WorldWideScience

Sample records for fluence implanted gaas

  1. Raman scattering probe of ion-implanted and pulse laser annealed GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prabhat; Jain, K. P.; Abbi, S. C.

    1996-04-01

    We report Raman scattering studies of phosphorus-ion-implanted and subsequently pulse laser annealed (PLA) GaAs. The threshold value of implantation fluence for the disappearance of one-phonon modes in the Raman spectrum of ion-implanted GaAs sample is found to be greater than that for the two-phonon modes by an order of magnitude. The phonon correlation length decreases with increasing disorder. The lattice reconstruction process during PLA creates microcrystallites for incomplete annealing, whose sizes can be given by the phonon correlation lengths, and are found to increase with the annealing power density. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectra corresponding to the allowed longitudinal-optical (LO)-phonon mode to the forbidden transverse-optical (TO)-phonon mode, ILO/ITO, is used as a quantitative measure of crystallinity in the implantation and PLA processes. The threshold annealing power density is estimated to be 20 MW/cm2 for 70 keV phosphorus-ion-implanted GaAs at a fluence of 5×1015 ions/cm2. The localized vibrational mode of phosphorus is observed in PLA samples for fluences above 1×1015 ions/cm2.

  2. Heat flow model for pulsed laser melting and rapid solidification of ion implanted GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeseok; Pillai, Manoj R.; Aziz, Michael J.; Scarpulla, Michael A.; Dubon, Oscar D.; Yu, Kin M.; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Ridgway, Mark C.

    2010-07-01

    In order to further understand the pulsed-laser melting (PLM) of Mn and N implanted GaAs, which we have used to synthesize thin films of the ferromagnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMnxAs and the highly mismatched alloy GaNxAs1-x, we have simulated PLM of amorphous (a-) and crystalline (c-) GaAs. We present a numerical solution to the one-dimensional heat equation, accounting for phase-dependent reflectivity, optical skin depth, and latent heat, and a temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and specific heat. By comparing the simulations with experimental time-resolved reflectivity and melt depth versus laser fluence, we identify a set of thermophysical and optical properties for the crystalline, amorphous, and liquid phases of GaAs that give reasonable agreement between experiment and simulation. This work resulted in the estimation of thermal conductivity, melting temperature and latent heat of fusion of a-GaAs of 0.008 W/cm K at 300 K, 1350 K, and 2650 J/cm3, respectively. These materials properties also allow the prediction of the solidification velocity of crystalline and ion-amorphized GaAs.

  3. Influence of hydrogen fluence on surface blistering of H and He co-implanted Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Jiayun; Xue, Zhongying; Zhang, Miao; Wei, Xing; Wang, Gang; Di, Zengfeng, E-mail: zfdi@mail.sim.ac.cn

    2016-02-01

    Highlights: • The effect of hydrogen dose on blistering was investigated. • Changes in the blistering phenomena of all the samples were studied. • The evolutions of strain and implantation induced-defects were analyzed. • The platelet forming tendency is responsible for the difference in blistering. - Abstract: The effect of hydrogen fluence on surface blistering of H and He co-implanted Ge is investigated using atom force microscope, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. With a fixed He, we find that for 1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} H implantation fluence, only a few small dome-shaped blisters appear, for 3 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} H implantation fluence, large blisters as well as craters are formed, while for 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} H implantation fluence, no blisters can be observed. The strain evolution and platelet forming tendency are found to be relevant for the different blistering phenomenon. The weak blistering phenomenon for 1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} H implantation fluence may be attributed to less “free” H for the building up of internal pressure of platelets and the sustained growth of platelets. While the absence of blistering phenomenon for 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} H implantation fluence is likely due to the retarded relief of the decreased uniform compressive stress throughout the damage region.

  4. Influence of hydrogen fluence on surface blistering of H and He co-implanted Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiayun; Xue, Zhongying; Zhang, Miao; Wei, Xing; Wang, Gang; Di, Zengfeng

    2016-02-01

    The effect of hydrogen fluence on surface blistering of H and He co-implanted Ge is investigated using atom force microscope, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. With a fixed He, we find that for 1 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence, only a few small dome-shaped blisters appear, for 3 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence, large blisters as well as craters are formed, while for 5 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence, no blisters can be observed. The strain evolution and platelet forming tendency are found to be relevant for the different blistering phenomenon. The weak blistering phenomenon for 1 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence may be attributed to less "free" H for the building up of internal pressure of platelets and the sustained growth of platelets. While the absence of blistering phenomenon for 5 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence is likely due to the retarded relief of the decreased uniform compressive stress throughout the damage region.

  5. High resistivity and ultrafast carrier lifetime in argon implanted GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walukiewicz, W.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Jasinski, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Almonte, M.; Prasad, A.; Haller, E.E.; Weber, E.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Grenier, P.; Whitaker, J.F. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    1996-10-01

    We have investigated the optoelectronic and structural properties of GaAs that has been implanted with Ar ions and subsequently annealed. The material exhibits all the basic optical and electronic characteristics typically observed in nonstoichiometric, As implanted or low-temperature-grown GaAs. Annealing of Ar implanted GaAs at 600{degree}C produces a highly resistive material with a subpicosecond trapping lifetime for photoexcited carriers. Transmission electron microscopy shows that, instead of As precipitates, characteristic for the nonstoichiometeric GaAs, voids ranging in size from 3 to 5 nm are observed in Ar implanted and annealed GaAs. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Modification in surface properties of poly-allyl-diglycol-carbonate (CR-39 implanted by Au+ ions at different fluences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagheer Riffat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ion implantation has a potential to modify the surface properties and to produce thin conductive layers in insulating polymers. For this purpose, poly-allyl-diglycol-carbonate (CR-39 was implanted by 400 keV Au+ ions with ion fluences ranging from 5 × 1013 ions/cm2 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The chemical, morphological and optical properties of implanted CR-39 were analyzed using Raman, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The electrical conductivity of implanted samples was determined through four-point probe technique. Raman spectroscopy revealed the formation of carbonaceous structures in the implanted layer of CR-39. From FT-IR spectroscopy analysis, changes in functional groups of CR-39 after ion implantation were observed. AFM studies revealed that morphology and surface roughness of implanted samples depend on the fluence of Au ions. The optical band gap of implanted samples decreased from 3.15 eV (for pristine to 1.05 eV (for sample implanted at 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The electrical conductivity was observed to increase with the ion fluence. It is suggested that due to an increase in ion fluence, the carbonaceous structures formed in the implanted region are responsible for the increase in electrical conductivity.

  7. Passive Q-switching of diode-pumped Yb:YAG microchip laser with ion-implanted GaAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonggang Wang(王勇刚); Xiaoyu Ma(马骁宇); Bin Zhong(钟斌); Desong Wang(王德松); Qiulin Zhang(张秋琳); Baohua Feng(冯宝华)

    2004-01-01

    We reported a passive Q-switched diode laser pumped Yb:YAG microchip laser with an ion-implanted semiinsulating GaAs wafer. The wafer was implanted with 400-kev As+ in the concentration of 1016 ions/cm2.To decrease the non-saturable loss, we annealed the ion-implanted GaAs at 500 ℃ for 5 minutes and coated both sides of the ion-implanted GaAs with antireflection (AR) and high reflection (HR) films,respectively. Using GaAs wafer as an absorber and an output coupler, we obtained 52-ns pulse duration of single pulse.

  8. Effect of fluence on the lattice site of implanted Er and implantation induced strain in GaN

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, U; Decoster, S; Vantomme, A; Correi, J G

    2009-01-01

    A GaN thin film was implanted with 5 × 1014 cm−2 of 60 keV stable 166Er, followed by the implantation of 2 × 1013 cm−2 radioactive 167Tm (t1/2 = 9.3 d) and an annealing sequence up to 900 °C. The emission channeling (EC) technique was applied to assess the lattice location of Er following the Tm decay from the conversion electrons emitted by 167mEr, which showed that more than 50% of 167mEr occupies substitutional Ga sites. The results are briefly compared to a 167mEr lattice location experiment in a GaN sample not pre-implanted with 166Er. In addition, high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) was used to characterize the perpendicular strain in the high-fluence implanted film. The HRXRD experiments showed that the Er implantation resulted in an increase of the c-axis lattice constant of the GaN film around 0.5–0.7%. The presence of significant disorder within the implanted region was corroborated by the fact that the EC patterns for off-normal directions exhibit a pronounced angular broadening of t...

  9. Effect of thermal annealing on optical properties of implanted GaAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulik, M; Komarov, FF; Maczka, D

    1999-01-01

    GaAs samples doped with indium atoms by ion implantation and thermal annealed were studied using a channelling method, Rutherford backscattering, and an ellipsometry. From these measurements it was observed that the layer implanted with 3 x 10(16) cm(-2) indium dose was totally damaged and its optic

  10. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy study of fluence dependence of paramagnetic relaxation in Mn/Fe implanted ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masenda, H.; Geburt, S.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Naidoo, D.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Mantovan, R.; Mølholt, T. E.; Ncube, M.; Shayestehaminzadeh, S.; Gislason, H. P.; Langouche, G.; Ólafsson, S.; Ronning, C.

    2016-12-01

    Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy following the implantation of radioactive precursor isotope 57Mn+ ( T 1/2= 1.5 min) into ZnO single crystals at ISOLDE/CERN shows that a large fraction of 57Fe atoms produced in the 57Mn beta decay is created as paramagnetic Fe3+ with relatively long spin-lattice relaxation times. Here we report on ZnO pre-implanted with 56Fe to fluences of 2×1013, 5×10 13 and 8 × 1013 ions/cm2 in order to investigate the dependence of the paramagnetic relaxation rate of Fe3+ on fluence. The spectra are dominated by magnetic features displaying paramagnetic relaxation effects. The extracted spin-lattice relaxation rates show a slight increase with increasing ion fluence at corresponding temperatures and the area fraction of Fe3+ at room temperature reaches a maximum contribution of 80(3)% in the studied fluence range.

  11. Characterization of device isolation in GaAs MESFET circuits by boron implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauwaert, F.; Van Daele, P.; Lagasse, P.

    1987-03-01

    The use of boron implantation for the electrical isolation of MESFET's and other electronic components in GaAs high speed digital IC's has been investigated. The sheet isolation resistance was measured as a function of the implantation energy and dose and of the anneal temperature and time. Topics considered include fabrication, integrated circuits, electric conductivity, annealing, transistors, ion implantation, and digital systems.

  12. Capacitance-voltage characteristics of GaAs ion-implanted structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Privalov E. N.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A noniterative numerical method is proposed to calculate the barrier capacitance of GaAs ion-implanted structures as a function of the Schottky barrier bias. The features of the low- and high-frequency capacitance-voltage characteristics of these structures which are due to the presence of deep traps are elucidated.

  13. Photoluminescence of pulsed ruby laser annealed crystalline and ion implanted GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Feldman, B. J.

    1981-11-01

    In an effort to understand the origin of effects earlier found to be present in p-n junctions formed by pulsed laser annealing (PLA) of ion implanted semiconducting GaAs, photoluminescence (PL) studies were carried out. PL spectra have been obtained at 4K, 77K and 300K, for both n- and p-type GaAs, for laser energy densities 0 equal to or less than E/sub 1/ equal to or less than 0.6 J/sq cm. It is found that PLA of c-GaAs alters the PL spectrum and decreases the PL intensity, corresponding to an increase in density of non-radiative recombination centers with increasing E/sub 1/. The variation of PL intensity with E/sub 1/ is found to be different for n- and p-type material. No PL is observed from high dose (1 or 5 x 10 to the 15th power ions/sq cm) Si- or Zn- implanted GaAs, either before or after laser annealing. The results suggest that the ion implantation step is primarily responsible for formation of defects associated with the loss of radiative recombination, with pulsed annealing contributing only secondarily.

  14. Charge and fluence lifetime measurements of a dc high voltage GaAs photogun at high average current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Grames, R. Suleiman, P.A. Adderley, J. Clark, J. Hansknecht, D. Machie, M. Poelker, M.L. Stutzman

    2011-04-01

    GaAs-based dc high voltage photoguns used at accelerators with extensive user programs must exhibit long photocathode operating lifetime. Achieving this goal represents a significant challenge for proposed high average current facilities that must operate at tens of milliamperes or more. This paper describes techniques to maintain good vacuum while delivering beam, and techniques that minimize the ill effects of ion bombardment, the dominant mechanism that reduces photocathode yield of a GaAs-based dc high voltage photogun. Experimental results presented here demonstrate enhanced lifetime at high beam currents by: (a) operating with the drive laser beam positioned away from the electrostatic center of the photocathode, (b) limiting the photocathode active area to eliminate photoemission from regions of the photocathode that do not support efficient beam delivery, (c) using a large drive laser beam to distribute ion damage over a larger area, and (d) by applying a relatively low bias voltage to the anode to repel ions created within the downstream beam line. A combination of these techniques provided the best total charge extracted lifetimes in excess of 1000 C at dc beam currents up to 9.5 mA, using green light illumination of bulk GaAs inside a 100 kV photogun.

  15. Removal of ion-implanted photoresists on GaAs using two organic solvents in sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Eunseok; Na, Jihoon; Lee, Seunghyo; Lim, Sangwoo, E-mail: swlim@yonsei.ac.kr

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Two-step photoresist removal process using two organic solvents was developed. • Photoresist on trench patterned GaAs was removed by two-step sequence. • Acetonitrile with dimethyl sulfoxide removed implanted photoresists at 30 °C. • Affinity and permeability of solvent through photoresist determine photoresist removal. - Abstract: Organic solvents can effectively remove photoresists on III–V channels without damage or etching of the channel material during the process. In this study, a two-step sequential photoresist removal process using two different organic solvents was developed to remove implanted ArF and KrF photoresists at room temperature. The effects of organic solvents with either low molar volumes or high affinities for photoresists were evaluated to find a proper combination that can effectively remove high-dose implanted photoresists without damaging GaAs surfaces. The performance of formamide, acetonitrile, nitromethane, and monoethanolamine for the removal of ion-implanted ArF and KrF photoresists were compared using a two-step sequential photoresist removal process followed by treatment in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Among the various combinations, the acetonitrile + DMSO two-step sequence exhibited the best removal of photoresists that underwent ion implantation at doses of 5 × 10{sup 13}–5 × 10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2} on both flat and trench-structured GaAs surfaces. The ability of the two-step process using organic solvents to remove the photoresists can be explained by considering the affinities of solvents for a polymer and its permeability through the photoresist.

  16. Implantation and diffusion of $^{73}$As in GaAs and GaP

    CERN Document Server

    Bösker, G; Stolwijk, N A; Mehrer, H; Burchard, A

    2000-01-01

    Self-diffusion on the As sublattice in intrinsic GaAs and foreign- atom diffusion on the P sublattice in intrinsic GaP were investigated in a direct way by As tracer diffusion measurements using the radioisotope /sup 73/As. For this purpose /sup 73/As was implanted in both materials at the ISOLDE facility of CERN. Then diffusion annealings were performed followed by serial sectioning and counting of the radioactivity in each section. The resulting profiles were simulated within a computer model which accounts for the observed loss of tracer to the diffusion ambient. The so-obtained diffusion coefficients for As in GaAs and GaP are compared with existing diffusivities in these compounds. (25 refs).

  17. The effect of incremental gamma-ray doses and incremental neutron fluences upon the performance of self-biased sup 1 sup 0 B-coated high-purity epitaxial GaAs thermal neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gersch, H K; Simpson, P A

    2002-01-01

    High-purity epitaxial GaAs sup 1 sup 0 B-coated thermal neutron detectors advantageously operate at room temperature without externally applied voltage. Sample detectors were systematically irradiated at fixed grid locations near the core of a 2 MW research reactor to determine their operational neutron dose threshold. Reactor pool locations were assigned so that fast and thermal neutron fluxes to the devices were similar. Neutron fluences ranged between 10 sup 1 sup 1 and 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2. GaAs detectors were exposed to exponential fluences of base ten. Ten detector designs were irradiated and studied, differentiated between p-i-n diodes and Schottky barrier diodes. The irradiated sup 1 sup 0 B-coated detectors were tested for neutron detection sensitivity in a thermalized neutron beam. Little damage was observed for detectors irradiated at neutron fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 2 n/cm sup 2 and below, but signals noticeably degraded at fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 3 n/cm sup 2. Catastrophic damage was appare...

  18. Evolution of arsenic in high fluence plasma immersion ion implanted silicon : Behavior of the as-implanted surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vishwanath, V.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Vanzetti, L.; Koh, A. L.; Steinhauser, G.; Pepponi, G.; Bersani, M.; Meirer, F.; Foad, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    High fluence (>1015 ions/cm2) low-energy (3 + on (1 0 0) silicon was investigated, with the focus on stability and retention of the dopant. At this dose, a thin (∼3 nm) amorphous layer forms at the surface, which contains about 45% arsenic (As) in a silicon and oxygen matrix. The presence of silicon

  19. Evolution of arsenic in high fluence plasma immersion ion implanted silicon : Behavior of the as-implanted surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vishwanath, V.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Vanzetti, L.; Koh, A. L.; Steinhauser, G.; Pepponi, G.; Bersani, M.; Meirer, F.; Foad, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    High fluence (>1015 ions/cm2) low-energy (3 + on (1 0 0) silicon was investigated, with the focus on stability and retention of the dopant. At this dose, a thin (∼3 nm) amorphous layer forms at the surface, which contains about 45% arsenic (As) in a silicon and oxygen matrix. The presence of silicon

  20. High-efficiency ion-implanted lo-hi-lo GaAs IMPATT diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozler, C.O.; Donnelly, J.P.; Murphy, R.A.; Laton, R.W.; Sudbury, R.W.; Lindley, W.T.

    1976-07-15

    A dc-to-rf conversion efficiency of 37% combined with an output power of 3.4 W at 3.3 GHz has been obtained from a Schottky-barrier GaAs IMPATT diode having a lo-hi-lo profile. The donor spike or clump was produced by implanting silicon into an epitaxial layer with a n-type concentration of 1.65 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/. Pyrolytic Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ was used to encapsulate the GaAs during the postimplantation anneal. For these devices, the Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ deposition procedure was found to be critical and had to be optimizied to achieve reproducible results. The devices have had very uniform electrical characteristics, and a large yield of devices with greater than 30% efficiency has been obtained. These results indicate that implantation can be used to produce lo-hi-lo IMPATT's with significantly higher device yields than have been obtained by epitaxial techniques. (AIP)

  1. Influence of ion-implanted profiles on the performance of GaAs MESFET's and MMIC amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlidis, D.; Cazaux, J.L.; Graffeuil, J.

    1988-04-01

    The RF small-signal performance of GaAs MESFET's and MMIC amplifiers as a function of various ion-implanted profiles is theoretically and experimentally investigated. Implantation energy, dose, and recess depth influence are theoretically analyzed with the help of a specially developed device simulator. The performance of MMIC amplifiers processed with various energies, doses, recess depths, and bias conditions is discussed and compared to experimental characteristics. Some criteria are finally proposed for the choice of implantation conditions and process in order to optimize the characteristics of ion-implanted FET's and to realize process-tolerant MMIC amplifiers.

  2. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  3. Ab-initio study of the electronic structure of sup 1 sup 9 F implanted in GaAs and GaN crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Park, J H; Cho, H S; Shin, Y N

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the nuclear quadrupole interaction of a fluorine atom implanted in gallium arsenide and gallium nitride cluster models using the ab-initio Hartree-Fock theory. For the three possible fluorine sites in GaAs and GaN, we have determined the location of the implanted fluorine atom by using a self-consistent calculation, the electric field gradient at the implanted atom, and the electronic structure. Good agreement is found with experimental data wherever they are available. Predictions are made for the implanted fluorine site associated with the total energy and the electric field gradient which are expected to be measurable by a variety of experimental techniques.

  4. Dose-rate effects in GaAs investigated by discrete pulsed implantation using a focused ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musil, C.R.; Melngailis, J.; Etchin, S. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Haynes, T.E. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The dependence of the retained lattice damage upon dose rate was investigated by focused ion beam (FIB) implantation of 210 keV Si{sup ++} into GaAs at room temperature. The as-implanted and postannealed states were characterized by ion channeling and Hall-effect measurements, respectively. Dose-rate effects arise from stabilizing interactions between populations of defects produced by different ions, and these experiments were designed to probe the time constants of those interactions. In the context of dose-rate experiments, direct-write FIB represents a much more controllable means of implantation over conventional broad beams since the exact timing of dose delivery may be precisely defined and varied. In this work, the final implanted dose was achieved by the successive application of individual flux pulses of constant intensity but of varying duration {ital t}{sub {ital d}} and repetition period {ital t}{sub {ital r}}. A consistent trend toward a greater concentration of displaced atoms directly after implantation and a higher sheet resistance after annealing was observed for longer {ital t}{sub {ital d}} and for shorter {ital t}{sub {ital r}}. This effect did not manifest itself simply in terms of the average current density, {ital J}{sub avg}{proportional_to}{ital t}{sub {ital d}}/{ital t}{sub {ital r}}. Furthermore, it was observed on all time scales accessible in this experiment, suggesting that the important self-annealing mechanisms have a wide range of time constants, from less than 1 {mu}s to more than 1 s. A heterogeneous model of damage nucleation is discussed whereby the defect track of an individual ion event self-anneals until it is overlapped by a following event. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. High-Energy Ion Implantation for Multigigabit-Rate GaAs Integrated Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    energy implant experiments was built by High Voltage Engineering Corp.* and was originally designed to produce proton beams at 3 MeV and ^I mA. The...resonant interaction occurs between the lithium target and the proton beam at 1.88 MeV which produces detectable neutrons . The machine .s calibrated by... Epitherm which is a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a second harmonic generator. The laser pulse width is 100 ns, repetition rate is 7 kHz, and beam spot size

  6. Optical and electrical studies of arsenic-implanted HgCdTe films grown with molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs and Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhnin, I. I.; Voitsekhovsky, A. V.; Korotaev, A. G.; Fitsych, O. I.; Bonchyk, A. Yu.; Savytskyy, H. V.; Mynbaev, K. D.; Varavin, V. S.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Yakushev, M. V.; Jakiela, R.

    2017-03-01

    A defect study was performed on arsenic-implanted Hg1-xCdxTe (x = 0.23-0.30) films with graded-gap surface layers, grown with molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs and Si substrates and designed for fabrication of 'p+-n'-type photodiodes. First, formation of n+-p structure was investigated in p-type material, in order to study radiation-induced donor defects. Next, formation of p+-n structure was investigated in the course of implantation in n-type material and arsenic activation annealing. Influence of the graded-gap surface layer was found to be expressed in the degree of saturation of the concentration of radiation-induced defects, with results obtained on arsenic- and boron-implanted material differing due to the difference in the ion masses.

  7. Synthesis of GaNxAs1-x thin films by pulsed laser melting andrapid thermal annealing (PLM-RTA) of N+-implanted GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Scarpulla, M.A.; Dubon, O.D.; Wu, J.; Jasinski, J.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Beeman, J.W.; Pillai, M.R.; Aziz, M.J.

    2003-03-11

    We present a systematic investigation on the formation of the highly mismatched alloy GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} using N{sup +}-implantation followed by a combination of pulsed laser melting and rapid thermal annealing. Thin films of GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} with x as high as 0.016 and an activation efficiency of the implanted N up to 50% have been synthesized with structural and optical properties comparable to films grown by epitaxial deposition techniques with similar substitutional N content. The effects of N{sup +} implantation dose, laser energy fluence and rapid thermal annealing temperature on the N incorporation as well as optical and structural properties of the GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} films are discussed.

  8. The effect of Be/+/ ion implanted exponential and uniform impurity profiles on the electrical characteristics of GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, K. V.; Walker, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    The high surface recombination velocity is the major deterrent to obtaining efficient GaAs solar cells. If, however, an electric field is built in at the surface, the carriers will be swept away from the surface thus minimizing the surface recombination velocity problem. It has been previously shown theoretically that an exponential impurity distribution in the doped region of the cell results in a built-in electric field. Ion implantation was used to produce solar cells with an exponential impurity profile and cells with uniform profiles. It is shown that cells with an exponential impurity profile have higher open-circuit voltage, fill factors, and spectral response than those with a uniform impurity profile.

  9. Linearity of photoconductive GaAs detectors to pulsed electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, L.H.

    1995-12-31

    The response of neutron damaged GaAs photoconductor detectors to intense, fast (50 psec fwhm) pulses of 16 MeV electrons has been measured. Detectors made from neutron damaged GaAs are known to have reduced gain, but significantly improved bandwidth. An empirical relationship between the observed signal and the incident electron fluence has been determined.

  10. Shift in room-temperature photoluminescence of low-fluence Si+-implanted SiO2 films subjected to rapid thermal annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yue Fu, Jen-Hwan Tsai, Cheng-Fu Yang and Chih-Hsiung Liao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally demonstrate the effect of the rapid thermal annealing (RTA in nitrogen flow on photoluminescence (PL of SiO2 films implanted by different doses of Si+ ions. Room-temperature PL from 400-nm-thick SiO2 films implanted to a dose of 3×1016 cm−2 shifted from 2.1 to 1.7 eV upon increasing RTA temperature (950–1150 °C and duration (5–20 s. The reported approach of implanting silicon into SiO2 films followed by RTA may be effective for tuning Si-based photonic devices.

  11. EXAFS characterization of amorphous GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgway, M.C.; Glover, C.J. [Australia National Univ., Canberra (Australia); Foran, G.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai (Australia); Yu, K.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1998-12-31

    The structural parameters of stoichiometric, amorphous GaAs have been determined with extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements performed in transmission mode at 10 K. Amorphous GaAs samples were fabricated with a combination of epitaxial growth, ion implantation and selective chemical etching. Relative to a crystalline sample, the nearest-neighbor bond length and Debye-Waller factor both increased for amorphous material. In contrast, the coordination numbers about both Ga and As atoms in the amorphous phase decreased to {approximately} 3.85 atoms from the crystalline value of four. All structural parameters were independent of implantation conditions and as a consequence, were considered representative of intrinsic, amorphous GaAs as opposed to an implantation-induced extrinsic structure.

  12. High slope efficiency and low threshold in a laser-diode-pumped passively Q-switched ion-implanted Nd:YVO4 planar waveguide laser with GaAs saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, G. L.; Li, G. Q.; Zhao, S. Z.; Li, T.; Yang, K. J.; Li, X.

    2011-11-01

    A passively Q-switched waveguide laser, to our knowledge, has been firstly demonstrated in Nd: YVO4 crystal formed by 3 MeV Si+ ion implantation at a dose of 1 × 1015 ions/cm2 at room temperature, in which GaAs was used as saturable absorber. The dependences of the average output power, pulse width, pulse repetition rate on absorbed pump power have been measured at different output plane mirror transmissions. At an absorbed pump power of 78.8 mW and output transmission of 20%, the shortest pulse width of 3.88 ns was obtained, corresponding to the peak power and single pulse energy of 212 W and 0.82 μJ, respectively. The threshold pump power was as low as 40 mW, and the slope efficiency was about 64.5% when the absorbed pump power was lower than 70 mW.

  13. Passive Q-Switching in a Flash-Lamp Pumped Nd∶YAG Laser with Ion-Implanted GaAs Wafer%用离子注入GaAs晶片实现闪光灯泵浦Nd∶YAG激光器中的被动调Q

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勇刚; 李朝阳; 马骁宇; 张志刚

    2004-01-01

    A passive Q-switched flash-lamp-pumped Nd∶YAG laser with the ion-implanted semi-insulating GaAs wafer is reported.The wafer is implanted with 400keV As+ ions in the concentration of 1016cm-2.Using GaAs wafer as an absorber and an output coupler,62ns pulse duration of single pulse is obtained.%对半绝缘GaAs晶片进行As+注入,注入能量为400keV,剂量为1016cm-2.用这种注入条件下的GaAs晶片作为吸收体和输出镜,在被动调Q闪光灯泵浦的Nd∶YAG激光器上获得了62ns的单脉冲宽度.这是迄今为止国内最好的报道结果.

  14. Raman-scattering probe of anharmonic effects in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prabhat; Abbi, S. C.; Jain, K. P.

    1995-06-01

    A comparative study of anharmonic effects in various structural forms of GaAs, namely crystalline, disordered and ion-implanted, and pulse laser annealed (PLA), using temperature-dependent Raman scattering, is reported for various phonon modes over the temperature range 10-300 K. The disordered and PLA samples are found to have greater anharmonicity than crystalline GaAs. The localized vibrational mode in PLA GaAs shows shorter relaxation time than the LO-phonon mode.

  15. Improvement in GaAs Device Yield and Performance through Substrate Defect Gettering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    capsulated Czochralski (LEC) growth methods to reduce the residual donor level and, thereby, produce semi-insulating GaAs without the intentional addition...fold: First, to provide an assessment of the incorporation of B into GaAs grown by the liquid encapsulated Czochralski methods and, secondly, to...insulating GaAs wafers or direct ion implantation and annealing of bulk insulating substrates. The latter method would appear to be straight forward process

  16. Analysis of LED degradation; proton-bombarded GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooft, G.W. ' t; Opdorp, C. van (Philips Gloeilampenfabrieken N.V., Eindhoven (Netherlands). Forschungslaboratorium)

    1984-03-01

    An analysis is given of the degradation of light-emitting, Zn-diffused GaAs diodes after proton bombardment. Use is made of a generally applicable method by which the external bulk quantum efficiency and the injection efficiency of an LED can be determined separately. Owing to the increase of non-radiative recombination being larger in the bulk than in the space-charge region, the injection efficiency at constant current first starts to increase and then decreases as a function of irradiation fluence. Furthermore, it is shown that the apparent bulk quantum efficiency decreases superlinearly with the irradiation fluence. This is consistent with the theory for a linear-graded pn junction and the assumption that the concentration of additional killer centres is directly proportional to the irradiation fluence.

  17. Ion Implantation of Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    are discussed. Related to that, the effects of radiothermolysis, degassing and carbonisation are considered. Specificity of depth distributions of implanted into polymers impurities is analysed and the case of high-fluence implantation is emphasised. Within rather broad topic of ion bombardment, the focus...

  18. Outer space grown semi-insulating GaAs and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林兰英; 张绵; 钟兴儒; 陈诺夫; Masayoshi; Yamada

    1999-01-01

    GaAs single crystal has been grown in recoverable satellite. Hall measurements indicate that the GaAs shows semi-insulating behavior. The structural properties of the crystal have been improved obviously, and their uniformity has been improved as well. The stoichiometry and its distribution in space-grown GaAs are improved greatly compared with the GaAs single crystal grown terrestrially. The properties of integrated circuits made by direct ion-implantation on space-grown GaAs are better than those made on ground-grown materials. These results show that the stoichiometry in semi-insulating GaAs seriously affects the properties of related devices.

  19. Rate of F center formation in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar+ irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epie, E. N.; Wijesundera, D. N.; Tilakaratne, B. P.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.

    2016-03-01

    Ionoluminescence, optical absorption spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channelling (RBS-C) have been used to study the rate of F center formation with fluence in 170 keV Ar+ irradiated single crystals of α-Al2O3 (sapphire) at room temperature. Implantation fluences range between 1013 cm-2 and 5 ×1014 cm-2. F center density (NF) has been found to display an initial rapid linear increase with Ar+ fluence followed by saturation to a maximum value of 1.74 ×1015 cm-2. Experimental results show a 1-1 correlation between radiation damage in the oxygen sublattice and F center density. This suggest F center kinetics in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar irradiation is a direct consequence of dynamic competition between oxygen defect creation and recombination. An attempt has also been made to extend this discussion to F center kinetics in sapphire under swift heavy ion irradiation.

  20. A simple model of space radiation damage in GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Stith, J. J.; Stock, L. V.

    1983-01-01

    A simple model is derived for the radiation damage of shallow junction gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells. Reasonable agreement is found between the model and specific experimental studies of radiation effects with electron and proton beams. In particular, the extreme sensitivity of the cell to protons stopping near the cell junction is predicted by the model. The equivalent fluence concept is of questionable validity for monoenergetic proton beams. Angular factors are quite important in establishing the cell sensitivity to incident particle types and energies. A fluence of isotropic incidence 1 MeV electrons (assuming infinite backing) is equivalent to four times the fluence of normal incidence 1 MeV electrons. Spectral factors common to the space radiations are considered, and cover glass thickness required to minimize the initial damage for a typical cell configuration is calculated. Rough equivalence between the geosynchronous environment and an equivalent 1 MeV electron fluence (normal incidence) is established.

  1. Evaluation of pressure vessel fluence computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. H.; Whang, I. S.; Kim, T. G.; Lee, H. C. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, M. H.; Whang, H. R.; Park, W. S.; An, J. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Insitute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    This study was performed as follows: evaluation of neutron fluence calculational methodology through the analysis of benchmark problem, evaluation of calculational results of Yonggwang 3 and 4 reactor vessel fluence, examination of calculational results against the requirements by 10CFR 50.61 and/or standard review plan. The preservation of reactor vessel integrity throughout the reactor lifetime is directly related to the economical and safe operation of nuclear power plants. In this regard, it is very important to accurately predict and assess the neutron fluence which impacts directly upon the reactor vessel integrity. The accurate. prediction and assessment of the reactor vessel fluence require the use of accurate data as well as systematic methodology. However, it is felt that all of these prerequisites are not sufficient at the moment. It is, therefore, recommended to establish a systematic methodology with sufficient nuclear data library for the reliable licensing review of the reactor vessel safety, by performing R and D to resolve the problems presented in this study and by using the results of this study.

  2. Deuterium accumulation in tungsten at high fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibrov, Mikhail [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Balden, Martin; Matej, Matej [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bystrov, Kirill; Morgan, Thomas [FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    The data on the deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) at high fluences (≥ 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}) are scarce and the existing results are contradictory. Since retention in W is known to be flux-dependent, the laboratory experiments addressing this issue should be carried out in reactor-relevant conditions (high fluxes of low-energy ions). In this work the samples made of polycrystalline W were exposed to D plasmas in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI at temperatures ranging from 360 K to 1140 K to fluences in the range of 0.3-8.7 x 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}. It was observed that at exposure temperatures of 360 K and 580 K the D retention was only slightly dependent on the ion fluence. In addition, the presence of blister-like structures was found after the exposures, and their density and size distributions were also only weakly dependent on the fluence. In the case of exposure at 1140 K no surface modifications of the samples after plasma exposure were detected and the concentrations of retained D were very small. At all temperatures used the total amounts of retained D were smaller compared to those obtained by other researchers at lower ion flux densities, which indicates that the incident ion flux may play an important role in the total D retention in W.

  3. Calibration of a He accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-03-01

    The helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for a fast reactor dosimetry. The HAFM measurement system was calibrated using He gas and He implanted samples and the measurement accuracy was confirmed to be less than 5%. Based on the preliminary irradiation test in JOYO, the measured He in the {sup 10}B type HAFM agreed well with the calculated values using the JENDL-3.2 library. (author)

  4. Ion implantation induced blistering of rutile single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Bing-Xi [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Jiao, Yang [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Guan, Jing [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Wang, Lei [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2015-07-01

    The rutile single crystals were implanted by 200 keV He{sup +} ions with a series fluence and annealed at different temperatures to investigate the blistering behavior. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, optical microscope and X-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the implantation induced lattice damage and blistering. It was found that the blistering on rutile surface region can be realized by He{sup +} ion implantation with appropriate fluence and the following thermal annealing.

  5. Proton Particle Test Fluence: What's the Right Number?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    While we have been utilizing standard fluence levels such as those listed in the JESD57 document, we have begun revisiting what an appropriate test fluence is when it comes to qualifying a device for single events. Instead of a fixed fluence level or until a specific number of events occurs, a different thought process is required.

  6. H{sup −} ion implantation induced ten-fold increase of photoluminescence efficiency in single layer InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreekumar, R.; Mandal, A. [Centre for Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Chakrabarti, S., E-mail: subho@ee.iitb.ac.in [Centre for Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Gupta, S.K. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-09-15

    We demonstrate a ten-fold increase in photoluminescence (PL) efficiency from 50 keV H{sup −} ion-implanted InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) at a temperature of 8 K and/or 145 K. Enhancement occurred without post-annealing treatment. PL efficiency increased with increasing implantation fluence from 6×10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} up to an optimum value of 2.4×10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}, beyond which PL efficiency decreased drastically (up to a fluence of 2.4×10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}). Passivation of non-radiative recombination centres (due to direct interaction of H{sup −} ions with lattice defects) and de-excitation of photo-generated carriers to QDs through quantum mechanical tunnelling via H{sup −} ion-induced defects (e-traps) that are created near the QD–cap layer interface, resulted in PL efficiency enhancement. Shallow e-traps with activation energy ∼90 meV and 30 meV created near the conduction band of GaAs cap layer for the samples implanted with H{sup −} of fluence 6×10{sup 12} and 2.4×10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} respectively are identified using low temperature PL study. Contribution of de-trapped electrons from the e-traps to the QDs enhanced the PL efficiency at 145 K. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction study revealed that the structural damage created by H{sup −} ions at the high fluence level of 2.4×10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, caused the degradation in PL efficiency. - Highlights: • Self-assembled single layer InAs/GaAs quantum dots. • Low energy hydrogen ion implantation. • PL efficiency enhancement for implanted samples. • Eradication of defects from dots and capping layers.

  7. A detailed model for defect concentration and dopant activation in GaAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepak; N Lakshminarayana

    2001-04-01

    Defects in semi-insulating (SI) GaAs are especially critical in determining the properties of devices in which dopants are introduced by ion-implantation. The defects in GaAs are native to the material and their concentrations are subsequently modified after ion-implantation and annealing. In this work, we have extended the existing models in the literature by incorporating a large set of defects and using the most recent values for formation energies of these defects. The model includes eight types of point defects, the vacancy of Ga and As, their antisites and interstitials of Ga and As on both sub-lattices, along with carbon related defects always present in SI–GaAs. We have also included Si and related defects when this element is implanted as an -type dopant. All these defects are considered in several charge states allowed by their stability conditions. The model assumes thermodynamic equilibrium between the point defects at an anneal temperature. Then the GaAs wafer is quenched so that the number of defects remain the same as those at the anneal temperature, but redistribution of charges occurs in various charge states. We find that the defect concentrations are extremely sensitive to the crystal stoichiometry, and good agreement with experimental data is shown. However, when we calculate the dopant activation in implanted GaAs, the quantitative agreement with experiments is not adequate. This discrepancy is explained on the basis of available formation energies for the defects.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation method for calculating fluence-dependent range profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Peltola, J; Keinonen, J

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics has proven to be successful in calculating range profiles for low energy (keV) ions implanted into crystalline materials. However, for high fluences the structure of the material changes during the implantation process. The crystalline material becomes amorphized, which changes the range profiles. This damage build-up process has usually been taken into account with probabilities for changing the crystal structure during the simulation, and typically only BCA methods have been used. We present a fast MD method that simulates the damage build-up process in silicon, without bringing any free parameters to the simulation. Damage accumulation during the implantation is simulated by changing the material structure in front of path of the incoming ion. The amorphization level at each depth is proportional to the nuclear deposited energy in that depth region. The amorphization states are obtained from MD simulations of cascade damage. Silicon was used as a target material because of the large amou...

  9. Modeling charge collection efficiency degradation in partially depleted GaAs photodiodes using the 1- and 2-carrier Hecht equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auden, E.C., E-mail: eauden@sandia.gov; Vizkelethy, G.; Serkland, D.K.; Bossert, D.J.; Doyle, B.L.

    2017-05-15

    The Hecht equation can be used to model the nonlinear degradation of charge collection efficiency (CCE) in response to radiation-induced displacement damage in both fully and partially depleted GaAs photodiodes. CCE degradation is measured for laser-generated photocurrent as a function of fluence and bias in Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/GaAs/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As p-i-n photodiodes which have been irradiated with 12 MeV C and 7.5 MeV Si ions. CCE is observed to degrade more rapidly with fluence in partially depleted photodiodes than in fully depleted photodiodes. When the intrinsic GaAs layer is fully depleted, the 2-carrier Hecht equation describes CCE degradation as photogenerated electrons and holes recombine at defect sites created by radiation damage in the depletion region. If the GaAs layer is partially depleted, CCE degradation is more appropriately modeled as the sum of the 2-carrier Hecht equation applied to electrons and holes generated within the depletion region and the 1-carrier Hecht equation applied to minority carriers that diffuse from the field-free (non-depleted) region into the depletion region. Enhanced CCE degradation is attributed to holes that recombine within the field-free region of the partially depleted intrinsic GaAs layer before they can diffuse into the depletion region.

  10. Effect of high dose γ-ray irradiation on GaAs p-i-n photodetectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixit, V.K., E-mail: dixit@rrcat.gov.in; Khamari, Shailesh K.; Manwani, Sapna; Porwal, S.; Alexander, K.; Sharma, T.K.; Kher, S.; Oak, S.M.

    2015-06-11

    Metal organic vapor phase epitaxy grown GaAs p-i-n photodetector devices are fabricated and tested for the assessment of practical usage of the detector after the exposure to high radiation doses of γ-ray. Increased values of saturation current, ideality factor and leakage current after 360 kGy γ-ray irradiation confirm a substantial increase in the number of generation–recombination centers. It is further observed that the leakage current density, current per unit volume (J{sub v}), increases linearly with the radiation fluence (Φ). The slope (α=ΔJ{sub v}/ΔΦ) of the leakage current density versus γ-ray radiation fluences curve is two order less (4–5×10{sup −l9} A/cm) for GaAs compared to Si (4–6×10{sup −l7} A/cm). The lower value of α (radiation damage constant) confirms that GaAs is radiation harder than Si. Subsequently, it is also observed that the photo response of 360 kGy γ-ray irradiated GaAs device is reduced by ~50% due to the reduction of quantum efficiency by the radiation induced generation–recombination centers. The functionality of the irradiated sensor is verified by comparing the response of the pristine and irradiated detectors to the photoluminescence of semiconductor quantum well structures.

  11. Effect of high dose γ-ray irradiation on GaAs p-i-n photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, V. K.; Khamari, Shailesh K.; Manwani, Sapna; Porwal, S.; Alexander, K.; Sharma, T. K.; Kher, S.; Oak, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    Metal organic vapor phase epitaxy grown GaAs p-i-n photodetector devices are fabricated and tested for the assessment of practical usage of the detector after the exposure to high radiation doses of γ-ray. Increased values of saturation current, ideality factor and leakage current after 360 kGy γ-ray irradiation confirm a substantial increase in the number of generation-recombination centers. It is further observed that the leakage current density, current per unit volume (Jv), increases linearly with the radiation fluence (Φ). The slope (α=ΔJv/ΔΦ) of the leakage current density versus γ-ray radiation fluences curve is two order less (4-5×10-l9 A/cm) for GaAs compared to Si (4-6×10-l7 A/cm). The lower value of α (radiation damage constant) confirms that GaAs is radiation harder than Si. Subsequently, it is also observed that the photo response of 360 kGy γ-ray irradiated GaAs device is reduced by ~50% due to the reduction of quantum efficiency by the radiation induced generation-recombination centers. The functionality of the irradiated sensor is verified by comparing the response of the pristine and irradiated detectors to the photoluminescence of semiconductor quantum well structures.

  12. Velocity of chloroplast avoidance movement is fluence rate dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-06-01

    In Arabidopsis leaves, chloroplast movement is fluence rate dependent. At optimal, lower light fluences, chloroplasts accumulate at the cell surface to maximize photosynthetic potential. Under high fluence rates, chloroplasts avoid incident light to escape photodamage. In this paper, we examine the phenomenon of chloroplast avoidance movement in greater detail and demonstrate a proportional relationship between fluence rate and the velocity of chloroplast avoidance. In addition we show that the amount of light-activated phototropin2, the photoreceptor for the avoidance response, likely plays a role in this phenomenon, as heterozygous mutant plants show a reduced avoidance velocity compared to that of homozygous wild type plants.

  13. Positron annihilation study of defects in GaAs irradiated by fission neutron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuSheng-Yun; QianJia-Yu; 等

    1997-01-01

    The defects in Si-doped,N-type HB GaAs single crystal irradiated by En≥1 MeV fission neutrons(6.5×1015cm-2 and 1.4×1014cm-2)have been investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique.The mono-and di-vacancies were created by irradiation and the tri-vacancies were formed during annealing.The concentration of defects is proportional to the irradiating neutron fluence.Three annealing stages were obsered at 250,450 and 650℃ for the mono-,di-and tri-vacancies,respectively.

  14. Carrier dynamics of terahertz emission from low-temperature-grown gaas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongfeng; Qin, Jiayin

    2003-06-20

    Through theoretical modeling, we find that the dynamics of photogenerated carriers play a very important role in shaping the temporal waveform of terahertz (THz) radiation pulses emitted from biased low-temperature (LT-grown GaAs antenna. Our modeling gives successful analyses for the sharp and short, slow and long negative parts of temporal THz waveforms. By including intraband, carrier relaxation effect in the modeled mobility, we find an obvious dependence of the THz conversion efficiency on the material of THz emitter and experimental parameters such as the optical duration, the center wavelength, and the fluence of the laser pulses. Our research also shows that electron-hole and electron-electron collisions in LT-GaAs contribute to the saturation phenomenon with an increase of laser fluence.

  15. The influence of microscopic and macroscopic non-stoichiometry on interfacial planarity during the solid-phase epitaxial growth of amorphized GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belay, K.B.; Ridgway, M.C.; Llewellyn, D.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The influence of microscopic and macroscopic non-stoichiometry on the Solid-Phase Epitaxial Growth of GaAs has been studied. Ion implantation has been employed to produce microscopic non-stoichiometry via Ga and As implants and macroscopic non-stoichiometry via Ga or As implants. In-situ Time Resolved Reflectivity and Transmission Electron Microscopy and ex-situ Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Channeling have been used to investigate the regrowth of amorphized GaAs layers. As non-stoichiometry shifts from microscopic to macroscopic the interface loses its planar nature and subsequently gets rougher. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Particle fluence measurements by activation technique for radiation damage studies

    CERN Document Server

    León-Florián, E; Furetta, C; Leroy, Claude

    1995-01-01

    High-level radiation environment can produce radiation damage in detectors and their associate electronic components. The establishment of a correlation between damage, irradiation level and absorbed dose requires a precise measurement of the fluence of particles causing the damage. The activation technique is frequently used for performing particle fluence measurements. A review of this technique is presented.

  17. Photoluminescence in large fluence radiation irradiated space silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Osamu; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Tsukamoto, Kazuyoshi

    1997-03-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were carried out for silicon 50{mu}m BSFR space solar cells irradiated with 1MeV electrons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 16} e/cm{sup 2} and 10MeV protons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}. The results were compared with the previous result performed in a relative low fluence region, and the radiation-induced defects which cause anomalous degradation of the cell performance in such large fluence regions were discussed. As far as we know, this is the first report which presents the PL measurement results at 4.2K of the large fluence radiation irradiated silicon solar cells. (author)

  18. Surface modification of sapphire by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1998-11-01

    The range of microstructures and properties of sapphire (single crystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) that are produced by ion implantation are discussed with respect to the implantation parameters of ion species, fluence, irradiation temperature and the orientation of the ion beam relative to crystallographic axes. The microstructure of implanted sapphire may be crystalline with varying concentrations of defects or it may be amorphous perhaps with short-range order. At moderate to high fluences, implanted metallic ions often coalesce into pure metallic colloids and gas ions form bubbles. Many of the implanted microstructural features have been identified from studies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), optical spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering-channeling. The chemical, mechanical, and physical properties reflect the microstructures.

  19. Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps: the single map case

    CERN Document Server

    Craft, David

    2016-01-01

    In this first paper of a two-paper series, we present a method for optimizing the dynamic delivery of fluence maps in radiation therapy. For a given fluence map and a given delivery time, the optimization of the leaf trajectories of a multi-leaf collimator to approximately form the given fluence map is a non-convex optimization problem. Its general solution has not been addressed in the literature, despite the fact that dynamic delivery of fluence maps has long been a common approach to intensity modulated radiation therapy. We model the leaf trajectory and dose rate optimization as a non-convex continuous optimization problem and solve it by an interior point method from randomly initialized feasible starting solutions. We demonstrate the method on a fluence map from a prostate case and a larger fluence map from a head-and-neck case. While useful for static beam IMRT delivery, our main motivation for this work is the extension to the case of sequential fluence map delivery, i.e. the case of VMAT, which is th...

  20. Accuracy of helium accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    A helium (He) accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for fast reactor dosimetry. In order to evaluate the measurement accuracy of neutron fluence by the HAFM method, the HAFMs of enriched boron (B) and beryllium (Be) were irradiated in the Fast Neutron Source Reactor `YAYOI`. The number of He atoms produced in the HAFMs were measured and compared with the calculated values. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that the neutron fluence could be measured within 5 % by the HAFM method, and that met the required accuracy for fast reactor dosimetry. (author)

  1. Light parameters influence cell viability in antifungal photodynamic therapy in a fluence and rate fluence-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prates, Renato A.; da Silva, Eriques G.; Yamada, Aécio M.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Paula, Claudete R.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of light parameters on yeast cells. It has been proposed for many years that photodynamic therapy (PDT) can inactivate microbial cells. A number of photosensitizer and light sources were reported in different light parameters and in a range of dye concentrations. However, much more knowledge concerning the importance of fluence, fluence rate and exposure time are required for a better understanding of the photodynamic efficiency. Suspensions (106 CFU/mL) of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii were used. Two fluence rates, 100 and 300 mW/cm2 were compared at 3, 6, and 9 min of irradiation, resulting fluences from 18 to 162 J/cm2. The light source was a laser emitting at λ = 660 nm with output power adjusted at 30 and 90 mW. As photosensitizer, one hundred-μM methylene blue was used. Temperature was monitored to verify possible heat effect and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was evaluated. The same fluence in different fluence rates showed dissimilar levels of inactivation on yeast cells as well as in ROS formation. In addition, the increase of the fluence rate showed an improvement on cell photoinactivation. PDT was efficient against yeast cells (6 log reduction), and no significant temperature increase was observed. Fluence per se should not be used as an isolate parameter to compare photoinactivation effects on yeast cells. The higher fluence rate was more effective than the lower one. Furthermore, an adequate duration of light exposure cannot be discarded.

  2. Undoped semi-insulating LEC GaAs - A model and a mechanism. [Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J. R.; Fairman, R. D.; Chen, R. T.; Yu, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Undoped semi-insulating GaAs grown by the high-pressure liquid encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) method has been produced for use in direct ion implantation in several laboratories. A clear understanding of the factors controlling impurity transport and compensation in these materials has been lacking to date. In this work, detailed characterization has been performed on undoped semi-insulating crystals grown from both SiO2 and PBN crucibles followed by a proposed impurity model and compensation mechanism.

  3. Boron implantation effects on Au:GaAs Schottky barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, A.; Roura, P.; Esteve, J.; Altelarrea, H.; Anton, J.A.; Cornet, A.; Morante, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    In this work, we analyse the use of boron implantation in order to change the barrier height of GaAs Schottky contacts. The dependence on the annealing temperature and implantation dose of the barrier height variation, as well as of the diode quality factor are also reported. In both cases, the observed behaviour is related to the presence of defects created by implantation in the surface layer, and their annealing kinetics.

  4. Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Breast Implants Breast Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Breast implants are medical devices that are implanted under the ...

  5. Solid phase epitaxial regrowth of (100)GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almonte, Marlene Isabel [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1996-02-01

    This thesis showed that low temperature (250°C) SPE of stoichiometrically balanced ion implanted GaAs layers can yield good epitaxial recovery for doses near the amorphization threshold. For 250°C anneals, most of the regrowth occurred in the first 10 min. HRTEM revealed much lower stacking fault density in the co-implanted sample than in the As-only and Ga-only samples with comparable doses. After low temp annealing, the nonstoichiometric samples had a large number of residual defects. For higher dose implants, very high temperatures (700°C) were needed to remove residual defects for all samples. The stoichiometrically balanced layer did not regrow better than the Ga-only and As-only samples. The co-implanted sample exhibited a thinner amorphous layer and a room temperature (RT) annealing effect. The amorphous layer regrew about 5 nm, suggesting that stoichiometrically balanced amorphous layers can regrow even at RT. Mechanisms for solid phase crystallization in (100)GasAs is discussed: nucleation and growth of randomly oriented crystallites and SPE. These two mechanisms compete in compound semiconductors at much lower temperatures than in Si. For the low dose As-only and Ga-only samples with low-temp anneals, both mechanisms are active. For this amorphization threshold dose, crystallites remain in the amorphous layer for all as-implants. 250°C annealing showed recrystallization from the surface and bulk for these samples; for the co-implant, the mechanism is not evident.

  6. Effects of COOH+ ion implantation on hemocompatibility of polypropylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Dejun(李德军); NIU; Lifang(牛丽芳)

    2002-01-01

    Carboxyl ion (COOH+) implantation was performed at 50 keV with different fluences for polypropylene. Hemocompatibility tests show that blood coagulation time and recalcification time of polypropylene were enhanced significantly with the increasing fluence. At the same time, the human endothelial cells grown on the surface of the implanted samples exhibited normal cellular growth and morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle analysis showed that COOH+ ion implantation rearranges chemical bonds and produces some new polar O-containing groups on the surface. The formation of polar functional groups, together with increase of roughness, induced an increase in hydrophilicity, which in turn improved the surface hemocompatibility of polypropylene.

  7. Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWatters, Bruce Ray (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

  8. Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Fay Hannon, Marcy Stutzman, V. Shutthanandan, Z. Zhu, M. Nandasri, S. V. Kuchibhatla, S. Thevuthasan, W. P. Hess

    2012-06-01

    Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Photocathode quantum efficiency (QE) degradation is due to residual gasses in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but shows evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

  9. Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shutthanandan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power free electron lasers (FEL. Photocathode quantum efficiency degradation is due to residual gases in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include helium ion microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS, atomic force microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS. In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but show evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements, the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

  10. Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Fay Hannon, Marcy Stutzman, V. Shutthanandan, Z. Zhu, M. Nandasri, S. V. Kuchibhatla, S. Thevuthasan, W. P. Hess

    2012-06-01

    Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Photocathode quantum efficiency (QE) degradation is due to residual gasses in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but shows evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

  11. Multiple Applications of GaAs semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Jenrené; Wonka, Willy

    2003-03-01

    The object of this discussion will be to explore the many facets of Gallium Arsenide(GaAs) semiconductors. The session will begin with a brief overview of the basic properties of semiconductors in general(band gap, doping, charge mobility etc.). It will then follow with a closer look at the properties of GaAs and how these properties could potentially translate into some very exciting applications. Furthermore, current applications of GaAs semiconductors will be dicussed and analyzed. Finally, physical limits and advantages/disadvantages of GaAs will be considered.

  12. ION BEAM AND SIMS ANALYSIS ON DAMAGE OF GaAs DOPED WITH N+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小山; 姬成周; 等

    1994-01-01

    The Rutherford backscattering (RBS) spectra of N+-implanted GaAs are measured with a He+ ion beam of 2.1MeV.The backscatteering yield along aligned incidence increases with the increase in implanted doses.The depth profiles of nitrogen and arsenic are measured by secondary ion mass spectrometer(SIMS).The diffusion of nitrogen in the implanted layers is explained as interstitial migration.The damage is very severe during the ion implantation.and it can be recovered partly by annealing.The two-step annealing improves the effect obviously.The calculation on distribution of damage shows that the recovery is proceeded from the inner side to the surface during the annealing.The mechanism of damage is discussed briefly.

  13. Krypton ion implantation effect on selenium nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Suresh; Chauhan, R. P.

    2017-08-01

    Among the rapidly progressing interdisciplinary areas of physics, chemistry, material science etc. ion induced modifications of materials is one such evolving field. It has been realized in recent years that a material, in the form of an accelerated ion beam, embedded into a target specimen offers a most productive tool for transforming its properties in a controlled manner. In semiconductors particularly, where the transport behavior is determined by very small concentrations of certain impurities, implantation of ions may bring considerable changes. The present work is based on the study of the effect of krypton ion implantation on selenium nanowires. Selenium nanowires of diameter 80 nm were synthesized by template assisted electro deposition technique. Implantation of krypton ions was done at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi, India. The effect of implantation on structural, electrical and optical properties of selenium nanowires was investigated. XRD analysis of pristine and implanted nanowires shows no shifting in the peak position but there is a variation in the relative intensity with fluence. UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the decrease in the optical band gap with fluence. PL spectra showed emission peak at higher wavelength. A substantial rise in the current was observed from I-V measurements, after implantation and with the increase in fluence. The increase in current conduction may be due to the increase in the current carriers.

  14. Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps for IMRT and VMAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvert, Marleen; Craft, David

    2017-02-01

    In this article we provide a method to generate the trade-off between delivery time and fluence map matching quality for dynamically delivered fluence maps. At the heart of our method lies a mathematical programming model that, for a given duration of delivery, optimizes leaf trajectories and dose rates such that the desired fluence map is reproduced as well as possible. We begin with the single fluence map case and then generalize the model and the solution technique to the delivery of sequential fluence maps. The resulting large-scale, non-convex optimization problem was solved using a heuristic approach. We test our method using a prostate case and a head and neck case, and present the resulting trade-off curves. Analysis of the leaf trajectories reveals that short time plans have larger leaf openings in general than longer delivery time plans. Our method allows one to explore the continuum of possibilities between coarse, large segment plans characteristic of direct aperture approaches and narrow field plans produced by sliding window approaches. Exposing this trade-off will allow for an informed choice between plan quality and solution time. Further research is required to speed up the optimization process to make this method clinically implementable.

  15. Biodegradable radioactive implants for glaucoma filtering surgery produced by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, W. [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: walter.assmann@lmu.de; Schubert, M. [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Held, A. [Augenklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Munich (Germany); Pichler, A. [Augenklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Muenchen (Germany); Chill, A. [Zentralinstitut fuer Medizintechnik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kiermaier, S. [Zentralinstitut fuer Medizintechnik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schloesser, K. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Busch, H. [NTTF GmbH, 53619 Rheinbreitbach (Germany); Schenk, K. [NTTF GmbH, 53619 Rheinbreitbach (Germany); Streufert, D. [Acri.Tec GmbH, 16761 Hennigsdorf (Germany); Lanzl, I. [Augenklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    A biodegradable, {beta}-emitting implant has been developed and successfully tested which prevents fresh intraocular pressure increase after glaucoma filtering surgery. Ion implantation has been used to load the polymeric implants with the {beta}-emitter {sup 32}P. The influence of ion implantation and gamma sterilisation on degradation and {sup 32}P-fixation behavior has been studied by ion beam and chemical analysis. Irradiation effects due to the applied ion fluence (10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) and gamma dose (25 kGy) are found to be tolerable.

  16. Nanostructures on GaAs surfaces due to 60 keV Ar{sup +}-ion beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, V., E-mail: vinay.venu@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Division of Physics, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Chennai Campus, Chennai 600 048 (India); Garg, Sandeep Kumar; Basu, Tanmoy [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Sinha, Om Prakash [Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Amity University, Noida 201 303 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-Univeristy Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Delhi 110 067 (India); Bhattacharyya, S.R. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Som, T. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)

    2012-02-15

    The effect of 60 keV Ar{sup +}-ion beam sputtering on the surface topography of p-type GaAs(1 0 0) was investigated by varying angle of incidence of the ion (060 Degree-Sign ) with respect to substrate normal and the ion fluence (2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}) at an ion flux of 3.75 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}-s. For normal incidence and at a fluence of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}, holes and islands are observed with the former having an average size and density of 31 nm and 4.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} holes/cm{sup 2}, respectively. For 30 Degree-Sign and 45 Degree-Sign off-normal incidence, in general, a smooth surface appears which is unaffected by increase of fluence. At 60 Degree-Sign off-normal incidence dots are observed while for the highest fluence of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2} early stage of ripple formation along with dots is observed with amplitude of 4 nm. The applicability and limitations of the existing theories of ion induced pattern formation to account for the observed surface topographies are discussed.

  17. Direct measurement of fluence rate in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Rusina, Tatyana V.; Denisov, Nikolay A.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Steiner, Rudolf W.; Rozumenko, Vladimir D.

    1996-01-01

    Fluence rate was measured in normal and cancerous (glioma) human brain samples using a multichannel detector. Detector consisted of 8 isotrope fiber probes positioned around the central irradiating probe. Detecting probes were displaced one from other at a step 0.5 mm along the central irradiating fiber. Bare ends of detecting fibers were coupled with photodiode array. He-Ne (633 nm) or Nd:YAG (1064 nm) lasers were coupled with irradiating probe. Fluence rate was measured in each of 8 points in the depth range 5 mm. Measured mean penetration depths of 633 nm light were 0.70 mm, 0.50 mm and 0.40 mm for white matter, grey matter and glioma, respectively. For Nd:YAG laser, penetration depth was about 2.3 mm for normal tissue and glioma. Multichannel computerized detector allows to provide a small invasive real-time measurements of fluence rate in different tissues.

  18. Cathodoluminescence Characterization of Ion Implanted GaAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    occurs from 0.1 ev below the band edge to the band edge. While they did not make measurements below 77’K, Biard, in a private communication to Vilms...coefficient and K,, is tile valli’ for k that corresponds to X(KMD) = D. In order to remove variations in tile experiental data from point to point the...Phys. 40, 3745 (1969). 20. Private communication from Y. S. Park following reference (17). 21. U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 58, 544 (1940). 22. W. van

  19. Penile Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the discussion with your doctor. Types of penile implants There are two main types of penile implants: ... might help reduce the risk of infection. Comparing implant types When choosing which type of penile implant ...

  20. Nickel Foil as Transmutation Detector for Neutron Fluence Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupák, Vít; Viererbl, Ladislav; Lahodová, Zdena; Šoltés, Jaroslav; Tomandl, Ivo; Kudějová, Petra

    2016-02-01

    Activation detectors are very often used for determination of the neutron fluence in reactor dosimetry. However, there are few disadvantages concerning these detectors; it is the demand of the knowledge of the irradiation history and a loss of information due to a radioactive decay in time. Transmutation detectors TMD could be a solution in this case. The transmutation detectors are materials in which stable or long-lived nuclides are produced by nuclear reactions with neutrons. From a measurement of concentration of these nuclides, neutron fluence can be evaluated regardless of the cooling time.

  1. Nickel Foil as Transmutation Detector for Neutron Fluence Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klupák Vít

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation detectors are very often used for determination of the neutron fluence in reactor dosimetry. However, there are few disadvantages concerning these detectors; it is the demand of the knowledge of the irradiation history and a loss of information due to a radioactive decay in time. Transmutation detectors TMD could be a solution in this case. The transmutation detectors are materials in which stable or long-lived nuclides are produced by nuclear reactions with neutrons. From a measurement of concentration of these nuclides, neutron fluence can be evaluated regardless of the cooling time.

  2. Formation of oriented nickel aggregates in rutile single crystals by Ni implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, M.M., E-mail: mmcruz@fc.ul.pt [CFMC, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Dep. Física, Fac. Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Silva, R.C. da [IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); CFNUL, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Pinto, J.V. [CFMC, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); CFNUL, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Borges, R.P. [CFMC, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Franco, N. [IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); CFNUL, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Casaca, A. [CFMC, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa—ISEL, R. Cons. Emídio Navarro 1, 1959-007 Lisboa (Portugal); Alves, E. [IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); CFNUL, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Godinho, M. [CFMC, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Dep. Física, Fac. Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-08-15

    The magnetic and electrical properties of Ni implanted single crystalline TiO{sub 2} rutile were studied for nominal implanted fluences between 0.5×10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} and 2.0×10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} with 150 keV energy, corresponding to maximum atomic concentrations between 9 at% and 27 at% at 65 nm depth, in order to study the formation of metallic oriented aggregates. The results indicate that the as implanted crystals exhibit superparamagnetic behavior for the two higher fluences, which is attributed to the formation of nanosized nickel clusters with an average size related with the implanted concentration, while only paramagnetic behavior is observed for the lowest fluence. Annealing at 1073 K induces the aggregation of the implanted nickel and enhances the magnetization in all samples. The associated anisotropic behavior indicates preferred orientations of the nickel aggregates in the rutile lattice consistent with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry—channelling results. Electrical conductivity displays anisotropic behavior but no magnetoresistive effects were detected. - Author-Highlights: • Ni nano-aggregates were grown on TiO{sub 2} using Ni implantation with different fluences. • In the as implanted state, the aggregates size is a function of the implanted fluence. • Ni aggregates are oriented within the rutile structure-2 orientations are proposed.

  3. Deuterium implantation into tungsten at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Balden, Martin; Schmid, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    To study the interaction of hydrogen isotopes with tungsten many experiments are conducted in linear plasma devices, which provide high enough hydrogen fluxes to supersaturate the tungsten sample and create defects such as blister. Here an alternative approach is presented. Instead of achieving a high deuterium concentration via high flux exposure, the sample temperature is reduced and the implantation energy of deuterium into tungsten is increased. The lower temperature associated with a reduction in diffusivity as well as the deeper implantation of deuterium lead to an increase of deuterium concentration within the implantation zone. Deuterium is stepwise implanted into polycrystalline tungsten up to a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 22} D/m{sup 2} with an energy of 3.0 keV/D at a sample temperature of 134 K. The retained deuterium is measured in-situ by nuclear reaction analysis. For low fluence approximately 100 % of the implanted deuterium is retained, while for higher fluence the retention saturates. Close to the surface deuterium concentrations up to 64 % are reached. This leads to massive grain orientation dependent blistering with blister sizes between 100-1000 nm at depths between 30-150 nm. Besides the characterization of the blisters their influence on deuterium transport is studied.

  4. Fluxes and fluences of SEP events derived from SOLPENCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aran, A. [Dept. d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Univ. de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Sanahuja, B. [Dept. d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Univ. de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); CER d' Astrofisica, Fisica de Particules i Cosmologia, Unitat Associada al CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Lario, D. [Applied Physics Lab., The Johns Hopkins Univ., MD (United States)

    2005-07-01

    We have developed (Aran et al., 2004) a tool for rapid predictions of proton flux and fluence profiles observed during gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events and upstream of the associated traveling interplanetary shocks. This code, named SOLPENCO (for SOLar Particle ENgineering COde), contains a data base with a large set of interplanetary scenarios under which SEP events develop. These scenarios are basically defined by the solar longitude of the parent solar activity, ranging from E76 to W90, and by the position of the observer, located at 0.4 AU or at 1.0 AU, from the Sun. We are now analyzing the performance and reliability of SOLPENCO. We address here two features of SEP events especially relevant to space weather purposes: the peak flux and the fluence. We analyze how the peak flux and the fluence of the synthetic profiles generated by SOLPENCO vary as a function of the strength of the CME-driven shock, the heliolongitude of the solar parent activity and the particle energy considered. In particular, we comment on the dependence of the fluence on the radial distance of the observer (which does not follow an inverse square law) and we draw conclusions about the influence of the sock as a particle accelerator in terms of its evolving strength and the heliolongitude of the solar site where the SEP event originated. (orig.)

  5. Thermal desorption of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markin, A.V.; Chernikov, V.N.; Zakharov, A.P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    By means of TDS measurements it is shown that the desorption of deuterium from Be implanted with 5 keV D ions to fluences, {Phi}, from 1x10{sup 20} D/m{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 21} D/m{sup 2} proceeds in one high temperature stage B, while at {Phi} {ge} 1.2x10{sup 21}D/m{sup 2} one more stage A is added. The desorption maximum A is narrow and consists of two peaks A{sub 1} and A{sub 2} at about 460 K and 490 K, respectively. Peak A{sub 1} is attributed to the desorption of deuterium from the walls of opened channels formed under D ion implantation. Peak {sub A}2 is a consequence of the opening of a part of closed bubbles/channels to the outer surface. The position of maximum B shifts noticeably and nonsteadily on the fluence in a range from 850 to 1050 K. The origin of this maximum is the liberation of D atoms bound at vacancy complexes discussed previously by Wampler. The dependence of Tm(B) on the fluence is governed by the interaction of freely migrating D atoms with partly opened or fully closed gas cavity arrangements which are created under temperature ramping, but differently in specimens implanted with D ions to different fluences.

  6. Raman scattering in silicon disordered by gold ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrentiev, Vasily; Vacik, Jiri; Vosecek, Vaclav [NS Lab, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Rez-130, Husinec 250 68 (Czech Republic); Vorlicek, Vladimir [Institute of Physics AS CR, Na Slovance 2, Prague 182 21 (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Si (111) covered by a 250-nm thick SiO{sub 2} surface layer has been disordered through implantation of 3.035 MeV gold ions within broad range of fluences from 1 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} to 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Raman spectroscopy (514.5 nm laser) was applied for characterization of the silicon disordering. Variation of the Raman spectra of silicon after low-fluence implantation (fluences lower than 5 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) in the vicinity of the transverse optical phonon (1TO) peak reflects the coexistence of bulk Si crystals (c-Si) and Si nanocrystals (nc-Si) in the implanted layer. Implantation with higher fluences yields only the stable 470 cm{sup -1} 1TO peak, corresponding to formation of amorphous phase (a-Si), in this region of the spectra. Detailed analysis of the silicon disorder was performed through calculation of the transverse acoustical phonon (1TA) peak area. The fluence dependence of the peak area reveals qualitative correlation with the depth profile of structural defects in the modified Si layer evaluated from RBS (Rutherford backscattering) experiment and from SRIM (stopping and range of ions in matter) code simulation. This correlation suggests a decrease of the structural disorder in the modified layer region enriched by vacancies. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Dependence of implantation sequence on surface blistering characteristics due to H and He ions co-implanted in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, J.H. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hsieh, H.Y.; Wu, C.W. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, C.M. [Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-12-15

    This study investigated surface blistering characteristics due to H and He ions co-implanted in silicon at room temperature. The H and He ion energies were 40 and 50 keV, respectively, so that their depth profiles were similar. The total implantation fluence for the H and He ions was 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} under various fluence fractions in the H ions. The implantation sequences under investigation were He + H and H + He. Dynamic optical microscopy (DOM) was employed in order to dynamically analyze surface blistering characteristics. This study used DOM data to construct so-called time–temperature–transformation (T–T–T) curves to easily predict blistering and crater transformation at specific annealing times and temperatures. The results revealed that the curves of blister initialization, crater initialization, and crater completion in the He + H implant occurred at a lower annealing temperature but with a longer annealing time compared to those in the H + He implant. Furthermore, the threshold annealing temperatures for blister and crater formation in the He + H implant were lower than they were in the H + He implant. The size distributions of the blisters and craters in the He + H implant extended wider than those in the H + He implant. In addition, the He + H implant exhibited larger blisters and craters compared to the ones in the H + He implant. Since the former has a higher percentage of exfoliation area than the latter, it is regarded as the more optimal implantation sequence.

  8. Fluence compensated photoacoustic tomography in small animals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Altaf; Pool, Martin; Daoudi, Khalid; de Vries, Liesbeth G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-03-01

    Light fluence inside turbid media can be experimentally mapped by measuring ultrasonically modulated light (Acousto-optics). To demonstrate the feasibility of fluence corrected Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, we have realized a tri-modality (i.e. photoacoustic, acousto-optic and ultrasound) tomographic small animal imaging system. Wherein PA imaging provides high resolution map of absorbed optical energy density, Acousto-optics yields the fluence distribution map in the corresponding PA imaging plane and Ultrasound provides morphological information. Further, normalization of the PA image with the acousto-optically measured fluence map results in an image that directly represents the optical absorption. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is commonly found overexpressed in human cancers, among which breast cancers, resulting in a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Identification of HER2-expression is clinically relevant, because cancers overexpressing this marker are amenable to HER2-directed therapies, among which antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Here, we investigate the feasibility and advantage of acousto-optically assisted fluence compensated PA imaging over PA imaging alone in visualizing and quantifying HER2 expression. For this experiment, nude mice were xenografted with human breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474 (both HER2 overexpressing), as well as HER2-negative MDA-MB-231. To visualize HER2 expression in these mice, HER2 monoclonal antibody pertuzumab (Perjeta®, Roche), was conjugated to near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW (800CW, LICOR Biosciences) at a ratio of 1∶2 antibody to 800CW. When xenograft tumors measured ≥ 100 mm3, mice received 100 µg 800CW-pertuzumab intravenously. Three days post injection, mice were scanned for fluorescence signal with an IVIS scanner. After fluorescence scans, mice were euthanized and imaged in our PA tomographic imaging system.

  9. Tailoring broadband light trapping of GaAs and Si substrates by self-organised nanopatterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martella, C.; Chiappe, D.; Mennucci, C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy)

    2014-05-21

    We report on the formation of high aspect ratio anisotropic nanopatterns on crystalline GaAs (100) and Si (100) substrates exploiting defocused Ion Beam Sputtering assisted by a sacrificial self-organised Au stencil mask. The tailored optical properties of the substrates are characterised in terms of total reflectivity and haze by means of integrating sphere measurements as a function of the morphological modification at increasing ion fluence. Refractive index grading from sub-wavelength surface features induces polarisation dependent anti-reflection behaviour in the visible-near infrared (VIS-NIR) range, while light scattering at off-specular angles from larger structures leads to very high values of the haze functions in reflection. The results, obtained for an important class of technologically relevant materials, are appealing in view of photovoltaic and photonic applications aiming at photon harvesting in ultrathin crystalline solar cells.

  10. Rethinking the Concepts of Fluence (UV Dose) and Fluence Rate: The Importance of Photon-based Units - A Systemic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, James R; Mayor-Smith, Ian; Linden, Karl G

    2015-11-01

    After a critical review of the fundamental equations describing photobiological and photochemical processes occurring in a medium exposed to a quasi-collimated monochromatic UV light beam, the analysis in this review is extended to analogous processes driven by polychromatic UV light, such as that emitted by medium pressure mercury-vapor arc lamps. The analysis is based on the Second Law of Photochemistry, namely that all photochemical events must be independent, and the rate of such events must be proportional to the rate of photon absorption. A consistent application of the Second Law of Photochemistry leads to a concept change; hence it is proposed herein to use photon fluence and photon fluence rate, rather than fluence (UV dose) and fluence rate, respectively, in the analysis and interpretation of photobiological and photochemical processes. As a consequence, many equations that have been used in the past must be revised, and some experimental information (e.g. action spectra) needs to be re-analyzed. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  11. Conductivity kinetics and conductivity levels of ion implanted poly(paraphenylene) pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Huee, C. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Moreau, C. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Moliton, A. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Guille, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Froyer, G. (Lab OCM, CNET, 22 Lannion (France))

    1993-04-19

    We have studied the kinetics of the dc conductivity [sigma][sub dc] of PPP pellets after ion implantation versus implantation parameters (size of ions, current density, fluence). The main process occurs during the vacuum - open air transition: the higher the implantation parameters are, the larger the [sigma][sub dc] decrease is. Finally, the conductivity level is all the higher as the implanted ion is heavy. (orig.)

  12. Study of surface exfoliation on 6H-SiC induced by H2+ implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Li, B. S.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of lattice damage generated by the H2+-implantation on exfoliation efficiency in 6H-SiC wafers is investigated. 6H-SiC wafers were implanted with 134 keV H2+ ions to ion fluences from 1.5×1016 to 5×1016 H2+ cm-2 and subsequently annealed at temperatures from 973 K to 1373 K. The samples were studied by a combination of optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Only after 1373 K annealing for 15 min, blisters and exfoliation occur on the H2+-implanted sample surface. With increasing the implantation fluences from 1.5×1016 to 3.75×1016 H2+ cm-2, the exfoliation mean size decreases, while the exfoliation density increases. For the highest fluence of 5×1016 H2+ cm-2, seldom exfoliations occur on the sample surface. Microstructure analysis shows that exfoliation efficiency is largely controlled by the H2+-implantation-induced lattice damage. The depth of the microcrack is related to the implantation fluence. The effect of implantation fluence on dislocation loops, platelet nucleation and growth is investigated.

  13. Epitaxial lift-off GaAs solar cell from a reusable GaAs substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geelen, A. van [Nijmegen Univ. (Netherlands). Res. Inst. for Mater.; Hageman, P.R. [Nijmegen Univ. (Netherlands). Res. Inst. for Mater.; Bauhuis, G.J. [Nijmegen Univ. (Netherlands). Res. Inst. for Mater.; Rijsingen, P.C. van [Nijmegen Univ. (Netherlands). Res. Inst. for Mater.; Schmidt, P. [Nijmegen Univ. (Netherlands). Res. Inst. for Mater.; Giling, L.J. [Nijmegen Univ. (Netherlands). Res. Inst. for Mater.

    1997-03-01

    Modifications to the existing epitaxial lift-off (ELO) method are described, which enable lift-off of large area devices (like solar cells). With the modified ELO method crack-free III-V films were obtained, up to 2 inch, in diameter and 1-6 {mu}m thick. For the first time epitaxial lift-off GaAs solar cells were made which contained an etch sensitive Al{sub 0.85}Ga{sub 0.15}As window layer. An energy conversion efficiency of 9.9% (AM1.5Gx1) was measured for the ELO GaAs cells. Compared to the thick GaAs reference cell, ELO cells still suffer from a low fill factor due to series and shunt resistances. Current GaAs ELO cells represent a power to weight ratio of 200 W kg{sup -1}. Because of the high selectivity of the ELO method, GaAs substrates remain unaffected after ELO. Reuse of a GaAs substrate after ELO was investigated in order to reduce the cost of III-V solar cell modules. With a simple cleaning procedure, GaAs substrates could be used at least four times without degradation of the minority carrier lifetime or carrier mobility of the grown epilayers. (orig.)

  14. Ion implantation of Cd and Ag into AlN and GaN

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, Sérgio M C; Correia, João Guilherme; Vianden, Reiner; Johnston, Karl; Alves, Eduardo; Lorenz, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    GaN and AlN thin films were implanted with cadmium (Cd) or silver (Ag), to fluences ranging from 1×1013 to 1.7 × 1015 at/cm$^{2}$. The implanted samples were annealed at 950 ºC under flowing nitrogen. While implantation damage could be fully removed for the lowest fluences, for higher fluences the crystal quality was only partially recovered. For the high fluence samples the lattice site location of the ions was studied by Rutherford Backscattering/ channelling (RBS/C). Cd ions are found to be incorporated in substitutional cation sites (Al or Ga) while Ag is slightly displaced from this position. To further investigate the incorporation sites, Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) measurements were performed and the electric field gradients at the site of the probe nuclei were determined.

  15. Effect of Fe ion implantation on tribological properties and Raman spectra characteristics of diamond-like carbon film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Wen-Bao; SUN Zhuo

    2004-01-01

    Fe ions in the fluence range of 2 × 1015 to 1×1017 cm -2 were implanted into diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film of 100 nm thick, which were deposited on silicon substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.Effects of Fe ion implantation on microstructure and friction coefficient of the DLC were studied. With increasing Fe ion fluence, friction coefficient of the DLC film increased as compared with that of DLC without implantation, and then decreased. The Raman spectra characteristics also show a dependence on the Fe ion fluence. With increasing the ion fluence, the sp2 bonding increased in the DLC film, resulting in the decrease of friction coefficient of the film after implantation. Substantial surface roughness was also measured.

  16. Compensator models for fluence field modulated computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolac, Steven [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Jaffray, David [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Fluence field modulated computed tomography (FFMCT) presents a novel approach for acquiring CT images, whereby a patient model guides dynamically changing fluence patterns in an attempt to achieve task-based, user-prescribed, regional variations in image quality, while also controlling dose to the patient. This work aims to compare the relative effectiveness of FFMCT applied to different thoracic imaging tasks (routine diagnostic CT, lung cancer screening, and cardiac CT) when the modulator is subject to limiting constraints, such as might be present in realistic implementations.Methods: An image quality plan was defined for a simulated anthropomorphic chest slice, including regions of high and low image quality, for each of the thoracic imaging tasks. Modulated fluence patterns were generated using a simulated annealing optimization script, which attempts to achieve the image quality plan under a global dosimetric constraint. Optimization was repeated under different types of modulation constraints (e.g., fixed or gantry angle dependent patterns, continuous or comprised of discrete apertures) with the most limiting case being a fixed conventional bowtie filter. For each thoracic imaging task, an image quality map (IQM{sub sd}) representing the regionally varying standard deviation is predicted for each modulation method and compared to the prescribed image quality plan as well as against results from uniform fluence fields. Relative integral dose measures were also compared.Results: Each IQM{sub sd} resulting from FFMCT showed improved agreement with planned objectives compared to those from uniform fluence fields for all cases. Dynamically changing modulation patterns yielded better uniformity, improved image quality, and lower dose compared to fixed filter patterns with optimized tube current. For the latter fixed filter cases, the optimal choice of tube current modulation was found to depend heavily on the task. Average integral dose reduction compared

  17. Effect of GaAs native oxide upon the surface morphology during GaAs MBE growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, O. A.; Solodovnik, M. S.; Balakirev, S. V.; Mikhaylin, I. A.; Eremenko, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The GaAs native oxide effect upon the surface morphology of the GaAs epitaxial layer was studied with taking into account the main growth parameters of MBE technology: substrate temperature, effective As4/Ga flux ratio and growth rate. The MBE modes of atomically smooth and rough surfaces and surfaces with Ga droplet array formation were determined. The possibility of the obtaining of GaAs nanowires via GaAs native oxide layer was shown.

  18. Carbon doping of GaAs NWs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh Einabad, Omid

    Nanowires (NWs) have been proposed and demonstrated as the building blocks for nanoscale electronic and photonic devices such as NW field effect transistors and NW solar cells which rely on doping and trap-free carrier transport. Controlled doping of NWs and a high degree of structure and morphology control are required for device applications. However, doping of III-V nanowires such as GaAs nanowires has not been reported extensively in the literature. Carbon is a well known p-type dopant in planar GaAs due to its low diffusivity and high solubility in bulk GaAs; however its use as an intentional dopant in NW growth has not yet been investigated. In this work we studied the carbon doping of GaAs nanowires using CBr4 as the dopant source. Gold nanoparticles (NP) at the tip ofthe NWs have been used to drive the NW growth. We show that carbon doping suppresses the migration ofthe gold NPs from the tip of the NWs. In addition, we show that the carbon doping of GaAs NWs is accompanied by an increase of the axial growth rate and decrease of the lateral growth rate ofthe NWs. Carbon-doped GaAs NWs, unlike the undoped ones which are highly tapered, are rod-like. The origin of the observed morphological changes is attributed to the carbon adsorbates on the sidewalls ofthe nanowires which suppress the lateral growth of the nanowires and increase the diffusion length of the gallium adatoms on the sidewalls. Stacking fault formation consisting of alternating regIOns of zincblende and wurtzite structures has been commonly observed in NWs grown along the (111) direction. In this work, based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, we show that carbon doping ofGaAs NWs eliminates the stacking fault formation. Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the effects of carbon doping on the vibrational properties of the carbon-doped GaAs nanowires. Carbon doping shows a strong impact on the intrinsic longitudinal and transverse optical (La and TO) modes of the GaAs

  19. XPS investigation of ion beam induced conversion of GaAs(0 0 1) surface into GaN overlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Praveen [Surface Physics and Nanostructure Group, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India); Kumar, Mahesh; Govind [Surface Physics and Nanostructure Group, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Mehta, B.R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India); Shivaprasad, S.M., E-mail: smsprasad@jncasr.ac.in [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, International Center for Material Science and Chemistry and Physics Materials Unit, Jakkur, 560064 Bangalore, Karnataka (India)

    2009-10-30

    For the advance of GaN based optoelectronic devices, one of the major barriers has been the high defect density in GaN thin films, due to lattice parameter and thermal expansion incompatibility with conventional substrates. Of late, efforts are focused in fine tuning epitaxial growth and in search for a low temperature method of forming low defect GaN with zincblende structure, by a method compatible to the molecular beam epitaxy process. In principle, to grow zincblende GaN the substrate should have four-fold symmetry and thus zincblende GaN has been prepared on several substrates including Si, 3C-SiC, GaP, MgO, and on GaAs(0 0 1). The iso-structure and a common shared element make the epitaxial growth of GaN on GaAs(0 0 1) feasible and useful. In this study ion-induced conversion of GaAs(0 0 1) surface into GaN at room temperature is optimized. At the outset a Ga-rich surface is formed by Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. Nitrogen ion bombardment of the Ga-rich GaAs surface is performed by using 2-4 keV energy and fluence ranging from 3 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} to 1 x 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. Formation of surface GaN is manifested as chemical shift. In situ core level and true secondary electron emission spectra by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are monitored to observe the chemical and electronic property changes. Using XPS line shape analysis by deconvolution into chemical state, we report that 3 keV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions and 7.2 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} are the optimal energy and fluence, respectively, for the nitridation of GaAs(0 0 1) surface at room temperature. The measurement of electron emission of the interface shows the dependence of work function to the chemical composition of the interface. Depth profile study by using Ar{sup +} ion sputtering, shows that a stoichiometric GaN of 1 nm thickness forms on the surface. This, room temperature and molecular beam epitaxy compatible, method of forming GaN temperature can serve as an excellent template for

  20. Accurate on line measurements of low fluences of charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, L.; Czelusniak, C.; Taccetti, F.; Carraresi, L.; Castelli, L.; Fedi, M. E.; Giuntini, L.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Sottili, L.; Taccetti, N.

    2015-03-01

    Ion beams supplied by the 3MV Tandem accelerator of LABEC laboratory (INFN-Firenze), have been used to study the feasibility of irradiating materials with ion fluences reproducible to about 1%. Test measurements have been made with 7.5 MeV 7Li2+ beams of different intensities. The fluence control is based on counting ions contained in short bursts generated by chopping the continuous beam with an electrostatic deflector followed by a couple of adjustable slits. Ions are counted by means of a micro-channel plate (MCP) detecting the electrons emitted from a thin layer of Al inserted along the beam path in between the pulse defining slits and the target. Calibration of the MCP electron detector is obtained by comparison with the response of a Si detector.

  1. Retention and release mechanisms of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberkofler, M.; Reinelt, M.; Linsmeier, Ch.

    2011-06-01

    The fraction of deuterium (D) that is retained upon irradiation of beryllium (Be) as well as the temperatures at which implanted D is released are of importance for the international fusion experiment ITER, where Be will be used as an armor material. The influence of single parameters on retention and release is investigated in laboratory experiments performed under well defined conditions with the aim to identify dominant underlying mechanisms and thus be able to predict the behavior of the Be wall in ITER. Recent progress in the quantification of retained fractions and release temperatures as well as in the understanding of the governing mechanisms is presented. The retained fraction upon implantation of D at 1 keV into Be(1 1 2¯ 0) to fluences far below the saturation threshold of 10 21 m -2 is almost 95%, the remaining 5% being attributed to reflection at the surface. At these low fluences, no dependence of the retained fractions on implantation energy is observed. At fluences of the order of 10 21 m -2 and higher, saturation of the irradiated material affects the retention, leading to lower retained fractions. Furthermore, at these fluences the retained fractions decrease with decreasing implantation energies. Differences in the retained fractions from implanted Be(1 1 2¯ 0) and polycrystalline Be are explained by anisotropic diffusion of interstitials during implantation, leading to an amount of surviving D-trap complexes that depends on surface-orientation. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) spectra are recorded after implantation of fluences of the order of 10 19 m -2 at various energies and simulated by means of a newly developed code based on coupled reaction-diffusion systems (CRDS). The asymmetric shape of the TPD peaks is reproduced by introducing a local D accumulation process into the model.

  2. Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps: the VMAT case

    CERN Document Server

    Balvert, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    In this article we provide a method to generate the trade-off between delivery time and fluence map matching quality for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the heart of our method lies a mathematical programming model that, for a given duration of delivery, optimizes leaf trajectories and dose rates such that the desired fluence map is reproduced as well as possible. This model was presented for the single map case in a companion paper (Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps: the single map case). The resulting large-scale, non-convex optimization problem was solved using a heuristic approach. The single-map approach cannot directly be applied to the full arc case due to the large increase in model size, the issue of allocating delivery times to each of the arc segments, and the fact that the ending leaf positions for one map will be the starting leaf positions for the next map. In this article the method proposed in \\cite{dm1} is extended to solve the full map treatment planning problem. We test ...

  4. Correlating Fast Fluence to dpa in Atypical Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drury Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage to a nuclear reactor's materials by high-energy neutrons causes changes in the ductility and fracture toughness of the materials. The reactor vessel and its associated piping's ability to withstand stress without brittle fracture are paramount to safety. Theoretically, the material damage is directly related to the displacements per atom (dpa via the residual defects from induced displacements. However in practice, the material damage is based on a correlation to the high-energy (E > 1.0 MeV neutron fluence. While the correlated approach is applicable when the material in question has experienced the same neutron spectrum as test specimens which were the basis of the correlation, this approach is not generically acceptable. Using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes, the energy dependent neutron flux is determined throughout the reactor structures and the reactor vessel. Results from the models provide the dpa response in addition to the high-energy neutron flux. Ratios of dpa to fast fluence are calculated throughout the models. The comparisons show a constant ratio in the areas of historical concern and thus the validity of the correlated approach to these areas. In regions above and below the fuel however, the flux spectrum has changed significantly. The correlated relationship of material damage to fluence is not valid in these regions without adjustment. An adjustment mechanism is proposed.

  5. A novel fluence map optimization model incorporating leaf sequencing constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Renchao; Min, Zhifang; Song, Enmin; Liu, Hong; Ye, Yinyu

    2010-02-21

    A novel fluence map optimization model incorporating leaf sequencing constraints is proposed to overcome the drawbacks of the current objective inside smoothing models. Instead of adding a smoothing item to the objective function, we add the total number of monitor unit (TNMU) requirement directly to the constraints which serves as an important factor to balance the fluence map optimization and leaf sequencing optimization process at the same time. Consequently, we formulate the fluence map optimization models for the trailing (left) leaf synchronized, leading (right) leaf synchronized and the interleaf motion constrained non-synchronized leaf sweeping schemes, respectively. In those schemes, the leaves are all swept unidirectionally from left to right. Each of those models is turned into a linear constrained quadratic programming model which can be solved effectively by the interior point method. Those new models are evaluated with two publicly available clinical treatment datasets including a head-neck case and a prostate case. As shown by the empirical results, our models perform much better in comparison with two recently emerged smoothing models (the total variance smoothing model and the quadratic smoothing model). For all three leaf sweeping schemes, our objective dose deviation functions increase much slower than those in the above two smoothing models with respect to the decreasing of the TNMU. While keeping plans in the similar conformity level, our new models gain much better performance on reducing TNMU.

  6. Performances of epitaxial GaAs p/i/n structures for X-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, G C; Haguet, V; Pesant, J C; Montagne, J P; Lenoir, M; Bourgoin, J C

    2002-01-01

    We have realized 150 mu mx150 mu m pixels using ion implantation followed by photolithography, metallic contact evaporation and chemical etching on about 200 mu m thick GaAs epitaxial layers. These layers were grown on n sup + and p sup + substrates by an already described Chemical Reaction technique, which is economical, non-polluting and can attain growth rates of several microns per minute. The mesa p sup + /i/n sup + pixel were characterized using current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements. The charge collection efficiency was evaluated by photoconductivity measurements under typical conditions of standard radiological examinations.

  7. Fluence and fluence rate effects on electrical conductivity and shrinkage in polyimide bombarded by an ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigaud, T. [LEPOFI, Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France); Moliton, J.P. [LEPOFI, Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France); Jussiaux, C. [LEPOFI, Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France); Maziere, B. [LEPOFI, Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France)

    1996-02-01

    When the ion fluence is increasing, a diminishing of the thickness and a rise in electrical conductivity can be simultaneously observed with polyimide films. However, in the 100 keV energy range, a saturation limit appears in both processes. Two experimental processes are presented to increase the conductivity limit ({approx_equal}10{sup -1} S cm{sup -1} with N{sup +} ions), while the shrinkage effect is maintained or even reduced. (1) Multiple irradiations of N{sup +} ions implemented from high to low energies induce tenfold increase in conductivity, and stop the thickness decrease beyond a fluence threshold. (2) Liquid-metal ion sources (LMIS) with Ga{sup +} ions (keV) perform high conductivities (above 300 S cm{sup -1}) without notable shrinkage. (orig.).

  8. Stoichiometric titanium dioxide ion implantation in AISI 304 stainless steel for corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, A.; Decker, M.; Klein, O.; Karl, H.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of highly chemically inert titanium dioxide synthesized by ion beam implantation for corrosion protection of AISI 304 stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. More specifically, the prevention of galvanic corrosion between carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) and AISI 304 was investigated. Corrosion performance of TiO2 implanted AISI 304 - examined for different implantation and annealing parameters - is strongly influenced by implantation fluence. Experimental results show that a fluence of 5 × 1016 cm-2 (Ti+) and 1 × 1017 cm-2 (O+) is sufficient to prevent pitting corrosion significantly, while galvanic corrosion with CFRP can already be noticeably reduced by an implantation fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 (Ti+) and 1 × 1016 cm-2 (O+). Surface roughness, implantation energy and annealing at 200 °C and 400 °C show only little influence on the corrosion behavior. TEM analysis indicates the existence of stoichiometric TiO2 inside the steel matrix for medium fluences and the formation of a separated metal oxide layer for high fluences.

  9. Si diffusion in GaAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Murugan; R Pothiraj; S D D Roy; K Ramachandran

    2002-08-01

    Theoretical studies are carried out to ascertain the dominant mechanism of Si diffusion in GaAs. Lattice dynamical model calculations have shown that the most probable diffusion mechanism is through a single vacancy even though several experiments cannot fix the mechanism as substitutional, substitutional–interstitial pair or neutral defect pair.

  10. GaAs optoelectronic neuron arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven; Grot, Annette; Luo, Jiafu; Psaltis, Demetri

    1993-01-01

    A simple optoelectronic circuit integrated monolithically in GaAs to implement sigmoidal neuron responses is presented. The circuit integrates a light-emitting diode with one or two transistors and one or two photodetectors. The design considerations for building arrays with densities of up to 10,000/sq cm are discussed.

  11. Gigant Eesti Gaas razdajot seti / Artur Tooman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tooman, Artur, 1971-

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Gaas sõlmis firmadega, mis on aastate jooksul ehitanud kümneid kilomeetreid gaasitrasse, tähtajatud lepingud. Nüüd on viieteistkümnel firmal gaasijagamise litsents. Majandus- ja kommunikatsiooniministeeriumi kavandatavatest muutustest gaasi müümisel ja transportimisel. Kaart

  12. Distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, J.; Kirsten, T.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of solar wind implanted noble gases in lunar samples depends on implantation energy, fluence, diffusion, radiation damage and erosion. It is known that at least the lighter rare gases are fractionated after implantation, but the redistribution processes, which mainly drive the losses, are not well understood. Some information about this one can get by looking at the concentration profiles of solar wind implanted He-4 measured by the Gas Ion Probe in single lunar grains. The observed profiles were divided in three groups. These groups are illustrated and briefly discussed.

  13. Defect formation and thermal evolution in H and O co-implanted Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhuo, E-mail: wangzhuo@tute.edu.cn [School of Science, Tianjin University of Technology and Education, Tianjin 300222 (China); Wang, Jun; Liu, Changlong [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2014-11-15

    190 keV O and 40 keV H ions with different fluences were sequentially implanted into crystalline Si at room temperature. The surface damage and defect microstructures after subsequent annealing have been studied by optical microscopy (OM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). The formation of surface damage depends strongly on both the H implant fluence and annealing temperature. After 400 °C annealing, surface blistering was first observed on Si co-implanted with O and H ions both at a relative high fluence, while no surface damage was observed on H-only implanted Si. Further annealing led to serious surface damage, such as blistering and localized exfoliation. According to statistics of the size of craters from exfoliated regions, O and H co-implantation could effectively increase the average size of the craters. XTEM observations have revealed that the additional high fluence O implantation could affect the thermal growth of H cavities. The surface damage and defect microstructures induced by O and H co-implantation were tentatively discussed considering the interactions between O, H implants and heavily damaged Si substrate.

  14. The charge state of iron implanted into sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J.; Sklad, P.S.; White, C.W.; Farlow, G.C.; Perez, A.; Kornilios, N.; Marest, G.

    1987-08-01

    Several techniques (RBS, TEM, CEMS) have been used to characterize sapphire single crystals implanted with iron at room temperature to fluences of 10/sup 16/ to 10/sup 17/ ions cm/sup -2/. At low fluences the as-implanted iron is found mainly in the ferrous state. As the fluence is increased, Fe/sup 3 +/ and metallic iron clusters became dominant. There is a strong correlation between the probability of finding specific configurations of iron ions within four cation coordination shells and the relative amounts of each charge state observed. The superparamagnetic behavior of the clusters suggest that they are of the order of 2 nm in size but the large amount of irradiation-induced damage and residual stress has prevented their imaging by TEM. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Implantation temperature and thermal annealing behavior in H2+-implanted 6H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B. S.; Wang, Z. G.; Jin, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of hydrogen implantation temperature and annealing temperature in 6H-SiC are studied by the combination of Rutherford backscattering in channeling geometry (RBS/C), high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). 6H-SiC wafers were implanted with 100 keV H2+ ions to a fluence of 2.5 × 1016 H2+ cm-2 at room temperature (RT), 573 K and 773 K. Post-implantation, the samples were annealing under argon gas flow at different temperatures from 973 K to 1373 K for isochronal annealing (15 min). The relative Si disorder at the damage peak for the sample implanted at RT decreases gradually with increasing annealing temperature. However, the reverse annealing effect is found for the samples implanted at 573 K and 773 K. As-implantation, the intensity of in-plane compressive stress is the maximum as the sample was implanted at RT, and is the minimum as the sample was implanted at 573 K. The intensity of in-plane compressive stress for the sample implanted at RT decreases gradually with increasing annealing temperature, while the intensities of in-plane compressive stress for the sample implanted at 573 K and 773 K show oscillatory changes with increasing annealing temperature. After annealing at 1373 K, blisters and craters occur on the sample surface and their average sizes increase with increasing implantation temperature.

  16. Investigating multi-objective fluence and beam orientation IMRT optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potrebko, Peter S.; Fiege, Jason; Biagioli, Matthew; Poleszczuk, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Radiation Oncology treatment planning requires compromises to be made between clinical objectives that are invariably in conflict. It would be beneficial to have a ‘bird’s-eye-view’ perspective of the full spectrum of treatment plans that represent the possible trade-offs between delivering the intended dose to the planning target volume (PTV) while optimally sparing the organs-at-risk (OARs). In this work, the authors demonstrate Pareto-aware radiotherapy evolutionary treatment optimization (PARETO), a multi-objective tool featuring such bird’s-eye-view functionality, which optimizes fluence patterns and beam angles for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. The problem of IMRT treatment plan optimization is managed as a combined monolithic problem, where all beam fluence and angle parameters are treated equally during the optimization. To achieve this, PARETO is built around a powerful multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, called Ferret, which simultaneously optimizes multiple fitness functions that encode the attributes of the desired dose distribution for the PTV and OARs. The graphical interfaces within PARETO provide useful information such as: the convergence behavior during optimization, trade-off plots between the competing objectives, and a graphical representation of the optimal solution database allowing for the rapid exploration of treatment plan quality through the evaluation of dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions. PARETO was evaluated for two relatively complex clinical cases, a paranasal sinus and a pancreas case. The end result of each PARETO run was a database of optimal (non-dominated) treatment plans that demonstrated trade-offs between the OAR and PTV fitness functions, which were all equally good in the Pareto-optimal sense (where no one objective can be improved without worsening at least one other). Ferret was able to produce high quality solutions even though a large number of parameters

  17. Neutron fluence in antiproton radiotherapy, measurements and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2010-01-01

    A significant part of the secondary particle spectrum from antiproton annihilation consists of fast neutrons, which may contribute to a significant dose background found outside the primary beam. Using a polystyrene phantom as a moderator, we have performed absolute measurements of the thermalized...... part of the fast neutron spectrum using Lithium-6 and -7 Fluoride TLD pairs. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with simulations using the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA. The thermal neutron kerma resulting from the measured thermal neutron fluence is insignificant...

  18. Copper nanoparticles synthesized in polymers by ion implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Nuzhdin, Vladimir; Valeev, Valerij

    2015-01-01

    nanoparticles are observed to partly tower above the sample surface due to a side effect of high-fluence irradiation leading to considerable sputtering of polymers. Implantation and particle formation significantly change optical properties of both polymers reducing transmittance in the UV-visible range due...

  19. Study of surface exfoliation on 6H-SiC induced by H{sub 2}{sup +} implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L. [Department of Physics, School of Science, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Li, B.S., E-mail: b.s.li@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-03-01

    The effect of lattice damage generated by the H{sub 2}{sup +}-implantation on exfoliation efficiency in 6H-SiC wafers is investigated. <0001> 6H-SiC wafers were implanted with 134 keV H{sub 2}{sup +} ions to ion fluences from 1.5×10{sup 16} to 5×10{sup 16} H{sub 2}{sup +} cm{sup −2} and subsequently annealed at temperatures from 973 K to 1373 K. The samples were studied by a combination of optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Only after 1373 K annealing for 15 min, blisters and exfoliation occur on the H{sub 2}{sup +}-implanted sample surface. With increasing the implantation fluences from 1.5×10{sup 16} to 3.75×10{sup 16} H{sub 2}{sup +} cm{sup −2}, the exfoliation mean size decreases, while the exfoliation density increases. For the highest fluence of 5×10{sup 16} H{sub 2}{sup +} cm{sup −2}, seldom exfoliations occur on the sample surface. Microstructure analysis shows that exfoliation efficiency is largely controlled by the H{sub 2}{sup +}-implantation-induced lattice damage. The depth of the microcrack is related to the implantation fluence. The effect of implantation fluence on dislocation loops, platelet nucleation and growth is investigated.

  20. Surface topographical and structural analysis of Ag{sup +}-implanted polymethylmethacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arif, Shafaq, E-mail: sarif2005@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rafique, M. Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Saleemi, Farhat [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Naab, Fabian; Toader, Ovidiu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory, University of Michigan, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Sagheer, Riffat [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia [Center for Advanced Studies in Physics (CASP), Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Zia, Rehana [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Siraj, Khurram; Iqbal, Saman [Department of Physics, University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2016-08-15

    Specimens of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) were implanted with 400-keV Ag{sup +} ions at different ion fluences ranging from 1 × 10{sup 14} to 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} using a 400-kV NEC ion implanter. The surface topographical features of the implanted PMMA were investigated by a confocal microscope. Modifications in the structural properties of the implanted specimens were analyzed in comparison with pristine PMMA by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. UV–Visible spectroscopy was applied to determine the effects of ion implantation on optical transmittance of the implanted PMMA. The confocal microscopic images revealed the formation of hillock-like microstructures along the ion track on the implanted PMMA surface. The increase in ion fluence led to more nucleation of hillocks. The XRD pattern confirmed the amorphous nature of pristine and implanted PMMA, while the Raman studies justified the transformation of Ag{sup +}-implanted PMMA into amorphous carbon at the ion fluence of ⩾5 × 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. Moreover, the decrease in optical transmittance of PMMA is associated with the formation of hillocks and ion-induced structural modifications after implantation.

  1. Interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium: radiation enhanced oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langley, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium is of significant interest in the application of first wall coatings and other components of fusion reactors. Electropolished polycrystalline beryllium was first implanted with an Xe backscatter marker at 1.98 MeV followed by either implantation with 5 keV diatomic deuterium or helium. A 2.0 MeV He beam was used to analyze for impurity buildup; namely oxygen. The oxide layer thickness was found to increase linearly with increasing implant fluence. A 2.5 MeV H/sup +/ beam was used to depth profile the D and He by ion backscattering. In addition the retention of the implant was measured as a function of the implant fluence. The mean depth of the implant was found to agree with theoretical range calculations. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe blister formation. No blisters were observed for implanted D but for implanted He blisters occurred at approx. 1.75 x 10/sup 17/ He cm/sup -2/. The blister diameter increased with increasing implant fluence from about 0.8 ..mu..m at 10/sup 18/ He cm/sup -2/ to 5.5 ..mu..m at 3 x 10/sup 18/ He cm/sup -2/.

  2. Improvement of tribological behavior of a Ti-Al-V alloy by nitrogen ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yanzhang; ZU Xiaotao; QIU Shaoyu; HUANG Xinquan

    2006-01-01

    The tribological properties especially wear and hardness of a Ti-Al-V alloy with nitrogen implantation (energy 60 keV) were investigated. The implantation was carried out at fluences range from 1×1016 to 4×1017 ions/cm2. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were performed to obtain surface characterization of the implanted sample. The unimplanted and implanted samples were also annealed at 600 ℃ in order to understand the influence of annealing on the tribological properties of Ti-Al-V. The hardness shows significant improvement at the higher fluence. After annealing at 600 ℃, the friction coefficient exhibits a relative decrease for the nitrogen-implanted samples. In addition, the wear rates of the implanted samples exhibits a great decrease after annealing at 600 ℃. Nature of the surface and reason for the variation and improvement in wear resistance were discussed in detail.

  3. On determining the spot size for laser fluence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, B. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: bfarkas@titan.physx.u-szeged.hu; Geretovszky, Zs. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2006-04-30

    Energy fluence, defined as pulse energy over irradiated area, is a key parameter of pulsed laser processing. Nevertheless, most of the authors using this term routinely do not realize the problems related to the accurate measurement of the spot size. In the present paper we are aiming to approach this problem by ablating crystalline Si wafers with pulses of a commercial KrF excimer laser ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau} = 15 ns) both in vacuum and at ambient atmosphere. For any pulse energy, the size of the ablated area monotonously increases with increasing number of pulses. The difference in the ablated area could be as high as a factor of three when 2000 consecutive pulses impinge on the surface. The existence and extent of the gradual lowering of multi-pulse ablation threshold queries the applicability of routinely used procedure of dividing the pulse energy with the size of the ablated area exposed into either carbon-paper or a piece of Si with one or a few pulses when determining the fluence. A more quantitative way is proposed allowing comparison of results originating from different laboratories.

  4. The fluence threshold of femtosecond laser blackening of metals: The effect of laser-induced ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Zhigui; Huang, Min; Zhao, Fuli

    2016-05-01

    With the primary controlling factor of the laser fluence, we have investigated femtosecond laser blackening of stainless steel, brass, and aluminum in visible light range. In general, low reflectance about 5% can be achieved in appropriate ranges of laser fluences for all the treated metal surfaces. Significantly, towards stainless steel and brass a fluence threshold of blackening emerges unusually: a dramatic reflectance decline occurs in a specific, narrow fluence range. In contrast, towards aluminum the reflectance declines steadily over a wide fluence range instead of the threshold-like behavior from steel and brass. The morphological characteristics and corresponding reflectance spectra of the treated surfaces indicates that the blackening threshold of stainless steel and brass corresponds to the fluence threshold of laser-induced subwavelength ripples. Such periodic ripples growing rapidly near ablation threshold absorb visible light efficiently through grating coupling and cavity trapping promoted by surface plasmon polaritons. Whereas, for aluminum, with fluence increasing the looming ripples are greatly suppressed by re-deposited nanoparticle aggregates that present intrinsic colors other than black, and until the formation of large scale "ravines" provided with strong light-trapping, sufficient blackening is achieved. In short, there are different fluence dependencies for femtosecond laser blackening of metals, and the specific blackening fluence threshold for certain metals in the visible range originates in the definite fluence threshold of femtosecond laser-induced ripples.

  5. Piezoelectric field in strained GaAs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Weng Wah; Wieczorek, Sebastian Maciej

    2005-11-01

    This report describes an investigation of the piezoelectric field in strained bulk GaAs. The bound charge distribution is calculated and suitable electrode configurations are proposed for (1) uniaxial and (2) biaxial strain. The screening of the piezoelectric field is studied for different impurity concentrations and sample lengths. Electric current due to the piezoelectric field is calculated for the cases of (1) fixed strain and (2) strain varying in time at a constant rate.

  6. Radiation annealing of gallium arsenide implanted with sulphur

    CERN Document Server

    Ardyshev, V M

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur ions were implanted in a semi-insulating GaAs. Photon annealing (805 deg C/(10-12) s) and the thermal one (800 deg C/30 min) were conducted under SiO sub 2 -films coating obtained by different ways. Contents of GaAs components in films were determined from Rutherford backscattering spectra; concentration profiles of electrons were measured by the voltage-capacitance method. Diffusion of sulfur was shown to go in two directions - to the surface and into bulk of GaAs. The first process was induced by vacancies that had been formed near the surface of semiconductors during the dielectric coating. The coefficient of the bulk-diffusion and diffusion-to-surface of sulfur ions under photon annealing was twice as much as that under thermal one. The doping efficiency was also larger

  7. GaAs devices for new mobile communication systems application

    OpenAIRE

    Pettenpaul, E.; Schopf, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    A set of GaAs SMD devices has been developed for use in the new european mobile communication equipment, i.e. for DECT and PCN at 1900 and 1800 MHz, respectively. These devices cover the rf part of mobile communication terminals. The devices considered are a GaAs LNC chip for the receiver part, an upconversion mixer MMIC, a prescaler and GaAs power MESFETs as end-stages for the transmitter. The complete DECT, PCN block circuit including GaAs and Si devices will be described.

  8. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  9. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... imaging (MRI) scans, to evaluate your inner ear anatomy. Cochlear implant surgery Cochlear implant surgery is usually performed as an outpatient procedure under general anesthesia. An incision is made behind the ear ...

  10. Comparison of Reg. Guide 1.99 fluence attenuation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E.N. [TransWare Enterprises Inc., 1565 Mediterranean Dr., Sycamore, IL 60178 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    U.S. Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1988, 'Radiation Embrittlement of Reactor Vessel Materials,' Regulatory Guide 1.99, Revision 2, Washington, D.C.) provides for the use of two substantially different methods for determining through-wall fluence in nuclear reactor pressure vessels. One method is a generic attenuation curve based on a simplistic exponential decay equation. Partly due to the simplicity of its application, the generic attenuation method is predominantly used for licensing calculations. However, it has a limitation in that at increasing distances away from the core belt-line, it becomes increasingly less accurate because it cannot account for neutron streaming effects in the cavity region surrounding the pressure vessel. The other attenuation method is based on a displacement per atom (dpa) calculation specific to the reactor vessel structure. The dpa method provides a more accurate representation of fluence attenuation through the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall at all elevations of the pressure vessel because it does account for neutron streaming in the cavity region. A requirement for using the dpa method, however, is an accurate flux solution through the RPV wall. This requirement has limited the use of traditional transport methods, such as discrete ordinates, that are limited by their treatment of cavity regions (i.e., air) outside the pressure vessel wall. TransWare Enterprises, under the sponsorship of EPRI and BWRVIR has developed an advanced three-dimensional transport methodology capable of producing fully converged flux solutions throughout the entire reactor system, including in the cavity region and primary shield structures. This methodology provides an accurate and reliable determination of through-wall fluence in boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessels, thus allowing the dpa method to be implemented with high reliability. Using this advanced 3

  11. High fluence laser irradiation induces reactive oxygen species generation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Xing, Da; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2006-09-01

    Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been used for therapies such as curing spinal cord injury, healing wound et al. Yet, the mechanism of LPLI remains unclear. Our previous study showed that low fluences laser irradiation induces human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) proliferation, but high fluences induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation. In order to study the mechanism of apoptosis induced by high fluences LPLI further, we have measured the dynamics of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using H IIDCFDA fluorescence probes during this process. ASTC-a-1 cells apoptosis was induced by He-Ne laser irradiation at high fluence of 120J/cm2. A confocal laser scanning microscope was used to perform fluorescence imaging. The results demonstrated that high fluence LPLI induced the increase of mitochondria ROS. Our studies contribute to clarify the biological mechanism of high fluence LPLI-induced cell apoptosis.

  12. Structural characterization of buried nitride layers formed by nitrogen ion implantation in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, A.D. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai, Maharashtra 400098 (India)], E-mail: adyadav@physics.mu.ac.in; Patel, A.P.; Dubey, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai, Maharashtra 400098 (India); Panigrahi, B.K.; Kesavamoorthy, R.; Nair, K.G.M. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

    2008-04-15

    The synthesis of buried silicon nitride insulating layers was carried out by SIMNI (separation by implanted nitrogen) process using implantation of 140 keV nitrogen ({sup 14}N{sup +}) ions at fluence of 1.0 x 10{sup 17}, 2.5 x 10{sup 17} and 5.0 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} into <1 1 1> single crystal silicon substrates held at elevated temperature (410 deg. C). The structures of ion-beam synthesized buried silicon nitride layers were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The XRD studies reveal the formation of hexagonal silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) structure at all fluences. The concentration of the silicon nitride phase was found to be dependent on the ion fluence. The intensity and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of XRD peak were found to increase with increase in ion fluence. The Raman spectra for samples implanted with different ion fluences show crystalline silicon (c-Si) substrate peak at wavenumber 520 cm{sup -1}. The intensity of the silicon peak was found to decrease with increase in ion fluence.

  13. Fluorescence Enhancement Ratio Dropdown at Low Fluences during Femtosecond Double Pulse Laser Ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sima SINGHA; Robert J. GORDON; HU Zhan

    2008-01-01

    In the study of double pulse ablation of materials (silicon and copper), a dropdown of double pulse to single pulse fluorescence signal enhancement at low fluences is observed. The dropdown is analysed with a simple theoretical one-dimensional heat diffusion model and verified by fluorescence time constants change as a function of fluence. The dropdown is explained as a result of liquid-solid mixture layer at the liquid and solid boundary. The effect of the layer becomes important at low fluences.

  14. The Fluence and Distance Distributions of Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Ravi, V.; Hallinan, G.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRB) are millisecond-duration radio pulses with apparent extragalactic origins. All but two of the FRBs have been discovered using the Parkes dish, which employs multiple beams formed by an array of feed horns on its focal plane. In this paper, we show that (i) the preponderance of multiple-beam detections and (ii) the detection rates for varying dish diameters can be used to infer the index α of the cumulative fluence distribution function (the logN–logF function: α = 1.5 for a non-evolving population in a Euclidean universe). If all detected FRBs arise from a single progenitor population, multiple-beam FRB detection rates from the Parkes telescope yield the constraint 0.52 the universe.

  15. Online measurement of fluence and position for protontherapy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, C.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cornelius, I.; Cuttone, G.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Guérin, L.; La Rosa, A.; Luparia, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, F.; Meyroneinc, S.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M. G.; Valastro, L.

    2004-09-01

    Tumour therapy with proton beams has been used for several decades in many centres with very good results in terms of local control and overall survival. Typical pathologies treated with this technique are located in head and neck, eye, prostate and in general at big depths or close to critical organs. The Experimental Physics Department of the University of Turin and the local Section of INFN, in collaboration with INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud Catania and Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay Paris, have developed detector systems that allow the measurement of beam position and fluence, obtained in real time during beam delivery. The centre in Catania (CATANA: Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been treating patients with eye pathologies since spring 2002 using a superconducting cyclotron accelerating protons up to 62 MeV.This kind of treatments need high-resolution monitor systems and for this reason we have developed a 256-strip segmented ionisation chamber, each strip being 400 μm wide, with a total sensitive area 13×13 cm2. The Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay (CPO) has been operational since 1991 and features a synchrocyclotron used for eye and head and neck tumours with proton beams up to 200 MeV. The monitor system has to work on a large surface and for this purpose we have designed a pixel-segmented ionisation chamber, each pixel being 5×5 mm2, for a total active area of 16×16 cm2. The results obtained with two prototypes of the pixel and strip chambers demonstrate that the detectors allow the measurement of fluence and centre of gravity as requested by clinical specifications.

  16. Transport properties of ion implanted poly (p-phenylene vinylene)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Ratier, B. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Moliton, A. (LEPOFI, Faculte des Sciences, 87 Limoges (France)); Moreau, C. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Friend, R.H. (Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1993-04-19

    We have studied the effect of ion implantation on transport properties (thermopower S, dc conductivity [sigma], ac conductivity [sigma][sub T]) of poly (p-phenylene vinylene). We have noticed that the thermopower sign is characteristic of the implanted ion (S > 0 for halogen, S < 0 for alkali) at low implantation energy (E [<=] 50 keV). The slope of [sigma] = f (T[sup -1]) varies, with values for activation energy between 32 meV (D = 10[sup 16] ions/cm[sup 2]) and 57 meV (D = 10[sup 15] ions/cm[sup 2]): the activation energy falls as the fluence increases in the case of implantation at low energy (E [<=] 50 keV). AC conductivity has been studied as a function of frequency v (v = 20 Hz - 1 MHz) and of temperatures T (T = 100 K - 380 K). For lower fluences (D = 2.10[sup 15] ions/cm[sup 2]), at low temperatures the ac conductivity shows hopping behaviour, switching to activated behaviour at higher temperatures. For higher fluences (D = 2.10[sup 16] ions/cm[sup 2]) the main processes are thermally activated. Thus for a high implantation energy (E = 250 keV), the related conductivity is less thermally activated and the curve [sigma][sub T] = f (1/T) slightly depends on temperature (hopping mechanism). (orig.)

  17. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  18. Fractal characterization of the silicon surfaces produced by ion beam irradiation of varying fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, R.P. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Kumar, T. [Department of Physics, Central University of Haryana, Jant-Pali, Mahendergarh, Haryana 123029 (India); Mittal, A.K. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); K Banerjee Centre of Atmospheric and Ocean Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Dwivedi, S., E-mail: suneetdwivedi@gmail.com [K Banerjee Centre of Atmospheric and Ocean Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, PO Box 10502, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Fractal analysis of Si(1 0 0) surface morphology at varying ion fluences. • Autocorrelation function and height–height correlation function as fractal measures. • Surface roughness and lateral correlation length increases with ion fluence. • Ripple pattern of the surfaces is found at higher ion fluences. • Wavelength of the ripple surfaces is computed for each fluence. - Abstract: Si (1 0 0) is bombarded with 200 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam at oblique incidence with fluences ranging from 3 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} to 3 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. The surface morphology of the irradiated surfaces is captured by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) for each ion fluence. The fractal analysis is performed on the AFM images. The autocorrelation function and height–height correlation function are used as fractal measures. It is found that the average roughness, interface width, lateral correlation length as well as roughness exponent increase with ions fluence. The analysis reveals the ripple pattern of the surfaces at higher fluences. The wavelength of the ripple surfaces is computed for each ion fluence.

  19. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets of NAND Flash Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with fluence. The SEU cross section decreased with increasing fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, heavy ion irradiation of devices with variable upset sensitivity distribution using typical fluence levels may underestimate the cross section and on-orbit event rate.

  20. Dielectric behavior of Ar{sup +} implanted CR-39 polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekhawat, Nidhi; Sharma, Annu; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Deshpande, S. K.; Nair, K. G. M. [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University Kurukshetra-136119 (India); UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Mumbai Centre, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2012-06-05

    The frequency dependent dielectric response of Ar{sup +} implanted CR-39 specimens has been studied. Samples were implanted with 130 keV Ar{sup +} ions to various doses ranging from 5x10{sup 14} to 1x10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The frequency response of dielectric constant (e) and dielectric loss has been studied both in the pristine and argon ion implanted samples of CR-39 polymer in the frequency range 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 8} Hz. Structural changes produced in CR-39 specimens due to implantation have been studied using Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic technique. Results of dielectric analysis indicate the lowering in dielectric constant ({epsilon}') and similar behavior of dielectric loss with increase in ion fluence. An attempt has been made to correlate these changes produced in the dielectric properties of implanted specimens with the structural changes produced due to implantation.

  1. GaAs IMPATT diodes for microstrip circuit applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisseman, W. R.; Tserng, H. Q.; Shaw, D. W.; Mcquiddy, D. N.

    1972-01-01

    GaAs IMPATT diodes with plated heat sinks are shown to be particularly well suited for microstrip circuit applications. Details of materials growth and device fabrication procedures are given, and experimental results are presented for a GaAs IMPATT microstrip oscillator operating at X band.

  2. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  3. Optimization of the doping profile of a MESFET, realized by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaux, J.L.; Graffeuil, J.; Pavlidis, D.

    1986-02-01

    A method is proposed to investigate the influence of doping profiles on the performance of GaAs Field Effect Transistors. We consider in particular the effect of different ion implantation energies and doses, as well as, the influence of gate recess. The static and dynamic small signal characteristics of GaAs MESFETs with non-uniform doping profiles are studied by combining analytical and numerical techniques to reduce calculation time. Details of the FET analysis and computer simulation are presented. Results are compared with experimental data obtained from FETs with different implantation conditions and gate recess depths. The influence of the doping profile on the equivalent circuit elements of GaAs MESFETs is finally investigated in view of an optimization of their microwave properties.

  4. GaAs Medipix2 hybrid pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kostamo, P; Vähänen, S; Tlustos, L; Fröjdh, C; Campbell, M; Zhilyaev, Y; Lipsanen, H

    2008-01-01

    A GaAs Medipix2 hybrid pixel detector based on high purity epitaxial GaAs material was successfully fabricated. The mesa type GaAs sensor with 256×256 pixels and total area of 1.4×1.4 cm2 was made of a 140-μm-thick epitaxial p–i–n structure utilizing reactive ion etching. A final thickness of approximately 110 μm for the all-epitaxial sensor element is achieved by back-thinning procedure. The sensor element is bump bonded to a Medipix2 read-out ASIC. The detector is capable of room temperature spectroscopic operation and it demonstrates the potential of GaAs for high resolution X-ray imaging systems operating at room temperature. This work describes the manufacturing process and electrical properties of the GaAs Medipix2 hybrid detector.

  5. Unidirectional expansion of lattice parameters in GaN induced by ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fa Tao; Li Lin; Yao Shu-De; Wu Ming-Fang; Zhou Sheng-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports that the 150-keV Mn ions are implanted into GaN thin film grown on Al2O3 by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition. The X-ray diffraction reciprocal spacing mapping is applied to study the lattice parameter variation upon implantation and post-annealing. After implantation, a significant expansion is observed in the perpendicular direction. The lattice strain in perpendicular direction strongly depends on ion fluence and implantation geometry and can be partially relaxed by post-annealing. While in the parallel direction, the lattice parameter approximately keeps the same as the unimplanted GaN, which is independent of ion fluence, implantation geometry and post-annealing temperature.

  6. Safety and efficacy of low fluence, high repetition rate versus high fluence, low repetition rate 810-nm diode laser for axillary hair removal in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhai; Liu, Chengyi; Chen, Zhou; Cai, Lin; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Qianxi; Li, Houmin; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2016-11-01

    High-fluence diode lasers with contact cooling have emerged as the gold standard to remove unwanted hair. Lowering the energy should result in less pain and could theoretically affect the efficacy of the therapy. To compare the safety and efficacy of a low fluence high repetition rate 810-nm diode laser to those of a high fluence, low repetition rate diode laser for permanent axillary hair removal in Chinese women. Ninety-two Chinese women received four axillae laser hair removal treatments at 4-week intervals using the low fluence, high repetition rate 810-nm diode laser in super hair removal (SHR) mode on one side and the high fluence, low repetition rate diode laser in hair removal (HR) mode on the other side. Hair counts were done at each follow-up visit and 6-month follow-up after the final laser treatment using a "Hi Quality Hair Analysis Program System"; the immediate pain score after each treatment session was recorded by a visual analog scale. The overall median reduction of hair was 90.2% with the 810-nm diode laser in SHR mode and 87% with the same laser in HR mode at 6-month follow-up. The median pain scores in SHR mode and in HR mode were 2.75 and 6.75, respectively. Low fluence, high repetition rate diode laser can efficiently remove unwanted hair but also significantly improve tolerability and reduce adverse events during the course of treatment.

  7. Amorphous surface layers in Ti-implanted Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Picraux, S.T.

    1979-01-01

    Implanting Ti into high-purity Fe results in an amorphous surface layer which is composed of not only Fe and Ti, but also C. Implantations were carried out at room temperature over the energy range 90 to 190 keV and fluence range 1 to 2 x 10/sup 16/ at/cm/sup 2/. The Ti-implanted Fe system has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ion backscattering and channeling analysis, and (d,p) nuclear reaction analysis. The amorphous layer was observed to form at the surface and grow inward with increasing Ti fluence. For an implant of 1 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ at 180 keV the layer thickness was 150 A, while the measured range of the implanted Ti was approx. 550 A. This difference is due to the incorporation of C into the amorphous alloy by C being deposited on the surface during implantation and subsequently diffusing into the solid. Our results indicate that C is an essential constituent of the amorphous phase for Ti concentrations less than or equal to 10 at. %. For the 1 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ implant, the concentration of C in the amorphous phase was approx. 25 at. %, while that of Ti was only approx. 3 at. %. A higher fluence implant of 2 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ produced an amorphous layer with a lower C concentration of approx. 10 at. % and a Ti concentration of approx. 20 at. %.

  8. THE BEHAVIORS OF 48keV Si IONS IMPLANTED INTO(100)GaAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘惠珍; 曹德新; 等

    1994-01-01

    The behaviors of Si ions implanted into(100)GaAs at liquid nitrogen temperature with energy of 48keV at the doses of 1×1015-5×1015 ions/cm2 has been investigated in this study.The Rutherford backscattering-channeling (RBS-C) combined with particle induced X-ray emission(PIXE) has been used to determine the sites of the Si atoms in the GaAs substrate.The four-point probe was used to measure the resistance of the GaAs before and after Si ions implantation.The experimental results show that Si atoms occupy not only on Ga site but also on As site.The sheet resistivity of GaAs reduced from 1×109Ω/□to 4.5×106Ω/□ after Si ions implanted.and to 4.0×104 Ω/□ after annealing at 850℃ in argon.These results are consistent with some other investigations,for instance,the results of G.Braunstein et al and R.S.Bhattacharya et al.although the implantation condition is not the same.

  9. Platelet adhesion and plasma protein adsorption control of collagen surfaces by He{sup +} ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurotobi, K. E-mail: kurotobi@postman.riken.go.jp; Suzuki, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Suzuki, H.; Iwaki, M

    2003-05-01

    He{sup +} ion implanted collagen-coated tubes with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} were exhibited antithrombogenicity. To investigate the mechanisms of antithrombogenicity of these samples, plasma protein adsorption assay and platelet adhesion experiments were performed. The adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg) and von Willebrand factor (vWf) was minimum on the He{sup +} ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. Platelet adhesion (using platelet rich plasma) was inhibited on the He{sup +} ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and was accelerated on the untreated collagen and ion implanted collagen with fluences of 1 x 10{sup 13}, 1 x 10{sup 15} and 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Platelet activation with washed platelets was observed on untreated collagen and He{sup +} ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and was inhibited with fluences of 1 x 10{sup 13}, 1 x 10{sup 15} and 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Generally, platelets can react with a specific ligand inside the collagen (GFOGER sequence). The results of platelets adhesion experiments using washed platelets indicated that there were no ligands such as GFOGER on the He{sup +} ion implanted collagen over a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. On the 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} implanted collagen, no platelet activation was observed due to the influence of plasma proteins. >From the above, it is concluded that the decrease of adsorbed Fg and vWf caused the antithrombogenicity of He{sup +} ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and that plasma protein adsorption took an important role repairing the graft surface.

  10. Comparison of fluence-response relationships of phototropism in light- and dark-grown buckwheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, R J

    1987-11-01

    Fluence-response relationships of phototropism in light- and dark-grown buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench.) were compared using systematically varied fluence rates and irradiation times of unilateral monochromatic blue light. Etiolated seedlings respond to most fluence rates in a tri-phasic manner. Phase one differs from classic first positive in that reciprocity is not observed and the peak occurs at a wide variety of fluences, often orders of magnitude less than those characteristic of first positive. Light-grown plants display this pattern only when stimulated by low fluence rates. Phase three is an ascending arm directly related to irradiance time and is comparable to classic second positive. Phase two is a nearly indifferent zone separating phases one and three. At the lowest fluence rates, the maximal observed curvature is greater for dark-grown than for light-grown plants and the former curve more in response to short (2-second) exposures than do the latter. At the highest fluence rates, the maximal observed curvature is much greater for light-grown than for dark-grown seedlings, particularly at irradiation times of 2 to 3 minutes or more. Tropic curvatures correlate positively with increasing fluence rate up to some inflection range, above which the relationship becomes negative. This inflection range is approximately two orders of magnitude higher for light-grown plants.

  11. Neutron fluence depth profiles in water phantom on epithermal beam of LVR-15 research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viererbl, L; Klupak, V; Lahodova, Z; Marek, M; Burian, J

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal channel with epithermal neutron beam at the LVR-15 research reactor is used mainly for boron neutron capture therapy. Neutron fluence depth profiles in a water phantom characterise beam properties. The neutron fluence (approximated by reaction rates) depth profiles were measured with six different types of activation detectors. The profiles were determined for thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons.

  12. Implantable Microimagers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ohta

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  13. Surface modulation of silicon surface by excimer laser at laser fluence below ablation threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit (CPMU), Bangalore, Jakkur PO (India)

    2010-04-15

    Controlled single step fabrication of silicon conical surface modulations on [311] silicon surface is reported utilizing KrF excimer laser [{lambda}=248 nm] at laser fluence below ablation threshold laser fluence. When laser fluence was increased gradually from 0 to 0.2 J/cm{sup 2} for fixed 200 numbers of shots; first nanopores are observed to form at 0.1 J/cm{sup 2}, then very shallow nanocones evolve as a function of laser fluence. At 0.2 J/cm{sup 2}, nanoparticles are observed to form. Up to 0.15 J/cm{sup 2} the very shallow nanocone volume is smaller but increases at a fast rate with laser fluence thereafter. It is observed that the net material volume before and after the laser irradiation remains the same, a sign of the melting and resolidification without any ablation. (orig.)

  14. La138/139 Isotopic Data and Neutron Fluences for Oklo RZ10 Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, C R; 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.027601

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the Oklo phenomenon, particularly in relation to the study of time variation of the fine structure constant. The neutron fluence is one of the crucial parameters for Oklo reactors. Several approaches to its determination were elaborated in the past. We consider whether it possible to use the present isotopic La138/139 data for RZ10 as an additional indicator of neutron fluences in the active cores of the reactors. We calculate the dependence of the Oklo La138 abundance on neutron fluence and elemental lanthanum concentration. The neutron fluence in RZ10 can be deduced from lanthanum isotopic data, but requires reliable data on the primordial elemental abundance. Conversely, if the fluence is known, the isotope ratio provides information on the primordial lanthanum abundance that is not otherwise easily determined.

  15. La-138/139 isotopic data and neutron fluences for Oklo RZ10 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.

    2012-08-01

    Background: Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the Oklo phenomenon, particularly in relation to the study of time variation of the fine structure constant α. The neutron fluence is one of the crucial parameters for Oklo reactors. Several approaches to its determination were elaborated in the past.Purpose: We consider whether it is possible to use the present isotopic 138La-139La data for RZ10 as an additional indicator of neutron fluences in the active cores of the reactors.Results: We calculate the dependence of the Oklo 138La abundance on neutron fluence and elemental lanthanum concentration.Conclusion: The neutron fluence in RZ10 can be deduced from lanthanum isotopic data, but requires reliable data on the primordial elemental abundance. Conversely, if the fluence is known, the isotope ratio provides information on the primordial lanthanum abundance that is not otherwise easily determined.

  16. Measured Thermal and Fast Neutron Fluence Rates for ATF-1 Holders During ATR Cycle 157D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 157D which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains measurements of the fluence rates corresponding to the particular elevations relative to the 80-ft. core elevation. The data in this report consist of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution.

  17. N and Cr ion implantation of natural ruby surfaces and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Sudheendra; Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Dash, Tapan [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Magudapathy, P.; Panigrahi, B.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Nayak, B.B.; Mishra, B.K. [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Cr and N ion implantation on natural rubies of low aesthetic quality. • Cr-ion implantation improves colour tone from red to deep red (pigeon eye red). • N-ion implantation at fluence of 3 × 10{sup 17} causes blue coloration on surface. • Certain extent of amorphization is observed in the case of N-ion implantation. - Abstract: Energetic ions of N and Cr were used to implant the surfaces of natural rubies (low aesthetic quality). Surface colours of the specimens were found to change after ion implantation. The samples without and with ion implantation were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra in ultra violet and visible region (DRS-UV–Vis), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nano-indentation. While the Cr-ion implantation produced deep red surface colour (pigeon eye red) in polished raw sample (without heat treatment), the N-ion implantation produced a mixed tone of dark blue, greenish blue and violet surface colour in the heat treated sample. In the case of heat treated sample at 3 × 10{sup 17} N-ions/cm{sup 2} fluence, formation of colour centres (F{sup +}, F{sub 2}, F{sub 2}{sup +} and F{sub 2}{sup 2+}) by ion implantation process is attributed to explain the development of the modified surface colours. Certain degree of surface amorphization was observed to be associated with the above N-ion implantation.

  18. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, A.; Sobierajski, R.; Ozkan, C.; Hájková, V.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Juha, L.; Störmer, M.; Bajt, S.; Klepka, M. T.; DłuŻewski, P.; Morawiec, K.; Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J.

    2015-06-01

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  19. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquila, A.; Ozkan, C.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, Hamburg D-22671 (Germany); Sobierajski, R.; Klepka, M. T.; Dłużewski, P.; Morawiec, K. [Institute of Physics, PAS Al. Lotnikw 32/46, Warsaw PL-02-668 (Poland); Hájková, V.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Juha, L. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, Na Slovance 2, CZ 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Störmer, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Straße 1, Geesthacht D-21502 (Germany); Bajt, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestraße 85, Hamburg D-22607 (Germany); Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K. [RIKEN/SPring-8 Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Inubushi, Y. [RIKEN/SPring-8 Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); and others

    2015-06-15

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  20. Fluence-convolution broad-beam (FCBB) dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Mingli

    2010-12-07

    IMRT optimization requires a fast yet relatively accurate algorithm to calculate the iteration dose with small memory demand. In this paper, we present a dose calculation algorithm that approaches these goals. By decomposing the infinitesimal pencil beam (IPB) kernel into the central axis (CAX) component and lateral spread function (LSF) and taking the beam's eye view (BEV), we established a non-voxel and non-beamlet-based dose calculation formula. Both LSF and CAX are determined by a commissioning procedure using the collapsed-cone convolution/superposition (CCCS) method as the standard dose engine. The proposed dose calculation involves a 2D convolution of a fluence map with LSF followed by ray tracing based on the CAX lookup table with radiological distance and divergence correction, resulting in complexity of O(N(3)) both spatially and temporally. This simple algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than the CCCS method. Without pre-calculation of beamlets, its implementation is also orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional voxel-based beamlet-superposition (VBS) approach. We compared the presented algorithm with the CCCS method using simulated and clinical cases. The agreement was generally within 3% for a homogeneous phantom and 5% for heterogeneous and clinical cases. Combined with the 'adaptive full dose correction', the algorithm is well suitable for calculating the iteration dose during IMRT optimization.

  1. The Fluence and Distance Distributions of Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Vedantham, H K; Hallinan, G; Shannon, R

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRB) are millisecond-duration radio pulses with apparent extragalactic origins. All but two of the FRBs have been discovered using the Parkes dish which employs multiple beams formed by an array of feed horns on its focal plane. In this paper, we show that (i) the preponderance of multiple-beam detections, and (ii) the detection rates for varying dish diameters, can be used to infer the index $\\alpha$ of the cumulative fluence distribution function (the log$N$-log$F$ function: $\\alpha=1.5$ for a non-evolving population in a Euclidean universe). If all detected FRBs arise from a single progenitor population, multiple-beam FRB detection rates from the Parkes telescope yield the constraint $0.52<\\alpha<1.0$ with $90$% confidence. Searches at other facilities with different dish sizes refine the constraint to $0.66<\\alpha<0.96$. Our results favor FRB searches with smaller dishes, because for $\\alpha<1$, the gain in field-of-view for a smaller dish is more important than the reduc...

  2. Reference Materials for Reactor Neutron Fluence Rate and Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelbrecht, C.

    2003-06-01

    Certified reference materials are distributed by the European Commission through the BCR® programme (over 500 CRMs) including a series of activation and fission monitor materials originally proposed by the Euratom Working Group on Reactor Dosimetry. The current range (18 CRMs) includes materials to cover the complete energy spectrum, and suitable for different irradiation times. Fission monitors are 238UO2 or 237NpO2 in the form of microspheres. Activation monitors are high purity metals (Ni, Cu, Al, Fe, Nb, Rh, or Ti), certified for interfering trace impurities, or dilute aluminium-based alloys. Reference materials newly certified are IRMM-530R A1-0.1%Au, replacing the exhausted IRMM-530 material, used as comparator for k0- standardisation, and three new Al-Co alloys (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0%Co). Others in the process of certification are A1-0.1%Ag and A1-2%Sc for thermal and epithermal fluence rate measurements and two uranium-doped glass materials intended for dosimetry by the fission-track technique. Various alloy compositions have been prepared for use as melt-wire temperature monitors with melting points ranging from 198 to 327ºC.

  3. Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6) Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    An atomic oxygen fluence monitor was flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6). The monitor was designed to measure the accumulation of atomic oxygen fluence with time as it impinged upon the ram surface of the MISSE 6B Passive Experiment Container (PEC). This was an active experiment for which data was to be stored on a battery-powered data logger for post-flight retrieval and analysis. The atomic oxygen fluence measurement was accomplished by allowing atomic oxygen to erode two opposing wedges of pyrolytic graphite that partially covered a photodiode. As the wedges of pyrolytic graphite erode, the area of the photodiode that is illuminated by the Sun increases. The short circuit current, which is proportional to the area of illumination, was to be measured and recorded as a function of time. The short circuit current from a different photodiode, which was oriented in the same direction and had an unobstructed view of the Sun, was also to be recorded as a reference current. The ratio of the two separate recorded currents should bear a linear relationship with the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence and be independent of the intensity of solar illumination. Ground hyperthermal atomic oxygen exposure facilities were used to evaluate the linearity of the ratio of short circuit current to the atomic oxygen fluence. In flight, the current measurement circuitry failed to operate properly, thus the overall atomic oxygen mission fluence could only be estimated based on the physical erosion of the pyrolytic graphite wedges. The atomic oxygen fluence was calculated based on the knowledge of the space atomic oxygen erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite measured from samples on the MISSE 2. The atomic oxygen fluence monitor, the expected result and comparison of mission atomic oxygen fluence based on the erosion of the pyrolytic graphite and Kapton H atomic oxygen fluence witness samples are presented in this paper.

  4. D10.7.2: Results for GaAs photocathodes

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R

    2013-01-01

    HZDR plans to apply bulk GaAs photocathode in SRF gun for high current electron source. Supported by this project, a preparation system for GaAs photocathode has been developed. The cathode plugs special for GaAs wafer have been modified and proofed in SRF gun real running conditions. Virgin GaAs wafer was tested in the SRF gun cavity, and the first GaAs activation was performed.

  5. High pressure annealing of Europium implanted GaN

    KAUST Repository

    Lorenz, K.

    2012-02-09

    GaN epilayers were implanted with Eu to fluences of 1×10^13 Eu/cm2 and 1×10^15 Eu/cm2. Post-implant thermal annealing was performed in ultra-high nitrogen pressures at temperatures up to 1450 ºC. For the lower fluence effective structural recovery of the crystal was observed for annealing at 1000 ºC while optical activation could be further improved at higher annealing temperatures. The higher fluence samples also reveal good optical activation; however, some residual implantation damage remains even for annealing at 1450 ºC which leads to a reduced incorporation of Eu on substitutional sites, a broadening of the Eu luminescence lines and to a strongly reduced fraction of optically active Eu ions. Possibilities for further optimization of implantation and annealing conditions are discussed.© (2012) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  6. Implantation induced hardening of nanocrystalline titanium thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, R; Amirthapandian, S; Mangamma, G; Ramaseshan, R; Dash, S; Tyagi, A K; Jayaram, V; Raj, Baldev

    2009-09-01

    Formation of nanocrystalline TiN at low temperatures was demonstrated by combining Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) and ion implantation techniques. The Ti films of nominal thickness approximatly 250 nm were deposited at a substrate temperature of 200 degrees C by ablating a high pure titanium target in UHV conditions using a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. These films were implanted with 100 keV N+ ions with fluence ranging from 1.0 x 10(16) ions/cm2 to 1.0 x 10(17) ions/cm2 The structural, compositional and morphological evolutions were tracked using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), respectively. TEM analysis revealed that the as-deposited titanium film is an fcc phase. With increasing ion fluence, its structure becomes amorphous phase before precipitation of nanocrystalline fcc TIN phase. Compositional depth profiles obtained from SIMS have shown the extent of nitrogen concentration gradient in the implantation zone. Both as-deposited and ion implanted films showed much higher hardness as compared to the bulk titanium. AFM studies revealed a gradual increase in surface roughness leading to surface patterning with increase in ion fluence.

  7. Suppression of ion-implantation induced porosity in germanium by a silicon dioxide capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan T.; Alkhaldi, Huda S.; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Pastor, David; Huston, Larissa Q.; Wong-Leung, Jennifer; Aziz, Michael J.; Williams, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    Ion implantation with high ion fluences is indispensable for successful use of germanium (Ge) in the next generation of electronic and photonic devices. However, Ge readily becomes porous after a moderate fluence implant ( ˜1 ×1015 ion cm-2 ) at room temperature, and for heavy ion species such as tin (Sn), holding the target at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature suppresses porosity formation only up to a fluence of 2 ×1016 ion cm-2 . We show, using stylus profilometry and electron microscopy, that a nanometer scale capping layer of silicon dioxide significantly suppresses the development of the porous structure in Ge during a S n - implant at a fluence of 4.5 ×1016 ion cm-2 at LN2 temperature. The significant loss of the implanted species through sputtering is also suppressed. The effectiveness of the capping layer in preventing porosity, as well as suppressing sputter removal of Ge, permits the attainment of an implanted Sn concentration in Ge of ˜15 at.% , which is about 2.5 times the maximum value previously attained. The crystallinity of the Ge-Sn layer following pulsed-laser-melting induced solidification is also greatly improved compared with that of uncapped material, thus opening up potential applications of the Ge-Sn alloy as a direct bandgap material fabricated by an ion beam synthesis technique.

  8. The effect of nitrogen implantation on structural changes in semi-insulating InP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhakumar, K.; Jayavel, P.; Reddy, G.L.N.; Sastry, V.S.; Nair, K.G.M.; Ravichandran, V. E-mail: vravichandran@vsnl.com

    2003-12-01

    110 keV nitrogen ions (N{sup +}) of fluences 1 x 10{sup 14}-1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} have been implanted in liquid encapsulated Czochralski grown Fe-doped semi-insulating indium phosphide (InP) single crystal substrates. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction measurements on as-grown and implanted samples have been carried out and analyzed. At all above fluences, a broad hump in the region of InP(1 1 1) peaks is observed. It might have resulted from implantation-induced misoriented grains along certain preferred orientations. The peak observed at a d-value of 1.77 A for all the fluences becomes more pronounced as the implantation fluence increases up to 1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. This could indicate formation of an Indium phosphide nitride alloy. Post-implantation annealing reduces the structural defects and assists in the growth of the nitride phase.

  9. Electrode pattern design for GaAs betavoltaic batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Haiyang; Yin Jianhua; Li Darang, E-mail: haiyangchen@bit.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-08-15

    The sensitivities of betavoltaic batteries and photovoltaic batteries to series and parallel resistance are studied. Based on the study, an electrode pattern design principle of GaAs betavoltaic batteries is proposed. GaAs PIN junctions with and without the proposed electrode pattern are fabricated and measured under the illumination of {sup 63}Ni. Results show that the proposed electrode can reduce the backscattering and shadowing for the beta particles from {sup 63}Ni to increase the GaAs betavoltaic battery short circuit currents effectively but has little impact on the fill factors and ideal factors.

  10. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry studies of 100 keV nitrogen ion implanted polypropylene polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Mahak; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Sharma, Annu

    2017-09-01

    The effect of nitrogen ion implantation on the structure and composition in polypropylene (PP) polymer has been studied. Implantation was carried out using 100 keV N+ ions at different fluences of 1 × 1015, 1 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 ions cm-2 with beam current density of ∼0.65 μA cm-2. Surface morphological changes in the pre- and post-implanted PP specimens have been studied using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and UV-Visible Spectroscopy. The spatial distribution of implantation induced modification in the form of carbonization and dehydrogenation in the near surface region of PP matrix, the projected range, retained dose of implanted nitrogen, the various elements present in the implanted layers and their differential cross-sections have been analyzed using RBS spectra. RUMP simulation yielded an increase in the concentration of carbon near the surface from 33 at.% (virgin) to 42 at.% at fluence of 1 × 1017 N+ cm-2. Further, optical absorption has been found to increase with a shift in the absorption edge from UV towards visible region with increasing fluence. UV-Vis absorption spectra also indicate a drastic decrease in optical energy gap from 4.12 eV (virgin) to 0.25 eV (1 × 1017 N+ cm-2) indicating towards the formation of carbonaceous network in the implanted region. All these changes observed using UV-Visible have been further correlated with the outcomes of the RBS characterization.

  11. He reemission implanted in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, T., E-mail: tanabe@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Observation of He reemission of various metals under He{sup +} implantation at wide temperature range. • Materials examined are aluminum (Al), Nickel (Ni) and molybdenum (Mo). • He reemission is quite temperature dependent and different with materials. • Three metals show similar dependence on temperature normalized with respective melting point. • He reemission is successfully correlated with He behavior in metals. - Abstract: Helium (He) reemission of Al, Ni and Mo under energetic He implantation (10–30 keV) in wide temperature range is studied to understand behavior of implanted He in correlation with structure changes. The reemission behavior is categorized into 4 different temperature ranges with the normalized temperature (T{sub m}) to the melting point of each metal. At elevated temperatures (well above ∼0.6 T{sub m}), interstitial He atoms and/or He-vacancy (ies) clusters can migrate remaining no structure change and showing smooth reemission without any burst. Between ∼0.25 and 0.6 T{sub m}, He reemission always accompanies significant structure modification. For ∼04–0.6 T{sub m}, implanted He coalesce to make bubbles and the bubbles can move to the surface. Bubble migration accompanies materials flow to the surface resulting in fuzz surface or columnar structure, depending on implantation flux. Slower bubble motion at ∼0.25–0.4 prohibits the material migration. Instead the bubbles coalesce to grow large and multi-layered blistering appears as periodic reemission behavior. Below ∼0.25 T{sub m}, He migration is too slow for bubbles to grow large, but bubble density increases up to a certain fluence, where neighboring bubbles start to coalesce. Accordingly, He release is mostly caused by mechanical failure or blister rapture. With increasing fluence, all defects (bubbles and dislocation loops) tangle or inter connected with neighboring defects and accordingly He migration to the surface along the tangled or connected

  12. Growth of strained ZnSe layers on GaAs substrates by pulsed laser deposition carried out in an off-axis deposition geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguli, Tapas [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452 013 (India)], E-mail: tapas@cat.ernet.in; Porwal, Sanjay; Sharma, Tarun; Ingale, Alka; Kumar, Shailendra; Tiwari, Pragya [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452 013 (India); Balamurugan, A.K.; Rajagopalan, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Division, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Chandrasekaran, K.S.; Arora, B.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, TIFR, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Rustagi, K.C. [Department of Physics, IIT, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2007-07-31

    We have deposited thin layers of ZnSe on (001) oriented GaAs substrates by pulsed laser deposition at different incident laser fluence (referred to as normal geometry) and in an off-axis geometry where the plasma plume direction is at an angle of {approx} 25{sup o} away from the direction of the substrate. The crystalline quality of these layers has been studied by high-resolution X-ray diffraction measurements and Raman scattering. We find that we are in a position to deposit pseudomorphic strained layers of ZnSe on GaAs in the off-axis deposition geometry when the ZnSe layer thickness is less than the critical thickness of ZnSe on GaAs i.e. 150 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, photoluminescence and electrical transport measurements have also been carried out in all the ZnSe layers and the results of all the above characterizations have been compared for the normal geometry and the off-axis geometry of deposition. All the results indicate that the ZnSe layers deposited in the off-axis geometry have better crystalline quality and an improved interface as compared to the ones deposited in the normal geometry. We attribute this improvement in the overall quality of the ZnSe layers in the off-axis geometry to the reduction in the average energy of the plume particles that reach the GaAs substrate in the off-axis geometry.

  13. Effect of UVA Fluence Rate on Indicators of Oxidative Stress in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Hoerter, Christopher S. Ward, Kyle D. Bale, Admasu N. Gizachew, Rachelle Graham, Jaclyn Reynolds, Melanie E. Ward, Chesca Choi, Jean-Leonard Kagabo, Michael Sauer, Tara Kuipers, Timothy Hotchkiss, Nate Banner, Renee A. Chellson, Theresa Ohaeri, L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During the course of a day human skin is exposed to solar UV radiation that fluctuates in fluence rate within the UVA (290-315 nm and UVB (315-400 nm spectrum. Variables affecting the fluence rate reaching skin cells include differences in UVA and UVB penetrating ability, presence or absence of sunscreens, atmospheric conditions, and season and geographical location where the exposure occurs. Our study determined the effect of UVA fluence rate in solar-simulated (SSR and tanning-bed radiation (TBR on four indicators of oxidative stress---protein oxidation, glutathione, heme oxygenase-1, and reactive oxygen species--in human dermal fibroblasts after receiving equivalent UVA and UVB doses. Our results show that the higher UVA fluence rate in TBR increases the level of all four indicators of oxidative stress. In sequential exposures when cells are exposed first to SSR, the lower UVA fluence rate in SSR induces a protective response that protects against oxidative stress following a second exposure to a higher UVA fluence rate. Our studies underscore the important role of UVA fluence rate in determining how human skin cells respond to a given dose of radiation containing both UVA and UVB radiation.

  14. Defects creation in sapphire by swift heavy ions: A fluence depending process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, A. [LRPCSI, Universite 20 Aout 55, BP 26, Route d' El-Hadaiek, Skikda (Algeria)], E-mail: a.nour_kabir@yahoo.fr; Meftah, A. [LRPCSI, Universite 20 Aout 55, BP 26, Route d' El-Hadaiek, Skikda (Algeria); Stoquert, J.P. [InESS, 23, rue du Loess - BP 20 CR - F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 02 (France); Toulemonde, M.; Monnet, I. [CIMAP, BP 5133, 14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France)

    2009-03-15

    Single crystals of sapphire ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were irradiated at GANIL with 0.7 MeV/amu xenon ions corresponding to an electronic stopping power of 21 keV/nm. Several fluences were applied between 5 x 10{sup 11} and 2 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. Irradiated samples were characterized using optical absorption spectroscopy. This technique exhibited the characteristic bands associated with F and F{sup +} centers defects. The F centers density was found to increase with the fluence following two different kinetics: a rapid increase for fluences less than 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} and then, a slow increase for higher fluences. For fluences less than 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}, results are in good agreement with those obtained by Canut et al. [B. Canut, A. Benyagoub, G. Marest, A. Meftah, N. Moncoffre, S.M.M. Ramos, F. Studer, P. Thevenard, M. Toulemonde, Phys. Rev. B 51 (1995) 12194]. In the fluences range: 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}, the F centers defects creation process is found to be different from the one evidenced for fluences less than 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Defects creation in sapphire by swift heavy ions: A fluence depending process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, A.; Meftah, A.; Stoquert, J. P.; Toulemonde, M.; Monnet, I.

    2009-03-01

    Single crystals of sapphire (α-Al 2O 3) were irradiated at GANIL with 0.7 MeV/amu xenon ions corresponding to an electronic stopping power of 21 keV/nm. Several fluences were applied between 5 × 10 11 and 2 × 10 14 ions/cm 2. Irradiated samples were characterized using optical absorption spectroscopy. This technique exhibited the characteristic bands associated with F and F + centers defects. The F centers density was found to increase with the fluence following two different kinetics: a rapid increase for fluences less than 10 13 ions/cm 2 and then, a slow increase for higher fluences. For fluences less than 10 13 ions/cm 2, results are in good agreement with those obtained by Canut et al. [B. Canut, A. Benyagoub, G. Marest, A. Meftah, N. Moncoffre, S.M.M. Ramos, F. Studer, P. Thévenard, M. Toulemonde, Phys. Rev. B 51 (1995) 12194]. In the fluences range: 10 13-10 14 ions/cm 2, the F centers defects creation process is found to be different from the one evidenced for fluences less than 10 13 ions/cm 2.

  16. Multidiagnostics analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoop, K. K.; Polek, M. P.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.

    2015-02-28

    The ions dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over a fluence range spanning from the ablation threshold up to ~75 J/cm2 by means of three established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup and spectrally resolved ICCD imaging simultaneously monitor the laser-produced plasma ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a copper target. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed observing the occurrence of three different regimes. Moreover, the specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4-5 J/cm2, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ~50 J/cm2. The fluence variation of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase of forward peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ~10 J/cm2. Then, a broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ~10 J/cm2. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ions angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ~66 J/cm2. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals show a narrow forward peaked distribution and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ion angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  17. Electrical properties and dielectric spectroscopy of Ar+ implanted polycarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Mahak; Shekhawat, Nidhi; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Sharma, Annu; Nair, K. G. M.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present paper is to study the effect of argon ion implantation on electrical and dielectric properties of polycarbonate. Specimens were implanted with 130 keV Ar+ ions in the fluence ranging from 1×1014 to 1×1016 ions cm-2. The beam current used was ˜0.40 µA cm-2. The electrical conduction behaviour of virgin and Ar+ implanted polycarbonate specimens have been studied through current-voltage (I-V characteristic) measurements. It has been observed that after implantation conductivity increases with increasing ion fluence. The dielectric spectroscopy of these specimens has been done in the frequency range of 100 kHz-100 MHz. Relaxation processes were studied by Cole-Cole plot of complex permittivity (real part of complex permittivity, ɛ' vs. imaginary part of complex permittivity, ɛ″). The Cole-Cole plots have also been used to determine static dielectric constant (ɛs), optical dielectric constant (ɛ∞), spreading factor (α), average relaxation time (τ0) and molecular relaxation time (τ). The dielectric behaviour has been found to be significantly affected due to Ar+ implantation. The possible correlation between this behaviour and the changes induced by the implantation has been discussed.

  18. Hydrogen molecules in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, E.V.; Weber, J

    2003-12-31

    GaAs samples treated in a hydrogen plasma have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. In addition to the known Raman line at 3912 cm{sup -1} of H{sub 2} trapped at the interstitial T{sub Ga} site surrounded by Ga neighbors, two new Raman signals at 4043 and 4112 cm{sup -1} have been observed at room temperature. The 4043 cm{sup -1} line is assigned to H{sub 2} trapped at the interstitial T{sub As} site with As closest neighbors and the 4112 cm{sup -1} line is associated with H{sub 2} trapped in voids formed by the hydrogen plasma. Para-H{sub 2} trapped at the interstitial T{sub Ga} site is shown to be unstable against irradiation with the band-gap light at room temperature and can be observed only at temperatures below 120 K.

  19. Ion implantations of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojak, S.; Simeg Veternikova, J.; Slugen, V.; Petriska, M.; Stacho, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is focused on a study of radiation damage and thermal stability of high chromium oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956 (20% Cr), which belongs to the most perspective structural materials for the newest generation of nuclear reactors - Generation IV. The radiation damage was simulated by the implantation of hydrogen ions up to the depth of about 5 μm, which was performed at a linear accelerator owned by Slovak University of Technology. The ODS steel MA 956 was available for study in as-received state after different thermal treatments as well as in ions implanted state. Energy of the hydrogen ions chosen for the implantation was 800 keV and the implantation fluence of 6.24 × 1017 ions/cm2. The investigated specimens were measured by non-destructive technique Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy in order to study the defect behavior after different thermal treatments in the as-received state and after the hydrogen ions implantation. Although, different resistance to defect production was observed in individual specimens of MA 956 during the irradiation, all implanted specimens contain larger defects than the ones in as-received state.

  20. Absolute monitoring of DD and DT neutron fluences using the associated-particle technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, N. E.; Wehring, B. W.

    1980-06-01

    An associated-particle system was constructed for use with a Texas Nuclear neutron generator. Associated-particle and neutron energy spectra were measured simultaneously using this system and an NE-213 proton recoil spectrometer, respectively. The associated-particle system proved to be not only an accurate monitor of DT neutron fluence, but also an accurate monitor of DD contamination in the DT spectrum. The DD and DT neutron fluences calculated from the measured associated-particle counting rates showed the best agreement with the measured neutron fluences when the laboratory distributions were assumed to be isotropic.

  1. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes} of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards.

  2. Dynamic defect annealing in wurtzite MgZnO implanted with Ar ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Wendler, E.; Du, X. L.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G.

    2015-09-01

    Successful implementation of ion beams for modification of ternary ZnO-based oxides requires understanding and control of radiation-induced defects. Here, we study structural disorder in wurtzite ZnO and MgxZn1-xO (x ⩽ 0.3) samples implanted at room and 15 K temperatures with Ar ions in a wide fluence range (5 × 1012-3 × 1016 cm-2). The samples were characterized by Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry performed in-situ without changing the sample temperature. The results show that all the samples exhibit high radiation resistance and cannot be rendered amorphous even for high ion fluences. Increasing the Mg content leads to some damage enhancement near the surface region; however, irrespective of the Mg content, the fluence dependence of bulk damage in the samples displays the so-called IV-stage evolution with a reverse temperature effect for high ion fluences.

  3. Diffusion of $^{52}$Mn in GaAs

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Following our previous diffusion studies performed with the modified radiotracer technique, we propose to determine the diffusion of Mn in GaAs under intrinsic conditions in a previously un-investigated temperature region. The aim of the presently proposed experiments is twofold. \\begin{itemize} \\item A quantitative study of Mn diffusion in GaAs at low Mn concentrations would be decisive in providing new information on the diffusion mechanism involved. \\item As Ga vacancies are expected to be involved in the Mn diffusion process it can be predicted that also the GaAs material growth technique most likely plays a role. To clarify this assumption diffusion experiments will be conducted for GaAs material grown by two different techniques. \\end{itemize} For such experiments we ask for two runs of 3 shifts (total of 6 shifts) with $^{52}$Mn$^{+}$ ion beam.

  4. Electrodeposition of Metal on GaAs Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Einabad, Omid; Watkins, Simon; Kavanagh, Karen

    2010-10-01

    Copper (Cu) electrical contacts to freestanding gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowires have been fabricated via electrodeposition. The nanowires are zincblende (111) oriented grown epitaxially on n-type Si-doped GaAs (111)B substrates by gold-catalyzed Vapor Liquid Solid (VLS) growth in a metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) reactor. The epitaxial electrodeposition process, based on previous work with bulk GaAs substrates, consists of a substrate oxide pre-etch in dilute ammonium-hydroxide carried out prior to galvanostatic electrodeposition in a pure Cu sulphate aqueous electrolyte at 20-60^oC. For GaAs nanowires, we find that Cu or Fe has a preference for growth on the gold catalyst avoiding the sidewalls. After removing gold, both metals still prefer to grow only on top of the nanowire, which has the largest potential field.

  5. GaAs Films Prepared by RF-Magnetron Sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.H. Ouyang; D.L. Rode; T. Zulkifli; B. Abraham-Shrauner; N. Lewis; M.R. Freeman

    2001-08-01

    The authors reported on the optical absorption, adhesion, and microstructure of RF-magnetron sputtered films of hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline GaAs films for the 1 to 25 {micro}m infrared wavelength rate. Sputtering parameters which were varied include sputtering power, temperature and pressure, and hydrogen sputtering-gas concentration. TEM results show a sharp transition from purely amorphous GaAs to a mixture of microcrystalline GaAs in an amorphous matrix at 34 {+-} 2 C. By optimizing the sputtering parameters, the optical absorption coefficient can be decreased below 100 cm{sup -1} for wavelengths greater than about 1.25 {micro}m. These results represent the lowest reported values of optical absorption for sputtered films of GaAs directly measured by spectrophotometry for the near-infrared wavelength region.

  6. Simulation of silicon diffusion in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, A.M., E-mail: daas005@yahoo.co.u [Al-Balga Applied University, P.O.Box 4545 - Amman - 11953 - Tela El Ali (Jordan); Velichko, O.I. [Department of Physics, Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, 6, P. Brovki Street, Minsk 220013 (Belarus)

    2011-03-01

    The simulation of coupled diffusion of silicon atoms and point defects in GaAs has been carried out for diffusion at the temperatures of 1000 and 850 {sup o}C. The amphoteric behavior of silicon atoms in GaAs has been taken into account in the investigation of high concentration diffusion from silicon layer deposited on GaAs substrate. The calculated dopant profiles agree well with the experimental ones and they confirm the adequacy of the model of silicon diffusion used for simulation. A comparison with the experimental data has enabled this work to obtain the parameters of silicon effective diffusivity and other values describing high concentration silicon diffusion in GaAs.

  7. Gaas tõstaks maakonna konkurentsivõimet / Marje Laugen

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laugen, Marje

    2005-01-01

    Tõrvas peeti Valgamaa gaasiprojekti arutelu, kus osalesid AS-i Eesti Gaas, AS-i Fortum Termest ning Tõrva linna-, Helme valla- ja Valga maavalitsuse esindajad. Kommenteerib Valga maavanem Georg Trashanov

  8. The microstructure and surface hardness of Ti6Al4V alloy implanted with nitrogen ions at an elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlcak, Petr, E-mail: petr.vlcak@fs.cvut.cz [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic); Cerny, Frantisek [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic); Drahokoupil, Jan [Department of Metals, Institute of Physics, AS CR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Sepitka, Josef [Department of Mechanics, Biomechanics and Mechatronics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic); Tolde, Zdenek [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • The Ti6Al4V samples were implanted with 90 keV nitrogen ions. • The samples were annealed at 500 °C during the ion implantation process. • An elevated temperature increases the mobility of the atoms and the quantity of TiN. • The hardness showed a significant increase compared to room temperature implantation. - Abstract: The effect of an elevated temperature during nitrogen ion implantation on the microstructure and on the surface hardness of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy was examined. The implantation process was carried out at fluences of 1 ⋅ 10{sup 17}, 2.7 ⋅ 10{sup 17} and 6 ⋅ 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} and at ion energy 90 keV. The implanted samples were annealed at 500 °C during the implantation process. X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to obtain a phase characterization and a phase quantification in the implanted sample surface. The surface hardness was investigated by nanoindentation testing, and the nitrogen depth distribution was measured by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy. Elevated temperature led to increased formation of a TiN compound. It was found that a mixture of TiN and an α-Ti(+N) solid solution had a predominant amount of TiN for samples with fluence of 2.7 ⋅ 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} or higher. Elevated temperature during ion implantation caused an increase in surface hardening more towards the depth of the substrate in comparison with room temperature implantation. The hardness showed a remarkably significant increase at a fluence of 1 ⋅ 10{sup 17} and 2.7 ⋅ 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} compared to samples implanted at the same fluences and at room temperature. There is a discussion of such mechanisms that explain the observed hardening more towards the depth of the substrate, and the increase in hardness.

  9. State of the art on epitaxial GaAs detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, G.C. [Laboratoire des Milieux Desordonnes et Heterogenes, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France)]. E-mail: guocsun@ccr.jussieu.fr; Manez, N. [Laboratoire des Milieux Desordonnes et Heterogenes, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Zazoui, M. [Laboratoire des Milieux Desordonnes et Heterogenes, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Al-Ajili, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Davidson, D.W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); O' Shea, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Quarati, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Smith, K.M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Chambellan, D. [LIST/DIMRI, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Gal, O. [LIST/DIMRI, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Pillot, Ph. [LIST/DIMRI, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Lenoir, M. [Hospital Armand Trousseau, 26 Avenue du Docteur Arnold Netter, 75571 Paris (France); Montagne, J.P. [Hospital Armand Trousseau, 26 Avenue du Docteur Arnold Netter, 75571 Paris (France); Bchetnia, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, 5019 Monastir, Tunisie (Tunisia); Bourgoin, J.C. [GESEC R and D, 68 Avenue de la Foret, 77210 Avon (France)

    2005-07-01

    We first briefly review the performances for X-ray detection which are obtained using thin epitaxial GaAs layers. We then show that good detectors can be realized on thick and large area epitaxial GaAs layers which are now available, making them suitable for X-ray imaging. We finally discuss the main limitation imposed by the epitaxial nature of this new material and ways to overcome it.

  10. Novel GAA mutations in patients with Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turaça, Lauro Thiago; de Faria, Douglas Oliveira Soares; Kyosen, Sandra Obikawa; Teixeira, Valber Dias; Motta, Fabiana Louise; Pessoa, Juliana Gilbert; Rodrigues E Silva, Marina; de Almeida, Sandro Soares; D'Almeida, Vânia; Munoz Rojas, Maria Verônica; Martins, Ana Maria; Pesquero, João Bosco

    2015-04-25

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder linked to GAA gene that leads to a multi-system intralysosomal accumulation of glycogen. Mutation identification in the GAA gene can be very important for early diagnosis, correlation between genotype-phenotype and therapeutic intervention. For this purpose, peripheral blood from 57 individuals susceptible to Pompe disease was collected and all exons of GAA gene were amplified; the sequences and the mutations were analyzed in silico to predict possible impact on the structure and function of the human protein. In this study, 46 individuals presented 33 alterations in the GAA gene sequence, among which five (c.547-67C>G, c.547-39T>G, p.R437H, p.L641V and p.L705P) have not been previously described in the literature. The alterations in the coding region included 15 missense mutations, three nonsense mutations and one deletion. One insertion and other 13 single base changes were found in the non-coding region. The mutation p.G611D was found in homozygosis in a one-year-old child, who presented low levels of GAA activity, hypotonia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Two patients presented the new mutation p.L705P in association with c.-32-13T>G. They had low levels of GAA activity and developed late onset Pompe disease. In our study, we observed alterations in the GAA gene originating from Asians, African-Americans and Caucasians, highlighting the high heterogeneity of the Brazilian population. Considering that Pompe disease studies are not very common in Brazil, this study will help to better understand the potential pathogenic role of each change in the GAA gene. Furthermore, a precise and early molecular analysis improves genetic counseling besides allowing for a more efficient treatment in potential candidates.

  11. Cell adhesion of F{sup +} ion implantation of intraocular lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.J. E-mail: dejunli@hotmail.com; Cui, F.Z.; Gu, H.Q

    1999-04-01

    The cell adhesion of ion implanted polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) intraocular lens was studied using cultured cells in vitro. F{sup +} ion implantation was performed at the energies of 40, 60, 80, 100 keV with the fluences ranging from 5x10{sup 13} to 1x10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. The cell adhesion tests gave interesting results that the number of the neutral granulocytes and the macrophages adhering on surface were reduced significantly after ion implantation. The optimal fluence was about 4x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. The hydrophobicity imparted to the lens surface was also enhanced. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that ion implantation resulted in the cleavage of some pendant groups, the oxidation of the surface, and the formation of some new chemical bonds, which was probably the main reason for the cell adhesion change.

  12. Design optimization of GaAs betavoltaic batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Haiyanag; Jiang Lan [Laser Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Chen Xuyuan, E-mail: jianglan@bit.edu.cn, E-mail: jianglan@missouri.edu [Institute for Microsystems and Nano Technology, Vestfold University College, N-3103 (Norway)

    2011-06-01

    GaAs junctions are designed and fabricated for betavoltaic batteries. The design is optimized according to the characteristics of GaAs interface states and the diffusion length in the depletion region of GaAs carriers. Under an illumination of 10 mCi cm{sup -2} {sup 63}Ni, the open circuit voltage of the optimized batteries is about {approx}0.3 V. It is found that the GaAs interface states induce depletion layers on P-type GaAs surfaces. The depletion layer along the P{sup +}PN{sup +} junction edge isolates the perimeter surface from the bulk junction, which tends to significantly reduce the battery dark current and leads to a high open circuit voltage. The short circuit current density of the optimized junction is about 28 nA cm{sup -2}, which indicates a carrier diffusion length of less than 1 {mu}m. The overall results show that multi-layer P{sup +}PN{sup +} junctions are the preferred structures for GaAs betavoltaic battery design.

  13. Au{sup 3+} ion implantation on FTO coated glasses: Effect on structural, electrical, optical and phonon properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Bindu; Dey, Ranajit; Bajpai, P.K., E-mail: bajpai.pk1@gmail.com

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Effects of 11.00 MeV Au{sup 3+} ions implanted in FTO coated (thickness ≈300 nm) silicate glasses at varying fluence. • Metal clustering near the surface and subsurface region below glass-FTO interface changes electrical and optical properties significantly. • Ion implantation does not affect the crystalline structure of the coated films; however, the tetragonal distortion increases with increasing ion fluence. • Significant surface reconstruction takes place with ion beam fluence; The average roughness also decreases with increasing fluence. • The sheet resistivity increases with increasing fluence. • Raman analysis also corroborates the re-crystallization process inducing due to ion implantation. • Optical properties of the implanted surfaces changes significantly. - Abstract: Effects of 11.00 MeV Au{sup 3+} ions implanted in FTO coated (thickness ≈300 nm) silicate glasses on structural, electrical optical and phonon behavior have been explored. It has been observed that metal clustering near the surface and sub-surface region below glass-FTO interface changes electrical and optical properties significantly. Ion implantation does not affect the crystalline structure of the coated films; however, the unit cell volume decreases with increase in fluence and the tetragonal distortion (c/a ratio) also decreases systematically in the implanted samples. The sheet resistivity of the films increases from 11 × 10{sup −5} ohm-cm (in pristine) to 7.5 × 10{sup −4} ohm-cm for highest ion beam fluence ≈10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The optical absorption decreases with increasing fluence whereas, the optical transmittance as well as reflectance increases with increasing fluence. The Raman spectra are observed at ∼530 cm{sup −1} and ∼1103 cm{sup −1} in pristine sample. The broad band at 530 cm{sup −1} shifts towards higher wave number in the irradiated samples. This may be correlated with increased disorder and strain relaxation in

  14. Characterisation of PEEK, PET and PI implanted with 80 keV Fe{sup +} ions to high fluencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackova, A., E-mail: mackova@ujf.cas.cz [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v. v. i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, Ceske mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Malinsky, P.; Miksova, R. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v. v. i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkinje University, Ceske mladeze 8, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Hnatowicz, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v. v. i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Khaibullin, R.I. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Kazan Physical–Technical Institute, Sibirsky Trakt 10/7, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Slepicka, P.; Svorcik, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-15

    Polyimide (PI), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) foils were implanted with 80 keV Fe{sup +} ions at room temperature at fluencies of 0.2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}– 5.0 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. The implanted polymers were subsequently annealed at 200 °C for 20 min. The depth profiles of implanted Fe atoms and compositional changes of the implanted polymers were characterised by RBS and ERDA methods. A significant shift of the Fe concentration maximum to the sample surface with increasing ion fluence was observed and annealing does not influence the Fe profiles. The implanted Fe profiles cannot be reproduced by SRIM and TRIDYN simulations. Hydrogen desorption from the surface layer of all polymers is observed, the effect being the most pronounced on PET. Desorption of oxygen from the samples implanted to lower fluences is observed too. On the samples implanted to the highest fluence of 5.0 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}, however, oxygen concentration increases to the value close to that of pristine polymer, this phenomenon is strongly pronounced after the annealing, which is provided in the ambient atmosphere. The electrical, optical and structural properties of the implanted polymers were investigated by sheet resistance measurement and UV–Vis spectroscopy. With increasing ion fluence, the sheet resistance decreases, but a saturation effect is achieved at a fluence of 5.0 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. UV–Vis absorbance increases simultaneously with the decline of the optical band gap E{sub g}. After annealing, no significant changes in UV–Vis spectra or in electrical properties were observed.

  15. Development of neutron fluence measurement and evaluation technology for the test materials in the capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, U.; Choi, S. H.; Kang, H. D. [Kyungsan University, Kyungsan (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The four kinds of the fluence monitor considered by self-shielding are design and fabricated for evaluation of neutron irradiation fluence. They are equipped with dosimeters consisting of Ni, Fe and Ti wires and so forth. The nuclear reaction rate is obtained by measurement on dosimeter using the spectroscopic analysis of induced {gamma}-ray. We established the nuetron fluence evaluating technology that is based on the measurement of the reaction rate considering reactor's irradiation history, burn-out, self-shielding in fluence monitor, and the influence of impurity in dosimeter. The distribution of high energy neutron flux on the vertical axis of the capsule shows fifth order polynomial equation and is good agree with theoretical value in the error range of 30% by MCNP/4A code. 22 refs., 50 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  16. Ultra-short pulsed laser ablation of silicon nitride layers: Investigation near threshold fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, Gerrit, E-mail: gheinrich@cismst.de [CIS Forschungsinstititut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Straße 14, Erfurt 99099 (Germany); Technische Universität Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Weimarer Str. 32, Ilmenau 98693 (Germany); Wollgarten, Markus [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Bereich Solarenergieforschung, Institut für Technologie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Bähr, Mario; Lawerenz, Alexander [CIS Forschungsinstititut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Straße 14, Erfurt 99099 (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    In this work, silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) layers, deposited on a planar silicon wafer are locally irradiated by ultra short laser pulses with fluences near the threshold fluence. The irradiated areas are investigated by SEM and TEM in order to analyze the laser influence to silicon and to the SiN{sub x} layer. Thereby, a lift-off process is observed for this SiN{sub x} layer. The silicon absorbs the laser pulse energy. For low fluences, crystalline silicon is disordered below the SiN{sub x} layer. For high fluences, silicon evaporates below the SiN{sub x} layer and bulge the SiN{sub x} layer. If the pressure within the bulge is high enough, the SiN{sub x} layer will break down due to high mechanical stress.

  17. Implantation damage in heavy gas implanted 4H-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C. [Institut Pprime, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, UPR 3346, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Nicolaï, J., E-mail: julien.nicolai@univ-poitiers.fr [Institut Pprime, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, UPR 3346, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Declémy, A. [Institut Pprime, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, UPR 3346, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Gilabert, E. [Centre d’Etude Nucléaire de Bordeaux-Gradignan, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Beaufort, M.-F.; Barbot, J.-F. [Institut Pprime, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, UPR 3346, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France)

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of SiC were implanted with heavy inert gases (Xe, Ar) at elevated temperatures (300–800 °C) and for a large range of fluence (1 × 10{sup 12}–1 × 10{sup 15} ions cm{sup −2}). Thermodesorption measurements suggest that gas is trapped by implantation-induced vacancy-type defects impeding any gas diffusion. The damage accumulation versus dose was studied through the tensile elastic strain determined by using X-ray diffraction. Results show that at low dose the strain is predictable via a thermally activated direct impact model. The low thermal activation energy at saturation suggests a dynamic recovery process dominated by the migration of interstitial-type defects as its relaxation during post thermal annealing. As compared with light-gas implantation the heavy-gas to defect ratio is low enhancing the formation of strongly perturbed zones rather than the formation of bubble precursors.

  18. Goserelin Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in men (blockage that causes difficulty urinating), or heart or liver disease.tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Goserelin implant should not be used in pregnant women, except ...

  19. Embrittlement of low copper VVER 440 surveillance samples neutron-irradiated to high fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Russell, K. F.; Kocik, J.; Keilova, E.

    2000-11-01

    An atom probe tomography microstructural characterization of low copper (0.06 at.% Cu) surveillance samples from a VVER 440 reactor has revealed manganese and silicon segregation to dislocations and other ultrafine features in neutron-irradiated base and weld materials (fluences 1×10 25 m-2 and 5×10 24 m-2, E>0.5 MeV, respectively). The results indicate that there is an additional mechanism of embrittlement during neutron irradiation that manifests itself at high fluences.

  20. Femtosecond laser fluence based nanostructuring of W and Mo in ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Nathala, Chandra Sekher; Ajami, Ali Asghar; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    The effect of femtosecond laser fluence on nanostructuring of Tungsten (W) and Molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated after ablation in ethanol environment. A Ti: Sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs) at fluences ranging from 0.6 to 5.7 J cm-2 was employed to ablate targets. The growth of structures on the surface of irradiated targets is investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis. The SEM was performed for both central as well as the peripheral ablated regions. It is observed that both the development and shape of nanoscale features is dependent upon deposited energies to the target surface as well as nature of material. Nanostructures grown on Mo are more distinct and well defined as compared to W. At central ablated areas of W, unorganized Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) are grown at low fluences, whereas, nonuniform melting along with cracking is observed at higher fluences. In case of Mo, well-defined and organized LIPSS are observed for low fluences. With increasing fluence, LIPSS become unorganized and broken with an appearance of cracks and are completely vanished with the formation of nanoscale cavities and conical structures. In case of peripheral ablated areas broken and bifurcated LIPSS are grown for all fluences for both materials. The, ablated diameter, ablation depth, ablation rate and the dependence of periodicity of LIPSS on the laser fluence are also estimated for both W and Mo. Parametric instabilities of laser-induced plasma along with generation and scattering of surface plasmons is considered as a possible cause for the formation of LIPSS. For ethanol assisted ablation, the role of bubble cavitation, precipitation, confinement and the convective flow is considered to be responsible for inducing increased hydrodynamic instabilities at the liquid-solid interface.

  1. Femtosecond laser fluence based nanostructuring of W and Mo in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore (Pakistan); Nathala, Chandra Sekher [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Ajami, Ali Asghar [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Faculty of Physics, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Husinsky, Wolfgang [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    The effect of femtosecond laser fluence on nanostructuring of Tungsten (W) and Molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated after ablation in ethanol environment. A Ti: Sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs) at fluences ranging from 0.6 to 5.7 J cm{sup −2} was employed to ablate targets. The growth of structures on the surface of irradiated targets is investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis. The SEM was performed for both central as well as the peripheral ablated regions. It is observed that both the development and shape of nanoscale features is dependent upon deposited energies to the target surface as well as nature of material. Nanostructures grown on Mo are more distinct and well defined as compared to W. At central ablated areas of W, unorganized Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) are grown at low fluences, whereas, nonuniform melting along with cracking is observed at higher fluences. In case of Mo, well-defined and organized LIPSS are observed for low fluences. With increasing fluence, LIPSS become unorganized and broken with an appearance of cracks and are completely vanished with the formation of nanoscale cavities and conical structures. In case of peripheral ablated areas broken and bifurcated LIPSS are grown for all fluences for both materials. The, ablated diameter, ablation depth, ablation rate and the dependence of periodicity of LIPSS on the laser fluence are also estimated for both W and Mo. Parametric instabilities of laser-induced plasma along with generation and scattering of surface plasmons is considered as a possible cause for the formation of LIPSS. For ethanol assisted ablation, the role of bubble cavitation, precipitation, confinement and the convective flow is considered to be responsible for inducing increased hydrodynamic instabilities at the liquid-solid interface.

  2. Contraceptive implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  3. Mechanical and structural properties of fluorine-ion-implanted boron suboxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Machaka, R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Results on a systematic study on the effects of ion implantation on the near-surface mechanical and structural properties of boron suboxide (B6 O) prepared by uniaxial hot pressing are reviewed. 150 keV fluorine ions at fluences of up to 5.0 × 1016...

  4. What is an acceptably smoothed fluence? Dosimetric and delivery considerations for dynamic sliding window IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Clivio

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study summarised in this report aimed to investigate the interplay between fluence complexity, dose calculation algorithms, dose calculation spatial resolution and delivery characteristics (monitor units, effective field width and dose delivery against dose prediction agreement was investigated. A sample set of complex planning cases was selected and tested using a commercial treatment planning system capable of inverse optimisation and equipped with tools to tune fluence smoothness. Methods A set of increasingly smoothed fluence patterns was correlated to a generalised expression of the Modulation Index (MI concept, in nature independent from the specific planning system used that could therefore be recommended as a predictor to score fluence "quality" at a very early stage of the IMRT QA process. Fluence complexity was also correlated to delivery accuracy and characteristics in terms of number of MU, dynamic window width and agreement between calculation and measurement (expressed as percentage of field area with a γ > 1 (%FA when comparing calculated vs. delivered modulated dose maps. Different resolutions of the calculation grid and different photon dose algorithms (pencil beam and anisotropic analytical algorithm were used for the investigations. Results and Conclusion i MI can be used as a reliable parameter to test different approaches/algorithms to smooth fluences implemented in a TPS, and to identify the preferable default values for the smoothing parameters if appropriate tools are implemented; ii a MI threshold set at MI

  5. Study of hydrogen implantation-induced blistering in GaSb for potential layer transfer applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ravi; Dadwal, U.; Singh, R.

    2017-07-01

    GaSb samples were implanted by 100 keV hydrogen ions (H+) at room temperature with fluence values of 1  ×  1017 and 2  ×  1017 ions cm-2. Post-implantation annealing studies revealed that the samples implanted with a fluence of 2  ×  1017 ions cm-2 did not show blistering/exfoliation. For the lower fluence, the samples showed the formation of surface blisters/craters along with the large area exfoliation of the top H-implanted surface. Topographical investigations of the samples were carried out using Nomarski optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy and stylus surface profilometry. The lateral sizes and heights of the blisters varied between 2-5 µm and 5-20 nm respectively. The root mean square roughness of the exfoliated region was about 12 nm while the exfoliation depth was found to be 730 nm. The exfoliation depth in the H-implanted GaSb is close to the damage concentration peak as found from SRIM calculations. The Föppl-von Karman theory of thin plates has been used to understand the effect of internal pressure and stress on the surface blistering. Using the above mentioned implantation and annealing parameters, potential layer transfer of GaSb could be enabled.

  6. Blistering in alloy Ti–6Al–4V from H+ ion implantation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Singh; V Singh

    2010-04-01

    The effect of H+ ion implantation on surface morphology of the titanium alloy, Ti–6Al–4V, was studied, following H+ ion implantation of 150 keV and 250 keV energy to fluence of 2.6 × 1018 cm-2 and 2.5 × 1019 cm-2, respectively at ambient temperature. No detectable change was observed in surface features of either of the above specimen immediately after the implantation. However, vein like features (VLF) were observed to appear on the surface of the sample, implanted at 150 keV to a fluence of 2.6 × 1018 cm-2, following natural ageing at room temperature for 150 days. Subsequent annealing of the above naturally aged sample, at 423 K for 150 min under vacuum (10-3 torr), led to development of a macroblister. In sharp contrast in the other sample, implanted by H+ ions of higher energy (250 keV) to higher fluence of 2.5 × 1019 cm-2, neither there was any effect of natural ageing following the implantation nor that of subsequent annealing at 423 K and ageing on its surface morphology.

  7. Copper nanoparticles synthesized in polymers by ion implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Nuzhdin, Vladimir; Valeev, Valerij

    2015-01-01

    nanoparticles are observed to partly tower above the sample surface due to a side effect of high-fluence irradiation leading to considerable sputtering of polymers. Implantation and particle formation significantly change optical properties of both polymers reducing transmittance in the UV-visible range due...... to structural and compositional change as well as causing an absorption band related to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the nanoparticles. The role of polymer type and its degradation under the implantation on LSPR is studied in order to optimize conditions for the formation of nanoplasmonic...

  8. Temperature behavior of damage in sapphire implanted with light ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, E. [Ion Beam Laboratory, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem 2686-953 (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: ealves@itn.pt; Marques, C. [Ion Beam Laboratory, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem 2686-953 (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Safran, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); McHargue, Carl J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0750 (United States)

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we compare and discuss the defect behavior of sapphire single crystals implanted with different fluences (1 x 10{sup 16}-1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}) of carbon and nitrogen with 150 keV. The implantation temperatures were RT, 500 deg. C and 1000 deg. C to study the influence of temperature on the defect structures. For all the ions the Rutherford backscattering-channeling (RBS-C) results indicate a surface region with low residual disorder in the Al-sublattice. Near the end of range the channeled spectrum almost reaches the random indicating a high damage level for fluences of 1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) photographs show a layered contrast feature for the C implanted sample where a buried amorphous region is present. For the N implanted sample the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) elemental mapping give evidence for the presence of a buried damage layer decorated with bubbles. Samples implanted at high temperatures (500 deg. C and 1000 deg. C) show a strong contrast fluctuation indicating a defective crystalline structure of sapphire.

  9. Ion implantation damage and crystalline-amorphous transition in Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Impellizzeri, G.; Mirabella, S.; Grimaldi, M.G. [Universita di Catania, MATIS IMM-CNR (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    Experimental studies on the damage produced in (100) Ge substrates by implantation of Ge{sup +} ions at different energies (from 25 to 600 keV), fluences (from 2 x 10{sup 13} to 4 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}) and temperature (room temperature, RT, or liquid-nitrogen temperature, LN{sub 2}T) have been performed by using the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry technique. We demonstrated that the higher damage rate of Ge with respect to Si is due to both the high stopping power of germanium atoms and the low mobility of point defects within the collision cascades. The amorphization of Ge has been modeled by employing the critical damage energy density model in a large range of implantation energies and fluences both at RT and LN{sub 2}T. The experimental results for implantation at LN{sub 2}T were fitted using a critical damage energy density of {proportional_to}1 eV/atom. A fictitious value of {proportional_to}5 eV/atom was obtained for the samples implanted at RT, essentially because at RT the damage annihilation plays a non-negligible role against the crystalline-amorphous transition phase. The critical damage energy density model was found to stand also for other ions implanted in crystalline Ge (Ar{sup +} and Ga{sup +}). (orig.)

  10. Effect of In implantation and annealing on the lattice disorder and nano-mechanical properties of GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filintoglou, K. [School of Physics, Section of Solid State Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Kavouras, P. [Department of Applied Sciences, Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki, 57400 Sindos (Greece); Katsikini, M., E-mail: katsiki@auth.gr [School of Physics, Section of Solid State Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Arvanitidis, J. [School of Physics, Section of Solid State Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Department of Applied Sciences, Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki, 57400 Sindos (Greece); Christofilos, D. [Physics Division, School of Technology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Ves, S. [School of Physics, Section of Solid State Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Wendler, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich Schiller Universität Jena, Max Wien Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    The effect of 700 keV In implantation and subsequent annealing on GaN was studied by Rutherford Backscattering spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and nanο-indentation as a function of the ion fluence (F) ranging from 5 × 10{sup 13} to 1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. Symmetry allowed and disorder activated Raman scattering peaks were analyzed using the spatial correlation model, allowing their assignment to phonon branches of crystalline GaN or defects and the estimation of the corresponding phonon coherence length (L). The L values decrease abruptly at a critical fluence of approximately 2 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2}. After a slight increase in the nano-hardness (H) and reduced elastic modulus (E{sub r}) values at low implantation fluences, they exhibit a steep reduction. These variations are accompanied by changes in the shape of the load–displacement curves, which are indicative of elasto-plastic behavior up to a critical F, whereas they approach the ideal plastic behavior at higher fluences. Annealing at 1000 °C of the sample implanted with 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} results in efficient recovery of its structural and nano-mechanical properties. However, annealing of specimens implanted at higher fluences causes partial recovery that starts mainly from the transition region between the heavily damaged and the underlying undamaged GaN. The highly correlated behavior of L, H and E{sub r} on the implantation fluence implies a common origin of the studied effects. - Highlights: ► In implanted GaN is studied by Raman spectroscopy, RBS and nano-indentation. ► Phonon coherence length decreases in accordance to hardness and elastic modulus. ► Elastoplastic behavior is observed at low and plastic at high fluences. ► Annealing is more effective at fluences that do not cause complete amorphization. ► At high fluences annealing results in redistribution of atomic species.

  11. 3-D GaAs radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Meikle, A R; Ledingham, Kenneth W D; Marsh, J H; Mathieson, K; O'Shea, V; Smith, K M

    2002-01-01

    A novel type of GaAs radiation detector featuring a 3-D array of electrodes that penetrate through the detector bulk is described. The development of the technology to fabricate such a detector is presented along with electrical and radiation source tests. Simulations of the electrical characteristics are given for detectors of various dimensions. Laser drilling, wet chemical etching and metal evaporation were used to create a cell array of nine electrodes, each with a diameter of 60 mu m and a pitch of 210 mu m. Electrical measurements showed I-V characteristics with low leakage currents and high breakdown voltages. The forward and reverse I-V measurements showed asymmetrical characteristics, which are not seen in planar diodes. Spectra were obtained using alpha particle illumination. A charge collection efficiency of 50% and a S/N ratio of 3 : 1 were obtained. Simulations using the MEDICI software package were performed on cells with various dimensions and were comparable with experimental results. Simulati...

  12. Spectroscopy of GaAs quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, L.C.

    1985-07-01

    A new type of optical dipole transition in GaAs quantum wells has been observed. The dipole occurs between two envelope states of the conduction band electron wavefunction, and is called a quantum well envelope state transition (QWEST). The QWEST is observed by infrared absorption in three different samples with quantum well thicknesses 65, 82, and 92 A and resonant energies of 152, 121, and 108 MeV, respectively. The oscillator strength is found to have values of over 12, in good agreement with prediction. The linewidths are seen as narrow as 10 MeV at room temperature and 7 MeV at low temperature, thus proving a narrow line resonance can indeed occur between transitions of free electrons. Techniques for the proper growth of these quantum well samples to enable observation of the QWEST have also been found using (AlGa)As compounds. This QWEST is considered to be an ideal material for an all optical digital computer. The QWEST can be made frequency matched to the inexpensive Carbon Dioxide laser with an infrared wavelength of 10 microns. The nonlinearity and fast relaxation time of the QWEST indicate a logic element with a subpicosecond switch time can be built in the near future, with a power level which will eventually be limited only by the noise from a lack of quanta to above approximately 10 microwatts. 64 refs., 35 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Multidiagnostic analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoop, K. K., E-mail: anoop.kiliyanamkandy@unina.it; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S. [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, Napoli 80126 (Italy); Polek, M. P. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Harilal, S. S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    The dynamics of ions in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over fluences ranging from the ablation threshold up to ≈75 J/cm{sup 2} by means of three well-established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup, and spectrally resolved intensified charge coupled device imaging simultaneously monitored the ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a pure copper target with 800 nm, ≈50 fs, Ti: Sapphire laser pulses. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed, resulting in the observance of three different regimes. The specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4–5 J/cm{sup 2}, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ≈50 J/cm{sup 2}. The fluence dependence of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase in forward-peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ≈10 J/cm{sup 2}. A broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ≈10 J/cm{sup 2}. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ionic angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ≈66 J/cm{sup 2}. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals shows a narrow, forward-peaked distribution, and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ionic angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  14. Low-fluence CO2 laser irradiation: selective epidermal damage to human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, B R; Tang, S V; Arndt, K A; Stern, R S; Noe, J M; Rosen, S

    1985-09-01

    The interaction of normal human skin with low-fluence CO2 laser irradiation was studied using a three-phase approach. In phase one, freshly excised skin was observed immediately after impact. In phase two, skin irradiated 2 h prior to excision was studied. In phase three, human volunteers were irradiated and biopsied at time zero, 24 h and 48 h. Seventy-five sites were exposed and 60 biopsies were performed. The earliest histologic changes were observed in the 6-10 J/cm2 fluence (radiant exposure) range and these changes included spindle and vacuolar changes in the basal layer of the epidermis. Papillary dermal coagulation was present to a maximum of 0.03 mm. At fluences of 10-25 J/cm2, superficial dermal necrosis (0.06-0.08 mm) was observed. At fluences above 25 J/cm2, transepidermal necrosis was present with increasing papillary dermal necrosis that was in proportion to the energy density delivered. At 2h, basal vacuolar changes were accompanied by diffuse keratinocytic cell death where contact was maintained between the epidermis and dermis, while where separation occurred limited keratinocytic death was observed. The earliest changes occurred at lower threshold fluences (4-6 J/cm2). After 24 h, these doses resulted in extensive epidermal necrosis with focal acute inflammatory infiltrates. At 48 h, the degree of epidermal "slough" was proportional to the energy density delivered and was maximal with a fluence of 5.7 J/cm2 delivered whereas with a fluence of 3.8 J/cm2 thin slough (0.02 mm) was observed. These findings suggest that low-dose CO2 laser irradiation may provide a new approach to selectively damage the epidermis with minimal dermal damage.

  15. Nondestructive tribochemistry-assisted nanofabrication on GaAs surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chenfei; Li, Xiaoying; Dong, Hanshan; Yu, Bingjun; Wang, Zhiming; Qian, Linmao

    2015-03-01

    A tribochemistry-assisted method has been developed for nondestructive surface nanofabrication on GaAs. Without any applied electric field and post etching, hollow nanostructures can be directly fabricated on GaAs surfaces by sliding a SiO2 microsphere under an ultralow contact pressure in humid air. TEM observation on the cross-section of the fabricated area shows that there is no appreciable plastic deformation under a 4 nm groove, confirming that GaAs can be removed without destruction. Further analysis suggests that the fabrication relies on the tribochemistry with the participation of vapor in humid air. It is proposed that the formation and breakage of GaAs-O-Si bonding bridges are responsible for the removal of GaAs material during the sliding process. As a nondestructive and conductivity-independent method, it will open up new opportunities to fabricate defect-free and well-ordered nucleation positions for quantum dots on GaAs surfaces.

  16. Terahertz pulse detection by the GaAs Schottky diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperashvili, Tina; Kvitsiani, Orest; Imerlishvili, Ilia; Laperashvili, David

    2010-06-01

    We present the results of experimental studies of physical properties of the detection process of GaAs Schottky diodes for terahertz frequency radiation. The development of technology in the THz frequency band has a rapid progress recently. Considered as an extension of the microwave and millimeter wave bands, the THz frequency offers greater communication bandwidth than is available at microwave frequencies. The Schottky barrier contact has an important role in the operation of many GaAs devices. GaAs Schottky diodes have been the primary nonlinear device used in millimeter and sub millimeter wave detectors and receivers. GaAs Schottky diodes are especially interesting due to their high mobility transport characteristics, which allows for a large reduction of the resistance-capacitance (RC) time constant and thermal noise. In This work are investigated the electrical and photoelectric properties of GaAs Schottky diodes. Samples were obtained by deposition of different metals (Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Fe, In, Ga, Al) on semiconductor. For fabrication metal-semiconductor (MS) structures is used original method of metal electrodepositing. In this method electrochemical etching of semiconductor surface occurs just before deposition of metal from the solution, which contains etching material and metal ions together. For that, semiconductor surface cleaning processes and metal deposition carries out in the same technological process. In the experiments as the electrolyte was used aqueous solution of chlorides. Metal deposition was carried out at room temperature.

  17. Cochlear Implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this text, the authors recall the main principles and data ruling cochlear implants. Then, a first circle of technical equipment for assistance is presented. This circle includes: device setting (DS), Electrically evoked Auditory Brainstem Responses (EABR), Neural Response Telemetry (NRT), Stapedial Reflex (SR) and Electrodogram Acquisition (EA). This first cycle becomes more and more important as children are implanted younger and younger; the amount of data available with this assistance makes necessary the use of models (implicit or explicit) to handle this information. Consequently, this field is more open than ever.

  18. Laser fluence dependence on emission dynamics of ultrafast laser induced copper plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoop, K. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Philip, Reji; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2016-11-14

    The characteristic emission features of a laser-produced plasma strongly depend strongly on the laser fluence. We investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of neutrals and ions in femtosecond laser (800 nm, ≈ 40 fs, Ti:Sapphire) induced copper plasma in vacuum using both optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and spectrally resolved two-dimensional (2D) imaging methods over a wide fluence range of 0.5 J/cm2-77.5 J/cm2. 2D fast gated monochromatic images showed distinct plume splitting between the neutral and ions especially at moderate to higher fluence ranges. OES studies at low to moderate laser fluence regime confirm intense neutral line emission over the ion emission whereas this trend changes at higher laser fluence with dominance of the latter. This evidences a clear change in the physical processes involved in femtosecond laser matter interaction at high input laser intensity. The obtained ion dynamics resulting from the OES, and spectrally resolved 2D imaging are compared with charged particle measurement employing Faraday cup and Langmuir probe and results showed good correlation.

  19. Flow transitions in model Czochralski GaAs melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shu-xian; LI Ming-wei

    2006-01-01

    The flow and heat transfer of molten GaAs during Czochralski growth are studied with a time-dependent and three-dimensional turbulent flow model. A transition from axisymmetric flow to non-axisymmetric flow and then back to axisymmetric flow again with increasing the crucible rotation rate is predicted. In the non-axisymmetric regime, the thermal wave induced by the combination of coriolis force, buoyancy and viscous force in the GaAs melt is predicted for the first time. The thermal wave is confirmed to be baroclinic thermal wave. The origin of the transition to non-axisymmetric flow is baroclinic instability. The critical parameters for the transitions are presented, which are quantitatively in agreement with Fein and Preffer's experimental results. The calculated results can be taken as a reference for the growth of GaAs single-crystal of high quality.

  20. Structural studies of silicon oxynitride layers formed by low energy ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Alka R. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Yadav, A.D. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India)], E-mail: adyadav@physics.mu.ac.in; Dubey, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Gundu Rao, T.K. [SAIF, IIT Bombay, Mumbai (India)

    2008-04-15

    Silicon oxynitride (Si{sub x}O{sub y}N{sub z}) layers were synthesized by implanting {sup 16}O{sub 2}{sup +} and {sup 14}N{sub 2}{sup +} 30 keV ions in 1:1 ratio with fluences ranging from 5 x 10{sup 16} to 1 x 10{sup 18} ions cm{sup -2} into single crystal silicon at room temperature. Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of the samples was carried out at different temperatures in nitrogen ambient for 5 min. The FTIR studies show that the structures of ion-beam synthesized oxynitride layers are strongly dependent on total ion-fluence and annealing temperature. It is found that the structures formed at lower ion fluences ({approx}1 x 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}) are homogenous oxygen-rich silicon oxynitride. However, at higher fluence levels ({approx}1 x 10{sup 18} ions cm{sup -2}) formation of homogenous nitrogen rich silicon oxynitride is observed due to ion-beam induced surface sputtering effects. The Micro-Raman studies on 1173 K annealed samples show formation of partially amorphous oxygen and nitrogen rich silicon oxynitride structures with crystalline silicon beneath it for lower and higher ion fluences, respectively. The Ellipsometry studies on 1173 K annealed samples show an increase in the thickness of silicon oxynitride layer with increasing ion fluence. The refractive index of the ion-beam synthesized layers is found to be in the range 1.54-1.96.

  1. Annealing behavior and lattice site location of Er implanted InGaN

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, E; Correia, M R; Pereira, S; De Vries, B; Vantomme, A

    2003-01-01

    Single crystalline InGaN epilayers with different In content were implanted with Er$^{+}$ fluences in the range of 1 $\\times 10^{13}$ to 5 $\\times 10^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$ at room temperature. The structural changes and lattice site location were studied with emission channeling and RBS/channeling. Photoluminescence measurements were also performed to study the optical properties of the implanted samples. After implantation of 1 $\\times 10^{13}$ Er$^{+}$ cm$^{-2}$, the emission channeling results show the incorporation of a significant fraction of Er in substitutional Ga/In sites. For fluences of 1 $\\times 10^{15}$ Er$^{+}$ cm$^{-2}$ the aligned RBS spectrum along the [0001] direction reveals the displacement of the Er ions into random sites in the entire implanted region. Proximity cap annealing at 400°C and 500°C leads to some damage recovery on the samples implanted with lowest fluence accompanied by an increase of the substitutional fraction of Er. Despite the lattice disorder, a fraction of the Er ions are i...

  2. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Helium Bubble Implantation in Metal Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bufford, Daniel Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Snow, Clark Sheldon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Here we investigated the microstructural response of various Pd physically vapor deposited films and Er and ErD2 samples prepared from neutron Tube targets to implanted He via in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscopy and subsequent in situ annealing experiments. Small bubbles formed in both systems during implantation, but did not grow with increasing fluence or a short duration room temperature aging (weeks). Annealing produced large cavities with different densities in the two systems. The ErD2 showed increased cavity nucleation compared to Er. The spherical bubbles formed from high fluence implantation and rapid annealing in both Er and ErD2 cases differed from microstructures of naturally aged tritiated samples. Further work is still underway to determine the transition in bubble shape in the Er samples, as well as the mechanism for evolution in Pd films.

  3. Damage annealing in low temperature Fe/Mn implanted ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnlaugsson, H. P. [University of Aarhus, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Bharuth-Ram, K., E-mail: kbr@tlabs.ac.za [Durban University of Technology, Physics Department (South Africa); Johnston, K. [PH Department, ISOLDE/CERN (Switzerland); Langouche, G. [University of Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralings fysika (Belgium); Mantovan, R. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR (Italy); Mølholt, T. E. [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland); Naidoo, D. [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Physics (South Africa); Ólafsson, O. [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland); Weyer, G. [University of Aarhus, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark)

    2015-04-15

    {sup 57}Fe Emission Mössbauer spectra obtained after low fluence (<10{sup 12} cm {sup −2}) implantation of {sup 57}Mn (T{sub 1/2}= 1.5 min.) into ZnO single crystal held at temperatures below room temperature (RT) are presented. The spectra can be analysed in terms of four components due to Fe {sup 2+} and Fe {sup 3+} on Zn sites, interstitial Fe and Fe in damage regions (Fe {sub D}). The Fe {sub D} component is found to be indistinguishable from similar component observed in emission Mössbauer spectra of higher fluence (∼10{sup 15} cm {sup −2}){sup 57}Fe/ {sup 57}Co implanted ZnO and {sup 57}Fe implanted ZnO, demonstrating that the nature of the damage regions in the two types of experiments is similar. The defect component observed in the low temperature regime was found to anneal below RT.

  4. DAMAGE DISTRIBUTION OF LiNbO3 CRYSTAL INDUCED BY C+ IMPLANTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShiBo-Rong; WangKe-Ming; 等

    1990-01-01

    The Y-cut X propagating LiNbO3 crystals were implanted with a fluence of 5×1013-5×1014 C ions/cm2 at energies from 100 to 200keV,respectively,The implanted LiNbO3 Crystals were analyzed using Rutherford backscattering/Channeling technique,The result shows that:(1)the damage rages are systematically higher than the projected ranges calculated from TRIM(Transport of Ions in Matter) simulation,and the damage widths are significantly broader than TRIM values;(2) the total disorder induced by carbon ion in LiNbO3 is not linearly increased with the implanted fluence.

  5. Electronic contribution to friction on GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Applied Science and Technology Graduate Group, UC Berkeley; Dept. of Materials Sciences and Engineering, UC Berkeley; Salmeron, Miquel; Qi, Yabing; Park, J.Y.; Hendriksen, B.L.M.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-04-15

    The electronic contribution to friction at semiconductor surfaces was investigated by using a Pt-coated tip with 50nm radius in an atomic force microscope sliding against an n-type GaAs(100) substrate. The GaAs surface was covered by an approximately 1 nm thick oxide layer. Charge accumulation or depletion was induced by the application of forward or reverse bias voltages. We observed a substantial increase in friction force in accumulation (forward bias) with respect to depletion (reverse bias). We propose a model based on the force exerted by the trapped charges that quantitatively explains the experimental observations of excess friction.

  6. The effect of local fluence on the micropatterning of poly(ethylene terephthalate) foils through proton beam writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, C. T.; Stori, E. M.; Boufleur, L. A.; Papaléo, R. M.; Dias, J. F.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of ion fluence on the development of microstructures produced by 2.2 MeV H+ impinging on 12-μm-thick poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET, Mylar®) foils. Several lines of 1 × 100 pixels corresponding to approximately 2.5 × 101.5 µm2 were patterned on PET foils using different ion fluences (from 1012 to 1017 H+/cm2) and etching times (from 1 to 60 min). We observe the presence of three different behaviors according to the ion fluence. Long etching times are necessary to open the structure in the low fluence regime, while moderate fluences require shorter etching times. In the high fluence regime, a more complex scenario emerges where short etching times lead to structures either fully or partially developed.

  7. Quantitative damage depth profiles in arsenic implanted HgCdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobre, C., E-mail: clement.lobre@cea.fr [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Jalabert, D. [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble 1 UMR-E, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Vickridge, I.; Briand, E.; Benzeggouta, D. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UMR 7588 du CNRS, Universite de Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Mollard, L. [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Jouneau, P.H. [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble 1 UMR-E, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Ballet, P. [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2013-10-15

    Rutherford backscattering experiments under channeling conditions (RBS-c) have been carried out on Hg{sub 0.77}Cd{sub 0.23}Te (MCT) layers implanted with arsenic. Accurate damage profiles have been extracted through a simple formalism for implanted and annealed layers. Quantitative damage profiles are correlated with structural defects observed by bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM) and chemical composition measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Evolution of damage for increasing ion implantation fluence has been investigated by these three complementary techniques. Evidence is found of irradiation induced annealing during implantation. A fast damage recovery has been observed for post-implantation thermal anneals. In the case of an implanted layer annealed during 1 h, the damage profile, associated with arsenic concentration measurements, indicates the presence of complexes involving arsenic.

  8. Blistering and cracking of LiTaO{sub 3} single crystal under helium ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Changdong; Lu, Fei; Ma, Yujie [Shandong University, School of Information Science and Engineering, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-11-29

    Blistering and cracking in LiTaO{sub 3} surface are investigated after 200-keV helium ion implantation and subsequent post-implantation annealing. Rutherford backscattering/channeling is used to examine the lattice damage caused by ion implantation. Blistering is observed through optical microscopy in a dynamic heating process. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy measurements are used to detect the LiTaO{sub 3} surface morphology. Experimental results show that blistering and flaking are dependent on implantation fluence, beam current, and also annealing temperature. We speculate that the surface cracking of He{sup +}-implanted LiTaO{sub 3} results from the implantation-induced stress and compression. (orig.)

  9. Lattice modification in KTiOPO4 by hydrogen and helium sequentially implantation in submicrometer depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Changdong; Lu, Fei; Xu, Bo; Fan, Ranran

    2016-05-01

    We investigated lattice modification and its physical mechanism in H and He co-implanted, z-cut potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO4). The samples were implanted with 110 keV H and 190 keV He, both to a fluence of 4 × 1016 cm-2, at room temperature. Rutherford backscattering/channeling, high-resolution x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the implantation-induced structural changes and strain. Experimental and simulated x-ray diffraction results show that the strain in the implanted KTiOPO4 crystal is caused by interstitial atoms. The strain and stress are anisotropic and depend on the crystal's orientation. Transmission electron microscopy studies indicate that ion implantation produces many dislocations in the as-implanted samples. Annealing can induce ion aggregation to form nanobubbles, but plastic deformation and ion out-diffusion prevent the KTiOPO4 surface from blistering.

  10. Tissue effects of Ho:YAG laser with varying fluences and pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-02-01

    We investigated the effect of varying fluence and pulse width on the ablation rate and consequent thermal damage of the Ho:YAG (2.130 micrometers ) laser. The rate of ablation on fresh bovine knee joint tissues, fibrous cartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone in saline was determined after varying the fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and pulse width (150, 250, 450 microsecond(s) ec, FWHM) at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A 400/440 micrometers fiber was used. The ablation rate increased linearly with the fluence. In fibrocartilage, different pulse durations generated significant changes in the ablation rates, but showed minor effects on hyaline cartilage and bone. The heat of ablation for all three tissue types decreased after lengthening the pulse.

  11. Fluence Rate in UV Photoreactor for Disinfection of Water: Isotropically Radiating Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Ilinsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The calculation of fluence rate in the photochemical reactor using ultraviolet (UV radiation for disinfection of water for the case, when a cylinder of infinite length is used as a light source, has been considered. Such a cylinder is filled with an isotropically radiating medium. The dependence of the fluent rate on the diameter of the radiating cylinder has been analytically analyzed. The limiting case when the diameter of the radiating cylinder tends to zero has been considered and the notion of “effective interval” has been introduced. Based on this notion, the comparison of fluence rates for the cylinders of finite and infinite lengths has been performed. In the calculations of fluence rate, it is advisable to use the Chebyshev method for the operations of numerical integration.

  12. Calculation of fluence and absorbed dose in head tissues due to different photon energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorín, C; Vega-Carrillo, H R; Rivera, T; Azorín, J

    2014-01-01

    Calculations of fluence and absorbed dose in head tissues due to different photon energies were carried out using the MCNPX code, to simulate two models of a patient's head: one spherical and another more realistic ellipsoidal. Both head models had concentric shells to describe the scalp skin, the cranium and the brain. The tumor was located at the center of the head and it was a 1 cm-radius sphere. The MCNPX code was run for different energies. Results showed that the fluence decreases as the photons pass through the different head tissues. It can be observed that, although the fluence into the tumor is different for both head models, absorbed dose is the same.

  13. Analysis of layer splitting in x and z-cut KTiOPO4 implanted by H+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu-Jie; Lu, Fei; Ma, Chang-Dong; Xu, Bo; Fan, Ranran

    2016-04-01

    H+ ions with various fluences are implanted into x and z-cut KTP crystals to achieve KTP film. Post-implantation annealing under different temperature is imposed on the samples to induce layer splitting and surface morphology modification. Layer exfoliation is observed in freestanding z-cut samples. Layer splitting is obtained using bonding method in x-cut sample implanted with 117 keV H+ ions at ion fluence of 6 × 1016 ions/cm2. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy are used to observe splitting phenomenon. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy/channeling method is employed to measure lattice damage and to investigate the relationship between implantation-induced defects and layer splitting.

  14. Oxygen ion implantation induced microstructural changes and electrical conductivity in Bakelite RPC detector material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. V. Aneesh; Ranganathaiah, C.; Kumarswamy, G. N.; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the structural modification induced electrical conductivity, samples of Bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detector materials were exposed to 100 keV Oxygen ion in the fluences of 1012, 1013, 1014 and 1015 ions/cm2. Ion implantation induced microstructural changes have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. Positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime and its intensity shows the deposition of high energy interior track and chain scission leads to the formation of radicals, secondary ions and electrons at lower ion implantation fluences (1012 to1014 ions/cm2) followed by cross-linking at 1015 ions/cm2 fluence due to the radical reactions. The reduction in electrical conductivity of Bakelite detector material is correlated to the conducting pathways and cross-links in the polymer matrix. The appropriate implantation energy and fluence of Oxygen ion on polymer based Bakelite RPC detector material may reduce the leakage current, improves the efficiency, time resolution and thereby rectify the aging crisis of the RPC detectors.

  15. Oxygen ion implantation induced microstructural changes and electrical conductivity in Bakelite RPC detector material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, K. V. Aneesh, E-mail: aneesh1098@gmail.com; Ravikumar, H. B., E-mail: hbr@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore-570006 (India); Ranganathaiah, C., E-mail: cr@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Govt. Research Centre, Sahyadri Educational Institutions, Mangalore-575007 (India); Kumarswamy, G. N., E-mail: kumy79@gmail.com [Department of Studies in Physics, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Bangalore-560035 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In order to explore the structural modification induced electrical conductivity, samples of Bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detector materials were exposed to 100 keV Oxygen ion in the fluences of 10{sup 12}, 10{sup 13}, 10{sup 14} and 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Ion implantation induced microstructural changes have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. Positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime and its intensity shows the deposition of high energy interior track and chain scission leads to the formation of radicals, secondary ions and electrons at lower ion implantation fluences (10{sup 12} to10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) followed by cross-linking at 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence due to the radical reactions. The reduction in electrical conductivity of Bakelite detector material is correlated to the conducting pathways and cross-links in the polymer matrix. The appropriate implantation energy and fluence of Oxygen ion on polymer based Bakelite RPC detector material may reduce the leakage current, improves the efficiency, time resolution and thereby rectify the aging crisis of the RPC detectors.

  16. Fluence dependent electrical conductivity in aluminium thin films grown by infrared pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollar, Esther, E-mail: e.rebollar@csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martínez-Tong, Daniel E. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Marco, José F. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ezquerra, Tiberio A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • IR pulsed laser ablation of aluminium gives rise to smooth layers of several tens of nanometers. • Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm{sup 2} and above 7 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films and metallic aluminium films respectively. • Highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. • It is possible to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films. - Abstract: We studied the effect of laser fluence on the morphology, composition, structure and electric conductivity of deposits generated by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic aluminium target in vacuum using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 15 ns). Upon irradiation for one hour at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, a smooth layer of several tens of nanometres, as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was deposited on glass. Surface chemical composition was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and to study the conductivity of deposits both I–V curves and conductive-AFM measurements were performed. Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films. Differently, at higher fluences above 7 J/cm{sup 2}, the films are constituted by metallic aluminium. Optical emission spectroscopy revealed that highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. The results demonstrate the possibility to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films.

  17. Damage properties in ion-implanted YbVO4 crystals using RBS/Channeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuan-Lei; Wei, Zhi-Ning

    2014-03-01

    YbVO4 crystals are implanted with 3.0 MeV Ni ions and 600 keV H ions with fluences of 2.0-10.0×1014 cm-2 and 6.0×1016 cm-2, respectively. In addition, post-implantation thermal annealing is performed at selected temperatures. The disorder induced by implantation and the effect of the annealing on the recovery of the crystal lattice are investigated by RBS/Channeling measurements with the help of simulation code RUMP.

  18. Measurement of angular distribution of cosmic-ray muon fluence rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jeng-Wei [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, Natioanl Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Fu [Department of Engineering and System Science, Natioanl Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Sheu, Rong-Jiun [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Shiang-Huei, E-mail: Shjiang@mx.nthu.edu.t [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, Natioanl Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, Natioanl Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-21

    In this work a Berkeley Lab cosmic ray detector was used to measure the angular distribution of the cosmic-ray muon fluence rate. Angular response functions of the detector at each measurement orientation were calculated by using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, where no energy attenuation was taken into account. Coincidence counting rates were measured at ten orientations with equiangular intervals. The muon angular fluence rate spectrum was unfolded from the measured counting rates associated with the angular response functions using both the MAXED code and the parameter adjusting method.

  19. A new monitor for routine thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate monitoring in k0 INAA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster-Ammerlaan, M J J; Bacchi, M A; Bode, P; De Nadai Fernandes, E A

    2008-12-01

    The Zr-Au set for monitoring the thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate and the epithermal spectrum parameter alpha is not always practicable for routine application of INAA in well-thermalized facilities. An alternative set consisting of Cr, Au and Mo provides values for the thermal neutron fluence rate, f and alpha that are not significantly different from those found via the Zr-Au method and the Cd-covered Zr-method. The IRMM standard SMELS-II was analyzed using the (Au-Cr-Mo) monitor and a good agreement was obtained.

  20. Modelling of the implantation and the annealing stages of 800 keV {sup 3}He implanted tungsten: Formation of nanovoids in the near surface region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A., E-mail: andree.de-backer@univ-lille1.fr [Unite Materiaux Et Transformations, UMET, UMR 8207, Universite de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modelisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Materiaux (EM2VM) (France); Lhuillier, P.E. [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Universite d' Orleans, Faculte des Sciences, Avenue du Parc Floral, BP 6749, 45067 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unite Materiaux Et Transformations, UMET, UMR 8207, Universite de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modelisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Materiaux (EM2VM) (France); Barthe, M.F. [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Universite d' Orleans, Faculte des Sciences, Avenue du Parc Floral, BP 6749, 45067 Orleans cedex 2 (France)

    2012-10-15

    The formation of voids in tungsten implanted at room temperature with 800 keV {sup 3}He atoms and subsequently annealed from 300 K to 900 K is modelled using an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code. Different fluences are investigated ranging from 10{sup 17} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} ions m{sup -2} and comparisons are made with Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy results. Good agreements with the experimental results are obtained regarding the temperature range at which the vacancy clustering occurs and the dependency of the nanovoid size with fluence. Despite the small amount of He atoms in the investigated region named 'track region', their role is underlined and it is shown that they act as nuclei for the nanovoid formation. The non trivial consequence is that the higher the fluence, the smaller the nanovoids in the track region.

  1. Structural and optical properties of low energy nitrogen ion implanted SrTiO3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vishnu; Asokan, K.; Annapoorni, S.

    2017-05-01

    The effect of 60 keV nitrogen ion implantation on the structural and optical properties of strontium titanate, SrTiO3 (STO) thin films were investigated as a function of ion fluences. These thin films were deposited on quartz substrates using RF magnetron sputtering and annealed at 750 °C for 5 hours. It was observed that the intensity of the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) peaks increase at lower ion fluence and then decrease at higher ion fluences. The band gap derived from the UV-Visible spectrum of annealed pristine film was estimated to be 3.62 eV. A slight increase in the band gap was observed after N ion implantation.

  2. Oxidation of polyethylene implanted with low energy magnesium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslandes, Alec, E-mail: acd@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Ionescu, Mihail, E-mail: mio@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Karatchevtseva, Inna, E-mail: ikm@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Siegele, Rainer, E-mail: rns@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Cohen, David D., E-mail: dcz@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    The oxidation of polyethylene implanted with low energy, i.e. 25–50 keV, Mg ions to fluences from 5 × 10{sup 12}–5 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} was studied. Rutherford back-scattering spectroscopy showed all implanted samples gained oxygen but the distribution did not match that of the implanted Mg. An increase in carbon content was also observed for the near-surface region. Depth profiles of hydrogen were obtained via elastic recoil detection analysis, showing that hydrogen was lost throughout and beyond the range of the Mg ions, producing unsaturated and chemically active sites available for oxidation. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the formation of carbon–oxygen bonding such as carbonyl groups, but showed no evidence of oxidised magnesium. Raman spectroscopy showed disordered and graphitic carbon bonding configurations were created by the irradiation, but no evidence of oxidised magnesium. The implantation of films to high fluence produced a carbonized surface-layer that made the irradiated polymer more resistant to oxidation.

  3. Nanocluster formation in Co/Fe implanted ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharuth-Ram, K., E-mail: kbr@tlabs.ac.za [Durban University of Technology, Physics Department (South Africa); Masenda, H. [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Physics (South Africa); Doyle, T. B. [iThemba LABS (South Africa); Geburt, S.; Ronning, C. [University of Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Conversion electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy (CEMS) measurements were made on a ZnO single crystal sample implanted at room temperature (RT) with of 145 and 345 keV {sup 59}Co ions with respective fluences of 1.15×10{sup 16} ions/cm {sup 2} and 4.17×10{sup 16} ions/cm {sup 2}, followed by implantation of 60 keV {sup 57}Fe to a fluence of 0.50×10{sup 16}/cm {sup 2} to yield a ‘box-shaped’ implantation profile with a Co + Fe concentration of about 3.2 at. %. CEM spectra were collected after annealing the sample up to 973 K. The spectra after annealing up to 973 K are similar to spectra observed in other CEMS studies on Fe implanted ZnO, but show a dramatic change after the 973 K annealing step; it is dominated by a doublet component with fit parameters typical of Fe {sup 3+}. Magnetization curves of the sample after the 973 K anneal show hysteresis, with a small residual magnetization at RT that increases at 4 K. The saturation magnetization at 4 K was approximately 0.33 μ{sub B}/CoFe ion, in good agreement with observations for 5–8 nm sized Co nanoclusters in ZnO.

  4. 14. 5% conversion efficiency GaAs solar cell fabricated on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Y.; Nishioka, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamaguchi, M.

    1986-12-08

    AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface p/sup +/-p-n solar cells have been fabricated directly on Si substrates using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. GaAs on Si solar cell efficiency as high as exceeding 14.5% at AM1.5 was obtained by cleaning the substrate surface and repeating GaAs film growth interruption. This value is the highest ever reported for GaAs solar cells on Si substrates. Defects, which could not be observed in homoepitaxially grown GaAs film, were observed in the heteroepitaxial GaAs films through electron beam induced current image. Relatively low conversion efficiency of the GaAs cell on Si compared to the GaAs can be attributed to these defects.

  5. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  6. Terahertz radiation from delta-doped GaAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Hansen, Ole; Sørensen, Claus Birger;

    1994-01-01

    Terahertz pulse emission from four different delta-doped molecular beam epitaxially grown GaAs samples is studied. We observe a decrease of the emitted THz pulse amplitude as the distance of the delta-doped layer from the surface is increased, and a change in polarity of the THz pulses as compared...

  7. GaAs microwave SSPA`s: design and characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hek, A.P. de; Vliet, F.E. van

    2002-01-01

    The performance of GaAs SSPA's is crucial to a rapidly increasing number of systems. This tutorial aims at clarifying the design choices and trade-offs, and at warning the new designer for pitfalls and unexpected problems. The tutorial starts, after a brief introduction, with a survey of the

  8. GaAs Photovoltaics on Polycrystalline Ge Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, David M.; Pal, AnnaMaria T.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Wolford, David S.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Smith, Mark A.; Scheiman, David; Jenkins, Phillip P.; McElroy Bruce

    2007-01-01

    High efficiency III-V multijunction solar cells deposited on metal foil or even polymer substrates can provide tremendous advantages in mass and stowage, particularly for planetary missions. As a first step towards that goal, poly-crystalline p/i/n GaAs solar cells are under development on polycrystalline Ge substrates. Organo Metallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (OMVPE) parameters for pre-growth bake, nucleation and deposition have been examined. Single junction p/i/n GaAs photovoltaic devices, incorporating InGaP front and back window layers, have been grown and processed. Device performance has shown a dependence upon the thickness of a GaAs buffer layer deposited between the Ge substrate and the active device structure. A thick (2 m) GaAs buffer provides for both increased average device performance as well as reduced sensitivity to variations in grain size and orientation. Illumination under IR light (lambda > 1 micron), the cells showed a Voc, demonstrating the presence of an unintended photoactive junction at the GaAs/Ge interface. The presence of this junction limited the efficiency to approx.13% (estimated with an anti-refection coating) due to the current mismatch and lack of tunnel junction interconnect.

  9. Pilot experiment for muonium photo ionization in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimomura, K; Nishiyama, K; Nagamine, K [Muon Science Laboratory, IMSS, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); Bakule, P; Pratt, F L [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Ohishi, K; Ishida, K; Watanabe, I [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0191 (Japan); Matsuda, Y [Graduate School of Arts and Science, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Torikai, E, E-mail: koichiro.shimomura@kek.j [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Kofu, Yamanashi, 400-8511 (Japan)

    2010-04-01

    Direct observation of muonium photo ionization in GaAs was tried for the first time, with wide range wave length from 1325nm to 800nm lasers in n-type GaAs at 15 K. Recently, Lichti et al. determined the energy levels in the band gap of T center muonium (as an acceptor) and BC muonium (as a donor) by reanalysis of the existing data obtained by various {mu}SR techniques for several semiconductors like Si, Ge, GaAs, GaP etc. In these semiconductors, GaAs is the best sample to apply the muonium photo ionization method for the first time, because the energy level of T center muonium is above 0.54 eV from the valence band, therefore the ionization energy for Mu{sub T}{sup -} {yields} Mu{sub T}{sup 0}+e{sup -} is 0.98eV (corresponding laser wave length is 1260nm), which is within the region of present OPO laser system produced, which was installed RIKEN-RAL

  10. Enhancement of Ag nanoparticles concentration by prior ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jun; Liu, Changlong

    2017-09-01

    Thermally grown SiO2 layer on Si substrates were singly or sequentially implanted with Zn or Cu and Ag ions at the same fluence of 2 × 1016/cm2. The profiles of implanted species, structure, and spatial distribution of the formed nanoparticles (NPs) have been characterized by the cross-sectional transmission electron microscope (XTEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). It is found that pre-implantation of Zn or Cu ions could suppress the self sputtering of Ag atoms during post Ag ion implantation, which gives rise to fabrication of Ag NPs with a high density. Moreover, it has also been demonstrated that the suppressing effect strongly depends on the applied energy and mobility of pre-implanted ions. The possible mechanism for the enhanced Ag NPs concentration has been discussed in combination with SRIM simulations. Both vacancy-like defects acting as the increased nucleation sites for Ag NPs and a high diffusivity of prior implanted ions in SiO2 play key roles in enhancing the deposition of Ag implants.

  11. Elaboration by ion implantation of cobalt nano-particles in silica layers and modifications of their properties by electron and swift heavy ion irradiations; Elaboration par implantation ionique de nanoparticules de cobalt dans la silice et modifications de leurs proprietes sous irradiation d'electrons et d'ions de haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Orleans, C

    2003-07-15

    This work aims to investigate the capability of ion irradiations to elaborate magnetic nano-particles in silica layers, and to modify their properties. Co{sup +} ions have been implanted at 160 keV at fluences of 2.10{sup 16}, 5.10{sup 16} and 10{sup 17} at/cm{sup 2}, and at temperatures of 77, 295 and 873 K. The dependence of the particle size on the implantation fluence, and more significantly on the implantation temperature has been shown. TEM (transmission electronic microscopy) observations have shown a mean diameter varying from 1 nm for implantations at 2.10{sup 16} Co{sup +}/cm{sup 2} at 77 K, to 9.7 nm at 10{sup 17} Co{sup +}/cm{sup 2} at 873 K. For high temperature implantations, two regions of particles appear. Simulations based on a kinetic 3-dimensional lattice Monte Carlo method reproduce quantitatively the features observed for implantations. Thermal treatments induce the ripening of the particles. Electron irradiations at 873 K induce an important increase in mean particle sizes. Swift heavy ion irradiations also induce the ripening of the particles for low fluences, and an elongation of the particles in the incident beam direction for high fluences, resulting in a magnetic anisotropy. Mechanisms invoked in thermal spike model could also explain this anisotropic growth. (author)

  12. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 160A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, D. T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-06

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 160A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  13. Simulation of the dependence of spatial fluence profiles on tissue optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.; Mitra, K.

    2016-03-01

    Medical laser applications are promoted as safe, effective treatments for a multiplicity of concerns, ranging from hyperthermal skin rejuvenation to subcutaneous tumor ablation. Chromophore and structural protein concentration and distribution within a patient's tissue vary from patient to patient and dictate the interaction of incident radiative energy of a specific wavelength with the target tissue. Laser parameters must be matched to tissue optical and thermal properties in order to achieve the desired therapeutic results without inducing unnecessary tissue damage, although accurate tissue optical properties are not always measured prior to and during laser therapies. A weighted variable step size Monte Carlo simulation of laser irradiation of skin tissue was used to determine the effects of variations in absorption (μa) and scattering coefficients (μs) and the degree of anisotropy (g) on the radiant energy transport per mm2 in response to steady-state photon propagation. The three parameters were varied in a factorial experimental design for the ranges of 0.25/mm isolate their impacts on the overall fluence distribution. Box plots of the resulting fluence profiles were created and compared to identify ranges in which optical property variance could be considered to significantly impact the spatial variance of fluence within the simulation volume. Results indicated that accurate prediction of the fluence profiles that will be achieved by any given medical laser treatment is unlikely without pre-treatment assessment of the tissue optical properties of individual patients.

  14. Two thermal methods to measure the energy fluence of a brief exposure of diagnostic x rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, A A; Mascarenhas, S; dePaula, M H; Cameron, J R

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes two simple thermal methods for measuring the energy fluence in J/cm2 from a diagnostic x-ray exposure. Both detectors absorb essentially 100% of the radiation and give a signal that is directly proportional to the energy fluence of the x-ray beam. One detector measures the thermal effect when a pulse of x rays is totally absorbed in the pyroelectric detector of lead-zirconium-titanate (PZT). The other detector measures the expansion of a gas surrounding a lead disk detector in a photoacoustic chamber. The increased pressure of the gas is transmitted through a 1-mm duct to a sensitive microphone. Both detectors have previously been used to measure the energy fluence rate of continuous x-ray beams in the same energy region using a chopped beam and a lock-in amplifier. Measurement of the energy fluence of a pulse of radiation eliminates the need for the beam chopper and lock-in amplifier and results in a simple, rugged, and inexpensive dosimeter. Either method can be combined with the area of the beam to give an estimate of the imparted energy to the patient from a diagnostic x-ray exposure.

  15. Evaluation of the Fluence Conversion Factor for 32P in Sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-18

    When 32S is exposed to neutrons it undergoes a 32S(n,p)32P reaction with a neutron cross section as shown in Figure 1. This reaction may be used to characterize the neutron fluence for neutrons greater than 3 MeV.

  16. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessho, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.; Wang, Q.; Masumoto, K.; Hagura, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Matsuhiro, T.; Tosaki, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ≈5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities.

  17. Ultra low fluence rate photodynamic therapy: simulation of light emitted by the Cerenkov effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Jonathan; Wang, Fred; Zamora, Genesis; Trinidad, Anthony; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-03-01

    PDT has been shown to be most effective at low fluence rates. Many radionuclides used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes produce measurable amounts of visible radiation when they decay via the Cerenkov effect which occurs when a charged particle travels faster in a dielectric medium than the speed of light in that medium. Cerenkov radiation from radiopharmaceuticals could serve as a source of extended duration, low level "internal" light, to mediate PDT, with the ultimate goals of overcoming some its current limitations. Using laser light, we are exploring the effects of fluence rates that could be generated by Cerenkov radiation on PDT efficacy. ALA or TPPS2a mediated PDT of rat gliomas monolayers or multicell spheroids ( F98, C6) was performed with 410 nm laser light exposure over an extended period of 24-96hrs. Photosensitizers were delivered either as a bolus or continuously with light exposure. At fluence rate of 20μW/cm2 effective PDT was obtained as measured by decrease in cell viability or inhibition of spheroid growth. PDT is effective at ultra low fluence rates if given over long time periods. No lower threshold has been ascertained. Since the half-life of 90Y, a radionuclide with a high Cherenkov yield is 64 hrs it is a good candidate to supply sufficient light activation for PDT. The combination of radionuclide and photodynamic therapies could improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment by exploiting synergies between these two modalities.

  18. New method for estimation of fluence complexity in IMRT fields and correlation with gamma analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanušová, T.; Vondráček, V.; Badraoui-Čuprová, K.; Horáková, I.; Koniarová, I.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimation of fluence complexity in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) fields is proposed. Unlike other previously published works, it is based on portal images calculated by the Portal Dose Calculation algorithm in Eclipse (version 8.6, Varian Medical Systems) in the plane of the EPID aS500 detector (Varian Medical Systems). Fluence complexity is given by the number and the amplitudes of dose gradients in these matrices. Our method is validated using a set of clinical plans where fluence has been smoothed manually so that each plan has a different level of complexity. Fluence complexity calculated with our tool is in accordance with the different levels of smoothing as well as results of gamma analysis, when calculated and measured dose matrices are compared. Thus, it is possible to estimate plan complexity before carrying out the measurement. If appropriate thresholds are determined which would distinguish between acceptably and overly modulated plans, this might save time in the re-planning and re-measuring process.

  19. Fluence dependent electrical conductivity in aluminium thin films grown by infrared pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollar, Esther; Martínez-Tong, Daniel E.; Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Marco, José F.; Ezquerra, Tiberio A.; Castillejo, Marta

    2016-11-01

    We studied the effect of laser fluence on the morphology, composition, structure and electric conductivity of deposits generated by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic aluminium target in vacuum using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 15 ns). Upon irradiation for one hour at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, a smooth layer of several tens of nanometres, as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was deposited on glass. Surface chemical composition was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and to study the conductivity of deposits both I-V curves and conductive-AFM measurements were performed. Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm2 resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films. Differently, at higher fluences above 7 J/cm2, the films are constituted by metallic aluminium. Optical emission spectroscopy revealed that highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. The results demonstrate the possibility to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films.

  20. Standard Test Method for Measuring Neutron Fluence Rate by Radioactivation of Cobalt and Silver

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a suitable means of obtaining the thermal neutron fluence rate, or fluence, in well moderated nuclear reactor environments where the use of cadmium, as a thermal neutron shield as described in Method E262, is undesirable because of potential spectrum perturbations or of temperatures above the melting point of cadmium. 1.2 This test method describes a means of measuring a Westcott neutron fluence rate (Note 1) by activation of cobalt- and silver-foil monitors (See Terminology E170). The reaction 59Co(n,γ)60Co results in a well-defined gamma emitter having a half-life of 1925.28 days (1). The reaction 109Ag(n,˙γ) 110mAg results in a nuclide with a complex decay scheme which is well known and having a half-life of 249.76 days (1). Both cobalt and silver are available either in very pure form or alloyed with other metals such as aluminum. A reference source of cobalt in aluminum alloy to serve as a neutron fluence rate monitor wire standard is available from the National Institute ...

  1. Towards a laser fluence dependent nanostructuring of thin Au films on Si by nanosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffino, F., E-mail: francesco.ruffino@ct.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); MATIS CNR-IMM, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Pugliara, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Carria, E.; Romano, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); MATIS CNR-IMM, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Bongiorno, C. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM) VIII Strada 5, 95121 Catania (Italy); Fisicaro, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM) VIII Strada 5, 95121 Catania (Italy); La Magna, A.; Spinella, C. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM) VIII Strada 5, 95121 Catania (Italy); Grimaldi, M.G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); MATIS CNR-IMM, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Au nanoclusters are produced by nanosecond laser irradiations of thin Au film on Si. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The shape, size, and surface density of the Au nanoclusters are tunable by laser fluence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation dynamic of the Au nanoclusters under nanosecond laser irradiation is analyzed. - Abstract: In this work, we study the nanostructuring effects of nanosecond laser irradiations on 5 nm thick Au film sputter-deposited on Si. After deposition of Au on Si substrate, nanosecond laser irradiations were performed increasing the laser fluence from 750 to 1500 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Several analyses techniques, such as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were crossed to study the morphological evolution of the Au film as a function of laser fluence. In particular, the formation of Au nanoparticles was observed. The analyses allowed a quantitative evaluation of the evolution of the nanoparticles size, surface density, and shape as a function of the laser fluence. Therefore, a control the structural properties of the Au nanoparticles is reached, for example, for applications in Si nanowires growth or plasmonics.

  2. Substrate temperature and electron fluence effects on metallic films created by electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, S.G.; Landheer, K.; Hagen, C.W.; Fairbrother, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    Using three different precursors [MeCpPtMe3, Pt(PF3)4, and W(CO)6], an ultra-high vacuum surface science approach has been used to identify and rationalize the effects of substrate temperature and electron fluence on the chemical composition and bonding in films created by electron beam induced

  3. Evaluation of fast neutron fluence for Kori Unit 2 pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Young Kyou; Lim, Mi Joung; Kim, Byoung Chul; Kim, Kyung Sik [Korea Reactor Integrity Surveillance Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Unit 2 at Kori reactor has been put into operation in 1983. During 24 cycle operation, five surveillance capsules at inner vessel and three ex-vessel dosimeter at cavity both are taken out for evaluation to neutron fluence. The evaluations following the surveillance program of Kori 2 unit which are required detect and prevent degradation of safety-related structures and components of the vessel. The fast (E > 1.0 MeV) neutron fluencies are necessary to estimate the fracture toughness of the pressure vessel materials. The determination of the pressure vessel neutron fluence is based on both calculations and measurements. The fluence prediction is made with a calculation, and the measurements are used to qualify the calculational methodology. Measurement-to-calculation comparisons are used to identify biases in the calculations and to provide reliable estimates of the fluence uncertainties As shown in Fig. 1, the Kori unit 2 reactor vessel surveillance programs includes the analysis of flux dosimeters contained in capsules located on the inner vessel wall at the Beltline region (0., 15., 30. and 40. Azimuth) and Ex vessel dosimeter capsules located on the cavity at connected bid chain. In this paper, the methodologies used to perform neutron transport calculations and dosimetry evaluations are described, the results of the plant specific transport calculations are given for the beltline region of Kori Unit 2 pressure vessel and the comparisons of calculations and measurements are discussed

  4. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhaes, L.A.G. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Morfologia; Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2015-10-15

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm{sup 2}) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. (author)

  5. Determination of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients by means of artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto B, T. G.; Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: tzinnia.soto@gmail.com [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal No. 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    In this paper is presented an Artificial Neural Network (Ann) that has been designed, trained and validated to determinate the effective dose e, ambient dose equivalent h(10) and personal dose equivalent hp(10,{theta}) fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients at different positions, having as only input data 7 count rates obtained with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (Bss) system. A set of 211 neutron spectra and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients published by the International Atomic Energy Agency were used to train and validate the Ann. This set was divided into 2 subsets, one of 181 elements to train the Ann and the remaining 30 to validate it. The Ann was trained using Bss count rates as input data and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients as output data. The network was validated and tested with the set of 30 elements that were not used during the training process. Good results were obtained proving that Ann are a good choice for calculating the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients having as only data the count rates obtained with a Bss. (Author)

  6. Assessment of the Efficiency of HWCon IASCC Crack Growth Rate for High Fluence BWRMaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the experimental study performed to assess the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry on the propagation rate of cracks generated by irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in high fluence material. The selection of the material and the test procedures followed for this study are presented. The test results obtained with 8.6 dpa specimen are discussed.

  7. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  8. Ringhals unit 3 and 4 - Fluence determination in a historic and future perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.L. [Primary Systems Inspection and Repair, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Rouden, J. [Material and Analytical Services, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Efsing, P. [Materials Mechanics, Research and Nuclear Development, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: The Ringhals site is situated on the Swedish southwest coastline. At the site, there are four operating nuclear power plants. Historically, the Swedish policy has been that the nuclear power plants were to be closed in 2010. The present position is to operate the units until their technical and economic lifetime has run out. The units shall be maintained and invested in to ensure a lifetime of at least 50 years, but the actions taken shall not limit the time to this date. When the initial surveillance capsules were evaluated, it was noted that the material properties of the weld material of unit 3 and 4 showed some deviations from the expected behaviour. Currently there is an extensive project running for re-evaluating the embrittlement situation from a long-term operating perspective. One part of the project is aimed at more accurately determining the fluence levels of the reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The basis for the early evaluations of the dosimeters in the surveillance capsules and the corresponding fluence evaluation had an operating lifetime of 25 years as a target value. Therefore, the accuracy and refinement of the measurement and calculation were taken to be good enough to suit this life span. Looking back at the results from the dosimetry measurements there are a few discrepancies. Some of the dosimeters were disintegrated and some measurements had comparatively large uncertainties. When starting this project there were some re-evaluations done with the old fluence prediction model. For every new run and refinement there appeared new difficulties, and the decision was to start the evaluation from scratch. Then there are two questions remaining regarding the fluence: What is the current fluence level? What will the resulting fluence be after 60 years of operation, when we have up-rated output power of both reactors? This paper aims to describe the view of the fluence evaluation

  9. Ion Implantation in III-V Compound Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    340 keV H + -0 Ga P  O UES-723-292 !:• (H o>ray *P-K X - rayO Ga-K X -ray iii! RBS * ..I -iO.. 0 10I to1. 01 • .0 -. I0 1 LI =i, O I 0 01 0.J 10...Identity by blo ," pume) Ion Implantation, GaAs, Hall effect, electrical resistivity, Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), channeling, Proton induced x -ray...Mebility (jH) upon Aiinealing Temperature (TA) for 1 X 101 /cm• Dose Samples of GaAs:Mg with Three Different Capping Methods 33 p 14 Dependence of Surface

  10. Controlling nickel silicide phase formation by Si implantation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guihard, M.; Turcotte-Tremblay, P. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Gaudet, S.; Coia, C. [Departement de Genie Physique, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Roorda, S. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Desjardins, P. [Departement de Genie Physique, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Lavoie, C. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York (United States); Schiettekatte, F. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal (Canada)], E-mail: francois.schiettekatte@umontreal.ca

    2009-05-01

    In the context of fabrication process of contacts in CMOS integrated circuits, we studied the effect of implantation-induced damage on the Ni silicide phase formation sequence. The device layers of Silicon-on-insulator samples were implanted with 30 or 60 keV Si ions at several fluences up to amorphization. Next, 10 or 30 nm Ni layers were deposited. The monitoring of annealing treatments was achieved with time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and pole figure XRD were also used to characterize some intermediate phase formations. We show the existence of an implantation threshold (1 ions/nm{sup 2}) from where the silicidation behaviour changes significantly, the formation temperature of the disilicide namely shifting abruptly from 800 to 450 deg. C. It is also found that the monosilicide formation onset temperature for the thinner Ni deposits increases linearly by about 30 deg. C with the amount of damage.

  11. Controlling Nickel Sillicide Phase by Si Implantation Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillard, M.; Turcotte-Tremblay, P; Gaudet, S; Coia, C; Roorda, S; Desjardins, P; Lavoie, C; Schiettekatte, F

    2009-01-01

    In the context of fabrication process of contacts in CMOS integrated circuits, we studied the effect of implantation-induced damage on the Ni silicide phase formation sequence. The device layers of Silicon-on-insulator samples were implanted with 30 or 60 keV Si ions at several fluences up to amorphization. Next, 10 or 30 nm Ni layers were deposited. The monitoring of annealing treatments was achieved with time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and pole figure XRD were also used to characterize some intermediate phase formations. We show the existence of an implantation threshold (1 ions/nm{sup 2}) from where the silicidation behaviour changes significantly, the formation temperature of the disilicide namely shifting abruptly from 800 to 450 C. It is also found that the monosilicide formation onset temperature for the thinner Ni deposits increases linearly by about 30 C with the amount of damage.

  12. Implantation and annealing effects in molecular organic films

    CERN Document Server

    Pakhomov, G L; Shashkin, V I; Tura, J M; Ribo, J M; Ottaviano, L

    2002-01-01

    Ion implantation and annealing effects on the surface of phthalocyanine thin films have been studied by means of atomic force microscopy and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Both the topology and the chemical composition of the surface are affected by irradiation. The influence of the irradiation dose is shown. The chemical degradation of the layer results mainly in the decrease of atomic concentration of nitrogen and chlorine, and in the increase of atomic concentration of oxygen. At highest dose, carbonization becomes important. Furthermore, N 1s, C 1s and Cl 2p core levels testify that the formation of new chemical species occurs in implanted pthalocyanine films. All these processes are modified by subsequent heat treatment in different ways, depending on the applied implantation fluence.

  13. Beam rate influence on dose distribution and fluence map in IMRT dynamic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slosarek, Krzysztof; Grządziel, Aleksandra; Osewski, Wojciech; Dolla, Lukasz; Bekman, Barbara; Petrovic, Borislava

    2012-01-01

    To examine the impact of beam rate on dose distribution in IMRT plans and then to evaluate agreement of calculated and measured dose distributions for various beam rate values. Accelerators used in radiotherapy utilize some beam rate modes which can shorten irradiation time and thus reduce ability of patient movement during a treatment session. This aspect should be considered in high conformal dynamic techniques. Dose calculation was done for two different beam rates (100 MU/min and 600 MU/min) in an IMRT plan. For both, a comparison of Radiation Planning Index (RPI) and MU was conducted. Secondly, the comparison of optimal fluence maps and corresponding actual fluence maps was done. Next, actual fluence maps were measured and compared with the calculated ones. Gamma index was used for that assessment. Additionally, positions of each leaf of the MLC were controlled by home made software. Dose distribution obtained for lower beam rates was slightly better than for higher beam rates in terms of target coverage and risk structure protection. Lower numbers of MUs were achieved in 100 MU/min plans than in 600 MU/min plans. Actual fluence maps converted from optimal ones demonstrated more similarity in 100 MU/min plans. Better conformity of the measured maps to the calculated ones was obtained when a lower beam rate was applied. However, these differences were small. No correlation was found between quality of fluence map conversion and leaf motion accuracy. Execution of dynamic techniques is dependent on beam rate. However, these differences are minor. Analysis shows a slight superiority of a lower beam rate. It does not significantly affect treatment accuracy.

  14. SU-E-T-436: Fluence-Based Trajectory Optimization for Non-Coplanar VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, G; Bamber, JC; Bedford, JL [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Evans, PM [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Saran, FH; Mandeville, HC [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a fluence-based trajectory optimization technique for non-coplanar VMAT for brain cancer. Methods: Single-arc non-coplanar VMAT trajectories were determined using a heuristic technique for five patients. Organ at risk (OAR) volume intersected during raytracing was minimized for two cases: absolute volume and the sum of relative volumes weighted by OAR importance. These trajectories and coplanar VMAT formed starting points for the fluence-based optimization method. Iterative least squares optimization was performed on control points 24° apart in gantry rotation. Optimization minimized the root-mean-square (RMS) deviation of PTV dose from the prescription (relative importance 100), maximum dose to the brainstem (10), optic chiasm (5), globes (5) and optic nerves (5), plus mean dose to the lenses (5), hippocampi (3), temporal lobes (2), cochleae (1) and brain excluding other regions of interest (1). Control point couch rotations were varied in steps of up to 10° and accepted if the cost function improved. Final treatment plans were optimized with the same objectives in an in-house planning system and evaluated using a composite metric - the sum of optimization metrics weighted by importance. Results: The composite metric decreased with fluence-based optimization in 14 of the 15 plans. In the remaining case its overall value, and the PTV and OAR components, were unchanged but the balance of OAR sparing differed. PTV RMS deviation was improved in 13 cases and unchanged in two. The OAR component was reduced in 13 plans. In one case the OAR component increased but the composite metric decreased - a 4 Gy increase in OAR metrics was balanced by a reduction in PTV RMS deviation from 2.8% to 2.6%. Conclusion: Fluence-based trajectory optimization improved plan quality as defined by the composite metric. While dose differences were case specific, fluence-based optimization improved both PTV and OAR dosimetry in 80% of cases.

  15. Monte Carlo fluence simulation for prospective evaluation of interstitial photodynamic therapy treatment plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Jeffrey; Betz, Vaughn; Lilge, Lothar

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) delivers a localized cytotoxic dose that is a function of tissue oxygen availability, photosensitive drug concentration, and light fluence. Providing safe and effective PDT requires an understanding of all three elements and the physiological response to the radicals generated. Interstitial PDT (IPDT) for solid tumours poses particular challenges due to complex organ geometries and the associated limitations for diffusion theory based fluence rate prediction, in addition to restricted access for light delivery and dose monitoring. As a first step towards enabling a complete prospective IPDT treatment-planning platform, we demonstrate use of our previously developed FullMonte tetrahedral Monte Carlo simulation engine for modeling of the interstitial fluence field due to intravesicular insertion of brief light sources. The goal is to enable a complete treatment planning and monitoring work flow analogous to that used in ionizing radiation therapy, including plan evaluation through dose-volume histograms and algorithmic treatment plan optimization. FullMonte is to our knowledge the fastest open-source tetrahedral MC light propagation software. Using custom hardware acceleration, we achieve 4x faster computing with 67x better power efficiency for limited-size meshes compared to the software. Ongoing work will improve the performance advantage to 16x with unlimited mesh size, enabling algorithmic plan optimization in reasonable time. Using FullMonte, we demonstrate significant new plan-evaluation capabilities including fluence field visualization, generation of organ dose-volume histograms, and rendering of isofluence surfaces for a representative bladder cancer mesh from a real patient. We also discuss the advantages of MC simulations for dose-volume histogram generation and the need for online personalized fluence-rate monitoring.

  16. Photoluminescence Response in Carbon Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition onto GaAs Substrates at Low Vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Caballero-Briones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon films were deposited onto GaAs substrates by pulsed laser deposition at low vacuum (10–15 mTorr from a graphite target. Films were prepared at different number of pulses (1500 to 6000 with fixed fluence (32 J/cm2, target-to-substrate distance, and pulse frequency using a Q:Switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm operating at a frequency of 10 Hz and producing burst-mode pulses with total duration per shot of 49 ns. Films were characterized by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Deposited films were visually smooth and adherent but on the other hand evidence of splashing was observed in all the films. Thickness varied linearly with the number of pulses from 8 to 42 μm with maximum height differences around 700 nm. Hexagonal and orthorhombic carbon was found in all the films and there was no evidence of nitrogen or oxygen incorporation during ablation process. Broad photoluminescence bands were observed and, particularly, emission peaks at 475–480 nm, 540–550 nm, 590 nm, and 625 nm. Bands tend to shift to lower wavelength with film thickness, suggesting that luminescence comes from splashed nanostructures influenced by the semiconducting substrate. This particular substrate effect is vanished as thickness of the films increases.

  17. Spin dynamics in GaAs and (110)-GaAs heterostructures; Spindynamik in GaAs und (110)-GaAs-Heterostrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oertel, Stefan

    2012-07-01

    This thesis investigates the spin dynamics in both bulk GaAs and (llO)GaAs heterostructures using time- and polarization-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. In bulk GaAs the spin relaxation t ime is measured for the first time in the high temperature regime from 280 K to 400 K and is compared to numerical calculations. The numerical calculations are based on the spin relaxation theory of the Dyakonov-Perel mechanism effected by momentum scattering with polar optical phonons and electron-electron scattering and are in good agreement with the experimental results. Measurements of the dependence on the electron density serve to determine the energy dependent proportional factor between the electron density and the effective electron-electron scattering time. Also in bulk GaAs the interaction between the electron spin system and the nuclear spin system is investigated. The measured electron Lande g-factor under the influence of the nuclear magnetic field is used as an indicator to monitor the temporal evolution of the nuclear magnetic field under sustained dynamic nuclear polarization. Measurements with polarization modulated excitation enable the determination of the relevant time scale at which dynamic nuclear polarization takes place. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of the measured electron Lande g-factor shows the complex interplay of the dynamic nuclear polarization, the nuclear spin diffusion and the nuclear spin relaxation. In symmetric (110)-GaAs quantum wells the dependence of the inplane anisotropy of the electron Lande g-factor on the quantum well thickness is determined experimentally. The measurements are in very good agreement with calculations based upon k . p-theory and reveal a maximum of the anisotropy at maximum carrier localization in the quantum well. The origin of the anisotropy that is not present in symmetric (001) quantum wells is qualitatively described by means of a simplified model based on fourth-order perturbation theory. A

  18. Droplet-mediated formation of embedded GaAs nanowires in MBE GaAs1-x Bi x films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Adam W.; Collar, Kristen; Li, Jincheng; Brown, April S.; Babcock, Susan E.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined the morphology and composition of embedded nanowires that can be formed during molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs1-x Bi x using high angle annular dark field (‘Z-contrast’) imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Samples were grown in Ga-rich growth conditions on a stationary GaAs substrate. Ga-rich droplets are observed on the surface with lateral trails extending from the droplet in the [110] direction. Cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy of the film reveals epitaxial nanowire structures of composition ˜GaAs embedded in the GaAs1-x Bi x epitaxial layers. These nanowires extend from a surface droplet to the substrate at a shallow angle of inclination (˜4°). They typically are 4 μm long and have a lens-shaped cross section with major and minor axes dimensions of 800 and 120 nm. The top surface of the nanowires exhibits a linear trace in longitudinal cross-section, across which the composition change from ˜GaAs to GaAs1-x Bi x appears abrupt. The bottom surfaces of the nanowires appear wavy and the composition change appears to be graded over ˜25 nm. The droplets have phase separated into Ga- and Bi-rich components. A qualitative model is proposed in which Bi is gettered into Ga droplets, leaving Bi depleted nanowires in the wakes of the droplets as they migrate in one direction across the surface during GaAs1-x Bi x film growth.

  19. Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss . In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  20. Estimated solar wind-implanted helium-3 distribution on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Swindle, T.D.; Lucey, P.G.

    1999-01-01

    Among the solar wind-implanted volatiles present in the lunar regolith, 3 He is possibly the most valuable resource because of its potential as a fusion fuel. The abundance of 3 He in the lunar regolith at a given location depends on surface maturity, the amount of solar wind fluence, and titanium content, because ilmenite (FeTiO3) retains helium much better than other major lunar minerals. Surface maturity and TiO2 maps from Clementine multispectral data sets are combined here with a solar wind fluence model to produce a 3He abundance map of the Moon. Comparison of the predicted 3He values to landing site observations shows good correlation. The highest 3He abundances occur in the farside maria (due to greater solar wind fluence received) and in higher TiO2 nearside mare regions.

  1. Ellipsometric study of crystalline silicon hydrogenated by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szekeres, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Alexandrova, S. [Department of Applied Physics, Technical University of Sofia, Kl. Ohridski 8, 1797 Sofia (Bulgaria); Petrik, P., E-mail: petrik@mfa.kfki.hu [MFA Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, TTK Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Konkoly Thege Rd. 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Fodor, B. [MFA Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, TTK Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Konkoly Thege Rd. 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Bakalova, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-09-15

    The structure and the optical properties of thin Si layer hydrogenated by shallow plasma ion implantation with different fluences up to 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} are studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry and simulation of the distributions of the ions and implantation induced defects. The implantation was regarded to proceed into Si through the native SiO{sub 2}. Two-layer optical models are applied for examination of the composition and dielectric function behavior of the formed structures. The native oxide is found to be 3 nm thick. The thickness of the Si modified layer decreased 23 to 14 nm with ion fluence due to increased formation of highly hydrogenated surface region that hinder further H-penetration into the Si bulk, especially at the highest fluence. Shifts of the features in the obtained dielectric functions related with Si interband transitions at about 3.4 and 4.2 eV are found caused by process-induced tensile stress. The modified Si region is related rather to defects created by the ion implantation process than the projected range of hydrogen ions. The overall layer modification can be characterized by a low degree of amorphization (up to 5.8%), creation of structural defects and internal tensile stress.

  2. Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prosthetics Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... majority of tissue used to produce these mesh implants are from a pig (porcine) or cow (bovine) ...

  3. Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prosthetics Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... majority of tissue used to produce these mesh implants are from a pig (porcine) or cow (bovine). ...

  4. Degradation of implant materials

    CERN Document Server

    Eliaz, Noam

    2012-01-01

    This book surveys the degradation of implant materials, reviewing in detail such failure mechanisms as corrosion, fatigue and wear, along with monitoring techniques. Surveys common implant biomaterials, as well as procedures for implant retrieval and analysis.

  5. Surface Properties of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy by Oxygen Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Chunbei; GONG Chunzhi; TIAN Xiubo; YANG Shiqin; Ricky K.Y.Fu; Paul K.CHU

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation(PIII)has been conducted on AZ31B magnesium alloy using different bias voltages.The modified layer is mainly composed of MgO and some MgAl2O4.Results form Rutherford backscattering spectrometry(RBS)and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS)indicate that the bias voltage has a significant impact on the structure of the films.The oxygen implant fluences and the thickness of the implanted layer increase with higher bias voltages.A high bias voltage such as 60 kV leads to an unexpected increments in the oxygen-rich layer's thickness compared to those of the samples implanted at 20 kV and 40 kV.The hardness is hardly enhanced by oxygen PIII.The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy may be improved by a proper implantation voltage.

  6. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2014-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  7. Implant marketing: cost effective implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohrle, P S; Levin, R P

    1996-01-01

    The application of the KAL-Technique to the field of implant dentistry allows both patients and dental practices to benefit. It is an exciting advance that decreases frustration and stress in providing implant procedures and lowers overall costs. Professionals using the KAL-Technique report significant predictability in achieving passive framework fit. They are also lowering overall cost of implant cases, which increases the number of patients who can accept implant treatment. It has been well established that the more individuals in a practice that receive implants, the more referrals a practice will gain. This is because implant patients find tremendous advances in the quality of life, and do not hesitate to tell others who can take advantage of this opportunity. Implant dentistry is one of the fastest growing fields in dentistry today. While some other areas of dentistry begin to decline in volume and need, implant dentistry provides the opportunity to keep practices strong and to insure long-term success.

  8. Effect of copper ions implantation on the corrosion behavior of ZIRLO alloy in 1 mol/L H2SO4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the effect of copper ion implantation on the aqueous corrosion behavior of ZIRLO alloy, specimens were implanted with copper ions with fluences ranging from l×l016 to 1×1017 ions/cm2, using a metal vapor vacuum arc source (MEVVA) at an extraction voltage of 40 kV.The valence states and depth distributions of elements in the surface layer of the samples were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), respectively.Glancing angle X-ray diffraction(GAXRD) was employed to examine the phase transformation due to the copper ion implantation.The potentiodynamic polarization technique was used to evaluate the aqueous corrosion resistance of implanted ZIRLO alloy in a l mol/L H2SO4 solution.It was found that a significant improvement was achieved in the aqueous corrosion resistance of ZIRLO alloy implanted with copper ions when the fluence is 5×1016 ions/cm2.When the fluence is l×l016 or l×l017 ions/cm2, the corrosion resistance of implanted samples was bad..Finally, the mechanism of the corrosion behavior of copper-implanted ZIRLO alloy was discussed.

  9. Pulsed laser ablation of Germanium under vacuum and hydrogen environments at various fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Dawood, Asadullah; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Hayat, Asma; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Mahmood, Arshad [National Institute of Laser and Optronics (NILOP), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • Germanium targets were exposed under vacuum and H{sub 2} environment by nanosecond laser pulses. • The effect of laser fluence and ambient environment has been investigated. • The surface morphology is investigated by SEM analysis. • Raman and FTIR Spectroscopy are performed to reveal structural modification. • Electrical conductivity is probed by four probe method. - Abstract: Laser fluence and ambient environment play a significant role for the formation and development of the micro/nano-structures on the laser irradiated targets. Single crystal (1 0 0) Germanium (Ge) has been ablated under two environments of vacuum (10{sup −3} Torr) and hydrogen (100 Torr) at various fluences ranging from 4.5 J cm{sup −2} to 6 J cm{sup −2}. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser with wavelength of 248 nm, pulse duration of 18 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets was explored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge is measured by four probe method. SEM analysis exhibits the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), cones and micro-bumps in both ambient environments (vacuum and hydrogen). The formation as well as development of these structures is strongly dependent upon the laser fluence and environmental conditions. The periodicity of LIPSS or ripples varies from 38 μm to 60 μm in case of vacuum whereas in case of hydrogen environment, the periodicity varies from 20 μm to 45 μm. The difference in number of ripples and periodicity as well as in shape and size of cones and bumps in vacuum and hydrogen is explained on the basis of confinement and shielding effect of plasma. FTIR spectroscopy reveals that no new bands are formed for laser ablated Ge under vacuum, whereas C−H stretching vibration band is

  10. Electron fluence correction factors for various materials in clinical electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, M; DeBlois, F; Podgorsak, E B; Seuntjens, J P

    2001-08-01

    Relative to solid water, electron fluence correction factors at the depth of dose maximum in bone, lung, aluminum, and copper for nominal electron beam energies of 9 MeV and 15 MeV of the Clinac 18 accelerator have been determined experimentally and by Monte Carlo calculation. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure depth doses in these materials. The measured relative dose at dmax in the various materials versus that of solid water, when irradiated with the same number of monitor units, has been used to calculate the ratio of electron fluence for the various materials to that of solid water. The beams of the Clinac 18 were fully characterized using the EGS4/BEAM system. EGSnrc with the relativistic spin option turned on was used to optimize the primary electron energy at the exit window, and to calculate depth doses in the five phantom materials using the optimized phase-space data. Normalizing all depth doses to the dose maximum in solid water stopping power ratio corrected, measured depth doses and calculated depth doses differ by less than +/- 1% at the depth of dose maximum and by less than 4% elsewhere. Monte Carlo calculated ratios of doses in each material to dose in LiF were used to convert the TLD measurements at the dose maximum into dose at the center of the TLD in the phantom material. Fluence perturbation correction factors for a LiF TLD at the depth of dose maximum deduced from these calculations amount to less than 1% for 0.15 mm thick TLDs in low Z materials and are between 1% and 3% for TLDs in Al and Cu phantoms. Electron fluence ratios of the studied materials relative to solid water vary between 0.83+/-0.01 and 1.55+/-0.02 for materials varying in density from 0.27 g/cm3 (lung) to 8.96 g/cm3 (Cu). The difference in electron fluence ratios derived from measurements and calculations ranges from -1.6% to +0.2% at 9 MeV and from -1.9% to +0.2% at 15 MeV and is not significant at the 1sigma level. Excluding the data for Cu, electron

  11. A study of the structural properties of GaN implanted by various rare-earth ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackova, A.; Malinský, P.; Sofer, Z.; Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D.; Mikulics, M.; Wilhelm, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    GaN layers with crystallographic orientation, grown by low-pressure metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on c-plane sapphire substrates, were implanted with 200 and 400 keV Sm+, Tm+, Eu+, Tb+ and Ho+ ions at fluencies of 1 × 1015-1 × 1016 cm-2. The composition of the ion-implanted layers and concentration profiles of the implanted atoms were studied by Rutherford Back-Scattering spectrometry (RBS). The profiles were compared to SRIM 2008 simulations. The structural properties of the ion-implanted layers were characterised by RBS-channelling and Raman spectroscopy. Changes in the surface morphology caused by the ion implantation were examined by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A structural analysis showed a high disorder of the atoms close to the amorphised structure at the surface layer above an implantation fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 while lower disorder density was observed in the bulk according to the projected range of 400 keV ions. The post-implantation annealing induced significant changes only in the Sm and Eu depth profiles; a diffusion of rare-earths implanted at a fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 to the surface was observed. The annealing caused the reconstruction of the surface layer accompanied by surface-roughness enhancement.

  12. GaAs nanowires. Epitaxy, crystal structure-related properties and magnetic heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubmann, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    The intention of this work is twofold: On the one hand, we explore the controlability of GaAs nanowire growth concerning orientation, shape and crystal structure. These are necessary steps, since the growth of GaAs nanowires proceeds not necessarily uniformly, and in GaAs nanowires the in bulk unstable wurtzite phase, and the usual observed zinc-blende crystal phase may coexist in one and the same nanowire. On the other hand, we include ferromagnetic materials into GaAs nanowires. To do that, we produce either ''core/shell'' structures, where the GaAs nanowire is coated with a ferromagnetic ''shell'' material, or grow ferromagnetic nanoscale segments in GaAs nanowires.

  13. Terahertz Radiation from Large Aperture Bulk Semi-insulating GaAs Photoconductive Dipole Antenna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施卫; 贾婉丽; 侯磊; 许景周; 张希成

    2004-01-01

    We report the experimental results of a large-aperture biased semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive dipole antenna, with a gap of 3mm between two Au/Ge/Ni electrodes, triggered by 800nm Ti-sapphire laser pulses with 82 MHz repetition rate. A direct comparison is made between insulated GaAs dipole antenna with a Si3N4 layer and bare GaAs dipole antenna. Both the current in the antenna and the radiation amplitude present as linear to the exciting power when the applied voltage is fixed. The Si3N4 insulated GaAs dipole antenna can hold higher biased voltage than a normal GaAs dipole antenna; its terahertz radiation generation efficiency is significantly higher than that of a normal GaAs dipole antenna.

  14. The damaging effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on upland cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L.) pollen grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanjie; Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Qingya; Tang, Canming

    2008-09-01

    With the aim to study the effects of an ion beam on plant cells, upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivar "Sumian 22" pollen grains were irradiated in vacuum (7.8 × 10-3 Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with an energy of 20 keV at various fluences ranging from 0.26 × 1016 to 0.78 × 1016 N+/cm2. The irradiation effects on pollen grains were tested, considering the ultrastructural changes in the exine and interior walls of pollen grains, their germination rate, the growth speed of the pollen tubes in the style, fertilization and boll development after the pistils were pollinated by the pollen grains which had been implanted with nitrogen ions. Nitrogen ions entered the pollen grains by etching and penetrating the exine and interior walls and destroying cell structures. A greater percentage of the pollen grains were destroyed as the fluence of N+ ions increased. Obviously, the nitrogen ion beam penetrated the exine and interior walls of the pollen grains and produced holes of different sizes. As the ion fluence increased, the amount and the density of pollen grain inclusions decreased and the size of the lacuna and starch granules increased. Pollen grain germination rates decreased with increasing ion fluence. The number of pollen tubes in the style declined with increased ion implantation into pollen grains, but the growth speed of the tubes did not change. All of the pollen tubes reached the end of the style at 13 h after pollination. This result was consistent with that of the control. Also, the weight and the diameter of the ovary decreased and shortened with increased ion beam implantation fluence. No evident change in the fecundation time of the ovule was observed. These results indicate that nitrogen ions can enter pollen grains and cause a series of biological changes in pollen grains of upland cotton.

  15. Effect of the order of He+ and H+ ion co-implantation on damage generation and thermal evolution of complexes, platelets, and blisters in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghbouj, N.; Cherkashin, N.; Darras, F.-X.; Paillard, V.; Fnaiech, M.; Claverie, A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen and helium co-implantation is nowadays used to efficiently transfer thin Si layers and fabricate silicon on insulator wafers for the microelectronic industry. The synergy between the two implants which is reflected through the dramatic reduction of the total fluence needed to fracture silicon has been reported to be strongly influenced by the implantation order. Contradictory conclusions on the mechanisms involved in the formation and thermal evolution of defects and complexes have been drawn. In this work, we have experimentally studied in detail the characteristics of Si samples co-implanted with He and H, comparing the defects which are formed following each implantation and after annealing. We show that the second implant always ballistically destroys the stable defects and complexes formed after the first implant and that the redistribution of these point defects among new complexes drives the final difference observed in the samples after annealing. When H is implanted first, He precipitates in the form of nano-bubbles and agglomerates within H-related platelets and nano-cracks. When He is implanted first, the whole He fluence is ultimately used to pressurize H-related platelets which quickly evolve into micro-cracks and surface blisters. We provide detailed scenarios describing the atomic mechanisms involved during and after co-implantation and annealing which well-explain our results and the reasons for the apparent contradictions reported at the state of the art.

  16. Micro-Photoluminescence Confocal Mapping of Single V-Grooved GaAs Quantum Wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shao-Hua; CHEN Zhang-Hai; BAI Li-Hui; SHEN Xue-Chu; H. H. Tan; L. Fu; M. Fraser; C. Jagadish

    2006-01-01

    We perform the micro-photoluminescence measurement at low temperatures and a scanning optical mapping with high spatial resolution of a single V-grooved GaAs quantum wire modified by the selective ion-implantation and rapid thermally annealing. While the mapping shows the luminescences respectively from the quantum wires and from quantum well areas between quantum wires in general, the micro-photoluminescence at liquid He temperatures reveals a plenty of spectral structures of the PL band for a single quantum wire. The spectral structures are attributed to the inhomogeneity and non-uniformity of both the space structure and compositions of realwires as well as the defects nearby the interface between quantum wire and surrounding quantum well structures.All these make the excitons farther localized in quasi-zero-dimensional quantum potential boxes related to these non-uniformity and/or defects. The results also demonstrate the ability of micro-photoluminescence measurement and mapping for the characterization of both opto-electronic and structural properties of realquantum wires.

  17. Electrical properties and dielectric spectroscopy of Ar{sup +} implanted polycarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawla, Mahak, E-mail: mahak.chawla@gmail.com; Shekhawat, Nidhi; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Sharma, Annu [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra - 136119 (India); Nair, K. G. M. [Consultant, UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kalpakkam Node, Kokilamedu-603104, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-05-15

    The aim of the present paper is to study the effect of argon ion implantation on electrical and dielectric properties of polycarbonate. Specimens were implanted with 130 keV Ar{sup +} ions in the fluence ranging from 1×10{sup 14} to 1×10{sup 16} ions cm{sup −2}. The beam current used was ∼0.40 µA cm{sup −2}. The electrical conduction behaviour of virgin and Ar{sup +} implanted polycarbonate specimens have been studied through current-voltage (I-V characteristic) measurements. It has been observed that after implantation conductivity increases with increasing ion fluence. The dielectric spectroscopy of these specimens has been done in the frequency range of 100 kHz-100 MHz. Relaxation processes were studied by Cole-Cole plot of complex permittivity (real part of complex permittivity, ε′ vs. imaginary part of complex permittivity, ε″). The Cole-Cole plots have also been used to determine static dielectric constant (ε{sub s}), optical dielectric constant (ε{sub ∞}), spreading factor (α), average relaxation time (τ{sub 0}) and molecular relaxation time (τ). The dielectric behaviour has been found to be significantly affected due to Ar{sup +} implantation. The possible correlation between this behaviour and the changes induced by the implantation has been discussed.

  18. Doping effects induced by potassium ion implantation in solid C{sub 60}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trouillas, P. [Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France). Lab. d`Electronique des Polymers sous Faisceau Ionique; Moliton, A. [Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France). Lab. d`Electronique des Polymers sous Faisceau Ionique; Ratier, B. [Faculte des Sci., Limoges (France). Lab. d`Electronique des Polymers sous Faisceau Ionique

    1995-08-01

    Ion implantation is presented here as another technique for investigating the electrical properties of doped solid C{sub 60}. The conductivity and the thermopower have been studied versus the implantation parameters in order to investigate electrical transport phenomena which occur in implanted solid C{sub 60}, and thus prove doping effects. First results on ion implantation in C{sub 60} show a strong competition between damaging (induced by energetic ions) and doping effect (induced by charge transfer). Generally, electron transfers between the potassium atoms and the C{sub 60} molecules produce a conducting phase: up to x{approx} =0.1, metallic K{sub 3}C{sub 60} islands are dispersed in an insulating phase (virgin C{sub 60}); then, for x>0.1, damage plays a major role, leading to conduction paths through the samples (the saturation threshold x{approx} =0.1 is lower than in chemical doping due to the degradations). Potassium ion implantation with low energy (E{approx} =30 keV) and low fluence (D<10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) seems to provide the best implantation parameters for doping. Indeed, small ion size, low energy and low fluence are necessary in order to diminish the degradation effects. (orig.)

  19. Experimental examination of gaas dissolution in in-p melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkhovityanov, Yu. B.; Bolkhovityanova, R. I.; Chikichev, S. I.

    1983-05-01

    The “solubility” of GaAs crystals in quaternary In-Ga-As-P liquids (X{Ga/I} = X{As/I}) has been studied experi-mentally at 770°C using seed-dissolution technique. The location of the true liquidus isotherm has been established independently by means of the direct vi-sual observation technique. Comparison between the two data sets indicates that the first method can be successfully used only for those In-Ga-As-P melt compositions which have the corresponding solid InxGa1-xAsyP1-y alloys nearly lattice-matched to the GaAs substrate. In other cases the results obtained by this method are totally misleading although in-teresting as they are. The phenomenon of “catastro-phic” substrate erosion is investigated. The results of the present study are interpreted within the conceptual framework developed previously.

  20. Resistance Fluctuations in GaAs Nanowire Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Marasović

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical study on resistance fluctuations in a series of nanowire-based grids. Each grid is made of GaAs nanowires arranged in parallel with metallic contacts crossing all nanowires perpendicularly. Electrical properties of GaAs nanowires known from previous experimental research are used as input parameters in the simulation procedure. Due to the nonhomogeneous doping, the resistivity changes along nanowire. Allowing two possible nanowire orientations (“upwards” or “downwards”, the resulting grid is partially disordered in vertical direction which causes resistance fluctuations. The system is modeled using a two-dimensional random resistor network. Transfer-matrix computation algorithm is used to calculate the total network resistance. It is found that probability density function (PDF of resistance fluctuations for a series of nanowire grids changes from Gaussian behavior towards the Bramwell-Holdsworth-Pinton distribution when both nanowire orientations are equally represented in the grid.

  1. Radiation damage in urania crystals implanted with low-energy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien Hien; Garrido, Frédérico; Debelle, Aurélien; Mylonas, Stamatis; Nowicki, Lech; Thomé, Lionel; Bourçois, Jérôme; Moeyaert, Jérémy

    2014-05-01

    Implantations with low-energy ions (470-keV Xe and 500-keV La with corresponding ion range Rp ∼ 85 nm and range straggling ΔRp ∼ 40 nm) have been performed to investigate both radiation and chemical effects due to the incorporation of different species in UO2 (urania) crystals. The presence of defects was monitored in situ after each implantation fluence step by the RBS/C technique. Channelling data were analysed afterwards by Monte-Carlo simulations with a model of defects involving (i) randomly displaced atoms (RDA) and (ii) distorted rows, i.e. bent channels (BC). While increasing the ion fluence, the accumulation of RDA leads to a steep increase of the defect fraction in the range from 4 to 7 dpa regardless of the nature of bombarding ions followed by a saturation plateau over a large dpa range. A clear difference of 6% in the yield of saturation plateaus between irradiation with Xe and La ions was observed. Conversely, the evolutions of the fraction of BC showed a similar regular increase with increasing ion fluence for both ions. Moreover, this increase is shifted to a larger fluence in comparison to the sharp increase step of RDA. This phenomenon indicates a continuous structural modification of UO2 crystals under irradiation unseen by the measurement of RDA.

  2. Radiation damage in urania crystals implanted with low-energy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tien Hien, E-mail: tien-hien.nguyen@u-psud.fr [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM – UMR 8609), CNRS-IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, Bâtiments 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Garrido, Frédérico; Debelle, Aurélien; Mylonas, Stamatis [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM – UMR 8609), CNRS-IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, Bâtiments 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Nowicki, Lech [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Thomé, Lionel; Bourçois, Jérôme; Moeyaert, Jérémy [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM – UMR 8609), CNRS-IN2P3-Université Paris-Sud, Bâtiments 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2014-05-01

    Implantations with low-energy ions (470-keV Xe and 500-keV La with corresponding ion range Rp ∼ 85 nm and range straggling ΔRp ∼ 40 nm) have been performed to investigate both radiation and chemical effects due to the incorporation of different species in UO{sub 2} (urania) crystals. The presence of defects was monitored in situ after each implantation fluence step by the RBS/C technique. Channelling data were analysed afterwards by Monte-Carlo simulations with a model of defects involving (i) randomly displaced atoms (RDA) and (ii) distorted rows, i.e. bent channels (BC). While increasing the ion fluence, the accumulation of RDA leads to a steep increase of the defect fraction in the range from 4 to 7 dpa regardless of the nature of bombarding ions followed by a saturation plateau over a large dpa range. A clear difference of 6% in the yield of saturation plateaus between irradiation with Xe and La ions was observed. Conversely, the evolutions of the fraction of BC showed a similar regular increase with increasing ion fluence for both ions. Moreover, this increase is shifted to a larger fluence in comparison to the sharp increase step of RDA. This phenomenon indicates a continuous structural modification of UO{sub 2} crystals under irradiation unseen by the measurement of RDA.

  3. High laser-fluence deposition of organic materials in water ice matrices by ''MAPLE''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Rodrigo, K.; Schou, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) is a deposition technique for organic material. Water ice was used as a matrix for the biotechnologically important guest material, polyethylene glycol (PEG), for concentrations from 0.5 to 4 wt.%. The target was irradiated with 6 ns laser pulses...... at 355 nm at a fluence of 2.5-12 J/cm(2). Even at this high fluence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicates a chemical structure of the deposit close to that of the un-irradiated PEG. Matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization (MALDI) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) show...... that the mass distribution of the deposited PEG is similar to that of the starting material. Optical pictures of the films show particle structures of PEG of a size up to 5-10 mu m. The deposition rate measured with a quartz crystal microbalance is typically of the order of 1 ng/ (cm(2) shot). (c) 2005 Elsevier...

  4. An altitude and distance correction to the source fluence distribution of TGFs

    CERN Document Server

    Nisi, R S; Gjesteland, T; Collier, A B

    2016-01-01

    The source fluence distribution of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) has been extensively discussed in recent years, but few have considered how the TGF fluence distribution at the source, as estimated from satellite measurements, depends on the distance from satellite foot point and assumed production altitude. As the absorption of the TGF photons increases significantly with lower source altitude and larger distance between the source and the observing satellite, these might be important factors. We have addressed the issue by using the tropopause pressure distribution as an approximation of the TGF production altitude distribution and World Wide Lightning Location Network spheric measurements to determine the distance. The study is made possible by the increased number of Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) TGFs found in the second catalog of the RHESSI data. One find is that the TGF/lightning ratio for the tropics probably has an annual variability due to an annual variability in the...

  5. Pain during photodynamic therapy is associated with protoporphyrin IX fluorescence and fluence rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S.R.; Skiveren, J.; Philipsen, P.A.;

    2008-01-01

    and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence, lesion type, lesion preparation and lesion localization. Methods Twenty-six patients with actinic keratoses (AKs) in different localizations and 34 patients with facial acne vulgaris were treated with methyl aminolaevulinate-PDT. Patients with acne were illuminated using......) patients with acne had a pain score of 6 [interquartile range (IQR) 5-7] compared with 8 (IQR 6-10) when using a fluence rate of 68 mW cm(-2) (P = 0.018). After correcting the pain score for PpIX fluorescence no differences in pain scores were found between first and second acne treatment, locations of AK...... lesions or between the two types of lesions. Conclusions Pain during PDT was correlated with the PpIX fluorescence in the treatment area prior to illumination. Pain was reduced using a lower fluence rate during PDT of acne Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  6. Time-resolved angular distributions of plume ions from silver at low and medium laser fluence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen

    in a vacuum chamber (~ 10-7 mbar) with a Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm and made detailed measurements of the time-resolved angular distribution. The ion flow in different directions has been measured with a hemispherical array of Langmuir probes, by which the time-of-flight spectra, as well...... 70 eV up to 145 eV in a direction normal to the target surface with increasing fluence. With increasing observation angle the time-of-flight spectra exhibit a peak at longer flight times, i.e. at a lower kinetic energy. At the highest fluence the ionized fraction of the ablated particles exceeds 0.5....

  7. High-power laser interference lithography process on photoresist: Effect of laser fluence and polarisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellman, M. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018, San Sebastian (Spain)], E-mail: mellman@ceit.es; Rodriguez, A.; Perez, N.; Echeverria, M. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018, San Sebastian (Spain); Verevkin, Y.K. [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ul' yanova Street, 603600 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Peng, C.S. [ORC (Tampere University of Technology), Korkeakoulunkatu 3, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Berthou, T. [SILIOS Technologies SA, Rue Gaston Imbert prolongee 13790 Peynier (France); Wang, Z. [MEC (Cardiff University), Queen' s Buildings, The Parade, Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Olaizola, S.M.; Ayerdi, I. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    High throughput and low cost fabrication techniques in the sub-micrometer scale are attractive for the industry. Laser interference lithography (LIL) is a promising technique that can produce one, two and three-dimensional periodical patterns over large areas. In this work, two- and four-beam laser interference lithography systems are implemented to produce respectively one- and two-dimensional periodical patterns. A high-power single pulse of {approx}8 ns is used as exposure process. The optimum exposure dose for a good feature patterning in a 600 nm layer of AZ-1505 photoresist deposited on silicon wafers is studied. The best aspect ratio is found for a laser fluence of 20 mJ/cm{sup 2}. A method to control the width of the sub-micrometer structures based on controlling the resist thickness and the laser fluence is proposed.

  8. Leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation to realize optimized fluence profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirkx, M.L.P.; Heijmen, B.J.M.; Santvoort, J.P.C. van [University Hospital Rotterdam/Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    1998-05-01

    An algorithm for the calculation of the required leaf trajectories to generate optimized intensity modulated beam profiles by means of dynamic multileaf collimation is presented. This algorithm iteratively accounts for leaf transmission and collimator scatter and fully avoids tongue-and-groove underdosage effects. Tests on a large number of intensity modulated fields show that only a limited number of iterations, generally less than 10, are necessary to minimize the differences between optimized and realized fluence profiles. To assess the accuracy of the algorithm in combination with the dose calculation algorithm of the Cadplan 3D treatment planning system, predicted absolute dose distributions for optimized fluence profiles were compared with dose distributions measured on the MM50 Racetrack Microtron and resulting from the calculated leaf trajectories. Both theoretical and clinical cases yield an agreement within 2%, or within 2 mm in regions with a high dose gradient, showing that the accuracy is adequate for clinical application. (author)

  9. Leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation to realize optimized fluence profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, M. L. P.; Heijmen, B. J. M.; van Santvoort, J. P. C.

    1998-05-01

    An algorithm for the calculation of the required leaf trajectories to generate optimized intensity modulated beam profiles by means of dynamic multileaf collimation is presented. This algorithm iteratively accounts for leaf transmission and collimator scatter and fully avoids tongue-and-groove underdosage effects. Tests on a large number of intensity modulated fields show that only a limited number of iterations, generally less than 10, are necessary to minimize the differences between optimized and realized fluence profiles. To assess the accuracy of the algorithm in combination with the dose calculation algorithm of the Cadplan 3D treatment planning system, predicted absolute dose distributions for optimized fluence profiles were compared with dose distributions measured on the MM50 Racetrack Microtron and resulting from the calculated leaf trajectories. Both theoretical and clinical cases yield an agreement within 2%, or within 2 mm in regions with a high dose gradient, showing that the accuracy is adequate for clinical application.

  10. The importance of the direction distribution of neutron fluence, and methods of determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, D.T. E-mail: david.bartlett@nrpb.org.uk; Drake, P.; D' Errico, F.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Matzke, M.; Tanner, R.J

    2002-01-01

    For the estimation of non-isotropic quantities such as personal dose equivalent and effective dose, and for the interpretation of the readings of personal dosemeters, it is necessary to determine both the energy and direction distributions of the neutron fluence. In fact, for workplace fields, the fluence and dose-equivalent responses of dosemeters and the relationships of operational and protection quantities, are frequently more dependent on the direction than on the energy distribution. In general, the direction distribution will not be independent of the energy distribution, and simultaneous determination of both may be required, which becomes a complex problem. The extent to which detailed information can be obtained depends on the spectrometric properties and on the angle dependence of the response of the detectors used. Methods for the determination of direction distributions of workplace fields are described.

  11. Microstrip and suspended substrate GaAs bias-T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalaswamy, A. D.; Das, Utpal

    2001-09-01

    For photodiode bias-Ts in optoelectronic ICs > 20dB isolation is essential at 2.5-10 GHz for the photodiode to work at both 2.5 and 10 Gbit/s. Designed micro strip and suspended substrate GaAs bias-Ts show 30-140 dB isolation and measured values are approximately 30 dB in the 2.5-10 Ghz range.

  12. Exciton-mediated photothermal cooling in GaAs membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Xuereb, André; Naesby, Andreas; Polzik, Eugene S; Hammerer, Klemens

    2012-01-01

    Cooling of the mechanical motion of a GaAs nano-membrane using the photothermal effect mediated by excitons was recently demonstrated by some of us [K. Usami, et al., Nature Phys. 8, 168 (2012)] and provides a clear example of the use of thermal forces to cool down mechanical motion. Here, we report on a single-free-parameter theoretical model to explain the results of this experiment which matches the experimental data remarkably well.

  13. Solar heating of GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-11-30

    We use a coupled thermal-optical approach to model the operating temperature rise in GaAs nanowire solar cells. We find that despite more highly concentrated light absorption and lower thermal conductivity, the overall temperature rise in a nanowire structure is no higher than in a planar structure. Moreover, coating the nanowires with a transparent polymer can increase the radiative cooling power by 2.2 times, lowering the operating temperature by nearly 7 K.

  14. Effects of laser focusing and fluence on the analysis of pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dario [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo - UNIFESP, Campus Diadema, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel 275, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Nunes, Lidiane Cristina [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Gomes, Marcos da Silva [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod. Washington Luis, km 235, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Leme, Flavio de Oliveira [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco Jose, E-mail: fjkrug@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    The effects of laser focusing and fluence on LIBS analysis of pellets of plant leaves was evaluated. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (5 ns, 10 Hz, 1064 nm) was used and the emission signals were collected by lenses into an optical fiber coupled to a spectrometer with Echelle optics and ICCD. Data were acquired from the accumulation of 20 laser pulses at 2.0 {mu}s delay and 5.0 {mu}s integration time gate. The emission signal intensities increased with both laser fluence and spot size. Higher sensitivities for Ca, K, Mg, P, Al, B, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn determinations were observed for fluences in the range from 25 to 60 J cm{sup -2}. Coefficients of variation of site-to-site measurements were generally lower than 10% (n = 30 sites, 20 laser pulses/site) for a fluence of 50 J cm{sup -2} and 750 {mu}m spot size. For most elements, there is an indication that accuracy is improved with higher fluences. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser focusing and fluence affect the quality of LIBS results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improvements on sensitivity and precision were observed for most analytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matrix effects can be minimized by choosing the most appropriate fluence.

  15. Biphasic fluence-response curves for phytochrome-mediated kalanchoë seed germination : sensitization by gibberellic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethy, R; Dedonder, A; De Petter, E; Van Wiemeersch, L; Fredericq, H; De Greef, J; Steyaert, H; Stevens, H

    1987-01-01

    The fluence-response curves for the effect of two red pulses separated by 24 hours on the germination of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. cv Vesuv seeds, incubated on gibberellic acid (GA(3)) are biphasic for suboptimal concentrations. The response in the low fluence range corresponds with a classical red/far-red reversible phytochrome mediated reaction. GA(3) induces an additional response in the very low fluence range, which is also phytochrome mediated. The sensitivity to phytochrome-far-red absorbing form (Pfr), however, is increased about 20,000-fold, so that even far-red fluences become saturating. Both in the very low and low fluence response range, the maximal responses induced by saturating fluences are modulated by the GA(3) concentration. GA(3) having no direct influence on the phytochrome phototransformations, alters the Pfr requirement and determines the responding seed population fraction in the very low and low fluence range. The effet of GA(3) appears to be on the transduction chain of the phytochrome signal.

  16. Fluence correction factor for graphite calorimetry in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, A.; Thomas, R.; Homer, M.; Bouchard, H.; Rossomme, S.; Renaud, J.; Kanai, T.; Royle, G.; Palmans, H.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work is to develop and adapt a formalism to determine absorbed dose to water from graphite calorimetry measurements in carbon-ion beams. Fluence correction factors, {{k}\\text{fl}} , needed when using a graphite calorimeter to derive dose to water, were determined in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam. Measurements were performed in a 290 MeV/n carbon-ion beam with a field size of 11  ×  11 cm2, without modulation. In order to sample the beam, a plane-parallel Roos ionization chamber was chosen for its small collecting volume in comparison with the field size. Experimental information on fluence corrections was obtained from depth-dose measurements in water. This procedure was repeated with graphite plates in front of the water phantom. Fluence corrections were also obtained with Monte Carlo simulations through the implementation of three methods based on (i) the fluence distributions differential in energy, (ii) a ratio of calculated doses in water and graphite at equivalent depths and (iii) simulations of the experimental setup. The {{k}\\text{fl}} term increased in depth from 1.00 at the entrance toward 1.02 at a depth near the Bragg peak, and the average difference between experimental and numerical simulations was about 0.13%. Compared to proton beams, there was no reduction of the {{k}\\text{fl}} due to alpha particles because the secondary particle spectrum is dominated by projectile fragmentation. By developing a practical dose conversion technique, this work contributes to improving the determination of absolute dose to water from graphite calorimetry in carbon-ion beams.

  17. Processing and characterization of epitaxial GaAs radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, X; Arsenovich, T; Gädda, A; Härkönen, J; Junkes, A; Karadzhinova, A; Kostamo, P; Lipsanen, H; Luukka, P; Mattila, M; Nenonen, S; Riekkinen, T; Tuominen, E; Winkler, A

    2015-01-01

    GaAs devices have relatively high atomic numbers (Z=31, 33) and thus extend the X-ray absorption edge beyond that of Si (Z=14) devices. In this study, radiation detectors were processed on GaAs substrates with 110 $\\mu\\textrm{m}$ - 130 $\\mu\\textrm{m}$ thick epitaxial absorption volume. Thick undoped and heavily doped p$^+$ epitaxial layers were grown using a custom-made horizontal Chloride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (CVPE) reactor, the growth rate of which was about 10 $\\mu\\textrm{m}$/h. The GaAs p$^+$/i/n$^+$ detectors were characterized by Capacitance Voltage ($CV$), Current Voltage ($IV$), Transient Current Technique (TCT) and Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements. The full depletion voltage ($V_{\\textrm{fd}}$) of the detectors with 110 $\\mu\\textrm{m}$ epi-layer thickness is in the range of 8 V - 15 V and the leakage current density is about 10 nA/cm$^2$. The signal transit time determined by TCT is about 5 ns when the bias voltage is well above the value that produces the peak saturation drift ve...

  18. Growth of High Quality GaAs by MBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Chand

    1989-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the requirements and current practices in the molecular beam epitaxial (MBE growth af high-quality GaAs. High quality growth of GaAs means excellent control on the growth process andthe excellent surface, structural, electrical and optical properties of the deposited GaAs. Background material is presented about the MBE technique, the MBE system and its initial preparation for growth,molecular-beam source materials, substrate preparation and the growth conditions. The importance of meticulousness at every step is emphasized.Then, to illustrate that the MBE-GaAs has reached a level of perfection,experimental data is presented which shows an excellent control on the growth rate and its lateral uniformity (+- 0.75 per cent, the presence of verylow-level of background impurities (-low 1013 and high electronmobilities ( peak - 3 x 10to poer 5 cm2 v-1s-1 at 42 K for n - 3 x 10 to the power 13 (cm-3. In addition, we show that MBE-GaAs is intrinsically free from electron and hole deep traps. Chemical impurities in the impure arsenic source are shown to be the main limiting factors in determining the transport andoptical properties and formation of deep centers in MBE-GaAs. Such chemical impurities may, however, originate from other sources as well.

  19. Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) Quantum Photonic Waveguide Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jianwei; Jiang, Pisu; Bonneau, Damien; Engin, Erman; Silverstone, Joshua W; Lermer, Matthias; Beetz, Johannes; Kamp, Martin; Hofling, Sven; Tanner, Michael G; Natarajan, Chandra M; Hadfield, Robert H; Dorenbos, Sander N; Zwiller, Val; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Thompson, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    Integrated quantum photonics is a promising approach for future practical and large-scale quantum information processing technologies, with the prospect of on-chip generation, manipulation and measurement of complex quantum states of light. The gallium arsenide (GaAs) material system is a promising technology platform, and has already successfully demonstrated key components including waveguide integrated single-photon sources and integrated single-photon detectors. However, quantum circuits capable of manipulating quantum states of light have so far not been investigated in this material system. Here, we report GaAs photonic circuits for the manipulation of single-photon and two-photon states. Two-photon quantum interference with a visibility of 94.9 +/- 1.3% was observed in GaAs directional couplers. Classical and quantum interference fringes with visibilities of 98.6 +/- 1.3% and 84.4 +/- 1.5% respectively were demonstrated in Mach-Zehnder interferometers exploiting the electro-optic Pockels effect. This w...

  20. Thermal diffusion of Mn through GaAs overlayers on (Ga, Mn)As

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adell, J; Ulfat, I; Ilver, L; Kanski, J [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Sadowski, J [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Karlsson, K [Department of Life Sciences, University of Skoevde, SE-541 28 Skoevde (Sweden)

    2011-03-02

    Thermally stimulated diffusion of Mn through thin layers of GaAs has been studied by x-ray photoemission. (Ga, Mn)As samples with 5 at% Mn were capped with 4, 6 and 8 monolayer (ML) GaAs, and Mn diffusing through the GaAs was trapped on the surface by means of amorphous As. It was found that the out-diffusion is completely suppressed for an 8 ML thick GaAs film. The short diffusion length is attributed to an electrostatic barrier formed at the (Ga, Mn)As/GaAs interface.

  1. Identification a novel mononucleotide deletion mutation in GAA in pompe disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Ebrahimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mutations in the acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA gene usually lead to reduced GAA activity. In this study, we analyzed the mutations of GAA and GAA enzyme activity from one sibling suspected Pompe disease and their first-degree relatives. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, GAA enzyme activity assay was assessed using tandem mass spectrometry. Polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing were performed for GAA analysis. Results: GAA enzyme activity was significantly decreased in patients compared to the normal range (P = 0.02. Two individuals showed ten alterations in the GAA sequence, in which one of them (c. 1650del G has not been previously described in the literature. A single Guanine deletion (del-G was detected at codon 551 in exon 12. Conclusion: According to the literature, the detected change is a novel mutation. We hypothesized that the discovered deletion in the GAA might lead to a reduced activity of the gene product.

  2. GAA triplet-repeats cause nucleosome depletion in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyu; Xing, Yongqiang; Liu, Guoqing; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Xiujuan; Li, Guohong; Cai, Lu

    2015-08-01

    Although there have been many investigations into how trinucleotide repeats affect nucleosome formation and local chromatin structure, the nucleosome positioning of GAA triplet-repeats in the human genome has remained elusive. In this work, the nucleosome occupancy around GAA triplet-repeats across the human genome was computed statistically. The results showed a nucleosome-depleted region in the vicinity of GAA triplet-repeats in activated and resting CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the A-tract was frequently adjacent to the upstream region of GAA triplet-repeats and could enhance the depletion surrounding GAA triplet-repeats. In vitro chromatin reconstitution assays with GAA-containing plasmids also demonstrated that the inserted GAA triplet-repeats destabilized the ability of recombinant plasmids to assemble nucleosomes. Our results suggested that GAA triplet-repeats have lower affinity to histones and can change local nucleosome positioning. These findings may be helpful for understanding the mechanism of Friedreich's ataxia, which is associated with GAA triplet-repeats at the chromatin level.

  3. Gate Drain Underlapped-PNIN-GAA-TFET for Comprehensively Upgraded Analog/RF Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Jaya; Chaujar, Rishu

    2017-02-01

    This work integrates the merits of gate-drain underlapping (GDU) and N+ source pocket on cylindrical gate all around tunnel FET (GAA-TFET) to form GDU-PNIN-GAA-TFET. It is analysed that the source pocket located at the source-channel junction narrows the tunneling barrier width at the tunneling junction and thereby enhances the ON-state current of GAA-TFET. Further, it is obtained that the GDU resists the extension of carrier density (built-up under the gated region) towards the drain side (under the underlapped length), thereby suppressing the ambipolar current and reducing the parasitic capacitances of GAA-TFET. Consequently, the amalgamated merits of both engineering schemes are obtained in GDU-PNIN-GAA-TFET that thus conquers the greatest challenges faced by TFET. Thus, GDU-PNIN-GAA-TFET results in an up-gradation in the overall performance of GAA-TFET. Moreover, it is realised that the RF figure of merits FOMs such as cut-off frequency (fT) and maximum oscillation frequency (fMAX) are also considerably improved with integration of source pocket on GAA-TFET. Thus, the improved analog and RF performance of GDU-PNIN-GAA-TFET makes it ideal for low power and high-speed applications.

  4. Thermal diffusion of Mn through GaAs overlayers on (Ga, Mn)As.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adell, J; Ulfat, I; Ilver, L; Sadowski, J; Karlsson, K; Kanski, J

    2011-03-02

    Thermally stimulated diffusion of Mn through thin layers of GaAs has been studied by x-ray photoemission. (Ga, Mn)As samples with 5 at% Mn were capped with 4, 6 and 8 monolayer (ML) GaAs, and Mn diffusing through the GaAs was trapped on the surface by means of amorphous As. It was found that the out-diffusion is completely suppressed for an 8 ML thick GaAs film. The short diffusion length is attributed to an electrostatic barrier formed at the (Ga, Mn)As/GaAs interface.

  5. GaAs thin films and methods of making and using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettcher, Shannon; Ritenour, Andrew; Boucher, Jason; Greenaway, Ann

    2016-06-14

    Disclosed herein are embodiments of methods for making GaAs thin films, such as photovoltaic GaAs thin films. The methods disclosed herein utilize sources, precursors, and reagents that do not produce (or require) toxic gas and that are readily available and relatively low in cost. In some embodiments, the methods are readily scalable for industrial applications and can provide GaAs thin films having properties that are at least comparable to or potentially superior to GaAs films obtained from conventional methods.

  6. Incorporation of oxygen in SiC implanted with hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcz, A.; Jakieła, R.; Kozubal, M.; Dyczewski, J.; Celler, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen accumulation at buried implantation-damage layers was studied after post-implantation annealing of hydrogen- or deuterium-implanted 4H-SiC. In this study H+ or 2H+ implantation was carried out at energies E, from 200 keV to 1 MeV, to fluences D, ranging from 2 × 1016/cm2 to 1 × 1017/cm2. For comparison, the implantation was also done into float-zone (FZ) and Czochralski (CZ) silicon wafers. Post-implantation annealing at temperatures from 400 °C to 1150 °C was performed either in pure argon or in a water vapor. Characterization methods included SIMS, RBS and TEM. At sufficiently high doses, hydrogen implantation into semiconductors leads to the irreversible formation of a planar zone of microcavities, bubbles and other extended defects located at the maximum of deposited energy. This kind of highly perturbed layer, containing large amounts of agglomerated hydrogen is known to efficiently getter a number of impurities. Oxygen was detected in both CZ and FZ silicon subjected to Smart-Cut™ processing. We have identified, by SIMS profiling, a considerable oxygen peak situated at the interface between the SiC substrate and a layer implanted with 1 × 1017 H ions/cm2 and heated to 1150 °C in either H2O vapor or in a nominally pure Ar. In view of a lack of convincing evidence that a hexagonal SiC might contain substantial amounts of oxygen, the objective of the present study was to identify the source and possible transport mechanism of oxygen species to the cavity band. Through the analysis of several implants annealed at various conditions, we conclude that, besides diffusion from the bulk or from surface oxides, an alternative path for oxygen agglomeration is migration of gaseous O2 or H2O from the edge of the sample through the porous layer.

  7. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intarasiri, S., E-mail: saweat@gmail.com [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Wijaikhum, A. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Bootkul, D., E-mail: mo_duangkhae@hotmail.com [Department of General Science (Gems and Jewelry), Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L.D.; Singkarat, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-08-15

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented.

  8. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarasiri, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Bootkul, D.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.; Singkarat, S.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented.

  9. An efficient method to determine double Gaussian fluence parameters in the eclipse™ proton pencil beam model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiajian; Liu, Wei; Stoker, Joshua; Ding, Xiaoning; Anand, Aman; Hu, Yanle; Herman, Michael G; Bues, Martin

    2016-12-01

    To find an efficient method to configure the proton fluence for a commercial proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment planning system (TPS). An in-water dose kernel was developed to mimic the dose kernel of the pencil beam convolution superposition algorithm, which is part of the commercial proton beam therapy planning software, eclipse™ (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The field size factor (FSF) was calculated based on the spot profile reconstructed by the in-house dose kernel. The workflow of using FSFs to find the desirable proton fluence is presented. The in-house derived spot profile and FSF were validated by a direct comparison with those calculated by the eclipse TPS. The validation included 420 comparisons of the FSFs from 14 proton energies, various field sizes from 2 to 20 cm and various depths from 20% to 80% of proton range. The relative in-water lateral profiles between the in-house calculation and the eclipse TPS agree very well even at the level of 10(-4). The FSFs between the in-house calculation and the eclipse TPS also agree well. The maximum deviation is within 0.5%, and the standard deviation is less than 0.1%. The authors' method significantly reduced the time to find the desirable proton fluences of the clinical energies. The method is extensively validated and can be applied to any proton centers using PBS and the eclipse TPS.

  10. Change of regional choroid thickness after reduced-fluence photodynamic therapy for chronic central serous chorioretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Saki; Shiragami, Chieko; Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Izumibata, Saeko; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Shiraga, Fumio

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate macular choroidal thickness after reduced-fluence photodynamic therapy (PDT) for chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Prospective, consecutive, interventional case series. Twenty-two eyes with chronic CSC were treated with reduced-fluence PDT. Macular choroidal thickness was examined using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with a 3-dimensinonal radial scan protocol in the choroidal mode before and 1, 3, and 6 months after the treatment. The mean choroidal thickness in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study grid (center, inner circle, and outer circle) was compared between before and after therapy, as well as between treated eyes and 54 volunteer normal eyes. Chronic CSC eyes showed significantly thicker choroids in the macular area compared with normal controls (P Choroidal thickness within the center area and inner circle showed a significant reduction at all time points after treatment (P choroidal thickness in the outer circle showed a statistically significant reduction at 1 and 3 months but not at 6 months. After treatment, the choroidal thickness reduced to the normal values at the center and inner circle, but was still significantly thicker in the outer circle (P choroids in the macular area. After reduced-fluence PDT, macular choroidal thickness became thinner within 6 months of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Robust fluence map optimization via alternating direction method of multipliers with empirical parameter optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hao

    2016-04-01

    For the treatment planning during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), beam fluence maps can be first optimized via fluence map optimization (FMO) under the given dose prescriptions and constraints to conformally deliver the radiation dose to the targets while sparing the organs-at-risk, and then segmented into deliverable MLC apertures via leaf or arc sequencing algorithms. This work is to develop an efficient algorithm for FMO based on alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). Here we consider FMO with the least-square cost function and non-negative fluence constraints, and its solution algorithm is based on ADMM, which is efficient and simple-to-implement. In addition, an empirical method for optimizing the ADMM parameter is developed to improve the robustness of the ADMM algorithm. The ADMM based FMO solver was benchmarked with the quadratic programming method based on the interior-point (IP) method using the CORT dataset. The comparison results suggested the ADMM solver had a similar plan quality with slightly smaller total objective function value than IP. A simple-to-implement ADMM based FMO solver with empirical parameter optimization is proposed for IMRT or VMAT.

  12. Effects of laser fluence on the structural properties of pulsed laser deposited ruthenium thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wai-Keat; Wong, Hin-Yong; Chan, Kah-Yoong; Tou, Teck-Yong [Multimedia University, Centre for Advanced Devices and Systems (CADS), Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yong, Thian-Khok [Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yap, Seong-Shan [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Institute of Physics, Trondheim (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    Ruthenium (Ru) has received great interest in recent years for applications in microelectronics. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) enables the growth of Ru thin films at low temperatures. In this paper, we report for the first time the characterization of pulsed laser deposited Ru thin films. The deposition processes were carried out at room temperature in vacuum environment for different durations with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser of 355-nm laser wavelength, employing various laser fluences ranging from 2 J/cm{sup 2} to 8 J/cm{sup 2}. The effect of the laser fluence on the structural properties of the deposited Ru films was investigated using surface profilometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ru droplets, some spherical in shape and some flattened into round discs were found on the deposited Ru. The droplets were correlated to ripple formations on the target during the laser-induced ejection from the target. In addition, crystalline Ru with orientations of (100), (101), and (002) was observed in the XRD spectra and their intensities were found to increase with increasing laser fluence and film thickness. Grain sizes ranging from 20 nm to 35 nm were deduced using the Scherrer formula. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) show that the composition of the plume and the deposited Ru film was of high purity. (orig.)

  13. Analysis for the Effect of Spatial Discretization Method on AP1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiao Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV is a critical concern related to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. To estimate the structural integrity over the designed lifetime and to support analyses for a potential plant life extension, an accurate calculation of the fast neutron fluence (E>1.0 MeV or E>0.1 MeV at the RPV is significant. The discrete ordinates method is one of the main methods to solve such problems. During the calculation process, many factors will affect the results. In this paper, the deviations introduced by different differencing schemes and mesh sizes on the AP1000 RPV fast neutron fluence have been studied, which are based on new discrete ordinates code ARES. The analysis shows that the differencing scheme (diamond difference with or without linear zero fix-up, theta weighted, directional theta weighted, and exponential directional weighted introduces a deviation within 4%. The coarse mesh (4 × 4 cm meshes in XY plane leads to approximately 23.7% calculation deviation compared to those of refined mesh (1 × 1 cm meshes in XY plane. Comprehensive study on the deviation introduced by differencing scheme and mesh size has great significance for reasoned evaluation of RPV fast neutron fluence calculation results.

  14. Surface Oxidation and Fast 18O Implant Diffusion in Nanostructured Layers of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    S.M. Duvanov; A.G. Balogh

    2015-01-01

    A formation of the near surface barrier composite oxide film and two-stage 18O implant diffusion in modified layers of Ti-6Al-4V alloy were observed in the present work. Fast and super fast regimes occur during second stage of the diffusion. Sample modification was performed using ion implantation and subsequent thermal annealing in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) atmosphere. Parameters of ion implantation are the following: 18O+ ion energy of 30 keV; fluence of 3 × 1017 ion/cm2; RT. Post-implantatio...

  15. Doping of C[sub 60] films after ion implantation. Dopage de films de C[sub 60] par implantation ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trouillas, P.; Ratier, B.; Moliton, A. (LEPOFI, Limoges (France). Faculte des Sciences); Gauneau, M. (Centre National d' Etudes des Telecommunications (CNET), 22 - Lannion (France)); Bernier, P. (Montpellier-2 Univ., 34 (France))

    1994-10-01

    With C[sub 60] films, ion implantation of inert ions (argon) gives rise to conduction processes ([sigma] > 10[sup 4] [Omega][sup -1] cm[sup -1]) related to degradation only in the case where implantation is performed at a high temperature (T = 560 K); no sample degeneracy ([sigma] < 10[sup -4] [Omega][sup -1] cm[sup -1]) appears after argon implantation at room temperature, but doping effects ([sigma] [approx] 1 [Omega][sup -1] cm[sup -1]) are obtained after implantation at room temperature with chemically active ions; with a fluence of the order of 10[sup 15] ions cm[sup -2], the thermoelectric power then appears negative with potassium or phosphorus ions, and positive with bromine or boron ions. (Author).

  16. Pulsed laser irradiation-induced microstructures in the Mn ion implanted Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Muneyuki, E-mail: naito22@center.konan-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Konan University, Okamoto, Higashi-Nada, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Yamada, Ryo; Machida, Nobuya [Department of Chemistry, Konan University, Okamoto, Higashi-Nada, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Koshiba, Yusuke; Sugimura, Akira; Aoki, Tamao; Umezu, Ikurou [Department of Physics, Konan University, Okamoto, Higashi-Nada, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    We have examined microstructures induced by pulsed-laser-melting for the Mn ion implanted Si using transmission electron microscopy. Single crystalline Si(0 0 1) wafers were irradiated with 65 keV and 120 keV Mn ions to a fluence of 1.0 × 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. The ion beam-induced amorphous layers in the as-implanted samples were melted and resolidified by pulsed YAG laser irradiation. After laser irradiation with appropriate laser fluence, the surface amorphous layers recrystallize into the single crystalline Si. The Mn concentration becomes higher in the near-surface region with increasing the number of laser shots. The migrated Mn atoms react with Si atoms and form the amorphous Mn–Si in the Si matrix.

  17. Retrograde peri-implantitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Jumshad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation.

  18. [Bilateral cochlear implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Jona; Migirov, Lela; Taitelbaum-Swead, Rikey; Hildesheimer, Minka

    2010-06-01

    Cochlear implant surgery became the standard of care in hearing rehabilitation of patients with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This procedure may alter the lives of children and adults enabling them to integrate with the hearing population. In the past, implantation was performed only in one ear, despite the fact that binaural hearing is superior to unilateral, especially in noisy conditions. Cochlear implantation may be performed sequentially or simultaneously. The "sensitive period" of time between hearing loss and implantation and between the two implantations, when performed sequentially, significantly influences the results. Shorter time spans between implantations improve the hearing results after implantation. Hearing success after implantation is highly dependent on the rehabilitation process which includes mapping, implant adjustments and hearing training. Bilateral cochlear implantation in children is recommended as the proposed procedure in spite of the additional financial burden.

  19. Electrical and structural characterization of GaAs on InP grown by OMCVD; application to GaAs MESFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, R.; Clei, A.; Dugrand, L.; Draïdia, auN.; Leroux, G.; Biblemont, S.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of GaAs on InP has attracted considerable interest recently because of the possibility of integration of GaAs electronic devices and 1.3 μm optical devices on the same wafer. In this work, we have investigated the growth of GaAs MESFETs and doped channel MIS-like FETs on InP by atmospheric pressure OMCVD. Because of the difference between the thermal expansion coefficient of GaAs and InP, the layers are under biaxial strain. The lowest FWHM of the (004) reflection curve of the double crystal X-ray diffraction spectra is 110 arc sec for a 12 μm thick layer. We have investigated the influence of the substrate temperature and of the arsine molar fraction on the residual carrier concentration of layers grown side by side on GaAs and on InP. The GaAs layers grown on InP are much more compensated than the layers grown on GaAs, indicating a higher incorporation of impurities. On MESFETs grown on InP, gm = 200mS/mm with Fmax higher than 30 GHz. On doped-channel MIS-like FETs on InP, we have measured gm = 145mS/mm.

  20. X-ray diffraction from single GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermanns, Andreas

    2012-11-12

    In recent years, developments in X-ray focussing optics have allowed to produce highly intense, coherent X-ray beams with spot sizes in the range of 100 nm and below. Together with the development of new experimental stations, X-ray diffraction techniques can now be applied to study single nanometer-sized objects. In the present work, X-ray diffraction is applied to study different aspects of the epitaxial growth of GaAs nanowires. Besides conventional diffraction methods, which employ X-ray beams with dimensions of several tens of {mu}m, special emphasis lies on the use of nanodiffraction methods which allow to study single nanowires in their as-grown state without further preparation. In particular, coherent X-ray diffraction is applied to measure simultaneously the 3-dimensional shape and lattice parameters of GaAs nanowires grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. It is observed that due to a high density of zinc-blende rotational twins within the nanowires, their lattice parameter deviates systematically from the bulk zinc-blende phase. In a second step, the initial stage in the growth of GaAs nanowires on Si (1 1 1) surfaces is studied. This nanowires, obtained by Ga-assisted growth in molecular beam epitaxy, grow predominantly in the cubic zinc-blende structure, but contain inclusions of the hexagonal wurtzite phase close to their bottom interface. Using nanodiffraction methods, the position of the different structural units along the growth axis is determined. Because the GaAs lattice is 4% larger than silicon, these nanowires release their lattice mismatch by the inclusion of dislocations at the interface. Whereas NWs with diameters below 50 nm are free of strain, a rough interface structure in nanowires with diameters above 100 nm prevents a complete plastic relaxation, leading to a residual strain at the interface that decays elastically along the growth direction. Finally, measurements on GaAs-core/InAs-shell nanowire heterostructures are presented

  1. Kinetic study of the effects of energetic fluence, the fluence flow, and the induced fading by heavy ions and. gamma. photons in cellulose triacetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moliton, J.P. (Laboratoire des Radiations Ionisantes, Limoges, France); Boutinaud, C.; Vareille, J.C.; Decossas, J.L.; Teyssier, J.L.; Delaunay, B.

    1982-07-01

    The kinetic interpretation of the damage produced by heavy ions (/sup 84/Kr and /sup 35/Cl from 1 MeV/amu) and ..gamma.. radiation in cellulose triacetate leads to an exponential dependence on the ion fluence. A comparison of the fading effect produced by heavy ions and ..gamma.. rays shows that the heavy ions, unlike ..gamma.. rays, cause irreversible damage. Finally, a nonlinear dependence on the flux of ions and ..gamma.. rays is found in the kinetics of radiation damage. This result is contrary to the usual assumption that heavy-ion flux, like ..gamma..-ray flux, is additive, at least for the fluxes of 10/sup 9/ to 2 x 10/sup 10/ ions/cm/sup 2/ s and dose rates of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/ Gy/h used in this work.

  2. Analysis of the longitudinal dependence of the downstream fluence of large solar energetic proton events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Daniel; Sanahuja, Blai; Aran, Angels; Agueda, Neus; Jiggens, Piers

    2016-07-01

    Simulations of the solar energetic particle (SEP) intensity-time profiles are needed to estimate the radiation environment for interplanetary missions. At present, the physics-based models applied for such a purpose, and including a moving source of particles, are not able to model the portion of the SEP intensity enhancement occurring after the coronal/interplanetary shock crossing by the observer (a.k.a. the downstream region). This is the case, for example, of the shock-and-particle model used to build the SOLPENCO2 code. SOLPENCO2 provides the statistical modelling tool developed in the ESA/SEPEM project for interplanetary missions with synthetic SEP event simulations for virtual spacecraft located at heliocentric distances between 0.2 AU and 1.6 AU (http://dev.sepem.oma.be/). In this work we present an analysis of 168 individual SEP events observed at 1 AU from 1988 to 2013. We identify the solar eruptive phenomena associated with these SEP events, as well as the in-situ passage of interplanetary shocks. For each event, we quantify the amount of fluence accounted in the downstream region, i.e. after the passage of the shock, at the 11 SEPEM reference energy channels (i.e., from 5 to 300 MeV protons). First, from the subset of SEP events simultaneously detected by near Earth spacecraft (using SEPEM reference data) and by one of the STEREO spacecraft, we select those events for which the downstream region can be clearly determined. From the 8 selected multi-spacecraft events, we find that the western observations of each event have a minor downstream contribution than their eastern counterpart, and that the downstream-to-total fluence ratio of these events decreases as a function of the energy. Hence, there is a variation of the downstream fluence with the heliolongitude in SEP events. Based on this result, we study the variation of the downstream-to-total fluence ratios of the total set of individual events. We confirm the eastern-to-western decrease of the

  3. Pulsed laser ablation of Germanium under vacuum and hydrogen environments at various fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Dawood, Asadullah; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Hayat, Asma; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif; Mahmood, Arshad

    2015-07-01

    Laser fluence and ambient environment play a significant role for the formation and development of the micro/nano-structures on the laser irradiated targets. Single crystal (1 0 0) Germanium (Ge) has been ablated under two environments of vacuum (10-3 Torr) and hydrogen (100 Torr) at various fluences ranging from 4.5 J cm-2 to 6 J cm-2. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser with wavelength of 248 nm, pulse duration of 18 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets was explored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge is measured by four probe method. SEM analysis exhibits the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), cones and micro-bumps in both ambient environments (vacuum and hydrogen). The formation as well as development of these structures is strongly dependent upon the laser fluence and environmental conditions. The periodicity of LIPSS or ripples varies from 38 μm to 60 μm in case of vacuum whereas in case of hydrogen environment, the periodicity varies from 20 μm to 45 μm. The difference in number of ripples and periodicity as well as in shape and size of cones and bumps in vacuum and hydrogen is explained on the basis of confinement and shielding effect of plasma. FTIR spectroscopy reveals that no new bands are formed for laser ablated Ge under vacuum, whereas Csbnd H stretching vibration band is formed for two moderate fluences (5 J cm-2 and 5.5 J cm-2) in case of ablation in hydrogen. Raman spectroscopy shows that no new bands are formed in case of ablation in both environments; however a slight Raman shift is observed which is attributed to laser-induced stresses. The electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge increases with increasing fluence and is also dependent upon the environment as well as grown structures.

  4. Experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT using digital beam attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczykutowicz, T. P.; Mistretta, C. A.

    2014-03-01

    Tailoring CT scan acquisition parameters to individual patients is a topic of much research in the CT imaging community. It is now common place to find automatically adjusted tube current options for modern CT scanners. In addition, the use of beam shaping filters, commonly called bowtie filters, is available on most CT systems and allows for different body regions to receive different incident x-ray fluence distributions. However, no method currently exists which allows for the form of the incident x-ray fluence distribution to change as a function of the view angle. This study represents the first experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) for a c-arm geometry CT scan. X-ray fluence modulation is accomplished using a digital beam attenuator (DBA). The device is composed of ten iron wedge pairs that modulate the thickness of iron, the x-rays must traverse before reaching a patient. Using this device, experimental data was taken using a Siemens Zeego c-arm scanner. Scans were performed on a cylindrical polyethylene phantom and on two different sections of an anthropomorphic phantom. The DBA was used to equalize the x-ray fluence striking the detector for each scan. Non DBA, or ‘flat field’ scans were also acquired of the same phantom objects for comparison. In addition, a scan was performed in which the DBA was used to enable volume of interest (VOI) imaging. In VOI, only a small sub-volume within a patient receives full dose and the rest of the patient receives a much lower dose. Data corrections unique to using a piece-wise constant modulator were also developed. The feasibility of FFMCT implemented using a DBA device has been demonstrated. Initial results suggest dose reductions of up to 3.6 times relative to ‘flat field’ CT. In addition to dose reduction, the DBA enables a large improvement in image noise uniformity and the ability to provide regionally enhanced signal to noise using VOI imaging techniques. The results presented in

  5. The Meteoroid Fluence at Mars Due to Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, A.; Wiegert, P.; Blaauw, R.; McCarty, C.; Kingery, A.; Cooke, W.

    2014-01-01

    Long-period comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will experience a close encounter with Mars on 2014 Oct 19. A collision between the comet and the planet has been ruled out, but the comet's coma may envelop Mars and its man-made satellites. By the time of the close encounter, five operational spacecraft will be present near Mars. Characterizing the coma is crucial for assessing the risk posed to these satellites by meteoroid impacts. We present an analytic model of cometary comae that describes the spatial and size distributions of cometary dust and meteoroids. This model correctly reproduces, to within an order of magnitude, the number of impacts recorded by Giotto near 1P/Halley [1] and by Stardust near comet 81P/Wild 2 [2]. Applied to Siding Spring, our model predicts a total particle fluence near Mars of 0.02 particles per square meter. In order to determine the degree to which Siding Spring's coma deviates from a sphere, we perform numerical simulations which take into account both gravitational effects and radiative forces. We take the entire dust component of the coma and tail continuum into account by simulating the ejection and evolution of dust particles from comet Siding Spring. The total number of particles simulated is essentially a free parameter and does not provide a check on the total fluence. Instead, these simulations illustrate the degree to which the coma of Siding Spring deviates from the perfect sphere described by our analytic model (see Figure). We conclude that our analytic model sacrifices less than an order of magnitude in accuracy by neglecting particle dynamics and radiation pressure and is thus adequate for order-of-magnitude fluence estimates. Comet properties may change unpredictably and therefore an analytic coma model that enables quick recalculation of the meteoroid fluence is highly desirable. NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office is monitoring comet Siding Spring and taking measurements of cometary brightness and dust production. We

  6. Synthesis of buried silicon oxynitride layers by ion implantation for silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, A.D. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India)]. E-mail: adyadav@physics.mu.ac.in; Polji, Rucha H. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Singh, Vibha [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Dubey, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari Campus, Santacruz (E), Mumbai 400 098 (India); Gundu Rao, T.K. [Regional Sophisticated Instrumentation Center, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2006-04-15

    Silicon oxynitride (Si {sub x}O {sub y}N {sub z}) buried insulating layers were synthesized by SIMNOX (separation by implanted nitrogen-oxygen) process by {sup 14}N{sup +} and {sup 16}O{sup +} ion implantation to high fluence levels 1 x 10{sup 17}, 2.5 x 10{sup 17} and 5 x 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2} sequentially in the ratio 1:1 at 150 keV into p-type (1 0 0) silicon wafers. The identification of structures and defects in the ion beam synthesized buried layers were carried out by FTIR, XRD and ESR measurements before and after RTA treatments at different temperatures in nitrogen ambient. The FTIR spectra show single broad absorption band in the wavenumber range 1250-600 cm{sup -1} confirming the formation of silicon oxynitride. The integrated absorption band intensity is found to increase with increasing ion fluence and on annealing indicating gradual chemical transformation of the ion implanted layer into silicon oxynitride. The XRD data of the implanted samples show the formation of Si{sub 2}N{sub 2}O (O) phase of silicon oxynitride. On annealing the samples, SiO{sub 2} (H)/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (H) phases are also formed in addition to Si{sub 2}N{sub 2}O (O) phase. The concentration of the formed phases is found to increase with increase in the ion fluence as well as the annealing temperature. The ESR studies both at room temperature and at low temperatures reveal the presence of a defect center associated with silicon dangling bonds. The increase in ion fluence gives rise to small variations in g-values and increase in the spin density. The spin density decreases in general with increasing the annealing temperature.

  7. Tolerance of GaAs as an original substrate for HVPE growth of free standing GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mio; Sato, T.; Suemasu, T.; Hasegawa, F.

    2004-09-01

    In order to investigate possibility of thick GaN growth on a GaAs substrate by halide vapar phase epitaxy (HVPE), GaN was grown on GaAs(111)/Ti wafer with Ti deposited by E-gun. It was found that surface treatment of the GaAs substrate by HF solution deteriorated greatly the tolerence of GaAs and that Ti can protected GaAs from erosion by NH3. By depositing Ti on GaAs(111)A surface, a millor-like GaN layer could be grown at 1000 °C for 1 hour without serious deterioration of the original GaAs substrate. By increasing the growth rate, a thick free standing GaN will be obtained with GaAs as an original substrate in near future.

  8. The structural changes and optical properties of LiNbO3 after Er implantation using high ion fluencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macková, A.; Malinský, P.; Pupíková, H.; Nekvindová, P.; Cajzl, J.; Sofer, Z.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Kolitsch, A.; Oswald, J.

    2014-08-01

    The structural and compositional changes of LiNbO3 implanted with 190 keV Er+ ions into various crystallographic cuts with fluencies of 1 × 1016 and 5 × 1016 cm-2 were studied. The effect of post-implantation annealing at 1000 °C in oxygen atmosphere was also examined. Concentration depth profiles of implanted erbium, determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), are broader than those from the SRIM simulation. The maximum erbium concentration (of up to 8 at.%) is observed at the depth of about 50 nm, for all crystal cuts. The structure of the implanted layers were characterised by RBS-channelling method. The lower relative number of disordered atoms in the crystalline matrix was observed in the lithium niobate (LN) implanted at a fluence of 1 × 1016 cm-2, where also the preferential position of the erbium in substitutional sites was observed when compared to the randomly distributed erbium in interstitial positions at a fluence of 5 × 1016 cm-2 after the annealing. Surface-morphology changes at the highest implantation fluencies were studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Since we were interested in the relation between the structural changes and optical properties, erbium luminescence properties were measured in the region of 1440-1650 nm. The positive effect of post-implantation annealing on the luminescence properties caused by structural recovery was proved.

  9. Time-resolved and integrated angular distributions of plume ions from silver at low and medium laser fluence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Laser impact on metals in the UV regime results in a significant number of ablated plume ions even at moderate fluence (0.7–2.4 J/cm2). The ablated particles are largely neutrals at the lowest fluence, but the fraction of ions increases strongly with fluence. The ion flow in different directions...... from a silver target irradiated by a laser beam at a wavelength of 355 nm in vacuum was measured with a hemispherical array of Langmuir probes. The time-of-flight spectra in all directions, as well as the total angular yield were determined. The angular distribution peaks strongly in forward direction...... flight times, i.e., at a lower kinetic energy. At the highest fluence, the ionized fraction of the ablated particles in the plume increases up to 0.5....

  10. Study of the effects of focused high-energy boron ion implantation in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ynsa, M. D.; Agulló-Rueda, F.; Gordillo, N.; Maira, A.; Moreno-Cerrada, D.; Ramos, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    Boron-doped diamond is a material with a great technological and industrial interest because of its exceptional chemical, physical and structural properties. At modest boron concentrations, insulating diamond becomes a p-type semiconductor and at higher concentrations a superconducting metal at low temperature. The most conventional preparation method used so far, has been the homogeneous incorporation of boron doping during the diamond synthesis carried out either with high-pressure sintering of crystals or by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of films. With these methods, high boron concentration can be included without distorting significantly the diamond crystalline lattice. However, it is complicated to manufacture boron-doped microstructures. A promising alternative to produce such microstructures could be the implantation of focused high-energy boron ions, although boron fluences are limited by the damage produced in diamond. In this work, the effect of focused high-energy boron ion implantation in single crystals of diamond is studied under different irradiation fluences and conditions. Micro-Raman spectra of the sample were measured before and after annealing at 1000 °C as a function of irradiation fluence, for both superficial and buried boron implantation, to assess the changes in the diamond lattice by the creation of vacancies and defects and their degree of recovery after annealing.

  11. Fluence correction factors for graphite calorimetry in a low-energy clinical proton beam: I. Analytical and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmans, H; Al-Sulaiti, L; Andreo, P; Shipley, D; Lühr, A; Bassler, N; Martinkovič, J; Dobrovodský, J; Rossomme, S; Thomas, R A S; Kacperek, A

    2013-05-21

    The conversion of absorbed dose-to-graphite in a graphite phantom to absorbed dose-to-water in a water phantom is performed by water to graphite stopping power ratios. If, however, the charged particle fluence is not equal at equivalent depths in graphite and water, a fluence correction factor, kfl, is required as well. This is particularly relevant to the derivation of absorbed dose-to-water, the quantity of interest in radiotherapy, from a measurement of absorbed dose-to-graphite obtained with a graphite calorimeter. In this work, fluence correction factors for the conversion from dose-to-graphite in a graphite phantom to dose-to-water in a water phantom for 60 MeV mono-energetic protons were calculated using an analytical model and five different Monte Carlo codes (Geant4, FLUKA, MCNPX, SHIELD-HIT and McPTRAN.MEDIA). In general the fluence correction factors are found to be close to unity and the analytical and Monte Carlo codes give consistent values when considering the differences in secondary particle transport. When considering only protons the fluence correction factors are unity at the surface and increase with depth by 0.5% to 1.5% depending on the code. When the fluence of all charged particles is considered, the fluence correction factor is about 0.5% lower than unity at shallow depths predominantly due to the contributions from alpha particles and increases to values above unity near the Bragg peak. Fluence correction factors directly derived from the fluence distributions differential in energy at equivalent depths in water and graphite can be described by kfl = 0.9964 + 0.0024·zw-eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.2%. Fluence correction factors derived from a ratio of calculated doses at equivalent depths in water and graphite can be described by kfl = 0.9947 + 0.0024·zw-eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.3%. These results are of direct relevance to graphite calorimetry in low-energy protons but given that the fluence

  12. Synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals in sapphire by ion implantation and vacuum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, C.; Franco, N.; Alves, L. C.; da Silva, R. C.; Alves, E.; Safran, G.; McHargue, C. J.

    2007-04-01

    The synthesis of embedded ZnO nanoparticles in m-cut sapphire was achieved through high fluence Zn ion implantation, 0.9 × 1017 cm-2 at room temperature, followed by annealing at 1000 °C in vacuum. In c-cut samples subjected to similar annealing conditions only buried precipitates of Zn form. TEM results in these samples show a high concentration of faceted precipitates distributed along the c-plane and the presence of Kirkendall voids distributed along the entire implanted region. In both cases a strong loss of Zn is observed upon annealing, which depends on the sapphire host orientation.

  13. Synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals in sapphire by ion implantation and vacuum annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, C. [LFI, Dep. Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Franco, N. [LFI, Dep. Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Alves, L.C. [LFI, Dep. Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Silva, R.C. da [LFI, Dep. Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal) and Centro Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Alves, E. [LFI, Dep. Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal) and Centro Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: ealves@itn.pt; Safran, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); McHargue, C.J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0750 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    The synthesis of embedded ZnO nanoparticles in m-cut sapphire was achieved through high fluence Zn ion implantation, 0.9 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} at room temperature, followed by annealing at 1000 deg. C in vacuum. In c-cut samples subjected to similar annealing conditions only buried precipitates of Zn form. TEM results in these samples show a high concentration of faceted precipitates distributed along the c-plane and the presence of Kirkendall voids distributed along the entire implanted region. In both cases a strong loss of Zn is observed upon annealing, which depends on the sapphire host orientation.

  14. Study of the fluence dependent interplay between laser induced material removal mechanisms in metals: Vaporization, melt displacement and melt ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishburn, J.M. [Centre for Lasers and Applications, Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109 (Australia); Withford, M.J. [Centre for Lasers and Applications, Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109 (Australia)]. E-mail: withford@ics.mq.edu.au; Coutts, D.W. [Centre for Lasers and Applications, Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109 (Australia); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Piper, J.A. [Centre for Lasers and Applications, Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109 (Australia)

    2006-05-15

    Three quantitative methods, namely profilometry, high speed imaging and recoil momentum measurements using a ballistic pendulum, are used to determine the interplay of vaporization, melt displacement and melt ejection on nanosecond laser induced material removal. At low to moderate fluences (<7 J cm{sup -2}) material removal occurs via vaporization and melt displacement in aluminium. At high fluences (>7 J cm{sup -2}), material removal occurs predominantly via the explosive ejection of liquid droplets from the melt pool.

  15. Fluence dependence of the ultrafast transition from the A7 to the simple cubic structure in arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntemann, Nils; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Garcia, Martin E. [Universitaet Kassel, Theoretische Physik, Kassel (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    We extend a previous theoretical study, in which we have predicted that a solid-solid phase transition can be induced by a laser in arsenic under pressure, to higher fluences. In particular, we compute the fluence that is needed to induce an ultrafast structural transition from the A7 to the simple cubic phase as a function of the applied pressure. We further discuss the possibility of ultrafast, laser-induced melting. (orig.)

  16. Influence of cooling on the working parameters of GaAs detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Golovnia, S N; Tsyupa, Yu P; Vorobev, A P; Koretskaja, O B; Okaevich, L P; Tolbanov, O P

    2002-01-01

    The results of the measurements working parameters of GaAs detector samples as the basis for the design of the X-ray sensitive detectors are presented. To select the optimal operating conditions for GaAs detectors the study of the temperature dependence of their working parameters has been done.

  17. Structure and homoepitaxial growth of GaAs(6 3 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez-Garcia, V.H. [Optical Communications Research Institute (IICO), Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi Av. Karakorum 1470, Lomas 4a Seccion, 78210 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: vmendez@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx; Ramirez-Arenas, F.J. [Optical Communications Research Institute (IICO), Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi Av. Karakorum 1470, Lomas 4a Seccion, 78210 San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Lastras-Martinez, A. [Optical Communications Research Institute (IICO), Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi Av. Karakorum 1470, Lomas 4a Seccion, 78210 San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Cruz-Hernandez, E. [Physics Department, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apartado Postal 14470, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Pulzara-Mora, A. [Physics Department, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apartado Postal 14470, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Rojas-Ramirez, J.S. [Physics Department, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apartado Postal 14470, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Lopez-Lopez, M. [Physics Department, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apartado Postal 14470, D.F. Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-05-30

    We have studied the surface atomic structure of GaAs(6 3 1), and the GaAs growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on this plane. After the oxide desorption process at 585 deg. Creflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) showed along the [-1 2 0] direction a 2x surface reconstruction for GaAs(6 3 1)A, and a 1x pattern was observed for GaAs(6 3 1)B. By annealing the substrates for 60 min, we observed that on the A surface appeared small hilly-like features, while on GaAs(6 3 1)B surface pits were formed. For GaAs(6 3 1)A, 500 nm-thick GaAs layers were grown at 585 deg. C. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) images at the end of growth showed the self-formation of nanoscale structures with a pyramidal shape enlarged along the [5-9-3] direction. Transversal views of the bulk-truncated GaAs(6 3 1) surface model showed arrays of atomic grooves along this direction, which could influence the formation of the pyramidal structures.

  18. Image processing by four-wave mixing in photorefractive GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheen, Gregory; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1987-01-01

    Three image processing experiments were performed by degenerate four-wave mixing in photorefractive GaAs. The experiments were imaging by phase conjugation, edge enhancement, and autocorrelation. The results show that undoped, semiinsulating, liquid-encapsulated Czochralski-grown GaAs crystals can be used as effective optical processing media despite their small electrooptic coefficient.

  19. Self-Assembled Monolayers of CdSe Nanocrystals on Doped GaAs Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marx, E.; Ginger, D.S.; Walzer, Karsten

    2002-01-01

    This letter reports the self-assembly and analysis of CdSe nanocrystal monolayers on both p- and a-doped GaAs substrates. The self-assembly was performed using a 1,6-hexanedithiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) to link CdSe nanocrystals to GaAs substrates. Attenuated total reflection Fourier tran...

  20. Implementation and Performance of GaAs Digital Signal Processing ASICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, William D.; Buchanan, Jeffrey R.; Burke, Gary R.; Chow, Terrance W.; Graham, J. Scott; Kowalski, James E.; Lam, Barbara; Siavoshi, Fardad; Thompson, Matthew S.; Johnson, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of performing high speed digital signal processing in GaAs gate array technology has been demonstrated with the successful implementation of a VLSI communications chip set for NASA's Deep Space Network. This paper describes the techniques developed to solve some of the technology and implementation problems associated with large scale integration of GaAs gate arrays.

  1. Structural and photoluminescence properties of Gd implanted ZnO single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murmu, P. P.; Mendelsberg, R. J.; Kennedy, J.; Carder, D. A.; Ruck, B. J.; Markwitz, A.; Reeves, R. J.; Malar, P.; Osipowicz, T.

    2011-08-01

    We present the structural and photoluminescence properties of 30 keV gadolinium implanted and subsequently annealed zinc oxide (ZnO) single crystals. Rutherford backscattering and channeling results reveal a low surface region defect density which was reduced further upon annealing. For low implantation fluence, around 85% of the Gd atoms are estimated to be in sites aligned with the ZnO lattice, while for higher fluences the Gd is largely disordered and likely forms precipitates. The Raman spectra of the implanted samples show defect-induced modes, which match the one-phonon density of states for the most heavily implanted samples. Annealing eliminates these features implying the removal of Gd-associated lattice disorder. Low temperature photoluminescence spectra revealed a red-shift in the defect emission, from green to orange/yellow, indicating the suppression of a deep level, which is thought to be due to oxygen vacancies. It is suggested that the orange/yellow emission is unmasked when the green emission is quenched by the presence of the implanted Gd atoms.

  2. Embedded Ge nanocrystals in SiO{sub 2} synthesized by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranwal, V., E-mail: vikasphy@gmail.com; Pandey, Avinash C. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211 002 (India); Gerlach, J. W.; Lotnyk, A.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung, Permoserstraße 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Karl, H. [Institut für Physik, Universität Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Ojha, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2015-10-07

    200 nm thick SiO{sub 2} layers grown on Si substrates were implanted with 150 keV Ge ions at three different fluences. As-implanted samples were characterized with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry to obtain depth profiles and concentration of Ge ions. As-implanted samples were annealed at 950 °C for 30 min. Crystalline quality of pristine, as-implanted, and annealed samples was investigated using Raman scattering measurements and the results were compared. Crystalline structure of as-implanted and annealed samples of embedded Ge into SiO{sub 2} matrix was studied using x-ray diffraction. No secondary phase or alloy formation of Ge was detected with x-ray diffraction or Raman measurements. Scanning transmission electron microscope measurements were done to get the nanocrystal size and localized information. The results confirmed that fluence dependent Ge nanocrystals of different sizes are formed in the annealed samples. It is also observed that Ge is slowly diffusing deeper into the substrate with annealing.

  3. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  4. High temperature annealing studies of strontium ion implanted glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odutemowo, O.S., E-mail: u12052613@tuks.co.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Malherbe, J.B.; Prinsloo, L.; Langa, D.F. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Wendler, E. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Glassy carbon samples were implanted with 200 keV strontium ions to a fluence of 2 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Analysis with Raman spectroscopy showed that ion bombardment amorphises the glassy carbon structure. Partial recovery of the glassy carbon structure was achieved after the implanted sample was vacuum annealed at 900 °C for 1 h. Annealing the strontium ion bombarded sample at 2000 °C for 5 h resulted in recovery of the glassy carbon substrate with the intensity of the D peak becoming lower than that of the pristine glassy carbon. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) showed that the implanted strontium diffused towards the surface of the glassy carbon after annealing the sample at 900 °C. This diffusion was also accompanied by loss of the implanted strontium. Comparison between the as-implanted and 900 °C depth profiles showed that less than 30% of the strontium was retained in the glassy carbon after heat treatment at 900 °C. The RBS profile after annealing at 2000 °C indicated that no strontium ions were retained after heat treatment at this temperature.

  5. High temperature annealing studies of strontium ion implanted glassy carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odutemowo, O. S.; Malherbe, J. B.; Prinsloo, L.; Langa, D. F.; Wendler, E.

    2016-03-01

    Glassy carbon samples were implanted with 200 keV strontium ions to a fluence of 2 × 1016 ions/cm2 at room temperature. Analysis with Raman spectroscopy showed that ion bombardment amorphises the glassy carbon structure. Partial recovery of the glassy carbon structure was achieved after the implanted sample was vacuum annealed at 900 °C for 1 h. Annealing the strontium ion bombarded sample at 2000 °C for 5 h resulted in recovery of the glassy carbon substrate with the intensity of the D peak becoming lower than that of the pristine glassy carbon. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) showed that the implanted strontium diffused towards the surface of the glassy carbon after annealing the sample at 900 °C. This diffusion was also accompanied by loss of the implanted strontium. Comparison between the as-implanted and 900 °C depth profiles showed that less than 30% of the strontium was retained in the glassy carbon after heat treatment at 900 °C. The RBS profile after annealing at 2000 °C indicated that no strontium ions were retained after heat treatment at this temperature.

  6. Near-surface recrystallization of the amorphous implanted layer of ion implanted 6H-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhudzai, R.J., E-mail: joeykuhu@yahoo.com [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Berg, N.G. van der; Malherbe, J.B.; Hlatshwayo, T.T.; Theron, C.C. [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Buys, A.V.; Botha, A.J. [Laboratory for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Pretoria (South Africa); Wendler, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut Für Festköperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    The recrystallization and subsequent crystal growth during annealing of amorphous surface layers on 6H-SiC produced by ion implantation is investigated. Amorphous surface layers were produced by ion implantation of 360 keV ions of iodine, silver, xenon, cesium and strontium into single crystalline 6H-silicon carbide samples. The ion fluence for all the implantations were in the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. Vacuum annealing of the damaged silicon carbide samples was then performed. The microstructure of SiC surfaces before and after annealing was investigated using a high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM analysis was complimented by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). SEM images acquired by an in-lens detector using an accelerating voltage of 2 kV show nano-crystallites developed for all implanted samples after annealing. Larger and more faceted crystallites along with elongated thin crystallites were observed for iodine and xenon implanted 6H-SiC. Crystallites formed on surfaces implanted with strontium and cesium were smaller and less faceted. Strontium, silver and cesium implanted samples also exhibited more cavities on the surface. AFM was used to evaluate the effect of annealing on the surface roughness. For all the amorphous surfaces which were essentially featureless, the root mean square (rms) roughness was approximately 1 nm. The roughness increased to approximately 17 nm for the iodine implanted sample after annealing with the surface roughness below this value for all the other samples. AFM also showed that the largest crystals grew to heights of about 17, 20, 45, 50 and 65 nm for Sr, Cs, Ag, Xe and I implanted samples after annealing at 1200 °C for 5 h respectively. SEM images and AFM analysis suggest that iodine is more effective in promoting crystal growth during the annealing of bombardment-induced amorphous SiC layers than the rest of the ions we implanted. In samples of silicon carbide co-implanted with iodine and

  7. Implant success!!!.....simplified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthra Kaushal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The endeavor towards life-like restoration has helped nurture new vistas in the art and science of implant dentistry. The protocol of "restoration-driven implant placement" ensures that the implant is an apical extension of the ideal future restoration and not the opposite. Meticulous pre-implant evaluation of soft and hard tissues, diagnostic cast and use of aesthetic wax-up and radiographic template combined with surgical template can simplify the intricate roadmap for appropriate implant treatment. By applying the harmony of artistic skill, scientific knowledge and clinical expertise, we can simply master the outstanding implant success in requisites of aesthetics, phonetics and function.

  8. Silicon exfoliation by hydrogen implantation: Actual nature of precursor defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuisseu, Pauline Sylvia Pokam; Pingault, Timothée; Ntsoenzok, Esidor; Regula, Gabrielle; Mazen, Frédéric; Sauldubois, Audrey; Andreazza, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    MeV energy hydrogen implantation in silicon followed by a thermal annealing is a very smart way to produce high crystalline quality silicon substrates, much thinner than what can be obtained by diamond disk or wire sawing. Using this kerf-less approach, ultra-thin substrates with thicknesses between 15 μm and 100 μm, compatible with microelectronic and photovoltaic applications are reported. But, despite the benefits of this approach, there is still a lack of fundamental studies at this implantation energy range. However, if very few papers have addressed the MeV energy range, a lot of works have been carried out in the keV implantation energy range, which is the one used in the smart-cut® technology. In order to check if the nature and the growth mechanism of extended defects reported in the widely studied keV implantation energy range could be extrapolated in the MeV range, the thermal evolution of extended defects formed after MeV hydrogen implantation in (100) Si was investigated in this study. Samples were implanted at 1 MeV with different fluences ranging from 6 × 1016 H/cm2 to 2 × 1017 H/cm2 and annealed at temperatures up to 873 K. By cross-section transmission electron microscopy, we found that the nature of extended defects in the MeV range is quite different of what is observed in the keV range. In fact, in our implantation conditions, the generated extended defects are some kinds of planar clusters of gas-filled lenses, instead of platelets as commonly reported in the keV energy range. This result underlines that hydrogen behaves differently when it is introduced in silicon at high or low implantation energy. The activation energy of the growth of these extended defects is independent of the chosen fluence and is between (0.5-0.6) eV, which is very close to the activation energy reported for atomic hydrogen diffusion in a perfect silicon crystal.

  9. Selective Growth of Graphene by Pulsed Laser Annealing Ion Implanted SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Kara; Wang, Xiaotie; Rudawski, Nick; Venkatachalam, Dinesh; Fridmann, Joel; Gila, Brent; Ren, Fan; Elliman, Rob; Hebard, Arthur; Appleton, Bill

    2014-03-01

    We report a method for site-selective graphene growth on SiC for direct nano-scale patterning of graphene. Crystalline SiC was implanted with Si and C ions to amorphize the sample surface, then subjected to pulsed laser annealing (PLA); graphene growth occurred only where ions were implanted. PLA parameters including the fluence, number of pulses, and annealing environment were investigated to optimize the growth process. Our previous work involving Au, Cu, and Ge implants in SiC suggested that both the implanted species and surface amorphization affect graphene growth. In this work, we show that surface amorphization alone, without the presence of foreign ionic species, can be used with PLA to create site-selective graphene growth on SiC. Samples were characterized using Raman spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. also affiliated with Raith USA, Incorporated.

  10. Characterization of Si and C implantation induced defects in 4H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummari, Venkata; Dhoubhadel, Mangal; Rout, Bibhudutta; Reinert, Tilo; Spemann, Daniel; Jiang, Weilin; McDaniel, Floyd

    2011-10-01

    Silicon Carbide is considered to be a promising material for dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs). Past experimental studies reveal that ferromagnetism can be observed in SiC diluted with 3d transition metals. Recent studies, based on first principle calculations, show that for SiC monolayers, the presence of silicon vacancies (VSi) may induce local magnetization. However, no spin polarization occurs for carbon vacancies (VC), Si+C divacancies, and Si-C antisite defects. Ion implantation is an excellent technique to create vacancies for defect induced magnetism. We have implanted Si and C into 4H-SiC at low energy 60 keV to study the implantation defects for different fluences which corresponds to different percentages of simulated damages (e.g. 10 -- 60 %) obtained using Monte-Carlo simulations code SRIM/TRIM-2008. Defect disorder after ion implantation has been investigated using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry/Channeling (RBS/C) and Raman spectroscopy.

  11. Interferometric pump-probe characterization of the nonlocal response of optically transparent ion implanted polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, Ivan L.; Hadjichristov, Georgi B.

    2012-03-01

    Optical interferometric technique is applied to characterize the nonlocal response of optically transparent ion implanted polymers. The thermal nonlinearity of the ion-modified material in the near-surface region is induced by continuous wave (cw) laser irradiation at a relatively low intensity. The interferometry approach is demonstrated for a subsurface layer of a thickness of about 100 nm formed in bulk polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by implantation with silicon ions at an energy of 50 keV and fluence in the range 1014-1017 cm-2. The laser-induced thermooptic effect in this layer is finely probed by interferometric imaging. The interference phase distribution in the plane of the ion implanted layer is indicative for the thermal nonlinearity of the near-surface region of ion implanted optically transparent polymeric materials.

  12. Depth concentrations of deuterium ions implanted into some pure metals and alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Wiśniewski, R.; Kitowski, K.; Kulikauskas, V.; Wilczynska, T.; Hofman, A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.

    2012-01-01

    Pure metals (Cu, Ti, Zr, V, Pd) and diluted Pd alloys (Pd-Ag, Pd-Pt, Pd-Ru, Pd-Rh) were implanted by 25-keV deuterium ions at fluences in the range (1.2-2.3) × 1022 m-2. The post-treatment depth distributions of deuterium ions were measured 10 days and three months after the implantation by using Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford Backscattering (RBS). Comparison of the obtained results allowed us to make conclusions about relative stability of deuterium and hydrogen gases in pure metals and diluted Pd alloys. Very high diffusion rates of implanted deuterium ions in V and Pd pure metals and Pd alloys were observed. Small-angle X-ray scattering revealed formation of nanosized defects in implanted corundum and titanium.

  13. Lattice Disorder and Photoluminescence of Er-Implanted A1N Crystalline Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢霏; A.Rizzi; R.Carius

    2002-01-01

    AlN crystalline films have been grown on SiC substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Er doping was carried out by implantation with energy 180keV to fluence of 1 × 1015 ions/cm2. The as-implanted samples were then annealed at 650, 800, 950 and 1100.C respectively, to remove defects and to make Er ions optically active. The annealing up to 1100.C did not exert significant influence on either Er distribution or the profiles of implant-induced lattice damage. Strong 1.54 μm photoluminescence was observed in Er-implanted A1N at room temperature. The experimental results indicate that the photoluminescence lifetime can be improved by increasing the annealing temperature. The maximum photoluminescence lifetime was measured to be 2.3ms.

  14. Heterogeneous integration of GaAs pHEMT and Si CMOS on the same chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Shu, Wu; Yan, Zhao; Hong-Chang, Shen; You-Tao, Zhang; Tang-Sheng, Chen

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the technology of wafer-scale transistor-level heterogeneous integration of GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (pHEMTs) and Si complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) on the same Silicon substrate. GaAs pHEMTs are vertical stacked at the top of the Si CMOS wafer using a wafer bonding technique, and the best alignment accuracy of 5 μm is obtained. As a circuit example, a wide band GaAs digital controlled switch is fabricated, which features the technologies of a digital control circuit in Si CMOS and a switch circuit in GaAs pHEMT, 15% smaller than the area of normal GaAs and Si CMOS circuits.

  15. Modulation Spectroscopy of GaAs Covered by InAs Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金鹏; 孟宪权; 张子旸; 李成明; 曲胜春; 徐波; 刘峰奇; 王占国; 李乙钢; 张存洲; 潘士宏

    2002-01-01

    Contactless electroreflectance has been employed at room temperature to study the Fermi level pinning atundoped-n+ GaAs surfaces covered by 1.6 and 1.8 monolayer (ML) InAs quantum dots (QDs). It is shownthat the 1.8 ML InAs QD moves the Fermi level at GaAs surface to the valence band maximum by about 70 meVcompared to bare GaAs, whereas 1.6 ML InAs on GaAs does not modify the Fermi level. It is corzfirmed thatthe modiffication of the 1.8 ML InAs deposition on the Fermi level at GaAs surface is due to the QDs, which aresurrounded by some oxidized InAs facets, rather than the wetting layer.

  16. Controlling crystal phases in GaAs nanowires grown by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheeraj, D L; Munshi, A M; Scheffler, M; van Helvoort, A T J; Weman, H; Fimland, B O

    2013-01-11

    Control of the crystal phases of GaAs nanowires (NWs) is essential to eliminate the formation of stacking faults which deteriorate the optical and electronic properties of the NWs. In addition, the ability to control the crystal phase of NWs provides an opportunity to engineer the band gap without changing the crystal material. We show that the crystal phase of GaAs NWs grown on GaAs(111)B substrates by molecular beam epitaxy using the Au-assisted vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism can be tuned between wurtzite (WZ) and zinc blende (ZB) by changing the V/III flux ratio. As an example we demonstrate the realization of WZ GaAs NWs with a ZB GaAs insert that has been grown without changing the substrate temperature.

  17. Neutron fluence rate measurements at an underground laboratory: A Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginatto, Marcel; Kasper, Angelika; Schuhmacher, Helmut; Wiegel, Burkhard; Zimbal, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    We describe the analysis of neutron fluence rate measurements that were carried out at the underground laboratory Felsenkeller, near Dresden, Germany, which is at a depth of 47 m. At this depth, neutrons are mainly produced by natural radioactivity via spontaneous fission and (α, n) reactions, and by reactions induced by cosmic-ray muons. The measurements were made with the NEMUS Bonner sphere spectrometer. This system consists of a set of moderating spheres of different diameters and a 3He-filled proportional counter placed at the center of each sphere. Due to time constraints, it was only possible to use three of the spheres and the "bare detector" (i.e., a 3He-filled proportional counter without a moderating sphere). In addition to the measurements carried out at Felsenkeller, we also made low-level measurements with a set of 3He-filled proportional counters in the UDO underground laboratory at the Asse salt mine, near Braunschweig, Germany, which is at a depth of 490 m. The neutron background at UDO is substantially lower than that at Felsenkeller and these data are useful for setting limits on the background of the 3He-filled proportional counters. To estimate the neutron fluence rate at Felsenkeller, we did an analysis which took into account the measurements at UDO, Felsenkeller, and calibration measurements made at our facility in PTB. The analysis was done using Bayesian parameter estimation. Since the data consisted of low-level measurements, careful attention was given to the modeling of the intrinsic background of the detector and to identifying relevant sources of uncertainty. With the approach developed here, it is possible to estimate the neutron fluence rate with a relatively small uncertainty of the order of 10%. The method should be useful for other underground laboratories.

  18. Charged particle mutagenesis at low dose and fluence in mouse splenic T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygoryev, Dmytro [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Gauny, Stacey [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Kronenberg, Amy [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Turker, Mitchell S., E-mail: turkerm@ohsu.edu [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Molecular and Medical Genetics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Densely ionizing forms of space radiation induce mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence. • Large interstitial deletions and discontinuous LOH patterns are radiation signature mutations. • Space radiation mutagenesis suggests a cancer risk from deep space travel. - Abstract: High-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions) found in the deep space environment can significantly affect human health by inducing mutations and related cancers. To better understand the relation between HZE ion exposure and somatic mutation, we examined cell survival fraction, Aprt mutant frequencies, and the types of mutations detected for mouse splenic T cells exposed in vivo to graded doses of densely ionizing {sup 48}Ti ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 107 keV/μm), {sup 56}Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 151 keV/μm) ions, or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV, LET = 0.24 keV/μm). The lowest doses for {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions were equivalent to a fluence of approximately 1 or 2 particle traversals per nucleus. In most cases, Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated mice were not significantly increased relative to the controls for any of the particles or doses tested at the pre-determined harvest time (3–5 months after irradiation). Despite the lack of increased Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated splenocytes, a molecular analysis centered on chromosome 8 revealed the induction of radiation signature mutations (large interstitial deletions and complex mutational patterns), with the highest levels of induction at 2 particles nucleus for the {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions. In total, the results show that densely ionizing HZE ions can induce characteristic mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence, and that at least a subset of radiation-induced mutant cells are stably retained despite the apparent lack of increased mutant frequencies at the time of harvest.

  19. Efficient localized heating of silver nanoparticles by low-fluence femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Sivayoganathan, M. [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mechanical & Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Duley, W.W. [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Zhou, Y., E-mail: nzhou@uwaterloo.ca [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mechanical & Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Obtained efficient localized heating (melting) of silver nanoparticles plasmonic structure, which is induced by the excitation of surface plasmon under femtosecond laser irradiation. • Resonance condition is not required here for surface plasmon induced efficient heating; this is different from previous studies where surface plasmon resonance is usually used to obtain enough heating generation. Compared to the previous studies of off-resonance laser heating, the laser fluence used in this study to obtain melting of silver nanoparticles is much lower, only 7.2 mJ/cm{sup 2}. • Beside surface plasmon itself induced heating, surface plasmon induced polymer shell deformation which resulted in electron and ion emission was identified to have certain contribution to the heating of silver nanoparticles plasmonic structure. - Abstract: Highly localized heating can be obtained in plasmonic nanomaterials using laser excitation but the high fluences required often produce unacceptable damage in and near irradiated components and structures. In this work we show that plasmonic nanostructures involving aggregated Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) can be heated effectively without attendant damage to the surrounding material when these structures are irradiated with many overlapping femtosecond (fs) laser pulses at very low fluence. Under these conditions, the effectiveness of heating is such that the temperature of 50 nm Ag NPs can be raised to their melting point from room temperature. Aggregates of these NPs are then observed to grow into larger spherical particles as laser heating continues. Imaging of these materials shows that the initiation of melting in individual Ag NPs depends on the local geometry surrounding each NP and on the polarization of the incident laser radiation. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations indicate that melting is triggered by localized surface plasmon (LSP)-induced electric field enhancement at “hotspots”.

  20. Estimation of saturation activities for activation experiments in CHARM and CSBF using Fluence Conversion Coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Guerin, Helene Chloe; Iliopoulou, Elpida; CERN. Geneva. HSE Department

    2017-01-01

    As summer student at CERN, I have been working in the Radiation Protection group for 10 weeks. I worked with the \\textsc{Fluka} Monte Carlo simulation code, using Fluence Conversion Coefficients method to perform simulations to estimate the saturation activities for activation experiments in the \\textsc{CSBF} and the \\textsc{Charm} facility in the East Experimental Area. The provided results will be used to plan a Monte Carlo benchmark in the \\textsc{CSBF} during a beam period at the end of August 2017.

  1. Investigating the Causes of Solar-Cycle Variations in Solar Energetic Particle Fluences and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, Richard; Cohen, Christina; Mason, Glenn M.; von Rosenvinge, Tycho; Li, Gang; Smith, Charles; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-04-01

    Measurements with ACE, STEREO, and GOES show that the number of large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events in solar cycle 24 is reduced by a factor of ~2 compared to this point of cycle 23, while the fluences of >10 MeV/nuc ions from H to Fe are reduced by factors ranging from ~4 to ~10. We investigate the origin of these cycle-to-cycle differences by evaluating possible factors that include properties of the associated CMEs, seed particle densities, and the interplanetary magnetic field strength and turbulence levels. These properties will be evaluated in the context of existing SEP acceleration models.

  2. Diamond single crystal-surface modification under high- fluence ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikin, V. A.; Borisov, A. M.; Kazakov, V. A.; Mashkova, E. S.; Palyanov, Yu N.; Popov, V. P.; Shmytkova, E. A.; Sigalaev, S. K.

    2016-09-01

    The modification of (111) face of synthetic diamond has been studied experimentally for high-fluence 30 keV argon bombardment. It has been found that ion irradiation leads to the electrically conductive layer formation the sheet resistance of which decreases more than 100 times while changing the temperature of the irradiated diamond from 70 to 400 oC. This effect, as well as significant changes of optical transmittance after ion irradiation are associated with ion-induced structural changes of irradiated diamond obtained by the methods of Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Residual radioactivity measurement in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for the evaluation of DS86 neutron fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuma, K.; Endo, S. [Faculty of Engineering, Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima Univ., Kasumi, Hiroshima (JP)] [and others

    2000-05-01

    Residual {sup 152}Eu activity produced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb has been measured in seven mineral samples located up to 1142 m from the epicenter. Europium was chemically separated from the sample and gamma-ray measurement was carried out with a well-type Ge detector. Deduced specific activities were compared with previous measurements and with activation calculation based on the DS86 neutron fluence. Present results are slightly higher than the calculation at far distances. However, systematic discrepancy as has been observed in Hiroshima is not clear. Further measurements for samples beyond 1000 m from the hypocenter are necessary to ensure the discrepancy problem. (author)

  4. The FLUKA study of the secondary particles fluence in the AD-Antiproton Decelerator target area

    CERN Document Server

    Calviani, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo FLUKA simulations [1, 2] carried out to investigate the secondary particles fluence emerging from the antiproton production target and their spatial distribution in the AD target area. The detailed quantitative analysis has been performed for different positions along the magnet dog-leg as well as after the main collimator. These results allow tuning the position of the new beam current transformers (BCT) in the target area, in order to have a precise pulse-by-pulse evaluation of the intensity of negative particles injected in the AD-ring before the deceleration phase.

  5. The GRB afterglow onset observed by REM: fireball Lorentz factor and afterglow fluence

    CERN Document Server

    Malesani, Daniele; Vergani, Susanna; Covino, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    We report observations of the early light curves of GRB 060418 and GRB 060607A, carried out with the pink robotic telescope REM. A clear peak is detected for both events, which is interpreted as the onset of the afterglow, that is the time at which the fireball starts decelerating. This detection allows to directly measure the initial fireball Lorentz factor, which was found to be Gamma_0 ~ 400 for both events, fully confirming the ultrarelativistic nature of gamma-ray burst fireballs. Sampling the light curve before the peak also allows to compute the bolometric fluence of the afterglow, which is 16% of the prompt one in the case of GRB 060418.

  6. Comprehensive measurements of GaAs pixel detectors capacitance

    CERN Document Server

    Caria, M; D'Auria, S; Lai, A; Randaccio, P; Cadeddu, S

    2002-01-01

    We have studied GaAs pixel detectors on semi-insulating wafers with Schottky contacts. We performed comprehensive measurements on the inter-pixel and capacitance to back plane. Being semi-insulating, the behaviour is totally different with respect to other common semiconductors, such as high resistivity silicon. Non-homogeneities are also an issue, due to both the contacts and the crystal bulk. In order to detect them and their influence on capacitance, we undertook systematic measurements with different configurations of the measuring electrodes.

  7. Modeling frequency dependence of GaAs MESFET characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Jeff; Peczalski, Andrzej; Shur, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new method of modeling the output conductance dispersion of GaAs MESFET's. High frequency model parameters are extracted and then used to model high frequency output conductance over a wide range of bias conditions. The model is then used to simulate and analyze the effect of output conductance dispersion on the performance of DCFL and SCFL logic gates. Whereas the DCFL performance is not significantly affected by the high frequency effects, the noise margin of SCFL decreases by almost a factor of 30% above 100 kHz, with an associated decrease in the voltage swing and gate delay.

  8. Laser Liftoff of GaAs Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Garrett J.; Clemens, Bruce M.

    2014-01-01

    The high cost of single crystal III-V substrates limits the use of GaAs and related sphalerite III-V materials in many applications, especially photovoltaics. Separating epitaxially-grown layers from a growth substrate can reduce costs, however the current approach, which uses an acid to laterally etch an epitaxial sacrificial layer, is slow and can damage other device layers. Here, we demonstrate a new approach that is orders of magnitude faster, and that enables more freedom in the selectio...

  9. Investigation of Optically Induced Avalanching in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    by Bovino , et al 4 to increase the hold off voltage. The button switch design of Fig. 4c has been used by several researchers5 ’ 7 to obtain the...ul Long flashover palh Figure 3b. 434 Optical Jlatlern a. Mourou Switch b. Bovino Switch c. Button Switch Figure 4. Photoconductive Switches...Technology and Devices Laboratory, ERADCOM (by L. Bovino , et. all) 4 • The deposition recipe for the contacts is 1) 50 ANi (provides contact to GaAs

  10. Electrode pattern design for GaAs betavoltaic batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Haiyang; Yin Jianhua; Li Darang

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivities of betavoltaic batteries and photovoltaic batteries to series and parallel resistance are studied.Based on the study,an electrode pattern design principle ofGaAs betavoltaic batteries is proposed.GaAs PIN junctions with and without the proposed electrode pattern are fabricated and measured under the illumination of 63Ni.Results show that the proposed electrode can reduce the backscattering and shadowing for the beta particles from 63Ni to increase the GaAs betavoltaic battery short circuit currents effectively but has little impact on the fill factors and ideal factors.

  11. GaAs MMIC building blocks for TV applications

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe, Pascal; Pertus, Marcel

    1990-01-01

    GaAs MMICs mixers and oscillators have been fabricated for application to VHF-UHF and satellite TV tuners using a 0.7 mm gate length MESFET process available in the Philips Microwave Limeil Foundry, in France. Various mixer configurations have been evaluated which show improved intermodulation/noise figure performance as compared to silicon bipolar circuits. Best circuits have input IP3 over 10 dBm with associated noise figure lower than 10 dB at 2 GHz. The oscillators tested are the multivib...

  12. Electronic properties of delta -doped GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A.; Ghazali, A.; Serre, J.

    1992-07-01

    For temperature zero the authors study the effects of disorder on the electronic properties of the two-dimensional electron gas which exists in planar-doped ( delta -doped) GaAs. The density of states, the Fermi level, the single-particle relaxation time and the electron mobility are calculated as functions of the dopant concentration. The transition from a band tail to an impurity band and the nature of the metal-insulator transition are discussed. The authors compare the theoretical results on the mobility with some available experimental data.

  13. Breast Implants: Saline vs. Silicone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... differ in material and consistency, however. Saline breast implants Saline implants are filled with sterile salt water. ... of any age for breast reconstruction. Silicone breast implants Silicone implants are pre-filled with silicone gel — ...

  14. Preparation of Large-Diameter GaAs Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-18

    pinch-off voltage in directly implanted FET structures. It ing attention oer the past decade. Monolithically in- is probable that the high and...reproducible 2. t:F. M Swiggard. S. H. tcc and F. W. Von Iatchelder, Ins. implant profiles showing excellent agreement with LSS Phys. Conf. Ser. Ni. 336

  15. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Muñoz, Roberto [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de [Private Practice, P° San Francisco, 43 A-1°, 20400 Tolosa (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm{sup 2}) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  16. Urinary incontinence - collagen implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007373.htm Urinary incontinence - injectable implant To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Injectable implants are injections of material into the urethra to ...

  17. Implantable Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Implantable Medical Devices Updated:Sep 16,2016 For Rhythm Control ... a Heart Attack Introduction Medications Surgical Procedures Implantable Medical Devices • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack ...

  18. About Implantable Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a tube was inserted, and get a new contraceptive implant on schedule or switch to another method of ... continue Possible Side Effects Young women who get contraceptive implants might notice such side effects as: irregular or ...

  19. Breast Reconstruction with Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast reconstruction with implants Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Breast reconstruction is a surgical procedure that restores shape to ... treat or prevent breast cancer. One type of breast reconstruction uses breast implants — silicone devices filled with silicone ...

  20. Observation of As-Grown Defects in Zn-Doped GaAs by Positron Lifetime Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhu; WANG Shao-Jie; CHEN Zhi-Quan

    2000-01-01

    Positron lifetime spectra were measured for the Zn-doped p-type GaAs. In comparing the horizontal-Bridgman-method-grown and the floating-zone-method grown p-type GaAs with the liquid-encapsulation-Czochvalski-grown p-type GaAs samples, positron trapping into vacancy type defects was observed in the former two grown p-type GaAs. Shallow positron traps were detected, and the dominant ones were attributed to acceptor the in p-type GaAs.

  1. Implantable electronic medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  2. SU-D-BRC-06: Experimental and Monte Carlo Studies of Fluence Corrections for Graphite Calorimetry in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenco, A [University College London, London (United Kingdom); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); Thomas, R [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); Bouchard, H [University of Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Kacperek, A [National Eye Proton therapy Centre, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral (United Kingdom); Vondracek, V [Proton Therapy Center, Prague (Czech Republic); Royle, G [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Palmans, H [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For photon and electron beams, the standard device used to measure absorbed dose is a calorimeter. Standards laboratories are currently working on the establishment of graphite calorimeters as a primary standard for proton beams. To provide a practical method for graphite calorimetry, it is necessary to convert dose to graphite to dose to water, requiring knowledge of the water-to-graphite stopping-power ratio and the fluence correction factor. This study aims to present a novel method to determine fluence corrections experimentally, and to apply this methodology to low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Measurements were performed in 60 MeV and 180 MeV proton beams. Experimental information was obtained from depth-dose ionization chamber measurements performed in a water phantom. This was repeated with different thicknesses of graphite plates in front of the water phantom. One distinct advantage of this method is that only ionization chamber perturbation factors for water are required. Fluence corrections were also obtained through Monte Carlo simulations for comparison with the experiments. Results: The experimental observations made in this study confirm the Monte Carlo results. Overall, fluence corrections between water and graphite increased with depth, with a maximum correction of 1% for the low-energy beam and 4% for the high-energy beam. The results also showed that a fraction of the secondary particles generated in proton therapy beams do not have enough energy to cross the ionization chamber wall; thus, their contribution is not accounted for in the measured fluence corrections. This effect shows up as a discrepancy in fluence corrections of 1% and has been confirmed by simulations of the experimental setup. Conclusion: Fluence corrections derived by experiment do not account for low-energy secondary particles that are stopped in the ion chamber wall. This work will contribute to a practical graphite calorimetry technique for determining

  3. Ion-beam characterization of He implanted into nuclear matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelica, D.; Thome, L. E-mail: thome@csnsm.in2p3.fr; Enescu, S.E.; Negoita, F.; Ionescu, P.; Stefan, I.; Gentils, A

    2004-06-01

    The behavior of helium produced by the disintegration of actinides is a very important issue in the management of radioactive waste arising from nuclear reactors. The experimental techniques generally used to determine He profiles, based on standard nuclear reaction analysis, are either time consuming or lacking in accuracy. Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) with high-energy heavy ions offers the possibility to extract helium profiles in a simpler way. This paper presents results obtained in the case of spinel single crystals implanted with He ions at several fluences (2 x 10{sup 16} and 5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}), providing different He concentrations ({approx}2 and 5 at.%, respectively). Helium depth profiles were measured by ERDA using high-energy Cu ions, whereas the damage induced by implantation was analyzed by classical Rutherford backscattering and channeling (RBS/C). Good He profiles were recorded, even at the smallest fluence used. Moreover, the combination of ERDA and RBS/C allows one to correlate He profiles and damage distributions.

  4. A Programmable Beam Shaping System for Tailoring the Profile of High Fluence Laser Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Henesian, M; Haynam, C; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Scanlan, M; Budge, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J

    2010-11-10

    Customized spatial light modulators have been designed and fabricated for use as precision beam shaping devices in fusion class laser systems. By inserting this device in a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain, 'blocker' obscurations can be programmed into the beam profile to shadow small isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. In this two stage system, 1920 x 1080 bitmap images are first imprinted on incoherent, 470 nm address beams via pixilated liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) modulators. To realize defined masking functions with smooth apodized shapes and no pixelization artifacts, address beam images are projected onto custom fabricated optically-addressable light valves. Each valve consists of a large, single pixel liquid cell in series with a photoconductive Bismuth silicon Oxide (BSO) crystal. The BSO crystal enables bright and dark regions of the address image to locally control the voltage supplied to the liquid crystal layer which in turn modulates the amplitude of the coherent beams at 1053 nm. Valves as large as 24 mm x 36 mm have been fabricated with low wavefront distortion (<0.5 waves) and antireflection coatings for high transmission (>90%) and etalon suppression to avoid spectral and temporal ripple. This device in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy represents a new approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics.

  5. Characterization of 235U Targets for the Development of a Secondary Neutron Fluence Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyse, J.; Anastasiou, M.; Eykens, R.; Moens, A.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Wynants, R.

    2014-05-01

    The MetroFission project, a Joint Research Project within the European Metrology Research Program (EMRP), aims at addressing a number of metrological problems involved in the design of proposed Generation IV nuclear reactors. As part of this project a secondary neutron fluence standard is being developed and tested at the neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA of the JRC Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM). This secondary standard will help to reach the neutron cross section measurement uncertainties required for the design of new generation power plants and fuel cycles. Such a neutron fluence device contains targets for which the neutron induced cross section is considered to be a standard. A careful preparation and characterization of these samples is an essential part of its development. In this framework a set of 235U targets has been produced by vacuum deposition of UF4 on aluminum backings by the target preparation laboratory at IRMM. These targets have been characterized for both their total mass and mass distribution over the sample area.

  6. Squeezed Thermal Phonons Precurse Nonthermal Melting of Silicon as a Function of Fluence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeuwe S. Zijlstra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A femtosecond-laser pulse can induce ultrafast nonthermal melting of various materials along pathways that are inaccessible under thermodynamic conditions, but it is not known whether there is any structural modification at fluences just below the melting threshold. Here, we show for silicon that in this regime the room-temperature phonons become thermally squeezed, which is a process that has not been reported before in this material. We find that the origin of this effect is the sudden femtosecond-laser-induced softening of interatomic bonds, which can also be described in terms of a modification of the potential energy surface. We further find in ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations on laser-excited potential energy surfaces that the atoms move in the same directions during the first stages of nonthermal melting and thermal phonon squeezing. Our results demonstrate how femtosecond-laser-induced coherent fluctuations precurse complete atomic disordering as a function of fluence. The common underlying bond-softening mechanism indicates that this relation between thermal squeezing and nonthermal melting is not material specific.

  7. EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION ON THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF ALLOY 690 AT LOW NEUTRON FLUENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOO SEOG RYU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alloy 690 has been selected as a steam generator tubing material for SMART owing to a near immunity to primary water stress corrosion cracking. The steam generators of SMART are faced with a neutron flux due to the integrated arrangement inside a reactor vessel, and thus it is important to know the irradiation effects of the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690. Alloy 690 was irradiated at HANARO to fluences of (0.7−28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV at 250°C, and its thermal conductivity was measured using the laser-flash equipment in the IMEF. The thermal conductivity of Alloy 690 was dependent on temperature, and it was a good fit to the Smith-Palmer equation, which modified the Wiedemann-Franz law. The irradiation at 250°C did not degrade the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690, and even showed a small increase (1% at fluences of (0.7∼28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV.

  8. Uncertainties in the Fluence Determination in the Surveillance Samples of VVER-440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konheiser Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactor pressure vessel (RPV represents one of the most important safety components in a nuclear power plant. Therefore, surveillance specimen (SS programs for the RPV material exist to deliver a reliable assessment of RPV residual lifetime. This report will present neutron fluence calculations for SS. These calculations were carried out by the codes TRAMO [1] and DORT [2]. This study was accompanied by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry experiments at Kola NPP. The main neutron activation monitoring reactions were 54Fe(n,p54Mn and 58Ni(n,p58Co. Good agreement was found between the deterministic and stochastic calculation results and between the calculations and the ex-vessel measurements. The different influences on the monitors were studied. In order to exclude the possible healing effects of the samples due to excessive temperatures, the heat release in the surveillance specimens was determined based on the calculated gamma fluences. Under comparatively realistic conditions, the heat increased by 6 K.

  9. Embrittlement of Cr-Mo steels after low fluence irradiation in HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of this work is the determination of the possible effect of the simultaneous formation of helium and displacement damage during irradiation on the Charpy impact behavior. Subsize Charpy impact specimens of 9Cr-1MoVNb (modified 9Cr-1Mo) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Sandvik HT9) steels and 12Cr-1MoVW with 2%Ni (12Cr-1MOVW-2Ni) were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at 300 and 400{degree}C to damage levels up to 2.5 dpa. The objective was to study the effect of the simultaneous formation of displacement damage and transmutation helium on impact toghness. Despite the low fluence relative to previous irradiations of these steels, significant increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) occurred. The 12Cr-1MoVW-2Ni steel irradiated at 400{degree}C had the largest increase in DBTT and displayed indications of intergranular fracture. A mechanism is proposed to explain how helium can affect the fracture behaviour of this latter steel in the present tests, and how it affected all three steels in previous experiments, where the steels were irradiated to higher fluences.

  10. Lifetime Neutron Fluence Analysis of the Ringhals Unit 1 Boiling Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a neutron fluence assessment considering the entire commercial operating history (35 cycles or ∼ 25 effective full power years of the Ringhals Unit 1 reactor pressure vessel beltline region. In this assessment, neutron (E >1.0 MeV fluence and iron atom displacement distributions were calculated on the moderator tank and reactor pressure vessel structures. To validate those calculations, five in-vessel surveillance chain dosimetry sets were evaluated as well as material samples taken from the upper core grid and wide range neutron monitor tubes to act as a form of retrospective dosimetry. During the analysis, it was recognized that delays in characterizing the retrospective dosimetry samples reduced the amount of reactions available to be counted and complicated the material composition determination. However, the comparisons between the surveillance chain dosimetry measurements (M and calculated (C results show similar and consistent results with the linear average M/C ratio of 1.13 which is in good agreement with the resultant least squares best estimate (BE/C ratios of 1.10 for both neutron (E >1.0 MeV flux and iron atom displacement rate.

  11. Comparison of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for deuterons, tritons and helions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Friedberg, Wallace; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji

    2012-02-01

    Secondary radiation in aircraft and spacecraft includes deuterons, tritons and helions. Two sets of fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients for isotropic exposure to these particles were compared: one used the particle and heavy ion transport code system (PHITS) radiation transport code coupled with the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms (PHITS-ICRP) and the other the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) radiation transport code coupled with modified BodyBuilder™ phantoms (MCNPX-BB). Also, two sets of fluence-to-effective dose equivalent conversion coefficients calculated using the PHITS-ICRP combination were compared: one used quality factors based on linear energy transfer; the other used quality factors based on lineal energy (y). Finally, PHITS-ICRP effective dose coefficients were compared with PHITS-ICRP effective dose equivalent coefficients. The PHITS-ICRP and MCNPX-BB effective dose coefficients were similar, except at high energies, where MCNPX-BB coefficients were higher. For helions, at most energies effective dose coefficients were much greater than effective dose equivalent coefficients. For deuterons and tritons, coefficients were similar when their radiation weighting factor was set to 2.

  12. Propensity and Risk Assessment for Solar Particle Events: Consideration of Integral Fluence at High Proton Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For future space missions with longer duration, exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is the major concern during extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. The expected SPE propensity for large proton fluence was estimated from a non-homogeneous Poisson model using the historical database for measurements of protons with energy > 30 MeV, Phi(sub 30). The database includes a continuous data set for the past 5 solar cycles. The resultant SPE risk analysis for a specific mission period was made including the 95% confidence level. In addition to total particle intensity of SPE, the detailed energy spectra of protons especially at high energy levels were recognized as extremely important parameter for the risk assessment, since there remains a significant cancer risks from those energetic particles for large events. Using all the recorded proton fluence of SPEs for energies >60 and >100 MeV, Phi(sub 60) and Phi(sub 100), respectively, the expected propensities of SPEs abundant with high energy protons were estimated from the same non-homogeneous Poisson model and the representative cancer risk was analyzed. The dependencies of risk with different energy spectra, for e.g. between soft and hard SPEs, were evaluated. Finally, we describe approaches to improve radiation protection of astronauts and optimize mission planning for future space missions.

  13. Fast modelling of spectra and stopping-power ratios using differentiated fluence pencil kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2008-08-21

    Modern radiotherapy steadily utilizes more of the available degrees of freedom provided by radiotherapy equipment, raising the need for the dosimetric methods to deliver reliable measurements for situations where the spectral properties of the radiation field may also vary. A kernel-based superposition method is presented for which the spectra from any field modulation can be instantly calculated, thus facilitating the determination of dosimetric quantities at arbitrary locations. A database of fluence pencil kernels describing the fluence resulting from point monodirectional monoenergetic beams incident onto a water phantom has been calculated with the PENELOPE-2005 Monte Carlo package. Spectra calculated by means of the kernels are presented for various 6 MV fields. The spectra have been used to investigate depth and lateral variations of water-to-air stopping-power ratios. Results show that the stopping-power ratio decreases with depth, and that this effect is more pronounced for small fields. These variations are clearly connected to spectral variations. For a 10 x 10 cm(2) field, the difference between the stopping-power ratio at 2.5 cm depth and 30 cm depth is less than 0.3% while for a 0.3 x 0.3 cm(2) field this difference is 0.7%. Ratios outside the field were found to be sensitive to the collimator leakage spectral variations.

  14. Uncertainties in the Fluence Determination in the Surveillance Samples of VVER-440

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konheiser, Joerg; Grahn, Alexander; Borodkin, Pavel; Borodkin, Gennady

    2016-02-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) represents one of the most important safety components in a nuclear power plant. Therefore, surveillance specimen (SS) programs for the RPV material exist to deliver a reliable assessment of RPV residual lifetime. This report will present neutron fluence calculations for SS. These calculations were carried out by the codes TRAMO [1] and DORT [2]. This study was accompanied by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry experiments at Kola NPP. The main neutron activation monitoring reactions were 54Fe(n,p)54Mn and 58Ni(n,p)58Co. Good agreement was found between the deterministic and stochastic calculation results and between the calculations and the ex-vessel measurements. The different influences on the monitors were studied. In order to exclude the possible healing effects of the samples due to excessive temperatures, the heat release in the surveillance specimens was determined based on the calculated gamma fluences. Under comparatively realistic conditions, the heat increased by 6 K.

  15. Statistical analysis on the fluence factor of surveillance test data of Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyeong Geun; Kim, Min Chul; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Bong Sang; Lim, Sang Yeob; Kwon, Jun Hyun [Nuclear Materials Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The transition temperature shift (TTS) of the reactor pressure vessel materials is an important factor that determines the lifetime of a nuclear power plant. The prediction of the TTS at the end of a plant’s lifespan is calculated based on the equation of Regulatory Guide 1.99 revision 2 (RG1.99/2) from the US. The fluence factor in the equation was expressed as a power function, and the exponent value was determined by the early surveillance data in the US. Recently, an advanced approach to estimate the TTS was proposed in various countries for nuclear power plants, and Korea is considering the development of a new TTS model. In this study, the TTS trend of the Korean surveillance test results was analyzed using a nonlinear regression model and a mixed-effect model based on the power function. The nonlinear regression model yielded a similar exponent as the power function in the fluence compared with RG1.99/2. The mixed-effect model had a higher value of the exponent and showed superior goodness of fit compared with the nonlinear regression model. Compared with RG1.99/2 and RG1.99/3, the mixed-effect model provided a more accurate prediction of the TTS.

  16. Inferences of Shell Asymmetry in ICF Implosions using Fluence Compensated Neutron Images at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D.; Fittinghoff, D.; Bionta, R.; Smalyuk, V.; Grim, G.; Munro, D.; Spears, B.; Raman, K.; Clark, D.; Kritcher, A.; Hinkel, D.; Hurricane, O.; Callahan, D.; Döppner, T.; Landen, O.; Ma, T.; Le Pape, S.; Ross, S.; Meezan, N.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Volegov, P.; Merill, F.

    2016-10-01

    In ICF experiments, a dense shell is imploded and used to compress and heat a hotspot of DT fuel. Controlling the symmetry of this process is both important and challenging. It is therefore important to observe the symmetry of the stagnated shell assembly. The Neutron Imaging System at the NIF is used to observe the primary 14 MeV neutrons from the hotspot and the down-scattered neutrons (6-12 MeV), from the assembled shell but with a strong imprint from the primary-neutron fluence. Using a characteristic scattering angle approximation, we have compensated the image for this fluence effect, revealing information about shell asymmetry that is otherwise difficult to extract without models. Preliminary observations with NIF data show asymmetries in imploded shell, which will be compared with other nuclear diagnostics and postshot simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Signal and noise of Diamond Pixel Detectors at High Radiation Fluences

    CERN Document Server

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Hügging, Fabian; Kagan, Harris; Krüger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    CVD diamond is an attractive material option for LHC vertex detectors because of its strong radiation-hardness causal to its large band gap and strong lattice. In particular, pixel detectors operating close to the interaction point profit from tiny leakage currents and small pixel capacitances of diamond resulting in low noise figures when compared to silicon. On the other hand, the charge signal from traversing high energy particles is smaller in diamond than in silicon by a factor of about 2.2. Therefore, a quantitative determination of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of diamond in comparison with silicon at fluences in excess of 10$^{15}$ n$_{eq}$ cm$^{-2}$, which are expected for the LHC upgrade, is important. Based on measurements of irradiated diamond sensors and the FE-I4 pixel readout chip design, we determine the signal and the noise of diamond pixel detectors irradiated with high particle fluences. To characterize the effect of the radiation damage on the materials and the signal decrease, the chang...

  18. Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x ray fluxes with CCD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, G. J.; Smith, G. W.; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M. C.

    The capability to measure bursts of neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes directly with charge coupled device (CCD) cameras while being able to distinguish between the video signals produced by these two types of radiation, even when they occur simultaneously, has been demonstrated. Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCD's) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (4-12 MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate approx. = .05 V/rad responsivity with greater than or = 1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or 'peaks' binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 105 to 107 n/cc range indicate smearing over approx. 1 to 10 percent of the CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels.

  19. Implantable Heart Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  20. Ion implantation of silicon in gallium arsenide: Damage and annealing characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribat, D.; Dieumegard, D.; Croset, M.; Cohen, C.; Nipoti, R.; Siejka, J.; Bentini, G. G.; Correra, L.; Servidori, M.

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of this work is twofold: (i) to study the damage induced by ion implantation, with special attention to low implanted doses; (ii) to study the efficiency of annealing techniques — particularly incoherent light annealing — in order to relate the electrical activity of implanted atoms to damage annealing. We have used three methods to study the damage induced by ion implantation: (1) RBS (or nuclear reactions) in random or in channeling geometry (2) RX double crystal diffractometry and (3) electrical measurements (free carrier profiling). Damage induced by silicon implantation at doses >10 14at/cm 2 can be monitored by all three techniques. However, the sensitivity of RBS is poor and hence this technique is not useful for low implantation doses. As device technology requires dopant levels in the range of 5 × 10 12 atoms/cm 2, we are particularly interested to the development of analytical techniques able to detect the damage at this implantation level. The sensitivity of such techniques was checked by studying homogeneously doped (5 × 10 16 e -/cm 3) and semi-insulating GaAs samples implanted with 3 × 10 12 silicon atoms/cm 2 at 150 keV. The substrate temperature during implantation was 200°C. The damage produced in these samples and its subsequent annealing are evidenced by strong changes in X-ray double crystal diffraction spectra. This method hence appears as a good monitoring technique. Annealing of the implanted layers has been performed using incoherent light sources (xenon lamps) either in flash or continuous conditions. Reference samples have also been thermally annealed (850°C, 20 min in capless conditions). The results are compared, and the electrical carrier profiles obtained after continuous incoherent light irradiation indicate that the implanted silicon atoms are almost dully activated. The advantages and disadvantages of incoherent light irradiation are discussed (surface oxidation, surface damage) in comparison with standard

  1. Long-range effect of ion implantation of Raex and Hardox steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzyński, P.; Kamiński, M.; Droździel, A.; Wiertel, M.

    2016-09-01

    Ion implantation involves introduction of ionized atoms of any element (nitrogen) to metals thanks to the high kinetic energy that they acquired in the electric field. The distribution of nitrogen ions implanted at E = 65 keV energy and D = 1.1017 N+ /cm2 fluence in the steel sample and vacancies produced by them was calculated using the SRIM program. This result was confirmed by RBS measurements. The initial maximum range of the implanted nitrogen ions is ∼⃒0.17 μm. This value is relatively small compared to the influence of nitriding on the thickness surface layer of modified steel piston rings. Measurements of the friction coefficient during the pin-on-disc tribological test were performed under dry friction conditions. The friction coefficient of the implanted sample increased to values characteristic of an unimplanted sample after ca. 1500 measurement cycles. The depth of wear trace is ca. 2.4 μm. This implies that the thickness of the layer modified by the implantation process is ∼⃒2.4 μm and exceeds the initial range of the implanted ions by an order of magnitude. This effect, referred to as a long-range implantation effect, is caused by migration of vacancies and nitrogen atoms into the sample. This phenomenon makes ion implantation a legitimate process of modification of the surface layer in order to enhance the tribological properties of critical components of internal combustion engines such as steel piston rings.

  2. Silicon defects characterization for low temperature ion implantation and RTA process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martirani Paolillo, Diego; Margutti, Giovanni; De Biase, Marco [LFoundry s.r.l. Avezzano (Italy); Barozzi, Mario; Giubertoni, Damiano [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento (Italy); Spaggiari, Claudio [Axcelis Technologies Srl, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    In the last years a lot of effort has been directed in order to reduce silicon defects eventually formed during the ion implantation/anneal sequence used in the fabrication of CMOS devices. In this work we explored the effect of ion implant dose rate and temperature on the formation of silicon defects for high fluence {sup 49}BF{sub 2} implantations. The considered processes (implantation and annealing) conditions are those typically used to form the source/drain regions of p-channel transistors in the submicron technology node and will be detailed in the document. Characterization of implant damage and extended silicon defects left after anneal has been performed by TEM. Dopant distribution and dopant activation has been investigated by SIMS and SRP analysis. We have verified that implant dose rate and temperature modulate the thickness of the amorphous silicon observed after implant, as well as the concentrations of silicon defects left after anneal. Effect of high dose rate low temperature implantation on product device was also evaluated, showing a reduction of leakage current on p-channel transistors. Experimental set up, results and possible explanation will be reported and discussed in the paper.

  3. Silicon defects characterization for low temperature ion implantation and RTA process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirani Paolillo, Diego; Margutti, Giovanni; De Biase, Marco; Barozzi, Mario; Giubertoni, Damiano; Spaggiari, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    In the last years a lot of effort has been directed in order to reduce silicon defects eventually formed during the ion implantation/anneal sequence used in the fabrication of CMOS devices. In this work we explored the effect of ion implant dose rate and temperature on the formation of silicon defects for high fluence 49BF2 implantations. The considered processes (implantation and annealing) conditions are those typically used to form the source/drain regions of p-channel transistors in the submicron technology node and will be detailed in the document. Characterization of implant damage and extended silicon defects left after anneal has been performed by TEM. Dopant distribution and dopant activation has been investigated by SIMS and SRP analysis. We have verified that implant dose rate and temperature modulate the thickness of the amorphous silicon observed after implant, as well as the concentrations of silicon defects left after anneal. Effect of high dose rate low temperature implantation on product device was also evaluated, showing a reduction of leakage current on p-channel transistors. Experimental set up, results and possible explanation will be reported and discussed in the paper.

  4. Sheet resistance of alumina ceramic after high energy implantation of tantalum ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savkin, Konstantin P., E-mail: savkinkp@mail2000.ru [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Avenue, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Bugaev, Alexey S., E-mail: bugaev@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Avenue, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nikolaev, Alexey G., E-mail: nik@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Avenue, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Oks, Efim M., E-mail: oks@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Avenue, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Shandrikov, Maxim V., E-mail: shandrikov@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Avenue, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Yushkov, Georgy Yu., E-mail: gyushkov@mail.ru [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Avenue, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tyunkov, Andrey V., E-mail: tyunkov@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Avenue, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Savruk, Elena V., E-mail: savruk@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Avenue, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Tantalum ions with the average energy about 145 keV were implanted in the surfaces of flat polycrystalline alumina samples. • The sheet resistance of implanted ceramic reduced after implantation with increasing of the implanted dose. • Normalized surface conductivity of treated alumina ceramic reduced only on 1% during 200 days after finishing the implantation process. • Creation of weak conducting layer on the surface of the ceramic insulator electric field strength of the flashover increases more than 25%. - Abstract: The results of investigation of the sheet resistance of alumina ceramic as a function of the fluence of implanted metal ions are presented. Tantalum ions with the average energy about 145 keV were used in experiments. Estimation of the sheet resistance was performed from analysis of volt–ampere characteristics by measuring the leakage current at a voltage between 100 V and several kilovolts, which was applied at a small area of the implanted surface. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis was used to determine composition of elements in the surface of the implanted ceramics. As a practical application of research results, it was shown that, after the creation of a weak conducting layer on the surface of the ceramic insulator, the electric field strength of the flashover increases by more than 25%.

  5. Single Ion Implantation and Deterministic Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, Thomas

    2010-06-11

    implantation is usually a highly statistical process, where high fluences of energetic ions, ranging from {approx}10{sup 9} to >10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} are implanted. For single atom device development, control over the absolute number of ions is needed and ions have to be placed with high spatial resolution. In the following sections we will discuss a series of approaches to single ion implantation with regard to single ion impact sensing and control of single ion positioning.

  6. GaAs clean up studied with synchrotron radiation photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, Massimo; Adelmann, Christoph; Delabie, Annelies; van Elshocht, Sven; Caymax, Matty; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2012-12-01

    In this contribution we describe the chemical changes at the surface of GaAs upon adsorption of tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA). TMA is used to grow Al2O3 with atomic layer deposition (ALD) usually using H2O as oxygen source. Recently, it was pointed out that the adsorption of TMA on various III-V surfaces reduces the native oxide, allowing the growth of an abrupt III-V/High-K interface with reduced density of defects. Synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SR-PES) is a powerful method to characterize surfaces and interfaces of many materials, as it is capable to determine their chemical composition as well as the electronic properties. We performed in-situ SR-PES measurements after exposing a GaAs surface to TMA pulses at about 250°C. Upon using the possibility of tuning the incident photon energy we compared the Ga3d spectra at 41 eV, 71 eV, 91 eV and 121 eV, as well as the As3d at 71 eV and 91 eV. Finally, we show that using SR-PES allows a further understanding of the surface composition, which is usually not accessible with other techniques.

  7. Sn nanothreads in GaAs: experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenikhin, I.; Vyurkov, V.; Bugaev, A.; Khabibullin, R.; Ponomarev, D.; Yachmenev, A.; Maltsev, P.; Ryzhii, M.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, V.

    2016-12-01

    The gated GaAs structures like the field-effect transistor with the array of the Sn nanothreads was fabricated via delta-doping of vicinal GaAs surface by Sn atoms with a subsequent regrowth. That results in the formation of the chains of Sn atoms at the terrace edges. Two device models were developed. The quantum model accounts for the quantization of the electron energy spectrum in the self-consistent two-dimensional electric potential, herewith the electron density distribution in nanothread arrays for different gate voltages is calculated. The classical model ignores the quantization and electrons are distributed in space according to 3D density of states and Fermi-Dirac statistics. It turned out that qualitatively both models demonstrate similar behavior, nevertheless, the classical one is in better quantitative agreement with experimental data. Plausibly, the quantization could be ignored because Sn atoms are randomly placed along the thread axis. The terahertz hot-electron bolometers (HEBs) could be based on the structure under consideration.

  8. Step-step interactions on GaAs (110) nanopatterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galiana, B.; Benedicto, M.; Tejedor, P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-14

    The step-step interactions on vicinal GaAs (110) surface patterns have been extracted from the quantitative analysis of the terrace width distribution (TWD). We have specifically studied the interactions in near-equilibrium faceting and kinetics-driven step bunching and meandering formed by spontaneous self-organization or through the modification of GaAs growth kinetics by atomic hydrogen. We show that the experimental TWDs determined from atomic force microscopy measurements can be accurately described by a weighed sum of a generalized Wigner distribution and several Gaussians. The results of our calculations indicate that straight facets are formed during high temperature homoepitaxy due to attractive interactions between [110] steps. At low temperatures, steady state attractive interactions in [110] step bunches are preceded by a transition regime dominated by entropic and energetic repulsions between meandering [11n]-type steps (n {>=} 2), whose population density exceeds that of the [110] bunched steps. In addition, it has been found that atomic H reduces the attractive interactions between [110] bunched steps and enhances entropic and dipole-induced energetic repulsions between H-terminated [11n] steps through the inhibition of As-As bond formation at step edges. Our analysis has evidenced a correlation between the value of the adjustable parameter that accounts in our model for the specific weight of the secondary peaks in the TWD ({beta}) and the extent of transverse meandering on the vicinal surface.

  9. Design and Fabrication of Planar GaAs Gunn Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Ra; Lee, Seong-Dae; Chae, Yeon-Sik; Rhee, Jin-Koo

    We studied planar graded-gap injector GaAs Gunn diodes designed for operation at 94GHz. Two types of planar Gunn diodes were designed and fabricated. In the first diode, a cathode was situated inside a circular anode with a diameter of 190μm. The distance between the anode and cathode varied from 60μm to 68μm depending on the cathode size. Also, we designed a structure with a constant distance between the anode and cathode of 10μm. In the second diode, the anode was situated inside the cathode for the flip-chip mounting on the oscillator circuits. The fabrication of the Gunn diode was based on ohmic contact metallization, mesa etching, and air-bridge and overlay metallization. DC measurements were carried out, and the nature of the negative differential resistance, the operating voltage, and the peak current in the graded-gap injector GaAs Gunn diodes are discussed for different device structures. It is shown that the structure with the shorter distance between the cathode and anode has a higher peak current, higher breakdown voltage, and lower threshold voltage than those of the structure with the larger distance between the cathode and anode.

  10. Bismuth alloying properties in GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Lu [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, PO Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Lu, Pengfei, E-mail: photon.bupt@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, PO Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Cao, Huawei; Cai, Ningning; Yu, Zhongyuan [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, PO Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Gao, Tao [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Shumin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Photonics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    First-principles calculations have been performed to investigate the structural, electronic and optical properties of bismuth alloying in GaAs nanowires. A typical model of Ga{sub 31}As{sub 31} nanowires is introduced for its reasonable band gap. The band gap of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} shrinks clearly with the increasing Bi concentration and the band edge shifts when spin–orbit coupling (SOC) is considered. The insertion of Bi atom leads to hybridization of Ga/As/Bi p states which contributes a lot around Fermi level. Scissor effect is involved. The optical properties are presented, including dielectric function, optical absorption spectra and reflectivity, which are also varied with the increasing of Bi concentrations. - Graphical abstract: Top view of Bi-doped GaAs nanowires. Ga, As, and Bi atoms are denoted with grey, purple and red balls, respectively. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A typical model of Ga{sub 31}As{sub 31} nanowires is introduced for its reasonable band gap. • The band gap of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} shrinks clearly with the increasing Bi concentration. • The band edge shifts when spin–orbit coupling (SOC) is considered. • The insertion of Bi atom leads to hybridization of Ga/As/Bi p states.

  11. High-efficiency nanostructured window GaAs solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dong; Kang, Yangsen; Huo, Yijie; Chen, Yusi; Cui, Yi; Harris, James S

    2013-10-09

    Nanostructures have been widely used in solar cells due to their extraordinary optical properties. In most nanostructured cells, high short circuit current has been obtained due to enhanced light absorption. However, most of them suffer from lowered open circuit voltage and fill factor. One of the main challenges is formation of good junction and electrical contact. In particular, nanostructures in GaAs only have shown unsatisfactory performances (below 5% in energy conversion efficiency) which cannot match their ideal material properties and the record photovoltaic performances in industry. Here we demonstrate a completely new design for nanostructured solar cells that combines nanostructured window layer, metal mesa bar contact with small area, high quality planar junction. In this way, we not only keep the advanced optical properties of nanostructures such as broadband and wide angle antireflection, but also minimize its negative impact on electrical properties. High light absorption, efficient carrier collection, leakage elimination, and good lateral conductance can be simultaneously obtained. A nanostructured window cell using GaAs junction and AlGaAs nanocone window demonstrates 17% energy conversion efficiency and 0.982 V high open circuit voltage.

  12. On the efficiency of combined ion implantation for the creation of near-surface nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Momenzadeh, Seyed Ali; Antonov, Denis; Fedder, Helmut; Denisenko, Andrej [3. Institute of Physics, Research Center SCoPE and IQST, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Wrachtrup, Joerg [3. Institute of Physics, Research Center SCoPE and IQST, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The efficiency of co-implantation of different ion species to generate near-surface nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond is analyzed by comparing the areal densities of NV centers corresponding to various experimental conditions. In particular, the effect of helium (6 keV He{sub 2}{sup +}) and carbon (10 keV C{sup +}) co-implantation within a wide range of ion fluences are studied. The total density of NV centers by co-implantation are shown to be basically a sum of the nitrogen-induced NV centers and those activated from residual nitrogen impurities present in the substrate (approximately 1ppb) by the excess of vacancies at the carbon- and helium-induced ion tracks. Such low efficiency of the co-implantation events is discussed considering the model of local clusters of vacancies at each implantation-induced ion track. This is also experimentally supported by the presence of a photoluminescence (PL) background related to radiation-induced defects measured within all implanted areas with high carbon and helium ion fluences. Further limits set by the annealing temperature are also discussed. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Xe distribution in amorphous SiO{sub 2} as a function of implantation and thermal annealing parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naas, A., E-mail: abdelkrim_naas@yahoo.fr [Conditions Extrêmes et Matériaux: Haute Température et Irradiation (CEMHT) CNRS, 3A rue de la Férollerie, 45071 Orléans (France); Materials Science and Informatics Laboratory, University of Djelfa, 17000 (Algeria); Ntsoenzok, E.; De Sousa-Meneses, D.; Hakim, B. [Conditions Extrêmes et Matériaux: Haute Température et Irradiation (CEMHT) CNRS, 3A rue de la Férollerie, 45071 Orléans (France); Beya-Wakata, A. [Département Physique, Université de Yaoundé 1 (Cameroon)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We studied the distribution of implanted Xe in amorphous SiO{sub 2}. • Various energies and fluencies as well as thermal annealing were considered. • RBS and TEM characterizations were undertaken. • We demonstrated that Xe can be located at vacancy peak or at ion projected range. • When a dense layer of bubbles is formed, Xe is shifted to stable bubbles region. - Abstract: We studied the distribution of implanted Xe in amorphous SiO{sub 2}. Our results clearly showed that Xe profile is energy and fluence dependent. By varying ion energy from 50 to 300 keV, we found that its thermal out-diffusion is very conventional for the first two energies and unexpected for the highest energy. In that last case Xe main peak increases with thermal annealing. Instead of out-diffusing, Xe seems to be driven toward the main peak. The effect of ion fluence is similar to energy one with a conventional out-diffusion for lower fluences (5 × 10{sup 15} and 1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}) while higher fluences (3.5 × 10{sup 16} and 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}) display an increase of the main peak with annealing. Such a behavior can be linked to the formation (or not) of a high density of stable bubbles.

  14. Depth dependent modification of optical constants arising from H+ implantation in n-type 4H-SiC measured using coherent acoustic phonons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Baydin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC is a promising material for new generation electronics including high power/high temperature devices and advanced optical applications such as room temperature spintronics and quantum computing. Both types of applications require the control of defects particularly those created by ion bombardment. In this work, modification of optical constants of 4H-SiC due to hydrogen implantation at 180 keV and at fluences ranging from 1014 to 1016 cm−2 is reported. The depth dependence of the modified optical constants was extracted from coherent acoustic phonon spectra. Implanted spectra show a strong dependence of the 4H-SiC complex refractive index depth profile on H+ fluence. These studies provide basic insight into the dependence of optical properties of 4H silicon carbide on defect densities created by ion implantation, which is of relevance to the fabrication of SiC-based photonic and optoelectronic devices.

  15. Deep level transient spectroscopy study for the development of ion-implanted silicon field-effect transistors for spin-dependent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, B.C., E-mail: johnsonb@unimelb.edu.a [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computer Technology, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); McCallum, J.C. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computer Technology, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Willems van Beveren, L.H.; Gauja, E. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computer Technology, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2010-02-26

    A deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) study of defects created by low-fluence, low-energy ion implantation for development of ion-implanted silicon field-effect transistors for spin-dependent transport experiments is presented. Standard annealing strategies are considered to activate the implanted dopants and repair the implantation damage in test metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. Fixed oxide charge, interface trapped charge and the role of minority carriers in DLTS are investigated. A furnace anneal at 950 {sup o}C was found to activate the dopants but did not repair the implantation damage as efficiently as a 1000 {sup o}C rapid thermal anneal. No evidence of bulk traps was observed after either of these anneals. The ion-implanted spin-dependent transport device is shown to have expected characteristics using the processing strategy determined in this study.

  16. A Hierarchical Relationship between CME Properties and the Fluence Spectral Index of Large Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, Seiji; Thakur, Neeharika; Makela, Pertti; Xie, Hong; Akiyama, Sachiko

    2017-01-01

    We report on a hierarchical relationship found between properties of white-light coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the fluence spectral indices of the associated Large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) Events. We consider 74 large SEP events from the western hemisphere in solar cycles 23 and 24 by multiple spacecraft (SAMPEX, GOES, and STEREO). The associated CMEs are observed by SOHO. We find that CMEs with high initial acceleration are associated with SEP events with the hardest fluence spectra, while those with lowest initial acceleration have SEP events with the softest fluence spectra; CMEs with intermediate initial acceleration result in SEP events with moderately hard fluence spectra. Impulsive acceleration leading to high CME speeds close to the Sun results in shock formation close to the Sun, where the ambient magnetic field and density are high and the particles are energized more efficiently. Slowly accelerating CMEs drive shocks at large distances from the Sun, where the magnetic field and density have fallen off significantly, reducing the efficiency of shock acceleration. These opposite extremes are represented by ground level enhancement (GLE) events that have high speeds early on (high initial acceleration) and the SEP events associated with CMEs from quiescent filament region that have low early speeds (low initial acceleration). This finding strongly supports the idea that CME-driven shocks accelerate SEPs and the heliocentric distance where the acceleration takes place decides the hardness of the SEP fluence spectrum.

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program BWR High-Fluence Material Project: Assessment of the Role of High-Fluence on the Efficiency of HWC Mitigation on SCC Crack Growth Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastien Teysseyre

    2014-04-01

    As nuclear power plants age, the increasing neutron fluence experienced by stainless steels components affects the materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness. The purpose of this report is to identify any new issues that are expected to rise as boiling water reactor power plants reach the end of their initial life and to propose a path forward to study such issues. It has been identified that the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry mitigation technology may decrease as fluence increases for high-stress intensity factors. This report summarizes the data available to support this hypothesis and describes a program plan to determine the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry as a function of the stress intensity factor applied and fluence. This program plan includes acquisition of irradiated materials, generation of material via irradiation in a test reactor, and description of the test plan. This plan offers three approaches, each with an estimated timetable and budget.

  18. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION: MY EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is a small, surgically implanted complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This type of hearing loss, typically involves damage to hair cells in the cochlea, as a result sound cannot reach the auditory nerve which usually receives information from hair cells. A cochlear implant skips the damaged hair cells and to stimulate the auditory nerve directly. An implant does not restore normal hearing, instead it can give a deaf person a useful representation of sounds in the environment and help him or her to understand speech. I am here presenting this article in relation to the indications, intraoperative and postoperative complications of cochlear implantation in our institute since January 2013. Children who receive implants at earlier age, outperform their peers who are implanted at a later age. This is reflected in all the areas of speech and language development.

  19. Implantes transcigomáticos Traszygomatic implants

    OpenAIRE

    B. Fernández Ateca; M. Colorado Bonnin; C. Gay Escoda

    2004-01-01

    Los implantes cigomáticos, originariamente diseñados por Branemark en 1989, son implantes de cabeza en 45 grados, de 4'5 milímetros de diámetro en su parte más ancha, y que pueden medir entre 30 y 50 milímetros de longitud. Se insertan desde la parte palatina del proceso alveolar, siguiendo la cresta cigomática-alveolar hasta anclarse en el cuerpo del malar, y en el caso de pacientes maxilectomizados, entrando directamente en el cuerpo del malar. Estos implantes ofrecen una alternativa más al...

  20. Experimental demonstration of strained Si nanowire GAA n-TFETs and inverter operation with complementary TFET logic at low supply voltages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, G. V.; Strangio, S.; Tiedemannn, A.; Lenk, S.; Trellenkamp, S.; Bourdelle, K. K.; Zhao, Q. T.; Mantl, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, strained Si (sSi) nanowire array of n-TFETs with gates all around (GAA) yielding ON-currents of 5 μA/μm at a supply voltage Vdd = 0.5 V are presented. Tilted ion implantation with BF2+ into NiSi2 dopant has been used to form a highly doped pocket for the source to channel tunneling junction. These devices indicate sub-threshold slopes (SS) below 60 mV/dec for Id Common analog device characteristics have been determined at Vdd = 0.5 V resulting in a transconductance gm = 24 μS/μm, transconductance efficiency gm/Id = 23 V-1 and the conductance gd = 0.8 μS/μm normalized to the gate width. Based on the good saturation behavior in the output characteristic, an intrinsic gain of 188 is observed. In addition, we present operation of the first experimental sSi GAA NW C-TFET inverter. In spite of ambipolar behavior, the voltage transfer curves (VTC) indicate wide and constant noise margin levels with steep transitions offering a voltage gain of 25 at Vdd = 1 V.

  1. New photocathode using ZnSe substrates with GaAs active layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiuguang; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Fuchi, Shingo

    2017-03-01

    GaAs active layers were successfully fabricated on ZnSe substrates using a metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy system. As a photocathode, a GaAs active layer shows a high quantum efficiency (QE) of 9% at 532 nm laser light illumination, which is comparable to a QE of 11% from GaAs bulk. In addition, a photoemission current of 10 µA was obtained from this photocathode. One more important point is that this photocathode could realize back-side illumination of 532 nm laser light, and thus its widespread applications are expected in microscopy and accelerator fields.

  2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the effects of ultrapure water on GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massies, J.; Contour, J. P.

    1985-06-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of de-ionized water on chemical etched GaAs surfaces. When the treatment with water is performed in static conditions (stagnant water) a Ga-rich oxide layer is formed on GaAs at the rate of 10-20 Å h-1. In contrast, when the GaAs surface is treated in dynamic conditions (running water), no oxide buildup is observed. Moreover, running water can remove the oxide film formed in static conditions, as well as oxidized layers due to air exposure. These results are discussed in the framework of cleaning prior to molecular beam epitaxy.

  3. Proposal to develop GaAs detectors for physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Beaumont, S P; Booth, C N; Buttar, C M; Carraresi, L; Colocci, M; Combley, F; D'Auria, S D; del Papa, C; Dogru, M; Edwards, M; Fiori, F; Francescato, A; Hou, Y; Lynch, J G; Lisowski, B; Matheson, J; Newett, S; Nuti, M; O'Shea, V; Pelfer, P G; Raine, P H; Sharp, P H; Skillicorn, Ian O; Smith, K M; Tartoni, N; ten Have, I; Turnbull, R M; Vanni, U; Vinattieri, A; Zichichi, Antonino; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1990-01-01

    The present proposal first describes the results obtained using GaAs Schottky diode detectors which we have constructed, and the initial steps which we have taken towards the design of a GaAs preamplifier to match the detectors. We then propose a continuation of the programme of work towards a demonstration detector module for an LHC pre-shower tracker detector based on GaAs, within a time-scale of two years. The module will be compatible with the design of the proposed pre-shower tracker using silicon detectors (DRDC/P3), and should allow direct substitution for comparison purposes.

  4. Growth and Photoluminescence of GaAs Quantum Dots on Si(1O0)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建国; 李广海; 张勇; 晋云霞; 张立德

    2001-01-01

    GaAs quantum dots (QDs) with high density and remarkable uniformity in dot size and distribution grown on Si(100) surface with artificial topography by radio-frequency sputtering have been demonstrated. The photoluminescence spectrum has been recorded. The growth of GaAs QDs is initiated with the preferential nucleation of small dots along ripples controlled by the Stranski-Krastanow growth mode. This method may be useful in combining high-speed and optoelectronic GaAs devices with Si integrated-circuit technology.

  5. An Improved Nonlinear Circuit Model for GaAs Gunn Diode in W-Band Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Fan, Yong; Zhang, Yonghong

    An improved nonlinear circuit model for a GaAs Gunn diode in an oscillator is proposed based on the physical mechanism of the diode. This model interprets the nonlinear harmonic character on the Gunn diode. Its equivalent nonlinear circuit of which can assist in the design of the Gunn oscillator and help in the analysis of the fundamental and harmonic characteristics of the GaAs Gunn diode. The simulation prediction and the experiment of the Gunn oscillator show the feasibility of the nonlinear circuit model for the GaAs Gunn oscillator.

  6. Growth Interruption Effect on the Fabrication of GaAs Concentric Multiple Rings by Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorov A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present the molecular beam epitaxy fabrication and optical properties of complex GaAs nanostructures by droplet epitaxy: concentric triple quantum rings. A significant difference was found between the volumes of the original droplets and the final GaAs structures. By means of atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy, we found that a thin GaAs quantum well-like layer is developed all over the substrate during the growth interruption times, caused by the migration of Ga in a low As background.

  7. Characterization of a Ga-assisted GaAs nanowire array solar cell on si substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulanger, J. P.; Chia, A. C. E.; Wood, B.

    2016-01-01

    A single-junction core-shell GaAs nanowire (NW) solar cell on Si (1 1 1) substrates is presented. A Ga-assisted vapor–liquid–solid growth mechanism was used for the formation of a patterned array of radial p-i-n GaAs NWs encapsulated in AlInP passivation. Novel device fabrication utilizing facet......-dependent properties to minimize passivation layer removal for electrical contacting is demonstrated. Thorough electrical characterization and analysis of the cell is reported. The electrostatic potential distribution across the radial p-i-n junction GaAs NW is investigated by off-axis electron holography....

  8. Preflight study of San Marco D/L GaAs solar cell panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, J. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The solar array for the San Marco D/L spacecraft is described and the performance of 4 GaAs solar cell panels are examined. In comparison to the typical Si solar cell panel for San Marco D/L, it is shown that each GaAs solar cell panel provides at least 23 percent more specific power at maximum output and 28 deg C. Also described here, are several measurements that will be made to evaluate the relative performance of Si and GaAs solar cell panels during the San Marco D/L flight.

  9. Dynamic defect annealing in wurtzite MgZnO implanted with Ar ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarov, A.Yu., E-mail: aazarov@smn.uio.no [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, PO Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Wendler, E. [Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Institut für Festkörperphysik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Du, X.L. [Institute of Physics, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Kuznetsov, A.Yu.; Svensson, B.G. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, PO Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2015-09-01

    Successful implementation of ion beams for modification of ternary ZnO-based oxides requires understanding and control of radiation-induced defects. Here, we study structural disorder in wurtzite ZnO and Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O (x ⩽ 0.3) samples implanted at room and 15 K temperatures with Ar ions in a wide fluence range (5 × 10{sup 12}–3 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}). The samples were characterized by Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry performed in-situ without changing the sample temperature. The results show that all the samples exhibit high radiation resistance and cannot be rendered amorphous even for high ion fluences. Increasing the Mg content leads to some damage enhancement near the surface region; however, irrespective of the Mg content, the fluence dependence of bulk damage in the samples displays the so-called IV-stage evolution with a reverse temperature effect for high ion fluences.

  10. Application of fluence field modulation to proton computed tomography for proton therapy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedes, G.; De Angelis, L.; Rit, S.; Hansen, D.; Belka, C.; Bashkirov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Coutrakon, G.; Schubert, K. E.; Schulte, R. W.; Parodi, K.; Landry, G.

    2017-08-01

    This simulation study presents the application of fluence field modulated computed tomography, initially developed for x-ray CT, to proton computed tomography (pCT). By using pencil beam (PB) scanning, fluence modulated pCT (FMpCT) may achieve variable image quality in a pCT image and imaging dose reduction. Three virtual phantoms, a uniform cylinder and two patients, were studied using Monte Carlo simulations of an ideal list-mode pCT scanner. Regions of interest (ROI) were selected for high image quality and only PBs intercepting them preserved full fluence (FF). Image quality was investigated in terms of accuracy (mean) and noise (standard deviation) of the reconstructed proton relative stopping power compared to reference values. Dose calculation accuracy on FMpCT images was evaluated in terms of dose volume histograms (DVH), range difference (RD) for beam-eye-view (BEV) dose profiles and gamma evaluation. Pseudo FMpCT scans were created from broad beam experimental data acquired with a list-mode pCT prototype. FMpCT noise in ROIs was equivalent to FF images and accuracy better than  -1.3%(-0.7%) by using 1% of FF for the cylinder (patients). Integral imaging dose reduction of 37% and 56% was achieved for the two patients for that level of modulation. Corresponding DVHs from proton dose calculation on FMpCT images agreed to those from reference images and 96% of BEV profiles had RD below 2 mm, compared to only 1% for uniform 1% of FF. Gamma pass rates (2%, 2 mm) were 98% for FMpCT while for uniform 1% of FF they were as low as 59%. Applying FMpCT to preliminary experimental data showed that low noise levels and accuracy could be preserved in a ROI, down to 30% modulation. We have shown, using both virtual and experimental pCT scans, that FMpCT is potentially feasible and may allow a means of imaging dose reduction for a pCT scanner operating in PB scanning mode. This may be of particular importance to proton therapy given the low integral dose found

  11. Compaction in optical fibres and fibre Bragg gratings under nuclear reactor high neutron and gamma fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, L.; Cheymol, G. [CEA, French Nuclear Energy Commission, Nuclear Energy Division, DPC/SEARS/LISL Bat 467 CEA Saclay 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Gusarov, A. [SCK.CEN - Belgian Nuclear Research center, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Morana, A.; Marin, E.; Girard, S. [Universite de Saint-Etienne, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS5516, 18, rue du Pr. Lauras, F-42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the development by CEA and SCK.CEN of a Fabry Perot Sensor (FPS) able to measure dimensional changes in Material Testing Reactor (MTR), the first goal of the SAKE 1 (Smirnof extention - Additional Key-tests on Elongation of glass fibres) irradiation was to measure the linear compaction of single mode fibres under high fast neutron fluence. Indeed, the compaction of the fibre which forms one side of the Fabry Perot cavity, may in particular cause a noticeable measurement error. An accurate quantification of this effect is then required to predict the radiation-induced drift and optimize the sensor design. To achieve this, an innovative approach was used. Approximately seventy uncoated fibre tips (length: 30 to 50 mm) have been prepared from several different fibre samples and were installed in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor (Mol Belgium). After 22 days of irradiation a total fast (E > 1 MeV) fluence of 3 to 5x10{sup 19} n{sub fast}/cm{sup 2}, depending on the sample location, was accumulated. The temperature during irradiation was 291 deg. C, which is not far from the condition of the intended FPS use. A precise measurement of each fibre tip length was made before the irradiation and compared to the post irradiation measurement highlighting a decrease of the fibres' length corresponding to about 0.25% of linear compaction. The amplitude of the changes is independent of the capsule, which could mean that the compaction effect saturates even at the lowest considered fluence. In the prospect of performing distributed temperature measurement in MTR, several fibre Bragg gratings written using a femtosecond laser have been also irradiated. All the gratings were written in radiation hardened fibres, and underwent an additional treatment with a procedure enhancing their resistance to ionizing radiations. A special mounting made it possible to test the reflection and the transmission of the gratings on fibre samples cut down to 30 to 50 mm. The comparison

  12. Optical properties of K9 glass waveguides fabricated by using carbon-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Wei, Wei; Fu, Li-Li; Zhu, Xu-Feng; Guo, Hai-Tao; Li, Wei-Nan; Lin, She-Bao

    2016-07-01

    K9 glass is a material with promising properties that make it attractive for optical devices. Ion implantation is a powerful technique to form waveguides with controllable depth and refractive index profile. In this work, optical planar waveguide structures were fabricated in K9 glasses by using 6.0-MeV C3+-ion implantation with a fluence of 1.0 × 1015 ions/cm2. The effective refractive indices of the guided modes were measured by using a prism-coupling system. The refractive index change in the ion-irradiated region was simulated by using the intensity calculation method. The modal intensity profile of the waveguide was calculated and measured by using the finite difference beam propagation method and the end-face coupling technique, respectively. The transmission spectra before and after the implantation showed that the main absorption band was not influenced by the low fluence dopants. The optical properties of the carbon-implanted K9 glass waveguides show promise for use as integrated photonic devices.

  13. Preparation of tungsten carbide nanoparticles by ion implantation and electrochemical etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yamaki, T., E-mail: yamaki.tetsuya@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yamamoto, S.; Hakoda, T. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kawaguchi, K. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 350-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, A.; Terai, T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Glassy carbon (GC) substrates were implanted with 100 keV tungsten ions at retained fluences of 4 × 10{sup 16} and 6 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} and surface-etched electrochemically in order to prepare tungsten-carbide (WC) nanoparticles on their topmost layers. The calculated current efficiency for the electrochemical etching was nearly the same for the two samples implanted at different fluences, suggesting the controllability of the etched depth using the consumed electric charge. The etching front reached the buried tungsten-implanted layer and increased the tungsten concentration at the surface. No oxidation of WC was observed, even under anodic potential application during electrochemical etching. The voltammogram response of the topmost nanoparticle layer was too small to be observed, probably due to the limited activity of the WC itself and the remaining low concentration. It was demonstrated that this technique could, in principle, be applied to various types of nanoparticle catalysts implanted in GC substrates.

  14. The electronic and optical properties of quaternary GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y alloy lattice-matched to GaAs: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyang; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Guiqiu; Yang, Kejian

    2014-01-01

    First-principles calculations based on density functional theory have been performed for the quaternary GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y alloy lattice-matched to GaAs. Using the state-of-the-art computational method with the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) hybrid functional, electronic, and optical properties were obtained, including band structures, density of states (DOSs), dielectric function, absorption coefficient, refractive index, energy loss function, and reflectivity. It is found that the lattice constant of GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y alloy with y/x =1.718 can match to GaAs. With the incorporation of N and Bi into GaAs, the band gap of GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y becomes small and remains direct. The calculated optical properties indicate that GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y has higher optical efficiency as it has less energy loss than GaAs. In addition, it is also found that the electronic and optical properties of GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y alloy can be further controlled by tuning the N and Bi compositions in this alloy. These results suggest promising applications of GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y quaternary alloys in optoelectronic devices.

  15. Proton implantation effect on (SUS-316) stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, A.K., E-mail: anandakdas@yahoo.com [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Savar, Dhaka 1349 (Bangladesh); Ishigami, R. [The Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center, 64-52-1 Nagatani, Tsuruga, Fukui 914-0192 (Japan); Kamal, I. [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Savar, Dhaka 1349 (Bangladesh)

    2015-04-25

    Microstructural damage and nano hardness of the industrial grade stainless steel (SUS-316) have been studied under proton (H{sup +}) implanted condition applying different doses at room temperature. The implantation scheme such as proton energy, fluence, irradiation time, and penetration depth in the target materials were estimated by Monte Carlo Simulation Code SRIM-2008. In the simulation, the parameters were chosen in such a way that the damage density (displacement per atom or dpa) would be uniform up to certain depth from the surface. X-ray diffraction study of the annealed samples prior to the proton implantation showed the austenitic fcc structure and no significant change was observed after proton implantation in it. Microstructural observation made by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) revealed that 1 dpa of proton-irradiation induced the structural damage extended up to 1 μm depth from the surface. The nano hardness study showed that the hardness level of the irradiated samples increased monotonically with the irradiation doses. Proton dose of 1 dpa caused 65% increment of hardness level on average in case of uniformly irradiated samples. It was realized that the increment of hardness was a consequence of microstructural damages caused by the formation of interstitial dislocation loops in the sample matrix keeping the lattice structure unaffected.

  16. Copper ion implanted aluminum nitride dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) prepared by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, A., E-mail: attaullah77@yahoo.com [National Institute of Lasers and Optronics (NILOP), PO Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); DMME, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Science (PIEAS), PO Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, Jamil [DMME, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Science (PIEAS), PO Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, Ishaq [Experimental Physics Lab, National Center for Physics (NCP), Islamabad (Pakistan); Mehmood, Mazhar [DMME, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Science (PIEAS), PO Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mahmood, Arshad [National Institute of Lasers and Optronics (NILOP), PO Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rasheed, Muhammad Asim [DMME, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Science (PIEAS), PO Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • AlN:Cu dilute magnetic semiconductors were successfully prepared by molecular beam epitaxy followed by Cu{sup +} implantation. • Room temperature ferromagnetism was observed after annealing the samples at appropriate temperature. • XRD and Raman spectrometry excluded the possibility of formation of any secondary phases. • By doping intrinsically nonmagnetic dopants (Cu), it has been proved experimentally that their precipitates do not contribute to ferromagnetism. • The reason for ferromagnetism in Cu-doped AlN as observed was explained on the basis of p–d hybridization mechanism (Wu et al.). - Abstract: Diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) AlN:Cu films were fabricated by implanting Cu{sup +} ions into AlN thin films at various ion fluxes. AlN films were deposited on c-plane sapphire by molecular beam epitaxy followed by Cu{sup +} ion implantation. The structural and magnetic characterization of the samples was performed through Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectrometry (RBS/C), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and SQUID. Incorporation of copper into the AlN lattice was confirmed by RBS, while XRD revealed that no new phase was formed as a result of ion implantation. RBS also indicated formation of defects as a result of implantation process and the depth and degree of damage increased with an increase in ion fluence. Raman spectra showed only E{sub 2} (high) and A{sub 1} (LO) modes of wurtzite AlN crystal structure and confirmed that no secondary phases were formed. It was found that both Raman modes shift with Cu{sup +} fluences, indicating that Cu ion may go to interstitial or substitutional sites resulting in distortion or damage of lattice. Although as implanted samples showed no magnetization, annealing of the samples resulted in appearance of room temperature ferromagnetism. The saturation magnetization increased with both the annealing temperature as well as with ion

  17. InGaP/GaAs heterojunction photosensor powered by an on-chip GaAs solar cell for energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Phuc Hong; Uchida, Kazuo; Makino, Takahiro; Ohshima, Takeshi; Nozaki, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an InGaP/GaAs heterojunction phototransistor (HPT) and a GaAs solar cell were monolithically integrated into an HPT epitaxial wafer, and the battery-free operation of the HPT was demonstrated for energy harvesting. Although the thickness and doping condition of the layers were optimized for the HPT performance, but not for the solar cell performance, the obtained short-circuit current was high enough to operate the InGaP/GaAs HPT in a two-terminal (2T) configuration. A collector photocurrent of 0.63 mA was obtained when the energy-harvesting InGaP/GaAs 2T-HPT was exposed to white light with a power density of 35 mW/cm2, and it linearly increased with the power density. For a potential application of the energy-harvesting InGaP/GaAs HPT as a photosensor in space, the device was irradiated with electrons of 1 MeV energy and 1015 cm-2 fluence. No significant degradation of the fabricated energy-harvesting 2T-HPT after the high-energy electron irradiation guarantees its battery-free operation in space.

  18. Influence of 400 keV carbon ion implantation on structural, optical and electrical properties of PMMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arif, Shafaq, E-mail: sarif2005@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rafique, M. Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Saleemi, Farhat; Sagheer, Riffat [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Naab, Fabian; Toader, Ovidiu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory, University of Michigan, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Mahmood, Arshad; Rashid, Rashad [National Institute of Lasers and Optronics (NILOP), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mahmood, Mazhar [Department of Metallurgy & Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering & Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-09-01

    Ion implantation is a useful technique to modify surface properties of polymers without altering their bulk properties. The objective of this work is to explore the 400 keV C{sup +} ion implantation effects on PMMA at different fluences ranging from 5 × 10{sup 13} to 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The surface topographical examination of irradiated samples has been performed using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The structural and chemical modifications in implanted PMMA are examined by Raman and Fourier Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) respectively. The effects of carbon ion implantation on optical properties of PMMA are investigated by UV–Visible spectroscopy. The modifications in electrical conductivity have been measured using a four point probe technique. AFM images reveal a decrease in surface roughness of PMMA with an increase in ion fluence from 5 × 10{sup 14} to 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The existence of amorphization and sp{sup 2}-carbon clusterization has been confirmed by Raman and FTIR spectroscopic analysis. The UV–Visible data shows a prominent red shift in absorption edge as a function of ion fluence. This shift displays a continuous reduction in optical band gap (from 3.13 to 0.66 eV) due to formation of carbon clusters. Moreover, size of carbon clusters and photoconductivity are found to increase with increasing ion fluence. The ion-induced carbonaceous clusters are believed to be responsible for an increase in electrical conductivity of PMMA from (2.14 ± 0.06) × 10{sup −10} (Ω-cm){sup −1} (pristine) to (0.32 ± 0.01) × 10{sup −5} (Ω-cm){sup −1} (irradiated sample)

  19. Fluence measurement at the neutron time of flight experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Christina; Jericha, Erwin

    At the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN a new spallation target was installed in 2008. In 2008 and 2009 the commissioning of the new target took place. During the summer 2009 a fission chamber of the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) Braunschweig was used for the neutron fluence measurement. The evaluation of the data recorded with this detector is the primary topic of this thesis. Additionally a neutron transmission experiment with air has been performed at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities (ATI). The experiment was implemented to clarify a question about the scattering cross section of molecular gas which could not be answered clearly via the literature. This problem came up during the evaluations for n_TOF.

  20. Energy spectra and fluence of the neutrons produced in deformed space-time conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, F.; Rosada, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, spectra of energy and fluence of neutrons produced in the conditions of deformed space-time (DST), due to the violation of the local Lorentz invariance (LLI) in the nuclear interactions are shown for the first time. DST-neutrons are produced by a mechanical process in which AISI 304 steel bars undergo a sonication using ultrasounds with 20 kHz and 330 W. The energy spectrum of the DST-neutrons has been investigated both at low (less than 0.4 MeV) and at high (up to 4 MeV) energy. We could conclude that the DST-neutrons have different spectra for different energy intervals. It is therefore possible to hypothesize that the DST-neutrons production presents peculiar features not only with respect to the time (asynchrony) and space (asymmetry) but also in the neutron energy spectra.

  1. Fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors for polyethylene-moderated {sup 252}Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, J.E.; Soldat, K.L.; Stewart, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Casson, W.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Neutron measurements and calculations were conducted to characterize the polyethylene-moderated {sup 252}Cf source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL). The 12-inch-diameter polyethylene sphere produces a highly scattered neutron spectrum which is more representative of most radiation fields found in the workplace than the D{sub 2}O-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron spectrum typically used for dosimeter calibration. However, the energy-dependent fluence and dose equivalent must be well known before using such a source for radiation protection purposes. The measurements and calculations were performed as independent checks of the desired quantities which were the flux, the absorbed dose rate, the dose equivalent rate, and the average energy. These quantities were determined for the polyethylene sphere with and without an outer cadmium shell and compared with a D{sub 2}O-moderated {sup 252}Cf source.

  2. Improvement of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Kenta, E-mail: murakami@tokai.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Iwai, Takeo, E-mail: iwai@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, 2-2-2 Iida-Nishi, Yamagata, Yamagata-shi 990-9585 (Japan); Abe, Hiroaki, E-mail: abe.hiroaki@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Sekimura, Naoto, E-mail: sekimura@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    This paper reports the modification of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo (HIT). The HIT facility was severely damaged during the 2011 earthquake, which occurred off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. A damaged 1.0 MV tandem Cockcroft-Walton accelerator was replaced with a 1.7 MV accelerator, which was formerly used in another campus of the university. A decision was made to maintain dual-beam irradiation capability by repairing the 3.75 MV single-ended Van de Graaff accelerator and reconstructing the related beamlines. A new beamline was connected with a 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) to perform in-situ TEM observation under ion irradiation.

  3. Extension of CASCADE.04 to estimate neutron fluence and dose rates and its validation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Kumawat; V Kumar; P Srinivasan

    2009-03-01

    Capability to compute neutron dose rate is introduced for the first time in the new version of the CASCADE.04 code. Two different methods, `track length estimator' and `collision estimator' are adapted for the estimation of neutron fluence rate needed to calculate the ambient dose rate. For the validation of the methods, neutron dose rates are experimentally measured at different locations of a 5Ci Am–Be source, shielded in Howitzer-type system and these results are compared with those estimated using (i) modified CASCADE.04.d and (ii) MCNP4A codes and it is found that the agreement is good. The paper presents details of modification and results of the comparative study.

  4. In-air fluence profiles and water depth dose for uncollimated electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toutaoui Abdelkader

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced electron beam dose calculation models for radiation treatment planning systems require the input of a phase space beam model to configure a clinical electron beam in a computer. This beam model is a distribution in position, energy, and direction of electrons and photons in a plane in front of the patient. The phase space beam model can be determined by Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment head or from a limited set of measurements. In the latter case, parameters of the electron phase space beam model are obtained by fitting measured to calculated dosimetric data. In the present work, data for air fluence profiles and water depth doses have been presented for electron beams without an applicator for a medical linear accelerator. These data are used to parameterize the electron phase space beam model to a Monte Carlo dose calculation module available in the first commercial (MDS Nordion, now Nucletron Monte Carlo treatment planning for electron beams.

  5. Retention of nanocrystalline WNx layers exposed to high-fluence deuterium plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassallo, E.; Caniello, R.; Angella, G.; Dellasega, D.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pedroni, M.; Ricci, D.; Rigato, V.; Passoni, M.

    2015-11-01

    For high-power plasma operation regimes in tokamak fusion devices the power load onto W divertor plates must be kept below acceptable limits for materials. N2 gas is likely to be used to reduce the power load. However, because of erosion phenomena, WNx compounds will be produced in the divertor and tritium retention is issue of concern. We report recent experiments using the GYM linear plasma device that examined D retention in WNx compounds exposed to D plasma at divertor relevant fluence (∼1024 m-2). It is shown that WNx compounds with different nitrogen concentration have very similar D retention, lower than the case of the tungsten without nitrogen and in any case lower than the acceptable limit for operation in ITER.

  6. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  7. FLUKA Simulation of Particle Fluences to ALICE due to LHC Injection Kicker Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Shetty, N V; Di Mauro, A; Lechner, A; Leogrande, E; Uythoven, J

    2014-01-01

    The counter-rotating beams of the LHC are injected in insertion regions which also accommodate the ALICE and LHCb experiments. An assembly of beam absorbers ensures the protection of machine elements in case of injection kicker failures, which can affect either the injected or the stored beam. In the first years of LHC operation, secondary particle showers due to beam impact on the injection beam stopper caused damage to the MOS injectors of the ALICE silicon drift detector as well as high-voltage trips in other ALICE subdetectors. In this study, we present FLUKA [1,2] simulations of particle fluences to the ALICE cavern for injection failures encountered during operation. Two different cases are reported, one where the miskicked beam is fully intercepted and one where the beam grazes the beam stopper.

  8. In-air fluence profiles and water depth dose for uncollimated electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutaoui, Abedelkadar; Aichouche, Amar Nassim; Adjidir, Kenza Adjidir; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2008-01-01

    Advanced electron beam dose calculation models for radiation treatment planning systems require the input of a phase space beam model to configure a clinical electron beam in a computer. This beam model is a distribution in position, energy, and direction of electrons and photons in a plane in front of the patient. The phase space beam model can be determined by Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment head or from a limited set of measurements. In the latter case, parameters of the electron phase space beam model are obtained by fitting measured to calculated dosimetric data. In the present work, data for air fluence profiles and water depth doses have been presented for electron beams without an applicator for a medical linear accelerator. These data are used to parameterize the electron phase space beam model to a Monte Carlo dose calculation module available in the first commercial (MDS Nordion, now Nucletron) Monte Carlo treatment planning for electron beams. PMID:19893707

  9. Status of the design concepts for a high fluence fast pulse reactor (HFFPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philbin, J.S.; Nelson, W.E.; Rosenstroch, B.

    1978-10-01

    The report describes progress that has been made on the design of a High Fluence Fast Pulse Reactor (HFFPR) through the end of calendar year 1977. The purpose of this study is to present design concepts for a test reactor capable of accommodating large scale reactor safety tests. These concepts for reactor safety tests are adaptations of reactor concepts developed earlier for DOE/OMA for the conduct of weapon effects tests. The preferred driver core uses fuel similar to that developed for Sandia's ACPR upgrade. It is a BeO/UO/sub 2/ fuel that is gas cooled and has a high volumetric heat capacity. The present version of the design can drive large (217) pin bundles of prototypically enriched mixed oxide fuel well beyond the fuel's boiling point. Applicability to specific reactor safety accident scenarios and subsequent design improvements will be presented in future reports on this subject.

  10. Identification of major proton fluence events from nitrates in polar ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, M A; Smart, D F; Dreschhoff, G A

    1999-06-01

    Large transient concentrations of nitrates in polar ice cores have been identified as the signature of some major solar proton fluence events between 1940 and 1991. We review this solar proton proxy identification technique using nitrate concentration measurements in ice cores from the Arctic and Antarctic. Using this identification technique we go back in time in an attempt to identify major solar proton events during the past several centuries. There is a very large nitrate increase corresponding to the Carrington flare of 1859 evident in the Arctic ice core. Other significant nitrate increases may indicate that major solar proton events occurred toward the end of the last century. The problems associated with this new technique of using nitrates as proxies to identify solar proton events are discussed.

  11. Ultrahigh precision nonlinear reflectivity measurement system for saturable absorber mirrors with self-referenced fluence characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsila, Lasse; Härkönen, Antti; Hyyti, Janne; Guina, Mircea; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2014-08-01

    Measurement of nonlinear optical reflectivity of saturable absorber devices is discussed. A setup is described that enables absolute accuracy of reflectivity measurements better than 0.3%. A repeatability within 0.02% is shown for saturable absorbers with few-percent modulation depth. The setup incorporates an in situ knife-edge characterization of beam diameters, making absolute reflectivity estimations and determination of saturation fluences significantly more reliable. Additionally, several measures are discussed to substantially improve the reliability of the reflectivity measurements. At its core, the scheme exploits the limits of state-of-the-art digital lock-in technology but also greatly benefits from a fiber-based master-oscillator power-amplifier source, the use of an integrating sphere, and simultaneous comparison with a linear reflectivity standard.

  12. Identification of cholesterol gallstones using in vitro low-fluence laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, R.; Niay, P.; Bernage, P.; Blondeau, J. M.; Ledee, J. J.; Brunetaud, J. M.

    1990-12-01

    Identifying the chemical composition of gallstones may be important in certain cases of calculus biliary disease when planning a dissolution therapy or a fragmentation of the calculi using pulsed lasers. The present study was conducted in vitro to evaluate the feasibility of distinguishing cholesterol gallstones from pigment stones. We propose an identification method in which the stone fluorescence spectrum, induced by a low fluence laser, is recorded using an optical multichannel analyser. Fluorescence spectra of twenty-two stones were recorded together with the fluorescence spectra of various pure compounds likely to compose the gallstones, using successively four different pump lasers (λp=308 nm, 337 nm, 423 nm, 469 nm). The fluorescence spectra of cholesterol gallstones are quite different from the pigment ones. Ratios of fluorescence intensities taken at three different wavelengths enable one to distinguish easily between cholesterol and pigment stones.

  13. Inferences from the Distributions of Fast Radio Burst Pulse Widths, Dispersion Measures and Fluences

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2015-01-01

    The widths, dispersion measures, dispersion indices and fluences of Fast Radio Bursts (FRB) impose coupled constraints that all models must satisfy. Observation of dispersion indices close to their low density limit of $-2$ sets a model-independent upper bound on the electron density and a lower bound on the size of any dispersive plasma cloud. The non-monotonic dependence of burst widths (after deconvolution of instrumental effects) on dispersion measure excludes the intergalactic medium as the location of scattering that broadens the FRB in time. Temporal broadening far greater than that of pulsars at similar high Galactic latitudes implies that scattering occurs close to the sources, where high densities and strong turbulence are plausible. FRB energetics are consistent with supergiant pulses from young, fast, high-field pulsars at cosmological distances. The distribution of FRB dispersion measures is inconsistent with expanding clouds (such as SNR). It excludes space-limited distributions (such as the loc...

  14. Ultraviolet radiation after exposure to a low-fluence IPL home-use device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Petersen, Daniel; Erlendsson, Andres M; Nash, J F

    2015-01-01

    The prevailing advice is to avoid sun exposure after intense pulsed light (IPL) hair removal. However, no systematic evaluation of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) after IPL hair removal exits. Therefore, we investigated the occurrence of side effects in subjects receiving solar-simulated UVR after...... a low-fluence IPL treatment with a home-use device. Sixteen subjects with Fitzpatrick skin types (FST) II-V were enrolled. Three constitutive buttock blocks (4.4 × 6.4 cm) were each subdivided into four sites, randomized to one IPL exposure of 0, 7, 8, or 10 J/cm2 (spectral output 530-1100 nm). Blocks...... were randomized to no UVR or three standard erythema doses (SEDs) UVR either 30 min or 24 h after IPL. Follow-up visits were 48 h, 1 week, and 4 weeks after IPL. Outcome measures were (i) clinical skin reactions, (ii) reflectance measurements of erythema and pigmentation, and (iii) pain. Subjects...

  15. Implantes transcigomáticos Traszygomatic implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Fernández Ateca

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Los implantes cigomáticos, originariamente diseñados por Branemark en 1989, son implantes de cabeza en 45 grados, de 4'5 milímetros de diámetro en su parte más ancha, y que pueden medir entre 30 y 50 milímetros de longitud. Se insertan desde la parte palatina del proceso alveolar, siguiendo la cresta cigomática-alveolar hasta anclarse en el cuerpo del malar, y en el caso de pacientes maxilectomizados, entrando directamente en el cuerpo del malar. Estos implantes ofrecen una alternativa más al cirujano en el momento de planificar un tratamiento protésico-rehabilitador implantosoportado. Sobretodo, en aquellos pacientes con un maxilar superior atrófico en el que no se pueden realizar injertos óseos o estos han fracasado. El objetivo de este artículo es proponer el protocolo quirúrgico de colocación de los implantes trascigomáticos y revisar la literatura actual sobre la evolución clínica de estos implantes.The zygomatic implants, originally designed by Branemark in 1989, are implants with a 45 degree inclined head, 4'5 millimetre diameter at their widest part and measuring between 30 and 50 millimetres in length. They are inserted from the palatine side of the alveolar process, following the zygomatic-alveolar edge and anchor in the body of the zygomatic bone. In the case of maxillectomized patients, they are inserted directly in the body of the malar bone. These implants offer an additional alternative to the surgeon when planning an implant supported rehabilitation treatment; specially in those patients with an atrophic maxilla in which osseous grafts cannot be realized or these grafts have failed. The objective of this article is to propose the surgical,protocol of placement of traszygomatic implants and to check the current literature on the clinical evolution of these implants.

  16. Influence of arsenic flow on the crystal structure of epitaxial GaAs grown at low temperatures on GaAs (100) and (111) A substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiev, G. B.; Klimov, E. A.; Vasiliev, A. L.; Imamov, R. M.; Pushkarev, S. S.; Trunkin, I. N.; Maltsev, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of arsenic flow in a growth chamber on the crystal structure of GaAs grown by molecular-beam epitaxy at a temperature of 240°C on GaAs (100) and (111) A substrates has been investigated. The flow ratio γ of arsenic As4 and gallium was varied in the range from 16 to 50. GaAs films were either undoped, or homogeneously doped with silicon, or contained three equidistantly spaced silicon δ-layers. The structural quality of the annealed samples has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It is established for the first time that silicon δ-layers in "low-temperature" GaAs serve as formation centers of arsenic precipitates. Their average size, concentration, and spatial distribution are estimated. The dependence of the film structural quality on γ is analyzed. Regions 100-150 nm in size have been revealed in some samples and identified (by X-ray microanalysis) as pores. It is found that, in the entire range of γ under consideration, GaAs films on (111) A substrates have a poorer structural quality and become polycrystalline beginning with a thickness of 150-200 nm.

  17. Influence of monte carlo variance with fluence smoothing in VMAT treatment planning with Monaco TPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The study aimed to investigate the interplay between Monte Carlo Variance (MCV and fluence smoothing factor (FSF in volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment planning by using a sample set of complex treatment planning cases and a X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo–based treatment planning system equipped with tools to tune fluence smoothness as well as MCV. Materials and Methods: The dosimetric (dose to tumor volume, and organ at risk and physical characteristic (treatment time, number of segments, and so on of a set 45 treatment plans for all combinations of 1%, 3%, 5% MCV and 1, 3, 5 FSF were evaluated for five carcinoma esophagus cases under the study. Result: Increase in FSF reduce the treatment time. Variation of MCV and FSF gives a highest planning target volume (PTV, heart and lung dose variation of 3.6%, 12.8% and 4.3%, respectively. The heart dose variation was highest among all organs at risk. Highest variation of spinal cord dose was 0.6 Gy. Conclusion: Variation of MCV and FSF influences the organ at risk (OAR doses significantly but not PTV coverage and dose homogeneity. Variation in FSF causes difference in dosimetric and physical parameters for the treatment plans but variation of MCV does not. MCV 3% or less do not improve the plan quality significantly (physical and clinical compared with MCV greater than 3%. The use of MCV between 3% and 5% gives similar results as 1% with lesser calculation time. Minimally detected differences in plan quality suggest that the optimum FSF can be set between 3 and 5.

  18. Influence of Two Different Fluences on Laser Photobiomodulation of Wound Healing in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplow, Philip V.; Chung, Tzu-Yun; Baxter, G. David

    2011-08-01

    Background: Laser irradiation of wounds in mice and rats was shown in previous studies to stimulate healing but in almost all the studies the wounds were not covered. Purpose: To compare the healing of covered wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic mice and the effect of laser irradiation 660 nm at two different fluences (energy densities). Method: A single wound 5-mm diameter was made on the left flank of forty-seven diabetic and twenty nondiabetic mice and covered with Tegaderm HP dressing (day 1). Wounds were irradiated 660 nm 20 s using a low power (18 mW) or high power (80 mW) laser starting immediately post-wounding for 7 consecutive days, with non-irradiated wounds as controls. Mice were euthanized on day 8, 10 or 14. Wound specimens were cut and stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and examined by light microscopy. Results: Wound healing was impaired in diabetic mice. Tegaderm HP dressing had retarded contraction in a large proportion of diabetic mice (splinted the wounds) and to a lesser extent in nondiabetic mice. Healing of splinted wounds was delayed compared to unsplinted wounds, but laser irradiation at high power stimulated healing by re-epithelization and granulation tissue formation. The fluence of low power laser was estimated to be about 1 J/cm2, while that of the high power laser was 3.7 to 5.0 J/cm2. Conclusion: Laser irradiation of wounds 660 nm with 1 J/cm2 had little effect on healing of wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic mice, whereas irradiation with 3.7 to 5.0 J/cm2 stimulated healing of wounds in diabetic mice most of which were splinted by the dressing.

  19. Low-fluence red light increases the transport and biosynthesis of auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Cohen, Jerry D; Gardner, Gary

    2011-10-01

    In plants, light is an important environmental signal that induces photomorphogenesis and interacts with endogenous signals, including hormones. We found that light increased polar auxin transport in dark-grown Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) hypocotyls. In tomato, this increase was induced by low-fluence red or blue light followed by 1 d of darkness. It was reduced in phyA, phyB1, and phyB2 tomato mutants and was reversed by far-red light applied immediately after the red or blue light exposure, suggesting that phytochrome is involved in this response. We further found that the free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) level in hypocotyl regions below the hook was increased by red light, while the level of conjugated IAA was unchanged. Analysis of IAA synthesized from [¹³C]indole or [¹³C]tryptophan (Trp) revealed that both Trp-dependent and Trp-independent IAA biosynthesis were increased by low-fluence red light in the top section (meristem, cotyledons, and hook), and the Trp-independent pathway appears to become the primary route for IAA biosynthesis after red light exposure. IAA biosynthesis in tissues below the top section was not affected by red light, suggesting that the increase of free IAA in this region was due to increased transport of IAA from above. Our study provides a comprehensive view of light effects on the transport and biosynthesis of IAA, showing that red light increases both IAA biosynthesis in the top section and polar auxin transport in hypocotyls, leading to unchanged free IAA levels in the top section and increased free IAA levels in the lower hypocotyl regions.

  20. Erosion of carbon fiber composites under high-fluence heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianova, Natalya N.; Borisov, Anatoly M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Mashkova, Eugenia S., E-mail: es_mashkova@mail.r [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Virgiliev, Yury S. [NIIgraphite, 111141 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-01

    The ion-induced erosion, determining by sputtering yield Y and surface evolution including structure and morphology changes of the modified surface layers, of two commercial carbon fiber composites (CFC) with different reinforcement - KUP-VM (1D) and Desna 4 (4D) have been studied under 30 keV Ar{sup +} high fluence ({phi}t {approx} 10{sup 18}-10{sup 20} ion/cm{sup 2}) irradiation in the temperature range from room temperature to 400 {sup o}C. Ion-induced erosion results in the changes of carbon fiber structure which depend on temperature and ion fluence. Monitoring of ion-induced structural changes using the temperature dependence of ion-induced electron emission yield has shown that for Desna 4 and KUP-VM at dynamic annealing temperature T{sub a} {approx} 170 {sup o}S the transition takes place from disordering at T < T{sub a} to recrystallization at T > T{sub a}. The annealing temperature T{sub a} is close to the one for polycrystalline graphites. Microscopy analysis has shown that at temperatures T < T{sub a} the etching of the fibers results in a formation of trough-like longitudinal cavities and hillocks. Irradiation at temperatures T > T{sub a} leads to a crimped structure with the ribs perpendicular to fiber axis. After further sputtering of the crimps the fiber morphology is transformed to an isotropic globular structure. As a result the sputtering yield decreases for Desna 4 more than twice. This value is almost equal to that for KUP-VM, Desna 4, polycrystalline graphites and glassy carbons at room temperature.

  1. Towards a reference numerical scheme using MCNPX for PWR control rod tip fluence estimations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferroukhi, H.; Vasiliev, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Dufresne, A. [Dept. of Physics, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Chawla, R. [Dept. of Physics, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    Recent occurrences of cracks and fissures on the cladding tubes of PWR control rod (CR) fingers employed in the Swiss reactors prompted the need to develop more reliable analytical methods for CR tip fluence estimations. To partly address this need, a deterministic methodology based on SIMULATE-3/CASMO-4 was in recent years developed at PSI. Although this methodology has already been applied for independent support to licensing issues related to CR lifetime, two main questions are currently being the center of attention for further enhancements. First, the methodology relies on several assumptions that have so far not been verified. Secondly, an assessment of the achieved accuracy has not been addressed. In an attempt to answer both these open questions, it was considered appropriate to develop an alternative computational scheme based on the stochastic MCNPX code with the objective to provide reference numerical solutions. This paper presents the first steps undertaken in that direction. To start, a methodology for a volumetric neutron source transfer to full core MCNPX models with detailed CR as well as axial reflector representations is established. On this basis, the assumptions of the deterministic methodology are studied for selected CR configurations for two Beginning-of-Life cores by comparing the spatial neutron flux distributions obtained with the two approaches for the entire spectrum. Finally, for the high-energy range (E> 1 MeV) and for a few CRs, the new MCNPX scheme is applied to estimate the accumulated fluence over one real operated cycle and the results are compared with the deterministic approach. (authors)

  2. The dose-dependence biological effect of laser fluence on rabbit fibroblasts derived from urethral scar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Yu, Bo; Sun, Dongchong; Wu, Yuanyi; Xiao, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Two-micrometer laser vaporization resection has been used in clinic for years, but some patients received the treatment are still faced with excessive and abnormal wound repair which leads to the recurrent of urethral stricture eventually. Fibroblasts play a key role in the processes of "narrow-expansion/operation-restenosis" recurring problems. Here, we investigated the effect of laser fluence biomodulation on urethral scar fibroblasts as well as the underlying mechanism. Urethral scar fibroblasts were isolated and cultured, and laser irradiation (2 μm) was applied at different laser fluence or doses (0, 0.125, 0.5, 2, 8, 32 J/cm(2)) with a single exposure in 1 day. The effect of 2-μm laser irradiation on cell proliferation, viability, and expression of scar formation related genes were investigated. Two-micrometer laser irradiation with intermediate dose (8 J/cm(2)) promoted scar fibroblasts proliferation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, while higher doses of 32 J/cm(2) are suppressive as it decreased the survival rate, viability, and proliferation of fibroblasts. In addition, qRT-PCR and Western blotting results both proven that collagen type I, collagen IV, MMP9, and CTGF display significant increase, yet the TGF-β1 expression was severely reduced at intermediate dose (8 J/cm(2)) group when compared with the others groups. Our findings suggest the scar formation-related genes are sensitive to intermediate laser irradiation dose, the most in scar fibroblasts. We revealed the bioeffect and molecular mechanism of 2-μm laser irradiation on rabbit urethral scar fibroblasts. Our study provides new insights into the mechanisms which involved in the excessive and abnormal wound repair of 2-μm laser vaporization resection. These results could potentially contribute to further study on biological effects and application of 2-μm laser irradiation in urethral stricture therapy.

  3. Impact of nucleation of carbonaceous clusters on structural, electrical and optical properties of Cr+-implanted PMMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Shafaq; Rafique, M. Shahid; Saleemi, Farhat; Naab, Fabian; Toader, Ovidiu; Mahmood, Arshad; Aziz, Uzma

    2016-09-01

    Specimens of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) have been implanted with 400 keV Cr+ ions at different ion fluences ranging from 5 × 1013 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The possible chemical reactions involved in the nucleation of conjugated carbonaceous clusters in implanted PMMA are discussed. Furthermore, impact of formation of carbonaceous clusters on structural, optical, electrical and morphological properties of implanted PMMA has been examined. The structural modifications in implanted PMMA are observed by Raman spectroscopy. The variation in optical band gap and Urbach energy is measured using UV-visible spectroscopic analysis. The effects of Cr+ ion implantation on electrical and morphological properties are investigated by four-probe apparatus and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The Raman spectroscopic analysis confirmed the formation of carbonaceous clusters with the transformation of implanted layer of PMMA into amorphous carbon. Simultaneously, the optical band gap of implanted PMMA has reduced from 3.13 to 0.85 eV. The increase in Urbach energy favors the decline in band gap together with the structural modification in implanted PMMA. As a result of Cr+ ion implantation, the electrical conductivity of PMMA has improved from 2.14 ± 0.06 × 10-10 S/cm (pristine) to 7.20 ± 0.36 × 10-6 S/cm. The AFM images revealed a decrease in surface roughness with an increment in ion fluence up to 5 × 1014 ions/cm2. The modification in the electrical, optical and structural properties makes the PMMA a promising candidate for its future utilization, as a semiconducting and optically active material, in various fields like plastic electronics and optoelectronic devices.

  4. RAMA Methodology for the Calculation of Neutron Fluence; Metodologia RAMA para el Calculo de la Fluencia Neutronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villescas, G.; Corchon, F.

    2013-07-01

    he neutron fluence plays an important role in the study of the structural integrity of the reactor vessel after a certain time of neutron irradiation. The NRC defined in the Regulatory Guide 1.190, the way must be estimated neutron fluence, including uncertainty analysis of the validation process (creep uncertainty is ? 20%). TRANSWARE Enterprises Inc. developed a methodology for calculating the neutron flux, 1,190 based guide, known as RAMA. Uncertainty values obtained with this methodology, for about 18 vessels, are less than 10%.

  5. A new monitor for routine thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate monitoring in k{sub 0} INAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koster-Ammerlaan, M.J.J. [Delft University of Technology, Reactor Institute Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.j.j.koster-ammerlaan@tudelft.nl; Bacchi, M.A. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo 13400-970, Piracicaba (Brazil); Bode, P. [Delft University of Technology, Reactor Institute Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Nadai Fernandes, E.A. de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo 13400-970, Piracicaba (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    The Zr-Au set for monitoring the thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate and the epithermal spectrum parameter {alpha} is not always practicable for routine application of INAA in well-thermalized facilities. An alternative set consisting of Cr, Au and Mo provides values for the thermal neutron fluence rate, f and {alpha} that are not significantly different from those found via the Zr-Au method and the Cd-covered Zr-method. The IRMM standard SMELS-II was analyzed using the (Au-Cr-Mo) monitor and a good agreement was obtained.

  6. Erbium ion implantation into different crystallographic cuts of lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekvindova, P.; Svecova, B.; Cajzl, J.; Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P.; Oswald, J.; Kolistsch, A.; Spirkova, J.

    2012-02-01

    Single crystals like lithium niobate are frequently doped with optically active rare-earth or transition-metal ions for a variety of applications in optical devices such as solid-state lasers, amplifiers or sensors. To exploit the potential of the Er:LiNbO 3, one must ensure high intensity of the 1.5 μm luminescence as an inevitable prerequisite. One of the important factors influencing the luminescence properties of a lasing ion is the crystal field of the surrounding, which is inevitably determined by the crystal structure of the pertinent material. From that point it is clear that it cannot be easy to affect the resulting luminescence properties - intensity or position of the luminescence band - without changing the structure of the substrate. However, there is a possibility to utilise a potential of the ion implantation of the lasing ions, optionally accompanied with a sensitising one, that can, besides the doping, also modify the structure of the treated area od the crystal. This effect can be eventually enhanced by a post-implantation annealing that may help to recover the damaged structure and hence to improve the desired luminescence. In this paper we are going to report on our experiments with ion-implantation technique followed with subsequent annealing could be a useful way to influence the crystal field of LN. Optically active Er:LiNbO 3 layers were fabricated by medium energy implantation under various experimental conditions. The Er + ions were implanted at energies of 330 and 500 keV with fluences ranging from 1.0 × 10 15 to 1.0 × 10 16 ion cm -2 into LiNbO 3 single-crystal cuts of both common and special orientations. The as-implanted samples were annealed in air and oxygen at two different temperatures (350 and 600 °C) for 5 h. The depth concentration profiles of the implanted erbium were measured by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) using 2 MeV He + ions. The photoluminescence spectra of the samples were measured to determine the

  7. Antireflection coatings for GaAs solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexieva, Z I; Nenova, Z S; Bakardjieva, V S; Dikov, Hr M; Milanova, M M, E-mail: alexieva@phys.bas.b [Central Laboratory of Applied Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 59 St Petersrburg Blvd, 4000 Plovdiv (Bulgaria)

    2010-04-01

    A double-layer structure of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} over ZrO{sub 2} film is studied. Minimization of the average weighted reflectance is carried out to optimize the thickness of the two layers in the antireflection coating. An optimal value of 2.17% for the weighted average reflection is estimated. The optimal thicknesses of the layers are 49 nm for the bottom and 45 nm for the top layer. Low temperature spin coating technique is used to deposit ZrO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films from sol gel solutions on polished silicon wafers, GaAs multilayer heterostructures and AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells. The density of the short-circuit photocurrent increases from 25 mA.cm{sup -2} for solar cells without an antireflection coating to 36 mA.cm{sup -2} for those with a double layer coating.

  8. Antireflection coatings for GaAs solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexieva, Z. I.; Nenova, Z. S.; Bakardjieva, V. S.; Milanova, M. M.; Dikov, Hr M.

    2010-04-01

    A double-layer structure of Al2O3 over ZrO2 film is studied. Minimization of the average weighted reflectance is carried out to optimize the thickness of the two layers in the antireflection coating. An optimal value of 2.17% for the weighted average reflection is estimated. The optimal thicknesses of the layers are 49 nm for the bottom and 45 nm for the top layer. Low temperature spin coating technique is used to deposit ZrO2 and Al2O3 films from sol gel solutions on polished silicon wafers, GaAs multilayer heterostructures and AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells. The density of the short-circuit photocurrent increases from 25 mA.cm-2 for solar cells without an antireflection coating to 36 mA.cm-2 for those with a double layer coating.

  9. Indirect excitons in (111) GaAs double quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, C.; Biermann, K.; Hernández-Mínguez, A.; Santos, P. V.

    2017-08-01

    We study the dynamics of indirect (or dipolar) excitons (interwell IXs) in GaAs (111) double quantum wells (DQWs) subjected to a transverse electric field. In comparison with single (111) QWs, these DQWs can store, for a comparable applied fields and optical excitation density, a density of interwell IXs much larger than in SQWs, thus leading to stronger interwell IX- IX repulsive interactions. We show by means of spatially-resolved optical spectroscopy that interwell IXs in (111) DWQs can be transported over distances exceeding 60 μm. From the spectral dependence of the interwell IX spatial distribution profiles, we show that the long transport distances are due to drift forces arising from the strong interwell IX- IX interactions.

  10. Study of the effect of H implantation and annealing on LiTaO{sub 3} surface blistering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Changdong; Lu, Fei, E-mail: lufei@sdu.edu.cn; Ma, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of hydrogen ion implantation fluence on modification of the Z-cut LiTaO{sub 3} surface morphology and the evolution of blistering during annealing were experimentally analyzed. • RBS/Channeling and ERD were used to examine ion-induced structural and compositional changes in the samples. • The Föoppl-von Karman theory was introduced to calculate the critical internal pressure and stress to induce surface blistering. • Gibbs free energy and critical radius are introduced to explain the blister shrink and rupture observed in the experiment. - Abstract: LiTaO{sub 3} samples are implanted by 120 keV hydrogen ion with different fluences at room temperature. H{sup +} concentration and distribution is detected using Elastic recoil detection. Experimental results show that the threshold fluence for blistering in LiTaO{sub 3} surface is 6 × 10{sup 16} ion/cm{sup 2}. Surface blistering phenomenon is studied by using optical microscopy, Rutherford back scattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Bubble growing and surface blister’s dependence on annealing process is observed and analyzed. The critical internal pressure and stress of surface blistering in H{sup +}-implanted LiTaO{sub 3} is derived based on theoretical model and experimental results. Gibbs free energy and cavity critical radius are introduced to explain the blister shrink and rupture observed in the experiment.

  11. The Effect of Thermal Annealing on Structural-phase Changes in the Ni-Ti Alloy Implanted with Krypton Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltavtseva, V. P.; Kislitsin, S. B.; Ghyngazov, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of thermal annealing within the temperature range 100-300°C on the structural-phase state of a Ni-Ti alloy with shape memory effect (SME) implanted with 84Kr ions at the energies E = 280 keV and 1.75 MeV/nucl and the fluences within 5·1012-1·1020 ion/m2 is investigated. For the samples modified by 84Kr ions at E = 1.75 MeV/nucl up to the fluences 1·1020 and 5·1012 ion/m2, the formation of a martensitic NiTi phase with the B19 ' structure, responsible for the SME, is revealed at the annealing temperatures 100 and 300°C, respectively, in the near-surface region corresponding to the outrange area. This is accompanied by the formation of nanosized NiTi particles in the R-phase. As the implantation fluence increases, the probability of their formation decreases. It is shown that annealing of the implanted structures can increase the strength of the Ni-Ti alloy. The degree of hardening is determined by the value of annealing temperature, and an increase in strength is primarily due to ordering of the radiation-induced defect structures (phases). A correlation between the onset temperature of a forward martensitic transition and the structural-phase state of the thermally annealed Ni-Ti alloy is established.

  12. Growth and characterization of molecular beam epitaxial GaAs layers on porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. L.; Liu, J. K.; Sadwick, L.; Wang, K. L.; Kao, Y. C.

    1987-01-01

    GaAs layers have been grown on porous silicon (PS) substrates with good crystallinity by molecular beam epitaxy. In spite of the surface irregularity of PS substrates, no surface morphology deterioration was observed on epitaxial GaAs overlayers. A 10-percent Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy minimum channeling yield for GaAs-on-PS layers as compared to 16 percent for GaAs-on-Si layers grown under the same condition indicates a possible improvement of crystallinity when GaAs is grown on PS. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the dominant defects in the GaAs-on-PS layers are microtwins and stacking faults, which originate from the GaAs/PS interface. GaAs is found to penetrate into the PS layers. n-type GaAs/p-type PS heterojunction diodes were fabricated with good rectifying characteristics.

  13. Development of GaAs Detectors for Physics at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Chu, Zhonghua; Krais, R; Rente, C; Syben, O; Tenbusch, F; Toporowsky, M; Xiao, Wenjiang; Cavallini, A; Fiori, F; Edwards, M; Geppert, R; Goppert, R; Haberla, C; Hornung, M F; Irsigler, R; Rogalla, M; Beaumont, S; Raine, C; Skillicorn, I; Margelevicius, J; Meshkinis, S; Smetana, S; Jones, B; Santana, J; Sloan, T; Zdansky, K; Alexiev, D; Donnelly, I J; Canali, C; Chiossi, C; Nava, F; Pavan, P; Kubasta, J; Tomiak, Z; Tchmil, V; Tchountonov, A; Tsioupa, I; Dogru, M; Gray, R; Hou, Yuqian; Manolopoulos, S; Walsh, S; Aizenshtadt, G; Budnitsky, D L; Gossen, A; Khludkov, S; Koretskaya, O B; Okaevitch, L; Potapov, A; Stepanov, V E; Tolbanov, O; Tyagev, A; Matulionis, A; Pozela, J; Kavaliauskiene, G; Kazukauskas, V; Kiliulis, R; Rinkevicius, V; Slenys, S; Storasta, J V

    2002-01-01

    % RD-8 Development of GaAs Detectors for Physics at the LHC \\\\ \\\\The aims of the collaboration are to investigate the available material options, performance and limitations of simple pad, pixel and microstrip GaAs detectors for minimum ionising particles with radiation hardness and speed which are competitive with silicon detectors. This new technology was originally developed within our university laboratories but now benefits from increasing industrial interest and collaboration in detector fabrication. Initial steps have also been taken towards the fabrication of GaAs preamplifiers to match the detectors in radiation hardness. The programme of work aims to construct a demonstration detector module for an LHC forward tracker based on GaAs.

  14. CMOS compatible route for GaAs based large scale flexible and transparent electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Nour, Maha A.

    2014-08-01

    Flexible electronics using gallium arsenide (GaAs) for nano-electronics with high electron mobility and optoelectronics with direct band gap are attractive for many applications. Here we describe a state-of-the-art CMOS compatible batch fabrication process of transforming traditional electronic circuitry into large-area flexible, semitransparent platform. We show a simple release process for peeling off 200 nm of GaAs from 200 nm GaAs/300 nm AlAs stack on GaAs substrate using diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF). This process enables releasing a single top layer compared to peeling off all layers with small sizes at the same time. This is done utilizing a network of release holes which contributes to the better transparency (45 % at 724 nm wavelength) observed.

  15. High Purity GaAs Far IR Photoconductor With Enhanced Quantum Efficieny Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal introduces an innovative concept aimed to significantly enhance the quantum efficiency of a far-infrared GaAs photoconductor and achieve sensitivity...

  16. Electromagnetically induced transparency due to intervalence band coherence in a GaAs quantum well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Mark; Wang, Hailin

    2003-05-15

    We demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency in the transient optical response in a GaAs quantum well by using the nonradiative coherence between the heavy-hole and the light-hole valence bands.

  17. Experimental study on the activation process of GaAs spin—polarized electron source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RuanCun-Jun

    2003-01-01

    GaAs spin-polarized electron source is a new kind of electron source, where the GaAs semiconductor crystal is used as a photocathode under the irradiation of helicity light. In this paper the activation process of the GaAs spin-polarized electron source is unvestigated experimentally in detail, during which the negative electron affinity of the photo cathode should be achieved more carefully by absorbing the caesium and oxygen on the surface of the GaAs crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Besides the different activation processes, the important physical parameters are studied to achieve the optimum activation results. At the same time the stability and lifetime of the polarized electron beam are explored for future experiments. Some important experimental data have been acquired.

  18. Experimental study on the activation process of GaAs spin-polarized electron source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮存军

    2003-01-01

    GaAs spin-polarized electron source is a new kind of electron source, where the GaAs semiconductor crystal is used as a photocathode under the irradiation of helicity light. In this paper the activation process of the GaAs spin-polarized electron source is investigated experimentally in detail, during which the negative electron affinity of the photo cathode should be achieved more carefully by absorbing the caesium and oxygen on the surface of the GaAs crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Besides the different activation processes, the important physical parameters are studied to achieve the optimum activation results. At the same time the stability and lifetime of the polarized electron beam are explored for future experiments. Some important experimental data have been acquired.

  19. Activation processes on GaAs photocathode by different currents of oxygen source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhuang; Shi, Feng; Cheng, Hongchang; Wang, Shufei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Chang

    2015-04-01

    In order to know the influence of activation processes on GaAs photocathodes, three GaAs samples were activated by a fixed current of cesium source and different currents of oxygen source. The current of caesium source is same during activation to ensure initial adsorption of caesium quantum is similar, which is the base to show the difference during alternation activation of caesium and oxygen. Analysed with the activation data, it is indicated that Cs-to-O current ratio of 1.07 is the optimum ratio to obtain higher sensitivity and better stability. According to double dipole model, stable and uniform double dipole layers of GaAs-O-Cs:Cs-O-Cs are formed and negative electron affinity is achieved on GaAs surface by activation with cesium and oxygen. The analytical result is just coincident with the model. Thus there is an efficient technological method to improve sensitivity and stability of GaAs photocathode.

  20. Direct Observation of the E_ Resonant State in GaAs1-xBix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberi, Kirstin; Beaton, Daniel A.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-12-15

    Bismuth-derived resonant states with T2 symmetry are detected in the valence band of GaAs1-xBix using electromodulated reflectance. A doublet is located 42 meV below the valence band edge of GaAs that is split by local strain around isolated Bi impurity atoms. A transition associated with a singlet is also observed just above the GaAs spin orbit split-off band. These states move deeper into the valence band with increasing Bi concentration but at a much slower rate than the well-known giant upward movement of the valence band edge in GaAs1-xBix. Our results provide key new insights for clarifying the mechanisms by which isovalent impurities alter the bandstructure of the host semiconductor.