WorldWideScience

Sample records for fluid component facility

  1. Explosive Components Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  2. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  3. Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility is a reusable test bed which is designed to be carried within the Shuttle cargo bay to investigate the systems and technologies associated with the efficient management of cryogens in space. Cryogenic fluid management consists of the systems and technologies for: (1) liquid storage and supply, including capillary acquisition/expulsion systems which provide single-phase liquid to the user system, (2) both passive and active thermal control systems, and (3) fluid transfer/resupply systems, including transfer lines and receiver tanks. The facility contains a storage and supply tank, a transfer line and a receiver tank, configured to provide low-g verification of fluid and thermal models of cryogenic storage and transfer processes. The facility will provide design data and criteria for future subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer system applications, such as Space Station life support, attitude control, power and fuel depot supply, resupply tankers, external tank (ET) propellant scavenging, and ground-based and space-based orbit transfer vehicles (OTV).

  4. Translator for Optimizing Fluid-Handling Components

    Landon, Mark; Perry, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    A software interface has been devised to facilitate optimization of the shapes of valves, elbows, fittings, and other components used to handle fluids under extreme conditions. This software interface translates data files generated by PLOT3D (a NASA grid-based plotting-and- data-display program) and by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software into a format in which the files can be read by Sculptor, which is a shape-deformation- and-optimization program. Sculptor enables the user to interactively, smoothly, and arbitrarily deform the surfaces and volumes in two- and three-dimensional CFD models. Sculptor also includes design-optimization algorithms that can be used in conjunction with the arbitrary-shape-deformation components to perform automatic shape optimization. In the optimization process, the output of the CFD software is used as feedback while the optimizer strives to satisfy design criteria that could include, for example, improved values of pressure loss, velocity, flow quality, mass flow, etc.

  5. Authorization basis status report (miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components)

    Stickney, R.G.

    1998-04-29

    This report presents the results of a systematic evaluation conducted to identify miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components with potential needed authorization basis upgrades. It provides the Authorization Basis upgrade plan for those miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components identified.

  6. Authorization basis status report (miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components)

    Stickney, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of a systematic evaluation conducted to identify miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components with potential needed authorization basis upgrades. It provides the Authorization Basis upgrade plan for those miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components identified

  7. Development of a test facility for analyzing supercritical fluid blowdown

    Roberto, Thiago D.; Alvim, Antonio C.M.

    2015-01-01

    The generation IV nuclear reactors under development mostly use supercritical fluids as the working fluid because higher temperatures improve the thermal efficiency. Supercritical fluids are used by modern nuclear power plants to achieve thermal efficiencies of around 45%. With water as the supercritical working fluid, these plants operate at a high temperature and pressure. However, experiments on supercritical water are limited by technical and financial difficulties. These difficulties can be overcome by using model fluids, which have more feasible supercritical conditions and exhibit a lower critical pressure and temperature. Experimental research is normally used to determine the conditions under which model fluids represent supercritical fluids under steady-state conditions. A fluid-to-fluid scaling approach has been proposed to determine model fluids that can represent supercritical fluids in a transient state. This paper presents an application of fractional scale analysis to determine the simulation parameters for a depressurization test facility. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and R134a gas were considered as the model fluids because their critical point conditions are more feasible than those of water. The similarities of water (prototype), CO 2 (model) and R134a (model) for depressurization in a pressure vessel were analyzed. (author)

  8. Microscope-Based Fluid Physics Experiments in the Fluids and Combustion Facility on ISS

    Doherty, Michael P.; Motil, Susan M.; Snead, John H.; Malarik, Diane C.

    2000-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the Microgravity Science Program is planning to conduct a large number of experiments on the International Space Station in both the Fluid Physics and Combustion Science disciplines, and is developing flight experiment hardware for use within the International Space Station's Fluids and Combustion Facility. Four fluids physics experiments that require an optical microscope will be sequentially conducted within a subrack payload to the Fluids Integrated Rack of the Fluids and Combustion Facility called the Light Microscopy Module, which will provide the containment, changeout, and diagnostic capabilities to perform the experiments. The Light Microscopy Module is planned as a fully remotely controllable on-orbit microscope facility, allowing flexible scheduling and control of experiments within International Space Station resources. This paper will focus on the four microscope-based experiments, specifically, their objectives and the sample cell and instrument hardware to accommodate their requirements.

  9. Fluid description of multi-component solar partially ionized plasma

    Khomenko, E.; Collados, M.; Vitas, N.; Díaz, A.

    2014-01-01

    We derive self-consistent formalism for the description of multi-component partially ionized solar plasma, by means of the coupled equations for the charged and neutral components for an arbitrary number of chemical species, and the radiation field. All approximations and assumptions are carefully considered. Generalized Ohm's law is derived for the single-fluid and two-fluid formalism. Our approach is analytical with some order-of-magnitude support calculations. After general equations are developed, we particularize to some frequently considered cases as for the interaction of matter and radiation

  10. Experimental Facilities for Performance Evaluation of Fast Reactor Components

    Chandramouli, S.; Kumar, V.A. Suresh; Shanmugavel, M.; Vijayakumar, G.; Vinod, V.; Noushad, I.B.; Babu, B.; Kumar, G. Padma; Nashine, B.K.; Rajan, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    Brief details about various experimental facilities catering to the testing and performance evaluation requirements of fast reactor components have been brought out. These facilities have been found to be immensely useful to continue research and development activities in the areas of component development and testing, sodium technology, thermal hydraulics and sodium instrumentation for the SFR’s. In addition new facilities which have been planned will be of great importance for the developmental activities related to future SFR’s

  11. The NASA Lewis Research Center Internal Fluid Mechanics Facility

    Porro, A. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Wasserbauer, C. A.; Andrews, T. B.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental facility specifically designed to investigate internal fluid duct flows is described. It is built in a modular fashion so that a variety of internal flow test hardware can be installed in the facility with minimal facility reconfiguration. The facility and test hardware interfaces are discussed along with design constraints of future test hardware. The plenum flow conditioning approach is also detailed. Available instrumentation and data acquisition capabilities are discussed. The incoming flow quality was documented over the current facility operating range. The incoming flow produces well behaved turbulent boundary layers with a uniform core. For the calibration duct used, the boundary layers approached 10 percent of the duct radius. Freestream turbulence levels at the various operating conditions varied from 0.64 to 0.69 percent of the average freestream velocity.

  12. Test facility for the evaluation of microwave transmission components

    Fong, C.G.; Poole, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    A Low Power Test Facility (LPTF) was developed to evaluate the performance of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) microwave transmission components for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The facility generates 26 to 60 GHz in modes of TE 01 , TE 02 , or TE 03 launched at power levels of 1/2 milliwatt. The propagation of the rf as it radiates from either transmitting or secondary reflecting microwave transmission components is recorded by a discriminating crystal detector mechanically manipulated at constant radius in spherical coordinates. The facility is used to test, calibrate, and verify the design of overmoded, circular waveguide components, quasi-optical reflecting elements before high power use. The test facility consists of microwave sources and metering components, such as VSWR, power and frequency meters, a rectangular TE 10 to circular TE 01 mode transducer, mode filter, circular TE 01 to 2.5 in. diameter overmoded waveguide with mode converters for combination of TE 01 to TE 03 modes. This assembly then connects to a circular waveguide launcher or the waveguide component under test

  13. Protein components in saliva and plaque fluid from irradiated primates

    Edgar, W.M.; Bowen, W.H.; Cole, M.F. (Caries Prevention and Research Branch, National Caries Program, NIDR, Bethesda, Maryland, USA)

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation of the major salivary glands of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) fed cariogenic diets leads to caries clinically indistinguishable from radiation caries in man. This study compares the organic compostion of individual samples of plaque fluid and saliva from irradiated and control monkeys receiving the same cariogenic diet. Plaque and saliva were collected from fasting, tranquillised animals. Four irradiated animals were sampled repeatedly as were non-irradiated controls. Total protein, albumin, immunoglobulins A, G, and M, and the third component of complement (C'3) were quantitated in plaque fluid and whole saliva. Salivary amylase and peroxidase activities were also determined. Plaque fluid and saliva samples were also subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The total viable anaerobic count and numbers of Streptococcus mutans were determined in samples of plaque. The results suggest that the major effect of irradiation leading to increased numbers of S. mutans and caries susceptibility is in the amount, and not the composition, of the saliva produced by the residual gland tissue. The scanty flow of saliva may reduce the effectiveness of cleansing, buffering and lubrication mechanisms as well as resulting in a marked reduction in the total amount of specific and non-specific immune factors entering the mouth.

  14. Protein components in saliva and plaque fluid from irradiated primates

    Edgar, W.M.; Bowen, W.H.; Cole, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation of the major salivary glands of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) fed cariogenic diets leads to caries clinically indistinguishable from radiation caries in man. This study compares the organic compostion of individual samples of plaque fluid and saliva from irradiated and control monkeys receiving the same cariogenic diet. Plaque and saliva were collected from fasting, tranquillised animals. Four irradiated animals were sampled repeatedly as were non-irradiated controls. Total protein, albumin, immunoglobulins A, G, and M, and the third component of complement (C'3) were quantitated in plaque fluid and whole saliva. Salivary amylase and peroxidase activities were also determined. Plaque fluid and saliva samples were also subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The total viable anaerobic count and numbers of Streptococcus mutans were determined in samples of plaque. The results suggest that the major effect of irradiation leading to increased numbers of S. mutans and caries susceptibility is in the amount, and not the composition, of the saliva produced by the residual gland tissue. The scanty flow of saliva may reduce the effectiveness of cleansing, buffering and lubrication mechanisms as well as resulting in a marked reduction in the total amount of specific and non-specific immune factors entering the mouth. (author)

  15. Protein components in saliva and plaque fluid from irradiated primates

    Edgar, W M; Bowen, W H; Cole, M F [Caries Prevention and Research Branch, National Caries Program, NIDR, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation of the major salivary glands of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) fed cariogenic diets leads to caries clinically indistinguishable from radiation caries in man. This study compares the organic compostion of individual samples of plaque fluid and saliva from irradiated and control monkeys receiving the same cariogenic diet. Plaque and saliva were collected from fasting, tranquillised animals. Four irradiated animals were sampled repeatedly as were non-irradiated controls. Total protein, albumin, immunoglobulins A, G, and M, and the third component of complement (C'3) were quantitated in plaque fluid and whole saliva. Salivary amylase and peroxidase activities were also determined. Plaque fluid and saliva samples were also subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The total viable anaerobic count and numbers of Streptococcus mutans were determined in samples of plaque. The results suggest that the major effect of irradiation leading to increased numbers of S. mutans and caries susceptibility is in the amount, and not the composition, of the saliva produced by the residual gland tissue. The scanty flow of saliva may reduce the effectiveness of cleansing, buffering and lubrication mechanisms as well as resulting in a marked reduction in the total amount of specific and non-specific immune factors entering the mouth.

  16. Energetic Variational Approach to Multi-Component Fluid Flows

    Kirshtein, Arkadz; Liu, Chun; Brannick, James

    2017-11-01

    In this talk I will introduce the systematic energetic variational approach for dissipative systems applied to multi-component fluid flows. These variational approaches are motivated by the seminal works of Rayleigh and Onsager. The advantage of this approach is that we have to postulate only energy law and some kinematic relations based on fundamental physical principles. The method gives a clear, quick and consistent way to derive the PDE system. I will compare different approaches to three-component flows using diffusive interface method and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. The diffusive interface method is an approach for modeling interactions among complex substances. The main idea behind this method is to introduce phase field labeling functions in order to model the contact line by smooth change from one type of material to another. The work of Arkadz Kirshtein and Chun Liu is partially supported by NSF Grants DMS-141200 and DMS-1216938.

  17. ORNL facilities for testing first-wall components

    Tsai, C.C.; Becraft, W.R.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Menon, M.M.; Stirling, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Future long-impulse magnetic fusion devices will have operating characteristics similar to those described in the design studies of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX), the Fusion Engineering Device (FED), and the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). Their first-wall components (pumped limiters, divertor plates, and rf waveguide launchers with Faraday shields) will be subjected to intense bombardment by energetic particles exhausted from the plasma, including fusion products. These particles are expected to have particle energies of approx.100 eV, particle fluxes of approx.10 18 cm -2 .s -1 , and heat fluxes of approx.1 kW/cm 2 CW to approx.100 kW/cm 2 transient. No components are available to simultaneously handle these particle and heat fluxes, survive the resulting sputtering erosion, and remove exhaust gas without degrading plasma quality. Critical issues for research and development of first-wall components have been identified in the INTOR Activity. Test facilities are needed to qualify candidate materials and develop components. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), existing neutral beam and wave heating test facilities can be modified to simulate first-wall environments with heat fluxes up to 30 kW/cm 2 , particle fluxes of approx.10 18 cm -2 .s -1 , and pulse lengths up to 30 s, within test volumes up to approx.100 L. The characteristics of these test facilities are described, with particular attention to the areas of particle flux, heat flux, particle energy, pulse length, and duty cycle, and the potential applications of these facilities for first-wall component development are discussed

  18. Uniform phases in fluids of hard isosceles triangles: One-component fluid and binary mixtures

    Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; Díaz-De Armas, Ariel; Velasco, Enrique

    2018-05-01

    We formulate the scaled particle theory for a general mixture of hard isosceles triangles and calculate different phase diagrams for the one-component fluid and for certain binary mixtures. The fluid of hard triangles exhibits a complex phase behavior: (i) the presence of a triatic phase with sixfold symmetry, (ii) the isotropic-uniaxial nematic transition is of first order for certain ranges of aspect ratios, and (iii) the one-component system exhibits nematic-nematic transitions ending in critical points. We found the triatic phase to be stable not only for equilateral triangles but also for triangles of similar aspect ratios. We focus the study of binary mixtures on the case of symmetric mixtures: equal particle areas with aspect ratios (κi) symmetric with respect to the equilateral one, κ1κ2=3 . For these mixtures we found, aside from first-order isotropic-nematic and nematic-nematic transitions (the latter ending in a critical point): (i) a region of triatic phase stability even for mixtures made of particles that do not form this phase at the one-component limit, and (ii) the presence of a Landau point at which two triatic-nematic first-order transitions and a nematic-nematic demixing transition coalesce. This phase behavior is analogous to that of a symmetric three-dimensional mixture of rods and plates.

  19. Structural integrity monitoring of critical components in nuclear facilities

    Roth, Maria; Constantinescu, Dan Mihai; Brad, Sebastian; Ducu, Catalin; Malinovschi, Viorel

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents the results obtained as part of the Project 'Integrated Network for Structural Integrity Monitoring of Critical Components in Nuclear Facilities', RIMIS, a research work underway within the framework of the Ministry of Education and Research Programme 'Research of Excellence'. The main objective of the Project is to constitute a network integrating the national R and D institutes with preoccupations in the structural integrity assessment of critical components in the nuclear facilities operating in Romania, in order to elaborate a specific procedure for this field. The degradation mechanisms of the structural materials used in the CANDU type reactors, operated by Unit 1 and Unit 2 at Cernavoda (pressure tubes, fuel elements sheaths, steam generator tubing) and in the nuclear facilities relating to reactors of this type as, for instance, the Hydrogen Isotopes Separation facility, will be investigated. The development of a flexible procedure will offer the opportunity to extend the applications to other structural materials used in the nuclear field and in the non-nuclear fields as well, in cooperation with other institutes involved in the developed network. The expected results of the project will allow the integration of the network developed at national level in the structures of similar networks operating within the EU, the enhancement of the scientific importance of Romanian R and D organizations as well as the increase of our country's contribution in solving the major issues of the nuclear field. (authors)

  20. 21 CFR 882.5550 - Central nervous system fluid shunt and components.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Central nervous system fluid shunt and components... Central nervous system fluid shunt and components. (a) Identification. A central nervous system fluid... central nervous system to an internal delivery site or an external receptacle for the purpose of relieving...

  1. Moly99 Production Facility: Report on Beamline Components, Requirements, Costs

    Bishofberger, Kip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-23

    In FY14 we completed the design of the beam line for the linear accelerator production design concept. This design included a set of three bending magnets, quadrupole focusing magnets, and octopoles to flatten the beam on target. This design was generic and applicable to multiple different accelerators if necessary. In FY15 we built on that work to create specifications for the individual beam optic elements, including power supply requirements. This report captures the specification of beam line components with initial cost estimates for the NorthStar production facility.This report is organized as follows: The motivation of the beamline design is introduced briefly, along with renderings of the design. After that, a specific list is provided, which accounts for each beamline component, including part numbers and costs, to construct the beamline. After that, this report details the important sections of the beamline and individual components. A final summary and list of follow-on activities completes this report.

  2. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  3. Seismic fragility analysis of structural components for HFBR facilities

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a summary of recently completed seismic fragility analyses of the HFBR facilities. Based on a detailed review of past PRA studies, various refinements were made regarding the strength and ductility evaluation of structural components. Available laboratory test data were analysed to evaluate the formulations used to predict the ultimate strength and deformation capacities of steel, reinforced concrete and masonry structures. The biasness and uncertainties were evaluated within the framework of the fragility evaluation methods widely accepted in the nuclear industry. A few examples of fragility calculations are also included to illustrate the use of the presented formulations

  4. Process component inventory in a large commercial reprocessing facility

    Canty, M.J.; Berliner, A.; Spannagel, G.

    1983-01-01

    Using a computer simulation program, the equilibrium operation of the Pu-extraction and purification processes of a reference commercial reprocessing facility was investigated. Particular attention was given to the long-term net fluctuations of Pu inventories in hard-to-measure components such as the solvent extraction contractors. Comparing the variance of these inventories with the measurement variance for Pu contained in feed, analysis and buffer tanks, it was concluded that direct or indirect periodic estimation of contactor inventories would not contribute significantly to improving the quality of closed material balances over the process MBA

  5. Cryogenic Fluid Transfer Components Using Single Crystal Piezoelectric Actuators, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid transfer components using single crystal piezoelectric actuators are proposed to enable low thermal mass, minimal heat leak, low power consumption...

  6. Cryogenic Fluid Transfer Components Using Single Crystal Piezoelectric Actuators, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic fluid transfer components using single crystal piezoelectric actuators are proposed to enable low thermal mass, minimal heat leak, low power consumption...

  7. National Ignition Facility and Managing Location, Component, and State

    Foxworthy, C; Fung, T; Beeler, R; Li, J; Dugorepec, J; Chang, C

    2011-07-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system coupled with a 10-meter diameter target chamber. There are over 6,200 Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) comprised of more than 104,000 serialized parts that make up the NIF. Each LRU is a modular unit typically composed of a mechanical housing, laser optics (glass, lenses, or mirrors), and utilities. To date, there are more than 120,000 data sets created to characterize the attributes of these parts. Greater than 51,000 Work Permits have been issued to install, maintain, and troubleshoot the components. One integrated system is used to manage these data, and more. The Location Component and State (LoCoS) system is a web application built using Java Enterprise Edition technologies and is accessed by over 1,200 users. It is either directly or indirectly involved with each aspect of NIF work activity, and interfaces with ten external systems including the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Besides providing business functionality, LoCoS also acts as the NIF enterprise service bus. In this role, numerous integration approaches had to be adopted including: file exchange, database sharing, queuing, and web services in order to accommodate various business, technical, and security requirements. Architecture and implementation decisions are discussed.

  8. National Ignition Facility and Managing Location, Component, and State

    Foxworthy, C.; Fung, T.; Beeler, R.; Li, J.; Dugorepec, J.; Chang, C.

    2011-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system coupled with a 10-meter diameter target chamber. There are over 6,200 Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) comprised of more than 104,000 serialized parts that make up the NIF. Each LRU is a modular unit typically composed of a mechanical housing, laser optics (glass, lenses, or mirrors), and utilities. To date, there are more than 120,000 data sets created to characterize the attributes of these parts. Greater than 51,000 Work Permits have been issued to install, maintain, and troubleshoot the components. One integrated system is used to manage these data, and more. The Location Component and State (LoCoS) system is a web application built using Java Enterprise Edition technologies and is accessed by over 1,200 users. It is either directly or indirectly involved with each aspect of NIF work activity, and interfaces with ten external systems including the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Besides providing business functionality, LoCoS also acts as the NIF enterprise service bus. In this role, numerous integration approaches had to be adopted including: file exchange, database sharing, queuing, and web services in order to accommodate various business, technical, and security requirements. Architecture and implementation decisions are discussed.

  9. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  10. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: (1) Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements; (2) Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout; (3) Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required; (4) Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems; (5) Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs; and (6) Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs

  11. National Ignition Facility and managing location, component, and state

    Foxworthy, Cemil, E-mail: foxworthy3@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Fung, Tracy; Beeler, Rich; Li, Joyce; Dugorepec, Jasna; Chang, Cathy [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NIF in comprised of over 100k serialized parts that must be tracked and maintained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discuss a web-based integrated parts management system designed for NIF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The parts database stores associated calibration data with effective dates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system interfaces with the NIF control system and performance models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Work activity (Permits, Problem Logs, Work Orders) are managed by the system. - Abstract: The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-MJ, 500-TW, ultraviolet laser system coupled with a 10-m diameter target chamber. There are over 6200 Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) comprised of more than 104,000 serialized parts that make up the NIF. Each LRU is a modular unit typically composed of a mechanical housing, laser optics (glass, lenses, or mirrors), and utilities. To date, there are more than 120,000 data sets created to characterize the attributes of these parts. Greater than 51,000 Work Permits have been issued to install, maintain, and troubleshoot the components. One integrated system is used to manage these data, and more. The Location Component and State (LoCoS) system is a web application built using Java Enterprise Edition technologies and is accessed by over 1200 users. It is either directly or indirectly involved with each aspect of NIF work activity, and interfaces with ten external systems including the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Besides providing business functionality, LoCoS also acts as the NIF enterprise service bus. In this role, numerous integration approaches had to be adopted including: file exchange, database sharing, queuing, and web services in order to accommodate various business, technical, and security requirements

  12. National Ignition Facility and managing location, component, and state

    Foxworthy, Cemil; Fung, Tracy; Beeler, Rich; Li, Joyce; Dugorepec, Jasna; Chang, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NIF in comprised of over 100k serialized parts that must be tracked and maintained. ► We discuss a web-based integrated parts management system designed for NIF. ► The parts database stores associated calibration data with effective dates. ► The system interfaces with the NIF control system and performance models. ► Work activity (Permits, Problem Logs, Work Orders) are managed by the system. - Abstract: The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-MJ, 500-TW, ultraviolet laser system coupled with a 10-m diameter target chamber. There are over 6200 Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) comprised of more than 104,000 serialized parts that make up the NIF. Each LRU is a modular unit typically composed of a mechanical housing, laser optics (glass, lenses, or mirrors), and utilities. To date, there are more than 120,000 data sets created to characterize the attributes of these parts. Greater than 51,000 Work Permits have been issued to install, maintain, and troubleshoot the components. One integrated system is used to manage these data, and more. The Location Component and State (LoCoS) system is a web application built using Java Enterprise Edition technologies and is accessed by over 1200 users. It is either directly or indirectly involved with each aspect of NIF work activity, and interfaces with ten external systems including the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Besides providing business functionality, LoCoS also acts as the NIF enterprise service bus. In this role, numerous integration approaches had to be adopted including: file exchange, database sharing, queuing, and web services in order to accommodate various business, technical, and security requirements. Architecture and implementation decisions are discussed.

  13. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    Koshelev, N.A., E-mail: koshna71@inbox.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy str 42, 432970 (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models.

  14. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    Koshelev, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models

  15. Physics and engineering assessments of spherical torus component test facility

    Peng, Y.-K.M.; Neumeyer, C.A.; Kessel, C.; Rutherford, P.; Mikkelsen, D.; Bell, R.; Menard, J.; Gates, D.; Schmidt, J.; Synakowski, E.; Grisham, L.; Fogarty, P.J.; Strickler, D.J.; Burgess, T.W.; Tsai, J.; Nelson, B.E.; Sabbagh, S.; Mitarai, O.; Cheng, E.T.; El-Guebaly, L.

    2005-01-01

    A broadly based study of the fusion engineering and plasma science conditions of a Component Test Facility (CTF), using the Spherical Torus or Spherical Tokamak (ST) configuration, have been carried out. The chamber systems testing conditions in a CTF are characterized by high fusion neutron fluxes Γ n > 4.4x10 13 n/s/cm 2 , over size scales > 10 5 cm 2 and depth scales > 50 cm, delivering > 3 accumulated displacement per atom (dpa) per year. The desired chamber conditions can be provided by a CTF with R 0 1.2 m, A = 1.5, elongation ∼ 3.2, I p ∼ 9 MA, B T ∼ 2.5 T, producing a driven fusion burn using 36 MW of combined neutral beam and RF power. Relatively robust ST plasma conditions are adequate, which have been shown achievable [4] without active feedback manipulation of the MHD modes. The ST CTF will test the single-turn, copper alloy center leg for the toroidal field coil without an induction solenoid and neutron shielding, and require physics data on solenoid-free plasma current initiation, ramp-up, and sustainment to multiple MA level. A new systems code that combines the key required plasma and engineering science conditions of CTF has been prepared and utilized as part of this study. The results show high potential for a family of lowercost CTF devices to suit a variety of fusion engineering science test missions. (author)

  16. Technology requirements to be addressed by the NASA Lewis Research Center Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility program

    Aydelott, J. C.; Rudland, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a scientific program which will provide advance in space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions were identified that require or could benefit from this technology. These fluid management technology needs were prioritized and a shuttle attached reuseable test bed, the cryogenic fluid management facility (CFMF), is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technology development effort.

  17. Invasion percolation of single component, multiphase fluids with lattice Boltzmann models

    Sukop, M.C.; Or, Dani

    2003-01-01

    Application of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to invasion percolation of single component multiphase fluids in porous media offers an opportunity for more realistic modeling of the configurations and dynamics of liquid/vapor and liquid/solid interfaces. The complex geometry of connected paths in standard invasion percolation models arises solely from the spatial arrangement of simple elements on a lattice. In reality, fluid interfaces and connectivity in porous media are naturally controlled by the details of the pore geometry, its dynamic interaction with the fluid, and the ambient fluid potential. The multiphase LBM approach admits realistic pore geometry derived from imaging techniques and incorporation of realistic hydrodynamics into invasion percolation models

  18. Asymptotic form of the classical one-component plasma fluid equation of state

    DeWitt, H.E.

    1976-01-01

    The Monte Carlo data of Hansen for the internal energy of the classical one-component plasma in the fluid state is found to satisfy accurately a simple functional form, U/NkT = aGAMMA + bGAMMA/sup 1;4/ + c, for GAMMA > 1. The fluid static energy is very close to the bcc lattice energy of the solid, and the fluid thermal energy varies as T/sup 3;4/. Simple and accurate expressions for other thermodynamic functions for the plasma fluid are given

  19. 30 seismic analysis of FBR vessels: Coupling between components and vessels, fluid communications, imperfections

    Gantenbein, F.; Gibert, R.J.; Aita, S.; Durandet, E.

    1988-01-01

    The internal structures of a loop type breeder reactors such as SUPERPHENIX are composed of axisymmetrical shells separated by fluid volumes. Seismic analysis is usually performed by axisymmetric finite element model taking into account fluid structure interaction but the geometry is in fact 3D due to components, small communications between fluid volumes and imperfections in the vessels. The methods to take this 3D behaviour into account are based on Fourier decomposition of the motion and substructuration. They are briefly described in the following chapters. The influence of components and of small communications on a block reactor similar to SPX1 will also be presented. 15 refs, 20 figs

  20. Standard Practices for Sampling for Particles in Aerospace Fluids and Components

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover sampling procedures for use in determining the particle cleanliness of liquids and liquid samples from components. Three practices, A, B, and C, have been developed on the basis of component geometry in order to encompass the wide variety of configurations. These practices establish guidelines to be used in preparing detailed procedures for sampling specific components. Note 1—The term cleanliness used in these practices refers to solid particles in the liquid. It does not generally cover other foreign matter such as gases, liquids, and products of chemical degradation. Cleanliness with respect to particulate contamination does not necessarily give any indication of the other types of contamination. 1.2 All components, regardless of application, may be tested provided (1) the fluid medium selected is completely compatible with the materials, packing and fluid used in the test component, and test apparatus, and (2) the fluid is handled in accordance with the manufacturer's recom...

  1. A multi-objective optimization approach for the selection of working fluids of geothermal facilities: Economic, environmental and social aspects.

    Martínez-Gomez, Juan; Peña-Lamas, Javier; Martín, Mariano; Ponce-Ortega, José María

    2017-12-01

    The selection of the working fluid for Organic Rankine Cycles has traditionally been addressed from systematic heuristic methods, which perform a characterization and prior selection considering mainly one objective, thus avoiding a selection considering simultaneously the objectives related to sustainability and safety. The objective of this work is to propose a methodology for the optimal selection of the working fluid for Organic Rankine Cycles. The model is presented as a multi-objective approach, which simultaneously considers the economic, environmental and safety aspects. The economic objective function considers the profit obtained by selling the energy produced. Safety was evaluated in terms of individual risk for each of the components of the Organic Rankine Cycles and it was formulated as a function of the operating conditions and hazardous properties of each working fluid. The environmental function is based on carbon dioxide emissions, considering carbon dioxide mitigation, emission due to the use of cooling water as well emissions due material release. The methodology was applied to the case of geothermal facilities to select the optimal working fluid although it can be extended to waste heat recovery. The results show that the hydrocarbons represent better solutions, thus among a list of 24 working fluids, toluene is selected as the best fluid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Support structures for optical components in the Laser Demonstration Facility

    Finucane, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The laser system in the Laser Demonstration Facility is mounted on an array of 108 support columns. This milestone report describes the design, analyses, testing, fabrication, installation, and performance characteristics of these supports

  3. EBR-II facility for cleaning and maintenance of LMR components

    Washburn, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cleaning and maintenance of EBR-II sodium wetted components is accomplished in a separate hands-on maintenance facility known as the Sodium Components Maintenance Shop (SCMS). Sodium removal is mostly done using alcohol but steam or water is used. The SCMS has three alcohol cleaning systems: one for small nonradioactive components, one for small radioactive components, and one for large radioactive components. The SCMS also has a water-wash station for the removal of sodium with steam or water. An Alcohol Recovery Facility removes radioactive contaminants from the alcohol and reclaims the alcohol for reuse. Associated with the large components cleaning system is a major component handling system

  4. Performance analysis a of solar driven organic Rankine cycle using multi-component working fluids

    Baldasso, E.; Andreasen, J. G.; Modi, A.

    2015-01-01

    suitable control strategy and both the overall annual production and the average solar to electrical efficiency are estimated with an annual simulation. The results suggest that the introduction of binary working fluids enables to increase the solar system performance both in design and part-load operation....... cycle. The purpose of this paper is to optimize a low temperature organic Rankine cycle tailored for solar applications. The objective of the optimization is the maximization of the solar to electrical efficiency and the optimization parameters are the working fluid and the turbine inlet temperature...... and pressure. Both pure fluids and binary mixtures are considered as possible working fluids and thus one of the primary aims of the study is to evaluate whether the use of multi-component working fluids might lead to increased solar to electrical efficiencies. The considered configuration includes a solar...

  5. Plasma Facing Components Generic Facilities Review Panel (PFC-GFRP): Final report

    McGrath, R.; Allen, S.; Hill, D.; Brooks, J.; Mattas, R.; Davis, J.; Lipschultz, B.; Ulrickson, M.

    1993-10-01

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) Facilities Review Panel was chartered by the US Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy, ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and Technology Division, to outline the program plan and identify the supporting test facilities that lead to reliable, long-lived plasma facing components for ITER. This report summarizes the panel's findings and identifies the necessary and sufficient set of test facilities required for ITER PFC development

  6. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid influence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    Guang-shuai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve regeneration conditioned fluid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the proteinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis confirmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8ß and complement factor D in the nerve regeneration conditioned fluid and each varied at different time points. These findings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration.

  7. Phase Equilibrium Calculations for Multi-Component Polar Fluid Mixtures with tPC-PSAFT

    Karakatsani, Eirini; Economou, Ioannis

    2007-01-01

    The truncated Perturbed-Chain Polar Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (tPC-PSAFT) is applied to a number of different mixtures, including binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures of components that differ substantially in terms of intermolecular interactions and molecular size. In contrast to m...

  8. On the relationship between executive functions of working memory and components derived from fluid intelligence measures.

    Ren, Xuezhu; Schweizer, Karl; Wang, Tengfei; Chu, Pei; Gong, Qin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the current study is to provide new insights into the relationship between executive functions and intelligence measures in considering the item-position effect observed in intelligence items. Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM) and Horn's LPS reasoning test were used to assess fluid intelligence which served as criterion in investigating the relationship between intelligence and executive functions. A battery of six experimental tasks measured the updating, shifting, and inhibition processes of executive functions. Data were collected from 205 university students. Fluid intelligence showed substantial correlations with the updating and inhibition processes and no correlation with the shifting process without considering the item-position effect. Next, the fixed-link model was applied to APM and LPS data separately to decompose them into an ability component and an item-position component. The results of relating the components to executive functions showed that the updating and shifting processes mainly contributed to the item-position component whereas the inhibition process was mainly associated with the ability component of each fluid intelligence test. These findings suggest that improvements in the efficiency of updating and shifting processes are likely to occur during the course of completing intelligence measures and inhibition is important for intelligence in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Supervision of electrical and instrumentation systems and components at nuclear facilities

    1986-01-01

    The general guidelines for the supervision of nuclear facilities carried out by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are set forth in the guide YVL 1.1. This guide shows in more detail how STUK supervises the electrical and instrumentation systems and components of nuclear facilities

  10. Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) feedback reactivity components

    Nguyen, D.H.

    1988-04-01

    The static tests conducted during Cycle 8A (1986) of the FFTF have allowed, for the first time, the experimental determination of each of the feedback reactivities caused by the following mechanisms: fuel axial expansion, control rod repositioning, core radial expansion, and subassembly bowing. A semiempirical equation was obtained to describe each of these feedback components that depended only on the relevant reactor temperature (bowing was presented in a tabular form). The Doppler and sodium density reactivities were calculated using existing mechanistic methods. Although they could also be fitted with closed-form equations depending only on temperatures, these equations are not needed in transient analyses using whole core safety computer codes, which use mechanistic methods. The static feedback reactivity model was extended to obtain a dynamic model via the concept of ''time constants.'' Besides being used for transient analyses in the FFTF, these feedback equations constitute a database for the validation and/or calibration of mechanistic feedback reactivity models. 2 refs., 6 tabs

  11. Conceptual Design of an In-Space Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility

    Willen, G. S.; Riemer, D. H.; Hustvedt, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Spacelab experiment to develop the technology associated with low gravity propellant management is presented. The proposed facility consisting of a supply tank, receiver tank, pressurization system, instrumentation, and supporting hardware, is described. The experimental objectives, the receiver tank to be modeled, and constraints imposed on the design by the space shuttle, Spacelab, and scaling requirements, are described. The conceptual design, including the general configurations, flow schematics, insulation systems, instrumentation requirements, and internal tank configurations for the supply tank and the receiver tank, is described. Thermal, structural, fluid, and safety and reliability aspects of the facility are analyzed. The facility development plan, including schedule and cost estimates for the facility, is presented. A program work breakdown structure and master program schedule for a seven year program are included.

  12. Two-component fluid membranes near repulsive walls: Linearized hydrodynamics of equilibrium and nonequilibrium states.

    Sankararaman, Sumithra; Menon, Gautam I; Sunil Kumar, P B

    2002-09-01

    We study the linearized hydrodynamics of a two-component fluid membrane near a repulsive wall, using a model that incorporates curvature-concentration coupling as well as hydrodynamic interactions. This model is a simplified version of a recently proposed one [J.-B. Manneville et al., Phys. Rev. E 64, 021908 (2001)] for nonequilibrium force centers embedded in fluid membranes, such as light-activated bacteriorhodopsin pumps incorporated in phospholipid egg phosphatidyl choline (EPC) bilayers. The pump-membrane system is modeled as an impermeable, two-component bilayer fluid membrane in the presence of an ambient solvent, in which one component, representing active pumps, is described in terms of force dipoles displaced with respect to the bilayer midpoint. We first discuss the case in which such pumps are rendered inactive, computing the mode structure in the bulk as well as the modification of hydrodynamic properties by the presence of a nearby wall. These results should apply, more generally, to equilibrium fluid membranes comprised of two components, in which the effects of curvature-concentration coupling are significant, above the threshold for phase separation. We then discuss the fluctuations and mode structure in the steady state of active two-component membranes near a repulsive wall. We find that proximity to the wall smoothens membrane height fluctuations in the stable regime, resulting in a logarithmic scaling of the roughness even for initially tensionless membranes. This explicitly nonequilibrium result is a consequence of the incorporation of curvature-concentration coupling in our hydrodynamic treatment. This result also indicates that earlier scaling arguments which obtained an increase in the roughness of active membranes near repulsive walls upon neglecting the role played by such couplings may need to be reevaluated.

  13. Air pollution control system testing at the DOE offgas components test facility

    Burns, D.B.; Speed, D.; VanPelt, W.; Burns, H.H.

    1997-01-01

    In 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to begin operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) leads an extensive technical support program designed to obtain incinerator and air pollution control equipment performance data to support facility start-up and operation. A key component of this technical support program includes the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a pilot-scale offgas system test bed. The primary goal for this test facility is to demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the planned CIF Air Pollution Control System (APCS). To accomplish this task, the OCTF has been equipped with a 1/10 scale CIF offgas system equipment components and instrumentation. In addition, the OCTF design maximizes the flexibility of APCS operation and facility instrumentation and sampling capabilities permit accurate characterization of all process streams throughout the facility. This allows APCS equipment performance to be evaluated in an integrated system under a wide range of possible operating conditions. This paper summarizes the use of this DOE test facility to successfully demonstrate APCS operability and maintainability, evaluate and optimize equipment and instrument performance, and provide direct CIF start-up support. These types of facilities are needed to permit resolution of technical issues associated with design and operation of systems that treat and dispose combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive waste throughout and DOE complex

  14. Molecular Analyses Reveal Inflammatory Mediators in the Solid Component and Cyst Fluid of Human Adamantinomatous Craniopharyngioma.

    Donson, Andrew M; Apps, John; Griesinger, Andrea M; Amani, Vladimir; Witt, Davis A; Anderson, Richard C E; Niazi, Toba N; Grant, Gerald; Souweidane, Mark; Johnston, James M; Jackson, Eric M; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, Bette K; Handler, Michael H; Tan, Aik-Choon; Gore, Lia; Virasami, Alex; Gonzalez-Meljem, Jose Mario; Jacques, Thomas S; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Foreman, Nicholas K; Hankinson, Todd C

    2017-09-01

    Pediatric adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (ACP) is a highly solid and cystic tumor, often causing substantial damage to critical neuroendocrine structures such as the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and optic apparatus. Paracrine signaling mechanisms driving tumor behavior have been hypothesized, with IL-6R overexpression identified as a potential therapeutic target. To identify potential novel therapies, we characterized inflammatory and immunomodulatory factors in ACP cyst fluid and solid tumor components. Cytometric bead analysis revealed a highly pro-inflammatory cytokine pattern in fluid from ACP compared to fluids from another cystic pediatric brain tumor, pilocytic astrocytoma. Cytokines and chemokines with particularly elevated concentrations in ACPs were IL-6, CXCL1 (GRO), CXCL8 (IL-8) and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. These data were concordant with solid tumor compartment transcriptomic data from a larger cohort of ACPs, other pediatric brain tumors and normal brain. The majority of receptors for these cytokines and chemokines were also over-expressed in ACPs. In addition to IL-10, the established immunosuppressive factor IDO-1 was overexpressed by ACPs at the mRNA and protein levels. These data indicate that ACP cyst fluids and solid tumor components are characterized by an inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression pattern. Further study regarding selective cytokine blockade may inform novel therapeutic interventions. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of the chemical components of hydatid fluid from Echinococcus granulosus

    Li Juyi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The aim of this study was to explore the environment of Echinococcus granulosus (E. granulosus protoscolices and their relationship with their host. Methods Proteins from the hydatid-cyst fluid (HCF from E. granulosus were identified by proteomics. An inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES was used to determine the elements, an automatic biochemical analyzer was used to detect the types and levels of biochemical indices, and an automatic amino acid analyzer was used to detect the types and levels of amino acids in the E. granulosus HCF. Results I Approximately 30 protein spots and 21 peptide mass fingerprints (PMF were acquired in the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE pattern of hydatid fluid; II We detected 10 chemical elements in the cyst fluid, including sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, copper, and zinc; III We measured 19 biochemical metabolites in the cyst fluid, and the amount of most of these metabolites was lower than that in normal human serum; IV We detected 17 free amino acids and measured some of these, including alanine, glycine, and valine. Conclusions We identified and measured many chemical components of the cyst fluid, providing a theoretical basis for developing new drugs to prevent and treat hydatid disease by inhibiting or blocking nutrition, metabolism, and other functions of the pathogen.

  16. Design and Testing of a Breadboard Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluid Combustion Facility Experiment

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.

    1999-01-01

    The Fluid Combustion Facility (FCF) Project and the Power Technology Division at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) at Lewis Field in Cleveland, OH along with the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL are jointly developing an Electrical Power Converter Unit (EPCU) for the Fluid Combustion Facility to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The FCF facility experiment contains three racks: A core rack, a combustion rack, and a fluids rack. The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS 120V(sub dc) power distribution system by each FCF experiment rack which requires 28V(sub dc). The EPCU is a modular design which contains three 120V(sub dc)-to-28V(sub dc) full-bridge, power converters rated at 1 kW(sub e) each bus transferring input relays and solid-state, current-limiting input switches, 48 current-limiting, solid-state, output switches; and control and telemetry hardware. The EPCU has all controls required to autonomously share load demand between the power feeds and--if absolutely necessary--shed loads. The EPCU, which maximizes the usage of allocated ISS power and minimizes loss of power to loads, can be paralleled with other EPCUs. This paper overviews the electrical design and operating characteristics of the EPCU and presents test data from the breadboard design.

  17. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Exploratory Shaft Facility fluids and materials evaluation

    West, K.A.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if any fluids or materials used in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) of Yucca Mountain will make the mountain unsuitable for future construction of a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain, an area on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, USA, is a candidate site for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power and defense nuclear activities. To properly characterize Yucca Mountain, it will be necessary to construct an underground test facility, in which in situ site characterization tests can be conducted. The candidate repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, however, could potentially be compromised by fluids and materials used in the site characterization tests. To minimize this possibility, Los Alamos National Laboratory was directed to evaluate the kinds of fluids and materials that will be used and their potential impacts on the site. A secondary objective was to identify fluids and materials, if any, that should be prohibited from, or controlled in, the underground. 56 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Exploratory Shaft Facility fluids and materials evaluation

    West, K.A.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if any fluids or materials used in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) of Yucca Mountain will make the mountain unsuitable for future construction of a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain, an area on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, USA, is a candidate site for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power and defense nuclear activities. To properly characterize Yucca Mountain, it will be necessary to construct an underground test facility, in which in situ site characterization tests can be conducted. The candidate repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, however, could potentially be compromised by fluids and materials used in the site characterization tests. To minimize this possibility, Los Alamos National Laboratory was directed to evaluate the kinds of fluids and materials that will be used and their potential impacts on the site. A secondary objective was to identify fluids and materials, if any, that should be prohibited from, or controlled in, the underground. 56 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs

  19. Effects assessment of 10 functioning years on the main components of the molten salt PCS experimental facility of ENEA

    Gaggioli, Walter; Di Ascenzi, Primo; Rinaldi, Luca; Tarquini, Pietro; Fabrizi, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    In the frame of the Solar Thermodynamic Laboratory, ENEA has improved CSP Parabolic Trough technologies by adopting new advanced solutions for linear tube receivers and by implementing a binary mixture of molten salt (60% NaNO3 and 40% KNO3) [1] as both heat transfer fluid and heat storage medium in solar field and in storage tanks, thus allowing the solar plants to operate at high temperatures up to 550°C. Further improvements have regarded parabolic mirror collectors, piping and process instrumentation. All the innovative components developed by ENEA, together with other standard parts of the plant, have been tested and qualified under actual solar operating conditions on the PCS experimental facility at the ENEA Casaccia Research Center in Rome (Italy). The PCS (Prova Collettori Solari, i.e. Test of Solar Collectors) facility is the main testing loop built by ENEA and it is unique in the world for what concerns the high operating temperature and the fluid used (mixture of molten salt). It consists in one line of parabolic trough collectors (test section of 100 m long life-size solar collectors) using, as heat transfer fluid, the aforesaid binary mixture of molten salt up to 10 bar, at high temperature in the range 270° and 550°C and a flow rate up to 6.5 kg/s. It has been working since early 2004 [2] till now; it consists in a unique closed loop, and it is totally instrumented. In this paper the effects of over ten years qualification tests on the pressurized tank will be presented, together with the characterization of the thermal losses of the piping of the molten salt circuit, and some observations performed on the PCS facility during its first ten years of operation.

  20. Improved E-ELT subsystem and component specifications, thanks to M1 test facility

    Dimmler, M.; Marrero, J.; Leveque, S.; Barriga, Pablo; Sedghi, B.; Kornweibel, N.

    2014-07-01

    During the last 2 years ESO has operated the "M1 Test Facility", a test stand consisting of a representative section of the E-ELT primary mirror equipped with 4 complete prototype segment subunits including sensors, actuators and control system. The purpose of the test facility is twofold: it serves to study and get familiar with component and system aspects like calibration, alignment and handling procedures and suitable control strategies on real hardware long before the primary mirror (hereafter M1) components are commissioned. Secondly, and of major benefit to the project, it offered the possibility to evaluate component and subsystem performance and interface issues in a system context in such detail, that issues could be identified early enough to feed back into the subsystem and component specifications. This considerably reduces risk and cost of the production units and allows refocusing the project team on important issues for the follow-up of the production contracts. Experiences are presented in which areas the results of the M1 Test Facility particularly helped to improve subsystem specifications and areas, where additional tests were adopted independent of the main test facility. Presented are the key experiences of the M1 Test Facility which lead to improved specifications or identified the need for additional testing outside of the M1 Test Facility.

  1. Implications of the effective one-component analysis of pair correlations in colloidal fluids with polydispersity

    Pond, Mark J.; Errington, Jeffrey R.; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2011-09-01

    Partial pair-correlation functions of colloidal suspensions with continuous polydispersity can be challenging to characterize from optical microscopy or computer simulation data due to inadequate sampling. As a result, it is common to adopt an effective one-component description of the structure that ignores the differences between particle types. Unfortunately, whether this kind of simplified description preserves or averages out information important for understanding the behavior of the fluid depends on the degree of polydispersity and can be difficult to assess, especially when the corresponding multicomponent description of the pair correlations is unavailable for comparison. Here, we present a computer simulation study that examines the implications of adopting an effective one-component structural description of a polydisperse fluid. The square-well model that we investigate mimics key aspects of the experimental behavior of suspended colloids with short-range, polymer-mediated attractions. To characterize the partial pair-correlation functions and thermodynamic excess entropy of this system, we introduce a Monte Carlo sampling strategy appropriate for fluids with a large number of pseudo-components. The data from our simulations at high particle concentrations, as well as exact theoretical results for dilute systems, show how qualitatively different trends between structural order and particle attractions emerge from the multicomponent and effective one-component treatments, even with systems characterized by moderate polydispersity. We examine consequences of these differences for excess-entropy based scalings of shear viscosity, and we discuss how use of the multicomponent treatment reveals similarities between the corresponding dynamic scaling behaviors of attractive colloids and liquid water that the effective one-component analysis does not capture.

  2. Analysis of synovial fluid components of hydrarthrosis in long-term hemodialysis patients.

    Shiota, E; Maekawa, M; Ohtani, M

    1999-01-01

    The synovial fluid components in long-term hemodialysis patients (HD; 43 knees in 43 patients) were investigated and compared with those in patients with osteoarthritis (OA; 21 knees in 21 patients) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA; 26 knees in 26 patients). The average ages in the three groups were, respectively, 60.7 years (range, 34-79 years), 63.2 years (range, 48-88 years), and 59.7 years (range, 37-76 years). The duration of hemodialysis in the HD group averaged 14.0 years (range, 4-24 years). The concentrations of hyaluronic acid, protein, and isomers of chondroitin sulfate (chondroitin 6-sulfate [C6S] and chondroitin 4-sulfate [C4S]) in the synovial fluid, and its viscosity were measured. Differences in each of the parameters were investigated according to disease clinical stage, roentgenological grade, and periods of dialysis in the HD group. The viscosity of the synovial fluid and the concentration of hyaluronic acid in HD patients were similar to those in OA patients; however, the C6S/C4S ratio in the synovial fluid of HD patients was similar to that in RA patients. The latter finding suggests that synovitis may be present in the hydrarthrosis of HD patients. The cause of this synovitis in HD patients remains to be elucidated.

  3. Supercritical Fluid Chromatography/Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Of Food Components

    Calvey, Elizabeth M.; Page, Samuel W.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1989-12-01

    Supercritical fluid (SF) technologies are being investigated extensively for applications in food processing. The number of SF-related patents issued testifies to the level of interest. Among the properties of materials at temperatures and pressures above their critical points (supercritical fluids) is density-dependent solvating power. Supercritical CO2 is of particular interest to the food industry because of its low critical temperature (31.3°C) and low toxicity. Many of the components in food matrices react or degrade at elevated temperatures and may be adversely affected by high temperature extractions. Likewise, these components may not be amenable to GC analyses. Our SF research has been in the development of methods employing supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and extraction (SFE) coupled to a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer to investigate food composition. The effects of processing techniques on the isomeric fatty acid content of edible oils and the analysis of lipid oxidation products using SFC/FT-IR with a flow-cell interface are described.

  4. Seismic qualification of safety class components in non-reactor nuclear facilities at Hanford site

    Ocoma, E.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the methods used during the walkdowns to compile as-built structural information to seismically qualify or verify the seismic adequacy of safety class components in the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex. The Plutonium finishing Plant is a non-reactor nuclear facility built during the 1950's and was designed to the Uniform Building Code criteria for both seismic and wind events. This facility is located at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site near Richland, Washington

  5. Numerical analysis of mixing process of two component gases in vertical fluid layer

    Hatori, Hirofumi; Takeda, Tetsuaki; Funatani, Shumpei

    2015-01-01

    When the depressurization accident occurs in the Very-High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR), it is expected that air enter into the reactor core. Therefore, it is important to know a mixing process of different kind of gases in the stable or unstable stratified fluid layer. Especially, it is also important to examine an influence of localized natural convection and molecular diffusion on mixing process from a viewpoint of safety. In order to research the mixing process of two component gases and flow characteristics of the localized natural convection, we have carried out numerical analysis using three dimensional CFD code. The numerical model was consisted of a storage tank and a reverse U-shaped vertical slot. They were separated by a partition plate. One side of the left vertical fluid layer was heated and the other side was cooled. The right vertical fluid layer was also cooled. The procedure of numerical analysis is as follows. Firstly, the storage tank was filled with heavy gas and the reverse U-shaped vertical slot was filled with light gas. In the left vertical fluid layer, the localized natural convection was generated by the temperature difference between the vertical walls. The flow characteristics were obtained by a steady state analysis. The unsteady state analysis was started when the partition plate was opened. The gases were mixed by molecular diffusion and natural convection. After the time elapsed, natural circulation occurred. The result obtained in this numerical analysis is as follows. The temperature difference of the left vertical fluid layer was set to 100 K. The combination of the mixed gas was nitrogen and argon. After 76 minutes elapsed, natural circulation occurred. (author)

  6. Three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction dynamics of a pool-reactor in-tank component

    Kulak, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    The safety evaluation of reactor-components often involves the analysis of various types of fluid/structural components interacting in three-dimensional space. For example, in the design of a pool-type reactor several vital in-tank components such as the primary pumps and the intermediate heat exchangers are contained within the primary tank. Typically, these components are suspended from the deck structure and largely submersed in the sodium pool. Because of this positioning these components are vulnerable to structural damage due to pressure wave propagation in the tank during a CDA. In order to assess the structural integrity of these components it is necessary to perform a dynamic analysis in three-dimensional space which accounts for the fluid-structure coupling. A model is developed which has many of the salient features of this fluid-structural component system

  7. Understanding and Managing Aging of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Facility Components in Wet Storage

    Johnson, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Storage of nuclear fuel after it has been discharged from reactors has become the leading spent fuel management option. Many storage facilities are being required to operate longer than originally anticipated. Aging is a term that has emerged to focus attention on the consequences of extended operation on systems, structures, and components that comprise the storage facilities. The key to mitigation of age-related degradation in storage facilities is to implement effective strategies to understand and manage aging of the facility materials. A systematic approach to preclude serious effects of age-related degradation is addressed in this paper, directed principally to smaller facilities (test and research reactors). The first need is to assess the materials that comprise the facility and the environments that they are subject to. Access to historical data on facility design, fabrication, and operation can facilitate assessment of expected materials performance. Methods to assess the current condition of facility materials are summarized in the paper. Each facility needs an aging management plan to define the scope of the management program, involving identification of the materials that need specific actions to manage age-related degradation. For each material identified, one or more aging management programs are developed and become part of the plan Several national and international organizations have invested in development of comprehensive and systematic approaches to aging management. A method developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is recommended as a concise template to organize measures to effectively manage age-related degradation of storage facility materials, including the scope of inspection, surveillance, and maintenance that is needed to assure successful operation of the facility over its required life. Important to effective aging management is a staff that is alert for evidence of materials degradation and committed to carry out the aging

  8. Texture-modified food and fluids in dementia and residential aged care facilities

    Painter V

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Virginia Painter,1 David G Le Couteur,1–3 Louise M Waite1–3 1Aged and Chronic Care Department, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, Concord, NSW, Australia; 2Ageing and Alzheimer’s Institute, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, Concord, NSW, Australia; 3Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, University of Sydney, Concord, NSW, Australia Introduction: Dysphagia is common in people living with dementia and associated with increased risk of aspiration pneumonia, dehydration, malnutrition, and death. Treatment options are limited and the use of texture-modified food and fluids (TMF is a widespread clinical practice. This review aimed to evaluate the evidence for TMF in dementia.Methods: A literature search using terms “dysphagia,” “texture-modified food and fluids,” “dementia,” and “aged care” was performed by using three electronic databases from 1990 to March 2017. Studies were assessed for suitability, then reviewed with data extracted, and grouped by categories of outcome measures.Results: A total of 3,722 publications were identified, and 22 studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies were heterogeneous in design and methodology. There were no publications examining dementia exclusively; however, many subjects with dementia were included in studies of residential aged care facilities. TMF reduced the risk of aspiration seen on videofluoroscopy but not clinical aspiration and pneumonia. TMF was associated with lower daily energy and fluid intake and variable adherence.Conclusion: There is a lack of evidence for people living with dementia and in residential care facilities that TMF improves clinical outcomes such as aspiration pneumonia, nutrition, hydration, morbidity, and mortality. Adverse effects including poorer energy and fluid intake were identified. Keywords: modified diet, dysphagia, aspiration, aged care, nursing homes, dehydration, nutrition

  9. Modeling, simulation and control for a cryogenic fluid management facility, preliminary report

    Turner, Max A.; Vanbuskirk, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The synthesis of a control system for a cryogenic fluid management facility was studied. The severe demand for reliability as well as instrumentation and control unique to the Space Station environment are prime considerations. Realizing that the effective control system depends heavily on quantitative description of the facility dynamics, a methodology for process identification and parameter estimation is postulated. A block diagram of the associated control system is also produced. Finally, an on-line adaptive control strategy is developed utilizing optimization of the velocity form control parameters (proportional gains, integration and derivative time constants) in appropriate difference equations for direct digital control. Of special concern are the communications, software and hardware supporting interaction between the ground and orbital systems. It is visualized that specialist in the OSI/ISO utilizing the Ada programming language will influence further development, testing and validation of the simplistic models presented here for adaptation to the actual flight environment.

  10. A facile and expedient one-pot three-component reaction leading to ...

    Sci. Vol. 124, No. 5, September 2012, pp. 1007–1012. c Indian Academy of Sciences. A facile and expedient one-pot three-component reaction leading to multifunctionalized stabilized phosphorus ylides. ZAHRA HASSANI. ∗ and ZEINAB ESFANDIARPOUR. Department of New Materials, International Center for Science, ...

  11. Conceptual design of a fission-based integrated test facility for fusion reactor components

    Watts, K.D.; Deis, G.A.; Hsu, P.Y.S.; Longhurst, G.R.; Masson, L.S.; Miller, L.G.

    1982-01-01

    The testing of fusion materials and components in fission reactors will become increasingly important because of lack of fusion engineering test devices in the immediate future and the increasing long-term demand for fusion testing when a fusion reactor test station becomes available. This paper presents the conceptual design of a fission-based Integrated Test Facility (ITF) developed by EG and G Idaho. This facility can accommodate entire first wall/blanket (FW/B) test modules such as those proposed for INTOR and can also accommodate smaller cylindrical modules similar to those designed by Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) and Westinghouse. In addition, the facility can be used to test bulk breeder blanket materials, materials for tritium permeation, and components for performance in a nuclear environment. The ITF provides a cyclic neutron/gamma flux as well as the numerous module and experiment support functions required for truly integrated tests

  12. Droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with wettability gradients

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2012-05-11

    Droplet motion on solid substrates has been widely studied not only because of its importance in fundamental research but also because of its promising potentials in droplet-based devices developed for various applications in chemistry, biology, and industry. In this paper, we investigate the motion of an evaporating droplet in one-component fluids on a solid substrate with a wettability gradient. As is well known, there are two major difficulties in the continuum description of fluid flows and heat fluxes near the contact line of droplets on solid substrates, namely, the hydrodynamic (stress) singularity and thermal singularity. To model the droplet motion, we use the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)] for the hydrodynamic equations in the bulk region, supplemented with the boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface. In this continuum hydrodynamic model, various physical processes involved in the droplet motion can be taken into account simultaneously, e.g., phase transitions (evaporation or condensation), capillary flows, fluid velocity slip, and substrate cooling or heating. Due to the use of the phase field method (diffuse interface method), the hydrodynamic and thermal singularities are resolved automatically. Furthermore, in the dynamic van der Waals theory, the evaporation or condensation rate at the liquid-gas interface is an outcome of the calculation rather than a prerequisite as in most of the other models proposed for evaporating droplets. Numerical results show that the droplet migrates in the direction of increasing wettability on the solid substrates. The migration velocity of the droplet is found to be proportional to the wettability gradients as predicted by Brochard [Langmuir 5, 432 (1989)]. The proportionality coefficient is found to be linearly dependent on the ratio of slip length to initial droplet radius. These results indicate that the steady migration of the droplets results from the balance between the

  13. Droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with wettability gradients

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2012-01-01

    Droplet motion on solid substrates has been widely studied not only because of its importance in fundamental research but also because of its promising potentials in droplet-based devices developed for various applications in chemistry, biology, and industry. In this paper, we investigate the motion of an evaporating droplet in one-component fluids on a solid substrate with a wettability gradient. As is well known, there are two major difficulties in the continuum description of fluid flows and heat fluxes near the contact line of droplets on solid substrates, namely, the hydrodynamic (stress) singularity and thermal singularity. To model the droplet motion, we use the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)] for the hydrodynamic equations in the bulk region, supplemented with the boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface. In this continuum hydrodynamic model, various physical processes involved in the droplet motion can be taken into account simultaneously, e.g., phase transitions (evaporation or condensation), capillary flows, fluid velocity slip, and substrate cooling or heating. Due to the use of the phase field method (diffuse interface method), the hydrodynamic and thermal singularities are resolved automatically. Furthermore, in the dynamic van der Waals theory, the evaporation or condensation rate at the liquid-gas interface is an outcome of the calculation rather than a prerequisite as in most of the other models proposed for evaporating droplets. Numerical results show that the droplet migrates in the direction of increasing wettability on the solid substrates. The migration velocity of the droplet is found to be proportional to the wettability gradients as predicted by Brochard [Langmuir 5, 432 (1989)]. The proportionality coefficient is found to be linearly dependent on the ratio of slip length to initial droplet radius. These results indicate that the steady migration of the droplets results from the balance between the

  14. Single-bubble dynamics in pool boiling of one-component fluids

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2014-01-01

    We numerically investigate the pool boiling of one-component fluids with a focus on the effects of surface wettability on the single-bubble dynamics. We employed the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], a diffuse-interface model for liquid-vapor flows involving liquid-vapor transition in nonuniform temperature fields. We first perform simulations for bubbles on homogeneous surfaces. We find that an increase in either the contact angle or the surface superheating can enhance the bubble spreading over the heating surface and increase the bubble departure diameter as well and therefore facilitate the transition into film boiling. We then examine the dynamics of bubbles on patterned surfaces, which incorporate the advantages of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The central hydrophobic region increases the thermodynamic probability of bubble nucleation while the surrounding hydrophilic region hinders the continuous bubble spreading by pinning the contact line at the hydrophobic-hydrophilic intersection. This leads to a small bubble departure diameter and therefore prevents the transition from nucleate boiling into film boiling. With the bubble nucleation probability increased and the bubble departure facilitated, the efficiency of heat transfer on such patterned surfaces is highly enhanced, as observed experimentally [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 57, 733 (2013)]. In addition, the stick-slip motion of contact line on patterned surfaces is demonstrated in one-component fluids, with the effect weakened by surface superheating.

  15. Thermal singularity and droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with thermal gradients

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2012-01-01

    Using a continuum model capable of describing the one-component liquid-gas hydrodynamics down to the contact line scale, we carry out numerical simulation and physical analysis for the droplet motion driven by thermal singularity. For liquid droplets in one-component fluids on heated or cooled substrates, the liquid-gas interface is nearly isothermal. Consequently, a thermal singularity occurs at the contact line and the Marangoni effect due to temperature gradient is suppressed. Through evaporation or condensation in the vicinity of the contact line, the thermal singularity makes the contact angle increase with the increasing substrate temperature. This effect on the contact angle can be used to move the droplets on substrates with thermal gradients. Our numerical results for this kind of droplet motion are explained by a simple fluid dynamical model at the droplet length scale. Since the mechanism for droplet motion is based on the change of contact angle, a separation of length scales is exhibited through a comparison between the droplet motion induced by a wettability gradient and that by a thermal gradient. It is shown that the flow field at the droplet length scale is independent of the statics or dynamics at the contact line scale.

  16. Thermal singularity and droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with thermal gradients

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2012-06-26

    Using a continuum model capable of describing the one-component liquid-gas hydrodynamics down to the contact line scale, we carry out numerical simulation and physical analysis for the droplet motion driven by thermal singularity. For liquid droplets in one-component fluids on heated or cooled substrates, the liquid-gas interface is nearly isothermal. Consequently, a thermal singularity occurs at the contact line and the Marangoni effect due to temperature gradient is suppressed. Through evaporation or condensation in the vicinity of the contact line, the thermal singularity makes the contact angle increase with the increasing substrate temperature. This effect on the contact angle can be used to move the droplets on substrates with thermal gradients. Our numerical results for this kind of droplet motion are explained by a simple fluid dynamical model at the droplet length scale. Since the mechanism for droplet motion is based on the change of contact angle, a separation of length scales is exhibited through a comparison between the droplet motion induced by a wettability gradient and that by a thermal gradient. It is shown that the flow field at the droplet length scale is independent of the statics or dynamics at the contact line scale.

  17. Single-bubble dynamics in pool boiling of one-component fluids

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2014-06-04

    We numerically investigate the pool boiling of one-component fluids with a focus on the effects of surface wettability on the single-bubble dynamics. We employed the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], a diffuse-interface model for liquid-vapor flows involving liquid-vapor transition in nonuniform temperature fields. We first perform simulations for bubbles on homogeneous surfaces. We find that an increase in either the contact angle or the surface superheating can enhance the bubble spreading over the heating surface and increase the bubble departure diameter as well and therefore facilitate the transition into film boiling. We then examine the dynamics of bubbles on patterned surfaces, which incorporate the advantages of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The central hydrophobic region increases the thermodynamic probability of bubble nucleation while the surrounding hydrophilic region hinders the continuous bubble spreading by pinning the contact line at the hydrophobic-hydrophilic intersection. This leads to a small bubble departure diameter and therefore prevents the transition from nucleate boiling into film boiling. With the bubble nucleation probability increased and the bubble departure facilitated, the efficiency of heat transfer on such patterned surfaces is highly enhanced, as observed experimentally [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 57, 733 (2013)]. In addition, the stick-slip motion of contact line on patterned surfaces is demonstrated in one-component fluids, with the effect weakened by surface superheating.

  18. Safety evaluation of the loss of fluid test facility project No. 394

    1975-05-01

    Assessment of the safety of the LOFT facility and subsequent recommendations have been based on a comparison of the LOFT facility to requirements for commercial power reactors. In this comparison, the many unique features of the LOFT facility were considered including the low power level, the limited operational use as a test reactor, and the remoteness of the site. Based on this assessment, it is concluded, that while the likelihood of an accidental release of fission products may be greater than for a commercial power reactor, the consequences of such a release are reduced by the lower fission product inventory, the remoteness of the site and the capability of evacuating the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent areas. There is reasonable assurance that the public health and safety will not be endangered due to operation of this facility, specifically: The INEL site is acceptable with respect to location, land use, population distribution, controlled access, hydrology, meteorology, geology and seismology. Sufficient engineered safety features have been included to assure that the potential offsite doses are well within 10 CFR Part 100 guidelines. The LOFT facility has been designed in general accordance with standards, guides and codes which are comparable to those applied to commercial power reactors and any exceptions to these have been based on the unique features of the LOFT facility. Certain matters including the final safety analyses based on detailed component designs, Technical Specifications, LOCE controls and detailed program plan have not been reviewed but we assume will properly be resolved by ERDA, which has the ultimate responsibility for the safety of this facility. Changes to the facility design or program plan such as removal of the fueled Mobile Test Assembly or blowdowns to the containment vessel also will require additional analyses and review. (U.S.)

  19. Integrated network for structural integrity monitoring of critical components in nuclear facilities, RIMIS

    Roth, Maria; Constantinescu, Dan Mihai; Brad, Sebastian; Ducu, Catalin; Malinovschi, Viorel

    2008-01-01

    The round table aims to join specialists working in the research area of the Romanian R and D Institutes and Universities involved in structural integrity assessment of materials, especially those working in the nuclear field, together with the representatives of the end user, the Cernavoda NPP. This scientific event will offer the opportunity to disseminate the theoretical, experimental and modelling activities, carried out to date, in the framework of the National Program 'Research of Excellence', Module I 2006-2008, managed by the National Authority for Scientific Research. Entitled 'Integrated Network for Structural Integrity Monitoring of Critical Components in Nuclear Facilities, RIMIS, the project has two main objectives: 1. - to elaborate a procedure applicable to the structural integrity assessment of critical components used in Romanian nuclear facilities (CANDU type Reactor, Hydrogen Isotopes Separation installations); 2. - to integrate the national networking into a similar one of European level, and to enhance the scientific significance of Romanian R and D organisations as well as to increase the contribution in solving major issues of the nuclear field. The topics of the round table will be focused on: 1. Development of a Structural Integrity Assessment Methodology applicable to the nuclear facilities components; 2. Experimental investigation methods and procedures; 3. Numeric simulation of nuclear components behaviour; 4. Further activities to finalize the assessment procedure. Also participations and contributions to sustain the activity in the European Network NULIFE, FP6 will be discussed. (authors)

  20. An agent-based method for simulating porous fluid-saturated structures with indistinguishable components

    Kashani, Jamal; Pettet, Graeme John; Gu, YuanTong; Zhang, Lihai; Oloyede, Adekunle

    2017-10-01

    Single-phase porous materials contain multiple components that intermingle up to the ultramicroscopic level. Although the structures of the porous materials have been simulated with agent-based methods, the results of the available methods continue to provide patterns of distinguishable solid and fluid agents which do not represent materials with indistinguishable phases. This paper introduces a new agent (hybrid agent) and category of rules (intra-agent rule) that can be used to create emergent structures that would more accurately represent single-phase structures and materials. The novel hybrid agent carries the characteristics of system's elements and it is capable of changing within itself, while also responding to its neighbours as they also change. As an example, the hybrid agent under one-dimensional cellular automata formalism in a two-dimensional domain is used to generate patterns that demonstrate the striking morphological and characteristic similarities with the porous saturated single-phase structures where each agent of the ;structure; carries semi-permeability property and consists of both fluid and solid in space and at all times. We conclude that the ability of the hybrid agent to change locally provides an enhanced protocol to simulate complex porous structures such as biological tissues which could facilitate models for agent-based techniques and numerical methods.

  1. Co-existence of Gel and Fluid Lipid Domains in Single-component Phospholipid Membranes

    Armstrong, Clare L [McMaster University; Barrett, M [McMaster University; Toppozini, L [McMaster University; Yamani, Zahra [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, National Research Council, Chalk River Laboratorie; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Katsaras, John [ORNL; Fragneto, Giovanna [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Rheinstadter, Maikel C [McMaster University

    2012-01-01

    Lateral nanostructures in membranes, so-called rafts, are believed to strongly influence membrane properties and functions. The experimental observation of rafts has proven difficult as they are thought to be dynamic structures that likely fluctuate on nano- to microsecond time scales. Using neutron diffraction we present direct experimental evidence for the co-existence of gel and fluid lipid domains in a single-component phospholipid membrane made of DPPC as it undergoes its main phase transition. The coherence length of the neutron beam sets a lower limit for the size of structures that can be observed. Neutron coherence lengths between 30 and 242A used in this study were obtained by varying the incident neutron energy and the resolution of the neutron spectrometer. We observe Bragg peaks corresponding to co-existing nanometer sized structures, both in out-of-plane and in-plane scans, by tuning the neutron coherence length. During the main phase transition, instead of a continuous transition that shows a pseudo-critical behavior, we observe the co-existence of gel and fluid domains.

  2. HELCZA-High heat flux test facility for testing ITER EU first wall components.

    Prokůpek, J.; Samec, K.; Jílek, R.; Gavila, P.; Neufuss, S.; Entler, Slavomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, November (2017), s. 187-190 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : HELCZA * High heat flux * Electron beam testing * Test facility * Plasma facing components * First wall * Divertora Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379617302818

  3. Gamma irradiation facilities for radiation tolerance assessment of components and systems at SCK.CEN

    Coenen, S.; Decreton, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the different gamma irradiation facilities available at SCK-CEN (Mol, Belgium). With gamma dose rates ranging from 1 Gy/h up to 50 kGy/h, extensive environmental control and on-line instrumentation possibilities, they offer ideal test environments for the radiation tolerance assessment of components and systems for many applications where radiation tolerance is a concern. (authors)

  4. EVAPORATIVE DROPLETS IN ONE-COMPONENT FLUIDS DRIVEN BY THERMAL GRADIENTS ON SOLID SUBSTRATES

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2013-01-01

    A continuum hydrodynamic model is presented for one-component liquid-gas flows on nonisothermal solid substrates. Numerical simulations are carried out for evaporative droplets moving on substrates with thermal gradients. For droplets in one-component fluids on heated/cooled substrates, the free liquid-gas interfaces are nearly isothermal. Consequently, a thermal singularity occurs at the contact line while the Marangoni effect due to interfacial temperature variation is suppressed. Through evaporation/condensation near the contact line, the thermal singularity makes the contact angle increase with the increasing substrate temperature. Due to this effect, droplets will move toward the cold end on substrates with thermal gradients. The droplet migration velocity is found to be proportional to the change of substrate temperature across the droplet. It follows that for two droplets of different sizes on a substrate with temperature gradient, the larger droplet moves faster and will catch up with the smaller droplet ahead. As soon as they touch, they coalesce rapidly into an even larger droplet that will move even faster. © 2013 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  5. EVAPORATIVE DROPLETS IN ONE-COMPONENT FLUIDS DRIVEN BY THERMAL GRADIENTS ON SOLID SUBSTRATES

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2013-03-20

    A continuum hydrodynamic model is presented for one-component liquid-gas flows on nonisothermal solid substrates. Numerical simulations are carried out for evaporative droplets moving on substrates with thermal gradients. For droplets in one-component fluids on heated/cooled substrates, the free liquid-gas interfaces are nearly isothermal. Consequently, a thermal singularity occurs at the contact line while the Marangoni effect due to interfacial temperature variation is suppressed. Through evaporation/condensation near the contact line, the thermal singularity makes the contact angle increase with the increasing substrate temperature. Due to this effect, droplets will move toward the cold end on substrates with thermal gradients. The droplet migration velocity is found to be proportional to the change of substrate temperature across the droplet. It follows that for two droplets of different sizes on a substrate with temperature gradient, the larger droplet moves faster and will catch up with the smaller droplet ahead. As soon as they touch, they coalesce rapidly into an even larger droplet that will move even faster. © 2013 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  6. Effects of non-uniform temperature gradients on surface tension driven two component magneto convection in a porous- fluid system

    Manjunatha, N.; Sumithra, R.

    2018-04-01

    The problem of surface tension driven two component magnetoconvection is investigated in a Porous-Fluid system, consisting of anincompressible two component electrically conducting fluid saturatedporous layer above which lies a layer of the same fluid in the presence of a uniform vertical magnetic field. The lower boundary of the porous layeris rigid and the upper boundary of the fluid layer is free with surfacetension effects depending on both temperature and concentration, boththese boundaries are insulating to heat and mass. At the interface thevelocity, shear and normal stress, heat and heat flux, mass and mass fluxare assumed to be continuous suitable for Darcy-Brinkman model. Theeigenvalue problem is solved in linear, parabolic and inverted parabolictemperature profiles and the corresponding Thermal Marangoni Numberis obtained for different important physical parameters.

  7. Longterm performance of structural component of intermediate- and low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    Whang, J. H.; Kim, S. S.; Chun, T. H.; Lee, J. M.; Yum, M. O.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. S.

    1997-03-01

    Underground repository for intermediate- and low-level radioactive waste is to be sealed and closed after operation. Structural components, which are generally made of cement concrete, are designed and accommodated in the repository for the purpose of operational convenience and stability after closure. To forecast the change of long-term integrity of the structural components, experimental verification, using in-situ or near in-situ conditions, is necessary. Domestic and foreign requirements with regard to the selection criteria and the performance criteria for structural components in disposal facility were surveyed. Characteristics of various types of cement were studied. Materials and construction methods of structural components similar to those of disposal facility was investigated and test items and methods for integrity of cement concrete were included. Literature survey for domestic groundwater characteristics was performed together with Ca-type bentonite ore which is a potential backfill material. Causes or factors affecting the durability of the cement structures were summarized. Experiments to figure out the ions leaching out from and migrating into cement soaked in distilled water and synthetic groundwater, respectively, were carried out. And finally, diffusion of chloride ion through cement was experimentally measured

  8. Dark energy interacting with dark matter and a third fluid: Possible EoS for this component

    Cruz, Norman; Lepe, Samuel; Pena, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    A cosmological model of dark energy interacting with dark matter and another general component of the universe is considered. The equations for the coincidence parameters r and s, which represent the ratios between dark energy and dark matter and the other cosmic fluid respectively, are analyzed in terms of the stability of stationary solutions. The obtained general results allow to shed some light on the equations of state of the three interacting fluids, due to the constraints imposed by the stability of the solutions. We found that for an interaction proportional to the sum of the dark energy density and the third fluid density, the hypothetical fluid must have positive pressure, which leads naturally to a cosmological scenario with radiation, unparticle or even some form of warm dark matter as the third interacting fluid.

  9. Dark energy interacting with dark matter and a third fluid: Possible EoS for this component

    Cruz, Norman, E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.c [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile); Lepe, Samuel, E-mail: slepe@ucv.c [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile); Pena, Francisco, E-mail: fcampos@ufro.c [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciencias y Administracion, Universidad de La Frontera, Avda. Francisco Salazar 01145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile)

    2011-05-09

    A cosmological model of dark energy interacting with dark matter and another general component of the universe is considered. The equations for the coincidence parameters r and s, which represent the ratios between dark energy and dark matter and the other cosmic fluid respectively, are analyzed in terms of the stability of stationary solutions. The obtained general results allow to shed some light on the equations of state of the three interacting fluids, due to the constraints imposed by the stability of the solutions. We found that for an interaction proportional to the sum of the dark energy density and the third fluid density, the hypothetical fluid must have positive pressure, which leads naturally to a cosmological scenario with radiation, unparticle or even some form of warm dark matter as the third interacting fluid.

  10. Conceptual design of low activation target chamber and components for the National Ignition Facility

    Streckert, H.H.; Schultz, K.R.; Sager, G.T.; Kantner, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    The baseline design for the target chamber and chamber components for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consists of aluminum alloy structural material. Low activation composite chamber and components have important advantages including enhanced environmental and safety characteristics and improved accessibility due to reduced neutron-induced radioactivity. A low activation chamber can be fabricated from carbon fiber reinforced epoxy using thick wall laminate technology similar to submarine bow dome fabrication for the U.S. Navy. A risk assessment analysis indicates that a composite chamber has a reasonably high probability of success, but that an aluminum alloy chamber represents a lower risk. Use of low activation composite materials for several chamber components such as the final optics assemblies, the target positioner and inserter, the diagnostics manipulator tubes, and the optics beam tubes would offer an opportunity to make significant reductions in post-shot radiation dose rate with smaller, less immediate impact on the NIF design. 7 refs., 3 figs

  11. Heat loss and fluid leakage tests of the ROSA-III facility

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Tasaka, Kanji; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1981-12-01

    The report presents characteristic test results about the steady state heat loss, one of the inherent characteristics of the ROSA-III test facility. The steady state heat loss tests were conducted at five different temperature conditions between 111 0 C and 290 0 C . Net heat loss rates were obtained by estimating the electric power supplied to the core, heat input from the recirculation pumps and steam leakage rate. The heat loss characteristics have important contribution to analyses of the ROSA-III small break tests. A following simple relation was obtained between the net heat loss rate Q*sub(HL) (kJ/s) (*: radical) of the ROSA-III facility and the temperature difference ΔT ( 0 C) between the fluid temperature of the system and the room temperature, Q*sub(HL) = 0.56 x ΔT. (*: radical) And the steam leak flow at normal operating condition of the ROSA-III test, (P = 7.2 MPa) was obtained as 8.9 x 10 -3 kg/s and corresponding steam leakage energy as 10.5 kJ/s. The heat input from the recirculation pumps was indirectly estimated under a constant speed by assuming the heat input was equal to the brake horce power of the pumps. (author)

  12. Recycle and reuse of materials and components from waste streams of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    2000-01-01

    All nuclear fuel cycle processes utilize a wide range of equipment and materials to produce the final products they are designed for. However, as at any other industrial facility, during operation of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, apart from the main products some byproducts, spent materials and waste are generated. A lot of these materials, byproducts or some components of waste have a potential value and may be recycled within the original process or reused outside either directly or after appropriate treatment. The issue of recycle and reuse of valuable material is important for all industries including the nuclear fuel cycle. The level of different materials involvement and opportunities for their recycle and reuse in nuclear industry are different at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle activity, generally increasing from the front end to the back end processes and decommissioning. Minimization of waste arisings and the practice of recycle and reuse can improve process economics and can minimize the potential environmental impact. Recognizing the importance of this subject, the International Atomic Energy Agency initiated the preparation of this report aiming to review and summarize the information on the existing recycling and reuse practice for both radioactive and non-radioactive components of waste streams at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This report analyses the existing options, approaches and developments in recycle and reuse in nuclear industry

  13. Potential criticality accident at the General Electric Nuclear Fuel and Component Manufacturing Facility, May 29, 1991

    1991-08-01

    At the General Electric Nuclear Fuel and Component Manufacturing facility, located near Wilmington, North Carolina, on May 28 and 29, 1991, approximately 150 kilograms of uranium were inadvertently transferred from safe process tanks to an unsafe tank located at the waste treatment facility, thus creating the potential for a localized criticality safety problem. The excess uranium was ultimately safely recovered when the tank contents were centrifuged to remove the uranium-bearing material. Subsequently, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission dispatched an Incident Investigation Team to determine what happened, to identify probable causes, and to make appropriate findings and conclusions. This report describes the incident, the methodology used by the team in its investigation, and presents the team's findings and conclusions. 48 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Russian Federation: Passive Safety Components for Lead-Cooled Reactor Facilities

    Sarkulov, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    There is a specific range of engineered features used traditionally in nuclear technology. As a rule, main reactivity control systems use conventional active actuators with solid-body control members and/or liquid systems with active injection of liquid absorber. Other operation principles are normally chosen for additional systems. Currently, the traditional approach to improving the reliability of a reactor facility suggests an increase in the number of safety components and systems which provide for mutual assurance or assist each other. There is a great variety of additional reactivity control members designed for the reactor facility control and shutdown, including hydrodynamic members in the form of rods (acting from the coolant flow); floating-type members (absorbers and displacers); storage-type and liquid members (used in separate channels); bulk members (pebble absorber); gas-based members (with a gas absorber); shape-memory members and others. Hydrodynamic systems were introduced at Beloyarsk NPP Units 1 and 2 and proposed for use in other facility designs, Gases and bulk materials have not been commonly accepted: the former because of the high cost of high-efficiency gaseous absorbers, and the latter because of the complecated monitoring of the bulk material position. It is rather difficult and not always necessary to use the same engineering approaches in new lead-cooled reactor facilities as in traditional ones. Similarly to the development of traditional safety systems, passive safety components (devices) shall be designed according to the essential requirements of the nuclear regulations of the Russian Federation

  15. Simulated spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak repair: an educational model with didactic and technical components.

    Ghobrial, George M; Anderson, Paul A; Chitale, Rohan; Campbell, Peter G; Lobel, Darlene A; Harrop, James

    2013-10-01

    In the era of surgical resident work hour restrictions, the traditional apprenticeship model may provide fewer hours for neurosurgical residents to hone technical skills. Spinal dura mater closure or repair is 1 skill that is infrequently encountered, and persistent cerebrospinal fluid leaks are a potential morbidity. To establish an educational curriculum to train residents in spinal dura mater closure with a novel durotomy repair model. The Congress of Neurological Surgeons has developed a simulation-based model for durotomy closure with the ongoing efforts of their simulation educational committee. The core curriculum consists of didactic training materials and a technical simulation model of dural repair for the lumbar spine. Didactic pretest scores ranged from 4/11 (36%) to 10/11 (91%). Posttest scores ranged from 8/11 (73%) to 11/11 (100%). Overall, didactic improvements were demonstrated by all participants, with a mean improvement between pre- and posttest scores of 1.17 (18.5%; P = .02). The technical component consisted of 11 durotomy closures by 6 participants, where 4 participants performed multiple durotomies. Mean time to closure of the durotomy ranged from 490 to 546 seconds in the first and second closures, respectively (P = .66), whereby the median leak rate improved from 14 to 7 (P = .34). There were also demonstrative technical improvements by all. Simulated spinal dura mater repair appears to be a potentially valuable tool in the education of neurosurgery residents. The combination of a didactic and technical assessment appears to be synergistic in terms of educational development.

  16. Rejuvenation of the controls of the CERN PS/ISOLDE facility using industrial components

    Allard, J.; Locci, F.; Mornacchi, G.

    2001-01-01

    In the context of the general consolidation of the CERN ISOLDE facility, a project has been started to upgrade the ISOLDE control system. We describe the new ISOLDE control system, emphasizing the systematic use of industrial components such as PLCs and field buses, their integration with the existing, VME based, CERN PS control system and their potential applicability to both existing and new controls problems at the CERN PS complex. We also discuss how to extend a PLC-based solution to the case where real-time response is an issue.

  17. Detailed measurements and modelling of thermo active components using a room size test facility

    Weitzmann, Peter; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    measurements in an office sized test facility with thermo active ceiling and floor as well as modelling of similar conditions in a computer program designed for analysis of building integrated heating and cooling systems. A method for characterizing the cooling capacity of thermo active components is described...... typically within 1-2K of the measured results. The simulation model, whose room model splits up the radiative and convective heat transfer between room and surfaces, can also be used to predict the dynamical conditions, where especially the temperature rise during the day is important for designing...

  18. Testing of the Engineering Model Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluids and Combustion Facility

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.; Fox, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (GRC) in Cleveland, OH and the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL have designed and developed an Engineering Model (EM) Electrical Power Control Unit (EPCU) for the Fluids Combustion Facility, (FCF) experiments to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS power distribution system for the FCF's space experiments'test and telemetry hardware. Furthermore. it is proposed to be the common power interface for all experiments. The EPCU is a three kilowatt 12OVdc-to-28Vdc converter utilizing three independent Power Converter Units (PCUs), each rated at 1kWe (36Adc @ 28Vdc) which are paralleled and synchronized. Each converter may be fed from one of two ISS power channels. The 28Vdc loads are connected to the EPCU output via 48 solid-state and current-limiting switches, rated at 4Adc each. These switches may be paralleled to supply any given load up to the 108Adc normal operational limit of the paralleled converters. The EPCU was designed in this manner to maximize allocated-power utilization. to shed loads autonomously, to provide fault tolerance. and to provide a flexible power converter and control module to meet various ISS load demands. Tests of the EPCU in the Power Systems Facility testbed at GRC reveal that the overall converted-power efficiency, is approximately 89% with a nominal-input voltage of 12OVdc and a total load in the range of 4O% to 110% rated 28Vdc load. (The PCUs alone have an efficiency of approximately 94.5%). Furthermore, the EM unit passed all flight-qualification level (and beyond) vibration tests, passed ISS EMI (conducted, radiated. and susceptibility) requirements. successfully operated for extended periods in a thermal/vacuum chamber, was integrated with a proto-flight experiment and passed all stability and functional requirements.

  19. Coal-fired MHD test progress at the Component Development and Integration Facility

    Hart, A.T.; Rivers, T.J.; Alsberg, C.M.; Filius, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) is a Department of Energy test facility operated by MSE, Inc. In the fall of 1984, a 50-MW t , pressurized, slag rejecting coal-fired combustor (CFC) replaced the oil-fired combustor in the test train. In the spring of 1989, a coal-fired precombustor was added to the test hardware, and current controls were installed in the spring of 1990. In the fall of 1990, the slag rejector was installed. MSE test hardware activities included installing the final workhorse channel and modifying the coalfired combustor by installing improved design and proof-of-concept (POC) test pieces. This paper discusses the involvement of this hardware in test progress during the past year. Testing during the last year emphasized the final workhorse hardware testing. This testing will be discussed. Facility modifications and system upgrades for improved operation and duration testing will be discussed. In addition, this paper will address long-term testing plans

  20. Material testing facilities and programs for plasma-facing component testing

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Doerner, R. P.; Greuner, H.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.

    2017-09-01

    Component development for operation in a large-scale fusion device requires thorough testing and qualification for the intended operational conditions. In particular environments are necessary which are comparable to the real operation conditions, allowing at the same time for in situ/in vacuo diagnostics and flexible operation, even beyond design limits during the testing. Various electron and neutral particle devices provide the capabilities for high heat load tests, suited for material samples and components from lab-scale dimensions up to full-size parts, containing toxic materials like beryllium, and being activated by neutron irradiation. To simulate the conditions specific to a fusion plasma both at the first wall and in the divertor of fusion devices, linear plasma devices allow for a test of erosion and hydrogen isotope recycling behavior under well-defined and controlled conditions. Finally, the complex conditions in a fusion device (including the effects caused by magnetic fields) are exploited for component and material tests by exposing test mock-ups or material samples to a fusion plasma by manipulator systems. They allow for easy exchange of test pieces in a tokamak or stellarator device, without opening the vessel. Such a chain of test devices and qualification procedures is required for the development of plasma-facing components which then can be successfully operated in future fusion power devices. The various available as well as newly planned devices and test stands, together with their specific capabilities, are presented in this manuscript. Results from experimental programs on test facilities illustrate their significance for the qualification of plasma-facing materials and components. An extended set of references provides access to the current status of material and component testing capabilities in the international fusion programs.

  1. Durability of spent nuclear fuels and facility components in wet storage

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    Wet storage continues to be the dominant option for the management of irradiated fuel elements and assemblies (fuel units). Fuel types addressed in this study include those used in: power reactors, research and test reactors, and defence reactors. Important decisions must be made regarding acceptable storage modes for a broad variety of fuel types, involving numerous combinations of fuel and cladding materials. A broadly based materials database has the following important functions: to facilitate solutions to immediate and pressing materials problems; to facilitate decisions on the most effective long term interim storage methods for numerous fuel types; to maintain and update a basis on which to extend the licenses of storage facilities as regulatory periods expire; to facilitate cost-effective transfer of numerous fuel types to final disposal. Because examinations of radioactive materials are expensive, access to materials data and experience that provide an informed basis to analyse and extrapolate materials behaviour in wet storage environments can facilitate identification of cost-effective approaches to develop and maintain a valuable materials database. Fuel storage options include: leaving the fuel in wet storage, placing the fuel in canisters with cover gases, stored underwater, or transferring the fuel to one of several dry storage modes, involving a range of conditioning options. It is also important to anticipate the condition of the various materials as periods of wet storage are extended or as decisions to transfer to dry storage are implemented. A sound basis for extrapolation is needed to assess fuel and facility component integrity over the expected period of wet storage. A materials database also facilitates assessment of the current condition of specific fuel and facility materials, with minimal investments in direct examinations. This report provides quantitative and semi-quantitative data on materials behaviour or references sources of data to

  2. Durability of spent nuclear fuels and facility components in wet storage

    1998-04-01

    Wet storage continues to be the dominant option for the management of irradiated fuel elements and assemblies (fuel units). Fuel types addressed in this study include those used in: power reactors, research and test reactors, and defence reactors. Important decisions must be made regarding acceptable storage modes for a broad variety of fuel types, involving numerous combinations of fuel and cladding materials. A broadly based materials database has the following important functions: to facilitate solutions to immediate and pressing materials problems; to facilitate decisions on the most effective long term interim storage methods for numerous fuel types; to maintain and update a basis on which to extend the licenses of storage facilities as regulatory periods expire; to facilitate cost-effective transfer of numerous fuel types to final disposal. Because examinations of radioactive materials are expensive, access to materials data and experience that provide an informed basis to analyse and extrapolate materials behaviour in wet storage environments can facilitate identification of cost-effective approaches to develop and maintain a valuable materials database. Fuel storage options include: leaving the fuel in wet storage, placing the fuel in canisters with cover gases, stored underwater, or transferring the fuel to one of several dry storage modes, involving a range of conditioning options. It is also important to anticipate the condition of the various materials as periods of wet storage are extended or as decisions to transfer to dry storage are implemented. A sound basis for extrapolation is needed to assess fuel and facility component integrity over the expected period of wet storage. A materials database also facilitates assessment of the current condition of specific fuel and facility materials, with minimal investments in direct examinations. This report provides quantitative and semi-quantitative data on materials behaviour or references sources of data to

  3. Views on seismic design standardization of structures, systems and components of nuclear facilities

    Reddy, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs) of nuclear facilities have to be designed for normal operating loads such as dead weight, pressure, temperature etc., and accidental loads such as earthquakes, floods, extreme, wind air craft impact, explosions etc. Manmade accidents such as aircraft impact, explosions etc., sometimes may be considered as design basis event and sometimes taken care by providing administrative controls. This will not be possible in the case of natural events such as earthquakes, flooding, extreme winds etc. Among natural events earthquakes are considered as most devastating and need to be considered as design basis event which has certain annual frequency specified in design codes. For example nuclear power plants are designed for a seismic event has 10000 year return period. It is generally felt that design of SSCs for earthquake loads is very time consuming and expensive. Conventional seismic design approaches demands for large number of supports for systems and components. This results in large space occupation and in turn creates difficulties for maintenance and in service inspection of systems and components. In addition, complete exercise of design need to be repeated for plants being located at different sites due to different seismic demands. However, advanced seismic response control methods will help to standardize the seismic design meeting the safety and economy. These methods adopt passive, semi active and active devices, and base isolators to control the seismic response. In nuclear industry, it is advisable to go for passive devices to control the seismic responses. Ideally speaking, these methods will make the designs made for normal loads can also satisfy the seismic demand without calling for change in material, geometry, layout etc. in the SSCs. This paper explain the basic ideas of seismic response control methods, demonstrate the effectiveness of control methods through case studies and eventually give the procedure to

  4. Air-conditioning and ventilation systems and components of nuclear facilities

    2006-01-01

    The Guide defines the requirements for the design, implementation and operation of the air-conditioning and ventilation systems of nuclear facilities belonging to safety classes 3 and 4, and for the related documents to be submitted to STUK (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Finland). Furthermore, the Guide describes the inspections of air-conditioning and ventilation systems to be conducted by STUK during construction and operation of the facilities. As far as systems and components belonging to safety class 2 are concerned, STUK sets additional requirements case by case. In general, air-conditioning systems refer to systems designed to manage the indoor air cleanness, temperature, humidity and movement. In some rooms of a nuclear power plant, ventilation systems are also used to prevent radioactive materials from spreading outside the rooms. Guide YVL1.0 defines the safety principles concerning the air-conditioning and ventilation of nuclear power plants. Guide YVL2.0 gives the requirements for the design of nuclear power plant systems. In addition, YVLGuide groups 3, 4, 5 and 7 deal with the requirements for air-conditioning and ventilation systems with regard to the mechanical equipment, fire prevention, electrical systems, instrumentation and control technology, and the restriction of releases. The rules and regulations issued by the Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of the Interior (RakMK, the Finnish building code) concerning the design and operation of air-conditioning and ventilation systems and the related fire protection design bases also apply to nuclear facilities. Exhaust gas treatment systems, condenser vacuum systems of boiling water reactor plants and leak collection systems are excluded from the scope of this Guide

  5. Damping of the radial impulsive motion of LMFBR core components separated by fluid squeeze films

    Liebe, R.; Zehlein, H.

    1977-01-01

    The core deformation of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) due to local pressure propagation from rapid energy releases is a complex three-dimensional fluid-structure-interaction problem. High pressure transients of short duration cause structural deformation of the closely spaced fuel elements, which are surrounded by the flowing coolant. Corresponding relative displacements give rise to squeezing fluid motion in the thin layers between the subassemblies. Therefore significant backpressures are produced and the resulting time and space dependent fluid forces are acting on the structure as additional non-conservative external loads. Realistic LMFBR safety analysis of several clustered fuel elements have to account for such flow induced forces. Several idealized models have been proposed to study some aspects of the complex problem. As part of the core mechanics activities at GfK Karlsruhe this paper describes two fluid flow models (model A, model B), which are shown to be suitable for physically coupled fluid-structure analyses. Important assumptions are discussed in both cases and basic equations are derived for one- and two-dimensional incompressible flow fields. The interface of corresponing computer codes FLUF (model A) and FLOWAX (model B) with structural dynamics programs is outlined. Finally fluid-structure interaction problems relevant to LMFBR design are analyzed; parametric studies indicate a significant cushioning effect, energy dissipation and a strongly nonlinear as well as timedependent damping of the structural response. (Auth.)

  6. Impact of the amount of working fluid in loop heat pipe to remove waste heat from electronic component

    Smitka Martin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the options on how to remove waste heat from electronic components is using loop heat pipe. The loop heat pipe (LHP is a two-phase device with high effective thermal conductivity that utilizes change phase to transport heat. It was invented in Russia in the early 1980’s. The main parts of LHP are an evaporator, a condenser, a compensation chamber and a vapor and liquid lines. Only the evaporator and part of the compensation chamber are equipped with a wick structure. Inside loop heat pipe is working fluid. As a working fluid can be used distilled water, acetone, ammonia, methanol etc. Amount of filling is important for the operation and performance of LHP. This work deals with the design of loop heat pipe and impact of filling ratio of working fluid to remove waste heat from insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT.

  7. Requirements to be taken into account when designing safety-related mechanical components conveying or containing pressurized fluid and classified as level 2 or 3

    1984-12-01

    RFS or Regles Fondamentales de Surete (Basic Safety Rules) applicable to certain types of nuclear facilities lay down requirements with which compliance, for the type of facilities and within the scope of application covered by the RFS, is considered to be equivalent to compliance with technical French regulatory practice. The object of the RFS is to take advantage of standardization in the field of safety, while allowing for technical progress in that field. They are designed to enable the operating utility and contractors to know the rules pertaining to various subjects which are considered to be acceptable by the Service Central de Surete des Installations Nucleaires, or the SCSIN (Central Department for the Safety of Nuclear Facilities). These RFS should make safety analysis easier and lead to better understanding between experts and individuals concerned with the problems of nuclear safety. The SCSIN reserves the right to modify, when considered necessary, any RFS and specify, if need be, the terms under which a modification is deemed retroactive. The purpose of this RFS is to specify the requirements to be taken into account when designing mechanical components conveying or containing pressurized fluid and which are in safety class 2 or 3

  8. Thermal studies of the canister staging pit in a hypothetical Yucca Mountain canister handling facility using computational fluid dynamics

    Soltani, Mehdi; Barringer, Chris; Bues, Timothy T. de

    2007-01-01

    The proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste storage site will contain facilities for preparing the radioactive waste canisters for burial. A previous facility design considered was the Canister Handling Facility Staging Pit. This design is no longer used, but its thermal evaluation is typical of such facilities. Structural concrete can be adversely affected by the heat from radioactive decay. Consequently, facilities must have heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for cooling. Concrete temperatures are a function of conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer. The prediction of concrete temperatures under such complex conditions can only be adequately handled by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The objective of the CFD analysis was to predict concrete temperatures under normal and off-normal conditions. Normal operation assumed steady state conditions with constant HVAC flow and temperatures. However, off-normal operation was an unsteady scenario which assumed a total HVAC failure for a period of 30 days. This scenario was particularly complex in that the concrete temperatures would gradually rise, and air flows would be buoyancy driven. The CFD analysis concluded that concrete wall temperatures would be at or below the maximum temperature limits in both the normal and off-normal scenarios. While this analysis was specific to a facility design that is no longer used, it demonstrates that such facilities are reasonably expected to have satisfactory thermal performance. (author)

  9. Study of the pyritized surfaces of the carbon steel components in heavy water production facilities

    Radulescu, Maria; Parvan, Ioana; Lucan, Dumitra; Fulger, Manuela; Dinu, Alice; Blanatui, A.

    1998-01-01

    The components used in the Girldler Sulfide (GS) process of heavy water production are made of carbon steel covered by iron sulfide layers of different compositions (mackinawite, troilite, pyrrhotite or pyrite) of variable thicknesses. The most protective layers which provide an acceptable corrosion resistance of the subjacent metal are the mixtures of pyrrhotite and pyrite. In the present work, the corrosion resistance of carbon steel samples covered by different types of sulfides was investigated by the following methods: X ray diffraction, metallography and electrochemical methods (potential-dynamical and electrochemical impedance). In order to carry out the electrochemical measurements in the same conditions as those of the operation of carbon steel components in D 2 O production facilities, the experiments were performed with Na 2 S solutions, at pH=4 - 13 and S 2- concentration value between 1 and 1000 mg/l. The dependence of corrosion rate kinetics on pH and S 2- concentration of the testing solution was investigated for sulfide covered samples comparatively with the uncovered ones. Corrosion rates determined gravimetrically were compared with those determined by electrochemical measurements. The uniformity and thickness of the sulfide layers were checked by metallographic methods. The composition of the sulfides formed in various environment conditions was established by X-ray diffraction. Reaction mechanisms specific for sulfide formation environments have been proposed. (authors)

  10. High Temperature Heat Pump Integration using Zeotropic Working Fluids for Spray Drying Facilities

    Zühlsdorf, Benjamin; Bühler, Fabian; Mancini, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    source and sink best possibly. Therefore, a set of six common working fluids is defined and the possible binary mixtures of these fluids are analyzed. The performance of the fluids is evaluated based on the energetic performance (COP) and the economic potential (NPV). The results show...... and show a large potential to reuse the excess heat from exhaust gases. This study analyses a heat pump application with an improved integration by choosing the working fluid as a mixture in such a way, that the temperature glide during evaporation and condensation matches the temperature glide of the heat...

  11. Conceptual design of an in-space cryogenic fluid management facility, executive summary

    Willen, G. S.; Riemer, D. H.; Hustvedt, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Spacelab experiment to develop the technology associated with low gravity propellant management is summarized. The preliminary facility definition, conceptual design and design analysis, and facility development plan, including schedule and cost estimates for the facility, are presented.

  12. Working memory components that predict word problem solving: Is it merely a function of reading, calculation, and fluid intelligence?

    Fung, Wenson; Swanson, H Lee

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether the differential effects of working memory (WM) components (the central executive, phonological loop, and visual-spatial sketchpad) on math word problem-solving accuracy in children (N = 413, ages 6-10) are completely mediated by reading, calculation, and fluid intelligence. The results indicated that all three WM components predicted word problem solving in the nonmediated model, but only the storage component of WM yielded a significant direct path to word problem-solving accuracy in the fully mediated model. Fluid intelligence was found to moderate the relationship between WM and word problem solving, whereas reading, calculation, and related skills (naming speed, domain-specific knowledge) completely mediated the influence of the executive system on problem-solving accuracy. Our results are consistent with findings suggesting that storage eliminates the predictive contribution of executive WM to various measures Colom, Rebollo, Abad, & Shih (Memory & Cognition, 34: 158-171, 2006). The findings suggest that the storage component of WM, rather than the executive component, has a direct path to higher-order processing in children.

  13. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Minor Components of Vegetable Oils: beta-Sitosterol

    Sovová, Helena; Galushko, A.A.; Stateva, R.P.; Rochová, Kristina; Sajfrtová, Marie; Bártlová, Milena

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 2 (2010), s. 201-209 ISSN 0260-8774 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : supercritical fluid extraction * sea buckthorn oil * beta-sitosterol Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2010

  14. Fluid mechanics of needle valves with rounded components Part III: Pressure distributions on walls

    Tesař, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 248, September (2016), s. 138-147 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : needle valves * pressure measurements * valves Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.499, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924424716303417

  15. Derivation of transient relativistic fluid dynamics from the Boltzmann equation for a multi-component system

    Denicol, G.S. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Institut für Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Niemi, H. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2013-05-02

    We derive the non-equilibrium single-particle momentum distribution function of a hadron resonance gas. We then study the effects that this newly derived expression can have in the freeze-out description of fluid-dynamical models of heavy ion collisions and compare it with the method traditionally employed, the 14-moment approximation.

  16. Projects at the component development and integration facility. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the third quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; and Spray Casting Project

  17. Integration of a functionally graded W/Cu transition for divertor components of fusion facilities

    Pintsuk, G.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most difficult topics in the design and development of future fusion devices, e.g. ITER (Latin for ''the way'') is the field of plasma facing components for the divertor. In steady-state mode these will be exposed to heat fluxes up to 20 MW/m 2 . The favored design-option is a component made out of tungsten and copper-alloys. Since these materials differ in their thermal expansion coefficient and their elastic modulus a temperature gradient within the component, caused by thermal loads, results in stresses at the interface. An alternative design-option for divertor-components deals with the insertion of a functionally graded material (FGM) between tungsten and copper. This establishes a continuous change of material properties and therefore minimize the stresses and optimize the thermal behavior of the component. Low pressure plasma-spraying and direct laser-sintering are introduced as possible production-methods of graded W/Cu-composites. Based on preliminary investigations both are used for fabricating W/Cu-composite materials with different mixing ratios. Thermo-mechanical and thermo-physical material properties will be determined on these composites and extrapolated to all mixing ratios. For laser-sintering these are limited to Cu-contents of ∝20 to 100 Vol%. Therefore the plasma-spraying process is favored. In finite-element-analyses the graded material and its material properties will be implemented into a 2-D simulation-model of a divertor component. The composition and the design of the graded W/Cu-composite will be optimized. Best results are obtained by high contents of tungsten within the graded layer, which are still improved by a macro-brush design with dimensions of 4.5 x 4.5 mm 2 . This results in a transfer of critical stresses from the mechanical bonded interface between the plasma facing and the graded material to the diffusion bonded interface between the graded material and copper. The joining of tungsten, a plasma-sprayed graded W

  18. Fluid mechanics of needle valves with rounded components Part I: Configurations and models

    Tesař, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 254, February (2017), s. 101-108 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : needle valves * valve with rounded inlet * valve Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.499, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0924424716310226/1-s2.0-S0924424716310226-main.pdf?_tid=f1570ee0-2f46-11e7-b057-00000aab0f26&acdnat=1493736920_595bfaae6a6922d4213225a968d5d74c

  19. Design of a cryogenic test facility for evaluating the performance of interferometric components of the SPICA/SAFARI instrument

    Veenendaal, Ian T.; Naylor, David A.; Gom, Brad G.

    2014-08-01

    The Japanese SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA), a 3 m class telescope cooled to ~ 6 K, will provide extremely low thermal background far-infrared observations. An imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (SAFARI) is being developed to exploit the low background provided by SPICA. Evaluating the performance of the interferometer translation stage and key optical components requires a cryogenic test facility. In this paper we discuss the design challenges of a pulse tube cooled cryogenic test facility that is under development for this purpose. We present the design of the cryostat and preliminary results from component characterization and external optical metrology.

  20. Fusion technology development: first wall/blanket system and component testing in existing nuclear facilities

    Hsu, P.Y.S.; Bohn, T.S.; Deis, G.A.; Judd, J.L.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Millsap, D.A.; Scott, A.J.; Wessol, D.E.

    1980-12-01

    A novel concept to produce a reasonable simulation of a fusion first wall/blanket test environment employing an existing nuclear facility, the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, is presented. Preliminary results show that an asymmetric, nuclear test environment with surface and volumetric heating rates similar to those expected in a fusion first wall/blanket or divertor chamber surface appears feasible. The proposed concept takes advantage of nuclear reactions within the annulus of an existing test space (15 cm in diameter and approximately 100 cm high) to provide an energy flux to the surface of a test module. The principal reaction considered involves 3 He in the annulus as follows: n + 3 He → p + t + 0.75 MeV. Bulk heating in the test module is accomplished by neutron thermalization, gamma heating, and absorption reactions involving 6 Li in the blanket breeding region. The concept can be extended to modified core configurations that will accommodate test modules of different sizes and types. It makes possible development testing of first wall/blanket systems and other fusion components on a scale and in ways not otherwise available until actual high-power fusion reactors are built

  1. Application of fluid-structure coupling to predict the dynamic behavior of turbine components

    Huebner, B; Seidel, U [Voith Hydro Holding GmbH and Co. KG, Alexanderstr. 11, 89522 Heidenheim (Germany); Roth, S, E-mail: bjoern.huebner@voith.co [Laboratory for Hydraulic Machines, EPFL, Avenue de Cour 33 Bis, 1007 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-08-15

    In hydro turbine design, fluid-structure interaction (FSI) may play an important role. Examples are flow induced inertia and damping effects, vortex induced vibrations in the lock-in vicinity, or hydroelastic instabilities of flows in deforming gaps (e.g. labyrinth seals). In contrast to aeroelasticity, hydroelastic systems require strongly (iteratively) coupled or even monolithic solution procedures, since the fluid mass which is moving with the structure (added-mass effect) is much higher and changes the dynamic behavior of submerged structures considerably. Depending on the mode shape, natural frequencies of a turbine runner in water may be reduced to less than 50% of the corresponding frequencies in air, and flow induced damping effects may become one or two orders of magnitude higher than structural damping. In order to reduce modeling effort and calculation time, the solution strategy has to be adapted precisely to a given application. Hence, depending on the problem to solve, different approximations may apply. Examples are the calculation of natural frequencies and response spectra in water using an acoustic fluid formulation, the determination of flow induced damping effects by means of partitioned FSI including complex turbulent flows, and the identification of hydroelastic instabilities using monolithic coupling of non-linear structural dynamics and water flow.

  2. Neutronics analysis of the conceptual design of a component test facility based on the spherical tokamak

    Zheng, S.; Voss, G.M.; Pampin, R.

    2010-01-01

    One of the crucial aspects of fusion research is the optimisation and qualification of suitable materials and components. To enable the design and construction of DEMO in the future, ITER is taken to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility and IFMIF will provide rigorous testing of small material samples. Meanwhile, a dedicated, small-scale components testing facility (CTF) is proposed to complement and extend the functions of ITER and IFMIF and operate in association with DEMO so as to reduce the risk of delays during this phase of fusion power development. The design of a spherical tokamak (ST)-based CTF is being developed which offers many advantages over conventional machines, including lower tritium consumption, easier maintenance, and a compact assembly. The neutronics analysis of this system is presented here. Based on a three-dimensional neutronics model generated by the interface programme MCAM from CAD models, a series of nuclear and radiation protection analyses were carried out using the MCNP code and FENDL2.1 nuclear data library to assess the current design and guide its development if needed. The nuclear analyses addresses key neutronics issues such as the neutron wall loading (NWL) profile, nuclear heat loads, and radiation damage to the coil insulation and to structural components, particularly the stainless steel vessel wall close to the NBI ports where shielding is limited. The shielding of the divertor coil and the internal Poloidal Field (PF) coil, which is introduced in the expanded divertor design, are optimised to reduce their radiation damage. The preliminary results show that the peak radiation damage to the structure of martensitic/ferritic steel is about 29 dpa at the mid-plane assuming a life of 12 years at a duty factor 33%, which is much lower than its ∼150 dpa limit. In addition, TBMs installed in 8 mid-plane ports and 6 lower ports, and 60% 6 Li enrichment in the Li 4 SiO 4 breeder, the total tritium generation is

  3. Computer analysis of an adiabatic Stirling cryocooler using a two-phase two-component working fluid

    Renfroe, D.A.; Cheung, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the performance and behavior of a Stirling cyrocooler incorporating a working fluid composed of helium and nitrogen. At the operating temperature of the cryocooler (80 K), the nitrogen component will condense in the freezer section. It is shown that the phase change in the working fluid increased the heat lifted for a given size and weight of machine and the coefficient of performance. The magnitude of these effects was dependent on the mass ratio of nitrogen to helium, phase angle between the compression and expansion processes, and the ratio of the compression space volume to the expansion space volume. The optimum heat lifted performance was obtained for a mass ratio of four parts of nitrogen to one part of helium, a phase angle of approximately 100 degrees, and a volume ratio of two which resulted in a heat lifted increase of 75% over the single phase, 90 degree phase angle configuration. The coefficient of performance showed a 20% improvement

  4. Technical assistance for the evaluation of fluid loop components (Peltier cooler)

    Best, R.; Biemann, W.; Bosch, R.; Hingst, U.; Kreeb, H.; Mueller, W.

    1980-07-01

    The application of Peltier elements for refrigeration with source temperature control and heat rejection to a fluid loop was investigated using commercially available Peltier cooling elements. Peltier element performance with Peltier elements integrated into a cooler unit, investigation of possible temperature stabilization of the source side of the Peltier cooler arrangement, investigation of the necessary power supply and the power consumption for certain requirements for temperature range and heat load at the source, and investigation of mounting and integration aspects are discussed. Analytical calculations for the performance of Peltier elements in a cooler unit are relevant for a power supply, a temperature regulation system, and the design of bread board cooler unit.

  5. Fluid mechanics of needle valves with rounded components. Part II: Preliminary measurements

    Tesař, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 251, November (2016), s. 52-58 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : needle valves * pressure measurements * valves Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.499, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S092442471630440X/1-s2.0-S092442471630440X-main.pdf?_tid=45acccf4-951f-11e6-a831-00000aab0f02&acdnat=1476787402_bf349ff3cfc7a824c1a01397a9a5b8b3

  6. Critical heat flux experimental facility using Freon R-134a fluid

    Hong, Sung Deok; Chung, C. H.; Kim, B. D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    A CHF experimental loop using Freon R-134a as a working fluid has been designed and built to facilitate modeling of high pressure/temperature water CHF experiments. This loop was designed to operate at 4 MPa, 100 deg C with the maximum flow rate of 2.5 kg/s. The detailed technical specification and operating procedure of the loop are described together with comments on the performance and limitations of the loop. A series of CHF experiment was carried out in a vertical round tube and the fluid-to-fluid modeling techniques are applied for it's validity for the high temperature/pressure reactor conditions. The experimental range covered all the application ranges of CHF correlations developed for both PWR and PHWR. 28 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  7. Statistical mechanics of a one-component fluid of charged hard rods in 1D

    Vericat, F.; Blum, L.

    1986-09-01

    The statistical mechanics of a classical one component system of charged hard rods in a neutralizing background is investigated in 1D stressing on the effects of the hard core interactions over the thermodynamic and the structure of the system. The crystalline status of the system at all temperatures and densities and the absence of phase transitions is shown by extending previous results of Baxter and Kunz on the one-component plasma of point particles. Explicit expressions for the thermodynamic functions and the one-particle correlation function are given in the limits of small and strong couplings. (author)

  8. Derivation of the one component plasma fluid equation of state in strong coupling

    DeWitt, H.E.; Rosenfeld, Y.

    1979-01-01

    A variational calculation of the one component plasma energy using the hard sphere Percus-Yevick g(r) and the virial entropy gives U/NkT = a GAMMA + b GAMMAsup(1/4) + c + d/ GAMMAsup(1/4) + ... in agreement with the empirical fit to Monte Carlo data. (orig.)

  9. Principal component analysis in an experimental cold flow model of a fluid catalytic cracking unit by gammametry

    Araujo, Janeo Severino C. de; Dantas, Carlos Costa; Santos, Valdemir A. dos; Souza, Jose Edson G. de; Luna-Finkler, Christine L.

    2009-01-01

    The fluid dynamic behavior of riser of a cold flow model of a Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit (FCCU) was investigated. The experimental data were obtained by the nuclear technique of gamma transmission. A gamma source was placed diametrically opposite to a detector in any straight section of the riser. The gas-solid flow through riser was monitored with a source of Americium-241 what allowed obtaining information of the axial solid concentration without flow disturbance and also identifying the dependence of this concentration profile with several independent variables. The MatLab R and Statistica R software were used. Statistica tool employed was the Principal Components Analysis (PCA), that consisted of the job of the data organization, through two-dimensional head offices to allow extract relevant information about the importance of the independent variables on axial solid concentration in a cold flow riser. The variables investigated were mass flow rate of solid, mass flow rate of gas, pressure in the riser base and the relative height in the riser. The first two components reached about 98 % of accumulated percentage of explained variance. (author)

  10. Factors relevant to the recycling or reuse of components arising from the decommissioning and refurbishment of nuclear facilities

    1988-01-01

    The decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear facilities is a topic of great interest to many Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) because of the large number of older nuclear facilities which are or soon will be retired from service. To assist in the development of the required decommissioning expertise, the IAEA is developing reports and recommendations which will eventually form an integrated information base covering in a systematic way the wide range of topics associated with decommissioning. This information is required so that Member States can decommission their nuclear facilities in a safe, timely and cost effective manner and the IAEA can effectively respond to requests for assistance. One area which warrants more detailed analyses is an assessment of the factors important to the recycling or reuse of components arising from the refurbishment or decommissioning of nuclear plants, the topic of the present report. The document provides an up to date review of the engineering, social, scientific and administrative factors relevant to the safe recycling or reuse of components arising from decommissioning or refurbishment of nuclear facilities. This report should be of interest to owners, operators, policy makers and regulators involved with nuclear facilities, especially those in developing countries. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Performance Test of Korea Heat Load Test Facility (KoHLT-EB) for the Plasma Facing Components of Fusion Reactor

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won; Cho, Seungyon

    2014-01-01

    The main components of the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the tokamak are the blanket first wall and divertor, which include the armour materials, the heat sink with the cooling mechanism, and the diagnostics devices for the temperature measurement. The Korea Heat Load Test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering. This electron beam facility was constructed using a 300 kW electron gun and a cylindrical vacuum chamber. Performance tests were carried out for the calorimetric calibrations with Cu dummy mockup and for the heat load test of large Cu module. For the simulation of the heat load test of each mockup, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses with ANSYS-CFX were performed. For the development of the plasma facing components in the fusion reactors, test mockups were fabricated and tested in the high heat flux test facility. To perform a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test, the Korean high-heat flux test facility using an electron beam system was constructed. In this facility, a cyclic heat flux test will be performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile, and cooling capacity

  12. Performance Test of Korea Heat Load Test Facility (KoHLT-EB) for the Plasma Facing Components of Fusion Reactor

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The main components of the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the tokamak are the blanket first wall and divertor, which include the armour materials, the heat sink with the cooling mechanism, and the diagnostics devices for the temperature measurement. The Korea Heat Load Test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering. This electron beam facility was constructed using a 300 kW electron gun and a cylindrical vacuum chamber. Performance tests were carried out for the calorimetric calibrations with Cu dummy mockup and for the heat load test of large Cu module. For the simulation of the heat load test of each mockup, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses with ANSYS-CFX were performed. For the development of the plasma facing components in the fusion reactors, test mockups were fabricated and tested in the high heat flux test facility. To perform a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test, the Korean high-heat flux test facility using an electron beam system was constructed. In this facility, a cyclic heat flux test will be performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile, and cooling capacity.

  13. Design and construction of γ-rays irradiation facility for remote-handling parts and components of fusion reactor

    Yagi, Toshiaki; Morita, Yousuke; Seguchi, Tadao

    1995-03-01

    For the evaluation of radiation resistance of remote-handling system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor(ITER), 'high dose-rate and high temperature (upper 350degC) γ-rays irradiation facility' was designed and constructed. In this facility, the parts and components of remote-handling system such as sensing devices, motors, optical glasses, wires and cables, etc., are tested by irradiation with 2x10 6 Roentgen/h Co-60 γ-rays at a temperature up to 350degC under various atmospheres (dry nitrogen gas, argon gas, dry air and vacuum). (author)

  14. Development of Integral Effect Test Facility P and ID and Technical Specification for SMART Fluid System

    Lee, Sang Il; Jung, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Song, S. Y.; Han, O. J.; Lee, B. J.; Kim, Y. A.; Lim, J. H.; Park, K. W.; Kim, N. G.

    2010-01-01

    SMART integral test loop is the thermal hydraulic test facility with a high pressure and temperature for simulating the major systems of the prototype reactor, SMART-330. The objective of this project is to conduct the basic design for constructing SMART ITL. The major results of this project include a series of design documents, technical specifications and P and ID. The results can be used as the fundamental materials for making the detailed design which is essential for manufacturing and installing SMART ITL

  15. Implementation of wall film condensation model to two-fluid model in component thermal hydraulic analysis code CUPID - 15237

    Lee, J.H.; Park, G.C.; Cho, H.K.

    2015-01-01

    In the containment of a nuclear reactor, the wall condensation occurs when containment cooling system and structures remove the mass and energy release and this phenomenon is of great importance to ensure containment integrity. If the phenomenon occurs in the presence of non-condensable gases, their accumulation near the condensate film leads to significant reduction in heat transfer during the condensation. This study aims at simulating the wall film condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas using CUPID, a computational multi-fluid dynamics code, which is developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) for the analysis of transient two-phase flows in nuclear reactor components. In order to simulate the wall film condensation in containment, the code requires a proper wall condensation model and liquid film model applicable to the analysis of the large scale system. In the present study, the liquid film model and wall film condensation model were implemented in the two-fluid model of CUPID. For the condensation simulation, a wall function approach with heat and mass transfer analogy was applied in order to save computational time without considerable refinement for the boundary layer. This paper presents the implemented wall film condensation model and then, introduces the simulation result using CUPID with the model for a conceptual condensation problem in a large system. (authors)

  16. Optimization of Cycle and Expander Design of an Organic Rankine Cycle Unit using Multi-Component Working Fluids

    Meroni, Andrea; Andreasen, Jesper Graa; Pierobon, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power systems represent at-tractive solutions for power conversion from low temperatureheat sources, and the use of these power systems is gaining increasing attention in the marine industry. This paper proposesthe combined optimal design of cycle and expander...... for an organic Rankine cycle unit utilizing waste heat from low temperature heat sources. The study addresses a case where the minimum temperature of the heat source is constrained and a case where no constraint is imposed. The former case is the wasteheat recovery from jacket cooling water of a marine diesel...... engine onboard a large ship, and the latter is representative of a low-temperature geothermal, solar or waste heat recovery application. Multi-component working fluids are investigated, as they allow improving the match between the temperature pro-files in the heat exchangers and, consequently, reducing...

  17. IFMIF [International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility], an accelerator-based neutron source for fusion components irradiation testing: Materials testing capabilities

    Mann, F.M.

    1988-08-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is proposed as an advanced accelerator-based neutron source for high-flux irradiation testing of large-sized fusion reactor components. The facility would require only small extensions to existing accelerator and target technology originally developed for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. At the extended facility, neutrons would be produced by a 0.1-A beam of 35-MeV deuterons incident upon a liquid lithium target. The volume available for high-flux (>10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/-s) testing in IFMITF would be over a liter, a factor of about three larger than in the FMIT facility. This is because the effective beam current of 35-MeV deuterons on target can be increased by a factor of ten to 1A or more. Such an increase can be accomplished by funneling beams of deuterium ions from the radio-frequency quadruple into a linear accelerator and by taking advantage of recent developments in accelerator technology. Multiple beams and large total current allow great variety in available testing. For example, multiple simultaneous experiments, and great flexibility in tailoring spatial distributions of flux and spectra can be achieved. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  18. A Principle of Corresponding States for Two-Component, Self-Gravitating Fluids

    Caimmi, R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrogases are defined as two-component,large-scale celestial objects where the subsystems interact only via gravitation.The macrogas equation of state is formulated and compared to the van der Waals (VDWequation of state for ordinary gases.By analogy, it is assumed that real macroisothermal curves in macrogases occur as real isothermal curves in ordinary gases, where a phase transition(vapour-liquid observed in ordinary gases and gas-stars assumed in macrogases takesplace along a horizontal linein the macrovolume-macropressure{small $({sf O}sX_mathrm{V}sX_mathrm{p}$} plane.The intersections between real and theoretical(deduced from the equation of state macro isothermalcurves, make two regions of equal surface as for ordinary gases obeying the VDW equation of state.A numerical algorithm is developed for determining the following points of a selected theoretical macroisothermal curve on the {small $({sf O}sX_mathrm{V}sX_mathrm{p}$} plane:the three intersections with the related real macroisothermal curve,and the two extremum points (one maximum and one minimum. Different kinds of macrogases are studied in detail: UU, where U density profiles are flat, to be conceived as a simple guidance case; HH, where H density profiles obey the Hernquist (1990 law, which satisfactorily fits the observed spheroidal components of galaxies; HN/NH, where N density profiles obey the Navarro-Frenk-White (1995,1996, 1997 law, which satisfactorily fits the simulated nonbaryonic dark matter haloes.A different trend is shown by theoretical macroisothermal curves on the{small $({sf O}sX_mathrm{V}sX_mathrm{p}$} plane,according to whether density profiles are sufficiently mild (UU or sufficiently steep (HH, HN/NH.In the former alternative, no critical macroisothermal curve exists, below or above which the trend is monotonous. In the latter alternative, a critical macroisothermal curve exists, as shown by VDW gases, where the critical point may be defined as the horizontal

  19. A principle of corresponding states for two-component, self-gravitating fluids

    Caimmi R.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrogases are defined as two-component, large-scale celestial objects where the subsystems interact only via gravitation. The macrogas equation of state is formulated and compared to the van der Waals (VDW equation of state for ordinary gases. By analogy, it is assumed that real macroisothermal curves in macrogases occur as real isothermal curves in ordinary gases, where a phase transition (vapour-liquid observed in ordinary gases and gas-stars assumed in macrogases takes place along a horizontal line in the macrovolume-macropressure (O, Xv, Xp plane. The intersections between real and theoretical (deduced from the equation of state macroisothermal curves, make two regions of equal surface as for ordinary gases obeying the VDW equation of state. A numerical algorithm is developed for determining the following points of a selected theoretical macroisothermal curve on the (O, Xv, Xp plane: the three intersections with the related real macroisothermal curve, and the two extremum points (one maximum and one minimum. Different kinds of macrogases are studied in detail: UU, where U density profiles are flat, to be conceived as a simple guidance case; HH, where H density profiles obey the Hernquist (1990 law, which satisfactorily fits the observed spheroidal components of galaxies; HN/NH, where N density profiles obey the Navarro-Frenk-White (1995, 1996, 1997 law, which satisfactorily fits the simulated nonbaryonic dark matter haloes. A different trend is shown by theoretical macroisothermal curves on the (O/XV/Xp plane, according to whether density profiles are sufficiently mild (UU or sufficiently steep (HH, HN/NH. In the former alternative, no critical macroisothermal curve exists, below or above which the trend is monotonous. In the latter alternative, a critical macroisothermal curve exists, as shown by VDW gases, where the critical point may be defined as the horizontal inflexion point. In any case, by analogy with VDW gases, the first quadrant

  20. In-vacuum sensors for the beamline components of the ITER neutral beam test facility

    Dalla Palma, M., E-mail: mauro.dallapalma@igi.cnr.it; Pasqualotto, R.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35127 (Italy); Sartori, E. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35127 (Italy); Università degli Studi di Padova, Padova 35122 (Italy); Veltri, P. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35127 (Italy); INFN-LNL, Legnaro (PD) 35020 (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Embedded sensors have been designed for installation on the components of the MITICA beamline, the prototype ITER neutral beam injector (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), to derive characteristics of the particle beam and to monitor the component conditions during operation for protection and thermal control. Along the beamline, the components interacting with the particle beam are the neutralizer, the residual ion dump, and the calorimeter. The design and the positioning of sensors on each component have been developed considering the expected beam-surface interaction including non-ideal and off-normal conditions. The arrangement of the following instrumentation is presented: thermal sensors, strain gages, electrostatic probes including secondary emission detectors, grounding shunt for electrical currents, and accelerometers.

  1. The impact of CFD on development test facilities - A National Research Council projection. [computational fluid dynamics

    Korkegi, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a National Research Council study on the effect that advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will have on conventional aeronautical ground testing are reported. Current CFD capabilities include the depiction of linearized inviscid flows and a boundary layer, initial use of Euler coordinates using supercomputers to automatically generate a grid, research and development on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations, and preliminary research on solutions to the full N-S equations. Improvements in the range of CFD usage is dependent on the development of more powerful supercomputers, exceeding even the projected abilities of the NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator (1 BFLOP/sec). Full representation of the Re-averaged N-S equations will require over one million grid points, a computing level predicted to be available in 15 yr. Present capabilities allow identification of data anomalies, confirmation of data accuracy, and adequateness of model design in wind tunnel trials. Account can be taken of the wall effects and the Re in any flight regime during simulation. CFD can actually be more accurate than instrumented tests, since all points in a flow can be modeled with CFD, while they cannot all be monitored with instrumentation in a wind tunnel.

  2. Component failure-rate data with potential applicability to the hot experimental facility. Technical information

    Dexter, A.H.

    1980-12-01

    A literature search, that was aided by computer searches of a number of data bases, resulted in the compilation of approximately 1223 pieces of component failure-rate data under 136 subject categories. The data bank can be provided upon request as a punched-card deck or on magnetic tape

  3. A facile and expedient one-pot three-component reaction leading to ...

    A three-component reaction between triphenylphosphine, a dialkyl acetylenedicarboxylate and phthalazin-1(2H)-ones that affords novel organic phosphorane derivatives in good to excellent yields is reported. FTIR, 1H, 13C and 31P NMR and elemental analyses have been utilized to characterize the synthesized ...

  4. Dynamic interaction of components, structure, and foundation of nuclear power facilities

    Pajuhesh, J.; Hadjian, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    A solution is formulated for the dynamic analysis of structures and components with different stiffness and damping characteristics, including the consideration of soil-structure interaction effects. Composite structures are often analysed approximately, in particular with regards to damping. For example, the reactor and other equipment in nuclear power plant structures are often analysed by assuming them uncoupled from the supporting structures. To achieve a better accuracy, the coupled system is hereby analysed as a composite component-structure-soil system. To demonstrate the assembly technique, two examples are considered: (a) a steel structure sitting on a concrete stem and linked by a steel bridge to another concrete structure, and (b) an actual model of a nuclear power plant containment structure. (Auth.)

  5. Development of a personal computer based facility-level SSAC component and inspector support system

    Markov, A.

    1989-08-01

    Research Contract No. 4658/RB was conducted between the IAEA and the Bulgarian Committee on Use of Atomic Energy for Peaceful Purposes. The contract required the Committee to develop and program a personal computer based software package to be used as a facility-level computerized State System of Accounting and Control (SSAC) at an off-load power reactor. The software delivered, called the National Safeguards System (NSS) keeps track of all fuel assembly activity at a power reactor and generates all ledgers, MBA material balances and any required reports to national or international authorities. The NSS is designed to operate on a PC/AT or compatible equipment with a hard disk of 20 MB, color graphics monitor or adaptor and at least one floppy disk drive, 360 Kb. The programs are written in Basic (compiler 2.0). They are executed under MS DOS 3.1 or later

  6. Seismic fragility of reinforced concrete structures and components for application to nuclear facilities

    Gergely, P.

    1984-09-01

    The failure and fragility analyses of reinforced concrete structures and elements in nuclear reactor facilities within the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are evaluated. Uncertainties in material modeling, behavior of low shear walls, and seismic risk assessment for nonlinear response receive special attention. Problems with ductility-based spectral deamplification and prediction of the stiffness of reinforced concrete walls at low stress levels are examined. It is recommended to use relatively low damping values in connection with ductility-based response reductions. The study of static nonlinear force-deflection curves is advocated for better nonlinear dynamic response predictions. Several details of the seismic risk analysis of the Zion plant are also evaluated. 73 references

  7. Calculating the shrapnel generation and subsequent damage to first wall and optics components for the National Ignition Facility

    Tokheim, R.E.; Seaman, L.; Cooper, T.; Lew, B.; Curran, D.R.; Sanchez, J.; Anderson, A.; Tobin, M.

    1996-01-01

    This study computationally assesses the threat from shrapnel generation on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) first wall, final optics, and ultimately other target chamber components. Motion of the shrapnel is determined both by particle velocities resulting from the neutron deposition and by x-ray and ionic debris loading arising from explosion of the hohlraum. Material responses of different target area components are computed from one-dimensional and two-dimensional stress wave propagation codes. Well developed rate-dependent spall computational models are used for stainless steel spall and splitting. Severe cell distortion is accounted for in shine-shield and hohlraum-loading computations. Resulting distributions of shrapnel particles are traced to the first wall and optics and damage is estimated for candidate materials. First wall and optical material damage from shrapnel includes crater formation and associated extended cracking. 5 refs., 10 figs

  8. Efficient numerical methods for simulating surface tension of multi-component mixtures with the gradient theory of fluid interfaces

    Kou, Jisheng

    2015-08-01

    Surface tension significantly impacts subsurface flow and transport, and it is the main cause of capillary effect, a major immiscible two-phase flow mechanism for systems with a strong wettability preference. In this paper, we consider the numerical simulation of the surface tension of multi-component mixtures with the gradient theory of fluid interfaces. Major numerical challenges include that the system of the Euler-Lagrange equations is solved on the infinite interval and the coefficient matrix is not positive definite. We construct a linear transformation to reduce the Euler-Lagrange equations, and naturally introduce a path function, which is proven to be a monotonic function of the spatial coordinate variable. By using the linear transformation and the path function, we overcome the above difficulties and develop the efficient methods for calculating the interface and its interior compositions. Moreover, the computation of the surface tension is also simplified. The proposed methods do not need to solve the differential equation system, and they are easy to be implemented in practical applications. Numerical examples are tested to verify the efficiency of the proposed methods. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Dynamic interactions of components, structure, and foundation of nuclear power facilities

    Pajuhesh, J.; Hadjian, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    A solution is formulated for the dynamic analysis of structures and components with different stiffness and damping characteristics, including the consideration of soil-structure interaction effects. Composite structures are often analysed approximately, in particular with regards to damping. For example, the reactor and other equipment in nuclear power plant structures are often analysed by assuming them uncoupled from the supporting structures. To achieve a better accuracy, the coupled system is hereby analysed as a composite component-structure-soil system. Although derivation of mass and stiffness matrices for the component-structure-soil system is a simple problem, the determination of the damping characteristics of such a system is more complex. This emphasis on the proper evaluation of system damping is warranted on the grounds that, when resonance conditions occur, the response amplitude is governed to a significant degree by the system damping. The damping information is usually available for each sub-structure separately with its based fixed or devoid of rigid-body modes of motion. The rigid-body motions are often free of damping resistance but sometimes, such as in the case of soil-structure interaction, or in the case of aerodynamic resistance, are uniquely defined. The composite damping matrix for the complete structure is hereby derived from the above-mentioned information. Thus, the damping matrix is first obtained for the free-free model of each sub-structure (the model containing the structural degrees of freedom together with rigid-body modes of motion), and then the submatrices for the free-free models are assembled to form the composite damping matrix in acccordance with an assembly technique relating the sub-structure coordinates to the global coordinates of the composite structure

  10. Computing the influences of different Intraocular Pressures on the human eye components using computational fluid-structure interaction model.

    Karimi, Alireza; Razaghi, Reza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Intraocular Pressure (IOP) is defined as the pressure of aqueous in the eye. It has been reported that the normal range of IOP should be within the 10-20 mmHg with an average of 15.50 mmHg among the ophthalmologists. Keratoconus is an anti-inflammatory eye disorder that debilitated cornea unable to reserve the normal structure contrary to the IOP in the eye. Consequently, the cornea would bulge outward and invoke a conical shape following by distorted vision. In addition, it is known that any alterations in the structure and composition of the lens and cornea would exceed a change of the eye ball as well as the mechanical and optical properties of the eye. Understanding the precise alteration of the eye components' stresses and deformations due to different IOPs could help elucidate etiology and pathogenesis to develop treatments not only for keratoconus but also for other diseases of the eye. In this study, at three different IOPs, including 10, 20, and 30 mmHg the stresses and deformations of the human eye components were quantified using a Three-Dimensional (3D) computational Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) model of the human eye. The results revealed the highest amount of von Mises stress in the bulged region of the cornea with 245 kPa at the IOP of 30 mmHg. The lens was also showed the von Mises stress of 19.38 kPa at the IOPs of 30 mmHg. In addition, by increasing the IOP from 10 to 30 mmHg, the radius of curvature in the cornea and lens was increased accordingly. In contrast, the sclera indicated its highest stress at the IOP of 10 mmHg due to over pressure phenomenon. The variation of IOP illustrated a little influence in the amount of stress as well as the resultant displacement of the optic nerve. These results can be used for understanding the amount of stresses and deformations in the human eye components due to different IOPs as well as for clarifying significant role of IOP on the radius of curvature of the cornea and the lens.

  11. Review of Maintenance and Repair Times for Components in Technological Facilities

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2012-11-01

    This report is a compilation of some unique component repair time data and it also presents citations of more extensive reports where lists of repair times can be found. This collection of information should support analysts who seek to quantify maintainability and availability of high technology and nuclear energy production systems. While there are newer sources of repair time information, most, if not all, of the newer sources are proprietary and cannot be shared. This report offers data that, while older, is openly accessible and can serve as reasonable estimates of repair times, at least for initial studies. Some times were found for maintenance times in radiation environments, and some guidance for multiplicative factors to use to account for work in contamination areas.

  12. Carbon isotope fractionation during diamond growth in depleted peridotite: Counterintuitive insights from modelling water-maximum CHO fluids as multi-component systems

    Stachel, T.; Chacko, T.; Luth, R. W.

    2017-09-01

    Because of the inability of depleted cratonic peridotites to effectively buffer oxygen fugacities when infiltrated by CHO or carbonatitic fluids, it has been proposed recently (Luth and Stachel, 2014) that diamond formation in peridotites typically does not occur by rock-buffered redox reactions as previously thought but by an oxygen-conserving reaction in which minor coexisting CH4 and CO2 components in a water-rich fluid react to form diamond (CO2 + CH4 = 2C + 2H2O). In such fluid-buffered systems, carbon isotope fractionation during diamond precipitation occurs in the presence of two dominant fluid carbon species. Carbon isotope modelling of diamond precipitation from mixed CH4- and CO2-bearing fluids reveals unexpected fundamental differences relative to diamond crystallization from a single carbon fluid species: (1) irrespective of which carbon fluid species (CH4 or CO2) is dominant in the initial fluid, diamond formation is invariably associated with progressive minor (diamond in 13C as crystallization proceeds. This is in contrast to diamond precipitation by rock-buffered redox processes from a fluid containing only a single carbon species, which can result in either progressive 13C enrichment (CO2 or carbonate fluids) or 13C depletion (CH4 fluids) in the diamond. (2) Fluid speciation is the key factor controlling diamond δ13 C values; as XCO2 (XCO2 = CO2/[CO2 + CH4]) in the initial fluid increases from 0.1 to 0.9 (corresponding to an increase in fO2 of 0.8 log units), the carbon isotope composition of the first-precipitated diamond decreases by 3.7‰. The tight mode in δ13C of - 5 ± 1 ‰ for diamonds worldwide places strict constraints on the dominant range of XCO2 in water-rich fluids responsible for diamond formation. Specifically, precipitation of diamonds with δ13C values in the range -4 to -6‰ from mantle-derived fluids with an average δ13C value of -5‰ (derived from evidence not related to diamonds) requires that diamond-forming fluids were

  13. Decommissioning: A critical component of the design for uranium tailings management facilities

    Clifton, W.A.; Barsi, R.G.; Misfeldt, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium was discovered in the Beaverlodge area of northern Saskatchewan in 1934 with the first major mill beginning operation in 1953. Little attention was paid to tailings quality or tailings management practices. With the onset of the modem uranium operations beginning in the late 1970's, it was repeatedly evident, that the public had significant concerns, particularly with respect to tailings management, that must be addressed if the developments were to be allowed to proceed. Primary considerations related to environmental protection, public safety and an assurance of the ongoing sustainable development of the region. Integrating the decommissioning of a mine/mill site into development planning from the very outset has proven to be a critical component that has contributed to the ongoing success of the Saskatchewan uranium operations. This paper will provide a case study of the evolution of the uranium tailings management technology utilized in Saskatchewan. It documents the evolution of tailings management processes and the characteristics of tailings produced by successive mines in northern Saskatchewan. It also discusses the evolution of technologies applied to management of uranium mill tailings and demonstrates how progressively increasing levels of environmental protection have been achieved during the last 47 years of uranium mill operation. The paper also shows that the planned and progressive decommissioning of an operational site is the key to: Minimizing environmental impacts; Satisfying public and regulatory concerns; Minimizing operational and decommissioning costs; Minimizing corporate liability; and Shifting public resistance to public support. (author)

  14. Development of data acquisition and control system for ICH & CD transmission line components test facility

    Patel, Manoj, E-mail: manoj.patel@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, Gujarat (India); Jha, Akhil [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, Gujarat (India); Patel, Nidhi [Department of Instrumentation & Control Engineering, Dharmsinh Desai University, Nadiad 387001, Gujarat (India); Krishna, J.V.S. Hari; Rajnish, Kumar; Soni, Dipal; Verma, Sriprakash; Patel, Hriday; Trivedi, Rajesh; Mukherjee, Aparajita [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, Gujarat (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Traveling Wave Resonator (TWR) gain achieved is 13.58 dB using 10 dB coupler. • Software module for Automatic calibration for power detector is developed and integrated. • Application module is developed using LabVIEW™ for high power RF operation of TWR. - Abstarct: India is developing a very high power test bed (∼MW level) based on concept of Travelling Wave Resonator (TWR) for testing of passive transmission line components [3]. Data acquisition and control system is required for safe and reliable operation of TWR. It includes online monitoring of input power and circulating ring power. Acquired RF signal provides information about forward and reflected RF power. For MW power level testing, system is protected against arc and thermal effect during CW operation. National Instrument make hardware and software have been used to acquire signals from RF detector, Arc detectors, IR camera and thermocouples etc. LabVIEW™ based software has been developed for calculation of RF parameters. Graphical user interface is developed for better visualization. Initial testing of the TWR setup with 10 dB coupler provides a power gain of 13.58 dB (22X). For future 3 MW TWR test bed the required power gain is ∼20 dB (100X) since the available source is ∼40 kW. This paper describes the detail design and integrated test results for data acquisition and control system for TWR test bed.

  15. Decommissioning: A critical component of the design for uranium tailings management facilities

    Clifton, A.W.; Barsi, R.G.; Misfeldt, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    Uranium was discovered in the Beaverlodge area of northern Saskatchewan in 1934 with the first major mill beginning operation in 1953. Little attention was paid to tailings quality or tailings management practices. With the onset of the modern uranium operations beginning in the late 1970's, it was repeatedly evident, that the public had significant concerns, particularly with respect to tailings management, that must be addressed if the developments were to be allowed to proceed. Primary considerations related to environmental protection, public safety and an assurance of the ongoing sustainable development of the region. Integrating the decommissioning of a mine/mill site into development planning from the very outset has proven to be a critical component that has contributed to the ongoing success of the Saskatchewan uranium operations. This paper will provide a case study of the evolution of the uranium tailings management technology utilized in Saskatchewan. It documents the evolution of tailings management processes and the characteristics of tailings produced by successive mines in northern Saskatchewan. It also discusses the evolution of technologies applied to management of uranium mill tailings and demonstrates how progressively increasing levels of environmental protection have been achieved during the last 47 years of uranium mill operation. The paper also shows that the planned and progressive decommissioning of an operational site is the key to: Minimizing environmental impacts; Satisfying public and regulatory concerns; Minimizing operational and decommissioning costs; Minimizing corporate liability; and Shifting public resistance to public support. (author)

  16. Long-term performance of structural component of intermediate- and low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    Hwang, Joo Ho; Kim, Seong Soo; Lee, Jae Min; Kang, Dong Koo; Yu, Jeong Beom; Lim, Goon Taek

    1998-03-01

    Domestic and foreign requirements with regard to the selection criteria and the performance criteria for structural components of disposal facility were surveyed. Characteristics of presently available cements were studied. Types and characteristics of high performance concrete and construction methods similar to disposal facility are also included in the study. Definitions of the term durability and the limit of the term were surveyed. Literature survey for the important factors affecting the durability and modeling methods to assess durability was performed. Deterioration and crack forming mechanisms were studied. Characteristics of domestic ground water were collected from KAERI data. Experiments were carried out with synthetic ground water to study the reactions between cement and constituents in the ground water. Experiments lasted up to 130 days and penetration of cations and anions was investigated. Ions of importance were Ca 2- . Mg 2- , SO 4 2+ , Cl - . Changes of ionic concentrations and compressive strength after 110 to 130 days of soaking in synthetic ground water with accelerated conditions were measured. Based upon ASTM's standard for accelerated testing, procedures to assess the durability of cement concrete were suggested

  17. Computational fluid dynamics as a virtual facility for R and D in the IRIS project: an overview

    Colombo, E.; Inzoli, F.; Ricotti, M.; Uddin, R.; Yan, Y.; Sobh, N.

    2004-01-01

    The pressurized light water cooled, medium power (1000 MWt) IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) has been under development for four years by an international consortium of over 21 organizations from ten countries. The plant conceptual design was completed in 2001 and the preliminary design is nearing completion. The pre-application licensing process with NRC started in October, 2002 and IRIS is one of the designs considered by US utilities as part of the ESP (Early Site Permit) process. The development of a new nuclear plant concept presents the opportunity and potential for a significant usage of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the design process, as it is in many conventional applications related to power generation. A CFD-Group of international scientists has been given the mission of investigating the many application opportunities for CFD related to the IRIS project and to verify the support that the IRIS design process may gain from CFD in terms of time, costs, resource saving, and visibility. The key objective identified is the use of CFD as a design tool for virtual tests in order to simplify the optimization effort for the nuclear plant's components and support the IRIS testing program. In this paper, the CFD-Group is described in terms of their resources and capabilities. A program of activities with identified goals and a possible schedule is also presented.(author)

  18. Final environmental assessment for a refinement of the power delivery component of the Southern Nevada Water Authority Treatment and Transmission Facility

    1998-07-01

    The Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) is designing and constructing a system of regional water supply facilities to meet current and projected water demands and increase system reliability. The existing Southern Nevada Water system is being upgraded with a number of improvements to increase the capacity of the system. However, even the expanded system is expected to be unable to meet projected peak daily water demands by the year 1999. As a result, new facilities are being designed and constructed to operate in conjunction with the upgraded Southern Nevada Water system. These new facilities, known as the Southern Nevada Water Authority Treatment and Transmission Facility (SNWA-TTF), include four primary components: a new raw water intake; new transmission facilities including below ground pipelines, tunnels, and above ground pumping stations; a water treatment facility; and new power supply facilities. Because existing power supplies would not be adequate for the new water treatment facilities, new power facilities, consisting of two new 230 kV-69 kV substations and new 69 and 230 kV power lines, are being constructed. This environmental assessment is specifically on the new power facilities

  19. Calculating the shrapnel generation and subsequent damage to first wall and optics components for the National Ignition Facility

    Tokheim, R.E.; Seaman, L.; Cooper, T.; Lew, B.; Curran, D.R.; Sanchez, J.; Anderson, A.; Tobin, M.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to computationally assess the threat from shrapnel generation on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) first wall, final optics, and ultimately other target chamber components. Shrapnel is defined as material.that is in a solid, liquid, or clustered-vapor phase with sufficient velocity to become a threat to exposed surfaces as a consequence of its impact. Typical NIF experiments will be of two types, low neutron yield shots in which the capsule is not cryogenically cooled, and high yield shots for which cryogenic cooling of the capsule is required. For non-cryogenic shots, shrapnel would be produced by spaIIing, melting and vaporizing of ''shine shields'' by absorption and shock wave loading following 1-ω and 2-ω laser radiation. For cryogenic shots, shrapnel would be generated through shock wave splitting, spalling, and droplet formation of the cryogenic tubes following neutron energy deposition. Motion of the shrapnel is determined not only by particle velocities resulting from the neutron deposition, but also by both x-ray and debris loading arising from explosion of the hohlraum. Material responses of different target area components are computed from one- dimensional and two-dimensional stress wave propagation codes. Well developed rate-dependent spall computational models are used for stainless steel spall and splitting,. Severe cell distortion is accounted for in shine-shield and hohlraum-loading computations. Resulting distributions of shrapnel particles are traced to the first wall and optics and damage is estimated for candidate materials. First wall and optical material damage from shrapnel includes crater formation and associated extended cracking

  20. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho and Component Development and Integration Facility, Butte, Montana

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF), conducted September 14 through October 2, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the INEL and CDIF. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations' carried on at the INEL and the CDIF, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S ampersand A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S ampersand A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the S ampersand A results will be incorporated into the INEL/CDIF Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 90 refs., 95 figs., 77 tabs

  1. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho and Component Development and Integration Facility, Butte, Montana

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF), conducted September 14 through October 2, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the INEL and CDIF. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations' carried on at the INEL and the CDIF, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the INEL/CDIF Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 90 refs., 95 figs., 77 tabs.

  2. Effect of amplifier component maintenance on laser system availability and reliability for the US National Ignition Facility

    Erlandson, A.C.; Lambert, H.; Zapata, L.E.

    1996-12-01

    We have analyzed the availability and reliability of the flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass amplifiers that, as a part of a laser now being designed for future experiments, in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), will be used in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Clearly , in order for large ICF systems such as the NIF to operate effectively as a whole, all components must meet demanding availability and reliability requirements. Accordingly, the NIF amplifiers can achieve high reliability and availability by using reliable parts, and by using a cassette-based maintenance design that allows most key amplifier parts to be 1744 replaced within a few hours. In this way, parts that degrade slowly, as the laser slabs, silver reflectors, and blastshields can be expected to do, based on previous experience, can be replaced either between shots or during scheduled maintenance periods, with no effect on availability or reliability. In contrast, parts that fail rapidly, such as the flashlamps, can and do cause unavailability or unreliability. Our analysis demonstrates that the amplifiers for the NIF will meet availability and reliability goals, respectively, of 99.8% and 99.4%, provided that the 7680 NIF flashlamps in NIF have failure rates of less than, or equal to, those experienced on Nova, a 5000-lamp laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

  3. Future technological and economic performance of IGCC and FT production facilities with and without CO2 capture: Combining component based learning curve and bottom-up analysis

    Knoope, M.M.J.; Meerman, J.C.; Ramirez, C.A.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the technological and economic prospects of integrated gasification facilities for power (IGCC) and Fischer–Tropsch (FT) liquid production with and without CCS over time. For this purpose, a component based experience curve was constructed and applied to identify the

  4. Facile Synthesis of Smart Nanocontainers as Key Components for Construction of Self-Healing Coating with Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Liang, Yi; Wang, MingDong; Wang, Cheng; Feng, Jing; Li, JianSheng; Wang, LianJun; Fu, JiaJun

    2016-12-01

    SiO2-imidazoline nanocomposites (SiO2-IMI) owning high loading capacity of corrosion inhibitor, 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (HMID), and a special acid/alkali dual-stimuli-accelerated release property have been synthesized via a one-step modified Stöber method. SiO2-IMI were uniformly distributed into the hydrophobic SiO2 sol to construct "host"-"guest" feedback active coating with a superhydrophobic surface (SiO2-IMI@SHSC) on aluminium alloy, AA2024, by dip-coating technique. SiO2-IMI as "guest" components have good compatibility with "host" sol-gel coating, and more importantly, once localized corrosion occurs on the surface of AA2024, SiO2-IMI can simultaneously respond to the increase in environmental pH around corrosive micro-cathodic regions and decrease in pH near micro-anodic regions, promptly releasing HMID to form a compact molecular film on the damaged surface, inhibiting corrosion spread and executing a self-healing function. The scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) was applied to illustrate the suppression process of cathodic/anodic corrosion activities. Furthermore, benefiting from the superhydrophobic surface, SiO2-IMI@SHSC remained its protective ability after immersion in 0.5 M NaCl solution for 35 days, which is far superior to the conventional sol-gel coating with the same coating thickness. The facile fabrication method of SiO2-IMI simplifies the construction procedure of SiO2-IMI@SHSC, which have great potential to replace non-environmental chromate conversion coatings for practical use.

  5. Facile Synthesis of Smart Nanocontainers as Key Components for Construction of Self-Healing Coating with Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Liang, Yi; Wang, MingDong; Wang, Cheng; Feng, Jing; Li, JianSheng; Wang, LianJun; Fu, JiaJun

    2016-04-01

    SiO2-imidazoline nanocomposites (SiO2-IMI) owning high loading capacity of corrosion inhibitor, 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (HMID), and a special acid/alkali dual-stimuli-accelerated release property have been synthesized via a one-step modified Stöber method. SiO2-IMI were uniformly distributed into the hydrophobic SiO2 sol to construct "host"-"guest" feedback active coating with a superhydrophobic surface (SiO2-IMI@SHSC) on aluminium alloy, AA2024, by dip-coating technique. SiO2-IMI as "guest" components have good compatibility with "host" sol-gel coating, and more importantly, once localized corrosion occurs on the surface of AA2024, SiO2-IMI can simultaneously respond to the increase in environmental pH around corrosive micro-cathodic regions and decrease in pH near micro-anodic regions, promptly releasing HMID to form a compact molecular film on the damaged surface, inhibiting corrosion spread and executing a self-healing function. The scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) was applied to illustrate the suppression process of cathodic/anodic corrosion activities. Furthermore, benefiting from the superhydrophobic surface, SiO2-IMI@SHSC remained its protective ability after immersion in 0.5 M NaCl solution for 35 days, which is far superior to the conventional sol-gel coating with the same coating thickness. The facile fabrication method of SiO2-IMI simplifies the construction procedure of SiO2-IMI@SHSC, which have great potential to replace non-environmental chromate conversion coatings for practical use.

  6. A test facility for the international linear collider at SLAC end station a for prototypes of beam delivery and IR components

    Hildreth, M.D.; Erickson, R.; Frisch, J.

    2006-01-01

    The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference. (author)

  7. An energy stable evolution method for simulating two-phase equilibria of multi-component fluids at constant moles, volume and temperature

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-02-25

    In this paper, we propose an energy-stable evolution method for the calculation of the phase equilibria under given volume, temperature, and moles (VT-flash). An evolution model for describing the dynamics of two-phase fluid system is based on Fick’s law of diffusion for multi-component fluids and the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The mobility is obtained from diffusion coefficients by relating the gradient of chemical potential to the gradient of molar density. The evolution equation for moles of each component is derived using the discretization of diffusion equations, while the volume evolution equation is constructed based on the mechanical mechanism and the Peng-Robinson equation of state. It is proven that the proposed evolution system can well model the VT-flash problem, and moreover, it possesses the property of total energy decay. By using the Euler time scheme to discretize this evolution system, we develop an energy stable algorithm with an adaptive choice strategy of time steps, which allows us to calculate the suitable time step size to guarantee the physical properties of moles and volumes, including positivity, maximum limits, and correct definition of the Helmhotz free energy function. The proposed evolution method is also proven to be energy-stable under the proposed time step choice. Numerical examples are tested to demonstrate efficiency and robustness of the proposed method.

  8. Development of GPU Based Parallel Computing Module for Solving Pressure Equation in the CUPID Component Thermo-Fluid Analysis Code

    Lee, Jin Pyo; Joo, Han Gyu

    2010-01-01

    In the thermo-fluid analysis code named CUPID, the linear system of pressure equations must be solved in each iteration step. The time for repeatedly solving the linear system can be quite significant because large sparse matrices of Rank more than 50,000 are involved and the diagonal dominance of the system is hardly hold. Therefore parallelization of the linear system solver is essential to reduce the computing time. Meanwhile, Graphics Processing Units (GPU) have been developed as highly parallel, multi-core processors for the global demand of high quality 3D graphics. If a suitable interface is provided, parallelization using GPU can be available to engineering computing. NVIDIA provides a Software Development Kit(SDK) named CUDA(Compute Unified Device Architecture) to code developers so that they can manage GPUs for parallelization using the C language. In this research, we implement parallel routines for the linear system solver using CUDA, and examine the performance of the parallelization. In the next section, we will describe the method of CUDA parallelization for the CUPID code, and then the performance of the CUDA parallelization will be discussed

  9. Correlation of horizontal and vertical components of strong ground motion for response-history analysis of safety-related nuclear facilities

    Huang, Yin-Nan, E-mail: ynhuang@ntu.edu.tw [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Yen, Wen-Yi, E-mail: b01501059@ntu.edu.tw [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Whittaker, Andrew S., E-mail: awhittak@buffalo.edu [Dept. of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, MCEER, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The correlation of components of ground motion is studied using 1689 sets of records. • The data support an upper bound of 0.3 on the correlation coefficient. • The data support the related requirement in the upcoming edition of ASCE Standard 4. - Abstract: Design standards for safety-related nuclear facilities such as ASCE Standard 4-98 and ASCE Standard 43-05 require the correlation coefficient for two orthogonal components of ground motions for response-history analysis to be less than 0.3. The technical basis of this requirement was developed by Hadjian three decades ago using 50 pairs of recorded ground motions that were available at that time. In this study, correlation coefficients for (1) two horizontal components, and (2) the vertical component and one horizontal component, of a set of ground motions are computed using records from a ground-motion database compiled recently for large-magnitude shallow crustal earthquakes. The impact of the orientation of the orthogonal horizontal components on the correlation coefficient of ground motions is discussed. The rules in the forthcoming edition of ASCE Standard 4 for the correlation of components in a set of ground motions are shown to be reasonable.

  10. The detection and quantitative analysis of the psychoactive component of Salvia divinorum, salvinorin A, in human biological fluids using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    McDonough, Pamela C; Holler, Justin M; Vorce, Shawn P; Bosy, Thomas Z; Magluilo, Joseph; Past, Marilyn R

    2008-01-01

    Salvia divinorum, a member of the mint plant family, has hallucinogenic properties that have become increasingly sought after by recreational drug users. The main psychoactive component, salvinorin A, has potency comparable to lysergic acid diethylamide. Though still legal to possess in most of the United States and much of Europe, little is known regarding the compound's long-term health effects, addiction liability, and pharmacokinetics. Limited data are available in the scientific literature, and few analytical methods are published for the detection in human biological fluids. These factors contribute to the unfamiliarity of the compound and complicate the method development process necessary to accommodate special requested testing for salvinorin A. A sensitive analytical method for the detection and quantitation of salvinorin A in human biological fluids was developed and validated to resolve analytical shortcomings. The method utilizes a solid-phase extraction technique coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry operated in selected ion monitoring mode. The assay has a linear range of 5.0-100 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.997. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were experimentally determined as 2.5 and 5.0 ng/mL, respectively. The method has been applied to blood and urine samples successfully and can be used to detect the presence of salvinorin A in forensic testing.

  11. Cross-sectional relationship between physical fitness components and functional performance in older persons living in long-term care facilities

    van Mechelen Willem

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The age-related deterioration of physiological capacities such as muscle strength and balance is associated with increased dependence. Understanding the contribution of physical fitness components to functional performance facilitates the development of adequate exercise interventions aiming at preservation of function and independence of older people. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between physical fitness components and functional performance in older people living in long-term care facilities. Methods Design cross-sectional study Subjects 226 persons living in long-term care facilities (mean age: 81.6 ± 5.6. Outcome measures Physical fitness and functional performance were measured by performance-based tests. Results Knee and elbow extension strength were significantly higher in men (difference = 44.5 and 50.0 N, respectively, whereas women were more flexible (difference sit & reach test = 7.2 cm. Functional performance was not significantly different between the genders. In men, motor coordination (eye-hand coordination and measures of strength were the main contributors to functional performance, whereas in women flexibility (sit and reach test and motor coordination (tandem stance and eye-hand coordination played a major role. Conclusion The results of this study show that besides muscle strength, fitness components such as coordination and flexibility are associated with functional performance of older people living in long-term care facilities. This suggests that men and women living in long-term care facilities, differ considerably concerning the fitness factors contributing to functional performance. Women and men may, therefore, need exercise programs emphasizing different fitness aspects in order to improve functional performance.

  12. Seismic evaluation of a cooling water reservoir facility including fluid-structure and soil-structure interaction effects

    Kabir, A.F.; Maryak, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    Seismic analyses and structural evaluations were performed for a cooling water reservoir of a nuclear reactor facility. The horizontal input seismic motion was the NRC Reg. guide 1.60 spectrum shape anchored at 0.20g zero period acceleration. Vertical input was taken as two-thirds of the horizontal input. Soil structure interaction and hydrodynamic effects were addressed in the seismic analyses. Uncertainties in the soil properties were accounted for by considering three soil profiles. Two 2-dimensional SSI models and a 3-dimensional static model. Representing different areas of the reservoir structures were developed and analyzed to obtain seismic forces and moments, and accelerations at various locations. The results included in this paper indicated that both hydrodynamic and soil-structure interaction effects are significant contributors to the seismic responses of the water-retaining walls of the reservoir

  13. Event simulation based on three-fluid hydrodynamics for collisions at energies available at the Dubna Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility and at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Darmstadt

    Batyuk, P.; Blaschke, D.; Bleicher, M.; Ivanov, Yu. B.; Karpenko, Iu.; Merts, S.; Nahrgang, M.; Petersen, H.; Rogachevsky, O.

    2016-10-01

    We present an event generator based on the three-fluid hydrodynamics approach for the early stage of the collision, followed by a particlization at the hydrodynamic decoupling surface to join to a microscopic transport model, ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics, to account for hadronic final-state interactions. We present first results for nuclear collisions of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research-Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility energy scan program (Au+Au collisions, √{sN N}=4 -11 GeV ). We address the directed flow of protons and pions as well as the proton rapidity distribution for two model equations of state, one with a first-order phase transition and the other with a crossover-type softening at high densities. The new simulation program has the unique feature that it can describe a hadron-to-quark matter transition which proceeds in the baryon stopping regime that is not accessible to previous simulation programs designed for higher energies.

  14. Increasing the reliability of the fluid/crystallized difference score from the Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test with reliable component analysis.

    Caruso, J C

    2001-06-01

    The unreliability of difference scores is a well documented phenomenon in the social sciences and has led researchers and practitioners to interpret differences cautiously, if at all. In the case of the Kaufman Adult and Adolescent Intelligence Test (KAIT), the unreliability of the difference between the Fluid IQ and the Crystallized IQ is due to the high correlation between the two scales. The consequences of the lack of precision with which differences are identified are wide confidence intervals and unpowerful significance tests (i.e., large differences are required to be declared statistically significant). Reliable component analysis (RCA) was performed on the subtests of the KAIT in order to address these problems. RCA is a new data reduction technique that results in uncorrelated component scores with maximum proportions of reliable variance. Results indicate that the scores defined by RCA have discriminant and convergent validity (with respect to the equally weighted scores) and that differences between the scores, derived from a single testing session, were more reliable than differences derived from equal weighting for each age group (11-14 years, 15-34 years, 35-85+ years). This reliability advantage results in narrower confidence intervals around difference scores and smaller differences required for statistical significance.

  15. Lewis Acid Catalyzed Asymmetric Three-Component Coupling Reaction: Facile Synthesis of α-Fluoromethylated Tertiary Alcohols.

    Aikawa, Kohsuke; Kondo, Daisuke; Honda, Kazuya; Mikami, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    A chiral dicationic palladium complex is found to be an efficient Lewis acid catalyst for the synthesis of α-fluoromethyl-substituted tertiary alcohols using a three-component coupling reaction. The reaction transforms three simple and readily available components (terminal alkyne, arene, and fluoromethylpyruvate) to valuable chiral organofluorine compounds. This strategy is completely atom-economical and results in perfect regioselectivities and high enantioselectivities of the corresponding tertiary allylic alcohols in good to excellent yields. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Testing and Performance Verification of a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor in an Internal Flow Component Test Facility

    VanZante, Dale E.; Podboy, Gary G.; Miller, Christopher J.; Thorp, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    A 1/5 scale model rotor representative of a current technology, high bypass ratio, turbofan engine was installed and tested in the W8 single-stage, high-speed, compressor test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The same fan rotor was tested previously in the GRC 9x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel as a fan module consisting of the rotor and outlet guide vanes mounted in a flight-like nacelle. The W8 test verified that the aerodynamic performance and detailed flow field of the rotor as installed in W8 were representative of the wind tunnel fan module installation. Modifications to W8 were necessary to ensure that this internal flow facility would have a flow field at the test package that is representative of flow conditions in the wind tunnel installation. Inlet flow conditioning was designed and installed in W8 to lower the fan face turbulence intensity to less than 1.0 percent in order to better match the wind tunnel operating environment. Also, inlet bleed was added to thin the casing boundary layer to be more representative of a flight nacelle boundary layer. On the 100 percent speed operating line the fan pressure rise and mass flow rate agreed with the wind tunnel data to within 1 percent. Detailed hot film surveys of the inlet flow, inlet boundary layer and fan exit flow were compared to results from the wind tunnel. The effect of inlet casing boundary layer thickness on fan performance was quantified. Challenges and lessons learned from testing this high flow, low static pressure rise fan in an internal flow facility are discussed.

  17. 32 CFR 644.560 - Inspections of civilian component training facilities and other properties conveyed subject to...

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Inspections of civilian component training... Disposal Inspections to Insure Compliance with Disposal Conditions § 644.560 Inspections of civilian... responsibility of the Secretary of Transportation; for property conveyed for purposes of health and education...

  18. United States Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Component Test Facility for 760°C Steam Power Plants ComTest Project

    Hack, Horst [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Purgert, Robert Michael [Energy Industries of Ohio

    2017-12-13

    Following the successful completion of a 15-year effort to develop and test materials that would allow coal-fired power plants to be operated at advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) steam conditions, a United States-based consortium is presently engaged in a project to build an A-USC component test facility (ComTest). A-USC steam cycles have the potential to improve cycle efficiency, reduce fuel costs, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Current development and demonstration efforts are focused on enabling the construction of A-USC plants, operating with steam temperatures as high as 1400°F (760°C) and steam pressures up to 5000 psi (35 MPa), which can potentially increase cycle efficiencies to 47% HHV (higher heating value), or approximately 50% LHV (lower heating value), and reduce CO2 emissions by roughly 25%, compared to today’s U.S. fleet. A-USC technology provides a lower-cost method to reduce CO2 emissions, compared to CO2 capture technologies, while retaining a viable coal option for owners of coal generation assets. Among the goals of the ComTest facility are to validate that components made from advanced nickel-based alloys can operate and perform under A-USC conditions, to accelerate the development of a U.S.-based supply chain for the full complement of A-USC components, and to decrease the uncertainty of cost estimates for future A-USC power plants. The configuration of the ComTest facility would include the key A-USC technology components that were identified for expanded operational testing, including a gas-fired superheater, high-temperature steam piping, steam turbine valve, and cycling header component. Membrane walls in the superheater have been designed to operate at the full temperatures expected in a commercial A-USC boiler, but at a lower (intermediate) operating pressure. This superheater has been designed to increase the temperature of the steam supplied by the host utility boiler up to 1400°F (760

  19. Testing of components on the shaking table facilities of AEP and contribution to full scale dynamic testing of Kozloduy NPP. Final report

    Ambriashvili, Y.

    1996-01-01

    This final report summarizes the results of components testing on the shaking table facilities of 'Atomenergoproject' which are considered as a contribution to the full scale dynamic testing of the Kozloduy nuclear power plant Units 5 and 6. It was designed on 1.0 g according to the calculations that were based on accelerograms which included artificial and already known recordings of real earthquakes. Maximum acceleration of the designed spectrum and new spectrum which are recommended are now within the range of frequencies 2.5-20 Hz. Active reactor and the primary loop are seismic stable as well as the tested equipment tested by 'Atomenergoproject'

  20. Method of determining the radioactivity concentration in contaminated or activated components and materials, facility for implementing the method

    Kroeger, J.

    1988-01-01

    The invention concerns a method for the determination of the radiation activity of contaminated constructional components by means of detectors. The measured values are processed and displayed by a computer. From the given parameters the current and error-oriented threshold contamination or threshold impulse rate is determined continuously with the expiration of the gate time and is then compared with the actual measured value of the specific surface activity or mass-specific activity or impulse rate. (orig.) [de

  1. Component Test Facility (Comtest) Phase 1 Engineering For 760°C (1400°F) Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC) Steam Generator Development

    Weitzel, Paul [Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group, Inc., Barberton, OH (United States)

    2016-05-13

    The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) performed a Pre-Front End Engineering Design (Pre-FEED) of an A-USC steam superheater for a proposed component test program achieving 760°C (1400°F) steam temperature. This would lead to follow-on work in a Phase 2 and Phase 3 that would involve detail design, manufacturing, construction and operation of the ComTest. Phase 1 results have provided the engineering data necessary for proceeding to the next phase of ComTest. The steam generator superheater would subsequently supply the steam to an A-USC prototype intermediate pressure steam turbine. The ComTest program is important in that it will place functioning A-USC components in operation and in coordinated boiler and turbine service. It is also important to introduce the power plant operation and maintenance personnel to the level of skills required and provide the first background experience with hands-on training. The project will provide a means to exercise the complete supply chain events required in order to practice and perfect the process for A-USC power plant design, supply, manufacture, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance. Representative participants will then be able to transfer knowledge and recommendations to the industry. ComTest is conceived in the manner of using a separate standalone plant facility that will not jeopardize the host facility or suffer from conflicting requirements in the host plant’s mission that could sacrifice the nickel alloy components and not achieve the testing goals. ComTest will utilize smaller quantities of the expensive materials and reduce the risk in the first operational practice for A-USC technology in the United States. Components at suitable scale in ComTest provide more assurance before putting them into practice in the full size A-USC demonstration plant.

  2. Transonic Experimental Research Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Experimental Research Facility evaluates aerodynamics and fluid dynamics of projectiles, smart munitions systems, and sub-munitions dispensing systems;...

  3. Implementation of the Principal Component Analysis onto High-Performance Computer Facilities for Hyperspectral Dimensionality Reduction: Results and Comparisons

    Ernestina Martel

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Dimensionality reduction represents a critical preprocessing step in order to increase the efficiency and the performance of many hyperspectral imaging algorithms. However, dimensionality reduction algorithms, such as the Principal Component Analysis (PCA, suffer from their computationally demanding nature, becoming advisable for their implementation onto high-performance computer architectures for applications under strict latency constraints. This work presents the implementation of the PCA algorithm onto two different high-performance devices, namely, an NVIDIA Graphics Processing Unit (GPU and a Kalray manycore, uncovering a highly valuable set of tips and tricks in order to take full advantage of the inherent parallelism of these high-performance computing platforms, and hence, reducing the time that is required to process a given hyperspectral image. Moreover, the achieved results obtained with different hyperspectral images have been compared with the ones that were obtained with a field programmable gate array (FPGA-based implementation of the PCA algorithm that has been recently published, providing, for the first time in the literature, a comprehensive analysis in order to highlight the pros and cons of each option.

  4. External micro-PIXE analysis of fluid inclusions: Test of the LABEC facility on samples of quartz veins from Apuan Alps (Italy)

    Massi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino 50019, Firenze (Italy)], E-mail: massi@fi.infn.it; Calusi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN sezione di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Giuntini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino 50019, Firenze (Italy); Ruggieri, G. [CNR - Istituto di Geoscienze e Georisorse sezione di Firenze, via G. La Pira 4, Firenze 50121 (Italy); Dini, A. [CNR - Istituto di Geoscienze e Georisorse sezione di Pisa, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Fluid inclusions are small portions, usually smaller than 100 {mu}m, of fluid trapped within minerals during or after growth. Their characteristics provide therefore fundamental information on nature and evolution of fluids present in the past in different geological environments. At the LABEC laboratory in Firenze, high-salinity fluid inclusions in quartz crystals, coming from the Apuan Alps metamorphic complex, were analysed at the external scanning microbeam. Results, although still preliminary, have already provided us with hints on fluid-rock interaction processes during the metamorphism of the Apuan Alps.

  5. External micro-PIXE analysis of fluid inclusions: Test of the LABEC facility on samples of quartz veins from Apuan Alps (Italy)

    Massi, M.; Calusi, S.; Giuntini, L.; Ruggieri, G.; Dini, A.

    2008-01-01

    Fluid inclusions are small portions, usually smaller than 100 μm, of fluid trapped within minerals during or after growth. Their characteristics provide therefore fundamental information on nature and evolution of fluids present in the past in different geological environments. At the LABEC laboratory in Firenze, high-salinity fluid inclusions in quartz crystals, coming from the Apuan Alps metamorphic complex, were analysed at the external scanning microbeam. Results, although still preliminary, have already provided us with hints on fluid-rock interaction processes during the metamorphism of the Apuan Alps

  6. Biochemical analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in the laboratories of deployed medical treatment facilities: are Multistix 10 SG strip and iSTAT useful?

    Lefrere, Bertrand; Plantamura, J; Renard, C; Ceppa, F; Delacour, H

    2017-12-01

    During military deployment, the diagnosis and the management of acute bacterial meningitis can be problematic, as deployed Medical Treatment Facilities (MTFs) often have a limited laboratory diagnostic capability. However, French Role 2 and 3 MTFs have point-of-care (POC) testing to perform urinary (Multistix 10 SG strip) and blood (iSTAT handheld analyser) biochemical testing mentioned in AMedP8.5. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of this urine test strip and of the iSTAT CHEM8 and CG4 cartridges with a standard hospital bench top analyser in order to determine if these POC devices have a potential role in the biochemical analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF protein, CSF glucose and CSF lactate, respectively). Agreement between the index methods and the reference methods (suitable kits on the Cobas 6 000 System) was evaluated by parallel testing of 30 CSF samples by both techniques. For CSF protein, agreement between the strip and the reference method was evaluated determining the κ coefficient. For CSF glucose and CSF lactate subgroups, least squares linear regressions were calculated and Bland-Altman analyses were performed. The Multistix 10 SG strip can be used to make a semiquantitative determination of CSF protein. A good agreement between the strip and the reference method was observed (κ coefficient: 0.93 (IC 95 0.82 to 1)). This strip is thus well adapted to demonstrate an elevation of CSF protein level as observed in acute bacterial meningitis. The iSTAT CHEM8 and CG4+ cartridges correlated well with the reference methods for the determination of CSF glucose and CSF lactate, respectively (r 2 >0.98) but exhibited a negative bias (∼ -7% and ∼ -15%, respectively). The combined use of the Multistix 10 SG strip and of the iSTAT system appears to be an attractive solution for the biochemical investigation of CSF in medical treatment facilities with limited laboratory diagnostic capability. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  7. The high-temperature helium test facility (HHV)

    Noack, G.; Weiskopf, H.

    1977-03-01

    The report describes the high-temperature helium test facility (HHV). Construction of this plant was started in 1972 by Messrs. BBC, Mannheim, on behalf of the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich. By the end of 1976, the construction work is in its last stage, so that the plant may start operation early in 1977. First of all, the cycle system and the arrangement of components are dealt with, followed by a discussion of individual components. Here, emphasis is laid on components typical for HHT systems, while conventional components are mentioned without further structural detail. The projected test programme for the HHV facility in phase IB of the HHT project is shortly dealt with. After this, the potential of this test facility with regard to the possible use of test components and to fluid- and thermodynamic boundary conditions is pointed out. With the unique potential the facility offers here, aspects of shortened service life at higher cycle temperatures do not remain disregarded. (orig./UA) [de

  8. The Multi-User Droplet Combustion Apparatus: the Development and Integration Concept for Droplet Combustion Payloads in the Fluids and Combustion Facility Combustion Integrated Rack

    Myhre, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) is a multi-user facility designed to accommodate four different droplet combustion science experiments. The MDCA will conduct experiments using the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). The payload is planned for the International Space Station. The MDCA, in conjunction with the CIR, will allow for cost effective extended access to the microgravity environment, not possible on previous space flights. It is currently in the Engineering Model build phase with a planned flight launch with CIR in 2004. This paper provides an overview of the capabilities and development status of the MDCA. The MDCA contains the hardware and software required to conduct unique droplet combustion experiments in space. It consists of a Chamber Insert Assembly, an Avionics Package, and a multiple array of diagnostics. Its modular approach permits on-orbit changes for accommodating different fuels, fuel flow rates, soot sampling mechanisms, and varying droplet support and translation mechanisms to accommodate multiple investigations. Unique diagnostic measurement capabilities for each investigation are also provided. Additional hardware provided by the CIR facility includes the structural support, a combustion chamber, utilities for the avionics and diagnostic packages, and the fuel mixing capability for PI specific combustion chamber environments. Common diagnostics provided by the CIR will also be utilized by the MDCA. Single combustible fuel droplets of varying sizes, freely deployed or supported by a tether are planned for study using the MDCA. Such research supports how liquid-fuel-droplets ignite, spread, and extinguish under quiescent microgravity conditions. This understanding will help us develop more efficient energy production and propulsion systems on Earth and in space, deal better with combustion generated pollution, and address fire hazards associated with

  9. Research and Development (R&D) on Advanced Nonstructural Materials. Delivery Order 0001: Study of Hydraulic System Component Storage With Operational and Rust-Inhibited Hydraulic Fluids

    Gschwender, Lois J; Snyder Jr, Carl E; Sharma, Shashi K; Jenney, Tim; Campo, Angela

    2004-01-01

    .... Jars, containing bearings and pistons, as well as hydraulic pumps were stored for up to 3 years in a laboratory environment to determine if operational fluids would protect them from rusting during storage...

  10. Developing a Model Component

    Fields, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) is responsible for providing simulations to support test and verification of SCCS hardware and software. The Universal Coolant Transporter System (UCTS) was a Space Shuttle Orbiter support piece of the Ground Servicing Equipment (GSE). The initial purpose of the UCTS was to provide two support services to the Space Shuttle Orbiter immediately after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The UCTS is designed with the capability of servicing future space vehicles; including all Space Station Requirements necessary for the MPLM Modules. The Simulation uses GSE Models to stand in for the actual systems to support testing of SCCS systems during their development. As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), my assignment was to develop a model component for the UCTS. I was given a fluid component (dryer) to model in Simulink. I completed training for UNIX and Simulink. The dryer is a Catch All replaceable core type filter-dryer. The filter-dryer provides maximum protection for the thermostatic expansion valve and solenoid valve from dirt that may be in the system. The filter-dryer also protects the valves from freezing up. I researched fluid dynamics to understand the function of my component. The filter-dryer was modeled by determining affects it has on the pressure and velocity of the system. I used Bernoulli's Equation to calculate the pressure and velocity differential through the dryer. I created my filter-dryer model in Simulink and wrote the test script to test the component. I completed component testing and captured test data. The finalized model was sent for peer review for any improvements. I participated in Simulation meetings and was involved in the subsystem design process and team collaborations. I gained valuable work experience and insight into a career path as an engineer.

  11. SRL incinerator components test facility

    Freed, E.J.

    1982-08-01

    A full-scale (5 kg waste/hour) controlled-air incinerator, the ICTF, is presently being tested with simulated waste as part of a program to develop technology for incineration of Savannah River Plant solid transuranic wastes. This unit is designed specifically to incinerate relatively small quantities of solid combustible waste that are contaminated up to 10 5 times the present nominal 10 nCi/g threshold value for such isotopes as 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 242 Cm, and 252 Cf. Automatic incinerator operation and control has been incorporated into the design, simulating the future plant design which minimizes operator radiation exposure. Over 3000 kg of nonradioactive wastes characteristic of plutonium finishing operations have been incinerated at throughputs exceeding 5 kg/hr. Safety and reliability were the major design objectives. In addition to the incinerator tests, technical data were gathered on two different off-gas systems: a wet system composed of three scrubbers in series, and a dry system employing sintered metal filters

  12. Influence of ethanol as bore fluid component on the morphological structure and performance of PES hollow fiber membrane for oil in water separation

    Otitoju, Tunmise Ayode; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Ooi, Boon Seng [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

    2017-10-15

    The relationships among varying bore fluid compositions containing ethanol/water were studied. The ethanol composition was varied in the ratio of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. The membrane dope solutions were prepared from 17.25 wt% polyethersulfone (PES), 0.75 wt% polyethylene glycol (PEG), 3 wt% silicon dioxide sol and 78.25 wt% of 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) via dry-jet spinning process. The membranes’ morphology as a result of varying ethanol ratio in the bore fluid composition was characterized and their effects on crude oil/water emulsion separation were evaluated. Results show that the membrane pore size and porosity decreased with increasing ethanol content in the bore fluid mixture, whereas the inner wall thickness of fibers increased. Furthermore, an increase in ethanol concentration also resulted in a slight increase in water contact angle. The use of 100/0 of ethanol/water resulted in UF membranes with the lowest performance. On the other hand, bore fluid mixture containing 25/75 ethanol/water produced membrane with the best performance for crude oil/water separation. Overall, the use of bore fluid mixture containing 25/75 ethanol/water mixture was found to be a powerful way to tune the morphological properties and performance of HF membrane.

  13. Influence of ethanol as bore fluid component on the morphological structure and performance of PES hollow fiber membrane for oil in water separation

    Otitoju, Tunmise Ayode; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Ooi, Boon Seng

    2017-01-01

    The relationships among varying bore fluid compositions containing ethanol/water were studied. The ethanol composition was varied in the ratio of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. The membrane dope solutions were prepared from 17.25 wt% polyethersulfone (PES), 0.75 wt% polyethylene glycol (PEG), 3 wt% silicon dioxide sol and 78.25 wt% of 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) via dry-jet spinning process. The membranes’ morphology as a result of varying ethanol ratio in the bore fluid composition was characterized and their effects on crude oil/water emulsion separation were evaluated. Results show that the membrane pore size and porosity decreased with increasing ethanol content in the bore fluid mixture, whereas the inner wall thickness of fibers increased. Furthermore, an increase in ethanol concentration also resulted in a slight increase in water contact angle. The use of 100/0 of ethanol/water resulted in UF membranes with the lowest performance. On the other hand, bore fluid mixture containing 25/75 ethanol/water produced membrane with the best performance for crude oil/water separation. Overall, the use of bore fluid mixture containing 25/75 ethanol/water mixture was found to be a powerful way to tune the morphological properties and performance of HF membrane.

  14. Conceptual Engineering Method for Attenuating He Ion Interactions on First Wall Components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Employing a Low-Pressure Noble Gas

    Gentile, C.A.; Blanchard, W.R.; Kozub, T.; Priniski, C.; Zatz, I.; Obenschain, S.

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that post detonation energetic helium ions can drastically reduce the useful life of the (dry) first wall of an IFE reactor due to the accumulation of implanted helium. For the purpose of attenuating energetic helium ions from interacting with first wall components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber, several concepts have been advanced. These include magnetic intervention (MI), deployment of a dynamically moving first wall, use of a sacrificial shroud, designing the target chamber large enough to mitigate the damage caused by He ions on the target chamber wall, and the use of a low pressure noble gas resident in the target chamber during pulse power operations. It is proposed that employing a low-pressure (∼ 1 torr equivalent) noble gas in the target chamber will thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall. The principle benefit of this concept is the simplicity of the design and the utilization of (modified) existing technologies for pumping and processing the noble ambient gas. Although the gas load in the system would be increased over other proposed methods, the use of a 'gas shield' may provide a cost effective method of greatly extending the first wall of the target chamber. An engineering study has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the FTF.

  15. Air Dispersion Modeling for the INL Application for a Synthetic Minor Sitewide Air Quality Permit to Construct with a Facility Emission Cap Component

    Sondrup, Andrus Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is applying for a synthetic minor, Sitewide, air quality permit to construct (PTC) with a facility emission cap (FEC) component from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) for Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to limit its potential to emit to less than major facility limits for criteria air pollutants (CAPs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) regulated under the Clean Air Act. This document is supplied as an appendix to the application, Idaho National Laboratory Application for a Synthetic Minor Sitewide Air Quality Permit to Construct with a Facility Emissions Cap Component, hereafter referred to as “permit application” (DOE-ID 2015). Air dispersion modeling was performed as part of the permit application process to demonstrate pollutant emissions from the INL will not cause a violation of any ambient air quality standards. This report documents the modeling methodology and results for the air dispersion impact analysis. All CAPs regulated under Section 109 of the Clean Air Act were modeled with the exception of lead (Pb) and ozone, which are not required to be modeled by DEQ. Modeling was not performed for toxic air pollutants (TAPs) as uncontrolled emissions did not exceed screening emission levels for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic TAPs. Modeling for CAPs was performed with the EPA approved AERMOD dispersion modeling system (Version 14134) (EPA 2004a) and five years (2000-2004) of meteorological data. The meteorological data set was produced with the companion AERMET model (Version 14134) (EPA 2004b) using surface data from the Idaho Falls airport, and upper-air data from Boise International Airport supplied by DEQ. Onsite meteorological data from the Grid 3 Mesonet tower located near the center of the INL (north of INTEC) and supplied by the local National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) office was used for surface wind directions and wind speeds. Surface data (i

  16. An energy stable evolution method for simulating two-phase equilibria of multi-component fluids at constant moles, volume and temperature

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu; Wang, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an energy-stable evolution method for the calculation of the phase equilibria under given volume, temperature, and moles (VT-flash). An evolution model for describing the dynamics of two-phase fluid system is based on Fick

  17. Process to remove turbidity-causing components from a fluid by micro-filtration - passes the fluid across an asymmetric membrane with inlet pores larger than those of nominal size, and cleans the membrane by backwashing

    1995-01-01

    turbidity-causing components from beer, wine, fruit juice, milk and blood, and from bacterial and enzyme suspensions. ADVANTAGE-The process greatly reduces the lost production time associated with earlier filtration methods, and beneficial components can pass through the membrane, thereby improving...

  18. Proof study on elucidation of transfer and diffusion mechanism of fluid ranging from adjacent to wide area of geological disposal facility

    Ishii, Takemasa; Marui, Atsunao; Takahashi, Manabu; Tsukamoto, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    Aim of this study are to elucidate transfer and diffusion mechanism of fluid under an environment of deep geological environment by each two geological media such as fractured and porous media, to establish a precise evaluation method on hydrogeological features, to develop a new researching method on transfer and diffusion mechanism of fluid at field, and to conduct model construction and effect evaluation of fluid at deep underground based on measuring values. As a result, on cracking medium, it was found that a value relating to storage rate could be evaluated simultaneously, that both water permeability coefficient and storage rate decreased as sealing pressure of specimen increased, and that change of hydrologic features in specimen could be evaluated more accurately. And, on porous medium, it was conducted to compare mutually two water permeability coefficients obtained by using three kinds of sedimentation rock with different interstitial ratio and two testing methods of transient pulse method and changing water level method. (G.K.)

  19. Contaminant Characterization of Effluent from Pennsylvania Brine Treatment, Inc., Josephine Facility: Implications for Disposal of Oil and Gas Flowback Fluids from Brine Treatment Plants

    The PBT-Josephine Facility accepts only wastewater from the oil and gas industry. This report describes the concentrations of selected contaminants in the effluent water and compares the contaminant effluent concentrations to state and federal standards.

  20. A High Performance Computing Approach to the Simulation of Fluid Solid Interaction Problems with Rigid and Flexible Components (Open Access Author’s Manuscript)

    2014-08-01

    Thiscorrection takes into account the velocity of neighboring mark-ers through a mean velocity evaluated within the support of anominal marker a as v̂a...right hand side of Eqs. (7) and (8), are accounted for,the total rigid body force and torque due to the interaction withthe fluid can be obtained by...absolute nodal coordinate formulation. In: Pro-ceedings of the ASME 2005 IDETC/ CIE , Orlando, FL, USA.American Society of Mechanical Engineers (2005)[35

  1. Tumor interstitial fluid

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) is a proximal fluid that, in addition to the set of blood soluble phase-borne proteins, holds a subset of aberrantly externalized components, mainly proteins, released by tumor cells and tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms, which include classical...

  2. Aerodynamic and Related Hydrodynamic Studies Using Water Facilities, Symposium of the Fluid Dynamics Panel Held in Monterey, California on 20-23 October 1986.

    1987-06-01

    dimensional simulation of the structure of this tip vortex can be carried out either on the Unigraphics UG-2 terminal or the Evans and Sutherland PS-300...fluid dynamics then to have close contact with John Stack (to whom we owe transonic developments then), Tony Ferri, Carl Kaplan, Adolf Busemann, Clint

  3. ATLAS Facility Description Report

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Moon, Sang Ki; Park, Hyun Sik; Cho, Seok; Choi, Ki Yong

    2009-04-01

    A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation), has been constructed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). The ATLAS has the same two-loop features as the APR1400 and is designed according to the well-known scaling method suggested by Ishii and Kataoka to simulate the various test scenarios as realistically as possible. It is a half-height and 1/288-volume scaled test facility with respect to the APR1400. The fluid system of the ATLAS consists of a primary system, a secondary system, a safety injection system, a break simulating system, a containment simulating system, and auxiliary systems. The primary system includes a reactor vessel, two hot legs, four cold legs, a pressurizer, four reactor coolant pumps, and two steam generators. The secondary system of the ATLAS is simplified to be of a circulating loop-type. Most of the safety injection features of the APR1400 and the OPR1000 are incorporated into the safety injection system of the ATLAS. In the ATLAS test facility, about 1300 instrumentations are installed to precisely investigate the thermal-hydraulic behavior in simulation of the various test scenarios. This report describes the scaling methodology, the geometric data of the individual component, and the specification and the location of the instrumentations in detail

  4. Experimental Component Characterization, Monte-Carlo-Based Image Generation and Source Reconstruction for the Neutron Imaging System of the National Ignition Facility

    Barrera, C A; Moran, M J

    2007-08-21

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is one of seven ignition target diagnostics under development for the National Ignition Facility. The NIS is required to record hot-spot (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (6-10 MeV) images with a resolution of 10 microns and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 at the 20% contour. The NIS is a valuable diagnostic since the downscattered neutrons reveal the spatial distribution of the cold fuel during an ignition attempt, providing important information in the case of a failed implosion. The present study explores the parameter space of several line-of-sight (LOS) configurations that could serve as the basis for the final design. Six commercially available organic scintillators were experimentally characterized for their light emission decay profile and neutron sensitivity. The samples showed a long lived decay component that makes direct recording of a downscattered image impossible. The two best candidates for the NIS detector material are: EJ232 (BC422) plastic fibers or capillaries filled with EJ399B. A Monte Carlo-based end-to-end model of the NIS was developed to study the imaging capabilities of several LOS configurations and verify that the recovered sources meet the design requirements. The model includes accurate neutron source distributions, aperture geometries (square pinhole, triangular wedge, mini-penumbral, annular and penumbral), their point spread functions, and a pixelated scintillator detector. The modeling results show that a useful downscattered image can be obtained by recording the primary peak and the downscattered images, and then subtracting a decayed version of the former from the latter. The difference images need to be deconvolved in order to obtain accurate source distributions. The images are processed using a frequency-space modified-regularization algorithm and low-pass filtering. The resolution and SNR of these sources are quantified by using two surrogate sources. The simulations show that all LOS

  5. A bio-based, facile approach for the preparation of covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes aqueous suspensions and their potential as heat transfer fluids.

    Sadri, Rad; Hosseini, Maryam; Kazi, S N; Bagheri, Samira; Zubir, Nashrul; Solangi, K H; Zaharinie, Tuan; Badarudin, A

    2017-10-15

    In this study, we propose an innovative, bio-based, environmentally friendly approach for the covalent functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes using clove buds. This approach is innovative because we do not use toxic and hazardous acids which are typically used in common carbon nanomaterial functionalization procedures. The MWCNTs are functionalized in one pot using a free radical grafting reaction. The clove-functionalized MWCNTs (CMWCNTs) are then dispersed in distilled water (DI water), producing a highly stable CMWCNT aqueous suspension. The CMWCNTs are characterized using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The electrostatic interactions between the CMWCNT colloidal particles in DI water are verified via zeta potential measurements. UV-vis spectroscopy is also used to examine the stability of the CMWCNTs in the base fluid. The thermo-physical properties of the CMWCNT nano-fluids are examined experimentally and indeed, this nano-fluid shows remarkably improved thermo-physical properties, indicating its superb potential for various thermal applications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Fluid/structure interaction in BERDYNE (Level 4)

    Fox, M.J.H.

    1988-02-01

    A fluid-structure interaction capability has been developed for Level 4 of the finite element dynamics code BERDYNE, as part of the BERSAFE structural analysis system. This permits analysis of small amplitude free or forced vibration of systems comprising elastic structural components and inviscid volumes of possibly compressible fluid. Free fluid surfaces under the influence of gravity may be present. The formulation chosen uses the rigid walled fluid modes, calculated in a preliminary stage, as a basis for description of the coupled system, providing symmetric system matrices for which efficient solution procedures are available. The inclusion of the fluid modal variables within the system matrices is carried out through the use of the BERDYNE 'substructuring' feature, which allows the inclusion of very general 'super-elements' among the normal structural elements. The program also has a seismic analysis capability, used for the analysis of fluid-structure systems subjected to a specified support acceleration time history. In this case analysis is carried out in terms of relative structural motions, but absolute fluid pressures. Application of the BERDYNE fluid/structure interaction capability to some simple test cases produced results in good agreement with results obtained by analytic or independent numerical techniques. Full instructions on the use of the facility will be included in the BERDYNE Level 4 documentation. Interim documentation for the pre-release version is available from the author. (author)

  7. Computing the stresses and deformations of the human eye components due to a high explosive detonation using fluid-structure interaction model.

    Karimi, Alireza; Razaghi, Reza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu

    2016-05-01

    In spite the fact that a very small human body surface area is comprised by the eye, its wounds due to detonation have recently been dramatically amplified. Although many efforts have been devoted to measure injury of the globe, there is still a lack of knowledge on the injury mechanism due to Primary Blast Wave (PBW). The goal of this study was to determine the stresses and deformations of the human eye components, including the cornea, aqueous, iris, ciliary body, lens, vitreous, retina, sclera, optic nerve, and muscles, attributed to PBW induced by trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosion via a Lagrangian-Eulerian computational coupling model. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was employed to establish a Finite Element (FE) model of the human eye according to a normal human eye. The solid components of the eye were modelled as Lagrangian mesh, while an explosive TNT, air domain, and aqueous were modelled using Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) mesh. Nonlinear dynamic FE simulations were accomplished using the explicit FE code, namely LS-DYNA. In order to simulate the blast wave generation, propagation, and interaction with the eye, the ALE formulation with Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation defining the explosive material were employed. The results revealed a peak stress of 135.70kPa brought about by detonation upsurge on the cornea at the distance of 25cm. The highest von Mises stresses were observed on the sclera (267.3kPa), whereas the lowest one was seen on the vitreous body (0.002kPa). The results also showed a relatively high resultant displacement for the macula as well as a high variation for the radius of curvature for the cornea and lens, which can result in both macular holes, optic nerve damage and, consequently, vision loss. These results may have implications not only for understanding the value of stresses and strains in the human eye components but also giving an outlook about the process of PBW triggers damage to the eye. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  8. Phoresis in fluids.

    Brenner, Howard

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a unified theory of phoretic phenomena in single-component fluids. Simple formulas are given for the phoretic velocities of small inert force-free non-Brownian particles migrating through otherwise quiescent single-component gases and liquids and animated by a gradient in the fluid's temperature (thermophoresis), pressure (barophoresis), density (pycnophoresis), or any combination thereof. The ansatz builds upon a recent paper [Phys. Rev. E 84, 046309 (2011)] concerned with slip of the fluid's mass velocity at solid surfaces--that is, with phenomena arising from violations of the classical no-slip fluid-mechanical boundary condition. Experimental and other data are cited in support of the phoretic model developed herein.

  9. Direct sunlight facility for testing and research in HCPV

    Sciortino, Luisa; Agnello, Simonpietro; Bonsignore, Gaetano; Cannas, Marco; Gelardi, Franco Mario; Napoli, Gianluca; Spallino, Luisa; Barbera, Marco; Buscemi, Alessandro; Montagnino, Fabio Maria; Paredes, Filippo; Candia, Roberto; Collura, Alfonso; Di Cicca, Gaspare; Cicero, Ugo Lo; Varisco, Salvo

    2014-01-01

    A facility for testing different components for HCPV application has been developed in the framework of 'Fotovoltaico ad Alta Efficienza' (FAE) project funded by the Sicilian Regional Authority (PO FESR Sicilia 2007/2013 4.1.1.1). The testing facility is equipped with an heliostat providing a wide solar beam inside the lab, an optical bench for mounting and aligning the HCPV components, electronic equipments to characterize the I-V curves of multijunction cells operated up to 2000 suns, a system to circulate a fluid in the heat sink at controlled temperature and flow-rate, a data logging system with sensors to measure temperatures in several locations and fluid pressures at the inlet and outlet of the heat sink, and a climatic chamber with large test volume to test assembled HCPV modules

  10. Fluid Mechanics.

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  11. Assessment of radiation impact on the environment components while preparing for construction site of centralized storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (CSSNF)

    Pavlovs'kij, L.Yi.; Gorodets'kij, D.V.; Syizov, A.O.; Kholodyuk, A.O.

    2016-01-01

    Predictive assessment of radiation impacts on the air environment, soil cover, staff, which is located in a residential area, staff of an adjacent to the CSSNF enterprises as a result of work to prepare the site for construction of CSSNF at the Chornobyl Exclusion Zone is presented. It is shown that radiation effects on components of the environment will not result in exceeding the reference levels of radiation safety

  12. Thermodynamics of Fluid Polyamorphism

    Mikhail A. Anisimov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid polyamorphism is the existence of different condensed amorphous states in a single-component fluid. It is either found or predicted, usually at extreme conditions, for a broad group of very different substances, including helium, carbon, silicon, phosphorous, sulfur, tellurium, cerium, hydrogen, and tin tetraiodide. This phenomenon is also hypothesized for metastable and deeply supercooled water, presumably located a few degrees below the experimental limit of homogeneous ice formation. We present a generic phenomenological approach to describe polyamorphism in a single-component fluid, which is completely independent of the molecular origin of the phenomenon. We show that fluid polyamorphism may occur either in the presence or in the absence of fluid phase separation depending on the symmetry of the order parameter. In the latter case, it is associated with a second-order transition, such as in liquid helium or liquid sulfur. To specify the phenomenology, we consider a fluid with thermodynamic equilibrium between two distinct interconvertible states or molecular structures. A fundamental signature of this concept is the identification of the equilibrium fraction of molecules involved in each of these alternative states. However, the existence of the alternative structures may result in polyamorphic fluid phase separation only if mixing of these structures is not ideal. The two-state thermodynamics unifies all the debated scenarios of fluid polyamorphism in different areas of condensed-matter physics, with or without phase separation, and even goes beyond the phenomenon of polyamorphism by generically describing the anomalous properties of fluids exhibiting interconversion of alternative molecular states.

  13. A cylindrical salad growth facility with a light-emitting diodes unit as a component for biological life support system for space crews

    Erokhin, A. N.; Berkovich, Yu. A.; Smolianina, S. O.; Krivobok, N. M.; Agureev, A. N.; Kalandarov, S. K.

    2006-01-01

    Efficiency of salad production under light-emitting diodes was tested with a prototype space plant growth facility "Phytocycle SD" with a 10-step crop conveyer. The system has a plant chamber in the form of a spiral cylinder. The planting unit inside the chamber is built of 10 root modules which provide a co-axial planting cylinder that rotates relative to the leaf chamber. Twelve panels of the lighting unit on the internal surfaces of the spiral cylinder carry 438 red (660 nm) and 88 blue (470 nm) light-emitting diodes producing average PPF equal 360 μmol m -2 s -1 4 cm below the light source, and 3 panels producing PPF equal 190 μmol m -2 s -1 at the initial steps of the plant conveyer. The system requires 0.44 kW and provides a plant chamber volume of 0.19 m 3, with 0.86 m 2 illuminated crop area. Productive efficiency of the facility was studied in a series of laboratory experiments with celery cabbage ( Brassica pekinensis) ( Lour) ( Rupr.) grown in the conveyer with a one-step period of 3 days. The crop grew in a fiber ion-exchange mineral-rich soil BIONA V3 under the 24-h light. Maximal productivity of the ripe (30-day-old) plants reached 700 g of the fresh edible biomass from one root module. There was a 30% greater biomass production and 3-5 times greater specific productivity per unit of expenditure of consumable resources over plants grown in a flat planting. This improved production was due to the extension of illuminated crop area for the final conveyor steps and concentration of photon flux toward center axis of cylindrical growth chamber. Biomass contents of ascorbic acid and carotene gathered from one root module per day ranged from 250 to 300 mg and 30 to 40 mg respectively. With this productivity, celery cabbage raised in "Phytocycle SD" potentially can satisfy the daily demands in vitamin C, vitamin A for a crew of three. Wider nutritional needs can be satisfied by planting mixed salad crops.

  14. Facile one-pot synthesis of 1-amido alkyl-2-naphthols by RuCl2(PPh3)3-catalyzed multi-component reactions

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Lee, Yong Rok; Kim, Sung Hong

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an efficient and general synthesis of 1-amidoalkyl-2-naphthols by RuCl 2 (PPh 3 ) 3 -catalyzed one-pot multi-component reaction of 2-naphthol with aromatic aldehydes and amides. The advantages of these methodologies are easy handling, mild reaction conditions, and use of an effective and non-toxic catalyst. Molecules bearing 1,3-amino oxygenated functional groups have been reported to exhibit a variety of biological and pharmacological activities including nucleoside antibiotics and HIV protease inhibitors such as ritonavir and lipinavir. Importantly, 1-amidoalkyl-2-naphthols can be easily converted to biologically active 1-aminomethyl-2-naphthols by amide hydrolysis. These compounds also exhibit potent antihypertensive, adrenoceptor-blocking, and Ca +2 channel-blocking activities. Because of the importance of these compounds, numerous methods for the synthesis of 1-amidoalkyl-2-naphthols have been described. The reported methods mainly include one-pot three-component reactions of 2-naphthol, aromatic aldehydes, and amides

  15. Fluids engineering

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Fluids engineering has played an important role in many applications, from ancient flood control to the design of high-speed compact turbomachinery. New applications of fluids engineering, such as in high-technology materials processing, biotechnology, and advanced combustion systems, have kept up unwaining interest in the subject. More accurate and sophisticated computational and measurement techniques are also constantly being developed and refined. On a more fundamental level, nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of fluid flow are no longer an intellectual curiosity and fluid engineers are increasingly interested in finding practical applications for these emerging sciences. Applications of fluid technology to new areas, as well as the need to improve the design and to enhance the flexibility and reliability of flow-related machines and devices will continue to spur interest in fluids engineering. The objectives of the present seminar were: to exchange current information on arts, science, and technology of fluids engineering; to promote scientific cooperation between the fluids engineering communities of both nations, and to provide an opportunity for the participants and their colleagues to explore possible joint research programs in topics of high priority and mutual interest to both countries. The Seminar provided an excellent forum for reviewing the current state and future needs of fluids engineering for the two nations. With the Seminar ear-marking the first formal scientific exchange between Korea and the United States in the area of fluids engineering, the scope was deliberately left broad and general

  16. Buffer fluid

    Mirzadzhanzade, A Kh; Dedusanko, G Ya; Dinaburg, L S; Markov, Yu M; Rasizade, Ya N; Rozov, V N; Sherstnev, N M

    1979-08-30

    A drilling fluid is suggested for separating the drilling and plugging fluids which contains as the base increased solution of polyacrylamide and additive. In order to increase the viscoelastic properties of the liquid with simultaneous decrease in the periods of its fabrication, the solution contains as an additive dry bentonite clay. In cases of the use of a buffer fluid under conditions of negative temperatures, it is necessary to add to it table salt or ethylene glycol.

  17. Working Fluid Stability in Large-Scale Organic Rankine Cycle-Units Using Siloxanes—Long-Term Experiences and Fluid Recycling

    Tobias G. Erhart

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The results in this work show the influence of long-term operation on the decomposition of working fluids in eight different organic rankine cycle (ORC power plants (both heat-led and electricity-led in a range of 900 kW el to 2 MW el . All case study plants are using octamethyltrisiloxane (MDM as a working fluid; the facilities are between six to 12 years old. Detailed analyses, including the fluid distribution throughout the cycle, are conducted on one system. All presented fluid samples are analyzed via head space gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS. Besides the siloxane composition, the influence of contaminants, such as mineral oil-based lubricants (and their components, is examined. In most cases, the original working fluid degrades to fractions of siloxanes with a lower boiling point (low boilers and fractions with a higher boiling point (high boilers. As a consequence of the analyses, a new fluid recycling and management system was designed and tested in one case study plant (Case Study #8. Pre-post comparisons of fluid samples prove the effectiveness of the applied methods. The results show that the recovery of used working fluid offers an alternative to the purchase of fresh fluid, since operating costs can be significantly reduced. For large facilities, the prices for new fluid range from € 15 per liter (in 2006 to € 22 per liter (in 2013, which is a large reinvestment, especially in light of filling volumes of 4000 liters to 7000 liters per unit. Using the aforementioned method, a price of € 8 per liter of recovered MDM can be achieved.

  18. Use of system code to estimate equilibrium tritium inventory in fusion DT machines, such as ARIES-AT and components testing facilities

    Wong, C.P.C.; Merrill, B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • With the use of a system code, tritium burn-up fraction (f burn ) can be determined. • Initial tritium inventory for steady state DT machines can be estimated. • f burn of ARIES-AT, CFETR and FNSF-AT are in the range of 1–2.8%. • Respective total tritium inventories of are 7.6 kg, 6.1 kg, and 5.2 kg. - Abstract: ITER is under construction and will begin operation in 2020. This is the first 500 MW fusion class DT device, and since it is not going to breed tritium, it will consume most of the limited supply of tritium resources in the world. Yet, in parallel, DT fusion nuclear component testing machines will be needed to provide technical data for the design of DEMO. It becomes necessary to estimate the tritium burn-up fraction and corresponding initial tritium inventory and the doubling time of these machines for the planning of future supply and utilization of tritium. With the use of a system code, tritium burn-up fraction and initial tritium inventory for steady state DT machines can be estimated. Estimated tritium burn-up fractions of FNSF-AT, CFETR-R and ARIES-AT are in the range of 1–2.8%. Corresponding total equilibrium tritium inventories of the plasma flow and tritium processing system, and with the DCLL blanket option are 7.6 kg, 6.1 kg, and 5.2 kg for ARIES-AT, CFETR-R and FNSF-AT, respectively

  19. Use of system code to estimate equilibrium tritium inventory in fusion DT machines, such as ARIES-AT and components testing facilities

    Wong, C.P.C., E-mail: wongc@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Merrill, B. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • With the use of a system code, tritium burn-up fraction (f{sub burn}) can be determined. • Initial tritium inventory for steady state DT machines can be estimated. • f{sub burn} of ARIES-AT, CFETR and FNSF-AT are in the range of 1–2.8%. • Respective total tritium inventories of are 7.6 kg, 6.1 kg, and 5.2 kg. - Abstract: ITER is under construction and will begin operation in 2020. This is the first 500 MW{sub fusion} class DT device, and since it is not going to breed tritium, it will consume most of the limited supply of tritium resources in the world. Yet, in parallel, DT fusion nuclear component testing machines will be needed to provide technical data for the design of DEMO. It becomes necessary to estimate the tritium burn-up fraction and corresponding initial tritium inventory and the doubling time of these machines for the planning of future supply and utilization of tritium. With the use of a system code, tritium burn-up fraction and initial tritium inventory for steady state DT machines can be estimated. Estimated tritium burn-up fractions of FNSF-AT, CFETR-R and ARIES-AT are in the range of 1–2.8%. Corresponding total equilibrium tritium inventories of the plasma flow and tritium processing system, and with the DCLL blanket option are 7.6 kg, 6.1 kg, and 5.2 kg for ARIES-AT, CFETR-R and FNSF-AT, respectively.

  20. Supply chain components

    Vieraşu, T.; Bălăşescu, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I will go through three main logistics components, which are represented by: transportation, inventory and facilities, and the three secondary logistical components: information, production location, price and how they determine performance of any supply chain. I will discuss then how these components are used in the design, planning and operation of a supply chain. I will also talk about some obstacles a supply chain manager may encounter.

  1. Supply chain components

    Vieraşu, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article I will go through three main logistics components, which are represented by: transportation, inventory and facilities, and the three secondary logistical components: information, production location, price and how they determine performance of any supply chain. I will discuss then how these components are used in the design, planning and operation of a supply chain. I will also talk about some obstacles a supply chain manager may encounter.

  2. Schroedinger fluid

    Kan, K.K.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of nuclear internal flow and collective inertia, the difference of this flow from that of a classical fluid, and the approach of this flow to rigid flow in independent-particle model rotation are elucidated by reviewing the theory of Schroedinger fluid and its implications for collective vibration and rotation. (author)

  3. Fluid-structure interaction investigations for pipelines

    Altstadt, E.; Carl, H.; Weiss, R.

    2003-12-01

    In existing Nuclear Power Plants water hammers can occur in case of an inflow of sub-cooled water into pipes or other parts of the equipment, which are filled with steam or steam-water mixture. They also may appear as the consequence of fast valve closing or opening actions or of breaks in pipelines, with single phase or two-phase flow. In the latter case, shock waves in two-phase flow must be expected. In all cases, strong dynamic stresses are induced in the wall of the equipment. Further, the change of the momentum of the liquid motion and the deformation of the component due to the dynamic stresses generate high loads on the support structures of the component, in which the water hammer respectively the shock wave occurs. The influence of the fluid-structure interaction on the magnitude of the loads on pipe walls and support structures is not yet completely understood. In case of a dynamic load caused by a pressure wave, the stresses in pipe walls, especially in bends, are different from the static case. The propagating pressure wave may cause additional non-symmetric deformations which increase the equivalent stresses in comparison to the symmetric load created by a static inner pressure. On the other hand, fluid-structure interaction causes the structure to deform, which leads to a decrease of the resulting stresses. The lack of experimental data obtained at well defined geometric boundary conditions is a significant obstacle for the validation of codes which consider fluid-structure interaction. Furthermore, up to now the feedback from structural deformations to the fluid mechanics has not been fully implemented in existing calculation software codes. Therefore, at FZR a cold water hammer test facility (CWHTF) was designed and built up. (orig.)

  4. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  5. Structural Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides a wide variety of testing equipment, fixtures and facilities to perform both unique aviation component testing as well as common types of materials testing...

  6. Thermostating highly confined fluids.

    Bernardi, Stefano; Todd, B D; Searles, Debra J

    2010-06-28

    In this work we show how different use of thermostating devices and modeling of walls influence the mechanical and dynamical properties of confined nanofluids. We consider a two dimensional fluid undergoing Couette flow using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Because the system is highly inhomogeneous, the density shows strong fluctuations across the channel. We compare the dynamics produced by applying a thermostating device directly to the fluid with that obtained when the wall is thermostated, considering also the effects of using rigid walls. This comparison involves an analysis of the chaoticity of the fluid and evaluation of mechanical properties across the channel. We look at two thermostating devices with either rigid or vibrating atomic walls and compare them with a system only thermostated by conduction through vibrating atomic walls. Sensitive changes are observed in the xy component of the pressure tensor, streaming velocity, and density across the pore and the Lyapunov localization of the fluid. We also find that the fluid slip can be significantly reduced by rigid walls. Our results suggest caution in interpreting the results of systems in which fluid atoms are thermostated and/or wall atoms are constrained to be rigid, such as, for example, water inside carbon nanotubes.

  7. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  8. Fluid dynamics

    Bernard, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a focused, readable account of the principal physical and mathematical ideas at the heart of fluid dynamics. Graduate students in engineering, applied math, and physics who are taking their first graduate course in fluids will find this book invaluable in providing the background in physics and mathematics necessary to pursue advanced study. The book includes a detailed derivation of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations, followed by many examples of their use in studying the dynamics of fluid flows. Modern tensor analysis is used to simplify the mathematical derivations, thus allowing a clearer view of the physics. Peter Bernard also covers the motivation behind many fundamental concepts such as Bernoulli's equation and the stream function. Many exercises are designed with a view toward using MATLAB or its equivalent to simplify and extend the analysis of fluid motion including developing flow simulations based on techniques described in the book.

  9. The Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study: III. Interrelations between respirable elemental carbon and gaseous and particulate components of diesel exhaust derived from area sampling in underground non-metal mining facilities.

    Vermeulen, Roel; Coble, Joseph B; Yereb, Daniel; Lubin, Jay H; Blair, Aaron; Portengen, Lützen; Stewart, Patricia A; Attfield, Michael; Silverman, Debra T

    2010-10-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) has been implicated as a potential lung carcinogen. However, the exact components of DE that might be involved have not been clearly identified. In the past, nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and carbon oxides (CO(x)) were measured most frequently to estimate DE, but since the 1990s, the most commonly accepted surrogate for DE has been elemental carbon (EC). We developed quantitative estimates of historical exposure levels of respirable elemental carbon (REC) for an epidemiologic study of mortality, particularly lung cancer, among diesel-exposed miners by back-extrapolating 1998-2001 REC exposure levels using historical measurements of carbon monoxide (CO). The choice of CO was based on the availability of historical measurement data. Here, we evaluated the relationship of REC with CO and other current and historical components of DE from side-by-side area measurements taken in underground operations of seven non-metal mining facilities. The Pearson correlation coefficient of the natural log-transformed (Ln)REC measurements with the Ln(CO) measurements was 0.4. The correlation of REC with the other gaseous, organic carbon (OC), and particulate measurements ranged from 0.3 to 0.8. Factor analyses indicated that the gaseous components, including CO, together with REC, loaded most strongly on a presumed 'Diesel exhaust' factor, while the OC and particulate agents loaded predominantly on other factors. In addition, the relationship between Ln(REC) and Ln(CO) was approximately linear over a wide range of REC concentrations. The fact that CO correlated with REC, loaded on the same factor, and increased linearly in log-log space supported the use of CO in estimating historical exposure levels to DE.

  10. Facilities & Leadership

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  11. Lewis Research Center R and D Facilities

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) defines and develops advanced technology for high priority national needs. The work of the Center is directed toward new propulsion, power, and communications technologies for application to aeronautics and space, so that U.S. leadership in these areas is ensured. The end product is knowledge, usually in a report, that is made fully available to potential users--the aircraft engine industry, the energy industry, the automotive industry, the space industry, and other NASA centers. In addition to offices and laboratories for almost every kind of physical research in such fields as fluid mechanics, physics, materials, fuels, combustion, thermodynamics, lubrication, heat transfer, and electronics, LeRC has a variety of engineering test cells for experiments with components such as compressors, pumps, conductors, turbines, nozzles, and controls. A number of large facilities can simulate the operating environment for a complete system: altitude chambers for aircraft engines; large supersonic wind tunnels for advanced airframes and propulsion systems; space simulation chambers for electric rockets or spacecraft; and a 420-foot-deep zero-gravity facility for microgravity experiments. Some problems are amenable to detection and solution only in the complete system and at essentially full scale. By combining basic research in pertinent disciplines and generic technologies with applied research on components and complete systems, LeRC has become one of the most productive centers in its field in the world. This brochure describes a number of the facilities that provide LeRC with its exceptional capabilities.

  12. Biochemistry Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  13. Fluid Shifts

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  14. Fluid mechanics

    Granger, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This text offers the most comprehensive approach available to fluid mechanics. The author takes great care to insure a physical understanding of concepts grounded in applied mathematics. The presentation of theory is followed by engineering applications, helping students develop problem-solving skills from the perspective of a professional engineer. Extensive use of detailed examples reinforces the understanding of theoretical concepts

  15. Dance Facilities.

    Ashton, Dudley, Ed.; Irey, Charlotte, Ed.

    This booklet represents an effort to assist teachers and administrators in the professional planning of dance facilities and equipment. Three chapters present the history of dance facilities, provide recommended dance facilities and equipment, and offer some adaptations of dance facilities and equipment, for elementary, secondary and college level…

  16. Bactericidal activity of culture fluid components of Lactobacillus fermentum strain 90 TS-4 (21) clone 3, and their capacity to modulate adhesion of Candida albicans yeast-like fungi to vaginal epithelial cells.

    Anokhina, I V; Kravtsov, E G; Protsenko, A V; Yashina, N V; Yermolaev, A V; Chesnokova, V L; Dalin, M V

    2007-03-01

    Antagonistic activities of L. fermentum strain 90 TS-4 (21), L. casei ATCC 27216, and L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 and bactericidal activity of lactobacillus culture fluid towards E. coli strain K12, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis test cultures were studied. The bactericidal effect of L. fermentum strain 90 TS-4 (21) clone 3 culture fluid preparation (pH 6.0) on the test cultures was dose-dependent. Adhesion of C. albicans yeast-like fungi to vaginal epitheliocytes was more pronounced for strains isolated from women with asymptomatic infection than for strains isolated from women with manifest forms. L. fermentum strain 90 TS-4 (21) clone 3 culture fluid preparation modulated adhesion of yeast-like fungi only if the fungal strain was initially highly adherent.

  17. Exposure of fluid milk to LED light negatively affects consumer perception and alters underlying sensory properties.

    Martin, Nicole; Carey, Nancy; Murphy, Steven; Kent, David; Bang, Jae; Stubbs, Tim; Wiedmann, Martin; Dando, Robin

    2016-06-01

    Fluid milk consumption per capita in the United States has been steadily declining since the 1940s. Many factors have contributed to this decline, including the increasing consumption of carbonated beverages and bottled water. To meet the challenge of stemming the decline in consumption of fluid milk, the dairy industry must take a systematic approach to identifying and correcting for factors that negatively affect consumers' perception of fluid milk quality. To that end, samples of fluid milk were evaluated to identify factors, with a particular focus on light-emitting diode (LED) light exposure, which negatively affect the perceived sensory quality of milk, and to quantify their relative effect on the consumer's experience. Fluid milk samples were sourced from 3 processing facilities with varying microbial postprocessing contamination patterns based on historical testing. The effect of fat content, light exposure, age, and microbiological content were assayed across 23 samples of fluid milk, via consumer, descriptive sensory, and instrumental analyses. Most notably, light exposure resulted in a broad negative reaction from consumers, more so than samples with microbiological contamination exceeding 20,000 cfu/mL on days approaching code. The predominant implication of the study is that a component of paramount importance in ensuring the success of the dairy industry would be to protect fluid milk from all sources of light exposure, from processing plant to consumer. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluid dynamics of dilatant fluid

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-01-01

    of the state variable, we demonstrate that the model can describe basic features of the dilatant fluid such as the stress-shear rate curve that represents discontinuous severe shear thickening, hysteresis upon changing shear rate, and instantaneous hardening upon external impact. An analysis of the model...

  19. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-01-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  20. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics.

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  1. Fluid dynamics

    Ruban, Anatoly I

    This is the first book in a four-part series designed to give a comprehensive and coherent description of Fluid Dynamics, starting with chapters on classical theory suitable for an introductory undergraduate lecture course, and then progressing through more advanced material up to the level of modern research in the field. The present Part 1 consists of four chapters. Chapter 1 begins with a discussion of Continuum Hypothesis, which is followed by an introduction to macroscopic functions, the velocity vector, pressure, density, and enthalpy. We then analyse the forces acting inside a fluid, and deduce the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible and compressible fluids in Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates. In Chapter 2 we study the properties of a number of flows that are presented by the so-called exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Couette flow between two parallel plates, Hagen-Poiseuille flow through a pipe, and Karman flow above an infinite rotating disk. Chapter 3 is d...

  2. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  3. Other components

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter includes descriptions of electronic and mechanical components which do not merit a chapter to themselves. Other hardware requires mention because of particularly high tolerance or intolerance of exposure to radiation. A more systematic analysis of radiation responses of structures which are definable by material was given in section 3.8. The components discussed here are field effect transistors, transducers, temperature sensors, magnetic components, superconductors, mechanical sensors, and miscellaneous electronic components

  4. Rb-Sr, K-Ar, and stable isotope evidence for the ages and sources of fluid components of gold-bearing quartz veins in the northern Sierra Nevada foothills metamorphic belt, California

    Böhlke, John Karl; Kistler, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Gold-bearing quartz veins occur in and near major fault zones in deformed oceanic and island-arc rocks west of the main outcrop of the Sierra Nevada composite batholith. Veins typically occupy minor reverse faults that crosscut blueschist to amphibolite-grade metamorphic rocks whose metamorphic ages range from early Paleozoic to Jurassic. Vein micas and carbonate-quartz-mica assemblages that formed by hydrothermal metasomatism of ultramafic wall rocks in the Alleghany, Grass Valley, Washington, and Mother Lode districts yield concordant K-Ar and Rb-Sr ages. The dated veins are significantly younger than prograde metamorphism, penetrative deformation, and accretion of their host rocks to the continental margin. New and previously published mineralization ages from 13 localities in the Sierra foothills range from about 140 to 110 m.y. ago, with mean and median between 120 and 115 m.y. The age relations suggest that mineralizing fluids were set in motion by deep magmatic activity related to the resumption of east-dipping subduction along the western margin of North America following the Late Jurassic Nevadan collision event.CO 2 -bearing fluids responsible for metasomatism and much of the vein mica, carbonate, albite, and quartz deposition in several northern mines were isotopically heavy (delta 18 O [asymp] 8-14ppm; delta D between about -10 and -50ppm) and do not resemble seawater, magmatic, or meteoric waters. Metasomatic and vein-filling mica, dolomite, magnesite, and quartz in altered ultramafic rocks generally formed from fluids with similar Sr and O isotope ratios at a given locality. Consistent quartz-mica delta 18 O fractionations (delta 18 O (sub Q-M) = 4.5-4.9ppm) from various localities imply uniform equilibration temperatures, probably between 300 degrees and 350 degrees C. On a local (mine) scale, fluids responsible for both carbonate alteration of mafic and ultramafic wall rocks and albitic alteration of felsic and pelitic rocks had similar Sr isotope

  5. Process for heating a part of an equipment to bring a fluid flowing in this part at a fixed temperature

    Chavanne, Claude; Vanderchmitt, Andre.

    1978-01-01

    Processs for heating a valve, pump and connections of a circuit so as to bring or maintain the fluid flowing through them at a temperature such that its change of state or a modification of its physical characteristics is avoided, by means of a heating unit built in a high thermal conductivity material, made integral with the heated component and including electric heating facilities [fr

  6. Selected solutions and design features from the design of remotely handled filters and the technology of remote filter handling. Previous operating experience with these components in the PASSAT facility

    Jannakos, K.; Lange, W.; Potgeter, G.; Furrer, J.; Wilhelm, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    In a prototype filter offgas cleaning system for reprocessing plants (PASSAT) built at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center a fullscale filter cell with remotely handled filters for aerosol and iodine removal and the corresponding remote handling systems for exchange, bagging out, packaging and disposal of spent filter elements has been installed and run in trial operation since July 1978. The filters and the replacement techniques have been tested for the past two years or so and so far have always worked satisfactory over the test period involving some 150 replacement events. Neither wear nor corrosion phenomena were found in the filter housings and the replacement systems. The seals and clamping devices were selected so that during operation the prescribed leak rates of -3 Torr l/s were always maintained on the filter lid, the seat of the filter element and the cell lock. The total clamping loads for the filter element and the filter lid amount to approx. 20 kN. The force necessary to separate the filter element from the filter housing is approx. 3.5 kN. No ruptures of seals or gaskets were to be detected. The design of the filters and of the handling systems has been found satisfactorily in the cold test operation so far and can be recommended for use in nuclear facilities. In all experiments conducted until now PASSAT has worked without any failure. All operating data required in the specifications were met in the test period. The maximum pressure loss in the system with loaded filter elements amounts to some 3000 mm of water. After operation with iodine and NO/sub x/, plant components exposed to 100% relative humidity and condensate showed corrosion

  7. Definition of a facility for experimental studies of two-phase flows and heat transfer in porous materials

    Reda, D.C.; Eaton, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    A facility-development effort is currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in order to create an experimental capability for the study of two-phase, steam/water flows through a variety of porous media. The facility definition phase of this project is described. Equations are derived for the steady, adiabatic, macroscopically-linear two-phase flow of a single-component fluid through a porous medium, including energy transfer both by convection and conduction. These equations are then solved to give relative permeabilities for the steam and water phases as functions of known and/or measurable quantities. A viable experimental approach was thereby formulated, leading to the definition of facility components and instrumentation requirements, including the application of gamma-beam densitometry for the measurement of liquid-saturation distributions in porous media. Finally, a state-of-the-art computer code was utilized to numerically simulate the proposed experiments, providing an estimate of the facility operating envelope

  8. Waste Facilities

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  9. Health Facilities

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  10. Fabrication Facilities

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  11. Fluid mechanics

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Prud'homme, M.; Robillard, L.; Vasseur, P.

    2003-01-01

    This book constitutes at the same time theoretical and practical base relating to the phenomena associated with fluid mechanics. The concept of continuum is at the base of the approach developed in this work. The general advance proceeds of simple balances of forces as into hydrostatic to more complex situations or inertias, the internal stresses and the constraints of Reynolds are taken into account. This advance is not only theoretical but contains many applications in the form of solved problems, each chapter ending in a series of suggested problems. The major part of the applications relates to the incompressible flows

  12. Principles of fluid mechanics

    Kreider, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is an introduction on fluid mechanics incorporating computer applications. Topics covered are as follows: brief history; what is a fluid; two classes of fluids: liquids and gases; the continuum model of a fluid; methods of analyzing fluid flows; important characteristics of fluids; fundamentals and equations of motion; fluid statics; dimensional analysis and the similarity principle; laminar internal flows; ideal flow; external laminar and channel flows; turbulent flow; compressible flow; fluid flow measurements

  13. MRI of subdural fluid collections in infants

    Fukushima, Tsuneyuki; Takagi, Takuji; Nagai, Hajime; Banno, Tatsuo

    1988-01-01

    Twenty cases of subdural fluid collectioin in infants were examined by MRI (0.5 Tesla). The findings of MRI were classified into 3 groups as follows: Group I: Blood component is observed in the entire subdural fluid (4 cases, 20 %). Group II: Blood component is observed in a part of the subdural fluid (4 cases, 20 %). Group III: Subdural fluid consists of pure CSF (12 cases, 60 %). In general, operative treatment should be considered for cases which have blood components in the subdural space and/or symptoms and signs of increased ICP. In group I, operation was performed on 2 cases (50 %). In group II, subdural fluid collections were associated with dilated subarachnoid spaces and 2 cases were operated on in this group (50 %). In group III, only one case was operated on (8.3 %) and subdural fluid collections disappeared spontaneously in 4 cases of this group. The precise anatomical location of subdural fluid collections could not be decided in several cases even by MRI. The cases which had blood components, tended to demonstrate membranes frequently on MRI. However, the existence of blood components did not affect the DQ S significantly. The prognosis of subdural fluid collection is supposedly related to the degree of preexistent brain damage. (author)

  14. Disappearing fluid?

    Graney, K.; Chu, J.; Lin, P.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A 78-year old male in end stage renal failure (ESRF) with a background of NIDDM retinopathy, nephropathy, and undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) presented with anorexia, clinically unwell, decreased mobility and right scrotal swelling. There was no difficulty during CAPD exchange except there was a positive fluid balance Peritoneal dialysates remained clear A CAPD peritoneal study was requested. 100Mbq 99mTc Sulphur Colloid was injected into a standard dialysate bag containing dialysate. Anterior dynamic images were acquired over the abdomen pelvis while the dialysate was infused Static images with anatomical markers were performed 20 mins post infusion, before and after patient ambulation and then after drainage. The study demonstrated communication between the peritoneal cavity and the right scrotal sac. Patient underwent right inguinal herniaplasty with a marlex mesh. A repeat CAPD flow study was performed as follow up and no abnormal connection between the peritoneal cavity and the right scrotal sac was demonstrated post operatively. This case study shows that CAPD flow studies can be undertaken as a simple, minimally invasive method to evaluate abnormal peritoneal fluid flow dynamics in patients undergoing CAPD, and have an impact on dialysis management. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  15. 21 CFR 606.40 - Facilities.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Facilities. 606.40 Section 606.40 Food and Drugs... GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Plant and Facilities § 606.40 Facilities. Facilities shall be maintained in a clean and orderly manner, and shall be of suitable size, construction and...

  16. ATLAS Facility and Instrumentation Description Report

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Moon, Sang Ki; Park, Hyun Sik

    2009-06-01

    A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation), has been constructed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). The ATLAS is a half-height and 1/288-volume scaled test facility with respect to the APR1400. The fluid system of the ATLAS consists of a primary system, a secondary system, a safety injection system, a break simulating system, a containment simulating system, and auxiliary systems. The primary system includes a reactor vessel, two hot legs, four cold legs, a pressurizer, four reactor coolant pumps, and two steam generators. The secondary system of the ATLAS is simplified to be of a circulating looptype. Most of the safety injection features of the APR1400 and the OPR1000 are incorporated into the safety injection system of the ATLAS. In the ATLAS test facility, about 1300 instrumentations are installed to precisely investigate the thermal-hydraulic behavior in simulation of the various test scenarios. This report describes the scaling methodology, the geometric data of the individual component, and the specification and the location of the instrumentations which are specific to the simulation of 50% DVI line break accident of the APR1400 for supporting the 50 th OECD/NEA International Standard Problem Exercise (ISP-50)

  17. Auxillary Fluid Flowmeter

    RezaNejad Gatabi, Javad; Forouzbakhsh, Farshid; Ebrahimi Darkhaneh, Hadi

    2010-01-01

    The Auxiliary Fluid Flow meter is proposed to measure the fluid flow of any kind in both pipes and open channels. In this kind of flow measurement, the flow of an auxiliary fluid is measured Instead of direct measurement of the main fluid flow. The auxiliary fluid is injected into the main fluid ...

  18. Electronic components

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  19. Growth kinetics in multicomponent fluids

    Chen, S.; Lookman, T.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrodynamic effects on the late-stage kinetics in spinodal decomposition of multicomponent fluids are examined using a lattice Boltzmann scheme with stochastic fluctuations in the fluid and at the interface. In two dimensions, the three- and four-component immiscible fluid mixture (with a 1024 2 lattice) behaves like an off-critical binary fluid with an estimated domain growth of t 0.4 +/= 0.03 rather than t 1/3 as previously estimated, showing the significant influence of hydrodynamics. In three dimensions (with a 256 3 lattice), we estimate the growth as t 0.96 +/= 0.05 for both critical and off-critical quenches, in agreement with phenomenological theory

  20. CFD analysis and experimental investigation associated with the design of the Los Alamos nuclear materials storage facility

    Bernardin, J.D.; Hopkins, S.; Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is being renovated for long-term storage of canisters designed to hold heat-generating nuclear materials, such as powders, ingots, and other components. The continual heat generation within the canisters necessitates a reliable cooling scheme of sufficient magnitude which maintains the stored material temperatures within acceptable limits. The primary goal of this study was to develop both an experimental facility and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a subsection of the NMSF which could be used to observe general performance trends of a proposed passive cooling scheme and serve as a design tool for canister holding fixtures. Comparisons of numerical temperature and velocity predictions with empirical data indicate that the CFD model provides an accurate representation of the NMSF experimental facility. Minor modifications in the model geometry and boundary conditions are needed to enhance its accuracy, however, the various fluid and thermal models correctly capture the basic physics

  1. Gyroelastic fluids

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-20

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch.

  2. Gyroelastic fluids

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch

  3. Design, Evaluation and Test Technology Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of this facility, which is composed of numerous specialized facilities, is to provide capabilities to simulate a wide range of environments for component...

  4. Computational modelling in fluid mechanics

    Hauguel, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modelling of the greatest part of environmental or industrial flow problems gives very similar types of equations. The considerable increase in computing capacity over the last ten years consequently allowed numerical models of growing complexity to be processed. The varied group of computer codes presented are now a complementary tool of experimental facilities to achieve studies in the field of fluid mechanics. Several codes applied in the nuclear field (reactors, cooling towers, exchangers, plumes...) are presented among others [fr

  5. Implementation of a geological disposal facility (GDF) in the UK by the NDA Radioactive Waste Management Directorate (RWMD): the potential for interaction between the co-located ILW/LLW and HLW/SF components of a GDF - 16306

    Towler, George; Hicks, Tim; Watson, Sarah; Norris, Simon

    2009-01-01

    In June 2008 the UK government published a 'White Paper' as part of the 'Managing Radioactive Waste Safety' (MRWS) programme to provide a framework for managing higher activity radioactive wastes in the long-term through geological disposal. The White Paper identifies that there are benefits to disposing all of the UK's higher activity wastes (Low and Intermediate Level Waste (LLW and ILW), High Level Waste (HLW), Spent Fuel (SF), Uranium (U) and Plutonium (Pu)) at the same site, and this is currently the preferred option. It also notes that research will be required to support the detailed design and safety assessment in relation to any potentially detrimental interactions between the different modules. Different disposal system designs and associated Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) will be required for these different waste types, i.e. ILW/LLW and HLW/SF. If declared as waste U would be disposed as ILW and Pu as HLW/SF. The Geological Disposal Facility (GDF) would therefore comprise two co-located modules (respectively for ILW/LLW and HLW/SF). This paper presents an overview of a study undertaken to assess the implications of co-location by identifying the key Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) interactions that might occur during both the operational and post-closure phases, and their consequences for GDF design, performance and safety. The MRWS programme is currently seeking expressions of interest from communities to host a GDF. Therefore, the study was required to consider a wide range of potential GDF host rocks and consistent, conceptual disposal system designs. Two example disposal concepts (i.e. combinations of host rock, GDF design including wasteform and layout, etc.) were carried forward for detailed assessment and a third for qualitative analysis. Dimensional and 1D analyses were used to identify the key interactions, and 3D models were used to investigate selected interactions in more detail. The results of this study show that it is possible

  6. Irradiation facilities at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    Sandberg, V.

    1990-01-01

    The irradiation facilities for testing SSC components and detector systems are described. Very high intensity proton, neutron, and pion fluxes are available with beam kinetic energies of up to 800 MeV. 4 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  7. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H; Wilson, J

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1 x 1 cm^2 ) silicon sensors.

  8. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    Dervan, P.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Wilson, J.

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1×1 cm 2 ) silicon sensors

  9. Animal facilities

    Fritz, T.E.; Angerman, J.M.; Keenan, W.G.; Linsley, J.G.; Poole, C.M.; Sallese, A.; Simkins, R.C.; Tolle, D.

    1981-01-01

    The animal facilities in the Division are described. They consist of kennels, animal rooms, service areas, and technical areas (examining rooms, operating rooms, pathology labs, x-ray rooms, and 60 Co exposure facilities). The computer support facility is also described. The advent of the Conversational Monitor System at Argonne has launched a new effort to set up conversational computing and graphics software for users. The existing LS-11 data acquisition systems have been further enhanced and expanded. The divisional radiation facilities include a number of gamma, neutron, and x-ray radiation sources with accompanying areas for related equipment. There are five 60 Co irradiation facilities; a research reactor, Janus, is a source for fission-spectrum neutrons; two other neutron sources in the Chicago area are also available to the staff for cell biology studies. The electron microscope facilities are also described

  10. A glimpse of fluid turbulence from the molecular scale

    Komatsu, Teruhisa S.

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of freely decaying turbulence in three-dimensional space are reported. Fluid components are defined from the microscopic states by eliminating thermal components from the coarse-grained fields. The energy spectrum of the fluid components is observed to scale reasonably well according to Kolmogorov scaling determined from the energy dissipation rate and the viscosity of the fluid, even though the Kolmogorov length is of the order of the molecular scale. © 2014 The Authors.

  11. EVA Training and Development Facilities

    Cupples, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Overview: Vast majority of US EVA (ExtraVehicular Activity) training and EVA hardware development occurs at JSC; EVA training facilities used to develop and refine procedures and improve skills; EVA hardware development facilities test hardware to evaluate performance and certify requirement compliance; Environmental chambers enable testing of hardware from as large as suits to as small as individual components in thermal vacuum conditions.

  12. Spent fuel storage facility, Kalpakkam

    Shreekumar, B.; Anthony, S.

    2017-01-01

    Spent Fuel Storage Facility (SFSF), Kalpakkam is designed to store spent fuel arising from PHWRs. Spent fuel is transported in AERB qualified/authorized shipping cask by NPCIL to SFSF by road or rail route. The spent fuel storage facility at Kalpakkam was hot commissioned in December 2006. All systems, structures and components (SSCs) related to safety are designed to meet the operational requirements

  13. Facilities Programming.

    Bullis, Robert V.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for physical facilities management written 17 years ago is still worth following today. Each of the steps outlined for planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and evaluating must be accomplished if school facilities are to be properly planned and constructed. However, lessons have been learned about energy consumption and proper…

  14. Nuclear facilities

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Here is given the decree (2000-1065) of the 25. of October 2000 reporting the publication of the convention between the Government of the French Republic and the CERN concerning the safety of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) and the SPS (Proton Supersynchrotron) facilities, signed in Geneva on July 11, 2000. By this convention, the CERN undertakes to ensure the safety of the LHC and SPS facilities and those of the operations of the LEP decommissioning. The French legislation and regulations on basic nuclear facilities (concerning more particularly the protection against ionizing radiations, the protection of the environment and the safety of facilities) and those which could be decided later on apply to the LHC, SPS and auxiliary facilities. (O.M.)

  15. Cosmology with moving bimetric fluids

    García-García, Carlos; Maroto, Antonio L.; Martín-Moruno, Prado, E-mail: cargar08@ucm.es, E-mail: maroto@ucm.es, E-mail: pradomm@ucm.es [Departamento de Física Teórica I, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-12-01

    We study cosmological implications of bigravity and massive gravity solutions with non-simultaneously diagonal metrics by considering the generalized Gordon and Kerr-Schild ansatzes. The scenario that we obtain is equivalent to that of General Relativity with additional non-comoving perfect fluids. We show that the most general ghost-free bimetric theory generates three kinds of effective fluids whose equations of state are fixed by a function of the ansatz. Different choices of such function allow to reproduce the behaviour of different dark fluids. In particular, the Gordon ansatz is suitable for the description of various kinds of slowly-moving fluids, whereas the Kerr-Schild one is shown to describe a null dark energy component. The motion of those dark fluids with respect to the CMB is shown to generate, in turn, a relative motion of baryonic matter with respect to radition which contributes to the CMB anisotropies. CMB dipole observations are able to set stringent limits on the dark sector described by the effective bimetric fluid.

  16. Fluid element in SAP IV

    Yilmaz, C.; Akkas, N.

    1979-01-01

    In previous studies a fluid element is incorporated in the widely used general purpose finite element program SAPIV. This type of problem is of interest in the design of nuclear components involving geometric complexities and nonlinearities. The elasticity matrix of a general-purpose finite element program is modified in such a way that it becomes possible to idealize fluid as a structural finite element with zero shear modulus and a given bulk modules. Using the modified version of SAPIV, several solid-fluid interactions problems are solved. The numerical solutions are compared with the available analytical solutions. They are shown to be in reasonable aggrement. It is also shown that by solving an exterior-fluid interaction problem, the pressure wave propagation in the acoustic medium can be solved with the same approach. In this study, two of the problem not studied in the previous work will be presented. These problems are namely the effects of the link elements used at solid-fluid interfaces and of the concentrated loads on the response of the fluid medium. Truss elements are used as the link elements. After these investigations, it is decided that general purpose finite element programs with slight modifications can be used in the safety analysis of nuclear reactor plants. By this procedure it is possible to handle two-dimensional plane strain and tridimensional axisymmetric problems of this type. (orig.)

  17. Power Systems Development Facility

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the PSDF would be to provide a modular facility which would support the development of advanced, pilot-scale, coal-based power systems and hot gas clean-up components. These pilot-scale components would be designed to be large enough so that the results can be related and projected to commercial systems. The facility would use a modular approach to enhance the flexibility and capability for testing; consequently, overall capital and operating costs when compared with stand-alone facilities would be reduced by sharing resources common to different modules. The facility would identify and resolve technical barrier, as well as-provide a structure for long-term testing and performance assessment. It is also intended that the facility would evaluate the operational and performance characteristics of the advanced power systems with both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Five technology-based experimental modules are proposed for the PSDF: (1) an advanced gasifier module, (2) a fuel cell test module, (3) a PFBC module, (4) a combustion gas turbine module, and (5) a module comprised of five hot gas cleanup particulate control devices. The final module, the PCD, would capture coal-derived ash and particles from both the PFBC and advanced gasifier gas streams to provide for overall particulate emission control, as well as to protect the combustion turbine and the fuel cell

  18. Gravity-Dependent Combustion and Fluids Research - From Drop Towers to Aircraft to the ISS

    Urban, David L.; Singh, Bhim S.; Kohl, Fred J.

    2007-01-01

    Driven by the need for knowledge related to the low-gravity environment behavior of fluids in liquid fuels management, thermal control systems and fire safety for spacecraft, NASA embarked on a decades long research program to understand, accommodate and utilize the relevant phenomena. Beginning in the 1950s, and continuing through to today, drop towers and aircraft were used to conduct an ever broadening and increasingly sophisticated suite of experiments designed to elucidate the underlying gravity-dependent physics that drive these processes. But the drop towers and aircraft afford only short time periods of continuous low gravity. Some of the earliest rocket test flights and manned space missions hosted longer duration experiments. The relatively longer duration low-g times available on the space shuttle during the 1980s and 1990s enabled many specialized experiments that provided unique data for a wide range of science and engineering disciplines. Indeed, a number of STS-based Spacelab missions were dedicated solely to basic and applied microgravity research in the biological, life and physical sciences. Between 1980 and 2000, NASA implemented a vigorous Microgravity Science Program wherein combustion science and fluid physics were major components. The current era of space stations from the MIR to the International Space Station have opened up a broad range of opportunities and facilities that are now available to support both applied research for technologies that will help to enable the future exploration missions and for a continuation of the non-exploration basic research that began over fifty years ago. The ISS-based facilities of particular value to the fluid physics and combustion/fire safety communities are the Fluids and Combustion Facility Combustion Integrated Rack and the Fluids Integrated Rack.

  19. Introduction to thermo-fluids systems design

    Garcia McDonald, André

    2012-01-01

    A fully comprehensive guide to thermal systems design covering fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, heat transfer and thermodynamic power cycles Bridging the gap between the fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics, heat transfer and thermodynamics, and the practical design of thermo-fluids components and systems, this textbook focuses on the design of internal fluid flow systems, coiled heat exchangers and performance analysis of power plant systems. The topics are arranged so that each builds upon the previous chapter to convey to the reader that topics are not stand-alone i

  20. Synovial fluid analysis

    Joint fluid analysis; Joint fluid aspiration ... El-Gabalawy HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of ...

  1. Design of a hydrogen test facility

    Morgan, M.J.; Beam, J.E.; Sehmbey, M.S.; Pais, M.R.; Chow, L.C.; Hahn, O.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Air Force has sponsored a program at the University of Kentucky which will lead to a better understanding of the thermal and fluid instabilities during blowdown of supercritical fluids at cryogenic temperatures. An integral part of that program is the design and construction of that hydrogen test facility. This facility will be capable of providing supercritical hydrogen at 30 bars and 35 K at a maximum flow rate of 0.1 kg/s for 90 seconds. Also presented here is an extension of this facility to accommodate the use of supercritical helium

  2. Principal components

    Hallin, M.; Hörmann, S.; Piegorsch, W.; El Shaarawi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Principal Components are probably the best known and most widely used of all multivariate analysis techniques. The essential idea consists in performing a linear transformation of the observed k-dimensional variables in such a way that the new variables are vectors of k mutually orthogonal

  3. Self lubricating fluid bearings

    Kapich, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    The invention concerns self lubricating fluid bearings, which are used in a shaft sealed system extending two regions. These regions contain fluids, which have to be isolated. A first seal is fluid tight for the first region between the carter shaft and the shaft. The second seal is fluid tight between the carter and the shaft, it communicates with the second region. The first fluid region is the environment surrounding the shaft carter. The second fluid region is a part of a nuclear reactor which contains the cooling fluid. The shaft is conceived to drive a reactor circulating and cooling fluid [fr

  4. Modern fluid dynamics

    Kleinstreuer, Clement

    2018-01-01

    Modern Fluid Dynamics, Second Edition provides up-to-date coverage of intermediate and advanced fluids topics. The text emphasizes fundamentals and applications, supported by worked examples and case studies. Scale analysis, non-Newtonian fluid flow, surface coating, convection heat transfer, lubrication, fluid-particle dynamics, microfluidics, entropy generation, and fluid-structure interactions are among the topics covered. Part A presents fluids principles, and prepares readers for the applications of fluid dynamics covered in Part B, which includes computer simulations and project writing. A review of the engineering math needed for fluid dynamics is included in an appendix.

  5. A Prospective, Multicenter Study to Compare a Disposable, High-fluid Capacity Underpad to Nonpermeable, Disposable, Reusable Containment Products on Incontinence-associated Dermatitis Rates Among Skilled Nursing Facility Residents.

    Motta, Glenda; Milne, Catherine T

    2017-12-01

    Due to the high prevalence of incontinence among skilled nursing facility (SNF) residents, incontinence-associated derma- titis (IAD) is a common occurrence. In addition, facility staff may mistakenly identify IAD as a pressure injury. A prospective, descriptive, multicenter study was conducted in 3 Connecticut facilities to evaluate the effect of substituting a disposable, high- uid capacity underpad for nonpermeable disposable and reusable containment products on the rate of IADs. Residents with and without IAD but with high IAD risk scores who were bed- or chairbound or ambulatory and used disposable nonpermeable briefs and underpads or reusable, laundered containment products when in bed longer than 2 hours were randomly enrolled and observed for a 4-week period. Facility staff were trained on the importance of differentiating between IAD and pressure injury; they substituted the study product (a disposable, high- uid capacity underpad) for all previously used containment products. Patient risk for IAD and skin condition were assessed using the Perineal Assessment Tool (PAT) and the Skin Condition Assessment Tool (SAT), respectively, at 5 time points: baseline, week 1, week 2, week 3, and week 4. The PAT is a 4-item instrument based conceptually on the 4 determinants in perineal skin breakdown; subscales are rated from 1 (least risk) to 3 (most risk), with a total score range of 4 to 12. The SAT is used to evaluate IAD speci cally, generating a cumulative severity score ranging from 0 to 3 on area of skin affected, degree of redness, and depth of ero- sion. Final data analysis was conducted on 40 residents: 25 had IAD present at enrollment and 15 were deemed high risk for developing IAD. Mean SAT scores in the 25 participants with IAD decreased with signi cance at week 1 (P = .0016), week 2 (P = .0023), week 3 (P = .0005), and week 4 (P disposable, high- uid capacity underpad improved SAT scores over time. IAD rates increased in each facility, but pressure

  6. Mammography Facilities

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  7. Canyon Facilities

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  8. UHV facility at pelletron

    Gupta, S.K.; Hattangadi, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    One of the important requirements of a heavy ion accelerator is the maintenance of a clean, ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment in the accelerating tubes as well as in the beamlines. This becomes necessary in order to minimise transmission losses of the ion beam due to charge exchange or scattering during collisions with the residual gas atoms. In view of these considerations, as an essential ancillary facility, a UHV laboratory with all required facilities has been set up for the pelletron accelerator and the work done in this laboratory is described. First the pelletron accelerator vacuum system is described in brief. The UHV laboratory facilities are described. Our operational experience with the accelerator vacuum system is discussed. The development of accelerator components carried out by the UHV laboratory is also discussed. (author)

  9. Geothermal energy conversion facility

    Kutscher, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    With the termination of favorable electricity generation pricing policies, the geothermal industry is exploring ways to improve the efficiency of existing plants and make them more cost-competitive with natural gas. The Geothermal Energy Conversion Facility (GECF) at NREL will allow researchers to study various means for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of binary cycle geothermal plants. This work has received considerable support from the US geothermal industry and will be done in collaboration with industry members and utilities. The GECF is being constructed on NREL property at the top of South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. As shown in Figure 1, it consists of an electrically heated hot water loop that provides heating to a heater/vaporizer in which the working fluid vaporizes at supercritical or subcritical pressures as high as 700 psia. Both an air-cooled and water-cooled condenser will be available for condensing the working fluid. In order to minimize construction costs, available equipment from the similar INEL Heat Cycle Research Facility is being utilized.

  10. Reinforced seal component

    Jeanson, G.M.; Odent, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    The invention concerns a seal component of the kind comprising a soft sheath and a flexible reinforcement housed throughout the entire length of the sheath. The invention enables O ring seals to be made capable of providing a radial seal, that is to say between two sides or flat collars of two cylindrical mechanical parts, or an axial seal, that is to say between two co-axial axisymmetrical areas. The seal so ensured is relative, but it remains adequately sufficient for many uses, for instance, to ensure the separation of two successive fixed blading compartments of axial compressors used in gas diffusion isotope concentration facilities [fr

  11. Fluid mechanics in fluids at rest.

    Brenner, Howard

    2012-07-01

    Using readily available experimental thermophoretic particle-velocity data it is shown, contrary to current teachings, that for the case of compressible flows independent dye- and particle-tracer velocity measurements of the local fluid velocity at a point in a flowing fluid do not generally result in the same fluid velocity measure. Rather, tracer-velocity equality holds only for incompressible flows. For compressible fluids, each type of tracer is shown to monitor a fundamentally different fluid velocity, with (i) a dye (or any other such molecular-tagging scheme) measuring the fluid's mass velocity v appearing in the continuity equation and (ii) a small, physicochemically and thermally inert, macroscopic (i.e., non-Brownian), solid particle measuring the fluid's volume velocity v(v). The term "compressibility" as used here includes not only pressure effects on density, but also temperature effects thereon. (For example, owing to a liquid's generally nonzero isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, nonisothermal liquid flows are to be regarded as compressible despite the general perception of liquids as being incompressible.) Recognition of the fact that two independent fluid velocities, mass- and volume-based, are formally required to model continuum fluid behavior impacts on the foundations of contemporary (monovelocity) fluid mechanics. Included therein are the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, which are now seen to apply only to incompressible fluids (a fact well-known, empirically, to experimental gas kineticists). The findings of a difference in tracer velocities heralds the introduction into fluid mechanics of a general bipartite theory of fluid mechanics, bivelocity hydrodynamics [Brenner, Int. J. Eng. Sci. 54, 67 (2012)], differing from conventional hydrodynamics in situations entailing compressible flows and reducing to conventional hydrodynamics when the flow is incompressible, while being applicable to both liquids and gases.

  12. Reduced abrasion drilling fluid

    2010-01-01

    A reduced abrasion drilling fluid system and method of drilling a borehole by circulating the reduced abrasion drilling fluid through the borehole is disclosed. The reduced abrasion drilling fluid comprises a drilling fluid, a first additive and a weighting agent, wherein the weighting agent has a

  13. Reduced abrasion drilling fluid

    2012-01-01

    A reduced abrasion drilling fluid system and method of drilling a borehole by circulating the reduced abrasion drilling fluid through the borehole is disclosed. The reduced abrasion drilling fluid comprises a drilling fluid, a first additive and a weighting agent, wherein the weighting agent has a

  14. Process fluid cooling system

    Farquhar, N.G.; Schwab, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system of heat exchangers is disclosed for cooling process fluids. The system is particularly applicable to cooling steam generator blowdown fluid in a nuclear plant prior to chemical purification of the fluid in which it minimizes the potential of boiling of the plant cooling water which cools the blowdown fluid

  15. Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) maintenance provisions

    Marshall, J.L.

    1981-05-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was designed with maintainability as a primary parameter, and facilities and provisions were designed into the plant to accommodate the maintenance function. This paper describes the FFTF and its systems. Special maintenance equipment and facilities for performing maintenance on radioactive components are discussed. Maintenance provisions designed into the plant to enhance maintainability are also described

  16. Computer-Aided Facilities Management Systems (CAFM).

    Cyros, Kreon L.

    Computer-aided facilities management (CAFM) refers to a collection of software used with increasing frequency by facilities managers. The six major CAFM components are discussed with respect to their usefulness and popularity in facilities management applications: (1) computer-aided design; (2) computer-aided engineering; (3) decision support…

  17. The TOPFLOW multi-purpose thermohydraulic test facility

    Schaffrath, Andreas; Kruessenberg, A.-K.; Weiss, F.-P.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2002-01-01

    The TOPFLOW (Transient Two Phase Flow Test Facility) multi-purpose thermohydraulic test facility is being built for studies of steady-state and transient flow phenomena in two-phase flows, and for the development and validation of the models contained in CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes. The facility is under construction at the Institute for Safety Research of the Rossendorf Research Center (FZR). It will be operated together with the Dresden Technical University and the Zittau/Goerlitz School for Technology, Economics and Social Studies within the framework of the Nuclear Technology Competence Preservation Program. TOPFLOW, with its test sections and its flexible concept, is available as an attractive facility also to users from all European countries. Experiments are planned in these fields, among others: - Transient two-phase flows in vertical and horizontal pipes and pipes of any inclination as well as in geometries typical of nuclear reactors (annulus, hot leg). - Boiling in large vessels and water pools (measurements of steam generation, 3D steam content distribution, turbulence, temperature stratification). - Test of passive components and safety systems. - Condensation in horizontal pipes in the absence and presence of non-condensable gases. The construction phase of TOPFLOW has been completed more or less on schedule. Experiments can be started after a commissioning phase in the 3rd quarter of 2002. (orig.) [de

  18. The engineering test facility

    Steiner, D.; Becraft, W.R.; Sager, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test-bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This paper describes the design status of the ETF. (orig.)

  19. Engineering test facility

    Steiner, D.; Becraft, W.R.; Sager, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test-bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This paper described the design status of the ETF

  20. Packing frustration in dense confined fluids.

    Nygård, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Kjellander, Roland

    2014-09-07

    Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile--each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.

  1. Big bang nucleosynthesis with a stiff fluid

    Dutta, Sourish; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Models that lead to a cosmological stiff fluid component, with a density ρ S that scales as a -6 , where a is the scale factor, have been proposed recently in a variety of contexts. We calculate numerically the effect of such a stiff fluid on the primordial element abundances. Because the stiff fluid energy density decreases with the scale factor more rapidly than radiation, it produces a relatively larger change in the primordial helium-4 abundance than in the other element abundances, relative to the changes produced by an additional radiation component. We show that the helium-4 abundance varies linearly with the density of the stiff fluid at a fixed fiducial temperature. Taking ρ S10 and ρ R10 to be the stiff fluid energy density and the standard density in relativistic particles, respectively, at T=10 MeV, we find that the change in the primordial helium abundance is well-fit by ΔY p =0.00024(ρ S10 /ρ R10 ). The changes in the helium-4 abundance produced by additional radiation or by a stiff fluid are identical when these two components have equal density at a 'pivot temperature', T * , where we find T * =0.55 MeV. Current estimates of the primordial 4 He abundance give the constraint on a stiff fluid energy density of ρ S10 /ρ R10 <30.

  2. Integrated Component and System Analyses of Instabilities in Test Stands, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Instabilities associated with fluid handling and operation in liquid rocket propulsion systems and test facilities usually manifest themselves as structural...

  3. Equipment for the conditioning of core components in the fuel element storage pool with particular respect to the design required by the conditions for nuclear facilities in operation and the surveillance in accordance with atomic rules and regulations

    Dumpe, J.; Schwiertz, V.; Geiser, C.; Prucker, E.

    2001-01-01

    In nuclear power plants worn out and activated parts from the reactor core (core components) which are placed into the fuel element storage pool arise on a regular basis during the technical maintenance and the review. The disposal of these core components due to radiation protection aspects is only feasible within the fuel element storage pool during the operation of the NPP using techniques of the under water conditioning. Therefore, special GNS equipment is used for the conditioning, using under water conditioning equipment, such as UWS, BZ, and ZVA, a number of lifting and auxiliary equipment for mounting and dismantling purposes and the handling of the core components and the waste casks within the fuel element storage pool. These components must meet particular safety requirements with regard to their integrity and reliability. They are designed according to the requirements on nuclear components (KTA). The manipulating equipment must be partly redundant and the protection goals for nuclear accidents must be met. The Bavarian Ministry for Development and Environment tasked the TUeV Sueddeutschland with the surveillance and control. The conditioning equipment of GNS is therefore designed in co-ordination with the examiner of the Governmental Regulating Agency, in particular respect to all safety aspects. Furthermore the examiners perform reviews of the construction and the documentation during the design and construction phase. (orig.)

  4. Method for removing impurities from an impurity-containing fluid stream

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.

    2010-04-06

    A method of removing at least one polar component from a fluid stream. The method comprises providing a fluid stream comprising at least one nonpolar component and at least one polar component. The fluid stream is contacted with a supercritical solvent to remove the at least one polar component. The at least one nonpolar component may be a fat or oil and the at least one polar component may be water, dirt, detergents, or mixtures thereof. The supercritical solvent may decrease solubility of the at least one polar component in the fluid stream. The supercritical solvent may function as a solvent or as a gas antisolvent. The supercritical solvent may dissolve the nonpolar components of the fluid stream, such as fats or oils, while the polar components may be substantially insoluble. Alternatively, the supercritical solvent may be used to increase the nonpolarity of the fluid stream.

  5. MICROFLUIDIC COMPONENT CAPABLE OF SELF-SEALING

    2009-01-01

    A microfluidic component (100) for building a microfluidic system is provided. The microfluidic component (100) can be mounted on a microf luidic breadboard (202) in a manner that allows it to be connected to other microfluidic components (204, 206) without the requirement of additional devices....... The microfluidic component (100) comprises at least one flexible tube piece (102) for transporting a fluid. The microfluidic component (100) also comprises means for applying and maintaining pressure (104) between the flexible tube piece (102) and a tube piece (208, 210) housed in another microfluidic component...

  6. The diesel exhaust in miners study: III. Interrelations between respirable elemental carbon and gaseous and particulate components of diesel exhaust derived from area sampling in underground non-metal mining facilities.

    Vermeulen, R.; Coble, J.B.; Yereb, D.; Lubin, J.H.; Blair, A.; Portengen, L.; Stewart, P.A.; Attfield, M.; Silverman, D.T.

    2010-01-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) has been implicated as a potential lung carcinogen. However, the exact components of DE that might be involved have not been clearly identified. In the past, nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and carbon oxides (CO(x)) were measured most frequently to estimate DE, but since the 1990s, the

  7. Effects of drilling fluids on marine organisms

    Parrish, P.R.; Duke, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on drilling fluids, also called drilling muds, which are essential to drilling processes in the exploration and production of oil and gas from the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). These fluids are usually discharged from drilling platforms into surrounding waters of the OCS and are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In a program carried out by the EPA Environmental research Laboratory at Gulf Breeze, Florida, diverse marine species as well as microbiotic and macrobiotic communities were studied. Drilling fluids were toxic to marine organisms in certain concentrations and exposure regimes. Furthermore, the fluids adversely affected the benthos physically by burying them or by altering the substrates. Toxicity of the drilling-fluid components, used drilling fluids from active Gulf of Mexico sites, and laboratory-prepared drilling fluids varied considerably. for example 96-h LC 50 s were from 25 μ liter -1 to > 1500 μl liter -1 for clams, larval lobsters, mysids, and grass shrimp. In most instances, mortality was significantly (α = 0.05) correlated with the diesel-oil content of the fluids collected from the Gulf of Mexico. Data and model simulations suggest a rapid dilution of drilling fluids released into OCS waters, resulting in concentrations below the acute-effect concentration for the water column organisms tested

  8. Studies and testing in water and steam of valves and fittings, and nuclear components. The result of 25 years of testing using a comprehensive range of test facilities under service conditions

    Berail, J.F.; Bruneau, S.; Crouzet, D.; Haas, J.L.; Zbinden, M.

    1998-05-01

    Electricite de France operates 58 PWR nuclear power stations, for which the behaviour of valves and fittings is of major importance for safety, for the availability of the plants, and for maintenance costs. Since the early 70's, EDF has developed a comprehensive range of facilities to test valves and fittings in PWR service and accident conditions. It has carried out studies, tests, development work, experimental and numerical research in collaboration with external organisations and manufacturers, to improve the technologies of these equipment as well as maintenance tools and methods. In the present paper, the authors quantify the importance of valves and fittings studies for EDF, which has led to the drawing up of a catalogue of approved equipment. They describe the principle test facilities, and the structure of the EDF 'valves and fittings tests results' data base. They show the importance of twenty-five years of testing experience for both the evolution of equipment and for the increase in French nuclear plants availability. (author)

  9. FOREWORD Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP)

    This section of the Special Issue carries selected articles from the Fluid Mechanics and Fluid. Power Conference held during 12–14 December 2013 at the National Institute of Technology,. Hamirpur (HP). The section includes three review articles and nine original research articles. These were selected on the basis of their ...

  10. Fluid structure interaction in tube bundles

    Brochard, D.; Jedrzejewski, F.; Gibert, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    A lot of industrial components contain tube bundles immersed in a fluid. The mechanical analysis of such systems requires the study of the fluid structure interaction in the tube bundle. Simplified methods, based on homogenization methods, have been developed to analyse such phenomenon and have been validated through experimental results. Generally, these methods consider only the fluid motion in a plan normal to the bundle axis. This paper will analyse, in a first part, the fluid structure interaction in a tube bundle through a 2D finite element model representing the bundle cross section. The influence of various parameters like the bundle size, and the bundle confinement will be studied. These results will be then compared with results from homogenization methods. Finally, the influence of the 3D fluid motion will be investigated, in using simplified methods. (authors). 11 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Performance Evaluation of the International Space Station Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) Test Facility

    Hasan, Mohammad; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Mackey, Jeff; Hall, Nancy; Frankenfield, Bruce; Harpster, George; May, Rochelle; Mudawar, Issam; Kharangate, Chirag R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    A ground-based experimental facility to perform flow boiling and condensation experiments is built in support of the development of the long duration Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) destined for operation on board of the International Space Station (ISS) Fluid Integrated Rack (FIR). We performed tests with the condensation test module oriented horizontally and vertically. Using FC-72 as the test fluid and water as the cooling fluid, we evaluated the operational characteristics of the condensation module and generated ground based data encompassing the range of parameters of interest to the condensation experiment to be performed on the ISS. During this testing, we also evaluated the pressure drop profile across different components of the fluid subsystem, heater performance, on-orbit degassing subsystem, and the heat loss from different components. In this presentation, we discuss representative results of performance testing of the FBCE flow loop. These results will be used in the refinement of the flight system design and build-up of the FBCE which is scheduled for flight in 2019.

  12. Raman spectroscopic signature of vaginal fluid and its potential application in forensic body fluid identification.

    Sikirzhytskaya, Aliaksandra; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Lednev, Igor K

    2012-03-10

    Traces of human body fluids, such as blood, saliva, sweat, semen and vaginal fluid, play an increasingly important role in forensic investigations. However, a nondestructive, easy and rapid identification of body fluid traces at the scene of a crime has not yet been developed. The obstacles have recently been addressed in our studies, which demonstrated the considerable potential of Raman spectroscopy. In this study, we continued to build a full library of body fluid spectroscopic signatures. The problems concerning vaginal fluid stain identification were addressed using Raman spectroscopy coupled with advanced statistical analysis. Calculated characteristic Raman and fluorescent spectral components were used to build a multidimensional spectroscopic signature of vaginal fluid, which demonstrated good specificity and was able to handle heterogeneous samples from different donors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Magmatic gases in fluid inclusions from hydrothermal ore deposits

    Graney, J.; Kesler, S. (University of Michigan, MI (United States))

    1992-08-31

    In this study, magmatic gases in fluid inclusions from hydrothermal ore deposits have been analyzed. The gas composition of fluid inclusions from a wide range of extinct hydrothermal systems as represented by different ore deposit types was determined using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Most samples used for analysis consisted of transparent quartz, although barite, jasperoid, opal, sphalerite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, and bornite were also analyzed. H2O was the dominant volatile component in fluid inclusions, and composed 95-99 mole percent of the inclusion fluid. CO2 comprised most of the remaining volatile component and the other gases were generally present in amounts smaller than 0.1 mole percent. Analysis from porphyry and acid-sulfate deposits, in which magmatic gas contributions are considered to be largest, plotted closest to the fumarolic gas compositions. These inclusion fluid volatile component comparisons have shown that there are systematic differences in inclusion fluids from different hydrothermal systems. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Performance Comparison and Selection of Transformer Fluid

    Lu Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transformer fluid directly affects the working state of the components and the cooling efficiency of transformer. There are three kinds of transformer fluid used for electric locomotive, EMU and suburban rail vehicles: mineral oil, silicone liquid and synthetic ester based insulating oil. In this paper, the three kinds of oil are compared from the fire safety, environmental protection, reliability and low maintenance. It provides a strong basis for the selection of transformer fluid. By comprehensive analysis, synthetic ester based insulating oil can completely replace mineral oil and silicone liquid. With rail transport safety and environmental protection standards improving, synthetic ester based insulating oil will be the best choice for transformer.

  15. Hydrodynamic 'memory' of binary fluid mixtures

    Kalashnik, M. V.; Ingel, L. Kh.

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of hydrostatic adjustment in a two-component fluid system, such as seawater stratified with respect to temperature and salinity. Both linear approximation and nonlinear problem are investigated. It is shown that scenarios of relaxation to a hydrostatically balanced state in binary fluid mixtures may substantially differ from hydrostatic adjustment in fluids that can be stratified only with respect to temperature. In particular, inviscid two-component fluids have 'memory': a horizontally nonuniform disturbance in the initial temperature or salinity distribution does not vanish even at the final stage, transforming into a persistent thermohaline 'trace.' Despite stability of density stratification and convective stability of the fluid system by all known criteria, an initial temperature disturbance may not decay and may even increase in amplitude. Moreover, its sign may change (depending on the relative contributions of temperature and salinity to stable background density stratification). Hydrostatic adjustment may involve development of discontinuous distributions from smooth initial temperature or concentration distributions. These properties of two-component fluids explain, in particular, the occurrence of persistent horizontally or vertically nonuniform temperature and salinity distributions in the ocean, including discontinuous ones

  16. Lectures on fluid mechanics

    Shinbrot, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Readable and user-friendly, this high-level introduction explores the derivation of the equations of fluid motion from statistical mechanics, classical theory, and a portion of the modern mathematical theory of viscous, incompressible fluids. 1973 edition.

  17. Synovial Fluid Analysis

    ... Plasma Free Metanephrines Platelet Count Platelet Function Tests Pleural Fluid Analysis PML-RARA Porphyrin Tests Potassium Prealbumin ... is being tested? Synovial fluid is a thick liquid that acts as a lubricant for the body's ...

  18. Electric fluid pump

    Van Dam, Jeremy Daniel; Turnquist, Norman Arnold; Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Shen, Xiaochun

    2015-09-29

    An electric machine is presented. The electric machine includes a hollow rotor; and a stator disposed within the hollow rotor, the stator defining a flow channel. The hollow rotor includes a first end portion defining a fluid inlet, a second end portion defining a fluid outlet; the fluid inlet, the fluid outlet, and the flow channel of the stator being configured to allow passage of a fluid from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet via the flow channel; and wherein the hollow rotor is characterized by a largest cross-sectional area of hollow rotor, and wherein the flow channel is characterized by a smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel, wherein the smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel is at least about 25% of the largest cross-sectional area of the hollow rotor. An electric fluid pump and a power generation system are also presented.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid culture

    ... Alternative Names Culture - CSF; Spinal fluid culture; CSF culture Images Pneumococci organism References Karcher DS, McPherson RA. Cerebrospinal, synovial, serous body fluids, and alternative specimens. In: McPherson RA, Pincus ...

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid leak (image)

    ... brain and spinal cord by acting like a liquid cushion. The fluid allows the organs to be buoyant protecting them from blows or other trauma. Inside the skull the cerebrospinal fluid is contained by the dura which covers ...

  1. Fabrication of ion source components by electroforming

    Schechter, D.E.; Sluss, F.

    1983-01-01

    Several components of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Magnetic Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) ion source have been fabricated utilizing an electroforming process. A procedure has been developed for enclosing coolant passages in copper components by electrodepositing a thick (greater than or equal to 0.75-mm) layer of copper (electroforming) over the top of grooves machined into the copper component base. Details of the procedure to fabricate acceleration grids and other ion source components are presented

  2. S.E.T., CSNI Separate Effects Test Facility Validation Matrix

    1997-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: The SET matrix of experiments is suitable for the developmental assessment of thermal-hydraulics transient system computer codes by selecting individual tests from selected facilities, relevant to each phenomena. Test facilities differ from one another in geometrical dimensions, geometrical configuration and operating capabilities or conditions. Correlation between SET facility and phenomena were calculated on the basis of suitability for model validation (which means that a facility is designed in such a way as to stimulate the phenomena assumed to occur in a plant and is sufficiently instrumented); limited suitability for model variation (which means that a facility is designed in such a way as to stimulate the phenomena assumed to occur in a plant but has problems associated with imperfect scaling, different test fluids or insufficient instrumentation); and unsuitability for model validation. 2 - Description of test: Whereas integral experiments are usually designed to follow the behaviour of a reactor system in various off-normal or accident transients, separate effects tests focus on the behaviour of a single component, or on the characteristics of one thermal-hydraulic phenomenon. The construction of a separate effects test matrix is an attempt to collect together the best sets of openly available test data for code validation, assessment and improvement, from the wide range of experiments that have been carried out world-wide in the field of thermal hydraulics. In all, 2094 tests are included in the SET matrix

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Myeong, Hyeon Guk

    1999-06-01

    This book deals with computational fluid dynamics with basic and history of numerical fluid dynamics, introduction of finite volume method using one-dimensional heat conduction equation, solution of two-dimensional heat conduction equation, solution of Navier-Stokes equation, fluid with heat transport, turbulent flow and turbulent model, Navier-Stokes solution by generalized coordinate system such as coordinate conversion, conversion of basic equation, program and example of calculation, application of abnormal problem and high speed solution of numerical fluid dynamics.

  4. Support facilities

    Williamson, F.S.; Blomquist, J.A.; Fox, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Computer support is centered on the Remote Access Data Station (RADS), which is equipped with a 1000 lpm printer, 1000 cpm reader, and a 300 cps paper tape reader with 500-foot spools. The RADS is located in a data preparation room with four 029 key punches (two of which interpret), a storage vault for archival magnetic tapes, card files, and a 30 cps interactive terminal principally used for job inquiry and routing. An adjacent room provides work space for users, with a documentation library and a consultant's office, plus file storage for programs and their documentations. The facility has approximately 2,600 square feet of working laboratory space, and includes two fully equipped photographic darkrooms, sectioning and autoradiographic facilities, six microscope cubicles, and five transmission electron microscopes and one Cambridge scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray energy dispersive analytical system. Ancillary specimen preparative equipment includes vacuum evaporators, freeze-drying and freeze-etching equipment, ultramicrotomes, and assorted photographic and light microscopic equipment. The extensive physical plant of the animal facilities includes provisions for holding all species of laboratory animals under controlled conditions of temperature, humidity, and lighting. More than forty rooms are available for studies of the smaller species. These have a potential capacity of more than 75,000 mice, or smaller numbers of larger species and those requiring special housing arrangements. There are also six dog kennels to accommodate approximately 750 dogs housed in runs that consist of heated indoor compartments and outdoor exercise areas

  5. The ISS Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR): a Summary of Capabilities

    Gati, F.; Hill, M. E.

    2002-01-01

    The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) is a modular, multi-user scientific research facility that will fly in the U.S. laboratory module, Destiny, of the International Space Station (ISS). The FIR will be one of the two racks that will make up the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) - the other being the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR). The ISS will provide the FCF with the necessary resources, such as power and cooling. While the ISS crew will be available for experiment operations, their time will be limited. The FCF is, therefore, being designed for autonomous operations and remote control operations. Control of the FCF will be primarily through the Telescience Support Center (TSC) at the Glenn Research Center. The FCF is being designed to accommodate a wide range of combustion and fluids physics experiments within the ISS resources and constraints. The primary mission of the FIR, however, is to accommodate experiments from four major fluids physics disciplines: Complex Fluids; Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer; Interfacial Phenomena; and Dynamics and Stability. The design of the FIR is flexible enough to accommodate experiments from other science disciplines such as Biotechnology. The FIR flexibility is a result of the large volume dedicated for experimental hardware, easily re-configurable diagnostics that allow for unique experiment configurations, and it's customizable software. The FIR will utilize six major subsystems to accommodate this broad scope of fluids physics experiments. The major subsystems are: structural, environmental, electrical, gaseous, command and data management, and imagers and illumination. Within the rack, the FIR's structural subsystem provides an optics bench type mechanical interface for the precise mounting of experimental hardware; including optical components. The back of the bench is populated with FIR avionics packages and light sources. The interior of the rack is isolated from the cabin through two rack doors that are hinged near

  6. Fluid Statics and Archimedes

    librium of a vertical slice fluid (Figure Id) of height H and again using the fact .... same fluid having the same shape and same volume as the body. This fluid volume .... example, can be caused by the heating of air near the ground by the sun ...

  7. Fullerol ionic fluids

    Fernandes, Nikhil; Dallas, Panagiotis; Rodriguez, Robert; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Georgakilas, Vasilios; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2010-01-01

    ®). The ionic fluid was compared to a control synthesized by mixing the partially protonated form (sodium form) of the fullerols with the same oligomeric amine in the same ratio as in the ionic fluids (20 wt% fullerol). In the fullerol fluid the ionic bonding

  8. Sn-PILC: A novel Efficient and Recyclable Catalyst for One-pot Three Component Povarov’s Inverse-electron-demand Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction for a Facile Synthesis of Tetrahydropyranoquinoline Derivatives under Neat Conditions

    Megha Rai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Povarov’s inverse-electron-demand hetero Diels–Alder one-pot three components reaction of aromatic aldehyde, aromatic amine with DHF has been developed using Sn-PILC as a catalyst under a neat condition which may helpful to society to get pharmacologically more active compounds. In the present study a novel series of tetrahydroquinoline 4(a-f were synthesized and characterized by IR, 1HNMR, 13CNMR, Mass spectral analysis and elemental analysis. The synthetic details and characterization results are discussed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v8i3.801

  9. Microbial Metabolism in Serpentinite Fluids

    Crespo-Medina, M.; Brazelton, W. J.; Twing, K. I.; Kubo, M.; Hoehler, T. M.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization is the process in which ultramafic rocks, characteristic of the upper mantle, react with water liberating mantle carbon and reducing power to potenially support chemosynthetic microbial communities. These communities may be important mediators of carbon and energy exchange between the deep Earth and the surface biosphere. Our work focuses on the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO) in Northern California where subsurface fluids are accessible through a series of wells. Preliminary analyses indicate that the highly basic fluids (pH 9-12) have low microbial diversity, but there is limited knowledge about the metabolic capabilities of these communties. Metagenomic data from similar serpentine environments [1] have identified Betaproteobacteria belonging to the order Burkholderiales and Gram-positive bacteria from the order Clostridiales as key components of the serpentine microbiome. In an effort to better characterize the microbial community, metabolism, and geochemistry at CROMO, fluids from two representative wells (N08B and CSWold) were sampled during recent field campaigns. Geochemical characterization of the fluids includes measurements of dissolved gases (H2, CO, CH4), dissolved inorganic and organic carbon, volatile fatty acids, and nutrients. The wells selected can be differentiated in that N08B had higher pH (10-11), lower dissolved oxygen, and cell counts ranging from 105-106 cells mL-1 of fluid, with an abundance of the betaproteobacterium Hydrogenophaga. In contrast, fluids from CSWold have slightly lower pH (9-9.5), DO, and conductivity, as well as higher TDN and TDP. CSWold fluid is also characterized for having lower cell counts (~103 cells mL-1) and an abundance of Dethiobacter, a taxon within the phylum Clostridiales. Microcosm experiments were conducted with the purpose of monitoring carbon fixation, methanotrophy and metabolism of small organic compounds, such as acetate and formate, while tracing changes in fluid

  10. Development and tests of molybdenum armored copper components for MITICA ion source

    Pavei, Mauro; Böswirth, Bernd; Greuner, Henri; Marcuzzi, Diego; Rizzolo, Andrea; Valente, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    In order to prevent detrimental material erosion of components impinged by back-streaming positive D or H ions in the megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement beam source, a solution based on explosion bonding technique has been identified for producing a 1 mm thick molybdenum armour layer on copper substrate, compatible with ITER requirements. Prototypes have been recently manufactured and tested in the high heat flux test facility Garching Large Divertor Sample Test Facility (GLADIS) to check the capability of the molybdenum-copper interface to withstand several thermal shock cycles at high power density. This paper presents both the numerical fluid-dynamic analyses of the prototypes simulating the test conditions in GLADIS as well as the experimental results.

  11. Development and tests of molybdenum armored copper components for MITICA ion source

    Pavei, Mauro; Marcuzzi, Diego; Rizzolo, Andrea; Valente, Matteo; Böswirth, Bernd; Greuner, Henri

    2016-01-01

    In order to prevent detrimental material erosion of components impinged by back-streaming positive D or H ions in the megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement beam source, a solution based on explosion bonding technique has been identified for producing a 1 mm thick molybdenum armour layer on copper substrate, compatible with ITER requirements. Prototypes have been recently manufactured and tested in the high heat flux test facility Garching Large Divertor Sample Test Facility (GLADIS) to check the capability of the molybdenum-copper interface to withstand several thermal shock cycles at high power density. This paper presents both the numerical fluid-dynamic analyses of the prototypes simulating the test conditions in GLADIS as well as the experimental results

  12. Development and tests of molybdenum armored copper components for MITICA ion source

    Pavei, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.pavei@igi.cnr.it; Marcuzzi, Diego; Rizzolo, Andrea; Valente, Matteo [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Böswirth, Bernd; Greuner, Henri [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    In order to prevent detrimental material erosion of components impinged by back-streaming positive D or H ions in the megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement beam source, a solution based on explosion bonding technique has been identified for producing a 1 mm thick molybdenum armour layer on copper substrate, compatible with ITER requirements. Prototypes have been recently manufactured and tested in the high heat flux test facility Garching Large Divertor Sample Test Facility (GLADIS) to check the capability of the molybdenum-copper interface to withstand several thermal shock cycles at high power density. This paper presents both the numerical fluid-dynamic analyses of the prototypes simulating the test conditions in GLADIS as well as the experimental results.

  13. Fast Flux Test Facility

    Munn, W.I.

    1981-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Hanford site a few miles north of Richland, Washington, is a major link in the chain of development required to sustain and advance Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) technology in the United States. This 400 MWt sodium cooled reactor is a three loop design, is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy, and is the largest research reactor of its kind in the world. The purpose of the facility is three-fold: (1) to provide a test bed for components, materials, and breeder reactor fuels which can significantly extend resource reserves; (2) to produce a complete body of base data for the use of liquid sodium in heat transfer systens; and (3) to demonstrate inherent safety characteristics of LMFBR designs

  14. Fluid and particle mechanics

    Michell, S J

    2013-01-01

    Fluid and Particle Mechanics provides information pertinent to hydraulics or fluid mechanics. This book discusses the properties and behavior of liquids and gases in motion and at rest. Organized into nine chapters, this book begins with an overview of the science of fluid mechanics that is subdivided accordingly into two main branches, namely, fluid statics and fluid dynamics. This text then examines the flowmeter devices used for the measurement of flow of liquids and gases. Other chapters consider the principle of resistance in open channel flow, which is based on improper application of th

  15. Fluid inclusion geothermometry

    Cunningham, C.G.

    1977-01-01

    Fluid inclusions trapped within crystals either during growth or at a later time provide many clues to the histories of rocks and ores. Estimates of fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature and density can be obtained using a petrographic microscope with thin sections, and they can be refined using heating and freezing stages. Fluid inclusion studies, used in conjunction with paragenetic studies, can provide direct data on the time and space variations of parameters such as temperature, pressure, density, and composition of fluids in geologic environments. Changes in these parameters directly affect the fugacity, composition, and pH of fluids, thus directly influencing localization of ore metals. ?? 1977 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  16. Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP)

    Amitabh Bhattacharya

    of renewable energy (e.g., via wind, hydrokinetic generators), creating low-cost healthcare ... multiphase flow, turbulence, bio-fluid dynamics, atmospheric flows, microfluidic flows, and ... study the challenging problem of entry of solids in water.

  17. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow, Volume 1

    1992-06-01

    The Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the thermal sciences. The handbook includes information on thermodynamics and the properties of fluids; the three modes of heat transfer -- conduction, convection, and radiation; and fluid flow, and the energy relationships in fluid systems. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility fluid systems

  18. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow, Volume 3

    1992-06-01

    The Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the thermal sciences. The handbook includes information on thermodynamics and the properties of fluids; the three modes of heat transfer -- conduction, convection, and radiation; and fluid flow, and the energy relationships in fluid systems. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility fluid systems

  19. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow, Volume 2

    1992-06-01

    The Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the thermal sciences. The handbook includes information on thermodynamics and the properties of fluids; the three modes of heat transfer -- conduction, convection, and radiation; and fluid flow, and the energy relationships in fluid systems. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility fluid systems

  20. Status of the EP Simulations and Facilities for the SPL

    Calatroni, S; Macatrao, M; Skala, A; Sosin, M; de Waele, R; Withofs, Y

    2011-01-01

    CERN is assembling a new vertical electropolishing facility in order to process several niobium cavities of beta 1 and beta 0.65 in the context of the HP-SPL R&D programme. Electrochemical simulations are being used in order to define the optimal cathode geometry to process the cavities in a vertical position. Macroscopic properties of fluid dynamics like the Reynolds number and thermodynamics linked to the power dissipated in the process are taken into account to dimension the main system components. All the materials from the different equipments must be compatible with all chemicals within the required working temperature and pressure. To provide safe operating conditions when handling chemicals or processing cavities, specific safety and protection equipment is also foreseen.

  1. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  2. Components of laboratory accreditation.

    Royal, P D

    1995-12-01

    Accreditation or certification is a recognition given to an operation or product that has been evaluated against a standard; be it regulatory or voluntary. The purpose of accreditation is to provide the consumer with a level of confidence in the quality of operation (process) and the product of an organization. Environmental Protection Agency/OCM has proposed the development of an accreditation program under National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program for Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) laboratories as a supplement to the current program. This proposal was the result of the Inspector General Office reports that identified weaknesses in the current operation. Several accreditation programs can be evaluated and common components identified when proposing a structure for accrediting a GLP system. An understanding of these components is useful in building that structure. Internationally accepted accreditation programs provide a template for building a U.S. GLP accreditation program. This presentation will discuss the traditional structure of accreditation as presented in the Organization of Economic Cooperative Development/GLP program, ISO-9000 Accreditation and ISO/IEC Guide 25 Standard, and the Canadian Association for Environmental Analytical Laboratories, which has a biological component. Most accreditation programs are managed by a recognized third party, either privately or with government oversight. Common components often include a formal review of required credentials to evaluate organizational structure, a site visit to evaluate the facility, and a performance evaluation to assess technical competence. Laboratory performance is measured against written standards and scored. A formal report is then sent to the laboratory indicating accreditation status. Usually, there is a scheduled reevaluation built into the program. Fee structures vary considerably and will need to be examined closely when building a GLP program.

  3. Hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets in one-component fluids

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2013-01-01

    Using the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], we numerically investigate the hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets under gravity in two dimensions. Some recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations are confirmed in our simulations. A Leidenfrost droplet larger than a critical size is shown to be unstable and break up into smaller droplets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the bottom surface of the droplet. Our simulations demonstrate that an evaporating Leidenfrost droplet changes continuously from a puddle to a circular droplet, with the droplet shape controlled by its size in comparison with a few characteristic length scales. The geometry of the vapor layer under the droplet is found to mainly depend on the droplet size and is nearly independent of the substrate temperature, as reported in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 074301 (2012)]. Finally, our simulations demonstrate that a Leidenfrost droplet smaller than a characteristic size takes off from the hot substrate because the levitating force due to evaporation can no longer be balanced by the weight of the droplet, as observed in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 034501 (2012)].

  4. Hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets in one-component fluids

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2013-04-24

    Using the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], we numerically investigate the hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets under gravity in two dimensions. Some recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations are confirmed in our simulations. A Leidenfrost droplet larger than a critical size is shown to be unstable and break up into smaller droplets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the bottom surface of the droplet. Our simulations demonstrate that an evaporating Leidenfrost droplet changes continuously from a puddle to a circular droplet, with the droplet shape controlled by its size in comparison with a few characteristic length scales. The geometry of the vapor layer under the droplet is found to mainly depend on the droplet size and is nearly independent of the substrate temperature, as reported in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 074301 (2012)]. Finally, our simulations demonstrate that a Leidenfrost droplet smaller than a characteristic size takes off from the hot substrate because the levitating force due to evaporation can no longer be balanced by the weight of the droplet, as observed in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 034501 (2012)].

  5. Nuclear reactor facility

    Wampole, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of manitenance and inspections it is proposed for a nuclear reactor facility with a primary circuit containing liquid metal to provide a thermally insulated chamber, within which are placed a number of components of the primary circuit, as e.g. valves, recirculation pump, heat exchangers. The isolated placement permit controlled preheating on one hand, but prevents undesirable heating of adjacent load-bearing elements on the other. The chamber is provided with heating devices and, on the outside, with cooling devices; it is of advantage to fill it with an inert gas. (UWI) 891 HP [de

  6. Education & Collection Facility GSHP Demonstration Project

    Joplin, Jeff [Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, CO (United States)

    2015-03-28

    The Denver Museum of Nature & Science (DMNS) designed and implemented an innovative ground source heat pump (GSHP) system for heating and cooling its new Education and Collection Facility (ECF) building addition. The project goal was to successfully design and install an open-loop GSHP system that utilized water circulating within an underground municipal recycled (non-potable) water system as the heat sink/source as a demonstration project. The expected results were to significantly reduce traditional GSHP installation costs while increasing system efficiency, reduce building energy consumption, require significantly less area and capital to install, and be economically implemented wherever access to a recycled water system is available. The project added to the understanding of GSHP technology by implementing the first GSHP system in the United States utilizing a municipal recycled water system as a heat sink/source. The use of this fluid through a GSHP system has not been previously documented. This use application presents a new opportunity for local municipalities to develop and expand the use of underground municipal recycled (non-potable) water systems. The installation costs for this type of technology in the building structure would be a cost savings over traditional GSHP costs, provided the local municipal infrastructure was developed. Additionally, the GSHP system functions as a viable method of heat sink/source as the thermal characteristics of the fluid are generally consistent throughout the year and are efficiently exchanged through the GSHP system and its components. The use of the recycled water system reduces the area required for bore or loop fields; therefore, presenting an application for building structures that have little to no available land use or access. This GSHP application demonstrates the viability of underground municipal recycled (non-potable) water systems as technically achievable, environmentally supportive, and an efficient

  7. Survey of solar thermal test facilities

    Masterson, K.

    1979-08-01

    The facilities that are presently available for testing solar thermal energy collection and conversion systems are briefly described. Facilities that are known to meet ASHRAE standard 93-77 for testing flat-plate collectors are listed. The DOE programs and test needs for distributed concentrating collectors are identified. Existing and planned facilities that meet these needs are described and continued support for most of them is recommended. The needs and facilities that are suitable for testing components of central receiver systems, several of which are located overseas, are identified. The central contact point for obtaining additional details and test procedures for these facilities is the Solar Thermal Test Facilities Users' Association in Albuquerque, N.M. The appendices contain data sheets and tables which give additional details on the technical capabilities of each facility. Also included is the 1975 Aerospace Corporation report on test facilities that is frequently referenced in the present work.

  8. Manual for operation of the multipurpose thermalhydraulic test facility TOPFLOW (Transient Two Phase Flow Test Facility)

    Beyer, M.; Carl, H.; Schuetz, H.; Pietruske, H.; Lenk, S.

    2004-07-01

    The Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR) e. V. is constructing a new large-scale test facility, TOPFLOW, for thermalhydraulic single effect tests. The acronym stands for transient two phase flow test facility. It will mainly be used for the investigation of generic and applied steady state and transient two phase flow phenomena and the development and validation of models of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes. The manual of the test facility must always be available for the staff in the control room and is restricted condition during operation of personnel and also reconstruction of the facility. (orig./GL)

  9. The Integral Test Facility Karlstein

    Stephan Leyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Integral Test Facility Karlstein (INKA test facility was designed and erected to test the performance of the passive safety systems of KERENA, the new AREVA Boiling Water Reactor design. The experimental program included single component/system tests of the Emergency Condenser, the Containment Cooling Condenser and the Passive Core Flooding System. Integral system tests, including also the Passive Pressure Pulse Transmitter, will be performed to simulate transients and Loss of Coolant Accident scenarios at the test facility. The INKA test facility represents the KERENA Containment with a volume scaling of 1 : 24. Component heights and levels are in full scale. The reactor pressure vessel is simulated by the accumulator vessel of the large valve test facility of Karlstein—a vessel with a design pressure of 11 MPa and a storage capacity of 125 m3. The vessel is fed by a benson boiler with a maximum power supply of 22 MW. The INKA multi compartment pressure suppression Containment meets the requirements of modern and existing BWR designs. As a result of the large power supply at the facility, INKA is capable of simulating various accident scenarios, including a full train of passive systems, starting with the initiating event—for example pipe rupture.

  10. Meal/smoking areas and personal hygiene facilities

    1981-01-01

    Specific facilities for eating, drinking, smoking, washing, changing and laundering are necessary components in the overall radiation protection program. The location, design, construction, use, maintenance and monitoring of these facilities are considered in this guideline

  11. Western Canada beef productivity study : a component of the western Canada study on animal and human health effects associated with exposure to emissions from oil and natural gas field facilities : study design

    2001-11-01

    A study was conducted to determine if exposure from oil and gas emissions has an impact on animal and human health in western Canada. The study design has been reviewed and endorsed by the Science Advisory Panel of the Western Interprovincial Scientific Studies Association which is composed of 10 internationally renowned scientists with experience in environmental and reproductive epidemiology, animal and human health, and toxicology. The research methodology includes a peer review process to ensure credibility. The five components of the study include: beef cattle productivity; assessment of the immune function in beef cattle; assessment of wildlife reproduction and immune function; exposure monitoring; and, human health. This study provides insight beyond that gained from previous studies. The association between flaring and reproductive outcomes in beef herds was examined. The association between herd location in high sulfur deposition areas and increased risk of reproductive failure was also evaluated. The study includes exposure markers for both sweet gas emissions and sour gas sources. Passive monitors measured volatile organic carbons such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene. Monitoring was also conducted for other compounds including sulphur dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, particulate matter, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Final analysis and assessment of the data should be complete by late 2003 with a report available for peer review at the beginning of 2004. refs

  12. Several new thermo-hydraulic test facilities in NPIC

    Ye Shurong; Sun Yufa; Ji Fuyun; Zong Guifang; Guo Zhongchuan

    1997-01-01

    Several new thermo-hydraulic test facilities are under construction in Nuclear Power Institute of Chinese (NPIC) at Chengdu. These facilities include: 1. Nuclear Power Component Comprehensive Test Facility. 2. Reactor Hydraulic Modeling Test Facility. 3. Control Rod Drive Line Hydraulic Test Facility. 4. Large Scale Thermo-Hydraulic Test Facility. The construction of these facilities will make huge progress in the research and development capability of nuclear power technology in CHINA. The author will present a brief description of the design parameters flowchart and test program of these facilities

  13. High heat flux facility GLADIS

    Greuner, H.; Boeswirth, B.; Boscary, J.; McNeely, P.

    2007-01-01

    The new ion beam facility GLADIS started the operation at IPP Garching. The facility is equipped with two individual 1.1 MW power ion sources for testing actively cooled plasma facing components under high heat fluxes. Each ion source generates heat loads between 3 and 55 MW/m 2 with a beam diameter of 70 mm at the target position. These parameters allow effective testing from probes to large components up to 2 m length. The high heat flux allows the target to be installed inclined to the beam and thus increases the heated surface length up to 200 mm for a heat flux of 15 MW/m 2 in the standard operating regime. Thus the facility has the potential capability for testing of full scale ITER divertor targets. Heat load tests on the WENDELSTEIN 7-X pre-series divertor targets have been successfully started. These tests will validate the design and manufacturing for the production of 950 elements

  14. Statistical mechanics of homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems.

    Krakoviack, Vincent

    2010-12-01

    The homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems are simple models of a fluid confined in a disordered porous matrix obtained by arresting randomly chosen particles in a one-component bulk fluid or one of the two components of a binary mixture. In this paper, their configurational properties are investigated. It is shown that a peculiar complementarity exists between the mobile and immobile phases, which originates from the fact that the solid is prepared in presence of and in equilibrium with the adsorbed fluid. Simple identities follow, which connect different types of configurational averages, either relative to the fluid-matrix system or to the bulk fluid from which it is prepared. Crucial simplifications result for the computation of important structural quantities, both in computer simulations and in theoretical approaches. Finally, possible applications of the model in the field of dynamics in confinement or in strongly asymmetric mixtures are suggested.

  15. Air Quality Facilities

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  16. Fullerol ionic fluids

    Fernandes, Nikhil; Dallas, Panagiotis; Rodriguez, Robert; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Georgakilas, Vasilios; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2010-09-01

    We report for the first time an ionic fluid based on hydroxylated fullerenes (fullerols). The ionic fluid was synthesized by neutralizing the fully protonated fullerol with an amine terminated polyethylene/polypropylene oxide oligomer (Jeffamine®). The ionic fluid was compared to a control synthesized by mixing the partially protonated form (sodium form) of the fullerols with the same oligomeric amine in the same ratio as in the ionic fluids (20 wt% fullerol). In the fullerol fluid the ionic bonding significantly perturbs the thermal transitions and melting/crystallization behavior of the amine. In contrast, both the normalized heat of fusion and crystallization of the amine in the control are similar to those of the neat amine consistent with a physical mixture of the fullerols/amine with minimal interactions. In addition to differences in thermal behavior, the fullerol ionic fluid exhibits a complex viscoelastic behavior intermediate between the neat Jeffamine® (liquid-like) and the control (solid-like).

  17. Fiber optic fluid detector

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  18. Fiber optic fluid detector

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  19. Effective fluid description of the dark universe

    M. Cadoni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an effective anisotropic fluid description for a generic infrared-modified theory of gravity. In our framework, the additional component of the acceleration, commonly attributed to dark matter, is explained as a radial pressure generated by the reaction of the dark energy fluid to the presence of baryonic matter. Using quite general assumptions, and a microscopic description of the fluid in terms of a Bose–Einstein condensate of gravitons, we find the static, spherically symmetric solution for the metric in terms of the Misner–Sharp mass function and the fluid pressure. At galactic scales, we correctly reproduce the leading MOND-like log⁡(r and subleading (1/rlog⁡(r terms in the weak-field expansion of the potential. Our description also predicts a tiny (of order 10−6 for a typical spiral galaxy Machian modification of the Newtonian potential at galactic scales, which is controlled by the cosmological acceleration.

  20. Resolution of through tubing fluid flow and behind casing fluid flow in multiple completion wells

    Arnold, D.M.

    1977-01-01

    A method is provided for resolving undesired fluid flow in cement channels behind casing in one producing zone of a multi zone completion well operating on gas lift from the fluid flow from lower producing zones in the same well which is contained in production tubing passing through the producing zone being investigated. Gamma rays which are characteristic of the decay of the unstable isotope nitrogen 16 produced by activation of elemental oxygen nuclei comprising the molecular structure of both the tubing fluid flow and the undesired fluid flow are detected in at least two energy bonds at two longitudinally spaced detectors in a well borehole. By appropriately combining the four count rate signals so producing according to predetermined relationships the two fluid flow components in the same direction may be uniquely distinguished on the basis of their differing distances from the gamma ray detectors. 9 claims, 17 figures

  1. Directed Fluid Transport with Biomimetic ``Silia'' Arrays

    Shields, A. R.; Evans, B. A.; Carstens, B. L.; Falvo, M. R.; Washburn, S.; Superfine, R.

    2008-10-01

    We present results on the long-range, directed fluid transport produced by the collective beating of arrays of biomimetic ``silia.'' Silia are arrays of free-standing nanorods roughly the size of biological cilia, which we fabricate from a polymer-magnetic nanoparticle composite material. With external permanent magnets we actuate our silia such that their motion mimics the beating of biological cilia. Biological cilia have evolved to produce microscale fluid transport and are increasingly being recognized as critical components in a wide range of biological systems. However, despite much effort cilia generated fluid flows remain an area of active study. In the last decade, cilia-driven fluid flow in the embryonic node of vertebrates has been implicated as the initial left-right symmetry breaking event in these embryos. With silia we generate directional fluid transport by mimicking the tilted conical beating of these nodal cilia and seek to answer open questions about the nature of particle advection in such a system. By seeding fluorescent microparticles into the fluid we have noted the existence of two distinct flow regimes. The fluid flow is directional and coherent above the tips of the silia, while between the silia tips and floor particle motion is complicated and suggestive of chaotic advection.

  2. Metalworking and machining fluids

    Erdemir, Ali; Sykora, Frank; Dorbeck, Mark

    2010-10-12

    Improved boron-based metal working and machining fluids. Boric acid and boron-based additives that, when mixed with certain carrier fluids, such as water, cellulose and/or cellulose derivatives, polyhydric alcohol, polyalkylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, dextrin, in solid and/or solvated forms result in improved metalworking and machining of metallic work pieces. Fluids manufactured with boric acid or boron-based additives effectively reduce friction, prevent galling and severe wear problems on cutting and forming tools.

  3. Disposing of fluid wastes

    Bradley, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Toxic liquid waste, eg liquid radioactive waste, is disposed of by locating a sub-surface stratum which, before removal of any fluid, has a fluid pressure in the pores thereof which is less than the hydrostatic pressure which is normal for a stratum at that depth in the chosen area, and then feeding the toxic liquid into the stratum at a rate such that the fluid pressure in the stratum never exceeds the said normal hydrostatic pressure. (author)

  4. Maintenance facilities, stores and records

    Fischer, K.

    1986-01-01

    The topics of this report are: on-site or off-site facilities. On-site facilities: workshops and special facilities. KWU's Service Center, a typical off-site supporting facility in Germany, capabilities and activities. A pool for special tools and equipment: devices for plugging of nozzles, for handling of RPU-studs and RPU internals etc. Devices for and management of radiological protection on-site for typical outage work. Spare parts and spare part management on site, typical examples. KWU's centralized spare part pools for components, generators and turbines etc. A computerized system for spare parts storage and maintenance planning. A system for mutual exchange of operational experience with respect to maintenance and repair activities. Systematic evaluation of failures and statistical results. (orig./GL)

  5. Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE) methodology

    Chapman, L.D.; Grady, L.M.; Bennett, H.A.; Sasser, D.W.; Engi, D.

    1978-08-01

    An automated approach to facility safeguards effectiveness evaluation has been developed. This automated process, called Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE), consists of a collection of a continuous stream of operational modules for facility characterization, the selection of critical paths, and the evaluation of safeguards effectiveness along these paths. The technique has been implemented on an interactive computer time-sharing system and makes use of computer graphics for the processing and presentation of information. Using this technique, a comprehensive evaluation of a safeguards system can be provided by systematically varying the parameters that characterize the physical protection components of a facility to reflect the perceived adversary attributes and strategy, environmental conditions, and site operational conditions. The SAFE procedure has broad applications in the nuclear facility safeguards field as well as in the security field in general. Any fixed facility containing valuable materials or components to be protected from theft or sabotage could be analyzed using this same automated evaluation technique

  6. Bevalac Minibeam Facility

    Schimmerling, W.; Alonso, J.; Morgado, R.; Tobias, C.A.; Grunder, H.; Upham, F.T.; Windsor, A.; Armer, R.A.; Yang, T.C.H.; Gunn, J.T.

    1977-03-01

    The Minibeam Facility is a biomedical heavy-ion beam area at the Bevalac designed to satisfy the following requirements: (1) provide a beam incident in a vertical plane for experiments where a horizontal apparatus significantly increases the convenience of performing an experiment or even determines its feasibility; (2) provide an area that is well shielded with respect to electronic interference so that microvolt signals can be detected with acceptable signal-to-noise ratios; (3) provide a beam of small diameter, typically a few millimeters or less, for various studies of cellular function; and (4) provide a facility for experiments that require long setup and preparation times and apparatus that must be left relatively undisturbed between experiments and that need short periods of beam time. The design of such a facility and its main components is described. In addition to the above criteria, the design was constrained by the desire to have inexpensive, simple devices that work reliably and can be easily upgraded for interfacing to the Biomedical PDP 11/45 computer

  7. APS beamline standard components handbook

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    It is clear that most Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) members would like to concentrate on designing specialized equipment related to their scientific programs rather than on routine or standard beamline components. Thus, an effort is in progress at the APS to identify standard and modular components of APS beamlines. Identifying standard components is a nontrivial task because these components should support diverse beamline objectives. To assist with this effort, the APS has obtained advice and help from a Beamline Standardization and Modularization Committee consisting of experts in beamline design, construction, and operation. The staff of the Experimental Facilities Division identified various components thought to be standard items for beamlines, regardless of the specific scientific objective of a particular beamline. A generic beamline layout formed the basis for this identification. This layout is based on a double-crystal monochromator as the first optical element, with the possibility of other elements to follow. Pre-engineering designs were then made of the identified standard components. The Beamline Standardization and Modularization Committee has reviewed these designs and provided very useful input regarding the specifications of these components. We realize that there will be other configurations that may require special or modified components. This Handbook in its current version (1.1) contains descriptions, specifications, and pre-engineering design drawings of these standard components. In the future, the APS plans to add engineering drawings of identified standard beamline components. Use of standard components should result in major cost reductions for CATs in the areas of beamline design and construction

  8. Fluid dynamics transactions

    Fiszdon, W

    1965-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Transactions, Volume 2 compiles 46 papers on fluid dynamics, a subdiscipline of fluid mechanics that deals with fluid flow. The topics discussed in this book include developments in interference theory for aeronautical applications; diffusion from sources in a turbulent boundary layer; unsteady motion of a finite wing span in a compressible medium; and wall pressure covariance and comparison with experiment. The certain classes of non-stationary axially symmetric flows in magneto-gas-dynamics; description of the phenomenon of secondary flows in curved channels by means of co

  9. Electrorheological fluids and methods

    Green, Peter F.; McIntyre, Ernest C.

    2015-06-02

    Electrorheological fluids and methods include changes in liquid-like materials that can flow like milk and subsequently form solid-like structures under applied electric fields; e.g., about 1 kV/mm. Such fluids can be used in various ways as smart suspensions, including uses in automotive, defense, and civil engineering applications. Electrorheological fluids and methods include one or more polar molecule substituted polyhedral silsesquioxanes (e.g., sulfonated polyhedral silsesquioxanes) and one or more oils (e.g., silicone oil), where the fluid can be subjected to an electric field.

  10. Plasmas and fluids

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma and fluid physics includes the fields of fusion research and space investigation. This book discusses the most important advances in these areas over the past decade and recommends a stronger commitment to basic research in plasma and fluid physics. The book recommends that plasma and fluid physics be included in physics curriculums because of their increasing importance in energy and defense. The book also lists recent accomplishments in the fields of general plasma physics, fusion plasma confinement and heating, space and astrophysical plasmas, and fluid physics and lists research opportunities in these areas. A funding summary explains how research monies are allocated and suggests ways to improve their effectiveness

  11. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K

    1998-01-01

    "Although there are many texts and monographs on fluid dynamics, I do not know of any which is as comprehensive as the present book. It surveys nearly the entire field of classical fluid dynamics in an advanced, compact, and clear manner, and discusses the various conceptual and analytical models of fluid flow." - Foundations of Physics on the first edition. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics functions equally well as a graduate-level text and a professional reference. Steering a middle course between the empiricism of engineering and the abstractions of pure mathematics, the author focuses

  12. Industrial applications and current trends in supercritical fluid technologies

    Gamse Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Supercritical fluids have a great potential for wide fields of processes Although CO2 is still one of the most used supercritical gases, for special purposes propane or even fluorinated-chlorinated fluids have also been tested. The specific characteristics of supercritical fluids behaviour were analyzed such as for example the solubilities of different components and the phase equilibria between the solute and solvent. The application at industrial scale (decaffeinating of tea and coffee, hop...

  13. Tritium Systems Test Facility

    Cafasso, F.A.; Maroni, V.A.; Smith, W.H.; Wilkes, W.R.; Wittenberg, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    This TSTF proposal has two principal objectives. The first objective is to provide by mid-FY 1981 a demonstration of the fuel cycle and tritium containment systems which could be used in a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor for operation in the mid-1980's. The second objective is to provide a capability for further optimization of tritium fuel cycle and environmental control systems beyond that which is required for the EPR. The scale and flow rates in TSTF are close to those which have been projected for a prototype experimental power reactor (PEPR/ITR) and will permit reliable extrapolation to the conditions found in an EPR. The fuel concentrations will be the same as in an EPR. Demonstrations of individual components of the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle and of monitoring, accountability and containment systems and of a maintenance methodology will be achieved at various times in the FY 1979-80 time span. Subsequent to the individual component demonstrations--which will proceed from tests with hydrogen (and/or deuterium) through tracer levels of tritium to full operational concentrations--a complete test and demonstration of the integrated fuel processing and tritium containment facility will be performed. This will occur near the middle of FY 1981. Two options were considered for the TSTF: (1) The modification of an existing building and (2) the construction of a new facility

  14. Analysis of removal of residual decay heat from interim storage facilities by means of the CFD program FLUENT

    Stratmann, W.; Hages, P.

    2004-01-01

    Within the scope of nuclear licensing procedures of on-site interim storage facilities for dual purpose casks it is necessary, among other things, to provide proof of sufficient removal of the residual decay heat emitted by the casks. The results of the analyses performed for this purpose define e.g. the boundary conditions for further thermal analyses regarding the permissible cask component temperatures or the maximum permissible temperatures of the fuel cladding tubes of the fuel elements stored in the casks. Up to now, for the centralized interim storage facilities in Germany such analyses were performed on the basis of experimental investigations using scaled-down storage geometries. In the engineering phase of the Lingen on-site interim storage facility, proof was furnished for the first time using the CFD (computational fluid dynamics) program FLUENT. The program FLUENT is an internationally recognized and comprehensively verified program for the calculation of flow and heat transport processes. Starting from a brief discussion of modeling and the different boundary conditions of the computation, this contribution presents various results regarding the temperatures of air, cask surfaces and storage facility components, the mass flows through the storage facility and the heat transfer at the cask surface. The interface point to the cask-specific analyses is defined to be the cask surface

  15. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. [University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine; Castro, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  16. The 400W at 1.8K Test Facility at CEA-Grenoble

    Roussel, P.; Girard, A.; Jager, B.; Rousset, B.; Bonnay, P.; Millet, F.; Gully, P.

    2006-04-01

    A new test facility with a cooling capacity respectively of 400W at 1.8K or 800W at 4.5K, is now under nominal operation in SBT (Low Temperature Department) at CEA Grenoble. It has been recently used for thermohydraulic studies of two phase superfluid helium in autumn 2004. In the near future, this test bench will allow: - to test industrial components at 1.8K (magnets, cavities of accelerators) - to continue the present studies on thermohydraulics of two phase superfluid helium - to develop and simulate new cooling loops for ITER Cryogenics, and other applications such as high Reynolds number flows This new facility consists of a cold box connected to a warm compressor station (one subatmospheric oil ring pump in series with two screw compressors). The cold box, designed by AIR LIQUIDE, comprises two centrifugal cold compressors, a cold turbine, a wet piston expander, counter flow heat exchangers and two phase separators at 4.5K and 1.8K. The new facility uses a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) connected to a bus for the measurements. The design is modular and will allow the use of saturated fluid flow (two phase flow at 1.8K or 4.5K) or single phase fluid forced flow. Experimental results and cooling capacity in different operation modes are detailed.

  17. LOFT/LP-LB-1, Loss of Fluid Test, Large-Break LOCA Experiment

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: The LOFT Integral Test Facility is a scale model of a LPWR. The intent of the facility is to model the nuclear, Thermal-hydraulic phenomena which would take place in a LPWR during a LOCA. The general philosophy in scaling coolant volumes and flow areas in LOFT was to use the ratio of the LOFT core [50 MW(t)] to a typical LPWR core [3000 MW(t)]. For some components, this factor is not applied; however, it is used as extensively as practical. In general, components used in LOFT are similar in design to those of a LPWR. Because of scaling and component design, the LOFT LOCE is expected to closely model a LPWR LOCA. 2 - Description of test: Experiment LP-LB-1 was conducted on 3 February 1984 in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the auspices of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The primary objectives of Experiment LP-LB-1 were to determine system transient characteristics and to assess code predictive capabilities for design basis large-break loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This experiment simulated a double-ended offset shear of one inlet pipe in a four-loop PWR and was initiated from conditions representative of licensing limits in a PWR. Other boundary conditions for the simulation were loss of offsite power, rapid primary coolant pump coast down, and United Kingdom minimum safeguard emergency core coolant injection rates. The nuclear fuel rods were not pressurized. The transient was initiated by opening the quick-opening blowdown valves in the broken loop hot and cold legs. 3 - Experimental limitations or shortcomings: Short core and steam generator, excessive core bypass, other scaling compromises, and lack of adequate measurements in certain areas

  18. Modeling of Dynamic Fluid Forces in Fast Switching Valves

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2015-01-01

    Switching valves experience opposing fluid forces due to movement of the moving member itself, as the surrounding fluid volume must move to accommodate the movement. This movement-induced fluid force may be divided into three main components; the added mass term, the viscous term and the socalled...... history term. For general valve geometries there are no simple solution to either of these terms. During development and design of such switching valves, it is therefore, common practice to use simple models to describe the opposing fluid forces, neglecting all but the viscous term which is determined...... based on shearing areas and venting channels. For fast acting valves the opposing fluid force may retard the valve performance significantly, if appropriate measures are not taken during the valve design. Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are available to simulate the total fluid...

  19. Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) facility specification

    1976-01-01

    General requirements for the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS)/Ground Demonstration System (GDS) assembly and test facility are defined. The facility will include provisions for a complete test laboratory for GDS checkout, performance, and endurance testing, and a contamination-controlled area for assembly, fabrication, storage, and storage preparation of GDS components. Specifications, schedules, and drawings are included

  20. Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) facility specification

    1976-05-31

    General requirements for the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS)/Ground Demonstration System (GDS) assembly and test facility are defined. The facility will include provisions for a complete test laboratory for GDS checkout, performance, and endurance testing, and a contamination-controlled area for assembly, fabrication, storage, and storage preparation of GDS components. Specifications, schedules, and drawings are included.

  1. Chromate Dissociation from Primer Paint in Simulated Lung Fluid.

    2000-03-01

    and simulated interstitial lung fluid is surface active component (dipalmitoyl lecithin : DPL) in simulated surfactant lung fluid (Dennis, 1982:470...Biology in Health and Disease Vol 84: Surfactant Therapy for Lung Disease. Ed. Bengt Robertson and H. William Taeusch. New York, NY: Mrecel Dekker inc

  2. A glimpse of fluid turbulence from the molecular scale

    Komatsu, Teruhisa S.; Matsumoto, Shigenori; Shimada, Takashi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2014-01-01

    . The energy spectrum of the fluid components is observed to scale reasonably well according to Kolmogorov scaling determined from the energy dissipation rate and the viscosity of the fluid, even though the Kolmogorov length is of the order of the molecular

  3. Space Station fluid management logistics

    Dominick, Sam M.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion on space station fluid management logistics are presented. Topics covered include: fluid management logistics - issues for Space Station Freedom evolution; current fluid logistics approach; evolution of Space Station Freedom fluid resupply; launch vehicle evolution; ELV logistics system approach; logistics carrier configuration; expendable fluid/propellant carrier description; fluid carrier design concept; logistics carrier orbital operations; carrier operations at space station; summary/status of orbital fluid transfer techniques; Soviet progress tanker system; and Soviet propellant resupply system observations.

  4. Reactor facility

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Murase, Michio; Yokomizo, Osamu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR type reactor facility capable of suppressing the amount of steams generated by the mutual effect of a failed reactor core and coolants upon occurrence of an imaginal accident, and not requiring spacial countermeasures for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel. Namely, a means for supplying cooling water at a temperature not lower by 30degC than the saturated temperature corresponding to the inner pressure of the containing vessel upon occurrence of an accident is disposed to a lower dry well below the pressure vessel. As a result, upon occurrence of such an accident that the reactor core should be melted and flown downward of the pressure vessel, when cooling water at a temperature not lower than the saturated temperature, for example, cooling water at 100degC or higher is supplied to the lower dry well, abrupt generation of steams by the mutual effect of the failed reactor core and cooling water is scarcely caused compared with a case of supplying cooling water at a temperature lower than the saturation temperature by 30degC or more. Accordingly, the amount of steams to be generated can be suppressed, and special countermeasure is no more necessary for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel is no more necessary. (I.S.)

  5. Nuclear facilities

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    During September and October 2001, 15 events were recorded on the first grade and 1 on the second grade of the INES scale. The second grade event is in fact a re-classification of an incident that occurred on the second april 2001 at Dampierre power plant. This event happened during core refueling, a shift in the operation sequence led to the wrong positioning of 113 assemblies. A preliminary study of this event shows that this wrong positioning could have led, in other circumstances, to the ignition of nuclear reactions. Even in that case, the analysis made by EDF shows that the consequences on the staff would have been limited. Nevertheless a further study has shown that the existing measuring instruments could not have detected the power increase announcing the beginning of the chain reaction. The investigation has shown that there were deficiencies in the control of the successive operations involved in refueling. EDF has proposed a series of corrective measures to be implemented in all nuclear power plants. The other 15 events are described in the article. During this period 121 inspections have been made in nuclear facilities. (A.C.)

  6. Hydrogen Infrastructure Testing and Research Facility Video (Text Version)

    grid integration, continuous code improvement, fuel cell vehicle operation, and renewable hydrogen Systems Integration Facility or ESIF. Research projects including H2FIRST, component testing, hydrogen

  7. Resident Satisfaction and Its Components in Residential Aged Care

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the direction and magnitude of the effects among the components of resident satisfaction in residential aged care and to examine if the relationships among satisfaction components vary according to facility type (i.e., nursing home and hostel). Briefly, a hostel is a low-care facility in which…

  8. Compressible generalized Newtonian fluids

    Málek, Josef; Rajagopal, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2010), s. 1097-1110 ISSN 0044-2275 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : power law fluid * uniform temperature * compressible fluid Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.290, year: 2010

  9. Pleural fluid smear

    ... into the space around the lungs, called the pleural space. As fluid drains into a collection bottle, you may cough a bit. This is because your lung re-expands to fill the space where fluid had been. This sensation lasts for a few hours after the test.

  10. Peritoneal fluid culture

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... The peritoneal fluid culture may be negative, even if you have ... diagnosis of peritonitis is based on other factors, in addition ...

  11. Fluid control valves

    Rankin, J.

    1980-01-01

    A fluid control valve is described in which it is not necessary to insert a hand or a tool into the housing to remove the valve seat. Such a valve is particularly suitable for the control of radioactive fluids since maintenance by remote control is possible. (UK)

  12. Time Independent Fluids

    Collyer, A. A.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids by explaining flow curves exhibited by plastic, shear-thining, and shear-thickening fluids and Bingham plastic materials. Indicates that the exact mechanism governing shear-thickening behaviors is a problem of further study. (CC)

  13. Fluid management plan for the Project Shoal Area Offsites Subproject

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has initiated the Offsites Subproject to characterize the hazards posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at facilities other than the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A primary Subproject objective is to gather adequate data to characterize the various Subproject sites through the collection of surface and subsurface soil samples and by drilling several wells for the collection of groundwater data. The Project Shoal Area (PSA) is one of the Subproject's Nevada sites and is subject to the requirements set forth in the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (DOE, 1996a). In accordance with the FFACO, a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed for work at the PSA (designated as Corrective Action Unit Number 416). This Fluid Management Plan (FMP) provides guidance for the management of fluids generated from wells constructed at the PSA. Long-term monitoring and future activities at the site, if required, will be set forth in additional documents as required by the FFACO. The ultimate method for disposition of fluids generated by site operations depends upon sample analysis and process knowledge in relation to fluid management criteria. Section 2 describes well site operations; Section 3 discusses fluid management criteria; Section 4 includes the fluid monitoring program; Section 5 presents the fluid management strategy; Section 6 provides for fluid management during routine well monitoring; and Section 7 contains reporting criteria

  14. Relativistic thermodynamics of fluids

    Souriau, J.-M.

    1977-05-01

    The relativistic covariant definition of a statistical equilibrium, applied to a perfect gas, involves a 'temperature four-vector', whose direction is the mean velocity of the fluid, and whose length is the reciprocal temperature. The hypothesis of this 'temperature four-vector' being a relevant variable for the description of the dissipative motions of a simple fluid is discussed. The kinematics is defined by using a vector field and measuring the number of molecules. Such a dissipative fluid is subject to motions involving null entropy generation; the 'temperature four-vector' is then a Killing vector; the equations of motion can be completely integrated. Perfect fluids can be studied by this way and the classical results of Lichnerowicz are obtained. In weakly dissipative motions two viscosity coefficient appear together with the heat conductibility coefficient. Two other coefficients perharps measurable on real fluids. Phase transitions and shock waves are described with using the model [fr

  15. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    Wilhelm, D.

    1990-09-01

    This volume describes the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM) for topologies, flow regimes, and interfacial areas. The objective of these models is to provide values for the interfacial areas between all components existing in a computational cell. The interfacial areas are then used to evaluate the mass, energy, and momentum transfer between the components. A new approach has been undertaken in the development of a model to convect the interfacial areas of the discontinuous velocity fields in the three-velocity-field environment of AFDM. These interfacial areas are called convectible surface areas. The continuous and discontinuous components are chosen using volume fraction and levitation criteria. This establishes so-called topologies for which the convectible surface areas can be determined. These areas are functions of space and time. Solid particulates that are limited to being discontinuous within the bulk fluid are assumed to have a constant size. The convectible surface areas are subdivided to model contacts between two discontinuous components or discontinuous components and the structure. The models have been written for the flow inside of large pools. Therefore, the structure is tracked only as a boundary to the fluid volume without having a direct influence on velocity or volume fraction distribution by means of flow regimes or boundary layer models. 17 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs

  16. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility

    1993-02-01

    The US Department of Energy's liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility is a research and demonstration facility available on a user-fee basis to private and public sector test and training sponsors concerned with safety aspects of hazardous chemicals. Though initially designed to accommodate large liquefied natural gas releases, the Spill Test Facility (STF) can also accommodate hazardous materials training and safety-related testing of most chemicals in commercial use. The STF is located at DOE's Nevada Test Site near Mercury, Nevada, USA. Utilization of the Spill Test Facility provides a unique opportunity for industry and other users to conduct hazardous materials testing and training. The Spill Test Facility is the only facility of its kind for either large- or small-scale testing of hazardous and toxic fluids including wind tunnel testing under controlled conditions. It is ideally suited for test sponsors to develop verified data on prevention, mitigation, clean-up, and environmental effects of toxic and hazardous gaseous liquids. The facility site also supports structured training for hazardous spills, mitigation, and clean-up. Since 1986, the Spill Test Facility has been utilized for releases to evaluate the patterns of dispersion, mitigation techniques, and combustion characteristics of select materials. Use of the facility can also aid users in developing emergency planning under US P.L 99-499, the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and other regulations. The Spill Test Facility Program is managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy (FE) with the support and assistance of other divisions of US DOE and the US Government. DOE/FE serves as facilitator and business manager for the Spill Test Facility and site. This brief document is designed to acquaint a potential user of the Spill Test Facility with an outline of the procedures and policies associated with the use of the facility

  17. Multivariate Associations of Fluid Intelligence and NAA.

    Nikolaidis, Aki; Baniqued, Pauline L; Kranz, Michael B; Scavuzzo, Claire J; Barbey, Aron K; Kramer, Arthur F; Larsen, Ryan J

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the neural and metabolic correlates of fluid intelligence not only aids scientists in characterizing cognitive processes involved in intelligence, but it also offers insight into intervention methods to improve fluid intelligence. Here we use magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to measure N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), a biochemical marker of neural energy production and efficiency. We use principal components analysis (PCA) to examine how the distribution of NAA in the frontal and parietal lobes relates to fluid intelligence. We find that a left lateralized frontal-parietal component predicts fluid intelligence, and it does so independently of brain size, another significant predictor of fluid intelligence. These results suggest that the left motor regions play a key role in the visualization and planning necessary for spatial cognition and reasoning, and we discuss these findings in the context of the Parieto-Frontal Integration Theory of intelligence. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. An Automated High Aspect Ratio Mesher for Computational Fluid Dynamics, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are routinely used while designing, analyzing, and optimizing air- and spacecraft. An important component of CFD...

  19. Probabilistic Methods for the Quantification of Uncertainty and Error in Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations

    Faragher, John

    2004-01-01

    ... conservatism to allow for them. This report examines the feasibility of using a probabilistic approach for modelling the component temperatures in an engine using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics).

  20. Experimental facilities and simulation means

    Thomas, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper and its associated series of slides review the experimental facilities and the simulation means used for the development of nuclear reactors in France. These experimental facilities include installations used for the measurement and qualification of nuclear data (mainly cross-sections) like EOLE reactor and Minerve zero power reactor, installations like material testing reactors, installations dedicated to reactor safety experiments like Cabri reactor, and other installations like accelerators (Jannus accelerator, GANIL for instance) that are complementary to neutron irradiations in experimental reactors. The simulation means rely on a series of advanced computer codes: Tripoli-Apollo for neutron transport, Numodis for irradiation impact on materials, Neptune and Cathare for 2-phase fluid dynamics, Europlexus for mechanical structures, and Pleiades (with Alcyone) for nuclear fuels. (A.C.)

  1. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    Kemp, E.L.; Trego, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is being designed to be constructed at Hanford, Washington, The system is designed to produce about 10 15 n/cm-s in a volume of approx. 10 cc and 10 14 n/cm-s in a volume of 500 cc. The lithium and target systems are being developed and designed by HEDL while the 35-MeV, 100-mA cw accelerator is being designed by LASL. The accelerator components will be fabricated by US industry. The total estimated cost of the FMIT is $105 million. The facility is scheduled to begin operation in September 1984

  2. Fire detection in warehouse facilities

    Dinaburg, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Automatic sprinklers systems are the primary fire protection system in warehouse and storage facilities. The effectiveness of this strategy has come into question due to the challenges presented by modern warehouse facilities, including increased storage heights and areas, automated storage retrieval systems (ASRS), limitations on water supplies, and changes in firefighting strategies. The application of fire detection devices used to provide early warning and notification of incipient warehouse fire events is being considered as a component of modern warehouse fire protection.Fire Detection i

  3. Fluid sampling tool

    Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

  4. Fluid mechanics. Vol. 2

    Truckenbrodt, E.

    1980-01-01

    The second volume contains the chapter 4 to 6. Whereas chapter 1 deals with the introduction into the mechanics of fluids and chapter 2 with the fundamental laws of fluid and thermal fluid dynamics, in chapter 3 elementary flow phenomena in fluids with constant density are treated. Chapter 4 directly continues chapter 3 and describes elementary flow phenomena in fluids with varying density. Fluid statics again is treated as a special case. If compared with the first edition the treatment of unsteady laminar flow and of pipe flow for a fluid with varying density were subject to a substantial extension. In chapter 5 rotation-free and rotating potential flows are presented together. By this means it is achieved to explain the behaviour of the multidimensional fictionless flow in closed form. A subchapter describes some related problems of potential theory like the flow along a free streamline and seepage flow through a porous medium. The boundary layer flows in chapter 6 are concerned with the flow and temperature boundary layer in laminar and turbulent flows at a fired wall. In it differential and integral methods are applied of subchapter reports on boundary layer flows without a fixed boundary, occurring e.g. in an open jet and in a wake flow. The problems of intermittence and of the Coanda effect are briefly mentioned. (orig./MH)

  5. Fluid sampling tool

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall.

  6. Some aspects of fluid-structure coupling

    Kulak, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    The numerical simulation of nonlinear, transient fluid-structure interactions (FSI) is a current area of concern by researchers in various fields, including the field of nuclear reactor safety. This paper primarily discusses the formulation used in an algorithm that couples three-dimensional hydrodynamic and structural domains. The fluid domain is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations, and the structural domain is governed by the equations of nonlinear structural dynamics. Here, both the fluid and structure are discretized using finite elements. The fluid is discretized with eight-noded quasi-Eulerian hexahedrons and the structural components are represented by Lagrangian triangular plate elements. The semi-discretized equations of motion are solved using an explicit temporal integrator. The coupling is accomplished by satisfying interface mechanics. The structure imposes kinematic constraints to the moving fluid boundary, and the fluid in turn provides an external loading on the structure. At each interface node, normals are computed from the nodal basis functions of only the hydrodynamic nodes. By defining the interface normal in this manner, it becomes independent of the type of structural boundary (i.e. shell, plate, continuum etc.) and thus makes this aspect of the coupling independent of the structure type. Results for several problems are presented and these include a comparison between analytical results for a FSI problem and numerical predictions

  7. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges

    Sabharwall Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX. Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 °C, high-pressure (7 MPa helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4 flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa, at a temperature of ∼450 °C. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  8. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges - 15066

    Sabharwall, P.; O'Brien, J.E.; Yoon, S.J.; Sun, X.

    2015-01-01

    A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic, materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The 3 loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuits heat exchangers (PCHEs) at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integrated System Test (ARTIST) facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 C. degrees), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF 4 ) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa), at a temperature of ∼ 450 C. degrees. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift) in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  9. Fuel conditioning facility material accountancy

    Yacout, A.M.; Bucher, R.G.; Orechwa, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The operation of the Fuel conditioning Facility (FCF) is based on the electrometallurgical processing of spent metallic reactor fuel. It differs significantly, therefore, from traditional PUREX process facilities in both processing technology and safeguards implications. For example, the fissile material is processed in FCF only in batches and is transferred within the facility only as solid, well-characterized items; there are no liquid steams containing fissile material within the facility, nor entering or leaving the facility. The analysis of a single batch lends itself also to an analytical relationship between the safeguards criteria, such as alarm limit, detection probability, and maximum significant amount of fissile material, and the accounting system's performance, as it is reflected in the variance associated with the estimate of the inventory difference. This relation, together with the sensitivity of the inventory difference to the uncertainties in the measurements, allows a thorough evaluation of the power of the accounting system. The system for the accountancy of the fissile material in the FCF has two main components: a system to gather and store information during the operation of the facility, and a system to interpret this information with regard to meeting safeguards criteria. These are described and the precision of the inventory closure over one batch evaluated

  10. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  11. Research Facilities | Wind | NREL

    Research Facilities Research Facilities NREL's state-of-the-art wind research facilities at the Research Facilities Photo of five men in hard hards observing the end of a turbine blade while it's being tested. Structural Research Facilities A photo of two people silhouetted against a computer simulation of

  12. Erosion Evaluation of a Slurry Mixer Tank with Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods

    Lee, S

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to understand and characterize erosion of the floor and internal structures in the slurry mixing vessels in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. An initial literature survey helped identify the principal drivers of erosion for a solids laden fluid: the solids content of the working fluid, the regions of recirculation and particle impact with the walls, and the regions of high wall shear. A series of CFD analyses was performed to characterize slurry-flow profiles, wall shear, and particle impingement distributions in key components such as coil restraints and the vessel floor. The calculations showed that the primary locations of high erosion resulting from abrasion were at the leading edge of the coil guide, the tank floor below the insert plate of the coil guide support, and the upstream lead-in plate. These modeling results based on the calculated high shear regions were in excellent agreement with the observed erosion sites in both location and the degree of erosion. Loss of the leading edge of the coil guide due to the erosion damage during the slurry mixing operation did not affect the erosion patterns on the tank floor. Calculations for a lower impeller speed showed similar erosion patterns but significantly reduced wall shear stresses

  13. Diffuse-Interface Methods in Fluid Mechanics

    Anderson, D. M.; McFadden, G. B.; Wheeler, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    The authors review the development of diffuse-interface models of hydrodynamics and their application to a wide variety of interfacial phenomena. The authors discuss the issues involved in formulating diffuse-interface models for single-component and binary fluids. Recent applications and computations using these models are discussed in each case. Further, the authors address issues including sharp-interface analyses that relate these models to the classical free-boundary problem, related computational approaches to describe interfacial phenomena, and related approaches describing fully-miscible fluids.

  14. The new standard of fluids for hemodialysis in Japan.

    Kawanishi, Hideki; Masakane, Ikuto; Tomo, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    The standard of fluids for hemodialysis is being evaluated by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and will be decided within a few years. In 2008, the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy (JSDT) proposed the standard of fluids for hemodialysis by taking the draft ISO standard into consideration and the circumstances in Japan. It was characteristically a standard for Japan, where the central dialysis fluid delivery system (CDDS) is routinely used. In addition, the therapeutic application of each dialysis fluid is clarified. Since high-performance dialyzers are frequently employed in Japan, the standard recommends that ultrapure dialysis fluid be used for all dialysis modalities at all dialysis facilities. It also recommends that the dialysis equipment safety management committee at each facility validate the microbiological qualities of online-prepared substitution fluid, making the responsibility of the dialysis facility clear. This standard is more rigid than those of other countries, and is expected to contribute to improvements in the survival outcome of dialysis patients. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  16. Fluid Dynamics for Physicists

    Faber, T. E.

    1995-08-01

    This textbook provides an accessible and comprehensive account of fluid dynamics that emphasizes fundamental physical principles and stresses connections with other branches of physics. Beginning with a basic introduction, the book goes on to cover many topics not typically treated in texts, such as compressible flow and shock waves, sound attenuation and bulk viscosity, solitary waves and ship waves, thermal convection, instabilities, turbulence, and the behavior of anisotropic, non-Newtonian and quantum fluids. Undergraduate or graduate students in physics or engineering who are taking courses in fluid dynamics will find this book invaluable.

  17. Thermal Fluid Engineering

    Jang, Byeong Ju

    1984-01-01

    This book is made up of 5 chapters. They are fluid mechanics, fluid machines, Industrial thermodynamics, steam boiler and steam turbine. It introduces hydrostatics, basic theory of fluid movement and law of momentum. It also deals with centrifugal pump, axial flow pump, general hydraulic turbine, and all phenomena happening in the pump. It covers the law of thermodynamics, perfect gas, properties of steam, and flow of gas and steam and water tube boiler. Lastly it explains basic format, theory, loss and performance as well as principle part of steam turbine.

  18. Tritium decontamination of machine components and walls

    Hircq, B.; Wong, K.Y.; Jalbert, R.A.; Shmayda, W.T.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium decontamination techniques for machine components and their application at tritium handling facilities are reviewed. These include commonly used methods such as vacuuming, purging, thermal desorption and isotopic exchange as well as less common methods such as chemical/electrochemical etching, plasma discharge cleaning, and destructive methods. Problems associated with tritium contamination of walls and use of protective coatings are reviewed. Tritium decontamination considerations at fusion facilities are discussed

  19. Approach to testing fusion components in existing nuclear facilities

    Hsu, P.Y.; Miller, L.G.; Longhurst, G.R.; Masson, L.S.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    The concept presented makes use of the fast spectrum in the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Preliminary results show that an asymmetric, nuclear test environment with particle and radiant energy fluxes impinging on a first wall/blanket or divertor surface appears feasible in a neutron/gamma field not greatly different from that seen by a representative first wall/blanket module

  20. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  1. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  2. Windshield washer fluid

    ... tests Chest x-ray CT (computerized tomography, or advanced imaging) scan EKG (electrocardiogram, or heart tracing) Fluids ... Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  3. COUPLED CHEMOTAXIS FLUID MODEL

    LORZ, ALEXANDER

    2010-01-01

    We consider a model system for the collective behavior of oxygen-driven swimming bacteria in an aquatic fluid. In certain parameter regimes, such suspensions of bacteria feature large-scale convection patterns as a result of the hydrodynamic

  4. Peritoneal Fluid Analysis

    ... Get Tested? To help diagnose the cause of peritonitis, an inflammation of the membrane lining the abdomen, ... fever and your healthcare practitioner suspects you have peritonitis or ascites Sample Required? A peritoneal fluid sample ...

  5. The National Ignition Facility

    Hogan, W.J.; Moses, E.; Warner, B.; Sorem, M.; Soures, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest construction project ever undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF consists of 192 forty-centimeter-square laser beams and a 10-m-diameter target chamber. NIF is being designed and built by an LLNL-led team from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Rochester, and LLNL. Physical construction began in 1997. The Laser and Target Area Building and the Optics Assembly Building were the first major construction activities, and despite several unforeseen obstacles, the buildings are now 92% complete and have been done on time and within cost. Prototype component development and testing has proceeded in parallel. Optics vendors have installed full-scale production lines and have done prototype production runs. The assembly and integration of the beampath infrastructure has been reconsidered and a new approach has been developed. This paper will discuss the status of the NIF project and the plans for completion. (author)

  6. Technology Development Facility (TDF)

    Doggett, J.N.

    1982-01-01

    We have been studying small, driven, magnetic-mirror-based fusion reactors for the Technology Development Facility (TDF), that will test fusion reactor materials, components, and subsystems. Magnetic mirror systems are particularly interesting for this application because of their inherent steady-state operation, potentially high neutron wall loading, and relatively small size. Our design is a tandem mirror device first described by Fowler and Logan, based on the physics of the TMX experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The device produces 20 MW of fusion power with a first-wall, uncollided 14-MeV neutron flux of 1.4 MW/m 2 on an area of approximately 8 m 2 , while consuming approximately 250 MW of electrical power. The work was done by a combined industrial-laboratory-university group

  7. Afterheat usage from cooling facilities in ORC processes

    Theede, Florian; Luke, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In the course of the reduction of climate warming an energy-efficient lay-out of processes is necessary. A possibility for the efficiency increasement is the usage of afterheat currents for instance in ORC processes. Connected with the limitation of refrigerants with high greenhouse potential it comes to the increased application of transcritical cooling facilities with carbon dioxide (CO_2) as refrigerant. By the high pressures after the compression arise here new afterheat sources on a temperature level of about 100 C. An alternative for the simple back-cooling or the heating support and drinking-water heating represents the current production in an ORC process. Great challenges for the lay-out of such an ORC process are the selection of the working fluid as well as the lay-out of the heat exchangers. Established refrigerants in the low-temperature like R245fa for ORC facilities will be in forseeable future no more available. For the study of the possible replacement by alternative refrigerants a simulation model has been developed. By means of this model different refrigerants are analyzed regarding their performance and simultaneously the effects on process and other components studied. The results show that in the temperature range two hydrofluoroolefines R1233zd[E] and R1234ze[Z] as well as the hadron carbon butane can thermodynamically form an alternative.

  8. Fluid flow control system

    Rion, Jacky.

    1982-01-01

    Fluid flow control system featuring a series of grids placed perpendicular to the fluid flow direction, characterized by the fact that it is formed of a stack of identical and continuous grids, each of which consists of identical meshes forming a flat lattice. The said meshes are offset from one grid to the next. This system applies in particular to flow control of the coolant flowing at the foot of an assembly of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor [fr

  9. Amniotic fluid inflammatory cytokines

    Abdallah, Morsi; Larsen, Nanna; Grove, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze cytokine profiles in amniotic fluid (AF) samples of children developing autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and controls, adjusting for maternal autoimmune disorders and maternal infections during pregnancy.......The aim of the study was to analyze cytokine profiles in amniotic fluid (AF) samples of children developing autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and controls, adjusting for maternal autoimmune disorders and maternal infections during pregnancy....

  10. [Diagnosis: synovial fluid analysis].

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid analysis in rheumatological diseases allows a more accurate diagnosis in some entities, mainly infectious and microcrystalline arthritis. Examination of synovial fluid in patients with osteoarthritis is useful if a differential diagnosis will be performed with other processes and to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory forms. Joint aspiration is a diagnostic and sometimes therapeutic procedure that is available to primary care physicians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunotherapy With Magentorheologic Fluids

    2011-08-01

    anti-tumor effects are weakened by removal of the tumor antigen pool (i.e. surgery) or use of cytoreductive and immunosuppressive therapies (i.e...particles were injected as magneto -rheological fluid (MRF) into an orthotopic primary breast cancer and followed by application of a magnetic field to...SUBJECT TERMS MRF: Magneto -rehological fluid iron particles, IT: immunotherapy, necrotic death, DCs: dendritic cells, cytokines, chemokines

  12. Supercritical fluid chromatography

    Vigdergauz, M. S.; Lobachev, A. L.; Lobacheva, I. V.; Platonov, I. A.

    1992-03-01

    The characteristic features of supercritical fluid chromatography (SCFC) are examined and there is a brief historical note concerning the development of the method. Information concerning the use of supercritical fluid chromatography in the analysis of objects of different nature is presented in the form of a table. The roles of the mobile and stationary phases in the separation process and the characteristic features of the apparatus and of the use of the method in physicochemical research are discussed. The bibliography includes 364 references.

  13. Fullerol ionic fluids

    Fernandes, Nikhil

    2010-01-01

    We report for the first time an ionic fluid based on hydroxylated fullerenes (fullerols). The ionic fluid was synthesized by neutralizing the fully protonated fullerol with an amine terminated polyethylene/polypropylene oxide oligomer (Jeffamine®). The ionic fluid was compared to a control synthesized by mixing the partially protonated form (sodium form) of the fullerols with the same oligomeric amine in the same ratio as in the ionic fluids (20 wt% fullerol). In the fullerol fluid the ionic bonding significantly perturbs the thermal transitions and melting/crystallization behavior of the amine. In contrast, both the normalized heat of fusion and crystallization of the amine in the control are similar to those of the neat amine consistent with a physical mixture of the fullerols/amine with minimal interactions. In addition to differences in thermal behavior, the fullerol ionic fluid exhibits a complex viscoelastic behavior intermediate between the neat Jeffamine® (liquid-like) and the control (solid-like). © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Articulated pipes conveying fluid pulsating with high frequency

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    1999-01-01

    Stability and nonlinear dynamics of two articulated pipes conveying fluid with a high-frequency pulsating component is investigated. The non-autonomous model equations are converted into autonomous equations by approximating the fast excitation terms with slowly varying terms. The downward hanging...... pipe position will lose stability if the mean flow speed exceeds a certain critical value. Adding a pulsating component to the fluid flow is shown to stabilize the hanging position for high values of the ratio between fluid and pipe-mass, and to marginally destabilize this position for low ratios....... An approximate nonlinear solution for small-amplitude flutter oscillations is obtained using a fifth-order multiple scales perturbation method, and large-amplitude oscillations are examined by numerical integration of the autonomous model equations, using a path-following algorithm. The pulsating fluid component...

  15. Aperture area measurement facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has established an absolute aperture area measurement facility for circular and near-circular apertures use in radiometric instruments. The facility consists of...

  16. High Throughput Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  17. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  18. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  19. GASFLOW: A computational model to analyze accidents in nuclear containment and facility buildings

    Travis, J.R.; Nichols, B.D.; Wilson, T.L.; Lam, K.L.; Spore, J.W.; Niederauer, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    GASFLOW is a finite-volume computer code that solves the time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations for multiple gas species. The fluid-dynamics algorithm is coupled to the chemical kinetics of combusting liquids or gases to simulate diffusion or propagating flames in complex geometries of nuclear containment or confinement and facilities' buildings. Fluid turbulence is calculated to enhance the transport and mixing of gases in rooms and volumes that may be connected by a ventilation system. The ventilation system may consist of extensive ductwork, filters, dampers or valves, and fans. Condensation and heat transfer to walls, floors, ceilings, and internal structures are calculated to model the appropriate energy sinks. Solid and liquid aerosol behavior is simulated to give the time and space inventory of radionuclides. The solution procedure of the governing equations is a modified Los Alamos ICE'd-ALE methodology. Complex facilities can be represented by separate computational domains (multiblocks) that communicate through overlapping boundary conditions. The ventilation system is superimposed throughout the multiblock mesh. Gas mixtures and aerosols are transported through the free three-dimensional volumes and the restricted one-dimensional ventilation components as the accident and fluid flow fields evolve. Combustion may occur if sufficient fuel and reactant or oxidizer are present and have an ignition source. Pressure and thermal loads on the building, structural components, and safety-related equipment can be determined for specific accident scenarios. GASFLOW calculations have been compared with large oil-pool fire tests in the 1986 HDR containment test T52.14, which is a 3000-kW fire experiment. The computed results are in good agreement with the observed data

  20. A Framework for Managing Core Facilities within the Research Enterprise

    Haley, Rand

    2009-01-01

    Core facilities represent increasingly important operational and strategic components of institutions' research enterprises, especially in biomolecular science and engineering disciplines. With this realization, many research institutions are placing more attention on effectively managing core facilities within the research enterprise. A framework is presented for organizing the questions, challenges, and opportunities facing core facilities and the academic units and institutions in which th...

  1. Fluid Dynamics of Pressurized, Entrained Coal Gasifiers

    1997-01-01

    Pressurized, entrained gasification is a promising new technology for the clean and efficient combustion of coal. Its principle is to operate a coal gasifier at a high inlet gas velocity to increase the inflow of reactants, and at an elevated pressure to raise the overall efficiency of the process. Unfortunately, because of the extraordinary difficulties involved in performing measurements in hot, pressurized, high-velocity pilot plants, its fluid dynamics are largely unknown. Thus the designer cannot predict with certainty crucial phenomena like erosion, heat transfer and solid capture. In this context, we are conducting a study of the fluid dynamics of Pressurized Entrained Coal Gasifiers (PECGs). The idea is to simulate the flows in generic industrial PECGs using dimensional similitude. To this end, we employ a unique entrained gas-solid flow facility with the flexibility to recycle--rather than discard--gases other than air. By matching five dimensionless parameters, suspensions in mixtures of helium, carbon dioxide and sulfur hexafluoride simulate the effects of pressure and scale-upon the fluid dynamics of PECGs. Because it operates under cold, atmospheric conditions, the laboratory facility is ideal for detailed measurements

  2. Engineering test facility design center

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This section describes the status of this design

  3. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    Victoria, M.

    1995-01-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons

  4. BRAHMMA - accelerator driven subcritical facility

    Roy, Tushar; Shukla, Shefali; Shukla, M.; Ray, N.K.; Kashyap, Y.S.; Patel, T.; Gadkari, S.C.

    2017-01-01

    Accelerator Driven Subcritical systems are being studied worldwide for their potential in burning minor actinides and reducing long term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuels. In order to pursue the physics studies of Accelerator Driven Subcritical systems, a thermal subcritical assembly BRAHMMA (BeOReflectedAndHDPeModeratedMultiplying Assembly) has been developed at Purnima Labs, BARC. The facility consists of two major components: Subcritical core and Accelerator (DT/ DD Purnima Neutron Generator)

  5. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    Victoria, M. [Association EURATOM, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons.

  6. Hydrodynamic impact of reactor components - a review

    Krajcinovic, D.

    1977-01-01

    A variety of components belonging to a nuclear reactor are by virtue of their design exposed to a mass of fluid which is either in motion or can be set into motion under certain conditions. While the reactor is in its operational mode, the excitations of the structure by the fluid are generally of moderate intensities. In the case of a well designed component, these pressure fluctuations should not cause the failure of the structure. Problems of this type, generally known as vibrations of structures immersed into fluid (under either periodic or random excitations) have been studied in the past rather extensively. In an upset or emergency condition, a pressure pulse is usually generated and propagated through the fluid. While this hypothetical event is an occurrence of low probability the associated pressures are, as a rule, of intensities sufficiently large to cause extensive damage or even the failure of the component. This type of transient interaction problem is much less studied and the aim of this review is to offer a brief discussion of some of the more interesting results. (Auth.)

  7. Guide to research facilities

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  8. Sodium removal from Hallam Reactor components

    Huntsman, L.K.; Meservey, R.H.

    1979-08-01

    This report discussed the removal of sodium from major components of the Hallam Nuclear Power Facility. This facility contained the experimental ractor used to test the feasibility of sodium coolant. The Idaho Operations Office of the Department of Energy assigned EG and G Idaho, Inc., the task of carrying out this decontamination and decommissioning program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Since their shipment to the INEL from Lincoln, Nebraska in 1968, the Hallam Reactor components had been stored in inert nitrogen to prevent the sodium in the components from reacting with moisture in the air. The procedure used to react the sodium in the components and to decontaminate them is discussed. Problems and unusual occurrences in the decontamination and decommissioning process are also reported

  9. Volumetric velocimetry for fluid flows

    Discetti, Stefano; Coletti, Filippo

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, several techniques have been introduced that are capable of extracting 3D three-component velocity fields in fluid flows. Fast-paced developments in both hardware and processing algorithms have generated a diverse set of methods, with a growing range of applications in flow diagnostics. This has been further enriched by the increasingly marked trend of hybridization, in which the differences between techniques are fading. In this review, we carry out a survey of the prominent methods, including optical techniques and approaches based on medical imaging. An overview of each is given with an example of an application from the literature, while focusing on their respective strengths and challenges. A framework for the evaluation of velocimetry performance in terms of dynamic spatial range is discussed, along with technological trends and emerging strategies to exploit 3D data. While critical challenges still exist, these observations highlight how volumetric techniques are transforming experimental fluid mechanics, and that the possibilities they offer have just begun to be explored.

  10. Fluid inclusion brine compositions from Palo Duro Basin salt sites

    Moody, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The fluid inclusion analyses were done on salt samples from Lower San Andres Cycle 4 and 5. The stable isotope composition of the fluid inclusion brines was measured on duplicate samples taken from the same fluid inclusion brine for correlation of geochemical content with the stable isotopic content. The analyzed Palo Duro Basin salt fluid inclusions are predominantly one phase, i.e., the presence of a fluid only. However, many of the larger fluid inclusions do have a small vapor bubble. This liquid/vapor ratio is so high in these vapor-containing fluid inclusions that their behavior in a thermal gradient would be almost identical to that of all liquid inclusions. Closely associated with the fluid inclusions are cryptomelane where some fibers penetrate into halite host crystal. The fluid inclusions have a wide variability in content for those components that were analyzed, even within the same salt type. The fluid inclusion brines are also acidic, ranging from 3 to 6 as measured with pH test papers

  11. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains.

  12. Viscous Flow with Large Fluid-Fluid Interface Displacement

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole; Saasen, Arild

    1998-01-01

    The arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) kinematic description has been implemented in a 3D transient finite element program to simulate multiple fluid flows with fluid-fluid interface or surface displacements. The description of fluid interfaces includes variable interfacial tension, and the formulation...... is useful in the simulation of low and intermediate Reynolds number viscous flow. The displacement of two immiscible Newtonian fluids in a vertical (concentric and eccentric) annulus and a (vertical and inclined)tube is simulated....

  13. Two-phase cooling fluids; Les fluides frigoporteurs diphasiques

    Lallemand, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-12-31

    In the framework of the diminution of heat transfer fluid consumption, the concept of indirect refrigerating circuits, using cooling intermediate fluids, is reviewed and the fluids that are currently used in these systems are described. Two-phase cooling fluids advantages over single-phase fluids are presented with their thermophysical characteristics: solid fraction, two-phase mixture enthalpy, thermal and rheological properties, determination of heat and mass transfer characteristics, and cold storage through ice slurry

  14. MHD Hele-Shaw flow of Rivlin-Ericksen fluid

    Ghosh, B.C.; Sengupta, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to study the MHD Hele-Shaw flow of Rivlin-Ericksen visco-elastic fluid assuming the pressure gradient to be proportional to exp (-nt). The velocity components are obtained and the effect of visco-elasticity is discussed on velocity components. (author). 8 refs

  15. Testing structure formation in the universe via coupled matter fluids ...

    We present results from a new framework in which the matter fluid is split into a strongly clustered “halo” component and a weakly clustered “free” component accreted by the haloes. The interaction is modelled using a simple function of the matter density that mimics recently published results from halo theory of N-body ...

  16. Fluid dynamics of bubbly flows

    Ziegenhein, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bubbly flows can be found in many applications in chemical, biological and power engineering. Reliable simulation tools of such flows that allow the design of new processes and optimization of existing one are therefore highly desirable. CFD-simulations applying the multi-fluid approach are very promising to provide such a design tool for complete facilities. In the multi-fluid approach, however, closure models have to be formulated to model the interaction between the continuous and dispersed phase. Due to the complex nature of bubbly flows, different phenomena have to be taken into account and for every phenomenon different closure models exist. Therefore, reliable predictions of unknown bubbly flows are not yet possible with the multi-fluid approach. A strategy to overcome this problem is to define a baseline model in which the closure models including the model constants are fixed so that the limitations of the modeling can be evaluated by validating it on different experiments. Afterwards, the shortcomings are identified so that the baseline model can be stepwise improved without losing the validity for the already validated cases. This development of a baseline model is done in the present work by validating the baseline model developed at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf mainly basing on experimental data for bubbly pipe flows to bubble columns, bubble plumes and air-lift reactors that are relevant in chemical and biological engineering applications. In the present work, a large variety of such setups is used for validation. The buoyancy driven bubbly flows showed thereby a transient behavior on the scale of the facility. Since such large scales are characterized by the geometry of the facility, turbulence models cannot describe them. Therefore, the transient simulation of bubbly flows with two equation models based on the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is investigated. In combination with the before mentioned baseline model these

  17. Fluid dynamics of bubbly flows

    Ziegenhein, Thomas

    2016-07-08

    Bubbly flows can be found in many applications in chemical, biological and power engineering. Reliable simulation tools of such flows that allow the design of new processes and optimization of existing one are therefore highly desirable. CFD-simulations applying the multi-fluid approach are very promising to provide such a design tool for complete facilities. In the multi-fluid approach, however, closure models have to be formulated to model the interaction between the continuous and dispersed phase. Due to the complex nature of bubbly flows, different phenomena have to be taken into account and for every phenomenon different closure models exist. Therefore, reliable predictions of unknown bubbly flows are not yet possible with the multi-fluid approach. A strategy to overcome this problem is to define a baseline model in which the closure models including the model constants are fixed so that the limitations of the modeling can be evaluated by validating it on different experiments. Afterwards, the shortcomings are identified so that the baseline model can be stepwise improved without losing the validity for the already validated cases. This development of a baseline model is done in the present work by validating the baseline model developed at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf mainly basing on experimental data for bubbly pipe flows to bubble columns, bubble plumes and air-lift reactors that are relevant in chemical and biological engineering applications. In the present work, a large variety of such setups is used for validation. The buoyancy driven bubbly flows showed thereby a transient behavior on the scale of the facility. Since such large scales are characterized by the geometry of the facility, turbulence models cannot describe them. Therefore, the transient simulation of bubbly flows with two equation models based on the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is investigated. In combination with the before mentioned baseline model these

  18. Boiler using combustible fluid

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  19. Amniotic fluid embolism

    Kiranpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE is one of the catastrophic complications of pregnancy in which amniotic fluid, fetal cells, hair, or other debris enters into the maternal pulmonary circulation, causing cardiovascular collapse. Etiology largely remains unknown, but may occur in healthy women during labour, during cesarean section, after abnormal vaginal delivery, or during the second trimester of pregnancy. It may also occur up to 48 hours post-delivery. It can also occur during abortion, after abdominal trauma, and during amnio-infusion. The pathophysiology of AFE is not completely understood. Possible historical cause is that any breach of the barrier between maternal blood and amniotic fluid forces the entry of amniotic fluid into the systemic circulation and results in a physical obstruction of the pulmonary circulation. The presenting signs and symptoms of AFE involve many organ systems. Clinical signs and symptoms are acute dyspnea, cough, hypotension, cyanosis, fetal bradycardia, encephalopathy, acute pulmonary hypertension, coagulopathy etc. Besides basic investigations lung scan, serum tryptase levels, serum levels of C3 and C4 complements, zinc coproporphyrin, serum sialyl Tn etc are helpful in establishing the diagnosis. Treatment is mainly supportive, but exchange transfusion, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and uterine artery embolization have been tried from time to time. The maternal prognosis after amniotic fluid embolism is very poor though infant survival rate is around 70%.

  20. Material Processing Facility - Skylab Experiment M512

    1972-01-01

    This chart details Skylab's Materials Processing Facility experiment (M512). This facility, located in the Multiple Docking Adapter, was developed for Skylab and accommodated 14 different experiments that were carried out during the three marned missions. The abilities to melt and mix without the contaminating effects of containers, to suppress thermal convection and buoyancy in fluids, and to take advantage of electrostatic and magnetic forces and otherwise masked by gravitation opened the way to new knowledge of material properties and processes. This beginning would ultimately lead to the production of valuable new materials for use on Earth.

  1. Fluid structure interaction in piping systems

    Svingen, Bjoernar

    1996-12-31

    The Dr. ing. thesis relates to an analysis of fluid structure interaction in piping systems in the frequency domain. The governing equations are the water hammer equations for the liquid, and the beam-equations for the structure. The fluid and structural equations are coupled through axial stresses and fluid continuity relations controlled by the contraction factor (Poisson coupling), and continuity and force relations at the boundaries (junction coupling). A computer program has been developed using the finite element method as a discretization technique both for the fluid and for the structure. This is made for permitting analyses of large systems including branches and loops, as well as including hydraulic piping components, and experiments are executed. Excitations are made in a frequency range from zero Hz and up to at least one thousand Hz. Frequency dependent friction is modelled as stiffness proportional Rayleigh damping both for the fluid and for the structure. With respect to the water hammer equations, stiffness proportional damping is seen as an artificial (bulk) viscosity term. A physical interpretation of this term in relation to transient/oscillating hydraulic pipe-friction is given. 77 refs., 72 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Standard on microbiological management of fluids for hemodialysis and related therapies by the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy 2008.

    Kawanishi, Hideki; Akiba, Takashi; Masakane, Ikuto; Tomo, Tadashi; Mineshima, Michio; Kawasaki, Tadayuki; Hirakata, Hideki; Akizawa, Tadao

    2009-04-01

    The Committee of Scientific Academy of the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy (JSDT) proposes a new standard on microbiological management of fluids for hemodialysis and related therapies. This standard is within the scope of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), which is currently under revision. This standard is to be applied to the central dialysis fluid delivery systems (CDDS), which are widely used in Japan. In this standard, microbiological qualities for dialysis water and dialysis fluids are clearly defined by endotoxin level and bacterial count. The qualities of dialysis fluids were classified into three levels: standard, ultrapure, and online prepared substitution fluid. In addition, the therapeutic application of each dialysis fluid is clarified. Since high-performance dialyzers are frequently used in Japan, the standard recommends that ultrapure dialysis fluid be used for all dialysis modalities at all dialysis facilities. It also recommends that the dialysis equipment safety management committee at each facility should validate the microbiological qualities of online prepared substitution fluid.

  3. Linearly decoupled energy-stable numerical methods for multi-component two-phase compressible flow

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu; Wang, Xiuhua

    2017-01-01

    involved in the discrete momentum equation to ensure a consistency relationship with the mass balance equations. Moreover, we propose a component-wise SAV approach for a multi-component fluid, which requires solving a sequence of linear, separate mass

  4. Communication grounding facility

    Lee, Gye Seong

    1998-06-01

    It is about communication grounding facility, which is made up twelve chapters. It includes general grounding with purpose, materials thermal insulating material, construction of grounding, super strength grounding method, grounding facility with grounding way and building of insulating, switched grounding with No. 1A and LCR, grounding facility of transmission line, wireless facility grounding, grounding facility in wireless base station, grounding of power facility, grounding low-tenton interior power wire, communication facility of railroad, install of arrester in apartment and house, install of arrester on introduction and earth conductivity and measurement with introduction and grounding resistance.

  5. Cold component flow in a two-component mirror machine

    Rognlien, T.D.

    1975-12-01

    Steady-state solutions are given for the flow characteristics along the magnetic field of the cold plasma component in a two-component mirror machine. The hot plasma component is represented by a fixed density profile. The fluid equations are used to describe the cold plasma, which is assumed to be generated in a localized region at one end of the machine. The ion flow speed, v/sub i/, is required to satisfy the Bohm sheath condition at the end walls, i.e., v/sub i/ greater than or equal to c/sub s/, where c/sub s/ is the ion-acoustic speed. For the case when the cold plasma density, n/sub c/, is much less than the hot plasma density, n/sub h/, the cold plasma is stagnant and does not penetrate through the machine in the zero temperature case. The effect of a finite temperature is to allow for the penetration of a small amount of cold plasma through the machine. For the density range n/sub c/ approximately n/sub h/, the flow solutions are asymmetric about the midplane and have v/sub i/ = c/sub s/ near the midplane. Finally, for n/sub c/ much greater than n/sub h/, the solutions become symmetric about the midplane and approach the Lee--McNamara type solutions with v/sub i/ = c/sub s/ near the mirror throats

  6. Hot gas path component cooling system

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2014-02-18

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

  7. Development of simplified decommissioning cost estimation code for nuclear facilities

    Tachibana, Mitsuo; Shiraishi, Kunio; Ishigami, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    The simplified decommissioning cost estimation code for nuclear facilities (DECOST code) was developed in consideration of features and structures of nuclear facilities and similarity of dismantling methods. The DECOST code could calculate 8 evaluation items of decommissioning cost. Actual dismantling in the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was evaluated; unit conversion factors used to calculate the manpower of dismantling activities were evaluated. Consequently, unit conversion factors of general components could be classified into three kinds. Weights of components and structures of the facility were necessary for calculation of manpower. Methods for evaluating weights of components and structures of the facility were studied. Consequently, the weight of components in the facility was proportional to the weight of structures of the facility. The weight of structures of the facility was proportional to the total area of floors in the facility. Decommissioning costs of 7 nuclear facilities in the JAEA were calculated by using the DECOST code. To verify the calculated results, the calculated manpower was compared with the manpower gained from actual dismantling. Consequently, the calculated manpower and actual manpower were almost equal. The outline of the DECOST code, evaluation results of unit conversion factors, the evaluation method of the weights of components and structures of the facility are described in this report. (author)

  8. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-04-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

  9. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP

  10. Fluid structure coupling algorithm

    McMaster, W.H.; Gong, E.Y.; Landram, C.S.; Quinones, D.F.

    1980-01-01

    A fluid-structure-interaction algorithm has been developed and incorporated into the two-dimensional code PELE-IC. This code combines an Eulerian incompressible fluid algorithm with a Lagrangian finite element shell algorithm and incorporates the treatment of complex free surfaces. The fluid structure and coupling algorithms have been verified by the calculation of solved problems from the literature and from air and steam blowdown experiments. The code has been used to calculate loads and structural response from air blowdown and the oscillatory condensation of steam bubbles in water suppression pools typical of boiling water reactors. The techniques developed have been extended to three dimensions and implemented in the computer code PELE-3D

  11. Rheology of Active Fluids

    Saintillan, David

    2018-01-01

    An active fluid denotes a viscous suspension of particles, cells, or macromolecules able to convert chemical energy into mechanical work by generating stresses on the microscale. By virtue of this internal energy conversion, these systems display unusual macroscopic rheological signatures, including a curious transition to an apparent superfluid-like state where internal activity exactly compensates viscous dissipation. These behaviors are unlike those of classical complex fluids and result from the coupling of particle configurations with both externally applied flows and internally generated fluid disturbances. Focusing on the well-studied example of a suspension of microswimmers, this review summarizes recent experiments, models, and simulations in this area and highlights the critical role played by the rheological response of these active materials in a multitude of phenomena, from the enhanced transport of passive suspended objects to the emergence of spontaneous flows and collective motion.

  12. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    Gray, Harold E.; McLaurin, Felder M.; Ortiz, Monico; Huth, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  13. Fluid overload in the ICU: evaluation and management.

    Claure-Del Granado, Rolando; Mehta, Ravindra L

    2016-08-02

    Fluid overload is frequently found in acute kidney injury patients in critical care units. Recent studies have shown the relationship of fluid overload with adverse outcomes; hence, manage and optimization of fluid balance becomes a central component of the management of critically ill patients. In critically ill patients, in order to restore cardiac output, systemic blood pressure and renal perfusion an adequate fluid resuscitation is essential. Achieving an appropriate level of volume management requires knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology, evaluation of volume status, and selection of appropriate solution for volume repletion, and maintenance and modulation of the tissue perfusion. Numerous recent studies have established a correlation between fluid overload and mortality in critically ill patients. Fluid overload recognition and assessment requires an accurate documentation of intakes and outputs; yet, there is a wide difference in how it is evaluated, reviewed and utilized. Accurate volume status evaluation is essential for appropriate therapy since errors of volume evaluation can result in either in lack of essential treatment or unnecessary fluid administration, and both scenarios are associated with increased mortality. There are several methods to evaluate fluid status; however, most of the tests currently used are fairly inaccurate. Diuretics, especially loop diuretics, remain a valid therapeutic alternative. Fluid overload refractory to medical therapy requires the application of extracorporeal therapies. In critically ill patients, fluid overload is related to increased mortality and also lead to several complications like pulmonary edema, cardiac failure, delayed wound healing, tissue breakdown, and impaired bowel function. Therefore, the evaluation of volume status is crucial in the early management of critically ill patients. Diuretics are frequently used as an initial therapy; however, due to their limited effectiveness the use of continuous

  14. AOV Facility Tool/Facility Safety Specifications -

    Department of Transportation — Develop and maintain authorizing documents that are standards that facilities must follow. These standards are references of FAA regulations and are specific to the...

  15. Performance characterization of the FLEX low pressure helium facility for fusion technology experiments

    Schlindwein, Georg, E-mail: schlindwein@kit.edu; Arbeiter, Frederik

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A gas loop for fusion R and D has been built and tested. • Facility requirements and their implementation are given. • The loop's functions and instrumentation are explained. • The loops performance has been characterized. - Abstract: FLEX (Fluid Dynamics Experimental Facility) is a multi-purpose small scale gas loop for research on fluid and thermodynamic investigations, especially heat transfer, flow field measurements and gas purification. Initially it was built for investigation on mini-channel gas-flow to design the HFTM module of IFMIF. Because of its versatility it offers a wide range of further applications, e.g. the research of pressure drops in mockups of breeder units of the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) test blanket module for ITER. The main parameters of the loop, which can be operated with inert gases and air are: (i) operation gas pressure 0.02–0.38 MPa abs., (ii) test section pressure head up to 0.12 MPa, (iii) tolerable gas temperature RT – 200 °C and (iv) mass flow rate 0.2–12 × 10{sup −3} kg/s for Helium. This paper gives a detailed view of the loop assembly with the components that generate and regulate the mass flow and loop pressure. The measurement instrumentation will be presented as well as a representative mass flow-pressure drop characteristic. Furthermore, the achievable gas purity will be discussed.

  16. Clusters in simple fluids

    Sator, N.

    2003-01-01

    This article concerns the correspondence between thermodynamics and the morphology of simple fluids in terms of clusters. Definitions of clusters providing a geometric interpretation of the liquid-gas phase transition are reviewed with an eye to establishing their physical relevance. The author emphasizes their main features and basic hypotheses, and shows how these definitions lead to a recent approach based on self-bound clusters. Although theoretical, this tutorial review is also addressed to readers interested in experimental aspects of clustering in simple fluids

  17. Mechanics of fluid flow

    Basniev, Kaplan S; Chilingar, George V 0

    2012-01-01

    The mechanics of fluid flow is a fundamental engineering discipline explaining both natural phenomena and human-induced processes, and a thorough understanding of it is central to the operations of the oil and gas industry.  This book, written by some of the world's best-known and respected petroleum engineers, covers the concepts, theories, and applications of the mechanics of fluid flow for the veteran engineer working in the field and the student, alike.  It is a must-have for any engineer working in the oil and gas industry.

  18. Supercritical fluid analytical methods

    Smith, R.D.; Kalinoski, H.T.; Wright, B.W.; Udseth, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    Supercritical fluids are providing the basis for new and improved methods across a range of analytical technologies. New methods are being developed to allow the detection and measurement of compounds that are incompatible with conventional analytical methodologies. Characterization of process and effluent streams for synfuel plants requires instruments capable of detecting and measuring high-molecular-weight compounds, polar compounds, or other materials that are generally difficult to analyze. The purpose of this program is to develop and apply new supercritical fluid techniques for extraction, separation, and analysis. These new technologies will be applied to previously intractable synfuel process materials and to complex mixtures resulting from their interaction with environmental and biological systems

  19. 42 CFR 93.209 - Funding component.

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Funding component. 93.209 Section 93.209 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH...

  20. Mitigating component performance variation

    Gara, Alan G.; Sylvester, Steve S.; Eastep, Jonathan M.; Nagappan, Ramkumar; Cantalupo, Christopher M.

    2018-01-09

    Apparatus and methods may provide for characterizing a plurality of similar components of a distributed computing system based on a maximum safe operation level associated with each component and storing characterization data in a database and allocating non-uniform power to each similar component based at least in part on the characterization data in the database to substantially equalize performance of the components.

  1. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Moeller, M.P.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum three years. A variety of liquid wastes are generated in processing treatment, and disposal operations throughout the Hanford Site. The Tank Farms Project serves a major role in Hanford Site waste management activities as the temporary repository for these wastes. Stored wastes include hazardous components regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and as by-product material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. A total of 177 single- and double-shell tanks (SST and DST) have been constructed in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site. These facilities were constructed to various designs from 1943 to 1986. The Tank Farms Project is comprised of these tanks along with various transfer, receiving, and treatment facilities

  2. Complex Fluids in Energy Dissipating Systems

    Francisco J. Galindo-Rosales

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of engineered systems for energy dissipation (or absorption during impacts or vibrations is an increasing need in our society, mainly for human protection applications, but also for ensuring the right performance of different sort of devices, facilities or installations. In the last decade, new energy dissipating composites based on the use of certain complex fluids have flourished, due to their non-linear relationship between stress and strain rate depending on the flow/field configuration. This manuscript intends to review the different approaches reported in the literature, analyses the fundamental physics behind them and assess their pros and cons from the perspective of their practical applications.

  3. Incompressible ionized fluid mixtures

    Roubíček, Tomáš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 7 (2006), s. 493-509 ISSN 0935-1175 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : chemically reacting fluids * Navier-Stokes * Nernst-Planck * Possion equation s * heat equation s Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.954, year: 2006

  4. Fluids in metamorphic rocks

    Touret, J.L.R.

    2001-01-01

    Basic principles for the study of fluid inclusions in metamorphic rocks are reviewed and illustrated. A major problem relates to the number of inclusions, possibly formed on a wide range of P-T conditions, having also suffered, in most cases, extensive changes after initial trapping. The

  5. Removal of unwanted fluid

    Subudhi, Sudhakar; Sreenivas, K. R.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2013-01-01

    This work is concerned with the removal of unwanted fluid through the source-sink pair. The source consists of fluid issuing out of a nozzle in the form of a jet and the sink is a pipe that is kept some distance from the source pipe. Of concern is the percentage of source fluid sucked through the sink. The experiments have been carried in a large glass water tank. The source nozzle diameter is 6 mm and the sink pipe diameter is either 10 or 20 mm. The horizontal and vertical separations and angles between these source and sink pipes are adjustable. The flow was visualized using KMnO4 dye, planer laser induced fluorescence and particle streak photographs. To obtain the effectiveness (that is percentage of source fluid entering the sink pipe), titration method is used. The velocity profiles with and without the sink were obtained using particle image velocimetry. The sink flow rate to obtain a certain effectiveness increase dramatically with lateral separation. The sink diameter and the angle between source and the sink axes don't influence effectiveness as much as the lateral separation.

  6. Continuous feedback fluid queues

    Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.; van Foreest, N.D.; Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a fluid buffer which is modulated by a stochastic background process, while the momentary behavior of the background process depends on the current buffer level in a continuous way. Loosely speaking the feedback is such that the background process behaves `as a Markov process' with

  7. Fluid dynamics of Ribbed Annuli

    McCreery, G. E.; Pink, R. J.; Condie, K. G.; McEligot, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Typical advanced gas-cooled reactor designs use periodic spacer ribs to center rods in circular cooling channels, e.g., as for control rods (General Atomics and others) and fuel rods (HTTR). In contrast to classical studies of axisymmetric annuli, the flow becomes three-dimensional but is typically periodic in the circumferential direction and - in some cases - in the streamwise direction. Fundamental measurements have been obtained for two idealizations of these complex geometries: an annulus with three ribs circumferentially and one with four. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was employed with INEEL's unique Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) flow facility to determine the velocity and turbulence fields. The initial experiment was aimed at obtaining benchmark data to test the capabilities of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes to handle ribbed annular geometries without the complications of turbulent transport. The Reynolds number was about 1120. These conditions correspond to some stages during a pressurized cooldown (LOFA) event. Power spectral densities were obtained to determine the eddy shedding frequency downstream of the ribs. For the second experiment LDV measurements were obtained in another ribbed-annular model at a higher flow rate. For this nominally turbulent flow, evidence of laminarization appears in the flow converging to pass between ribs. The measurements indicated flow details which could be useful for assessment of CFD codes

  8. Linking rigid multibody systems via controllable thin fluid films

    Estupinan, Edgar Alberto; Santos, Ilmar

    2009-01-01

    , this paper gives a theoretical contribution to the combined fields of fluid–structure interaction and vibration control. The methodology is applied to a reciprocating linear compressor, where the dynamics of the mechanical components are described with help of multibody dynamics. The crank is linked......This work deals with the mathematical modelling of multibody systems interconnected via thin fluid films. The dynamics of the fluid films can be actively controlled by means of different types of actuators, allowing significant vibration reduction of the system components. In this framework...... to the rotor via a thin fluid film, where the hydrodynamic pressure is described by the Reynolds equation, which is modified to accommodate the controllable lubrication conditions. The fluid film forces are coupled to the set of nonlinear equations that describes the dynamics of the reciprocating linear...

  9. Comparison of Tritium Component Failure Rate Data

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-01-01

    Published failure rate values from the US Tritium Systems Test Assembly, the Japanese Tritium Process Laboratory, the German Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, and the Joint European Torus Active Gas Handling System have been compared. This comparison is on a limited set of components, but there is a good variety of data sets in the comparison. The data compared reasonably well. The most reasonable failure rate values are recommended for use on next generation tritium handling system components, such as those in the tritium plant systems for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the tritium fuel systems of inertial fusion facilities, such as the US National Ignition Facility. These data and the comparison results are also shared with the International Energy Agency cooperative task on fusion component failure rate data

  10. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-01-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs

  11. The planned Alaska SAR Facility - An overview

    Carsey, Frank; Weeks, Wilford

    1987-01-01

    The Alaska SAR Facility (ASF) is described in an overview fashion. The facility consists of three major components, a Receiving Ground System, a SAR Processing System and an Analysis and Archiving System; the ASF Program also has a Science Working Team and the requisite management and operations systems. The ASF is now an approved and fully funded activity; detailed requirements and science background are presented for the facility to be implemented for data from the European ERS-1, the Japanese ERS-1 and Radarsat.

  12. Analysis of anaerobic product properties in fluid and aggressive environments

    Goncharov, A.; Tulinov, A.

    2008-01-01

    The article presents the results of experiments involved in investigation of properties of some domestic and foreign-made anaerobic materials in components and units operating in fluid and aggressive environments. These experiments determined the strength and swell values of anaerobic products in the sea water, fuel and oil, and confirmed their anticorrosion properties. The experiments demonstrated high resistance of anaerobic products to various fluids and aggressive environments, which make...

  13. Introduction to the concept of added mass in fluid mechanics

    Pham Dan Tam.

    1977-07-01

    The physical phenomenum which leads to the concept of added mass for an inviscid fluid is recalled. The added-mass tensor for a solid body moving through an unbounded fluid is defined and some of its properties are presented. The Taylor theorem is exposed, which enables some of the tensor components to be analytically derived in particular cases. Added-mass values are provided for bodies of particular shape. Applications of the added-mass concept to different problems are given [fr

  14. Aerodynamic and related hydrodynamic studies using water facilities

    1987-06-01

    Related problems, experiences and advancements in aeronautical and maritime fluid dynamics through the use of water facilities are reviewed. In recent years there has been an increasing use of water facilities for aerodynamic investigations. These include water tunnels, towing channels, and stationary tanks. Examples include basic research problems as well as flow fields around fighter aircraft, inlet flows, recirculation flow patterns associated with VTOL, ramjet simulation, etc., and, in general, 3-D flows with vortices or separated regimes as prominent features. The Symposium was organized to provide an appropriate forum for the exchange of information within the aeronautical and maritime fluid dynamics community.

  15. Oak Ridge rf Test Facility

    Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; McCurdy, H.C.; McManamy, T.J.; Moeller, J.A.; Ryan, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The rf Test Facility (RFTF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a national facility for the testing and evaluation of steady-state, high-power (approx.1.0-MW) ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems and components. The facility consists of a vacuum vessel and two fully tested superconducting development magnets from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program. These are arranged as a simple mirror with a mirror ratio of 4.8. The axial centerline distance between magnet throat centers is 112 cm. The vacuum vessel cavity has a large port (74 by 163 cm) and a test volume adequate for testing prototypic launchers for Doublet III-D (DIII-D), Tore Supra, and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Attached to the internal vessel walls are water-cooled panels for removing the injected rf power. The magnets are capable of generating a steady-state field of approx.3 T on axis in the magnet throats. Steady-state plasmas are generated in the facility by cyclotron resonance breakdown using a dedicated 200-kW, 28-GHz gyrotron. Available rf sources cover a frequency range of 2 to 200 MHz at 1.5 kW and 3 to 18 MHz at 200 kW, with several sources at intermediate parameters. Available in July 1986 will be a >1.0-MW, cw source spanning 40 to 80 MHz. 5 figs

  16. Large-component handling equipment and its use

    Krieg, S.A.; Swannack, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor systems have special requirements for component replacements during maintenance servicing. Replacement operations must address handling of equipment within shielded metal containers while maintaining an inert atmosphere to prevent reaction of sodium with air. Plant identification of a failed component results in selecting and assembling the maintenance cask and equipment transport system for transfer from the storage facility to the Reactor Containment Building (RCB). This includes a proper diameter and length cask, inert atmosphere control consoles, component lift fixture and support structure for interface with the facility area surrounding the component. This equipment is staged in modular groups in the Reactor Service Building for transfer through the equipment airlock to the containment interior. The failed component is generally prepared for replacement by installation of the special lifting fixture attachment. Assembly of the cask support structure is performed over the component position on the containment building operating floor. The cask and shroud from the reactor interface are inerted after all manual service connections and handling attachments are completed. The component is lifted from the reactor and into the cask interior through a floor valve which is then closed to isolate the component reactor port. The cask with sodium wetted component is transferred to a service/repair location, either within containment or outside, to the Maintenance Facility cleaning and repair area. The complete equipment and handling operations for replacement of a large reactor component are described

  17. Optimal control of hydroelectric facilities

    Zhao, Guangzhi

    This thesis considers a simple yet realistic model of pump-assisted hydroelectric facilities operating in a market with time-varying but deterministic power prices. Both deterministic and stochastic water inflows are considered. The fluid mechanical and engineering details of the facility are described by a model containing several parameters. We present a dynamic programming algorithm for optimizing either the total energy produced or the total cash generated by these plants. The algorithm allows us to give the optimal control strategy as a function of time and to see how this strategy, and the associated plant value, varies with water inflow and electricity price. We investigate various cases. For a single pumped storage facility experiencing deterministic power prices and water inflows, we investigate the varying behaviour for an oversimplified constant turbine- and pump-efficiency model with simple reservoir geometries. We then generalize this simple model to include more realistic turbine efficiencies, situations with more complicated reservoir geometry, and the introduction of dissipative switching costs between various control states. We find many results which reinforce our physical intuition about this complicated system as well as results which initially challenge, though later deepen, this intuition. One major lesson of this work is that the optimal control strategy does not differ much between two differing objectives of maximizing energy production and maximizing its cash value. We then turn our attention to the case of stochastic water inflows. We present a stochastic dynamic programming algorithm which can find an on-average optimal control in the face of this randomness. As the operator of a facility must be more cautious when inflows are random, the randomness destroys facility value. Following this insight we quantify exactly how much a perfect hydrological inflow forecast would be worth to a dam operator. In our final chapter we discuss the

  18. Editorial Special Issue on Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP ...

    This special issue of Sadhana contains selected papers from two conferences related to fluid mechanics held in India recently, Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power conference at NIT, Hamirpur, and an International Union of Theoretical ... A simple, well thought out, flow visualization experiment or a computation can sometimes ...

  19. Lesotho - Health Facility Survey

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The main objective of the 2011 Health Facility Survey (HFS) was to establish a baseline for informing the Health Project performance indicators on health facilities,...

  20. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....