic model of fluid flow in a single-porosity reservoir with relaxation dynamics, the Warren and Root model, and our studied model, which is solved with the inverse Laplace transform. We find that the flux and the hydraulic head have spurious oscillations that most often appear in small-time solutions but are attenuated as the solution time progresses. Furthermore, we show that the finite difference method is unable to reproduce the exact flux at time zero. Obtaining results for oilfield production times, which are in the order of months in real units, is only feasible using parallel implicit schemes. In addition, we propose simple parallel algorithms for the memory flux and for the explicit scheme.

  19. Modelling of fluid flow phenomenon in laser+GMAW hybrid welding of aluminum alloy considering three phase coupling and arc plasma shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoxiang; Li, Pengfei; Cao, Qingnan; Hu, Qingxian; Gu, Xiaoyan; Du, Baoshuai

    2018-03-01

    The present study aims to develop a unified three dimensional numerical model for fiber laser+GMAW hybrid welding, which is used to study the fluid flow phenomena in hybrid welding of aluminum alloy and the influence of laser power on weld pool dynamic behavior. This model takes into account the coupling of gas, liquid and metal phases. Laser heat input is described using a cone heat source model with changing peak power density, its height being determined based on the keyhole size. Arc heat input is modeled as a double ellipsoid heat source. The arc plasma flow and droplet transfer are simulated through the two simplified models. The temperature and velocity fields for different laser powers are calculated. The computed results are in general agreement with the experimental data. Both the peak and average values of fluid flow velocity during hybrid welding are much higher than those of GMAW. At a low level of laser power, both the arc force and droplet impingement force play a relatively large role on fluid flow in the hybrid welding. Keyhole depth always oscillates within a range. With an increase in laser power, the weld pool behavior becomes more complex. An anti-clockwise vortex is generated and the stability of keyhole depth is improved. Besides, the effects of laser power on different driving forces of fluid flow in weld pool are also discussed.

  20. Chaotic-Dynamical Conceptual Model to Describe Fluid Flow and Contaminant Transport in a Fractured Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faybishenko, Boris; Doughty, Christine; Geller, Jil T.

    1999-01-01

    DOE faces the remediation of numerous contaminated sites, such as those at Hanford, INEEL, LLNL, and LBNL, where organic and/or radioactive wastes were intentionally or accidentally released to the vadose zone from surface spills, underground tanks, cribs, shallow ponds, and deep wells. Migration of these contaminants through the vadose zone has led to the contamination of (or threatens to contaminate) underlying groundwater. A key issue in choosing a corrective action plan to clean up contaminated sites is the determination of the location, total mass, mobility and travel time to receptors for contaminants moving in the vadose zone. These problems are difficult to solve in a technically defensible and accurate manner because contaminants travel downward intermittently, through narrow pathways, driven by variations in environmental conditions. These preferential flow pathways can be difficult to find and predict. The primary objective of this project is to determine if and when dynamical chaos theory can be used to investigate infiltration of fluid and contaminant transport in heterogeneous soils and fractured rocks. The objective of this project is being achieved through the following activities: Development of multi scale conceptual models and mathematical and numerical algorithms for flow and transport, which incorporate both (a) the spatial variability of heterogeneous porous and fractured media and (b) the temporal dynamics of flow and transport; Development of appropriate experimental field and laboratory techniques needed to detect diagnostic parameters for chaotic behavior of flow; Evaluation of chaotic behavior of flow in laboratory and field experiments using methods from non-linear dynamics; Evaluation of the impact these dynamics may have on contaminant transport through heterogeneous fractured rocks and soils and remediation efforts. This approach is based on the consideration of multi scale spatial heterogeneity and flow phenomena that are affected by

  1. Advances in fluid modeling and turbulence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Akira; Ninokata, Hisashi; Tanaka, Nobukazu

    2002-01-01

    The context of this book consists of four fields: Environmental Fluid Mechanics; Industrial Fluid Mechanics; Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics; and Turbulence Measurements. Environmental Fluid Mechanics includes free surface flows in channels, rivers, seas, and estuaries. It also discusses wind engineering issues, ocean circulation model and dispersion problems in atmospheric, water and ground water environments. In Industrial Fluid Mechanics, fluid phenomena in energy exchanges, modeling of turbulent two- or multi-phase flows, swirling flows, flows in combustors, variable density flows and reacting flows, flows in turbo-machines, pumps and piping systems, and fluid-structure interaction are discussed. In Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, progress in modeling turbulent flows and heat/mass transfers, computational fluid dynamics/numerical techniques, parallel computing algorithms, applications of chaos/fractal theory in turbulence are reported. In Turbulence Measurements, experimental studies of turbulent flows, experimental and post-processing techniques, quantitative and qualitative flow visualization techniques are discussed. Separate abstracts were presented for 15 of the papers in this issue. The remaining 89 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  2. Non-Newtonian fluid flow in 2D fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, L.; Håkansson, U.; Cvetkovic, V.

    2017-12-01

    Modeling of non-Newtonian fluid (e.g., drilling fluids and cement grouts) flow in fractured rocks is of interest in many geophysical and industrial practices, such as drilling operations, enhanced oil recovery and rock grouting. In fractured rock masses, the flow paths are dominated by fractures, which are often represented as discrete fracture networks (DFN). In the literature, many studies have been devoted to Newtonian fluid (e.g., groundwater) flow in fractured rock using the DFN concept, but few works are dedicated to non-Newtonian fluids.In this study, a generalized flow equation for common non-Newtonian fluids (such as Bingham, power-law and Herschel-Bulkley) in a single fracture is obtained from the analytical solutions for non-Newtonian fluid discharge between smooth parallel plates. Using Monte Carlo sampling based on site characterization data for the distribution of geometrical features (e.g., density, length, aperture and orientations) in crystalline fractured rock, a two dimensional (2D) DFN model is constructed for generic flow simulations. Due to complex properties of non-Newtonian fluids, the relationship between fluid discharge and the pressure gradient is nonlinear. A Galerkin finite element method solver is developed to iteratively solve the obtained nonlinear governing equations for the 2D DFN model. Using DFN realizations, simulation results for different geometrical distributions of the fracture network and different non-Newtonian fluid properties are presented to illustrate the spatial discharge distributions. The impact of geometrical structures and the fluid properties on the non-Newtonian fluid flow in 2D DFN is examined statistically. The results generally show that modeling non-Newtonian fluid flow in fractured rock as a DFN is feasible, and that the discharge distribution may be significantly affected by the geometrical structures as well as by the fluid constitutive properties.

  3. Fluid flow nozzle energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Winn, Tyler; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Power generation schemes that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce about 1 Watt average power with long-life (decades) are actively being developed. A variety of proposed energy harvesting schemes could be used to extract energy from this environment but each of these has their own limitations that limit their practical use. Since vibrating piezoelectric structures are solid state and can be driven below their fatigue limit, harvesters based on these structures are capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades); thereby, possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. An initial survey [1] identified that spline nozzle configurations can be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to convert the abundant flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. This paper presents current flow energy harvesting designs and experimental results of specific spline nozzle/ bimorph design configurations which have generated suitable power per nozzle at or above well production analogous flow rates. Theoretical models for non-dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical model are also presented in this paper to optimize the flow harvesting system.

  4. Poiseuille equation for steady flow of fractal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2016-07-01

    Fractal fluid is considered in the framework of continuous models with noninteger dimensional spaces (NIDS). A recently proposed vector calculus in NIDS is used to get a description of fractal fluid flow in pipes with circular cross-sections. The Navier-Stokes equations of fractal incompressible viscous fluids are used to derive a generalization of the Poiseuille equation of steady flow of fractal media in pipe.

  5. Numerical Modelling of Non-Newtonian Fluid in a Rotational Cross-Flow MBR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Ratkovic, Nicolas Rios; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Fouling is the main bottleneck of the widespread of MBR systems. One way to decrease and/or control fouling is by process hydrodynamics. This can be achieved by the increase of liquid crossflow velocity. In rotational cross-flow MBR systems, this is attained by the spinning of e.g. impellers. Val...

  6. An investigation of deformation and fluid flow at subduction zones using newly developed instrumentation and finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonte, Alison Louise

    Detecting seafloor deformation events in the offshore convergent margin environment is of particular importance considering the significant seismic hazard at subduction zones. Efforts to gain insight into the earthquake cycle have been made at the Cascadia and Costa Rica subduction margins through recent expansions of onshore GPS and seismic networks. While these studies have given scientists the ability to quantify and locate slip events in the seismogenic zone, there is little technology available for adequately measuring offshore aseismic slip. This dissertation introduces an improved flow meter for detecting seismic and aseismic deformation in submarine environments. The value of such hydrologic measurements for quantifying the geodetics at offshore margins is verified through a finite element modeling (FEM) study in which the character of deformation in the shallow subduction zone is determined from previously recorded hydrologic events at the Costa Rica Pacific margin. Accurately sensing aseismic events is one key to determining the stress state in subduction zones as these slow-slip events act to load or unload the seismogenic zone during the interseismic period. One method for detecting seismic and aseismic strain events is to monitor the hydrogeologic response to strain events using fluid flow meters. Previous instrumentation, the Chemical Aqueous Transport (CAT) meter which measures flow rates through the sediment-water interface, can detect transient events at very low flowrates, down to 0.0001 m/yr. The CAT meter performs well in low flow rate environments and can capture gradual changes in flow rate, as might be expected during ultra slow slip events. However, it cannot accurately quantify high flow rates through fractures and conduits, nor does it have the temporal resolution and accuracy required for detecting transient flow events associated with rapid deformation. The Optical Tracer Injection System (OTIS) developed for this purpose is an

  7. Modeling of fiber orientation in viscous fluid flow with application to self-compacting concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolařík, Filip; Patzák, Bořek

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, unconventional concrete reinforcement is of growing popularity. Especially fiber reinforcement has very wide usage in high performance concretes like "Self Compacting Concrete" (SCC). The design of advanced tailor-made structures made of SCC can take advantage of anisotropic orientation of fibers. Tools for fiber orientation predictions can contribute to design of tailor made structure and allow to develop casting procedures that enable to achieve the desired fiber distribution and orientation. This paper deals with development and implementation of suitable tool for prediction of fiber orientation in a fluid based on the knowledge of the velocity field. Statistical approach to the topic is employed. Fiber orientation is described by a probability distribution of the fiber angle.

  8. Modelling flow and heat transfer around a seated human body by computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Voigt, Lars Peter Kølgaard

    2003-01-01

    A database (http://www.ie.dtu.dk/manikin) containing a detailed representation of the surface geometry of a seated female human body was created from a surface scan of a thermal manikin (minus clothing and hair). The radiative heat transfer coefficient and the natural convection flow around...... of the computational manikin has all surface features of a human being; (2) the geometry is an exact copy of an experimental thermal manikin, enabling detailed comparisons between calculations and experiments....

  9. A Novel Plasma-Based Fluid for Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV): In-Vitro Feasibility Study of Flow Diverter Effects in Aneurysm Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauser, Johanna; Knieps, Marius S; Büsen, Martin; Ding, Andreas; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta; Cattaneo, Giorgio

    2018-02-27

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a commonly used method for in vitro investigation of fluid dynamics in biomedical devices, such as flow diverters for intracranial aneurysm treatment. Since it is limited to transparent blood substituting fluids like water-glycerol mixture, the influence of coagulation and platelet aggregation is neglected. We aimed at the development and the application of a modified platelet rich plasma as a new PIV fluid with blood-like rheological and coagulation properties. In standardized intracranial aneurysm silicone models, the effect of this new PIV plasma on the fluid dynamics before and after flow diverter implantation was evaluated and compared with water-glycerol measurements. The flow diverting effect was strongly dependent on the used fluid, with considerably lower velocities achieved using PIV plasma, despite the same starting viscosity of both fluids. Moreover, triggering coagulation of PIV plasma allowed for intra-aneurysmal clot formation. We presented the first in vitro PIV investigation using a non-Newtonian, clottable PIV plasma, demonstrating a mismatch to a standard PIV fluid and allowing for thrombus formation.

  10. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting in Internal Fluid Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong Jae Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph’s clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well.

  11. Piezoelectric energy harvesting in internal fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Colonius, Tim

    2015-10-14

    We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA) showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph's clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well.

  12. A two-phase debris-flow model that includes coupled evolution of volume fractions, granular dilatancy, and pore-fluid pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, David L.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-fluid pressure plays a crucial role in debris flows because it counteracts normal stresses at grain contacts and thereby reduces intergranular friction. Pore-pressure feedback accompanying debris deformation is particularly important during the onset of debrisflow motion, when it can dramatically influence the balance of forces governing downslope acceleration. We consider further effects of this feedback by formulating a new, depth-averaged mathematical model that simulates coupled evolution of granular dilatancy, solid and fluid volume fractions, pore-fluid pressure, and flow depth and velocity during all stages of debris-flow motion. To illustrate implications of the model, we use a finite-volume method to compute one-dimensional motion of a debris flow descending a rigid, uniformly inclined slope, and we compare model predictions with data obtained in large-scale experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume. Predictions for the first 1 s of motion show that increasing pore pressures (due to debris contraction) cause liquefaction that enhances flow acceleration. As acceleration continues, however, debris dilation causes dissipation of pore pressures, and this dissipation helps stabilize debris-flow motion. Our numerical predictions of this process match experimental data reasonably well, but predictions might be improved by accounting for the effects of grain-size segregation.

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Three-Dimensional Unsteady Turbulent Flow and Excitation Force in Partial Admission Air Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Air turbines are widely used to convert kinetic energy into power output in power engineering. The unsteady performance of air turbines with partial admission not only influences the aerodynamic performance and thermodynamic efficiency of turbine but also generates strong excitation force on blades to impair the turbine safely operating. Based on three-dimensional viscous compressible Navier-stokes equations, the present study employs RNG (Renormalization group k-ε turbulence model with finite volume discretization on air turbine with partial admission. Numerical models of four different admission rates with full annulus are built and analyzed via CFD (computational fluid dynamics modeling unsteady flows. Results indicate that the unsteady time-averaged isentropic efficiency is lower than the steady isentropic efficiency, and this difference rises as unsteady isentropic efficiency fluctuates stronger when the admission rate is reduced. The rotor axial and tangential forces with time are provided for all four admission rates. The low frequency excitation forces generated by partial admission are extraordinarily higher than the high frequency excitation forces by stator wakes.

  14. Basic study on an energy conversion system using boiling two-phase flows of temperature-sensitive magnetic fluid. Theoretical analysis based on thermal nonequilibrium model and flow visualization using ultrasonic echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Kamiyama, Shinichi; Okubo, Masaaki.

    1995-01-01

    Effects of magnetic field on the characteristics of boiling two-phase pipe flow of temperature-sensitive magnetic fluid are clarified in detail both theoretically and experimentally. Firstly, governing equations of two-phase magnetic fluid flow based on the thermal nonequilibrium two-fluid model are presented and numerically solved considering evaporation and condensation between gas- and liquid-phases. Next, behaviour of vapor bubbles is visualized with ultrasonic echo in the region of nonuniform magnetic field. This is recorded and processed with an image processor. As a result, the distributions of void fraction in the two-phase flow are obtained. Furthermore, detailed characteristics of the two-phase magnetic fluid flow are investigated using a small test loop of the new energy conversion system. From the numerical and experimental results, it is known that the precise control of the boiling two-phase flow and bubble generation is possible by using the nonuniform magnetic field effectively. These fundamental studies on the characteristics of two-phase magnetic fluid flow will contribute to the development of the new energy conversion system using a gas-liquid boiling two-phase flow of magnetic fluid. (author)

  15. PORFLO - a continuum model for fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transport in porous media. Model theory, numerical methods, and computational tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runchal, A.K.; Sagar, B.; Baca, R.G.; Kline, N.W.

    1985-09-01

    Postclosure performance assessment of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository in flood basalts at Hanford requires that the processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transport be numerically modeled at appropriate space and time scales. A suite of computer models has been developed to meet this objective. The theory of one of these models, named PORFLO, is described in this report. Also presented are a discussion of the numerical techniques in the PORFLO computer code and a few computational test cases. Three two-dimensional equations, one each for fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transport, are numerically solved in PORFLO. The governing equations are derived from the principle of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in a stationary control volume that is assumed to contain a heterogeneous, anisotropic porous medium. Broad discrete features can be accommodated by specifying zones with distinct properties, or these can be included by defining an equivalent porous medium. The governing equations are parabolic differential equations that are coupled through time-varying parameters. Computational tests of the model are done by comparisons of simulation results with analytic solutions, with results from other independently developed numerical models, and with available laboratory and/or field data. In this report, in addition to the theory of the model, results from three test cases are discussed. A users' manual for the computer code resulting from this model has been prepared and is available as a separate document. 37 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs

  16. An analytical model for the prediction of fluid-elastic forces in a rod bundle subjected to axial flow: theory, experimental validation and application to PWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaud, F.

    1997-01-01

    A model predicting the fluid-elastic forces in a bundle of circular cylinders subjected to axial flow is presented in this paper. Whereas previously published models were limited to circular flow channel, the present one allows to take a rectangular flow external boundary into account. For that purpose, an original approach is derived from the standard method of images. This model will eventually be used to predict the fluid-structure coupling between the flow of primary coolant and a fuel assemblies in PWR nuclear reactors. It is indeed of major importance since the flow is shown to induce quite high damping and could therefore mitigate the incidence of an external load like a seismic excitation on the dynamics of the assemblies. The proposed model is validated on two cases from the literature but still needs further comparisons with the experiments being currently carried out on the EDF set-up. The flow has been shown to induce an approximate 12% damping on a PWR fuel assembly, at nominal reactor conditions. The possible grid effect on the fluid-structure coupling has been neglected so far but will soon be investigated at EDF. (author)

  17. Benchmarking a computational fluid dynamics model of separated flow in a thin rectangular channel for use in predictive design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stovall, T.K.; Crabtree, A.; Felde, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor is being designed to provide a research tool with capabilities beyond those of any existing reactors. One portion of its state-of-the-art design requires high speed fluid flow through narrow channels between the fuel plates in the core. Experience with previous reactors has shown that fuel plate damage can occur when debris becomes lodged at the entrance to these channels. Such debris can disrupt the fluid flow to the plate surfaces and prevent adequate cooling of the fuel. Preliminary ANS designs addressed this issue by providing an unheated entrance length for each fuel plate. In theory, any flow disruption would recover within this unheated length, thus providing adequate heat removal from the downstream heated portions of the fuel plates

  18. Secondary flow in a curved artery model with Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood-analog fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-11-01

    Steady and pulsatile flows of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids through a 180°-curved pipe were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The experiment was inspired by physiological pulsatile flow through large curved arteries, with a carotid artery flow rate imposed. Sodium iodide (NaI) and sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) were added to the working fluids to match the refractive index (RI) of the test section to eliminate optical distortion. Rheological measurements revealed that adding NaI or NaSCN changes the viscoelastic properties of non-Newtonian solutions and reduces their shear-thinning property. Measured centerline velocity profiles in the upstream straight pipe agreed well with an analytical solution. In the pulsatile case, secondary flow structures, i.e. deformed-Dean, Dean, Wall and Lyne vortices, were observed in various cross sections along the curved pipe. Vortical structures at each cross section were detected using the d2 vortex identification method. Circulation analysis was performed on each vortex separately during the systolic deceleration phase, and showed that vortices split and rejoin. Secondary flow structures in steady flows were found to be morphologically similar to those in pulsatile flows for sufficiently high Dean number. supported by the George Washington University Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  19. Integration of two-phase solid fluid equations in a catchment model for flashfloods, debris flows and shallow slope failures

    KAUST Repository

    Bout, B.; Lombardo, Luigi; van Westen, C.J.; Jetten, V.G.

    2018-01-01

    An integrated, modeling method for shallow landslides, debris flows and catchment hydrology is developed and presented in this paper. Existing two-phase debris flow equations and an adaptation on the infinite slope method are coupled with a full

  20. Modeling Temperature Development of Li-ion Battery Packs using Phase Change Materials (PCM) and Fluid Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coman, Paul Tiberiu; Veje, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic model for simulating the heat generation and the impact of Phase Change Materials (PCMs) on the maximum temperature in LiFePO4 battery cells. The model is constructed by coupling a one-dimensional electro-chemical model with a two-dimensional thermal model and fluid...

  1. Radiotracer techniques for measuring fluid flow and calibrating flow meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, E.L.

    1987-08-01

    Radiotracer techniques can be used to measure accurately both gas and liquid flow rates under operating conditions in a wide range of flow systems. They are ideally suited for calibrating flow meters as well as for measuring unmetered flows in industrial plants. Applications of these techniques range from measuring the flows of fuels and process fluids for energy and mass balance studies to measuring the flows of liquid and airborne effluents for pollution control. This report describes the various radiotracer techniques which can be used to measure fluid flows. The range of application and inherent accuracy of each technique is discussed

  2. Measurement-Based Hybrid Fluid-Flow Models for Fast Multi-Scale Simulation and Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sohraby, Khosrow

    2004-01-01

    .... We point out that traditional queuing models are intractable or provide poor fit to real-life networks, while discrete-event simulation at the packet level can consume prohibitive amounts of CPU times...

  3. Overview of heat transfer and fluid flow problem areas encountered in Stirling engine modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Roy C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has been managing Stirling engine development programs for over a decade. In addition to contractual programs, this work has included in-house engine testing and development of engine computer models. Attempts to validate Stirling engine computer models with test data have demonstrated that engine thermodynamic losses need better characterization. Various Stirling engine thermodynamic losses and efforts that are underway to characterize these losses are discussed.

  4. Numerical simulations of natural or mixed convection in vertical channels: comparisons of level-set numerical schemes for the modeling of immiscible incompressible fluid flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research dissertation is at studying natural and mixed convections of fluid flows, and to develop and validate numerical schemes for interface tracking in order to treat incompressible and immiscible fluid flows, later. In a first step, an original numerical method, based on Finite Volume discretizations, is developed for modeling low Mach number flows with large temperature gaps. Three physical applications on air flowing through vertical heated parallel plates were investigated. We showed that the optimum spacing corresponding to the peak heat flux transferred from an array of isothermal parallel plates cooled by mixed convection is smaller than those for natural or forced convections when the pressure drop at the outlet keeps constant. We also proved that mixed convection flows resulting from an imposed flow rate may exhibit unexpected physical solutions; alternative model based on prescribed total pressure at inlet and fixed pressure at outlet sections gives more realistic results. For channels heated by heat flux on one wall only, surface radiation tends to suppress the onset of re-circulations at the outlet and to unify the walls temperature. In a second step, the mathematical model coupling the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the Level-Set method for interface tracking is derived. Improvements in fluid volume conservation by using high order discretization (ENO-WENO) schemes for the transport equation and variants of the signed distance equation are discussed. (author)

  5. The correct Q1D electrodynamical part of a model for the fluid flow in a faraday segmented magnetohydrodynamic generator channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajovic, V.S.

    1995-01-01

    A Faraday ideally segmented (the absence of the Hall electric current I x =0) MHD generator channel, with a weakly ionized plasma as a working fluid, is considered. The magnetic field is applied along the z axis and the working fluid flows along the x axis. The stationary state of the flow and the stationary electric current are considered. The new quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) electrodynamical part of a model is developed. The main assumption (besides j z = 0, E z = 0) taken in the whole working fluid flow, is j x = 0. It means that the bending of the electric current pattern in the working fluid, due to the nonmassive electrodes and the presence of the magnetic field, is not explicitly considered. In the frame of the assumption taken, the legitimacy regarding the equation of conservation of charges: div rvec j = 0 suggests that the straight electric current pattern in the model should be narrow. In other words, it suggests replacing of a rather complicated electric current pattern in a working fluid by an artificially straight and narrow one in the modeling, promising that it would still be possible to describe the global channel parameters - its electrical output, the influence of the shape and the size of the channel on the generator performance etc

  6. Fluid Flow in a Porous Tree-Shaped Network

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    Tree-shaped flow networks connect one point to an infinity of points and are everywhere in Nature. These networks often own minimal flow resistance and vessel sizes obey to scaling power-laws. In this paper presents a model for fluid flow through a tree-shaped network with porous tubes. Hagen–Poiseuille flow is assumed for tubes and Darcy flow for the porous wall.

  7. Coupling a fluid flow simulation with a geomechanical model of a fractured reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Segura Segarra, José María; Paz, C.M.; de Bayser, M.; Zhang, J.; Bryant, P.W.; Gonzalez, Nubia Aurora; Rodrigues, E.; Vargas, P.E.; Carol, Ignacio; Lakshmikantha, Ramasesha Mookanahallipatna; Das, K. C.; Sandha, S.S.; Cerqueira, R.; Mello,, U.

    2013-01-01

    Improving the reliability of integrated reservoir development planning and addressing subsidence, fault reactivation and other environmental impacts, requires increasingly sophisticated geomechanical models, especially in the case of fractured reservoirs where fracture deformation is strongly coupled with its permeability change. Reservoir simulation has historically treated any geomechanical effects by means of a rock compressibility term/table, which can be improved by simulating the actual...

  8. Oscillating flow of a Burgers' fluid in a pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.; Asghar, S.; Hayat, T.

    2005-12-01

    An analysis is made to see the influences of Hall current on the flow of a Burgers' fluid. The velocity field corresponding to flow in a pipe is determined. The closed form analytical solutions for several Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid models can be obtained from the present analysis as the limiting cases. The purpose of this work is twofold. Firstly, to investigate the oscillating flow in a pipe using Burgers? fluid model. Secondly, to see the effects of Hall current on the velocity field. The flow in a pipe is induced due to imposition of an oscillating pressure gradient. An exact analytical solution to the governing problem is given using the Fourier transform technique. The obtained expression for the velocity field shows that there are pronounced effects of Hall and rheological parameters. The considered fluid model is a viscoelastic model and has been used to characterize food products such as cheese, soil, asphalt and asphalt mixes etc. (author)

  9. Geophysical models of heat and fluid flow in damageable poro-elastic continua

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roubíček, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 2 (2017), s. 625-646 ISSN 0935-1175 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03823S; GA ČR GA14-15264S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : poro-elastic rocks * damage * biot model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 2.529, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00161-016-0547-5

  10. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    Methods of automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general and flow topology in particular are discussed. Two-dimensional vector field topology is reviewed as the basis for the examination of topology in three-dimensional separated flows. The use of tangent surfaces and clipping in visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows is addressed.

  11. COUPLED CHEMOTAXIS FLUID MODEL

    KAUST Repository

    LORZ, ALEXANDER

    2010-01-01

    We consider a model system for the collective behavior of oxygen-driven swimming bacteria in an aquatic fluid. In certain parameter regimes, such suspensions of bacteria feature large-scale convection patterns as a result of the hydrodynamic

  12. Slip analysis of squeezing flow using doubly stratified fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Farooq, M.; Javed, M.; Anjum, Aisha

    2018-06-01

    The non-isothermal flow is modeled and explored for squeezed fluid. The influence of velocity, thermal and solutal slip effects on transport features of squeezed fluid are analyzed through Darcy porous channel when fluid is moving due to squeezing of upper plate towards the stretchable lower plate. Dual stratification effects are illustrated in transport equations. A similarity analysis is performed and reduced governing flow equations are solved using moderated and an efficient convergent approach i.e. Homotopic technique. The significant effects of physical emerging parameters on flow velocity, temperature and fluid concentration are reporting through various plots. Graphical explanations for drag force, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are stated and examined. The results reveal that minimum velocity field occurs near the plate, whereas it increases far away from the plate for strong velocity slip parameter. Furthermore, temperature and fluid concentration significantly decreases with increased slip effects. The current analysis is applicable in some advanced technological processes and industrial fluid mechanics.

  13. Aspects of developed heat and mass flux models on 3D flow of Eyring-Powell fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanzila Hayat

    Full Text Available The variable thermal conductivity impacts and generalized Fourier’s and Fick’s laws over an exponentially stretching surface are reported in this paper. Another heat flux idea involving mystery of heat conduction is exploited which is not quite the same as the usual literature. Such idea has been utilized as a part of perspective of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux theory. The characteristic of temperature and concentration relaxation features are described. Other than this, chemical reactions are additionally considered.To solve the system of six highly non-linear coupled differential equations, a numerical technique bvp4c is adopted. The skin friction coefficient for three dimensional Eyring-Powell fluid model is calculated. From the present analysis we observe that the temperature and concentration profiles declines for higher values of thermal and concentration relaxation parameters. Also, for higher values of strength of reaction parameters, the concentration profile decreases. Current effort for three dimensional Cattaneo-Christov double diffusion and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions over an exponentially stretching surface does not yet exist in the literature. Keywords: Three dimensional flow, Cattaneo-Christov double diffusion, Homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions, Variable thermal conductivity, Exponentially stretching surface

  14. Acoustic geometry for general relativistic barotropic irrotational fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Matt; Molina-ParIs, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    'Acoustic spacetimes', in which techniques of differential geometry are used to investigate sound propagation in moving fluids, have attracted considerable attention over the last few decades. Most of the models currently considered in the literature are based on non-relativistic barotropic irrotational fluids, defined in a flat Newtonian background. The extension, first to special relativistic barotropic fluid flow and then to general relativistic barotropic fluid flow in an arbitrary background, is less straightforward than it might at first appear. In this paper, we provide a pedagogical and simple derivation of the general relativistic 'acoustic spacetime' in an arbitrary (d+1)-dimensional curved-space background.

  15. Computational modelling in fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauguel, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modelling of the greatest part of environmental or industrial flow problems gives very similar types of equations. The considerable increase in computing capacity over the last ten years consequently allowed numerical models of growing complexity to be processed. The varied group of computer codes presented are now a complementary tool of experimental facilities to achieve studies in the field of fluid mechanics. Several codes applied in the nuclear field (reactors, cooling towers, exchangers, plumes...) are presented among others [fr

  16. Conjugate Compressible Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    A computational approach to modeling transient, compressible fluid flow with heat transfer in long, narrow ducts is presented. The primary application of the model is for analyzing fluid flow and heat transfer in solid propellant rocket motor nozzle joints during motor start-up, but the approach is relevant to a wide range of analyses involving rapid pressurization and filling of ducts. Fluid flow is modeled through solution of the spatially one-dimensional, transient Euler equations. Source terms are included in the governing equations to account for the effects of wall friction and heat transfer. The equation solver is fully-implicit, thus providing greater flexibility than an explicit solver. This approach allows for resolution of pressure wave effects on the flow as well as for fast calculation of the steady-state solution when a quasi-steady approach is sufficient. Solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with source terms significantly reduces computational run times compared to general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages solving the Navier-Stokes equations with resolved boundary layers. In addition, conjugate heat transfer is more readily implemented using the approach described in this paper than with most general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages. The compressible flow code has been integrated with a transient heat transfer solver to analyze heat transfer between the fluid and surrounding structure. Conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solutions are presented. The author is unaware of any previous work available in the open literature which uses the same approach described in this paper.

  17. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3 mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67 kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3 mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7 mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  18. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  19. Brownian motion in a flowing fluid revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown how the phenomenon of osmosis may be treated using the phenomenological theory of Brownian motion in a flowing fluid. The theory is also generalized to include viscous stresses in the particle and mixture momentum equations

  20. Fluid Mechanics An Introduction to the Theory of Fluid Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Durst, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Advancements of fluid flow measuring techniques and of computational methods have led to new ways to treat laminar and turbulent flows. These methods are extensively used these days in research and engineering practise. This also requires new ways to teach the subject to students at higher educational institutions in an introductory manner. The book provides the knowledge to students in engineering and natural science needed to enter fluid mechanics applications in various fields. Analytical treatments are provided, based on the Navier-Stokes equations. Introductions are also given into numerical and experimental methods applied to flows. The main benefit the reader will derive from the book is a sound introduction into all aspects of fluid mechanics covering all relevant subfields.

  1. Simulation of uncompressible fluid flow through a porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (SEPI-ESIQIE-IPN), Unidad Profesional Zacatenco, Laboratorio de Analisis Met. (Edif. ' Z' y Edif. ' 6' P.B.), Mexico City (Mexico)], E-mail: adaramil@yahoo.com.mx; Gonzalez, J.L. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (SEPI-ESIQIE-IPN), Unidad Profesional Zacatenco, Laboratorio de Analisis Met. (Edif. ' Z' y Edif. ' 6' P.B.), Mexico City (Mexico); Carrillo, F. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (SEPI-CICATA-IPN), Unidad Altamira Tamaulipas, Mexico (Mexico); Lopez, S. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (I.M.P.-D.F.), Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-02-28

    Recently, a great interest has been focused for investigations about transport phenomena in disordered systems. One of the most treated topics is fluid flow through anisotropic materials due to the importance in many industrial processes like fluid flow in filters, membranes, walls, oil reservoirs, etc. In this work is described the formulation of a 2D mathematical model to simulate the fluid flow behavior through a porous media (PM) based on the solution of the continuity equation as a function of the Darcy's law for a percolation system; which was reproduced using computational techniques reproduced using a random distribution of the porous media properties (porosity, permeability and saturation). The model displays the filling of a partially saturated porous media with a new injected fluid showing the non-defined advance front and dispersion of fluids phenomena.

  2. Simulation of uncompressible fluid flow through a porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, J.L.; Carrillo, F.; Lopez, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a great interest has been focused for investigations about transport phenomena in disordered systems. One of the most treated topics is fluid flow through anisotropic materials due to the importance in many industrial processes like fluid flow in filters, membranes, walls, oil reservoirs, etc. In this work is described the formulation of a 2D mathematical model to simulate the fluid flow behavior through a porous media (PM) based on the solution of the continuity equation as a function of the Darcy's law for a percolation system; which was reproduced using computational techniques reproduced using a random distribution of the porous media properties (porosity, permeability and saturation). The model displays the filling of a partially saturated porous media with a new injected fluid showing the non-defined advance front and dispersion of fluids phenomena.

  3. Method and device for measuring fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, R.; Marinkovich, P.S.; Spadaro, P.R.; Stout, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    The invention is a fluid flow measuring device for determining the coolant flow at the entrance to a specific nuclear reactor fuel region. The device comprises a plurality of venturis having the upstream inlet and throat pressure of each respectively manifolded together to provide one static pressure signal for each region monitored. The device provides accurate flow measurement with low pressure losses and uniform entrance and discharge flow distribution. 1 claim, 7 figures

  4. Complex fluids modeling and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Saramito, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive overview of the modeling of complex fluids, including many common substances, such as toothpaste, hair gel, mayonnaise, liquid foam, cement and blood, which cannot be described by Navier-Stokes equations. It also offers an up-to-date mathematical and numerical analysis of the corresponding equations, as well as several practical numerical algorithms and software solutions for the approximation of the solutions. It discusses industrial (molten plastics, forming process), geophysical (mud flows, volcanic lava, glaciers and snow avalanches), and biological (blood flows, tissues) modeling applications. This book is a valuable resource for undergraduate students and researchers in applied mathematics, mechanical engineering and physics.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modeling patterns and force characteristics of flow over in-line four square cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yidan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow over four square cylinders in an in-line, square arrangement was numerically investigated by using the finite volume method with CFD techniques. The working fluid is an incompressible ideal gas. The length of the sides of the array, L, is equal. The analysis is carried out for a Reynolds number of 300, with center-to-center distance ratios, L/D, ranging from 1.5 to 8.0. To fully understand the flow mechanism, details in terms of lift and drag coefficients and Strouhal numbers of the unsteady wake frequencies are analyzed, and the vortex shedding patterns around the four square cylinders are described. It is concluded that L/D has important effects on the drag and lift coefficients, vortex shedding frequencies, and flow field characteristics.

  6. Statistically derived conservation equations for fluid particle flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, J.N. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of water droplets in a heated nuclear fuel channel is of significant interest to nuclear reactor safety studies pertaining to loss-of-coolant accidents. This paper presents the derivation of the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations for a distribution of fluid particles (bubbles or droplets) transported by a continuous fluid medium. When coupled with the appropriate closure equations, the conservation equations can be used to model nonequilibrium, two-phase, dispersed, fluid flow behavior

  7. Efficient simulations of fluid flow coupled with poroelastic deformations in pleated filters

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.; Iliev, Dimitar; Iliev, Oleg; Kirsch, Ralf; Lakdawala, Zahra; Printsypar, Galina

    2015-01-01

    model describes a free fluid flow coupled with a flow in porous media in a domain that contains the filtering media. To discretize the complex computational domain we use quadrilateral boundary fitted grids which resolve porous-fluid interfaces

  8. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.E.; Thomas, D.G.

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  9. Identification and control of factors influencing flow-accelerated corrosion in HRSG units using computational fluid dynamics modeling, full-scale air flow testing, and risk analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrowski, Ronald L. [The Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2010-11-15

    In 2009, Consolidated Edison's East River heat recovery steam generator units 10 and 20 both experienced economizer tube failures which forced each unit offline. Extensive inspections indicated that the primary failure mechanism was flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC). The inspections revealed evidence of active FAC in all 7 of the economizer modules, with the most advanced stages of degradation being noted in center modules. Analysis determined that various factors were influencing and enabling this corrosion mechanism. Computational fluid dynamics and full-scale air flow testing showed very turbulent feedwater flow prevalent in areas of the modules corresponding with the pattern of FAC damage observed through inspection. It also identified preferential flow paths, with higher flow velocities, in certain tubes directly under the inlet nozzles. A FAC risk analysis identified more general susceptibility to FAC in the areas experiencing damage due to feedwater pH, operating temperatures, local shear fluid forces, and the chemical composition of the original materials of construction. These, in combination, were the primary root causes of the failures. Corrective actions were identified, analyzed, and implemented, resulting in equipment replacements and repairs. (orig.)

  10. Thermo-Fluid Dynamics of Two-Phase Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Mamrou

    2011-01-01

    "Thermo-fluid Dynamics of Two-Phase Flow, Second Edition" is focused on the fundamental physics of two-phase flow. The authors present the detailed theoretical foundation of multi-phase flow thermo-fluid dynamics as they apply to: Nuclear reactor transient and accident analysis; Energy systems; Power generation systems; Chemical reactors and process systems; Space propulsion; Transport processes. This edition features updates on two-phase flow formulation and constitutive equations and CFD simulation codes such as FLUENT and CFX, new coverage of the lift force model, which is of part

  11. Influence of nanostructural environment and fluid flow on osteoblast-like cell behavior: a model for cell-mechanics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodanov, L; Semeins, C M; van Loon, J J W A; te Riet, J; Jansen, J A; Klein-Nulend, J; Walboomers, X F

    2013-05-01

    Introducing nanoroughness on various biomaterials has been shown to profoundly effect cell-material interactions. Similarly, physical forces act on a diverse array of cells and tissues. Particularly in bone, the tissue experiences compressive or tensile forces resulting in fluid shear stress. The current study aimed to develop an experimental setup for bone cell behavior, combining a nanometrically grooved substrate (200 nm wide, 50 nm deep) mimicking the collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix, with mechanical stimulation by pulsatile fluid flow (PFF). MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells were assessed for morphology, expression of genes involved in cell attachment and osteoblastogenesis and nitric oxide (NO) release. The results showed that both nanotexture and PFF did affect cellular morphology. Cells aligned on nanotexture substrate in a direction parallel to the groove orientation. PFF at a magnitude of 0.7 Pa was sufficient to induce alignment of cells on a smooth surface in a direction perpendicular to the applied flow. When environmental cues texture and flow were interacting, PFF of 1.4 Pa applied parallel to the nanogrooves initiated significant cellular realignment. PFF increased NO synthesis 15-fold in cells attached to both smooth and nanotextured substrates. Increased collagen and alkaline phosphatase mRNA expression was observed on the nanotextured substrate, but not on the smooth substrate. Furthermore, vinculin and bone sialoprotein were up-regulated after 1 h of PFF stimulation. In conclusion, the data show that interstitial fluid forces and structural cues mimicking extracellular matrix contribute to the final bone cell morphology and behavior, which might have potential application in tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Topological fluid mechanics of Axisymmetric Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    1998-01-01

    Topological fluid mechanics in the sense of the present paper is the study and classification of flow patterns close to a critical point. Here we discuss the topology of steady viscous incompressible axisymmetric flows in the vicinity of the axis. Following previous studies the velocity field v...... to the authors knowledge has not been used systematically to high orders in topological fluid mechanics. We compare the general results with experimental and computational results on the Vogel-Ronneberg flow. We show that the topology changes observed when recirculating bubbles on the vortex axis are created...

  13. Mathematical theory of compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    von Mises, Richard

    2004-01-01

    A pioneer in the fields of statistics and probability theory, Richard von Mises (1883-1953) made notable advances in boundary-layer-flow theory and airfoil design. This text on compressible flow, unfinished upon his sudden death, was subsequently completed in accordance with his plans, and von Mises' first three chapters were augmented with a survey of the theory of steady plane flow. Suitable as a text for advanced undergraduate and graduate students - as well as a reference for professionals - Mathematical Theory of Compressible Fluid Flow examines the fundamentals of high-speed flows, with

  14. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of hot air flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation of air flow distribution, air velocity and pressure field pattern as it will affect moisture transient in a cabinet tray dryer is performed using SolidWorks Flow Simulation (SWFS) 2014 SP 4.0 program. The model used for the drying process in this experiment was designed with Solid ...

  15. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  16. Analysis of the two-fluid model and the drift-flux model for numerical calculation of two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munkejord, Svend Tollak

    2006-05-11

    This thesis analyses models for two-phase flows and methods for the numerical resolution of these models. It is therefore one contribution to the development of reliable design tools for multiphase applications. Such tools are needed and expected by engineers in a range of fields, including in the oil and gas industry. The approximate Riemann solver of Roe has been studied. Roe schemes for three different two-phase flow models have been implemented in the framework of a standard numerical algorithm for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws. The schemes have been analysed by calculation of benchmark tests from the literature, and by comparison with each other. A Roe scheme for the four-equation one-pressure two-fluid model has been implemented, and a second-order extension based on wave decomposition and flux-difference splitting was shown to work well and to give improved results compared to the first-order scheme. The convergence properties of the scheme were tested on smooth and discontinuous solutions. A Roe scheme has been proposed for a five-equation two-pressure two-fluid model with pressure relaxation. The use of analogous numerical methods for the five-equation and four-equation models allowed for a direct comparison of a method with and without pressure relaxation. Numerical experiments demonstrated that the two approaches converged to the same results, but that the five-equation pressure-relaxation method was significantly more dissipative, particularly for contact discontinuities. Furthermore, even though the five-equation model with instantaneous pressure relaxation has real eigenvalues, the calculations showed that it produced oscillations for cases where the four-equation model had complex eigenvalues. A Roe scheme has been constructed for the drift-flux model with general closure laws. For the case of the Zuber-Findlay slip law describing bubbly flows, the Roe matrix is completely analytical. Hence the present Roe scheme is more efficient than

  17. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered.

  18. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigmatulin, R.I.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered

  19. Numerical simulation of travelling wave induced electrothermal fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R; Green, Nicolas G; Wolff, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Many microdevices for manipulating particles and cells use electric fields to produce a motive force on the particles. The movement of particles in non-uniform electric fields is called dielectrophoresis, and the usual method of applying this effect is to pass the particle suspension over a microelectrode structure. If the suspension has a noticeable conductivity, one important side effect is that the electric field drives a substantial conduction current through the fluid, causing localized Joule-heating. The resulting thermal gradient produces local conductivity and permittivity changes in the fluid. Dielectrophoretic forces acting upon these pockets of fluid will then produce motion of both the fluid and the particles. This paper presents a numerical solution of the electrical force and the resulting electrothermal driven fluid flow on a travelling wave structure. This common electrode geometry consists of interdigitated electrodes laid down in a long array, with the phase of the applied potential shifted by 90 0 on each subsequent electrode. The resulting travelling electric field was simulated and the thermal field and electrical body force on the fluid calculated, for devices constructed from two typical materials: silicon and glass. The electrothermal fluid flow in the electrolyte over the electrode array was then numerically simulated. The model predicts that the thermal field depends on the conductivity and applied voltage, but more importantly on the geometry of the system and the material used in the construction of the device. The velocity of the fluid flow depends critically on the same parameters, with slight differences in the thermal field for glass and silicon leading to diametrically opposite flow direction with respect to the travelling field for the two materials. In addition, the imposition of slight external temperature gradients is shown to have a large effect on the fluid flow in the device, under certain conditions leading to a reversal of

  20. Flow and Displacement of Non-Newtonian Fluid(Power-Law Model) by Surface Tension and Gravity Force in Inclined Circular Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moh, Jeong Hah; Cho, Y. I.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the theoretical analysis of a flow driven by surface tension and gravity in an inclined circular tube. A governing equation is developed for describing the displacement of a non-Newtonian fluid(Power-law model) that continuously flows into a circular tube owing to surface tension, which represents a second-order, nonlinear, non-homogeneous, and ordinary differential form. It was found that quantitatively, the theoretical predictions of the governing equation were in excellent agreement with the solutions of the equation for horizontal tubes and the past experimental data. In addition, the predictions compared very well with the results of the force balance equation for steady

  1. An investigation of fluid flow during induction stroke of a water analog model of an IC engine using an innovative optical velocimetry concept: LIPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, Bernd; Falco, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Optical measurements on an axisymmetrical quartz component engine research model were made to evaluate the flow field encountered during induction. The measurement technique is LIPA (Laser Induced Photochemical Anemometry), a non-intrusive velocimetry concept that provides an investigator of fluid flow with a tool to attain planar information about three-dimensional velocity and vorticity vectors in a single measurement step. The goal of this investigation is to further develop this measurement technique and apply it to study the induction stroke of a water analog model of a four-stroke internal combustion engine. The research conducted in the water analog model is a fundamental scientific inquiry into the flow fields that develop in the induction stroke of an engine at idling engine speeds. As this is the first investigation of its kind using LIPA technique, our goal has been to quantify, in a preliminary manner, the flow field features that develop during the intake stroke. In the process a more comprehensive understanding of the flow field features was developed, and tied to the quantification. The study evaluated the flow field of the intake stroke by estimating fields of velocity and vorticity. On the basis of these data, information about fluid dynamics during induction at engine speeds of 10, 20, and 30 RPM (corresponding to 170, 340, and 510 RPM respectively, when air is the flowing medium) for three different valve lifts was obtained. The overall development of the flow field, its energy content (kinetic, fluctuation) for the different settings of the engine parameters, vorticity information, and cyclic variations have been quantified. These have been discussed in terms of mixing performance.

  2. Shroud leakage flow models and a multi-dimensional coupling CFD (computational fluid dynamics) method for shrouded turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Zhengping; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Weihao; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Multi-dimensional coupling simulation is an effective approach for evaluating the flow and aero-thermal performance of shrouded turbines, which can balance the simulation accuracy and computing cost effectively. In this paper, 1D leakage models are proposed based on classical jet theories and dynamics equations, which can be used to evaluate most of the main features of shroud leakage flow, including the mass flow rate, radial and circumferential momentum, temperature and the jet width. Then, the 1D models are expanded to 2D distributions on the interface by using a multi-dimensional scaling method. Based on the models and multi-dimensional scaling, a multi-dimensional coupling simulation method for shrouded turbines is developed, in which, some boundary source and sink are set on the interface between the shroud and the main flow passage. To verify the precision, some simulations on the design point and off design points of a 1.5 stage turbine are conducted. It is indicated that the models and methods can give predictions with sufficient accuracy for most of the flow field features and will contribute to pursue deeper understanding and better design methods of shrouded axial turbines, which are the important devices in energy engineering. - Highlights: • Free and wall attached jet theories are used to model the leakage flow in shrouds. • Leakage flow rate is modeled by virtual labyrinth number and residual-energy factor. • A scaling method is applied to 1D model to obtain 2D distributions on interfaces. • A multi-dimensional coupling CFD method for shrouded turbines is proposed. • The proposed coupling method can give accurate predictions with low computing cost.

  3. Resolution of through tubing fluid flow and behind casing fluid flow in multiple completion wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, D.M.

    1977-01-01

    A method is provided for resolving undesired fluid flow in cement channels behind casing in one producing zone of a multi zone completion well operating on gas lift from the fluid flow from lower producing zones in the same well which is contained in production tubing passing through the producing zone being investigated. Gamma rays which are characteristic of the decay of the unstable isotope nitrogen 16 produced by activation of elemental oxygen nuclei comprising the molecular structure of both the tubing fluid flow and the undesired fluid flow are detected in at least two energy bonds at two longitudinally spaced detectors in a well borehole. By appropriately combining the four count rate signals so producing according to predetermined relationships the two fluid flow components in the same direction may be uniquely distinguished on the basis of their differing distances from the gamma ray detectors. 9 claims, 17 figures

  4. Mathematical model of microbicidal flow dynamics and optimization of rheological properties for intra-vaginal drug delivery: Role of tissue mechanics and fluid rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Md Rajib; Camarda, Kyle V; Kieweg, Sarah L

    2015-06-25

    Topically applied microbicide gels can provide a self-administered and effective strategy to prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We have investigated the interplay between vaginal tissue elasticity and the yield-stress of non-Newtonian fluids during microbicide deployment. We have developed a mathematical model of tissue deformation driven spreading of microbicidal gels based on thin film lubrication approximation and demonstrated the effect of tissue elasticity and fluid yield-stress on the spreading dynamics. Our results show that both elasticity of tissue and yield-stress rheology of gel are strong determinants of the coating behavior. An optimization framework has been demonstrated which leverages the flow dynamics of yield-stress fluid during deployment to maximize retention while reaching target coating length for a given tissue elasticity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of orthogonal 2-dimensional numerical code TFC2D for fluid flow with various turbulence models and numerical schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Yeop; In, Wang Kee; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    The development of orthogonal 2-dimensional numerical code is made. The present code contains 9 kinds of turbulence models that are widely used. They include a standard k-{epsilon} model and 8 kinds of low Reynolds number ones. They also include 6 kinds of numerical schemes including 5 kinds of low order schemes and 1 kind of high order scheme such as QUICK. To verify the present numerical code, pipe flow, channel flow and expansion pipe flow are solved by this code with various options of turbulence models and numerical schemes and the calculated outputs are compared to experimental data. Furthermore, the discretization error that originates from the use of standard k-{epsilon} turbulence model with wall function is much more diminished by introducing a new grid system than a conventional one in the present code. 23 refs., 58 figs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  6. Analysis of anisotropic shells containing flowing fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakis, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A general theory for the dynamic analysis of anisotropic thin cylindrical shells containing flowing fluid is presented. The shell may be uniform or non-uniform, provided it is geometrically axially symmetric. This is a finite- element theory, using cylindrical finite elements, but the displacement functions are determined by using classical shell theory. A new solution of the wave equation of the liquid finite element leads to an expression of the fluid pressure, p, as a function of the nodal displacements of the element and three operative forces (inertia, centrifugal and Coriolis) of the moving fluid. (Author) [pt

  7. 3-D pore-scale resolved model for coupled species/charge/fluid transport in a vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Gang; Joshi, Abhijit S.; Dennison, C.R.; Knehr, K.W.; Kumbur, E.C.; Sun Ying

    2012-01-01

    The vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) has emerged as a viable grid-scale energy storage technology that offers cost-effective energy storage solutions for renewable energy applications. In this paper, a novel methodology is introduced for modeling of the transport mechanisms of electrolyte flow, species and charge in the VRFB at the pore scale of the electrodes; that is, at the level where individual carbon fiber geometry and electrolyte flow are directly resolved. The detailed geometry of the electrode is obtained using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and calibrated against experimentally determined pore-scale characteristics (e.g., pore and fiber diameter, porosity, and surface area). The processed XCT data is then used as geometry input for modeling of the electrochemical processes in the VRFB. The flow of electrolyte through the pore space is modeled using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) while the finite volume method (FVM) is used to solve the coupled species and charge transport and predict the performance of the VRFB under various conditions. An electrochemical model using the Butler–Volmer equations is used to provide species and charge coupling at the surfaces of the carbon fibers. Results are obtained for the cell potential distribution, as well as local concentration, overpotential and current density profiles under galvanostatic discharge conditions. The cell performance is investigated as a function of the electrolyte flow rate and external drawing current. The model developed here provides a useful tool for building the structure–property–performance relationship of VRFB electrodes.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of The Dalles Project: Effects of Spill Flow Distribution Between the Washington Shore and the Tailrace Spillwall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Portland District (CENWP) has ongoing work to improve the survival of juvenile salmonids (smolt) migrating past The Dalles Dam. As part of that effort, a spillwall was constructed to improve juvenile egress through the tailrace downstream of the stilling basin. The spillwall was designed to improve smolt survival by decreasing smolt retention time in the spillway tailrace and the exposure to predators on the spillway shelf. The spillwall guides spillway flows, and hence smolt, more quickly into the thalweg. In this study, an existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was modified and used to characterize tailrace hydraulics between the new spillwall and the Washington shore for six different total river flows. The effect of spillway flow distribution was simulated for three spill patterns at the lowest total river flow. The commercial CFD solver, STAR-CD version 4.1, was used to solve the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations together with the k-epsilon turbulence model. Free surface motion was simulated using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique. The model results were used in two ways. First, results graphics were provided to CENWP and regional fisheries agency representatives for use and comparison to the same flow conditions at a reduced-scale physical model. The CFD results were very similar in flow pattern to that produced by the reduced-scale physical model but these graphics provided a quantitative view of velocity distribution. During the physical model work, an additional spill pattern was tested. Subsequently, that spill pattern was also simulated in the numerical model. The CFD streamlines showed that the hydraulic conditions were likely to be beneficial to fish egress at the higher total river flows (120 kcfs and greater, uniform flow distribution). At the lowest flow case, 90 kcfs, it was necessary to use a non-uniform distribution. Of the three distributions tested, splitting the flow evenly between

  9. Characterization and modelling of fluid flows in fissured and fractured media. relation with hydrothermal alterations and paleo-stress quantification; Caracterisation et modelisation des ecoulements fluides en milieu fissure. relation avec les alterations hydrothermales et quantification des paleocontraintes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sausse, J.

    1998-10-15

    the modelization of the space-time evolution of the Brezouard granite crack permeability during fluid-rock interactions. The two used permeability models (geometrical or statistical) remain very dependent on the definition of the characteristic opening of fracture or fissure. Real fractures in a rocky mass are characterised by non parallel, flat and thus overlapped walls. The study of these natural fracture surfaces at micro and macroscopic scale is completed by a theoretical modelization of their hydro-mechanical behaviour. This work indicates the influence of the surface roughness on the fluid flow as well as the propagation of the alteration. These fractures were formed and percolated under a particular tectonic regime that controls their orientation. Numerous quartz veins in the Soultz granite are opened and sealed during the Oligocene extension. The characteristic fluid pressure of these opening - sealing stages are quantified thanks to fluid inclusion studies. These inclusions are located in secondary quartz which seal the veins. A new method of paleo-stress quantification is proposed, based on the knowledge of this fluid pressure. It takes i) the geometrical distribution of the vein poles, ii) some empirical considerations of rupture criteria, and iii) the fluid pressures into account. (author)

  10. Two-fluid equilibria with flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.

    1999-01-01

    The formalism is developed for flowing two-fluid equilibria. The equilibrium system is governed by a pair of second order partial differential equations for the magnetic stream function and the ion stream function plus a Bernoulli-like equation for the density. There are six arbitrary surface function. There are separate characteristic surfaces for each species, which are the guiding-center surfaces. This system is a generalization of the familiar Grad-Shafranov system for a single-fluid equilibrium without flow, which has only one equation and two arbitrary surface functions. In the case of minimum energy equilibria, the six surface functions take on particular forms. (author)

  11. Two-fluid model of two-phase flow in a pin bundle of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, T.C.; Ishii, M.

    1980-01-01

    By considering two-phase flow as a field which is subdivided into two turbulent single-phase regions with moving boundaries separating the two constituent phases, such that the differential balances for three-dimensional turbulent flow hold for each subregion and for the interface, we perform the Eulerian area averaging over the cross-sectional area of each phase in a given channel and segment averaging of transverse momentum equation along the phase intercepts at the interchannel boundaries. To simplify the governing equations obtained as a result of these operations, we invoke the assumption that the motion of the fluid in each phase is dominantly in axial direction, that is the transverse components of velocity are small compared to axial components. We further assume that the variation of axial component of velocity within a channel is much stronger than the variation along the axial direction. We also assume that similar arguments can also be applied to the variation of enthalpy in a channel. As a result of these considerations, we obtain two sets of continuity, momentum, and energy equations describing motion of each phase in the axial direction. The phasic interaction terms which appear in these equations are governed by interfacial transfer conditions obtained from interface balances. The segment-averaged transverse-momentum equation for each phase provides the governing equation for cross flow. (author)

  12. Optimum solar collector fluid flow rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Shah, Louise Jivan

    1996-01-01

    Experiments showed that by means of a standard electronically controlled pump, type UPE 2000 from Grundfos it is possible to control the flow rate in a solar collector loop in such a way that the flow rate is strongly influenced by the temperature of the solar collector fluid passing the pump....... The flow rate is increasing for increasing temperature.The flow rate at the high temperature level is typically 70 % greater than the flow rate at the low temperature level.Further, the energy consumption for the electronically controlled pump in a solar heating system will be somewhat smaller than...... the energy consumption of a normal ciculation pump in the solar heating system.Calculations showed that the highest thermal performances for small SDHW systems based on mantle tanks with constant volume flow rates in the solar collector loops are achieved if the flow rate is situated in the interval from 0...

  13. Integration of two-phase solid fluid equations in a catchment model for flashfloods, debris flows and shallow slope failures

    KAUST Repository

    Bout, B.

    2018-04-09

    An integrated, modeling method for shallow landslides, debris flows and catchment hydrology is developed and presented in this paper. Existing two-phase debris flow equations and an adaptation on the infinite slope method are coupled with a full hydrological catchment model. We test the approach on the 4 km2 Scaletta catchment, North-Eastern Sicily, where the 1-10-2009 convective storm caused debris flooding after 395 shallow landslides. Validation is done based on the landslide inventory and photographic evidence from the days after the event. Results show that the model can recreate the impact of both shallow landslides, debris flow runout, and debris floods with acceptable accuracy (91 percent inventory overlap with a 0.22 Cohens Kappa). General patterns in slope failure and runout are well-predicted, leading to a fully physically based prediction of rainfall induced debris flood behavior in the downstream areas, such as the creation of a debris fan at the coastal outlet.

  14. Topological fluid dynamics of interfacial flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    1994-01-01

    The topological description of flows in the vicinity of a solid boundary, that is familiar from the aerodynamics literature, has recently been extended to the case of flow at a liquid–gas interface or a free surface by Lugt [Phys. Fluids 30, 3647 (1987)]. Lugt's work is revisited in a more general...... setting, including nonconstant curvature of the interface and gradients of surface tension, using tools of modern nonlinear dynamics. Bifurcations of the flow pattern occur at degenerate configurations. Using the theory of unfolding, this paper gives a complete description of the bifurcations that depend...... on terms up to the second order. The general theory of this paper is applied to the topology of streamlines during the breaking of a wave and to the flow below a stagnant surface film. Physics of Fluids is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  15. Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Calculation Using Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model Flow Measurements in Primary Loop of Coolant in a Pressurized Water Reactor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Farkas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to simulate the thermohydraulic consequences of a main steam line break and to compare the obtained results with Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model (ROCOM 1.1 experimental results. The objective is to utilize data from steady-state mixing experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD calculations to determine the flow distribution and the effect of thermal mixing phenomena in the primary loops for the improvement of normal operation conditions and structural integrity assessment of pressurized water reactors. The numerical model of ROCOM was developed using the FLUENT code. The positions of the inlet and outlet boundary conditions and the distribution of detailed velocity/turbulence parameters were determined by preliminary calculations. The temperature fields of transient calculation were averaged in time and compared with time-averaged experimental data. The perforated barrel under the core inlet homogenizes the flow, and therefore, a uniform temperature distribution is formed in the pressure vessel bottom. The calculated and measured values of lowest temperature were equal. The inlet temperature is an essential parameter for safety assessment. The calculation predicts precisely the experimental results at the core inlet central region. CFD results showed a good agreement (both qualitatively and quantitatively with experimental results.

  16. COUPLED CHEMOTAXIS FLUID MODEL

    KAUST Repository

    LORZ, ALEXANDER

    2010-06-01

    We consider a model system for the collective behavior of oxygen-driven swimming bacteria in an aquatic fluid. In certain parameter regimes, such suspensions of bacteria feature large-scale convection patterns as a result of the hydrodynamic interaction between bacteria. The presented model consist of a parabolicparabolic chemotaxis system for the oxygen concentration and the bacteria density coupled to an incompressible Stokes equation for the fluid driven by a gravitational force of the heavier bacteria. We show local existence of weak solutions in a bounded domain in d, d = 2, 3 with no-flux boundary condition and in 2 in the case of inhomogeneous Dirichlet conditions for the oxygen. © 2010 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  17. CFD Simulation and Experimental Validation of Fluid Flow and Particle Transport in a Model of Alveolated Airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoshun; Ruwet, Vincent; Corieri, Patricia; Theunissen, Raf; Riethmuller, Michel; Darquenne, Chantal

    2009-05-01

    Accurate modeling of air flow and aerosol transport in the alveolated airways is essential for quantitative predictions of pulmonary aerosol deposition. However, experimental validation of such modeling studies has been scarce. The objective of this study is to validate CFD predictions of flow field and particle trajectory with experiments within a scaled-up model of alveolated airways. Steady flow (Re = 0.13) of silicone oil was captured by particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the trajectories of 0.5 mm and 1.2 mm spherical iron beads (representing 0.7 to 14.6 mum aerosol in vivo) were obtained by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). At twelve selected cross sections, the velocity profiles obtained by CFD matched well with those by PIV (within 1.7% on average). The CFD predicted trajectories also matched well with PTV experiments. These results showed that air flow and aerosol transport in models of human alveolated airways can be simulated by CFD techniques with reasonable accuracy.

  18. Simulation of swimming strings immersed in a viscous fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Xi; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2006-11-01

    In nature, many phenomena involve interactions between flexible bodies and their surrounding viscous fluid, such as a swimming fish or a flapping flag. The intrinsic dynamics is complicate and not well understood. A flexible string can be regarded as a one-dimensional flag model. Many similarities can be found between the flapping string and swimming fish, although different wake speed results in a drag force for the flapping string and a propulsion force for the swimming fish. In the present study, we propose a mathematical formulation for swimming strings immersed in a viscous fluid flow. Fluid motion is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations and a momentum forcing is added in order to bring the fluid to move at the same velocity with the immersed surface. A flexible inextensible string model is described by another set of equations with an additional momentum forcing which is a result of the fluid viscosity and the pressure difference across the string. The momentum forcing is calculated by a feedback loop. Simulations of several numerical examples are carried out, including a hanging string which starts moving under gravity without ambient fluid, a swinging string immersed in a quiescent viscous fluid, a string swimming within a uniform surrounding flow, and flow over two side-by-side strings. The numerical results agree well with the theoretical analysis and previous experimental observations. Further simulation of a swimming fish is under consideration.

  19. Interfacial Fluid Mechanics A Mathematical Modeling Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ajaev, Vladimir S

    2012-01-01

    Interfacial Fluid Mechanics: A Mathematical Modeling Approach provides an introduction to mathematical models of viscous flow used in rapidly developing fields of microfluidics and microscale heat transfer. The basic physical effects are first introduced in the context of simple configurations and their relative importance in typical microscale applications is discussed. Then,several configurations of importance to microfluidics, most notably thin films/droplets on substrates and confined bubbles, are discussed in detail.  Topics from current research on electrokinetic phenomena, liquid flow near structured solid surfaces, evaporation/condensation, and surfactant phenomena are discussed in the later chapters. This book also:  Discusses mathematical models in the context of actual applications such as electrowetting Includes unique material on fluid flow near structured surfaces and phase change phenomena Shows readers how to solve modeling problems related to microscale multiphase flows Interfacial Fluid Me...

  20. Fluid flow for chemical and process engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, F

    1995-01-01

    This major new edition of a popular undergraduate text covers topics of interest to chemical engineers taking courses on fluid flow. These topics include non-Newtonian flow, gas-liquid two-phase flow, pumping and mixing. It expands on the explanations of principles given in the first edition and is more self-contained. Two strong features of the first edition were the extensive derivation of equations and worked examples to illustrate calculation procedures. These have been retained. A new extended introductory chapter has been provided to give the student a thorough basis to understand the methods covered in subsequent chapters.

  1. Modelling of fluid flow through short tube orifices under metastable conditions: A new numerical validation approach for evaluating the mass flow rate with refrigerant mixtures (HFC-407C and HFC-410A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Valladares, O.; Santoyo, E.

    2014-01-01

    In a previous work, one-dimensional numerical modelling of fluid-flow inside short tube orifices was performed, and successfully validated against a wide range of mass flow rate measurements reported for the refrigerant HFC-134a. Governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy and entropy were solved for describing the fluid flow under a wide variety of thermodynamic transitions (e.g., subcooled liquid region, metastable liquid region, metastable two-phase region and equilibrium two-phase region), including sudden contraction and enlargement. In this new study, a comprehensive comparison analysis between numerical simulation data and experimental measurements obtained for HFC-407C and HFC-410A refrigerants (N o  = 241) to extend the applicability of the same mathematical model was carried out. Using a widespread statistical analysis, based on weighted linear regressions with an outlier detection/rejection module at 95% of confidence level, the prediction performance of the mathematical model was again assessed. Linear regressions between predicted mass flow rate data and experimental measurements were computed, and used them as a statistical comparison criterion. A statistical comparison between predicted simulation results and mass flow rate experimental data are reported. Average deviation errors of ±11.1% (for the refrigerant HFC-407C) and ±7.3% (for refrigerant HFC-410A) were found between numerical model and experimental data. These results demonstrate a new and robust application of the model to predict reliably the mass flow rate through short tube orifices under metastable conditions, which enable this tool to be reliably used for the design of short tube orifices. - Highlights: •A modelling for evaluating short tube orifice was developed for refrigerant mixtures. •The numerical model applied considered metastable regions and choke flow. •The model was validated against experimental data for HFC-407C and HFC-410A. •Statistical analysis based

  2. An interfacial shear term evaluation study for adiabatic dispersed air–water two-phase flow with the two-fluid model using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S.L., E-mail: sharma55@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Hibiki, T.; Ishii, M. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Schlegel, J.P. [Department of Mining and Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Buchanan, J.R.; Hogan, K.J. [Bettis Laboratory, Naval Nuclear Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA (United States); Guilbert, P.W. [ANSYS UK Ltd, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Closure form of the interfacial shear term in three-dimensional form is investigated. • Assessment against adiabatic upward bubbly air–water flow data using CFD. • Effect of addition of the interfacial shear term on the phase distribution. - Abstract: In commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes such as ANSYS CFX and Fluent, the interfacial shear term is missing in the field momentum equations. The derivation of the two-fluid model (Ishii and Hibiki, 2011) indicates the presence of this term as a momentum source in the right hand side of the field momentum equation. The inclusion of this term is considered important for proper modeling of the interfacial momentum coupling between phases. For separated flows, such as annular flow, the importance of the shear term is understood in the one-dimensional (1-D) form as the major mechanism by which the wall shear is transferred to the gas phase (Ishii and Mishima, 1984). For gas dispersed two-phase flow CFD simulations, it is important to assess the significance of this term in the prediction of phase distributions. In the first part of this work, the closure of this term in three-dimensional (3-D) form in a CFD code is investigated. For dispersed gas–liquid flow, such as bubbly or churn-turbulent flow, bubbles are dispersed in the shear layer of the continuous phase. The continuous phase shear stress is mainly due to the presence of the wall and the modeling of turbulence through the Boussinesq hypothesis. In a 3-D simulation, the continuous phase shear stress can be calculated from the continuous fluid velocity gradient, so that the interfacial shear term can be closed using the local values of the volume fraction and the total stress of liquid phase. This form also assures that the term acts as an action-reaction force for multiple phases. In the second part of this work, the effect of this term on the volume fraction distribution is investigated. For testing the model two

  3. Fluid flow behaviour of gas-condensate and near-miscible fluids at the pore scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawe, Richard A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago); Grattoni, Carlos A. [Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College, London, SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15

    Retrograde condensate reservoir behaviour is complex with much of the detailed mechanisms of the multiphase fluid transport and mass transfer between the phases within the porous matrix still speculative. Visual modelling of selected processes occurring at the pore level under known and controlled boundary conditions can give an insight to fluid displacements at the core scale and help the interpretation of production behaviour at reservoir scale. Visualisation of the pore scale two-phase flow mechanisms has been studied experimentally at low interfacial tensions, < 0.5 mN/m, using a partially miscible fluid system in glass visual micro models. As the interfacial tension decreases the balance between fluid-fluid forces (interfacial, spreading and viscous) and fluid-solid interactions (wettability and viscous interactions) changes. Data measurements in the laboratory, particularly relative permeability, will therefore always be difficult especially for condensate fluids just below their dew point. What is certain is that gas production from a gas-condensate leads to condensate dropout when pressure falls below the dew point, either within the wellbore or, more importantly, in the reservoir. This paper illustrates some pore scale physics, particularly interfacial phenomena at low interfacial tension, which has relevance to appreciating the flow of condensate fluids close to their dew point either near the wellbore (which affects well productivity) or deep inside the reservoir (which affects condensate recovery). (author)

  4. Map of fluid flow in fractal porous medium into fractal continuum flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balankin, Alexander S; Elizarraraz, Benjamin Espinoza

    2012-05-01

    This paper is devoted to fractal continuum hydrodynamics and its application to model fluid flows in fractally permeable reservoirs. Hydrodynamics of fractal continuum flow is developed on the basis of a self-consistent model of fractal continuum employing vector local fractional differential operators allied with the Hausdorff derivative. The generalized forms of Green-Gauss and Kelvin-Stokes theorems for fractional calculus are proved. The Hausdorff material derivative is defined and the form of Reynolds transport theorem for fractal continuum flow is obtained. The fundamental conservation laws for a fractal continuum flow are established. The Stokes law and the analog of Darcy's law for fractal continuum flow are suggested. The pressure-transient equation accounting the fractal metric of fractal continuum flow is derived. The generalization of the pressure-transient equation accounting the fractal topology of fractal continuum flow is proposed. The mapping of fluid flow in a fractally permeable medium into a fractal continuum flow is discussed. It is stated that the spectral dimension of the fractal continuum flow d(s) is equal to its mass fractal dimension D, even when the spectral dimension of the fractally porous or fissured medium is less than D. A comparison of the fractal continuum flow approach with other models of fluid flow in fractally permeable media and the experimental field data for reservoir tests are provided.

  5. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes for sensing unidirectional fluid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiani, Keivan, E-mail: k_kiani@kntu.ac.ir

    2015-05-15

    From applied mechanics points of view, potential application of ensembles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as fluid flow sensors is aimed to be examined. To this end, useful nonlocal analytical and numerical models are developed. The deflection of the ensemble of SWCNTs at the tip is introduced as a measure of its sensitivity. The influences of the length and radius of the SWCNT, intertube distance, fluid flow velocity, and distance of the ensemble from the leading edge of the rigid base on the deflection field of the ensemble are comprehensively examined. The obtained results display how calibration of an ensemble of SWCNTs can be methodically carried out in accordance with the characteristics of the ensemble and the external fluid flow.

  6. Fluid-flow monitoring using electromagnetic probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, R.J.; Lager, D.L.; Laine, E.F.; Salisbury, J.D.; Okada, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    High-frequency electromagnetic probing is used to monitor the rate and direction of flow of fluids injected into the ground. This method shows the potential for providing more detailed information than procedures presently used. The experimental technique and the test-of-concept experimental results are discussed. This technique has applications in oil-reservoir engineering and in hydrology studies concerning storage of chemical and nuclear wastes. 11 figures

  7. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamics micropolar fluid in boundary layer flow past a sphere influenced by magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratomo, Rizky Verdyanto; Widodo, Basuki; Adzkiya, Dieky

    2017-12-01

    Research about fluid flow was very interesting because have a lot of advantages and it can be applied in many aspects of life. The study on fluid flow which is now widely studied is on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). Magnetohydrodynamic is a conductive and electrical in a magnetic field. This paper considers the effect of unsteady magnetic fields on the flow of magneto-hydrodynamic fluid on the boundary layer that flows past a sphere in micropolar fluid influenced by magnetic field. Our approach is as follows. First, we construct a mathematical model and then the system of equations obtained will be solved numerically using the Keller-Box scheme. Then the system is simulated to assess its effect on the fluid flow velocity profile and the profile of microrotation particles. The result of this research indicates, that when the magnetic parameters increase, then velocity profile increases. If material parameters increase, then velocity profile decreases and magnetic parameters increase for n = 0. For n = 0.5, if magnetic parameters increase, then microrotation profile decreases.

  8. A study of multi-phase flow through the cathode side of an interdigitated flow field using a multi-fluid model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Odgaard, Madeleine; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a study of multi-phase flow through the cathode side of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell employing an interdigitated flow field plate. A previously published model has been extended in order to account for phase change kinetics, and a comparison between the interdigitated...... flow field design and a conventional straight channel design has been conducted. It is found that the parasitic pressure drop in the interdigitated design is in the range of a few thousand Pa and could be reduced to a few hundred Pa by choosing diffusion media with high in-plane permeability....... In the interdigitated design more product water is carried out of the cell in the vapor phase compared to the straight channel design which indicates that liquid water management might be less problematic. This effect also leads to the finding that in the interdigitated design more waste heat is carried out of the cell...

  9. Fault-related CO2 degassing, geothermics, and fluid flow in southern California basins---Physiochemical evidence and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boles, James R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Garven, Grant [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2015-08-04

    Our studies have had an important impact on societal issues. Experimental and field observations show that CO2 degassing, such as might occur from stored CO2 reservoir gas, can result in significant stable isotopic disequilibrium. In the offshore South Ellwood field of the Santa Barbara channel, we show how oil production has reduced natural seep rates in the area, thereby reducing greenhouse gases. Permeability is calculated to be ~20-30 millidarcys for km-scale fault-focused fluid flow, using changes in natural gas seepage rates from well production, and poroelastic changes in formation pore-water pressure. In the Los Angeles (LA) basin, our characterization of formation water chemistry, including stable isotopic studies, allows the distinction between deep and shallow formations waters. Our multiphase computational-based modeling of petroleum migration demonstrates the important role of major faults on geological-scale fluid migration in the LA basin, and show how petroleum was dammed up against the Newport-Inglewood fault zone in a “geologically fast” interval of time (less than 0.5 million years). Furthermore, these fluid studies also will allow evaluation of potential cross-formational mixing of formation fluids. Lastly, our new study of helium isotopes in the LA basin shows a significant leakage of mantle helium along the Newport Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ), at flow rates up to 2 cm/yr. Crustal-scale fault permeability (~60 microdarcys) and advective versus conductive heat transport rates have been estimated using the observed helium isotopic data. The NIFZ is an important deep-seated fault that may crosscut a proposed basin decollement fault in this heavily populated area, and appears to allow seepage of helium from the mantle sources about 30 km beneath Los Angeles. The helium study has been widely cited in recent weeks by the news media, both in radio and on numerous web sites.

  10. Fault-Related CO2 Degassing, Geothermics, and Fluid Flow in Southern California Basins--Physiochemical Evidence and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garven, Grant [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2015-08-11

    Our studies have had an important impact on societal issues. Experimental and field observations show that CO2 degassing, such as might occur from stored CO2 reservoir gas, can result in significant stable isotopic disequilibrium. In the offshore South Ellwood field of the Santa Barbara channel, we show how oil production has reduced natural seep rates in the area, thereby reducing greenhouse gases. Permeability is calculated to be ~20-30 millidarcys for km-scale fault-focused fluid flow, using changes in natural gas seepage rates from well production, and poroelastic changes in formation pore-water pressure. In the Los Angeles (LA) basin, our characterization of formation water chemistry, including stable isotopic studies, allows the distinction between deep and shallow formations waters. Our multiphase computational-based modeling of petroleum migration demonstrates the important role of major faults on geological-scale fluid migration in the LA basin, and show how petroleum was dammed up against the Newport-Inglewood fault zone in a “geologically fast” interval of time (less than 0.5 million years). Furthermore, these fluid studies also will allow evaluation of potential cross-formational mixing of formation fluids. Lastly, our new study of helium isotopes in the LA basin shows a significant leakage of mantle helium along the Newport Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ), at flow rates up to 2 cm/yr. Crustal-scale fault permeability (~60 microdarcys) and advective versus conductive heat transport rates have been estimated using the observed helium isotopic data. The NIFZ is an important deep-seated fault that may crosscut a proposed basin decollement fault in this heavily populated area, and appears to allow seepage of helium from the mantle sources about 30 km beneath Los Angeles. The helium study has been widely cited in recent weeks by the news media, both in radio and on numerous web sites.

  11. The influence of tip clearance on performance and internal flow condition of fluid food pump using low viscous fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, S; Ishioka, T; Fukutomi, J; Shigemitsu, T

    2012-01-01

    Fluid machines for fluid food have been used in wide variety of fields i.e. transportation, the filling, and for the improvement of quality of fluid foods. However, flow conditions of it are quite complicated because fluid foods are different from water. Therefore, design methods based on internal flow conditions have not been conducted. In this research, turbo-pumps having a small number of blades were used to decrease shear loss and keep wide flow passage. The influence of the tip clearance was investigated by the numerical analysis using the model with and without the tip clearance. In this paper, the influence of tip clearance on performances and internal flow conditions of turbo-pump using low viscous fluid were clarified by experimental and numerical analysis results. In addition, design methods based on the internal flow were considered. Further, the influences of viscosity on the performance characteristic and internal flow were investigated.

  12. Flow cytometric characterization of cerebrospinal fluid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Marieke T; de Jongste, Arjen H C; Kraan, Jaco; Boonstra, Joke G; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; Gratama, Jan W

    2011-09-01

    Flow cytometry facilitates the detection of a large spectrum of cellular characteristics on a per cell basis, determination of absolute cell numbers and detection of rare events with high sensitivity and specificity. White blood cell (WBC) counts in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are important for the diagnosis of many neurological disorders. WBC counting and differential can be performed by microscopy, hematology analyzers, or flow cytometry. Flow cytometry of CSF is increasingly being considered as the method of choice in patients suspected of leptomeningeal localization of hematological malignancies. Additionally, in several neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis and paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, flow cytometry is commonly performed to obtain insight into the immunopathogenesis of these diseases. Technically, the low cellularity of CSF samples, combined with the rapidly declining WBC viability, makes CSF flow cytometry challenging. Comparison of flow cytometry with microscopic and molecular techniques shows that each technique has its own advantages and is ideally combined. We expect that increasing the number of flow cytometric parameters that can be simultaneously studied within one sample, will further refine the information on CSF cell subsets in low-cellular CSF samples and enable to define cell populations more accurately. Copyright © 2011 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  13. Squeeze flow of a Carreau fluid during sphere impact

    KAUST Repository

    Uddin, J.

    2012-07-19

    We present results from a combined numerical and experimental investigation into the squeeze flow induced when a solid sphere impacts onto a thin, ultra-viscous film of non-Newtonian fluid. We examine both the sphere motion through the liquid as well as the fluid flow field in the region directly beneath the sphere during approach to a solid plate. In the experiments we use silicone oil as the model fluid, which is well-described by the Carreau model. We use high-speed imaging and particle tracking to achieve flow visualisation within the film itself and derive the corresponding velocity fields. We show that the radial velocity either diverges as the gap between the sphere and the wall diminishes (Z tip → 0) or that it reaches a maximum value and then decays rapidly to zero as the sphere comes to rest at a non-zero distance (Z tip = Z min ) away from the wall. The horizontal shear rate is calculated and is responsible for significant viscosity reduction during the approach of the sphere. Our model of this flow, based on lubrication theory, is solved numerically and compared to experimental trials. We show that our model is able to correctly describe the physical features of the flow observed in the experiments.

  14. Squeeze flow of a Carreau fluid during sphere impact

    KAUST Repository

    Uddin, J.; Marston, J. O.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2012-01-01

    We present results from a combined numerical and experimental investigation into the squeeze flow induced when a solid sphere impacts onto a thin, ultra-viscous film of non-Newtonian fluid. We examine both the sphere motion through the liquid as well as the fluid flow field in the region directly beneath the sphere during approach to a solid plate. In the experiments we use silicone oil as the model fluid, which is well-described by the Carreau model. We use high-speed imaging and particle tracking to achieve flow visualisation within the film itself and derive the corresponding velocity fields. We show that the radial velocity either diverges as the gap between the sphere and the wall diminishes (Z tip → 0) or that it reaches a maximum value and then decays rapidly to zero as the sphere comes to rest at a non-zero distance (Z tip = Z min ) away from the wall. The horizontal shear rate is calculated and is responsible for significant viscosity reduction during the approach of the sphere. Our model of this flow, based on lubrication theory, is solved numerically and compared to experimental trials. We show that our model is able to correctly describe the physical features of the flow observed in the experiments.

  15. Thermodynamics of Fluids Under Flow Second Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Jou, David; Criado-Sancho, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This is the second edition of the book “Thermodynamics of Fluids under Flow,” which was published in 2000 and has now been corrected, expanded and updated. This is a companion book to our other title Extended irreversible thermodynamics (D. Jou, J. Casas-Vázquez and G. Lebon, Springer, 4th edition 2010), and of the textbook Understanding non-equilibrium thermodynamics (G. Lebon, D. Jou and J. Casas-Vázquez, Springer, 2008. The present book is more specialized than its counterpart, as it focuses its attention on the non-equilibrium thermodynamics of flowing fluids, incorporating non-trivial thermodynamic contributions of the flow, going beyond local equilibrium theories, i.e., including the effects of internal variables and of external forcing due to the flow. Whereas the book's first edition was much more focused on polymer solutions, with brief glimpses into ideal and real gases, the present edition covers a much wider variety of systems, such as: diluted and concentrated polymer solutions, polymer ble...

  16. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  17. Pulsatile flow of viscous and viscoelastic fluids in constricted tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javadzadegan, A.; Esmaeili, M.; Majidi, S. [University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fakhimghanbarzadeh, B. [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The unsteady flow of blood through stenosed artery, driven by an oscillatory pressure gradient, is studied. An appropriate shape of the time-dependent stenoses which are overlapped in the realm of the formation of arterial narrowing is constructed mathematically. A mathematical model is developed by treating blood as a non-Newtonian fluid characterized by the Oldroyd-B and Cross models. A numerical scheme has been used to solve the unsteady nonlinear Navier- stokes equations in cylindrical coordinate system governing flow, assuming axial symmetry under laminar flow condition so that the problem effectively becomes two-dimensional. Finite difference technique was used to investigate the effects of parameters such as pulsatility, non-Newtonian properties and the flow time on the velocity components, the rate of flow, and the wall shear stress through their graphical representations quantitatively at the end of the paper in order to validate the applicability of the present improved mathematical model under consideration

  18. Pulsatile flow of viscous and viscoelastic fluids in constricted tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadzadegan, A.; Esmaeili, M.; Majidi, S.; Fakhimghanbarzadeh, B.

    2009-01-01

    The unsteady flow of blood through stenosed artery, driven by an oscillatory pressure gradient, is studied. An appropriate shape of the time-dependent stenoses which are overlapped in the realm of the formation of arterial narrowing is constructed mathematically. A mathematical model is developed by treating blood as a non-Newtonian fluid characterized by the Oldroyd-B and Cross models. A numerical scheme has been used to solve the unsteady nonlinear Navier- stokes equations in cylindrical coordinate system governing flow, assuming axial symmetry under laminar flow condition so that the problem effectively becomes two-dimensional. Finite difference technique was used to investigate the effects of parameters such as pulsatility, non-Newtonian properties and the flow time on the velocity components, the rate of flow, and the wall shear stress through their graphical representations quantitatively at the end of the paper in order to validate the applicability of the present improved mathematical model under consideration

  19. [Models for quantification of fluid saturation in two-phase flow system by light transmission method and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Hong; Ye, Shu-Jun; Wu, Ji-Chun

    2014-06-01

    Based on light transmission method in quantification of liquid saturation and its application in two-phase flow system, two groups of sandbox experiments were set up to study the migration of gas or Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) in water saturated porous media. The migration of gas or DNAPL was monitored in the study. Two modified Light Intensity-Saturation (LIS) models for water/gas two-phase system were applied and verified by the experiment data. Moreover two new LIS models for NAPL/water system were developed and applied to simulate the DNAPL infiltration experiment data. The gas injection experiment showed that gas moved upward to the top of the sandbox in the form of 'fingering' and finally formed continuous distribution. The results of DNAPL infiltration experiment showed that TCE mainly moved downward as the result of its gravity, eventually formed irregular plume and accumulated at the bottom of the sandbox. The outcomes of two LIS models for water/gas system (WG-A and WG-B) were consistent to the measured data. The results of two LIS models for NAPL/water system (NW-A and NW-B) fit well with the observations, and Model NW-A based on assumption of individual drainage gave better results. It could be a useful reference for quantification of NAPL/water saturation in porous media system.

  20. Fluid Flow Behaviour under Different Gases and Flow Rate during Gas Metal Arc Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Jaison Peter

    2013-01-01

    Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is a highly efficient and fast process for fabricating high quality weld. High quality welds are fabricated by proper selection of consumable includes gas and filler metals. The optimum flow rate of gas will ensure the proper quality of weld. In this project, a fluid flow behavior of different flow rate is modeled and the change quality will be studied.

  1. One-dimensional two-fluid model for wavy flow beyond the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability: Limit cycles and chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez de Bertodano, Martín, E-mail: bertodan@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Fullmer, William D. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, U. of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)

    2016-12-15

    A 1D TFM numerical simulation of near horizontal stratified two-phase flow is performed where the TFM, including surface tension and viscous stresses, is simplified to a two-equation model using the fixed-flux approximation. As the angle of inclination of the channel increases so does the driving body force, so the flow becomes KH unstable, and waves grow and develop nonlinearities. It is shown that these waves grow until they reach a limit cycle due to viscous dissipation at wave fronts. Upon further inclination of the channel, chaos is observed. The appearance of chaos in a 1D TFM implies a nonlinear process that transfers energy intermittently from long wavelengths where energy is produced to short wavelengths where energy is dissipated by viscosity, so that an averaged energy equilibrium in frequency space is attained. This is comparable to the well-known turbulent stability mechanism of the multi-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations, i.e., chaos implies Lyapunov stability, but in this case it is strictly a two-phase phenomenon.

  2. Aspects of developed heat and mass flux models on 3D flow of Eyring-Powell fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tanzila; Nadeem, S.

    The variable thermal conductivity impacts and generalized Fourier's and Fick's laws over an exponentially stretching surface are reported in this paper. Another heat flux idea involving mystery of heat conduction is exploited which is not quite the same as the usual literature. Such idea has been utilized as a part of perspective of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux theory. The characteristic of temperature and concentration relaxation features are described. Other than this, chemical reactions are additionally considered. To solve the system of six highly non-linear coupled differential equations, a numerical technique bvp4c is adopted. The skin friction coefficient for three dimensional Eyring-Powell fluid model is calculated. From the present analysis we observe that the temperature and concentration profiles declines for higher values of thermal and concentration relaxation parameters. Also, for higher values of strength of reaction parameters, the concentration profile decreases. Current effort for three dimensional Cattaneo-Christov double diffusion and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions over an exponentially stretching surface does not yet exist in the literature.

  3. Numerical simulations of a 3D fluid-structure interaction model for blood flow in an atherosclerotic artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafi, Oualid; Khatib, Nader El; Tiago, Jorge; Sequeira, Adelia

    2017-02-01

    The inflammatory process of atherosclerosis leads to the formation of an atheromatous plaque in the intima of the blood vessel. The plaque rupture may result from the interaction between the blood and the plaque. In each cardiac cycle, blood interacts with the vessel, considered as a compliant nonlinear hyperelastic. A three dimensional idealized fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is constructed to perform the blood-plaque and blood-vessel wall interaction studies. An absorbing boundary condition (BC) is imposed directly on the outflow in order to cope with the spurious reflexions due to the truncation of the computational domain. The difference between the Newtonian and non-Newtonian effects is highlighted. It is shown that the von Mises and wall shear stresses are significantly affected according to the rigidity of the wall. The numerical results have shown that the risk of plaque rupture is higher in the case of a moving wall, while in the case of a fixed wall the risk of progression of the atheromatous plaque is higher.

  4. Cine MR imaging of cerebrospinal fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, K.; Yoshikawa, A.; Maeda, M.; Hamachi, J.; Morita, R.; Mishima, T.; Yamada, R.

    1988-01-01

    Cine MR imaging was used to study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in five patients with various kinds of hydrocephalus, 14 patients with brain atrophy, and 26 healthy subjects. For each study, sagittal and axial sections were obtained. In this study, the authors detected cerebrospinal fluid flow, apparent as high signal intensity, and its direction. They detected the outflow from the foramen of Monro, aqueduct, and foramen of Magendie in sagittal cine images of patients with those with normal-pressure hydrocehalus (NPH), those with brain atrophy, and controls. Especially in patients with NPH, the markedly high signal intensity from CSF flow was observeed in the third and fourth ventricles. In patients with obstructive hydrocephalus, the fourth ventricle tumor, the outflow of CSF was not present. In axial sections, the signal intensity of aqueduct in patients with obstructive hydrocephalus was lower, whereas that in patients with NPH, controls, and those with atrophy was higher than in the midbrain. Cine MR imaging is a very attractive technique in diagnosing hydrocephalus and other abnormal conditions

  5. Fluid flow in a porous medium with transverse permeability discontinuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas; Jin, Chunyu; Rigby, Sean P.

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) velocimetry methods are used to study fully developed axially symmetric fluid flow in a model porous medium of cylindrical symmetry with a transverse permeability discontinuity. Spatial mapping of fluid flow results in radial velocity profiles. High spatial resolution of these profiles allows estimating the slip in velocities at the boundary with a permeability discontinuity zone in a sample. The profiles are compared to theoretical velocity fields for a fully developed axially symmetric flow in a cylinder derived from the Beavers-Joseph [G. S. Beavers and D. D. Joseph, J. Fluid Mech. 30, 197 (1967), 10.1017/S0022112067001375] and Brinkman [H. C. Brinkman, Appl. Sci. Res. A 1, 27 (1947), 10.1007/BF02120313] models. Velocity fields are also computed using pore-scale lattice Boltzmann modeling (LBM) where the assumption about the boundary could be omitted. Both approaches give good agreement between theory and experiment, though LBM velocity fields follow the experiment more closely. This work shows great promise for MRI velocimetry methods in addressing the boundary behavior of fluids in opaque heterogeneous porous media.

  6. Flow acoustics in solid-fluid structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Mads, Mikhail Vladimirovich Deryabin

    2008-01-01

    along the x direction. In the first part of the paper, the governing set of differential equations are derived as well as the imposed boundary conditions. Solutions are provided using Hamilton's equations for the wavenumber vs. frequency as a function of the number and thickness of solid layers......The governing two-dimensional equations of a heterogeneous material composed of a fluid (allowed to flow in the absence of acoustic excitations) and a crystalline piezoelectric cubic solid stacked one-dimensionally (along the z direction) are derived and special emphasis is given to the discussion...

  7. Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) and gamma radiation meter for comparison with and validation and tuning of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeep, Chaminda; Yan, Ru; Mylvaganam, Saba; Vestøl, Sondre; Melaaen, Morten C

    2014-01-01

    The electrical capacitance tomographic (ECT) approach is increasingly seen as attractive for measurement and control applications in the process industries. Recently, there is increased interest in using the tomographic details from ECT for comparing with and validating and tuning CFD models of multiphase flow. Collaboration with researchers working in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flows gives valuable information for both groups of researchers in the field of ECT and CFD. By studying the ECT tomograms of multiphase flows under carefully monitored inflow conditions of the different media and by obtaining the capacitance values, C(i, j, t) with i = 1…N, j = 1, 2,…N and i ≠ j obtained from ECT modules with N electrodes, it is shown how the interface heights in a pipe with stratified flow of oil and air can be fruitfully compared to the values of those obtained from ECT and gamma radiation meter (GRM) for improving CFD modeling. Monitored inflow conditions in this study are flow rates of air, water and oil into a pipe which can be positioned at varying inclinations to the horizontal, thus emulating the pipelines laid in subsea installations. It is found that ECT-based tomograms show most of the features seen in the GRM-based visualizations with nearly one-to-one correspondence to interface heights obtained from these two methods, albeit some anomalies at the pipe wall. However, there are some interesting features the ECT manages to capture: features which the GRM or the CFD modeling apparently do not show, possibly due to parameters not defined in the inputs to the CFD model or much slower response of the GRM. Results presented in this paper indicate that a combination of ECT and GRM and preferably with other modalities with enhanced data fusion and analysis combined with CFD modeling can help to improve the modeling, measurement and control of multiphase flow in the oil and gas industries and in the process industries

  8. Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) and gamma radiation meter for comparison with and validation and tuning of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, Chaminda; Yan, Ru; Vestøl, Sondre; Melaaen, Morten C.; Mylvaganam, Saba

    2014-07-01

    The electrical capacitance tomographic (ECT) approach is increasingly seen as attractive for measurement and control applications in the process industries. Recently, there is increased interest in using the tomographic details from ECT for comparing with and validating and tuning CFD models of multiphase flow. Collaboration with researchers working in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flows gives valuable information for both groups of researchers in the field of ECT and CFD. By studying the ECT tomograms of multiphase flows under carefully monitored inflow conditions of the different media and by obtaining the capacitance values, C(i, j, t) with i = 1…N, j = 1, 2,…N and i ≠ j obtained from ECT modules with N electrodes, it is shown how the interface heights in a pipe with stratified flow of oil and air can be fruitfully compared to the values of those obtained from ECT and gamma radiation meter (GRM) for improving CFD modeling. Monitored inflow conditions in this study are flow rates of air, water and oil into a pipe which can be positioned at varying inclinations to the horizontal, thus emulating the pipelines laid in subsea installations. It is found that ECT-based tomograms show most of the features seen in the GRM-based visualizations with nearly one-to-one correspondence to interface heights obtained from these two methods, albeit some anomalies at the pipe wall. However, there are some interesting features the ECT manages to capture: features which the GRM or the CFD modeling apparently do not show, possibly due to parameters not defined in the inputs to the CFD model or much slower response of the GRM. Results presented in this paper indicate that a combination of ECT and GRM and preferably with other modalities with enhanced data fusion and analysis combined with CFD modeling can help to improve the modeling, measurement and control of multiphase flow in the oil and gas industries and in the process industries

  9. Comparison of drift-velocity and drag coefficient approaches for one-dimensional two-fluid models in bubbly flow regime and validation with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Zarzuela, C.; Miró, R.; Verdú, G. [Institute for Industrial Safety, Radiology and Environmental (ISIRYM), Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain); Peña-Monferrer, C.; Chiva, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón de la Plana (Spain); Muñoz-Cobo, J.L., E-mail: congoque@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: cpena@uji.es [Institute for Energy Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    Two-phase flow simulation has been an extended research topic over the years due to the importance of predicting with accuracy the flow behavior within different installations, including nuclear power plants. Some of them are low pressure events, like low water pressure injection, nuclear refueling or natural circulation. This work is devoted to investigate the level of accuracy of the results when a two-phase flow experiment, which has been carried out at low pressure, is performed in a one-dimensional simulation code. In particular, the codes that have been selected to represent the experiment are the best-estimate system codes RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACE v5.0 patch4. The experiment consists in a long vertical pipe along which an air-water fluid in bubbly regime moves upwards in adiabatic conditions and atmospheric pressure. The simulations have been first performed in both codes with their original correlations, which are based on the drift flux model for the case of bubbly regime in vertical pipes. Then, a different implementation for the drag force has been undertaken, in order to perform a simulation with equivalent bubble diameter to the experiment. Results show that the calculation obtained from the codes are within the ranges of validity of the experiment with some discrepancies, which leads to the conclusion that the use of a drag correlation approach is more realistic than drift flux model. (author)

  10. Comparison of drift-velocity and drag coefficient approaches for one-dimensional two-fluid models in bubbly flow regime and validation with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Zarzuela, C.; Miró, R.; Verdú, G.; Peña-Monferrer, C.; Chiva, S.; Muñoz-Cobo, J.L.

    2017-01-01

    Two-phase flow simulation has been an extended research topic over the years due to the importance of predicting with accuracy the flow behavior within different installations, including nuclear power plants. Some of them are low pressure events, like low water pressure injection, nuclear refueling or natural circulation. This work is devoted to investigate the level of accuracy of the results when a two-phase flow experiment, which has been carried out at low pressure, is performed in a one-dimensional simulation code. In particular, the codes that have been selected to represent the experiment are the best-estimate system codes RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACE v5.0 patch4. The experiment consists in a long vertical pipe along which an air-water fluid in bubbly regime moves upwards in adiabatic conditions and atmospheric pressure. The simulations have been first performed in both codes with their original correlations, which are based on the drift flux model for the case of bubbly regime in vertical pipes. Then, a different implementation for the drag force has been undertaken, in order to perform a simulation with equivalent bubble diameter to the experiment. Results show that the calculation obtained from the codes are within the ranges of validity of the experiment with some discrepancies, which leads to the conclusion that the use of a drag correlation approach is more realistic than drift flux model. (author)

  11. Flow Diode and Method for Controlling Fluid Flow Origin of the Invention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rodger W (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flow diode configured to permit fluid flow in a first direction while preventing fluid flow in a second direction opposite the first direction is disclosed. The flow diode prevents fluid flow without use of mechanical closures or moving parts. The flow diode utilizes a bypass flowline whereby all fluid flow in the second direction moves into the bypass flowline having a plurality of tortuous portions providing high fluidic resistance. The portions decrease in diameter such that debris in the fluid is trapped. As fluid only travels in one direction through the portions, the debris remains trapped in the portions.

  12. Coupling two-phase fluid flow with two-phase darcy flow in anisotropic porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, J.

    2014-06-03

    This paper reports a numerical study of coupling two-phase fluid flow in a free fluid region with two-phase Darcy flow in a homogeneous and anisotropic porous medium region. The model consists of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations in the free fluid region and the two-phase Darcy law in the anisotropic porous medium region. A Robin-Robin domain decomposition method is used for the coupled Navier-Stokes and Darcy system with the generalized Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition on the interface between the free flow and the porous media regions. Obtained results have shown the anisotropic properties effect on the velocity and pressure of the two-phase flow. 2014 Jie Chen et al.

  13. Coupling Two-Phase Fluid Flow with Two-Phase Darcy Flow in Anisotropic Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a numerical study of coupling two-phase fluid flow in a free fluid region with two-phase Darcy flow in a homogeneous and anisotropic porous medium region. The model consists of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations in the free fluid region and the two-phase Darcy law in the anisotropic porous medium region. A Robin-Robin domain decomposition method is used for the coupled Navier-Stokes and Darcy system with the generalized Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition on the interface between the free flow and the porous media regions. Obtained results have shown the anisotropic properties effect on the velocity and pressure of the two-phase flow.

  14. Analysis of fluid flow around a beating artificial cilium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Vilfan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological cilia are found on surfaces of some microorganisms and on surfaces of many eukaryotic cells where they interact with the surrounding fluid. The periodic beating of the cilia is asymmetric, resulting in directed swimming of unicellular organisms or in generation of a fluid flow above a ciliated surface in multicellular ones. Following the biological example, externally driven artificial cilia have recently been successfully implemented as micropumps and mixers. However, biomimetic systems are useful not only in microfluidic applications, but can also serve as model systems for the study of fundamental hydrodynamic phenomena in biological samples. To gain insight into the basic principles governing propulsion and fluid pumping on a micron level, we investigated hydrodynamics around one beating artificial cilium. The cilium was composed of superparamagnetic particles and driven along a tilted cone by a varying external magnetic field. Nonmagnetic tracer particles were used for monitoring the fluid flow generated by the cilium. The average flow velocity in the pumping direction was obtained as a function of different parameters, such as the rotation frequency, the asymmetry of the beat pattern, and the cilium length. We also calculated the velocity field around the beating cilium by using the analytical far-field expansion. The measured average flow velocity and the theoretical prediction show an excellent agreement.

  15. Fluid flow in a spiral microfluidic duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Brendan; Stokes, Yvonne

    2018-04-01

    We consider the steady, pressure driven flow of a viscous fluid through a microfluidic device having the geometry of a planar spiral duct with a slowly varying curvature and height smaller than width. For this problem, it is convenient to express the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of a non-orthogonal coordinate system. Then, after applying appropriate scalings, the leading order equations admit a relatively simple solution in the central region of the duct cross section. First-order corrections with respect to the duct curvature and aspect ratio parameters are also obtained for this region. Additional correction terms are needed to ensure that no slip and no penetration conditions are satisfied on the side walls. Our solutions allow for a top wall shape that varies with respect to the radial coordinate which allows us to study the flow in a variety of cross-sectional shapes, including trapezoidal-shaped ducts that have been studied experimentally. At leading order, the flow is found to depend on the local height and slope of the top wall within the central region. The solutions are compared with numerical approximations of a classical Dean flow and are found to be in good agreement for a small duct aspect ratio and a slowly varying and small curvature. We conclude that the slowly varying curvature typical of spiral microfluidic devices has a negligible impact on the flow in the sense that locally the flow does not differ significantly from the classical Dean flow through a duct having the same curvature.

  16. Local invariants in non-ideal flows of neutral fluids and two-fluid plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Zhou

    2018-03-01

    The main objective is the locally invariant geometric object of any (magneto-)fluid dynamics with forcing and damping (nonideal), while more attention is paid to the untouched dynamical properties of two-fluid fashion. Specifically, local structures, beyond the well-known "frozen-in" to the barotropic flows of the generalized vorticities, of the two-fluid model of plasma flows are presented. More general non-barotropic situations are also considered. A modified Euler equation [T. Tao, "Finite time blowup for Lagrangian modifications of the three-dimensional Euler equation," Ann. PDE 2, 9 (2016)] is also accordingly analyzed and remarked from the angle of view of the two-fluid model, with emphasis on the local structures. The local constraints of high-order differential forms such as helicity, among others, find simple formulation for possible practices in modeling the dynamics. Thus, the Cauchy invariants equation [N. Besse and U. Frisch, "Geometric formulation of the Cauchy invariants for incompressible Euler flow in flat and curved spaces," J. Fluid Mech. 825, 412 (2017)] may be enabled to find applications in non-ideal flows. Some formal examples are offered to demonstrate the calculations, and particularly interestingly the two-dimensional-three-component (2D3C) or the 2D passive scalar problem presents that a locally invariant Θ = 2θζ, with θ and ζ being, respectively, the scalar value of the "vertical velocity" (or the passive scalar) and the "vertical vorticity," may be used as if it were the spatial density of the globally invariant helicity, providing a Lagrangian prescription to control the latter in some situations of studying its physical effects in rapidly rotating flows (ubiquitous in atmosphere of astrophysical objects) with marked 2D3C vortical modes or in purely 2D passive scalars.

  17. Centrifuge modelling of granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A common characteristic of mass flows like debris flows, rock avalanches and mudflows is that gravity is their main driving force. Gravity defines the intensity and duration of the main interactions between particles and their surrounding media (particle-particle, particle-fluid, fluid-fluid). At the same time, gravity delimits the occurrence of phase separation, inverse segregation, and mass consolidation, among other phenomena. Therefore, in the understanding of the flow physics it is important to account for the scaling of gravity in scaled models. In this research, a centrifuge model is developed to model free surface granular flows down an incline at controlled gravity conditions. Gravity is controlled by the action of an induced inertial acceleration field resulting from the rotation of the model in a geotechnical centrifuge. The characteristics of the induced inertial acceleration field during flow are discussed and validated via experimental data. Flow heights, velocity fields, basal pressure and impact forces are measured for a range of channel inclinations and gravity conditions. Preliminary results enlighten the flow characteristics at variable gravity conditions and open a discussion on the simulation of large scale processes at a laboratory scale. Further analysis on the flow physics brings valuable information for the validation of granular flows rheology.

  18. Program Computes Flows Of Fluids And Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullimore, Brent; Ring, Steven; Welch, Mark

    1993-01-01

    SINDA'85/FLUINT incorporates lumped-parameter-network and one-dimensional-flow mathematical models. System enables analysis of mutual influences of thermal and flow phenomena. Offers two finite-difference numerical solution techniques: forward-difference explicit approximation and Crank-Nicholson approximation. Enables simulation of nonuniform heating and facilitates mathematical modeling of thin-walled heat exchangers. Ability to model nonequilibrium behavior within two-phase volumes included. Recent changes in program improve modeling of real evaporator pumps and other capillary-assist evaporators. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  19. Numerical computation of fluid flow in different nonferrous metallurgical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, A.

    1996-10-01

    Heat, mass and fluid flow phenomena in metallurgical reactor systems such as smelting cyclones or electrolytic cells are complex and intricately linked through the governing equations of fluid flow, chemical reaction kinetics and chemical thermodynamics. The challenges for the representation of flow phenomena in such reactors as well as the transfers of these concepts to non-specialist modelers (e.g. plant operators and management personnel) can be met through scientific flow visualization techniques. In the first example the fluid flow of the gas phase and of concentrate particles in a smelting cyclone for copper production are calculated three dimensionally. The effect of design parameters (length and diameter of reactor, concentrate feeding tangentially or from the top, ..) and operating conditions are investigated. Single particle traces show, how to increase particle retention time before the particles reach the liquid film flowing down the cyclone wall. Cyclone separators are widely used in the metallurgical and chemical industry for collection of large quantities of dust. Most of the empirical models, which today are applied for the design, are lacking in being valid in the high temperature region. Therefore the numerical prediction of the collection efficiency of dust particles is done. The particle behavior close to the wall is considered by applying a particle restitution model, which calculates individual particle restitution coefficients as functions of impact velocity and impact angle. The effect of design parameters and operating are studied. Moreover, the fluid flow inside a copper refining electrolysis cell is modeled. The simulation is based on density variations in the boundary layer at the electrode surface. Density and thickness of the boundary layer are compared to measurements in a parametric study. The actual inhibitor concentration in the cell is calculated, too. Moreover, a two-phase flow approach is developed to simulate the behavior of

  20. Soft Sensing of Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow in Open Venturi Channel Using an Array of Ultrasonic Level Sensors—AI Models and Their Validations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viumdal, Håkon; Mylvaganam, Saba

    2017-01-01

    In oil and gas and geothermal installations, open channels followed by sieves for removal of drill cuttings, are used to monitor the quality and quantity of the drilling fluids. Drilling fluid flow rate is difficult to measure due to the varying flow conditions (e.g., wavy, turbulent and irregular) and the presence of drilling cuttings and gas bubbles. Inclusion of a Venturi section in the open channel and an array of ultrasonic level sensors above it at locations in the vicinity of and above the Venturi constriction gives the varying levels of the drilling fluid in the channel. The time series of the levels from this array of ultrasonic level sensors are used to estimate the drilling fluid flow rate, which is compared with Coriolis meter measurements. Fuzzy logic, neural networks and support vector regression algorithms applied to the data from temporal and spatial ultrasonic level measurements of the drilling fluid in the open channel give estimates of its flow rate with sufficient reliability, repeatability and uncertainty, providing a novel soft sensing of an important process variable. Simulations, cross-validations and experimental results show that feedforward neural networks with the Bayesian regularization learning algorithm provide the best flow rate estimates. Finally, the benefits of using this soft sensing technique combined with Venturi constriction in open channels are discussed. PMID:29072595

  1. The flow and spray characteristics of gelled fluids; Die Stroemungs- und Verspruehungseigenschaften gelfoermiger Fluide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madlener, K.

    2008-07-01

    In the present study gelled fluids are investigated concerning their application as propellants in storable and thrust controllable rocket propulsion systems. The correlations between the non-Newtonian viscosity properties and the flow and spray characteristics are discussed. Based on the proposed viscosity model Herschel-Bulkley-Extended (HBE) the laminar pipe flow is calculated for the investigated propellants. With the introduction of a generalized form of the Reynolds number and the presentation of a possibility to determine the critical values of this number it is possible to calculate the laminar-turbulent transition in a pipe flow. The theoretical results are evaluated with experimental data. The spray characteristics of various gelled fluids are examined using an experimental setup with impinging-jet-injectors. (orig.)

  2. Partitioned fluid-solid coupling for cardiovascular blood flow: left-ventricular fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krittian, Sebastian; Janoske, Uwe; Oertel, Herbert; Böhlke, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    We present a 3D code-coupling approach which has been specialized towards cardiovascular blood flow. For the first time, the prescribed geometry movement of the cardiovascular flow model KaHMo (Karlsruhe Heart Model) has been replaced by a myocardial composite model. Deformation is driven by fluid forces and myocardial response, i.e., both its contractile and constitutive behavior. Whereas the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) of the Navier-Stokes equations is discretized by finite volumes (FVM), the solid mechanical finite elasticity equations are discretized by a finite element (FEM) approach. Taking advantage of specialized numerical solution strategies for non-matching fluid and solid domain meshes, an iterative data-exchange guarantees the interface equilibrium of the underlying governing equations. The focus of this work is on left-ventricular fluid-structure interaction based on patient-specific magnetic resonance imaging datasets. Multi-physical phenomena are described by temporal visualization and characteristic FSI numbers. The results gained show flow patterns that are in good agreement with previous observations. A deeper understanding of cavity deformation, blood flow, and their vital interaction can help to improve surgical treatment and clinical therapy planning.

  3. TURBO: a computer program for two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis using a two-equations turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.; Moreira, M.L.

    1991-06-01

    The Reynolds turbulent transport equations for an incompressible fluid are integrated on a bi-dimensional staggered grid, for velocity and pressure, using the SIMPLER method. With the resulting algebraic relations it was developed the TURBO program, which final objectives are the thermal stratification and natural convection analysis of nuclear reactor pools. This program was tested in problems applications with analytic or experimental solutions previously known. (author)

  4. Superconfinement tailors fluid flow at microscales.

    KAUST Repository

    Setu, Siti Aminah; Dullens, Roel P A; Herná ndez-Machado, Aurora; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding fluid dynamics under extreme confinement, where device and intrinsic fluid length scales become comparable, is essential to successfully develop the coming generations of fluidic devices. Here we report measurements of advancing fluid

  5. Physical and numerical modeling of multidimensional liquid-vapor flows advanced two-fluid models, application to upwind finite volume methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seignole, V.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the work of thesis realized under the direction of Jean-Michel Ghidaglia (thesis director, ENS-Cachan) and of Anela Kumbaro (tutor, CEA) within the framework of the modeling of two-phase flows with OAP code. The report consists of two parts of unequal size: the first part concentrates on aspects related exclusively to two-phase flows, while the second one is devoted to the study of a numerical problem inherent to the resolution of two-phase flow systems, but whose action has a broader framework. (author)

  6. Fluid Flow Technology that Measures Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    From 1994 to 1996, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a Center Director's Discretionary Fund research effort to apply artificial intelligence technologies to the health management of plant equipment and space propulsion systems. Through this effort, NASA established a business relationship with Quality Monitoring and Control (QMC), of Kingwood, Texas, to provide hardware modeling and artificial intelligence tools. Very detailed and accurate Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) analysis and algorithms were jointly created, which identified several missing, critical instrumentation needs for adequately evaluating the engine health status. One of the missing instruments was a liquid oxygen (LOX) flow measurement. This instrument was missing since the original SSME included a LOX turbine flow meter that failed during a ground test, resulting in considerable damage for NASA. New balanced flow meter technology addresses this need with robust, safe, and accurate flow metering hardware.

  7. MR image appearance of cerebrospinal fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, K.; Quencer, R.M.; Post, M.J.D.; Diaz, R.; Shapiro, R.

    1986-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid flow void phenomenon (FVP) was retrospectively reviewed in 402 brain MR imaging examinations to determine the incidence of, physical parameters responsible for, and clinical significance of the finding. A grading system was devised comparing T2-weighted signal intensities between lateral ventricles and other CSF spaces. FVP was classified as marked, moderate, or absent. Although FVP may be present (240 of 292, 82%) or absent (50 of 292, 18%) in healthy subjects, in all 13 cases of obstructive hydrocephalus (including three cases of normal pressure hydrocephalus) FVP was found. Hydrocephalus ex vacuo revealed no consistent pattern. The authors conclude that FVP may be a normal finding and may help distinguish various types of hydrocephalus

  8. The friction control of magnetic fluid in the Couette flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labkovich, O.N., E-mail: olji@tut.by; Reks, A.G.; Chernobai, V.A.

    2017-06-01

    In the work characteristic areas of magnetic fluid flow are experimentally determined in the gap between the cylinders: the area of strong dipole-dipole interaction between magnetite particles 0flow 8flow Ta>41,2. For areas with high flow losses in viscous friction is shown the possibility of reducing the introduction of magnetic fluid of carbon nanotubes and creating a rotating magnetic field. - Highlights: • Typical areas of magnetic fluid flow are determined in the gap. • Influence of dipole-dipole interaction of magnetite particles on the viscous friction. • Features of Taylor vortex flow.

  9. Time-Dependent Thermally-Driven Interfacial Flows in Multilayered Fluid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Borhan, A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational study of thermally-driven convection in multilayered fluid structures will be performed to examine the effect of interactions among deformable fluid-fluid interfaces on the structure of time-dependent flow in these systems. Multilayered fluid structures in two models configurations will be considered: the differentially heated rectangular cavity with a free surface, and the encapsulated cylindrical liquid bridge. An extension of a numerical method developed as part of our recent NASA Fluid Physics grant will be used to account for finite deformations of fluid-fluid interfaces.

  10. Flow induced particle migration in fresh concrete: Theoretical frame, numerical simulations and experimental results on model fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangenberg, J.; Roussel, N.; Hattel, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe and compare the various physical phenomena which potentially lead to flow induced particle migration in concrete. We show that, in the case of industrial casting of concrete, gravity induced particle migration dominates all other potential sources of heterogeneities ind...

  11. Optimization of micropillar sequences for fluid flow sculpting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoecklein, Daniel; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Wu, Chueh-Yu; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino [Department of Bioengineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Inertial fluid flow deformation around pillars in a microchannel is a new method for controlling fluid flow. Sequences of pillars have been shown to produce a rich phase space with a wide variety of flow transformations. Previous work has successfully demonstrated manual design of pillar sequences to achieve desired transformations of the flow cross section, with experimental validation. However, such a method is not ideal for seeking out complex sculpted shapes as the search space quickly becomes too large for efficient manual discovery. We explore fast, automated optimization methods to solve this problem. We formulate the inertial flow physics in microchannels with different micropillar configurations as a set of state transition matrix operations. These state transition matrices are constructed from experimentally validated streamtraces for a fixed channel length per pillar. This facilitates modeling the effect of a sequence of micropillars as nested matrix-matrix products, which have very efficient numerical implementations. With this new forward model, arbitrary micropillar sequences can be rapidly simulated with various inlet configurations, allowing optimization routines quick access to a large search space. We integrate this framework with the genetic algorithm and showcase its applicability by designing micropillar sequences for various useful transformations. We computationally discover micropillar sequences for complex transformations that are substantially shorter than manually designed sequences. We also determine sequences for novel transformations that were difficult to manually design. Finally, we experimentally validate these computational designs by fabricating devices and comparing predictions with the results from confocal microscopy.

  12. Improving flow distribution in influent channels using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, No-Suk; Yoon, Sukmin; Jeong, Woochang; Lee, Seungjae

    2016-10-01

    Although the flow distribution in an influent channel where the inflow is split into each treatment process in a wastewater treatment plant greatly affects the efficiency of the process, and a weir is the typical structure for the flow distribution, to the authors' knowledge, there is a paucity of research on the flow distribution in an open channel with a weir. In this study, the influent channel of a real-scale wastewater treatment plant was used, installing a suppressed rectangular weir that has a horizontal crest to cross the full channel width. The flow distribution in the influent channel was analyzed using a validated computational fluid dynamics model to investigate (1) the comparison of single-phase and two-phase simulation, (2) the improved procedure of the prototype channel, and (3) the effect of the inflow rate on flow distribution. The results show that two-phase simulation is more reliable due to the description of the free-surface fluctuations. It should first be considered for improving flow distribution to prevent a short-circuit flow, and the difference in the kinetic energy with the inflow rate makes flow distribution trends different. The authors believe that this case study is helpful for improving flow distribution in an influent channel.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrospinal fluid flow in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, R. [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Dept., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-06-30

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of flowing protons in cerebrospinal fluid is useful for demonstrating areas of obstruction or stenosis of the ventricular system causing hydrocephalus. This is used in pediatric patients to assess the circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid. This article discusses two studies. In the first, the cerebrospinal fluid flow study helped the neurosurgeon assess the patency after a third ventriculocisternostomy. The second study evaluated the cerebrospinal fluid flowing through the foramen magnum in a patient with cerebellar tonsilar descent (Chiari malformation) and a syringomyelia. Different techniques to evaluate the flow studies are also discussed. (author)

  14. Boundary control of fluid flow through porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasan, Agus; Foss, Bjarne; Sagatun, Svein Ivar

    2010-01-01

    The flow of fluids through porous media can be described by the Boussinesq’s equation with mixed boundary conditions; a Neumann’s boundary condition and a nonlinear boundary condition. The nonlinear boundary condition provides a means to control the fluid flow through porous media. In this paper,......, some stabilizing controllers are constructed for various cases using Lyapunov design.......The flow of fluids through porous media can be described by the Boussinesq’s equation with mixed boundary conditions; a Neumann’s boundary condition and a nonlinear boundary condition. The nonlinear boundary condition provides a means to control the fluid flow through porous media. In this paper...

  15. Fluid flows of mixed regimes in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Emine; Hoang, Luan; Ibragimov, Akif; Kieu, Thinh

    2017-02-01

    In porous media, there are three known regimes of fluid flows, namely, pre-Darcy, Darcy, and post-Darcy. Because of their different natures, these are usually treated separately in the literature. To study complex flows when all three regimes may be present in different portions of a same domain, we use a single equation of motion to unify them. Several scenarios and models are then considered for slightly compressible fluids. A nonlinear parabolic equation for the pressure is derived, which is degenerate when the pressure gradient is either small or large. We estimate the pressure and its gradient for all time in terms of initial and boundary data. We also obtain their particular bounds for large time which depend on the asymptotic behavior of the boundary data but not on the initial one. Moreover, the continuous dependence of the solutions on initial and boundary data and the structural stability for the equation are established.

  16. Nonlinear radiative peristaltic flow of hydromagnetic fluid through porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Q.; Latif, T.; Alvi, N.; Asghar, S.

    2018-06-01

    The radiative heat and mass transfer in wall induced flow of hydromagnetic fluid through porous medium in an asymmetric channel is analyzed. The fluid viscosity is considered temperature dependent. In the theory of peristalsis, the radiation effects are either ignored or taken as linear approximation of radiative heat flux. Such approximation is only possible when there is sufficiently small temperature differences in the flow field; however, nonlinear radiation effects are valid for large temperature differences as well (the new feature added in the present study). Mathematical modeling of the problems include the complicated system of highly nonlinear differential equations. Semi-analytical solutions are established in the wave reference frame. Results are displayed graphically and discussed in detail for the variation of various physical parameters with the special attention to viscosity, radiation, and temperature ratio parameters.

  17. Nonlinear radiative peristaltic flow of hydromagnetic fluid through porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Hussain

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The radiative heat and mass transfer in wall induced flow of hydromagnetic fluid through porous medium in an asymmetric channel is analyzed. The fluid viscosity is considered temperature dependent. In the theory of peristalsis, the radiation effects are either ignored or taken as linear approximation of radiative heat flux. Such approximation is only possible when there is sufficiently small temperature differences in the flow field; however, nonlinear radiation effects are valid for large temperature differences as well (the new feature added in the present study. Mathematical modeling of the problems include the complicated system of highly nonlinear differential equations. Semi-analytical solutions are established in the wave reference frame. Results are displayed graphically and discussed in detail for the variation of various physical parameters with the special attention to viscosity, radiation, and temperature ratio parameters. Keywords: Nonlinear thermal radiation, Variable viscosity, Porous medium, Soret and Dufour effects, Peristalsis

  18. Controlling chaos in a fluid flow past a movable cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo, Juan C.; Marino, Ines P.; Sanjuan, Miguel A.F.; Kurths, Juergen

    2003-01-01

    The model of a two-dimensional fluid flow past a cylinder is a relatively simple problem with a strong impact in many applied fields, such as aerodynamics or chemical sciences, although most of the involved physical mechanisms are not yet well known. This paper analyzes the fluid flow past a cylinder in a laminar regime with Reynolds number, Re, around 200, where two vortices appear behind the cylinder, by using an appropriate time-dependent stream function and applying non-linear dynamics techniques. The goal of the paper is to analyze under which circumstances the chaoticity in the wake of the cylinder might be modified, or even suppressed. And this has been achieved with the help of some indicators of the complexity of the trajectories for the cases of a rotating cylinder and an oscillating cylinder

  19. Immiscible two-phase fluid flows in deformable porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Sposito, Garrison; Majer, Ernest

    Macroscopic differential equations of mass and momentum balance for two immiscible fluids in a deformable porous medium are derived in an Eulerian framework using the continuum theory of mixtures. After inclusion of constitutive relationships, the resulting momentum balance equations feature terms characterizing the coupling among the fluid phases and the solid matrix caused by their relative accelerations. These terms, which imply a number of interesting phenomena, do not appear in current hydrologic models of subsurface multiphase flow. Our equations of momentum balance are shown to reduce to the Berryman-Thigpen-Chen model of bulk elastic wave propagation through unsaturated porous media after simplification (e.g., isothermal conditions, neglect of gravity, etc.) and under the assumption of constant volume fractions and material densities. When specialized to the case of a porous medium containing a single fluid and an elastic solid, our momentum balance equations reduce to the well-known Biot model of poroelasticity. We also show that mass balance alone is sufficient to derive the Biot model stress-strain relations, provided that a closure condition for porosity change suggested by de la Cruz and Spanos is invoked. Finally, a relation between elastic parameters and inertial coupling coefficients is derived that permits the partial differential equations of the Biot model to be decoupled into a telegraph equation and a wave equation whose respective dependent variables are two different linear combinations of the dilatations of the solid and the fluid.

  20. Mesoscopic model for binary fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, C.; Tucci, K.; Alvarez-Llamoza, O.; Orozco-Guillén, E. E.; Morales, M.; Cosenza, M. G.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a model for studying binary fluids based on the mesoscopic molecular simulation technique known as multiparticle collision, where the space and state variables are continuous, and time is discrete. We include a repulsion rule to simulate segregation processes that does not require calculation of the interaction forces between particles, so binary fluids can be described on a mesoscopic scale. The model is conceptually simple and computationally efficient; it maintains Galilean invariance and conserves the mass and energy in the system at the micro- and macro-scale, whereas momentum is conserved globally. For a wide range of temperatures and densities, the model yields results in good agreement with the known properties of binary fluids, such as the density profile, interface width, phase separation, and phase growth. We also apply the model to the study of binary fluids in crowded environments with consistent results.

  1. Dynamics of a fluid flow on Mars: Lava or mud?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lionel; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2014-05-01

    A distinctive flow deposit southwest of Cerberus Fossae on Mars is analyzed. The flow source is a ∼20 m deep, ∼12 × 1.5 km wide depression within a yardang associated with the Medusae Fossae Formation. The flow traveled for ∼40 km following topographic lows to leave a deposit on average 3-4 km wide. The surface morphology of the deposit suggests that it was produced by the emplacement of a fluid flowing in a laminar fashion and possessing a finite yield strength. We use topographic data from a digital elevation model (DEM) to model the dynamics of the motion and infer that the fluid had a Bingham rheology with a plastic viscosity of ∼1 Pa s and a yield strength of ∼185 Pa. Although the low viscosity is consistent with the properties of komatiite-like lava, the combination of values of viscosity and yield strength, as well as the surface morphology of the flow, suggests that this was a mud flow. Comparison with published experimental data implies a solids content close to 60% by volume and a grain size dominated by silt-size particles. Comparison of the ∼1.5 km3 deposit volume with the ∼0.03 km3 volume of the source depression implies that ∼98% of the flow material was derived from depth in the crust. There are similarities between the deposit studied here, which we infer to be mud, and other flow deposits on Mars currently widely held to be lavas. This suggests that a re-appraisal of many of these deposits is now in order.

  2. Chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doughty, C.; Dragila, M.I.; Faybishenko, B.; Podgorney, R.K.; Stoops, T.M.; Wheatcraft, S.W.; Wood, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    'DOE faces the remediation of numerous contaminated sites, such as those at Hanford, INEEL, LLNL, and LBNL, where organic and/or radioactive wastes were intentionally or accidentally released to the vadose zone from surface spills, underground tanks, cribs, shallow ponds, and deep wells. Migration of these contaminants through the vadose zone has lead to the contamination of or threatens to contaminate underlying groundwater. A key issue in choosing a corrective action plan to clean up contaminated sites is to determine the location, total mass, mobility and travel time to receptors for contaminants moving in the vadose zone. These problems are difficult to solve in a technically defensible and accurate manner because contaminants travel downward intermittently through narrow pathways driven by variations in environmental conditions. These preferential pathways can be difficult to find and predict. The primary objective of this project is to determine if and when dynamical chaos theory can be used to investigate infiltration of fluid and contaminant transport in heterogeneous soils and fractured rocks. The objective of this project is being achieved through the following Activities (1) Evaluation of chaotic behavior of flow in laboratory and field experiments using methods from non-linear dynamics; (2) Evaluation of the impact these dynamics may have on contaminant transport through heterogeneous fractured rocks and soils, and how it can be used to guide remediation efforts; (3) Development of a conceptual model and mathematical and numerical algorithms for flow and transport, which incorporate both: (a) the spatial variability of heterogeneous porous and fractured media, and (b) the description of the temporal dynamics of flow and transport, which may be chaotic; and (4) Development of appropriate experimental field and laboratory techniques needed to detect diagnostic parameters for chaotic behavior of flow. This approach is based on the assumption that spatial

  3. Some applications of magnetic resonance imaging in fluid mechanics: Complex flows and complex fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonn, Daniel; Rodts, Stephane; Groenink, Maarten; Rafai, Salima; Shahidzadeh-Bonn, Noushine; Coussot, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The review deals with applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to study flow. We first briefly discuss the principles of flow measurement by MRI and give examples of some applications, such as multiphase flows, the MRI rheology of complex fluid flows, and blood flows in the human

  4. Mathematical simulation of fluid flow and analysis of flow pattern in the flow path of low-head Kaplan turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rusanov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of numerical investigation of spatial flow of viscous incompressible fluid in flow part of Kaplan turbine PL20 Kremenchug HPP at optimum setting angle of runner blade φb = 15° and at maximum setting angle φb = 35° are shown. The flow simulation has been carried out on basis of numerical integration of the Reynolds equations with an additional term containing artificial compressibility. The differential two-parameter model of Menter (SST has been applied to take into account turbulent effects. Numerical integration of the equations is carried out using an implicit quasi-monotone Godunov type scheme of second - order accuracy in space and time. The calculations have been conducted with the help of the software system IPMFlow. The analysis of fluid flow in the flow part elements is shown and the values of hydraulic losses and local cavitation coefficient have been obtained. Comparison of calculated and experimental results has been carried out.

  5. An investigation of dentinal fluid flow in dental pulp during food mastication: simulation of fluid-structure interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kuo-Chih; Chuang, Shu-Fen; Ng, Eddie Yin-Kwee; Chang, Chih-Han

    2014-06-01

    This study uses fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation to investigate the relationship between the dentinal fluid flow in the dental pulp of a tooth and the elastic modulus of masticated food particles and to investigate the effects of chewing rate on fluid flow in the dental pulp. Three-dimensional simulation models of a premolar tooth (enamel, dentine, pulp, periodontal ligament, cortical bone, and cancellous bone) and food particle were created. Food particles with elastic modulus of 2,000 and 10,000 MPa were used, respectively. The external displacement loading (5 μm) was gradually directed to the food particle surface for 1 and 0.1 s, respectively, to simulate the chewing of food particles. The displacement and stress on tooth structure and fluid flow in the dental pulp were selected as evaluation indices. The results show that masticating food with a high elastic modulus results in high stress and deformation in the tooth structure, causing faster dentinal fluid flow in the pulp in comparison with that obtained with soft food. In addition, fast chewing of hard food particles can induce faster fluid flow in the pulp, which may result in dental pain. FSI analysis is shown to be a useful tool for investigating dental biomechanics during food mastication. FSI simulation can be used to predict intrapulpal fluid flow in dental pulp; this information may provide the clinician with important concept in dental biomechanics during food mastication.

  6. Comparison between traditional laboratory tests, permeability measurements and CT-based fluid flow modelling for cultural heritage applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Boever, Wesley, E-mail: Wesley.deboever@ugent.be [UGCT/PProGRess, Dept. of Geology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Bultreys, Tom; Derluyn, Hannelore [UGCT/PProGRess, Dept. of Geology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoorebeke, Luc [UGCT/Radiation Physics, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cnudde, Veerle [UGCT/PProGRess, Dept. of Geology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the possibility to use on-site permeability measurements for cultural heritage applications as an alternative for traditional laboratory tests such as determination of the capillary absorption coefficient. These on-site measurements, performed with a portable air permeameter, were correlated with the pore network properties of eight sandstones and one granular limestone that are discussed in this paper. The network properties of the 9 materials tested in this study were obtained from micro-computed tomography (μCT) and compared to measurements and calculations of permeability and the capillary absorption rate of the stones under investigation, in order to find the correlation between pore network characteristics and fluid management characteristics of these sandstones. Results show a good correlation between capillary absorption, permeability and network properties, opening the possibility of using on-site permeability measurements as a standard method in cultural heritage applications. - Highlights: • Measurements of capillary absorption are compared to in-situ permeability. • We obtain pore size distribution and connectivity by using micro-CT. • These properties explain correlation between permeability and capillarity. • Correlation between both methods is good to excellent. • Permeability measurements could be a good alternative to capillarity measurement.

  7. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, D.

    1990-09-01

    This volume describes the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM) for topologies, flow regimes, and interfacial areas. The objective of these models is to provide values for the interfacial areas between all components existing in a computational cell. The interfacial areas are then used to evaluate the mass, energy, and momentum transfer between the components. A new approach has been undertaken in the development of a model to convect the interfacial areas of the discontinuous velocity fields in the three-velocity-field environment of AFDM. These interfacial areas are called convectible surface areas. The continuous and discontinuous components are chosen using volume fraction and levitation criteria. This establishes so-called topologies for which the convectible surface areas can be determined. These areas are functions of space and time. Solid particulates that are limited to being discontinuous within the bulk fluid are assumed to have a constant size. The convectible surface areas are subdivided to model contacts between two discontinuous components or discontinuous components and the structure. The models have been written for the flow inside of large pools. Therefore, the structure is tracked only as a boundary to the fluid volume without having a direct influence on velocity or volume fraction distribution by means of flow regimes or boundary layer models. 17 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs

  8. The effect of magnetohydrodynamic nano fluid flow through porous cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Basuki; Arif, Didik Khusnul; Aryany, Deviana; Asiyah, Nur; Widjajati, Farida Agustini; Kamiran

    2017-08-01

    This paper concerns about the analysis of the effect of magnetohydrodynamic nano fluid flow through horizontal porous cylinder on steady and incompressible condition. Fluid flow is assumed opposite gravity and induced by magnet field. Porous cylinder is assumed had the same depth of porous and was not absorptive. The First thing to do in this research is to build the model of fluid flow to obtain dimentional governing equations. The dimentional governing equations are consist of continuity equation, momentum equation, and energy equation. Furthermore, the dimensional governing equations are converted to non-dimensional governing equation by using non-dimensional parameters and variables. Then, the non-dimensional governing equations are transformed into similarity equations using stream function and solved using Keller-Box method. The result of numerical solution further is obtained by taking variation of magnetic parameter, Prandtl number, porosity parameter, and volume fraction. The numerical results show that velocity profiles increase and temperature profiles decrease when both of the magnetic and the porosity parameter increase. However, the velocity profiles decrease and the temperature profiles increase when both of the magnetic and the porosity parameter increase.

  9. Numerical solution of viscous and viscoelastic fluids flow through the branching channel by finite volume scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keslerová, Radka; Trdlička, David

    2015-09-01

    This work deals with the numerical modelling of steady flows of incompressible viscous and viscoelastic fluids through the three dimensional channel with T-junction. The fundamental system of equations is the system of generalized Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluids. This system is based on the system of balance laws of mass and momentum for incompressible fluids. Two different mathematical models for the stress tensor are used for simulation of Newtonian and Oldroyd-B fluids flow. Numerical solution of the described models is based on cetral finite volume method using explicit Runge-Kutta time integration.

  10. Bingham plastic fluid flow model in tape casting of ceramics using two doctor blades – analytical approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common processes used in manufacturing of multilayer ceramic packages, multilayer capacitors and large scale integration circuits is tape casting. In this process, the wet tape thickness is one of the single most determining parameters affecting the final properties of the product......, and it is therefore of great interest to be able to control it. One way to control the tape thickness is to use a two doctor blade configuration in the tape casting machine. In this case, it becomes important to fix the height of the slurry in front of both doctor blades according to the desired tape thickness...... and casting speed (belt velocity). In the present work, the flow in both doctor blade regions of a slurry is described with a steady state momentum equation in combination with a Bingham plastic constitutive equation, and this is integrated to a closed form analytical solution for both reservoirs based...

  11. Loss of vacuum accident (LOVA): Comparison of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow velocities against experimental data for the model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellecci, C.; Gaudio, P.; Lupelli, I.; Malizia, A.; Porfiri, M.T.; Quaranta, R.; Richetta, M.

    2011-01-01

    A recognized safety issue for future fusion reactors fueled with deuterium and tritium is the generation of sizeable quantities of dust. Several mechanisms resulting from material response to plasma bombardment in normal and off-normal conditions are responsible for generating dust of micron and sub-micron length scales inside the VV (Vacuum Vessel) of experimental fusion facilities. The loss of coolant accidents (LOCA), loss of coolant flow accidents (LOFA) and loss of vacuum accidents (LOVA) are types of accidents, expected in experimental fusion reactors like ITER, that may jeopardize components and plasma vessel integrity and cause dust mobilization risky for workers and public. The air velocity is the driven parameter for dust resuspension and its characterization, in the very first phase of the accidents, is critical for the dust release. To study the air velocity trend a small facility, Small Tank for Aerosol Removal and Dust (STARDUST), was set up at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', in collaboration with ENEA Frascati laboratories. It simulates a low pressurization rate (300 Pa/s) LOVA event in ITER due to a small air inlet from two different positions of the leak: at the equatorial port level and at the divertor port level. The velocity magnitude in STARDUST was investigated in order to map the velocity field by means of a punctual capacitive transducer placed inside STARDUST without obstacles. FLUENT was used to simulate the flow behavior for the same LOVA scenarios used during the experimental tests. The results of these simulations were compared against the experimental data for CFD code validation. For validation purposes, the CFD simulation data were extracted at the same locations as the experimental data were collected for the first four seconds, because at the beginning of the experiments the maximum velocity values (that could cause the almost complete dust mobilization) have been measured. In this paper the authors present and discuss the

  12. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, P.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model

  13. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-11

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model.

  14. The fluid mechanics of continuous flow electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective is to establish theoretically and confirm experimentally the ultimate capabilities of continuous flow electrophoresis chambers operating in an environment essentially free of particle sedimentation and buoyancy. The efforts are devoted to: (1) studying the effects of particle concentration on sample conductivity and dielectric constant. The dielectric constant and conductivity were identified as playing crucial roles in the behavior of the sample and on the resolving power and throughput of continuous flow devices; and (2) improving the extant mathematical models to predict flow fields and particle trajectories in continuous flow electrophoresis. A dielectric spectrometer was designed and built to measure the complex dielectric constant of a colloidal dispersion as a function of frequency between 500 Hz and 200 kHz. The real part of the signal can be related to the sample's conductivity and the imaginary part to its dielectric constant. Measurements of the dielectric constants of several different dispersions disclosed that the dielectric constants of dilute systems of the sort encountered in particle electrophoresis are much larger than would be expected based on the extant theory. Experiments were carried out to show that, in many cases, this behavior is due to the presence of a filamentary structure of small hairs on the particle surface. A technique for producing electrokinetically ideal synthetic latex particles by heat treating was developed. Given the ubiquitous nature of hairy surfaces with both cells and synthetic particles, it was deemed necessary to develop a theory to explain their behavior. A theory for electrophoretic mobility of hairy particles was developed. Finally, the extant computer programs for predicting the structure of electro-osmotically driven flows were extended to encompass flow channels with variable wall mobilities.

  15. Computational modeling of concrete flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Geiker, Mette Rica; Dufour, Frederic

    2007-01-01

    particle flow, and numerical techniques allowing the modeling of particles suspended in a fluid. The general concept behind each family of techniques is described. Pros and cons for each technique are given along with examples and references to applications to fresh cementitious materials....

  16. Time-dependent flow model of a generalized Burgers' fluid with fractional derivatives through a cylindrical domain: An exact and numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Rabia; Imran, M.; Khalique, Chaudry Masood

    2018-06-01

    Exact solutions for velocity field and tangential stress for rotational flow of a generalized Burgers' fluid within an infinite circular pipe are derived by using the methods of Laplace and finite Hankel transformations. Firstly we take the position of fluid at rest and then the fluid flow due to the rotation of the pipe around the axis of flow having time dependant angular velocity. The exact solutions are presented in terms of the generalized Ga,b,c (., t) -functions. The corresponding results can be freely specified for the same results of Burgers', Oldroyd B, Maxwell, second grade and Newtonian fluids (performing the same motion) as particular cases of the results obtained earlier. The impact of the different parameters, individually and in comparison, are represented by graphical demonstrations. Secondly the numerical solutions for velocity and stress are also obtained with the help of Laplace transformation, Gaver Stehfest's algorithm and MATHCAD. Finally a comparison of both methods for the same problem is done and shows the consistency of results.

  17. Simulations of flow induced ordering in viscoelastic fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos de Oliveira, I.S.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we report on simulations of colloidal ordering phenomena in shearthinning viscoelastic fluids under shear flow. Depending on the characteristics of the fluid, the colloids are observed to align in the direction of the flow. These string-like structures remain stable as long as the

  18. Principles of fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreider, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is an introduction on fluid mechanics incorporating computer applications. Topics covered are as follows: brief history; what is a fluid; two classes of fluids: liquids and gases; the continuum model of a fluid; methods of analyzing fluid flows; important characteristics of fluids; fundamentals and equations of motion; fluid statics; dimensional analysis and the similarity principle; laminar internal flows; ideal flow; external laminar and channel flows; turbulent flow; compressible flow; fluid flow measurements

  19. Development and utilization of a two-dimensional model of transient fluid flow in a generic repository (OGRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korver, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    An existing time-dependent numerical model (OGRE) has been modified to examine the time frames associated with repressuring the formation rocks surrounding a generic nuclear waste repository following the operational period when wastes are being stored. The model is two-dimensional in the vertical plane, and assumes that the entire regime is saturated, but the repository is at one atmosphere during the operational period. For the physical and geometric parameters assumed, the results of a simulation of the time necessary to repressurize the formation after the operational period was 421.5 years. These results were in close agreement with a steady-state calculation performed by Golder Associates, Inc., in 1977. The fact that the time-dependent model results were close to the steady-state calculation resulted from the use (in the model) of a very small compressibility value, which caused the simulation to reach a steady-state condition in a relatively short time. Based on these studies, the magnitude of the system (water plus matrix) compressibility is of great importance in determining whether the time for repressurization can be determined from analytical methods or requires the use of a time-dependent numerical model

  20. Structural and numerical modeling of fluid flow and evolving stress fields at a transtensional stepover: A Miocene Andean porphyry copper system as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, R. C.; Griffith, W. A.; Mitchell, T. M.; Marquardt, C.; Iturrieta, P. C.; Cembrano, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Obliquely convergent subduction orogens show both margin-parallel and margin-oblique fault systems that are spatially and temporally associated with ore deposits and geothermal systems within the volcanic arc. Fault orientation and mechanical interaction among different fault systems influence the stress field in these arrangements, thus playing a first order control on the regional to local-scale fluid migration paths as documented by the spatial distribution of fault-vein arrays. Our selected case study is a Miocene porphyry copper-type system that crops out in the precordillera of the Maule region along the Teno river Valley (ca. 35°S). Several regional to local faults were recognized in the field: (1) Two first-order, N-striking subvertical dextral faults overlapping at a right stepover; (2) Second-order, N60°E-striking steeply-dipping, dextral-normal faults located at the stepover, and (3) N40°-60°W striking subvertical, sinistral faults crossing the stepover zone. The regional and local scale geology is characterized by volcano-sedimentary rocks (Upper Eocene- Lower Miocene), intruded by Miocene granodioritic plutons (U-Pb zircon age of 18.2 ± 0.11 Ma) and coeval dikes. We implement a 2D boundary element displacement discontinuity method (BEM) model to test the mechanical feasibility of kinematic model of the structural development of the porphyry copper-type system in the stepover between N-striking faults. The model yields the stress field within the stepover region and shows slip and potential opening distribution along the N-striking master faults under a regionally imposed stress field. The model shows that σ1 rotates clockwise where the main faults approach each other, becoming EW when they overlap. This, in turn leads to the generation of both NE- and NW-striking faults within the stepover area. Model results are consistent with the structural and kinematic data collected in the field attesting for enhanced permeability and fluid flow transport

  1. Modeling the thermal behavior of fluid flow inside channels using an artificial locally linear neuro-fuzzy approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Hashemian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced surface heat exchangers are commonly used all worldwide. If applicable, due to their complicated geometry, simulating corrugated plate heat exchangers is a time-consuming process. In the present study, first we simulate the heat transfer in a sharp V-shape corrugation cell with constant temperature walls; then, we use a Locally Linear Neuro-Fuzzy method based on a radial basis function (RBFs to model the temperature field in the whole channel. New approach is developed to deal with fast computational and low memory resources that can be used with the largest available data sets. The purpose of the research is to reveal the advantages of proposed Neuro-Fuzzy model as a powerful modeling system designed for predicting and to make a fair comparison between it and the successful FLUENT simulated approaches in its best structures.

  2. Development of a Model Foamy Viscous Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vial C.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to develop a model viscous foamy fluid, i.e. below the very wet limit, the rheological and stability properties of which can be tuned. First, the method used for the preparation of foamy fluids is detailed, including process and formulation. Then, experimental results highlight that stable foamy fluids with a monomodal bubble size distribution can be prepared with a void fraction between 25% and 50% (v/v. Their viscoelastic properties under flow and low-strain oscillatory conditions are shown to result from the interplay between the formulation of the continuous phase, void fraction and bubble size. Their apparent viscosity can be described using the Cross equation and zero-shear Newtonian viscosity may be predicted by a Mooney equation up to a void fraction about 40%. The Cox-Merz and the Laun’s rules apply when the capillary number Ca is lower than 0.1. The upper limit of the zero-shear plateau region decreases when void fraction increases or bubble size decreases. In the shear-thinning region, shear stress varies with Ca1/2, as in wet foams with immobile surfaces. Finally, foamy fluids can be sheared up to Ca about 0.1 without impairing their microstructure. Their stability at rest achieves several hours and increases with void fraction due to compact packing constraints. These constitute, therefore, versatile model fluids to investigate the behaviour of foamy fluids below the very wet limit in process conditions.

  3. On exact solutions for oscillatory flows in a generalized Burgers fluid with slip condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayat, Tasawar [Dept. of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan); Dept. of Mathematics, Coll. of Sciences, KS Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Najam, Saher [Theoretical Plasma Physics Div., PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Sajid, Muhammad; Mesloub, Said [Dept. of Mathematics, Coll. of Sciences, KS Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Ayub, Muhammad [Dept. of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2010-05-15

    An analysis is performed for the slip effects on the exact solutions of flows in a generalized Burgers fluid. The flow modelling is based upon the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) nature of the fluid and modified Darcy law in a porous space. Two illustrative examples of oscillatory flows are considered. The results obtained are compared with several limiting cases. It has been shown here that the derived results hold for all values of frequencies including the resonant frequency. (orig.)

  4. Real-time monitoring of spinal cord blood flow with a novel sensor mounted on a cerebrospinal fluid drainage catheter in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatsu, Yukihiro; Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Matsunaga, Tadao; Haga, Yoichi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our study was to develop a novel monitoring system for spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) to test the efficacy of the SCBF sensor in an animal model. The sensor system consisted of 2 optical fibers, a pedestal for fiber fixation, and a mirror for the laser reflection and was incorporated into a cerebrospinal fluid drainage catheter. In vivo studies were performed in a swine model (n=10) to measure SCBF during spinal cord ischemia induced by clamping the descending thoracic aorta and supra-aortic neck vessels, when necessary. A temporary low cardiac output model was also created by inflow clamping of the inferior vena cava to analyze the quantitative changes in SCBF during this maneuver. The developed SCBF monitoring catheter placed intrathecally could detect SCBF in all the swine. The SCBF after aortic crossclamping at the fourth intercostal level exhibited diverse changes reproducibly among the swine, with a >25% reduction in SCBF in 5 pigs, an increase in 3, and no significant changes in 2. Consistent reductions were recorded during inferior vena cava occlusion. The mean SCBF decreased by 32% after inferior vena cava occlusion when the cardiac output had decreased by 27%. We have developed a novel SCBF sensor that could detect real-time changes in spinal cord perfusion in a swine model. The device holds promise to detect imminent ischemia or ensure acceptable blood perfusion in the spinal cord and could further enhance our understanding of spinal cord circulation. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Heat transfer and fluid flow in biological processes advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Sid

    2015-01-01

    Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Biological Processes covers emerging areas in fluid flow and heat transfer relevant to biosystems and medical technology. This book uses an interdisciplinary approach to provide a comprehensive prospective on biofluid mechanics and heat transfer advances and includes reviews of the most recent methods in modeling of flows in biological media, such as CFD. Written by internationally recognized researchers in the field, each chapter provides a strong introductory section that is useful to both readers currently in the field and readers interested in learning more about these areas. Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Biological Processes is an indispensable reference for professors, graduate students, professionals, and clinical researchers in the fields of biology, biomedical engineering, chemistry and medicine working on applications of fluid flow, heat transfer, and transport phenomena in biomedical technology. Provides a wide range of biological and clinical applications of fluid...

  6. Hydraulic Characterization Activities in Support of the Shaft-Seals Fluid-Flow Modeling Integration into the WIPP EPA Compliance Certification Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, M.K.; Hurtado, L.D.; Dale, Tim

    1997-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a planned geologic repository for permanent disposal of transuranic waste generated by the U.S. Department of Energy. Disposal regions consist of panels and drifts mined from the bedded salt of the Salado Formation at a depth of approximately 650 m below the surface. This lithology is part of the 225 million year old Delaware Basin, and is geographically located in southeastern New Mexico. Four shafts service the facility needs for air intake, exhaust, waste handling, and salt handling. As the science advisor for the project, Sandia National Laboratories developed the WIPP shaft sealing system design. This design is a fundamental component of the application process for facility licensing, and has been found acceptable by stakeholders and regulatory agencies. The seal system design is founded on results obtained from laboratory and field experiments, numerical modeling, and engineering judgment. This paper describes a field test program to characterize the fluid flow properties in the WIPP shafts at representative seal locations. This work was conducted by Duke Engineering and Services under contract to Sandia National Laboratories in support of the seal system design

  7. Modeling of turbulent flows in porous media and at the interface with a free fluid medium; Modelisation des ecoulements turbulents dans les milieux poreux et a l'interface avec un milieu libre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandesris, M

    2006-12-15

    This work deals with the numerical simulation of turbulent flows in the whole nuclear reactor core, using multi-scale approaches. First, a macroscopic turbulence model is built, based on a porous media approach, to describe the flow in the fuel assemblies part of the nuclear core. Then, we study the jump conditions that have to be applied at a free fluid/porous interface. A thorough analytical study is carried out for laminar flows. This study allows to answer some fundamental questions about the physical meaning of the jump conditions, the values of the jump parameters and the location of the interface. Using these results, jump conditions for turbulent flows are proposed. The model is then applied to the simulation of a turbulent flow in a simplified model of a reactor core. (author)

  8. Heat and fluid flow in accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 2. Accident scenario based on thermodynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Shigenao

    2012-01-01

    An accident scenario of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 2 is analyzed from the data open to the public. Phase equilibrium process model was introduced that the vapor and water are at saturation point in the vessels. Proposed accident scenario agrees very well with the data of the plant parameters obtained just after the accident. The estimation describes that the rupture time of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) was at 22:50 14/3/2011. The estimation shows that the rupture time of the pressure containment vessel (RCP) was at 7:40 15/3/2011. These estimations are different from the ones by TEPCO, however; many measured evidences show good accordance with the present scenario. (author)

  9. Hydrodynamic cavitation in Stokes flow of anisotropic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Tillmann; Agha, Hakam; Schoen, Martin; Mazza, Marco G.; Sengupta, Anupam

    2017-05-01

    Cavitation, the nucleation of vapour in liquids, is ubiquitous in fluid dynamics, and is often implicated in a myriad of industrial and biomedical applications. Although extensively studied in isotropic liquids, corresponding investigations in anisotropic liquids are largely lacking. Here, by combining liquid crystal microfluidic experiments, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical arguments, we report flow-induced cavitation in an anisotropic fluid. The cavitation domain nucleates due to sudden pressure drop upon flow past a cylindrical obstacle within a microchannel. For an anisotropic fluid, the inception and growth of the cavitation domain ensued in the Stokes regime, while no cavitation was observed in isotropic liquids flowing under similar hydrodynamic parameters. Using simulations we identify a critical value of the Reynolds number for cavitation inception that scales inversely with the order parameter of the fluid. Strikingly, the critical Reynolds number for anisotropic fluids can be 50% lower than that of isotropic fluids.

  10. Energetic Variational Approach to Multi-Component Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshtein, Arkadz; Liu, Chun; Brannick, James

    2017-11-01

    In this talk I will introduce the systematic energetic variational approach for dissipative systems applied to multi-component fluid flows. These variational approaches are motivated by the seminal works of Rayleigh and Onsager. The advantage of this approach is that we have to postulate only energy law and some kinematic relations based on fundamental physical principles. The method gives a clear, quick and consistent way to derive the PDE system. I will compare different approaches to three-component flows using diffusive interface method and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. The diffusive interface method is an approach for modeling interactions among complex substances. The main idea behind this method is to introduce phase field labeling functions in order to model the contact line by smooth change from one type of material to another. The work of Arkadz Kirshtein and Chun Liu is partially supported by NSF Grants DMS-141200 and DMS-1216938.

  11. Fast intraslab fluid-flow events linked to pulses of high pore fluid pressure at the subducted plate interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taetz, Stephan; John, Timm; Bröcker, Michael; Spandler, Carl; Stracke, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    A better understanding of the subduction zone fluid cycle and its chemical-mechanical feedback requires in-depth knowledge about how fluids flow within and out of descending slabs. Relicts of fluid-flow systems in exhumed rocks of fossil subduction zones allow for identification of the general relationships between dehydration reactions, fluid pathway formation, the dimensions and timescales of distinct fluid flow events; all of which are required for quantitative models for fluid-induced subduction zone processes. Two types of garnet-quartz-phengite veins can be distinguished in an eclogite-facies mélange block from the Pouébo Eclogite Mélange, New Caledonia. These veins record synmetamorphic internal fluid release by mineral breakdown reactions (type I veins), and infiltration of an external fluid (type II veins) with the associated formation of a reaction selvage. The dehydration and fluid migration documented by the type I veins likely occurred on a timescale of 105-106 years, based on average subduction rates and metamorphic conditions required for mineral dehydration and fluid flow. The timeframe of fluid-rock interaction between the external fluid and the wall-rock of the type II veins is quantified using a continuous bulk-rock Li-diffusion profile perpendicular to a vein and its metasomatic selvage. Differences in Li concentration between the internal and external fluid reservoirs resulted in a distinct diffusion profile (decreasing Li concentration and increasing δ7 Li) as the reaction front propagated into the host rock. Li-chronometric constraints indicate that the timescales of fluid-rock interaction associated with type II vein formation are on the order of 1 to 4 months (0.150-0.08+0.14 years). The short-lived, pulse-like character of this process is consistent with the notion that fluid flow caused by oceanic crust dehydration at the blueschist-to-eclogite transition contributes to or even dominates episodic pore fluid pressure increases at the

  12. The Boundary Layer Flows of a Rivlin-Ericksen Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghy, K.; Khabazi, N.; Taghavi, S. M.

    The present work deals with the two-dimensional incompressible, laminar, steady-state boundary layer equations. First, we determine a family of velocity distributions outside the boundary layer such that these problems may have similarity solutions. We study the Falkner-Skan flow of a viscoelastic fluid governed by second order model, as the Reynolds number Re→ ∞. We obtain an ordinary forth order differential equation to obtain the stream function, velocity profile and the stress. The stream function is then governed by a generalized Falkner-Skan equation. In comparison with Newtonian Falkner-Skan equation that has two coefficients this new one has four coefficients that two of them represent elastic properties of the fluid. The effects of the elastic parameter on the velocity filed have been discussed. As it is shown in the figure there is a good agreement between numerical results and previous special cases confirm the validity of the presented algorithm.

  13. Visualization periodic flows in a continuously stratified fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakov, R.; Vasiliev, A.

    2012-04-01

    To visualize the flow pattern of viscous continuously stratified fluid both experimental and computational methods were developed. Computational procedures were based on exact solutions of set of the fundamental equations. Solutions of the problems of flows producing by periodically oscillating disk (linear and torsion oscillations) were visualized with a high resolutions to distinguish small-scale the singular components on the background of strong internal waves. Numerical algorithm of visualization allows to represent both the scalar and vector fields, such as velocity, density, pressure, vorticity, stream function. The size of the source, buoyancy and oscillation frequency, kinematic viscosity of the medium effects were traced in 2D an 3D posing problems. Precision schlieren instrument was used to visualize the flow pattern produced by linear and torsion oscillations of strip and disk in a continuously stratified fluid. Uniform stratification was created by the continuous displacement method. The buoyancy period ranged from 7.5 to 14 s. In the experiments disks with diameters from 9 to 30 cm and a thickness of 1 mm to 10 mm were used. Different schlieren methods that are conventional vertical slit - Foucault knife, vertical slit - filament (Maksoutov's method) and horizontal slit - horizontal grating (natural "rainbow" schlieren method) help to produce supplementing flow patterns. Both internal wave beams and fine flow components were visualized in vicinity and far from the source. Intensity of high gradient envelopes increased proportionally the amplitude of the source. In domains of envelopes convergence isolated small scale vortices and extended mushroom like jets were formed. Experiments have shown that in the case of torsion oscillations pattern of currents is more complicated than in case of forced linear oscillations. Comparison with known theoretical model shows that nonlinear interactions between the regular and singular flow components must be taken

  14. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Models in sheet cavitation in cryogenic fluids are developed for use in Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The models are based upon earlier potential-flow models but enable the cavity inception point, length, and shape to be determined as part of the computation. In the present paper, numerical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for both pressure distribution and cavity length. Comparisons between models are also presented. The CFD model provides a relatively simple modification to an existing code to enable cavitation performance predictions to be included. The analysis also has the added ability of incorporating thermodynamic effects of cryogenic fluids into the analysis. Extensions of the current two-dimensional steady state analysis to three-dimensions and/or time-dependent flows are, in principle, straightforward although geometrical issues become more complicated. Linearized models, however offer promise of providing effective cavitation modeling in three-dimensions. This analysis presents good potential for improved understanding of many phenomena associated with cavity flows.

  15. Persistent Homology to describe Solid and Fluid Structures during Multiphase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, A. L.; Robins, V.; Liu, Z.; Armstrong, R. T.; Sheppard, A.

    2017-12-01

    The question of how to accurately and effectively characterize essential fluid and solid distributions and structures is a long-standing topic within the field of porous media and fluid transport. For multiphase flow applications, considerable research effort has been made to describe fluid distributions under a range of conditions; including quantification of saturation levels, fluid-fluid pressure differences and interfacial areas, and fluid connectivity. Recent research has effectively used topological metrics to describe pore space and fluid connectivity, with researchers demonstrating links between pore-scale nonwetting phase topology to fluid mobilization and displacement mechanisms, relative permeability, fluid flow regimes, and thermodynamic models of multiphase flow. While topology is clearly a powerful tool to describe fluid distribution, topological metrics by definition provide information only on the connectivity of a phase, not its geometry (shape or size). Physical flow characteristics, e.g. the permeability of a fluid phase within a porous medium, are dependent on the connectivity of the pore space or fluid phase as well as the size of connections. Persistent homology is a technique which provides a direct link between topology and geometry via measurement of topological features and their persistence from the signed Euclidean distance transform of a segmented digital image (Figure 1). We apply persistent homology analysis to measure the occurrence and size of pore-scale topological features in a variety of sandstones, for both the dry state and the nonwetting phase fluid during two-phase fluid flow (drainage and imbibition) experiments, visualized with 3D X-ray microtomography. The results provide key insights into the dominant topological features and length scales of a media which control relevant field-scale engineering properties such as fluid trapping, absolute permeability, and relative permeability.

  16. Numerical analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a helical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... Numerical analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a helical rectangular .... by comparing the results of a conical spiral tube bundle modeled using the same software with that of.

  17. Flow of a non-Newtonian fluid through channels with permeable wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins-Costa, Maria Laura [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Matematica Teorica e Aplicada]. E-mail: laura@mec.uff.br; Gama, Rogerio M. Saldanha da [Laboratorio Nacional de Computacao Cientifica (LNCC), Petropolis, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: rsgama@domain.com.br; Frey, Sergio [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Grupo de Estudos Termicos e Energeticos

    2000-07-01

    In the present work the momentum transport in two adjacent flow regions is described by means of a continuum theory of mixtures, specially developed to model multiphase phenomena. A generalized Newtonian fluid flows through the permeable wall channel, originating a pure fluid region and a mixture region - where the fluid saturates the porous matrix. The fluid and the porous matrix are treated as continuous constituents of a binary mixture coexisting superposed, each of them occupying simultaneously the whole volume of the mixture. An Ostwald-de Waele behavior is assumed for both the fluid constituent (in the mixture region) and the fluid (in the so-called pure fluid region), while the porous matrix, represented by the solid constituent, is assumed rigid, homogeneous, isotropic and at rest. Compatibility conditions at the interface (pure fluid-mixture) for momentum transfer are proposed and discussed. Assuming no flow across the interface, the velocity should be zero on the solid parts of the boundary and should match the fluid diffusing velocity on the fluid parts of the boundary. Also the shear stress at the pure fluid region is to be balanced by a multiple of the partial shear stress at the mixture region. A minimum principle for the above-described problem, assuming fully developed flow in both regions, is presented, providing an easy and reliable way for carrying out numerical simulations. (author)

  18. Tracing fluid flow in geothermal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.E.; Adams, M.C. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A family of fluorescent compounds, the polycyclic aromatic sulfonates, were evaluated for application in intermediate- and high-temperature geothermal reservoirs. Whereas the naphthalene sulfonates were found to be very thermally stable and reasonably detectable, the amino-substituted naphthalene sulfonates were found to be somewhat less thermally stable, but much more detectable. A tracer test was conducted at the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir using one of the substituted naphthalene sulfonates, amino G, and fluorescein. Four of 9 production wells showed tracer breakthrough during the first 200 days of the test. Reconstructed tracer return curves are presented that correct for the thermal decay of tracer assuming an average reservoir temperature of 227{degrees}C. In order to examine the feasibility of using numerical simulation to model tracer flow, we developed simple, two-dimensional models of the geothermal reservoir using the numerical simulation programs TETRAD and TOUGH2. By fitting model outputs to measured return curves, we show that numerical reservoir simulations can be calibrated with the tracer data. Both models predict the same order of elution, approximate tracer concentrations, and return curve shapes. Using these results, we propose a method for using numerical models to design a tracer test.

  19. Calculation of incompressible fluid flow through cambered blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C. C.

    1970-01-01

    Conformal mapping technique yields linear, approximate solutions for calculating flow of an incompressible fluid through staggered array of cambered blades for the cases of flow with partial cavitation and supercavitation. Lift and drag coefficients, cavitation number, cavity shape, and exit flow conditions can be determined.

  20. Numerical simulation of fluid flow in a rotational bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganimedov, V. L.; Papaeva, E. O.; Maslov, N. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2017-10-01

    Application of scaffold technology for the problem of bone tissue regeneration has great prospects in modern medicine. The influence of fluid shear stress on stem cells cultivation and its differentiation into osteoblasts is the subject of intensive research. Mathematical modeling of fluid flow in bioreactor allowed us to determine the structure of flow and estimate the level of mechanical stress on cells. The series of computations for different rotation frequencies (0.083, 0.124, 0.167, 0.2 and 0.233 Hz) was performed for the laminar flow regime approximation. It was shown that the Taylor vortices in the gap between the cylinders qualitatively change the distribution of static pressure and shear stress in the region of vortices connection. It was shown that an increase in the rotation frequency leads to an increase of the unevenness in distribution of the above mentioned functions. The obtained shear stress and static pressure dependence on the rotational frequency make it possible to choose the operating mode of the reactor depending on the provided requirements. It was shown that in the range of rotation frequencies chosen in this work (0.083 < f < 0.233 Hz), the shear stress does not exceed the known literature data (0.002 - 0.1 Pa).

  1. Kinematics of a Fluid Ellipse in a Linear Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Lilly

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A four-parameter kinematic model for the position of a fluid parcel in a time-varying ellipse is introduced. For any ellipse advected by an arbitrary linear two-dimensional flow, the rates of change of the ellipse parameters are uniquely determined by the four parameters of the velocity gradient matrix, and vice versa. This result, termed ellipse/flow equivalence, provides a stronger version of the well-known result that a linear velocity field maps an ellipse into another ellipse. Moreover, ellipse/flow equivalence is shown to be a manifestation of Stokes’ theorem. This is done by deriving a matrix-valued extension of the classical Stokes’ theorem that involves a spatial integral over the velocity gradient tensor, thus accounting for the two strain terms in addition to the divergence and vorticity. General expressions for various physical properties of an elliptical ring of fluid are also derived. The ellipse kinetic energy is found to be composed of three portions, associated respectively with the circulation, the rate of change of the moment of inertia, and the variance of parcel angular velocity around the ellipse. A particular innovation is the use of four matrices, termed the I J K L basis, that greatly facilitate the required calculations.

  2. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  3. Acceleration of coupled granular flow and fluid flow simulations in pebble bed energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yanheng; Ji, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fast simulation of coupled pebble flow and coolant flow in PBR systems is studied. ► Dimension reduction based on axisymmetric geometry shows significant speedup. ► Relaxation of coupling frequency is investigated and an optimal range is determined. ► A total of 80% efficiency increase is achieved by the two fast strategies. ► Fast strategies can be applied to simulating other general fluidized bed systems. -- Abstract: Fast and accurate approaches to simulating the coupled particle flow and fluid flow are of importance to the analysis of large particle-fluid systems. This is especially needed when one tries to simulate pebble flow and coolant flow in Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) energy systems on a routine basis. As one of the Generation IV designs, the PBR design is a promising nuclear energy system with high fuel performance and inherent safety. A typical PBR core can be modeled as a particle-fluid system with strong interactions among pebbles, coolants and reactor walls. In previous works, the coupled Discrete Element Method (DEM)-Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach has been investigated and applied to modeling PBR systems. However, the DEM-CFD approach is computationally expensive due to large amounts of pebbles in PBR systems. This greatly restricts the PBR analysis for the real time prediction and inclusion of more physics. In this work, based on the symmetry of the PBR geometry and the slow motion characteristics of the pebble flow, two acceleration strategies are proposed. First, a simplified 3D-DEM/2D-CFD approach is proposed to speed up the DEM-CFD simulation without loss of accuracy. Pebble flow is simulated by a full 3D DEM, while the coolant flow field is calculated with a 2D CFD simulation by averaging variables along the annular direction in the cylindrical and annular geometries. Second, based on the slow motion of pebble flow, the impact of the coupling frequency on the computation accuracy and efficiency is

  4. Acceleration of coupled granular flow and fluid flow simulations in pebble bed energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanheng, E-mail: liy19@rpi.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY (United States); Ji, Wei, E-mail: jiw2@rpi.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Fast simulation of coupled pebble flow and coolant flow in PBR systems is studied. ► Dimension reduction based on axisymmetric geometry shows significant speedup. ► Relaxation of coupling frequency is investigated and an optimal range is determined. ► A total of 80% efficiency increase is achieved by the two fast strategies. ► Fast strategies can be applied to simulating other general fluidized bed systems. -- Abstract: Fast and accurate approaches to simulating the coupled particle flow and fluid flow are of importance to the analysis of large particle-fluid systems. This is especially needed when one tries to simulate pebble flow and coolant flow in Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) energy systems on a routine basis. As one of the Generation IV designs, the PBR design is a promising nuclear energy system with high fuel performance and inherent safety. A typical PBR core can be modeled as a particle-fluid system with strong interactions among pebbles, coolants and reactor walls. In previous works, the coupled Discrete Element Method (DEM)-Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach has been investigated and applied to modeling PBR systems. However, the DEM-CFD approach is computationally expensive due to large amounts of pebbles in PBR systems. This greatly restricts the PBR analysis for the real time prediction and inclusion of more physics. In this work, based on the symmetry of the PBR geometry and the slow motion characteristics of the pebble flow, two acceleration strategies are proposed. First, a simplified 3D-DEM/2D-CFD approach is proposed to speed up the DEM-CFD simulation without loss of accuracy. Pebble flow is simulated by a full 3D DEM, while the coolant flow field is calculated with a 2D CFD simulation by averaging variables along the annular direction in the cylindrical and annular geometries. Second, based on the slow motion of pebble flow, the impact of the coupling frequency on the computation accuracy and efficiency is

  5. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 progress report and presentations at the annual meeting, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, December 3-4, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faybishenko, B.; Doughty, C.; Geller, J.

    1998-07-01

    Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, the authors examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to develop a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, they measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which they try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies. View-graphs from ten presentations made at the annual meeting held December 3--4, 1997 are included in an appendix to this report

  6. Couple stress fluid flow in a rotating channel with peristalsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd elmaboud, Y.; Abdelsalam, Sara I.; Mekheimer, Kh. S.

    2018-04-01

    This article describes a new model for obtaining closed-form semi-analytical solutions of peristaltic flow induced by sinusoidal wave trains propagating with constant speed on the walls of a two-dimensional rotating infinite channel. The channel rotates with a constant angular speed about the z - axis and is filled with couple stress fluid. The governing equations of the channel deformation and the flow rate inside the channel are derived using the lubrication theory approach. The resulting equations are solved, using the homotopy perturbation method (HPM), for exact solutions to the longitudinal velocity distribution, pressure gradient, flow rate due to secondary velocity, and pressure rise per wavelength. The effect of various values of physical parameters, such as, Taylor's number and couple stress parameter, together with some interesting features of peristaltic flow are discussed through graphs. The trapping phenomenon is investigated for different values of parameters under consideration. It is shown that Taylor's number and the couple stress parameter have an increasing effect on the longitudinal velocity distribution till half of the channel, on the flow rate due to secondary velocity, and on the number of closed streamlines circulating the bolus.

  7. Superconfinement tailors fluid flow at microscales.

    KAUST Repository

    Setu, Siti Aminah

    2015-06-15

    Understanding fluid dynamics under extreme confinement, where device and intrinsic fluid length scales become comparable, is essential to successfully develop the coming generations of fluidic devices. Here we report measurements of advancing fluid fronts in such a regime, which we dub superconfinement. We find that the strong coupling between contact-line friction and geometric confinement gives rise to a new stability regime where the maximum speed for a stable moving front exhibits a distinctive response to changes in the bounding geometry. Unstable fronts develop into drop-emitting jets controlled by thermal fluctuations. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics in superconfined systems is dominated by interfacial forces. Henceforth, we present a theory that quantifies our experiments in terms of the relevant interfacial length scale, which in our system is the intrinsic contact-line slip length. Our findings show that length-scale overlap can be used as a new fluid-control mechanism in strongly confined systems.

  8. Ultrasonic Doppler Velocity Profiler for Fluid Flow

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) method, first developed in medical engineering, is now widely used in clinical settings. The fluid mechanical basis of UVP was established in investigations by the author and his colleagues with work demonstrating that UVP is a powerful new tool in experimental fluid mechanics. There are diverse examples, ranging from problems in fundamental fluid dynamics to applied problems in mechanical, chemical, nuclear, and environmental engineering. In all these problems, the methodological principle in fluid mechanics was converted from point measurements to spatio-temporal measurements along a line. This book is the first monograph on UVP that offers comprehensive information about the method, its principles, its practice, and applied examples, and which serves both current and new users. Current users can confirm that their application configurations are correct, which will help them to improve the configurations so as to make them more efficient and effective. New users will be...

  9. Centrifuge in space fluid flow visualization experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William A.; Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Dunbar, Bonnie J.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype flow visualization system is constructed to examine buoyancy driven flows during centrifugation in space. An axial density gradient is formed by imposing a thermal gradient between the two ends of the test cell. Numerical computations for this geometry showed that the Prandtl number plays a limited part in determining the flow.

  10. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1: Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re(sub max), Re(sub w), and A(sub R), embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. Volume 1 contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  11. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T.W.

    1992-03-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program is oscillating flow within a circular duct are present. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re max , Re W , and A R , embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radical components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and in reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. The following is presented in two-volumes. Volume I contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume II contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation)

  12. Sensor for Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu; Trease, Brian P.; Kerenyi, Kornel; Widholm, Scott E.; Ostlund, Patrick N.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex and lead to low-fidelity results. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress, normal stress, and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, most direct-measurement shear sensors are bulky in size or not compatible to fluid flow. A sensor has been developed that consists of a floating plate with folded beam support and an optical grid on the back, combined with a high-resolution optical position probe. The folded beam support makes the floating plate more flexible in the sensing direction within a small footprint, while maintaining high stiffness in the other directions. The floating plate converts the shear force to displacement, and the optical probe detects the plate s position with nanometer resolution by sensing the pattern of the diffraction field of the grid through a glass window. This configuration makes the sensor compatible with liquid flow applications.

  13. Geothermal heat exchanger with coaxial flow of fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejić Dragan M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a heat exchanger with coaxial flow. Two coaxial pipes of the secondary part were placed directly into a geothermal boring in such a way that geothermal water flows around the outer pipe. Starting from the energy balance of the exchanger formed in this way and the assumption of a study-state operating regime, a mathematical model was formulated. On the basis of the model, the secondary circle output temperature was determined as a function of the exchanger geometry, the coefficient of heat passing through the heat exchange areas, the average mass isobaric specific heats of fluid and mass flows. The input temperature of the exchanger secondary circle and the temperature of the geothermal water at the exit of the boring were taken as known values. Also, an analysis of changes in certain factors influencing the secondary water temperature was carried out. The parameters (flow temperature of the deep boring B-4 in Sijarinska Spa, Serbia were used. The theoretical results obtained indicate the great potential of this boring and the possible application of such an exchanger.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a mixed flow pump impeller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ATHARVA

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... From the CFD analysis software and advanced post processing tools the complex flow inside the ... The numerical simulation can provide quite accurate information on the fluid ...

  15. Nonlinear transport processes and fluid dynamics: Cylindrical Couette flow of Lennard-Jones fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayat, R.E.; Eu, B.C.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we report on calculations of flow profiles for cylindrical Couette flow of a Lennard-Jones fluid. The flow is subjected to a temperature gradient and thermoviscous effects are taken into consideration. We apply the generalized fluid dynamic equations which are provided by the modified moment method for the Boltzmann equation reported previously. The results of calculations are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo direct simulation method by K. Nanbu [Phys. Fluids 27, 2632 (1984)] for most of Knudsen numbers for which the simulation data are available

  16. Flow of viscoplastic fluids in eccentric annular geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    1992-01-01

    A classification of flowfields for the flow of a Bingham fluid in general eccentric annular geometries is presented. Simple arguments show that a singularity can exist in the stress gradient on boundaries between zones with yielded and un-yielded fluid respectively. A Finite Element code is used...

  17. Three ways to show 3D fluid flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van J.J.; Hin, A.J.S.; Leeuw, de W.C.; Post, F.H.

    1994-01-01

    Visualizing 3D fluid flow fields presents a challenge to scientific visualization, mainly because no natural visual representation of 3D vector fields exists. We can readily recognize geometric objects, color, and texture: unfortunately for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) researchers, vector

  18. Mechanical stimulation of bone cells using fluid flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huesa, C.; Bakker, A.D.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes several methods suitable for mechanically stimulating monolayers of bone cells by fluid shear stress (FSS) in vitro. Fluid flow is generated by pumping culture medium through two parallel plates, one of which contains a monolayer of cells. Methods for measuring nitric oxide

  19. A flow meter for ultrasonically measuring the flow velocity of fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The invention regards a flow meter for ultrasonically measuring the flow velocity of fluids comprising a duct having a flow channel with an internal cross section comprising variation configured to generate at least one acoustic resonance within the flow channel for a specific ultrasonic frequency......, and at least two transducers for generating and sensing ultrasonic pulses, configured to transmit ultrasonic pulses at least at said specific ultrasonic frequency into the flow channel such that the ultrasonic pulses propagate through a fluid flowing in the flow channel, wherein the flow meter is configured...

  20. Lattice Boltzmann computation of creeping fluid flow in roll-coating applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Isac; Kesana, Balashanker; Perumal, D. Arumuga

    2018-04-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has advanced as a class of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods used to solve complex fluid systems and heat transfer problems. It has ever-increasingly attracted the interest of researchers in computational physics to solve challenging problems of industrial and academic importance. In this current study, LBM is applied to simulate the creeping fluid flow phenomena commonly encountered in manufacturing technologies. In particular, we apply this novel method to simulate the fluid flow phenomena associated with the "meniscus roll coating" application. This prevalent industrial problem encountered in polymer processing and thin film coating applications is modelled as standard lid-driven cavity problem to which creeping flow analysis is applied. This incompressible viscous flow problem is studied in various speed ratios, the ratio of upper to lower lid speed in two different configurations of lid movement - parallel and anti-parallel wall motion. The flow exhibits interesting patterns which will help in design of roll coaters.

  1. Streamline topology: Patterns in fluid flows and their bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    2007-01-01

    Using dynamical systems theory, we consider structures such as vortices and separation in the streamline patterns of fluid flows. Bifurcation of patterns under variation of external parameters is studied using simplifying normal form transformations. Flows away from boundaries, flows close to fix...... walls, and axisymmetric flows are analyzed in detail. We show how to apply the ideas from the theory to analyze numerical simulations of the vortex breakdown in a closed cylindrical container....

  2. Deformation, Fluid Flow and Mantle Serpentinization at Oceanic Transform Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupke, L.; Hasenclever, J.

    2017-12-01

    Oceanic transform faults (OTF) and fracture zones have long been hypothesized to be sites of enhanced fluid flow and biogeochemical exchange. In this context, the serpentine forming interaction between seawater and cold lithospheric mantle rocks is particularly interesting. The transformation of peridotite to serpentinite not only leads to hydration of oceanic plates and is thereby an important agent of the geological water cycle, it is also a mechanism of abiotic hydrogen and methane formation, which can support archeal and bacterial communities at the seafloor. Inferring the likely amount of mantle undergoing serpentinization reactions therefore allows estimating the amount of biomass that may be autotrophically produced at and around oceanic transform faults and mid-ocean ridges Here we present results of 3-D geodynamic model simulations that explore the interrelations between deformation, fluid flow, and mantle serpentinization at oceanic transform faults. We investigate how slip rate and fault offset affect the predicted patterns of mantle serpentinization around oceanic transform faults. Global rates of mantle serpentinization and associated H2 production are calculated by integrating the modeling results with plate boundary data. The global additional OTF-related production of H2 is found to be between 6.1 and 10.7 x 1011 mol per year, which is comparable to the predicted background mid-ocean ridge rate of 4.1 - 15.0 x 1011 mol H2/yr. This points to oceanic transform faults as potential sites of intense fluid-rock interaction, where chemosynthetic life could be sustained by serpentinization reactions.

  3. Flow Velocities After Carotid Artery Stenting: Impact of Stent Design. A Fluid Dynamics Study in a Carotid Artery Model with Laser Doppler Anemometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greil, Oliver; Kleinschmidt, Thomas; Weiss, Wolfgang; Wolf, Oliver; Heider, Peter; Schaffner, Silvio; Gianotti, Marc; Schmid, Thomas; Liepsch, Dieter; Berger, Hermann

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To study the influence of a newly developed membrane stent design on flow patterns in a physiologic carotid artery model. Methods. Three different stents were positioned in silicone models of the carotid artery: a stainless steel stent (Wall-stent), a nitinol stent (SelfX), and a nitinol stent with a semipermeable membrane (MembraX). To increase the contact area of the membrane with the vessel wall, another MembranX model was modified at the outflow tract. The membrane consists of a biocompatible silicone-polyurethane copolymer (Elast-Eon) with a pore size of 100 μm. All stents were deployed across the bifurcation and the external carotid artery origin. Flow velocity measurements were performed with laser Doppler anemometry (LDA), using pulsatile flow conditions (Re = 220; flow 0.39 l/min; flow rate ratio ICA:ECA = 70:30) in hemodynamically relevant cross-sections. The hemodynamic changes were analyzed by comparing velocity fluctuations of corresponding flow profiles. Results. The flow rate ratio ICA:ECA shifted significantly from 70/30 to 73.9/26.1 in the MembraX and remained nearly unchanged in the SelfX and Wallstent. There were no changes in the flow patterns at the inflow proximal to the stents. In the stent no relevant changes were found in the SelfX. In the Wallstent the separation zone shifted from the orifice of the ICA to the distal end of the stent. Four millimeters distal to the SelfX and the Wallstent the flow profile returned to normal. In the MembraX an increase in the central slipstreams was found with creation of a flow separation distal to the stent. With a modification of the membrane this flow separation vanished. In the ECA flow disturbances were seen at the inner wall distal to the stent struts in the SelfX and the Wallstent. With the MembraX a calming of flow could be observed in the ECA with a slight loss of flow volume. Conclusions. Stent placement across the carotid artery bifurcation induces alterations of the physiologic flow

  4. Bone tissue engineering: the role of interstitial fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillsley, M. V.; Frangos, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established that vascularization is required for effective bone healing. This implies that blood flow and interstitial fluid (ISF) flow are required for healing and maintenance of bone. The fact that changes in bone blood flow and ISF flow are associated with changes in bone remodeling and formation support this theory. ISF flow in bone results from transcortical pressure gradients produced by vascular and hydrostatic pressure, and mechanical loading. Conditions observed to alter flow rates include increases in venous pressure in hypertension, fluid shifts occurring in bedrest and microgravity, increases in vascularization during the injury-healing response, and mechanical compression and bending of bone during exercise. These conditions also induce changes in bone remodeling. Previously, we hypothesized that interstitial fluid flow in bone, and in particular fluid shear stress, serves to mediate signal transduction in mechanical loading- and injury-induced remodeling. In addition, we proposed that a lack or decrease of ISF flow results in the bone loss observed in disuse and microgravity. The purpose of this article is to review ISF flow in bone and its role in osteogenesis.

  5. Investigation of the fluid flow dynamic parameters for Newtonian and non-Newtonian materials: an approach to understanding the fluid flow-like structures within fault zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H.; Shiomi, Y.; Ma, K.-F.

    2017-11-01

    To understand the fault zone fluid flow-like structure, namely the ductile deformation structure, often observed in the geological field (e.g., Ramsay and Huber The techniques of modern structure geology, vol. 1: strain analysis, Academia Press, London, 1983; Hobbs and Ord Structure geology: the mechanics of deforming metamorphic rocks, Vol. I: principles, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2015), we applied a theoretical approach to estimate the rate of deformation, the shear stress and the time to form a streak-line pattern in the boundary layer of viscous fluids. We model the dynamics of streak lines in laminar boundary layers for Newtonian and pseudoplastic fluids and compare the results to those obtained via laboratory experiments. The structure of deformed streak lines obtained using our model is consistent with experimental observations, indicating that our model is appropriate for understanding the shear rate, flow time and shear stress based on the profile of deformed streak lines in the boundary layer in Newtonian and pseudoplastic viscous materials. This study improves our understanding of the transportation processes in fluids and of the transformation processes in fluid-like materials. Further application of this model could facilitate understanding the shear stress and time history of the fluid flow-like structure of fault zones observed in the field.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Fluid-elastic vibration in two-phase cross flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasakawa, T.; Serizawa, A.; Kawara, Z.

    2003-01-01

    The present work aims at clarifying the mechanisms of fluid elastic vibration of tube bundles in two-phase cross flow. The experiment is conducted using air-water two-phase flow under atmospheric pressure. The test section is a 1.03m long transparent acrylic square duct with 128 x 128 mm 2 cross section, which consists of 3 rod-rows with 5 rods in each row. The rods are 125mm long aluminum rods with 22 mm in diameter (p/D=1.45). The natural frequency of rod vibration is about 30Hz. The result indicated a diversion of observed trend in vibration behavior depending on two-phase flow patterns either bubbly flow or churn flow. Specifically, in churn flow, the fluid elastic vibration has been observed to occur when the frequency in void fraction fluctuation approached to the natural frequency of the rods, but this was not the case in fluid elastic vibration in bubbly flow. This fact suggests the existence of mechanisms closely coupled with two-phase flow structures depending on the flow patterns, that is, static two-phase character-controlled mechanism in bubbly flow and dynamic character- controlled in churn flow

  7. CFD simulations of flow erosion and flow-induced deformation of needle valve: Effects of operation, structure and fluid parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongjun, E-mail: ticky863@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500, Sichuan (China); State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Pan, Qian; Zhang, Wenli; Feng, Guang; Li, Xue [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500, Sichuan (China)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A combined FSI–CFD and DPM computational method is used to investigate flow erosion and deformation of needle valve. • The numerical model is validated with the comparison of measured and predicted erosion rate. • Effects of operation, structure and fluid parameters on flow erosion and flow-induced deformation are discussed. • Particle diameter has the most significant effect on flow erosion. • Inlet rate has the most obvious effect on flow-induced deformation. - Abstract: A three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction (FSI) computational model coupling with a combined continuum and discrete model has been used to predict the flow erosion rate and flow-induced deformation of needle valve. Comparisons with measured data demonstrate good agreement with the predictions of erosion rate. The flow field distribution of gas-particle flow and the erosion rate and deformation of valve core are captured under different operating and structural conditions with different fluid parameters. The effects of inlet velocity, valve opening and inlet valve channel size, particle concentration, particle diameter and particle phase components are discussed in detail. The results indicate that valve tip has the most severe erosion and deformation, and flow field, erosion rate and deformation of valve are all sensitive to inlet condition changes, structural changes and fluid properties changes. The effect of particle diameter on erosion is the most significant, while the influence of inlet rate on deformation is the greatest one.

  8. Distributed thermal micro sensors for fluid flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, J.J.J.

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis thermal sensor-actuator structures are proposed for measuring the parameters pressure p, dynamic viscosity μ, thermal conductivity , specific heat c, density and the fluid velocity v. In this chapter examples will be given of the added value of many identical simple elements and the

  9. Multiphase flow of immiscible fluids on unstructured moving meshes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization op...

  10. Mixed convective flow of immiscible viscous fluids confined between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... finite difference methods to analyze the problem of natural convection boundary layer flow along a complex vertical surface ... analyzed the flow of two immiscible fluids in a parallel plate channel ... wavy and flat walls are maintained at constant temperatures w.

  11. Multiphase Flow of Immiscible Fluids on Unstructured Moving Meshes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization op...

  12. Numerical Simulation of Complex Multi-Fluid Flows using a Combined Immersed Boundary and Volume of Fluid Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, N.G.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a simulation model is presented for the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of complex multi-fluid flows in which simultaneously (moving) deformable (drops or bubbles) and non-deformable (moving) elements (particles) are present, possibly with the additional presence of free surfaces.

  13. Unsteady flow of fractional Oldroyd-B fluids through rotating annulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Madeeha; Naeem, Muhammad Nawaz; Javaid, Maria; Younas, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad; Sadiq, Naeem; Safdar, Rabia

    2018-04-01

    In this paper exact solutions corresponding to the rotational flow of a fractional Oldroyd-B fluid, in an annulus, are determined by applying integral transforms. The fluid starts moving after t = 0+ when pipes start rotating about their axis. The final solutions are presented in the form of usual Bessel and hypergeometric functions, true for initial and boundary conditions. The limiting cases for the solutions for ordinary Oldroyd-B, fractional Maxwell and Maxwell and Newtonian fluids are obtained. Moreover, the solution is obtained for the fluid when one pipe is rotating and the other one is at rest. At the end of this paper some characteristics of fluid motion, the effect of the physical parameters on the flow and a correlation between different fluid models are discussed. Finally, graphical representations confirm the above affirmation.

  14. Compressible fluid flows driven by stochastic forcing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Maslowski, B.; Novotný, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 254, č. 3 (2013), s. 1342-1358 ISSN 0022-0396 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : stochastic Navier-Stokes equations * compressible fluid * random driving force Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.570, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022039612004135

  15. Direct numerical simulation of solidification microstructures affected by fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juric, D.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of fluid flow on the solidification morphology of pure materials and solute microsegregation patterns of binary alloys are studied using a computational methodology based on a front tracking/finite difference method. A general single field formulation is presented for the full coupling of phase change, fluid flow, heat and solute transport. This formulation accounts for interfacial rejection/absorption of latent heat and solute, interfacial anisotropies, discontinuities in material properties between the liquid and solid phases, shrinkage/expansion upon solidification and motion and deformation of the solid. Numerical results are presented for the two dimensional dendritic solidification of pure succinonitrile and the solidification of globulitic grains of a plutonium-gallium alloy. For both problems, comparisons are made between solidification without fluid flow and solidification within a shear flow

  16. Periodic flow patterns of the magnetic fluid in microchannel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.-W.; Cheng, Y.-T.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Chien, J.-H.; Wang, P.-Y.; Chen, P.-H.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, of interests are the periodic flow patterns of the oil-based magnetic fluid in microchannels. A microfluidic chip is made of poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and contains cross-shape microchannels. The microchannels are 1000 μm in width and 200 μm in depth. A syringe pump was used to drive the fluids. Periodic flow patterns were seen and the slugs of magnetic fluid and DI water were generated. The operating factors discussed in the present work are the flow rates and the magnetic field. The frequency of generation of the slugs increases with increase in the flow rates. Besides, by settling the permanent magnet around the microchannel, the periods of the slug generation are changed. Different positions of the magnet lead to different periods for generating the slugs. By adjusting operating conditions, to control the frequency and the volume of the slugs is practical

  17. Numerical Investigation on Fluid Flow in a 90-Degree Curved Pipe with Large Curvature Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the mechanism of fluid flows in curved pipes, a large number of theoretical and experimental researches have been performed. As a critical parameter of curved pipe, the curvature ratio δ has received much attention, but most of the values of δ are very small (δ<0.1 or relatively small (δ≤0.5. As a preliminary study and simulation this research studied the fluid flow in a 90-degree curved pipe of large curvature ratio. The Detached Eddy Simulation (DES turbulence model was employed to investigate the fluid flows at the Reynolds number range from 5000 to 20000. After validation of the numerical strategy, the pressure and velocity distribution, pressure drop, fluid flow, and secondary flow along the curved pipe were illustrated. The results show that the fluid flow in a curved pipe with large curvature ratio seems to be unlike that in a curved pipe with small curvature ratio. Large curvature ratio makes the internal flow more complicated; thus, the flow patterns, the separation region, and the oscillatory flow are different.

  18. STAFAN, Fluid Flow, Mechanical Stress in Fractured Rock of Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyakorn, P.; Golis, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: STAFAN (Stress And Flow Analysis) is a two-dimensional, finite-element code designed to model fluid flow and the interaction of fluid pressure and mechanical stresses in a fractured rock surrounding a nuclear waste repository. STAFAN considers flow behavior of a deformable fractured system with fracture-porous matrix interactions, the coupling effects of fluid pressure and mechanical stresses in a medium containing discrete joints, and the inelastic response of the individual joints of the rock mass subject to the combined fluid pressure and mechanical loading. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: STAFAN does not presently contain thermal coupling, and it is unable to simulate inelastic deformation of the rock mass and variably saturated or two-phase flow in the fractured porous medium system

  19. Considerations of a nonhomogeneous fluid in the deep groundwater flow system at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.W.

    1988-11-01

    This report presents such a general theory capable of describing the flow on nonhomogeneous fluids in porous media, theory that is a composite from several disciplines including groundwater hydrology, soil physics, civil engineering, petroleum reservoir engineering, mechanics, and mathematical physics. The report discussed the conceptual basis for considering the flow of nonhomogeneous fluids. From this conceptual basis emphasis shifts to providing complete definitions and then appropriately describing those definitions in mathematical terms. Throughout the report, the necessary assumptions are stated in detail because the limitations of any theory are best assessed through careful scrutiny of the assumptions. From the mathematical definitions with appropriate functional dependence the results and constraints needed are derived to provide the general theory necessary to describe the flow of nonhomogeneous fluids in porous media. Particular attention is given to comparing the general theory with the classical theory of flow for a homogeneous fluid. Such comparison provides significant insight to the effects of variable fluid properties on subsurface flow systems. The comparisons also indicate the importance of carefully formulating subsurface flow models within the more general theoretical framework describing the flow of nonhomogeneous fluids in porous media. 29 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab

  20. Modeling the natural convective flow of micropolar nanofluids

    KAUST Repository

    Bourantas, Georgios; Loukopoulos, Vassilios C.

    2014-01-01

    transfer from the heated wall and should not therefore be neglected when computing heat and fluid flow of micropolar fluids, as nanofluids. The validity of the proposed model is depicted by comparing the numerical results obtained with available