WorldWideScience

Sample records for floating oyster crassostrea

  1. Alien species alert: Crassostrea gigas (Pacific oyster)

    OpenAIRE

    Miossec, Laurence; Le Deuff, Rose-marie; Goulletquer, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas, Thunberg, 1793) is one of 20 species in the genus Crassostrea. Although native to the Japan/Korea region, C. gigas is a hardy species that has been introduced to a number of countries worldwide, including the US, Canada, the UK, France, Korea, China, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, and South America, mainly for aquaculture purposes (Mann et al., 1991; Orensanz et al., 2002). As a result, C. gigas has become the leading species in world shellfish cu...

  2. Growth of transplanted mangrove oyster, Crassostrea gasar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From June to September 2004 we studied the survival and growth of the mangrove oyster, Crassostrea gasar transplanted from mangrove serial roots to wooden trays suspended at the intertidal area of Onne, Rivers State, Nigeria. Survival depended on stocking sizes. Oyster seed between 0.2-1.2 g, 1.6-4.8 g and 5.0- 8.0 g ...

  3. Length-weight relationship of Giant Oyster, Crassostrea gyphoides (Schlotheim)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Ansari, Z.A.; Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Relationship between shell length and total weight, shell weight and meat weight of giant oyster, Crassostrea gryphoides revealed that the growth of these parameters is very fast and significant. It indicates the suitability of the species concerned...

  4. Introduced Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Successful aquaculture species are often chosen for their fast growth rates and fecundity, which are also characteristics of invasive species. The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, which constitutes 80% of global oyster trade, has been confirmed as invasive in 17 of the 66 countries where it is cultured. The single study of its ...

  5. Length-Weight relationships of mangrove oyster, Crassostrea gasar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The length-weight relationships (LWRs) of mangrove oyster, Crassostrea gasar, cultured under continuous and periodic submergence in tidal ponds, for a period of seven months, February to August 2010 were determined. A total of 375 individuals each of pond A (continuous submergence) and B (periodic submergence) ...

  6. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) DEFENSES ON CLINICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHEMOLYTICUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three clinical (2030, 2062, and 2107) and three environmental (1094, 1163, and ATCC 17802) isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were exposed to hemocytes and plasma collected from oysters (Crassostrea virginica) to determine their susceptibility to putative oyster defenses. Clinic...

  7. RESPONSES OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTES TO NONPATHOGENIC AND CLINICAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial uptake by oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and bactericidal activity of oyster hemocytes were studied using four environmental isolates and three clinical isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Clinical isolates (2030, 2062, 2107) were obtained from gastroenteritis patien...

  8. The invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in Scandinavia coastal waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Holm, Mark Wejlemann; Strand, Åsa

    visualized the need for a continued collaboration between scientists in the Scandinavian countries, as the bio-invasion is a cross-border issue and management actions then have to be synchronized, and based on a “state of the art” knowledge of the Scandinavian bio-invasion of the species. The risk assessment......A massive invasion of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas , has occurred in Scandinavia during the last decade. The introduction and dispersal was described through collaboration between scientists from Sweden, Denmark and Norway. This work has been followed up by national activities that clearly...

  9. Aeromonas spp. isolated from oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorea) from a natural oyster bed, Ceará, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista-Barreto, Norma S; Vieira, Regine H S F; Carvalho, Fátima Cristiane T; Torres, Regina C O; Sant'Anna, Ernani S; Rodrigues, Dália P; Reis, Cristhiane M F

    2006-01-01

    Between April and October 2002, thirty fortnightly collections of oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorea) from a natural oyster bed at the Cocó River estuary in the Sabiaguaba region (Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil) were carried out, aiming to isolate Aeromonas spp. strains. Oyster samples were submitted to the direct plating (DP) and the presence/absence (P/A) methods. Aeromonas were identified in 15 (50%) samples analyzed by the DP method and in 13 (43%) analyzed by the P/A method. A. caviae, A. eucrenophila, A. media, A. sobria, A. trota, A. veronii bv. sobria, A. veronii bv. veronii and Aeromonas sp. were isolated. The predominant species was A. veronii (both biovars), which was identified in 13 (43%) samples, followed by A. media in 11 (37%) and A. caviae in seven (23%). From the 59 strains identified, 28 (48%) presented resistance to at least one of the eight antibiotics tested.

  10. Biochemical profile of oyster Crassostrea madrasensis and its nutritional attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K. Asha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oysters are highly esteemed sea food and considered a delicacy throughout the world. Yet this resource is not optimally utilised in several parts of the world. The aim of this study is to highlight its nutritional importance. Biochemical composition and nutritional attributes of oyster meat are discussed. Proximate composition, fatty acid and amino acid profiles and mineral content were determined in oysters (Crassostrea madrasensis. Moisture, protein, fat, carbohydrate and ash contents in the oyster were 82.64%, 9.41%, 3.25% 3.2% and 1.01%, respectively and it was rich in macro-minerals and trace elements especially selenium. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA were highest of the total lipids among which eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and linoleic acid were the prominent fatty acids. The n-3/n-6 index was high indicating a predominance of n-3 fatty acids in the species. Total amino acid content was 99.33 g/100 g crude protein, of which, essential amino acid lysine was the most abundant. Valine had the lowest essential amino acid score (EAAS (0.17 while threonine had the highest EAAS of 3.62. Chemical score was 17% and the lowest limiting amino acid was valine. Protein efficiency ratio, essential amino acid index and biological value of oyster were 3.92, 120.2 and 174.0, respectively which indicates that the protein is of superior quality. Data on biochemical composition, nutritional attributes and quality indices of C. madrasensis protein may prove important for future policies regarding exploitation of this species and for inducing favourable changes in consumer preferences.

  11. Possible Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Oysters (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang-Ho; Gu, Takyong; So, Jae-Seong

    2017-09-05

    We attempted to isolate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from the marine oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and selected several environmental stress-resistant isolates for the development of a future probiotic adjuvant for marine aquaculture. Twenty-six presumptive LAB isolates were extracted from oysters and screened (by an agar diffusion assay) for antimicrobial activity toward various pathogens: Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Streptococcus iniae, and Edwardsiella tarda. Eight isolates had an antibacterial activity toward V. parahaemolyticus; in particular, 6 isolates showed a growth-inhibitory activity, with inhibition zone diameters > 15 mm. Of these, 5 isolates (JL17, JL18, JL28, HL7, and HL32) were also active against S. iniae and E. tarda. Enterococcus faecium HL7 was selected as the isolate most resistant to environmental stressors: the minimum NaCl, ethanol, and hydrogen peroxide concentrations at which HL7 cells lost their viability were 1.9 M, 11%, and 0.013%, respectively. When an antibiotic sensitivity test was performed on E. faecium HL7, this isolate was found to be resistant to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cephalothin, ampicillin, rifampin, gentamicin, cefotaxime, cefepime, cefotetan, nalidixic acid, and kanamycin. While the oyster model studies provided indication that E. faecium HL7 could be a good candidate as biocontrol agent against V. vulnificus, further optimization is needed in the actual animal rearing situation.

  12. Introduction, establishment and expansion of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in the Oosterschelde (SW Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smaal, A.C.; Kater, B.J.; Wijsman, J.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was first introduced as an exotic species by oyster farmers in 1964 in the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands). The initial phase is not well documented but first natural spatfall was recorded in 1975. Excessive spatfall occurred in 1976 and this is considered

  13. Nitrogenous compounds changes in emersed oysters: Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafrafi, Sarra; Uglow, Roger F.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of emersing oysters ( Crassostrea gigas) for up to 66 h at 4 °C under humid air and nitrogen atmospheres were studied. A significant, gradual body mass loss occurred under nitrogen (8.36 ± 0.85% final weight loss) but no significant loss occurred under humid air (4.92 ± 2.67% final weight loss). Emersion duration and the mantle cavity fluid (MCF) total ammonia (TA) concentration showed a positive, linear relationship ( r2 = 0.73 and 0.74 under humid air and N 2, respectively). The MCF TA and trimethylamine (TMA) contents were also positively related ( r2 = 0.64 and 0.69 under humid air and N 2, respectively). Proline was the most abundant soft tissue free amino acid (71.07 ± 11.8%) in the control group and its concentration did not change significantly under either treatment. The concentration of alanine and valine increased significantly only under humid air. Under N 2, the concentrations of valine and lysine increased significantly and aspartate decreased significantly. Succinate showed a large increase during the first 6 h of emersion under both treatments but significantly more was accumulated in the N 2-exposed group (4.2-fold increase and 8.1-fold increase for the humid air- and N 2-exposed groups, respectively). The succinate concentration difference remained higher in the N 2-treated groups but, in the final 24 h, levels decreased again (quadratic regressions of r2 = 0.97 and 0.95 under humid air and N 2, respectively). Although the trend of succinate accumulation was similar under both treatments, the groups held under nitrogen did not gape (whereas those under humid air did). It is concluded that the implications of gaping behaviour on succinate accumulation in the initial hours of emersion have considerable ecological significance for oysters which occupy habitats in which they may become emersed for some hours naturally. Gaping behaviour also has considerable commercial implications because emersion occurs frequently during the marketing

  14. Microbiomes of American Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) Harvested from Two Sites in the Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossai, Sylvia; Ramachandran, Padmini; Ottesen, Andrea; Reed, Elizabeth; DePaola, Angelo; Parveen, Salina

    2017-07-27

    In this study, we used 16S rRNA gene amplicons to describe the bacterial microbiota associated with oysters ( Crassostrea virginica ) and seawater collected from two sites in the Chesapeake Bay. The dominant bacterial groups included those belonging to the order Pelagibacteraceae , family Enterobacteriaceae , and genus Synechococcus The microbiomes varied among oysters from the same site and between the two sites and months. Copyright © 2017 Ossai et al.

  15. Growth and Survival of the American Oyster Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay, New York

    OpenAIRE

    Sarinsky, Gary; Carroll, Margaret A.; Nduka, Ebere; Catapane, Edward J.

    2005-01-01

    Jamaica Bay is a major inlet opening to the Atlantic Ocean. It was abundant with oysters until early 1900's. Over-harvesting, pressure from predators, parasitic invasion and declining water quality often are cited as causes. Despite actions to arrest and reverse the pollution, oysters are not reestablished. We are studying factors relating to the rehabitation of Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay to determine if the water quality and environmental conditions are suitable for their survival....

  16. Massive settlements of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in Scandinavia : Original paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Valero, Johanna; Harkestad, Lisbeth S.

    2010-01-01

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is an important aquaculture species world-wide. Due to its wide environmental tolerance and high growth rate, it has also become a successful invader in many areas, leading to major ecosystem changes. Low water temperatures were previously believed to restrict...

  17. Molecular identification, phylogeny and geographic distribution of Brazilian mangrove oysters (Crassostrea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Grasielle Costa de Melo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oysters (Ostreidae manifest a high degree of phenotypic plasticity, whereby morphology is of limited value for species identification and taxonomy. By using molecular data, the aim was to genetically characterize the species of Crassostrea occurring along the Brazilian coast, and phylogenetically relate these to other Crassostrea from different parts of the world. Sequencing of the partial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I gene (COI, revealed a total of three species of Crassostrea at 16 locations along the Brazilian coast. C. gasar was found from Curuçá (Pará state to Santos (São Paulo state, and C. rhizophorae from Fortim (Ceará state to Florianópolis (Santa Catarina state, although small individuals of the latter species were also found at Ajuruteua beach (municipality of Bragança, Pará state. An unidentified Crassostrea species was found only on Canela Island, Bragança. Crassostrea gasar and C. rhizophorae grouped with C. virginica, thereby forming a monophyletic Atlantic group, whereas Crassostrea sp. from Canela Island was shown to be more similar to Indo-Pacific oysters, and either arrived in the Atlantic Ocean before the convergence of the Isthmus of Panama or was accidentally brought to Brazil by ship.

  18. Molecular identification, phylogeny and geographic distribution of Brazilian mangrove oysters (Crassostrea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Oysters (Ostreidae) manifest a high degree of phenotypic plasticity, whereby morphology is of limited value for species identification and taxonomy. By using molecular data, the aim was to genetically characterize the species of Crassostrea occurring along the Brazilian coast, and phylogenetically relate these to other Crassostrea from different parts of the world. Sequencing of the partial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I gene (COI), revealed a total of three species of Crassostrea at 16 locations along the Brazilian coast. C. gasar was found from Curuçá (Pará state) to Santos (São Paulo state), and C. rhizophorae from Fortim (Ceará state) to Florianópolis (Santa Catarina state), although small individuals of the latter species were also found at Ajuruteua beach (municipality of Bragança, Pará state). An unidentified Crassostrea species was found only on Canela Island, Bragança. Crassostrea gasar and C. rhizophorae grouped with C. virginica, thereby forming a monophyletic Atlantic group, whereas Crassostrea sp. from Canela Island was shown to be more similar to Indo-Pacific oysters, and either arrived in the Atlantic Ocean before the convergence of the Isthmus of Panama or was accidentally brought to Brazil by ship. PMID:21637433

  19. Role of dissolved and particulate cadmium in the accumulation of cadmium in cultured oysters (Crassostrea gigas)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lekhi, Priyanka; Cassis, D.; Pearce, C.M.; Ebell, N.; Maldonado, M.T.; Orians, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) collected on the coast of British Columbia, Canada have occasionally shown cadmium (Cd) concentrations at or above 2 μg g -1 (wet weight), which has resulted in the loss of some international markets. This study investigated the source and transfer of Cd to oysters by focusing on the role of dissolved and particulate Cd in seawater. Parameters monitored for 1 year at two oyster farm sites on Vancouver Island included: oyster tissue mass and shell length, Cd in oysters, dissolved Cd, particulate Cd, temperature and salinity. Results show that dissolved Cd was the main source of Cd to the oysters and that Cd was mainly concentrated in the gut tissues. A seasonal trend was observed in Cd in oysters, in which levels were lowest during periods of higher temperatures. Results also indicate that the local oceanographic inputs and sediment diagenesis directly affect dissolved Cd and thereby influence the Cd levels in oysters. Particulate matter was not found to be a source of Cd in oysters, and was actually negatively correlated. This was likely due to the uptake of dissolved Cd by phytoplankton and the effect of phytoplankton on oyster tissue mass

  20. Biochemical and volatile organic compound profile of European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) and Pacific cupped oyster (Crassostrea gigas) cultivated in the Eastern Scheldt and Lake Grevelingen, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houcke, van Jasper; Medina, Isabel; Linssen, Jozef; Luten, Joop

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two important different geographical cultivation areas in the Netherlands (Eastern Scheldt and Lake Grevelingen) on the volatile organic compound (VOC) profile of European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) and Pacific cupped oyster (Crassostrea

  1. Oxygen isotope fluctuations in a modern North Sea oyster (Crassostrea gigas) compared with annual variations in seawater temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Wiechert, Uwe; Korte, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    A total of 181 oxygen isotope values from sequential samples of the left shell of a modern Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) that lived on a sub-tidal oyster bank in the List Basin (North Sea, Germany) shows periodically varying values between + 1.3‰ and -2.5‰. In order to test whether these d18O...... equilibrium with the ambient seawater. A cessation of the oyster shell calcification starts at water temperatures below 6 °C, at lower temperatures than previously thought for Crassostrea. For palaeoclimate investigations the termination of shell production is important because the lowest temperatures might...

  2. Analysis of Stomach and Gut Microbiomes of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) from Coastal Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary M.; Judd, Craig; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Smith, Conor

    2012-01-01

    We used high throughput pyrosequencing to characterize stomach and gut content microbiomes of Crassostrea virginica, the Easter oyster, obtained from two sites, one in Barataria Bay (Hackberry Bay) and the other in Terrebonne Bay (Lake Caillou), Louisiana, USA. Stomach microbiomes in oysters from Hackberry Bay were overwhelmingly dominated by Mollicutes most closely related to Mycoplasma; a more rich community dominated by Planctomyctes occurred in Lake Caillou oyster stomachs. Gut communities for oysters from both sites differed from stomach communities, and harbored a relatively diverse assemblage of phylotypes. Phylotypes most closely related to Shewanella and a Chloroflexi strain dominated the Lake Caillou and Hackberry Bay gut microbiota, respectively. While many members of the stomach and gut microbiomes appeared to be transients or opportunists, a putative core microbiome was identified based on phylotypes that occurred in all stomach or gut samples only. The putative core stomach microbiome comprised 5 OTUs in 3 phyla, while the putative core gut microbiome contained 44 OTUs in 12 phyla. These results collectively revealed novel microbial communities within the oyster digestive system, the functions of the oyster microbiome are largely unknown. A comparison of microbiomes from Louisiana oysters with bacterial communities reported for other marine invertebrates and fish indicated that molluscan microbiomes were more similar to each other than to microbiomes of polychaetes, decapods and fish. PMID:23251548

  3. Role of bacteria in bioaccumulation of mercury in the oyster Crassostrea virginica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayler, G.S.; Nelson, J.D. Jr.; Colwell, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of mercury-resistant bacteria was undertaken to determine their role in the accumulation of mercury in a simplified food chain. Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were maintained in a closed system, sealed aquarium with stirred, aerated water containing 10 μg of 203 HgCl 2 per liter. Uptake of 203 Hg by oysters held under control conditions was compared with that of 203 Hg uptake by oysters under similar conditions except that mercury-accumulating and mercury-metabolizing species of Pseudomonsa, isolated from Chesapeake Bay, were added to the experimental oysters. After incubation for 4 days, the major portion of the 203 Hg in the water column was found to be associated with the microparticulate fraction, corresponding to a rise in total viable count. Mercury accumulation in the oysters was significantly higher in the gill and fisceral tissue than other tissues. Mercury concentrations were 200 times greater in tissue fractions of oysters dosed with mercury-metabolizing bacteria compared with the oysters held under control conditions without mercury-metabolizing bacteria. (U.S.)

  4. Antioxidant and detoxification responses of oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis in a multimetal-contaminated estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-11-01

    The contaminated oysters discovered in the Pearl River Estuary (Guangdong province, China) contained high levels of metals in their tissues, especially Cu and Zn, indicating that this large and densely urbanized estuary in Southern China suffers from serious metal pollution. The present study aimed to investigate the impacts of multimetal pollution in the Pearl River Estuary on oyster antioxidant and detoxification systems. The responses of various biochemical biomarkers in the ecologically important oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis collected from 7 sites in the Pearl River Estuary were quantified. Significant correlations were demonstrated between the accumulation of Cu and Zn and oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation) and oxidative stress defenses (catalase, glutathione peroxidase) in the oyster gills. Significant correlations between the accumulation of Cd and Cu and detoxification (glutathione and glutathione transferase) in the gills were also documented. Interestingly, metallothionein concentrations were positively correlated with Cd, but negatively correlated with Cu, Ni, and Zn concentrations in the gills. These measurements indicated that Cu in the Pearl River Estuary induced various biochemical responses in the oysters and influenced the susceptibility of oysters to environmental stress. The present study has provided the first evidence of antioxidant and detoxification responses in native contaminated oysters from a field environment seriously contaminated by metals. Coupling biomarkers with tissue metal concentration measurements was a promising approach to identify the metals causing biological impacts in a multimetal-contaminated estuary. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2798-2805. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Biofiltration, growth and body composition of oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae in effluents from shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Vieira de Azevedo

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to use oyster as biofilter to improve the quality of effluent from shrimp farming and to assess its growth performance and body composition. It was distributed 1,080 oysters into lanterns in fiberglass tanks (170 L in a completely randomized design with three treatments (0, 60 and 120 oysters and six replicates. It was used the effluent from the sedimentation tank. It was measured weekly: temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH, and it was analyzed ammonia-N, nitrite-N, nitrate-N, orthophosphate-P, suspended solids and chlorophyll-α of the input effluent. The control tanks (without oysters were more efficient at removing ammonia-N, nitrite-N, nitrate-N and orthophosphate-P. The tanks containing oysters were more efficient at removing suspended solids and chlorophyll-α. Stocking density influenced the height growth of oysters, but not width. Wet and daily weight, condition and yield index were not affected by stocking density, and a significant increase in comparison to the initials values was observed. Body composition was not affected by stocking density, and a significant difference (p0.05. Under the conditions evaluated, the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae improves water quality and presents growth rates and body composition similar to those obtained in traditional crops.

  6. The extracts of pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas ) alleviate Ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the widespread industrial compounds, which has adverse effects on animal and human health. The study was aimed to explore the effects of Crassostrea gigas extracts (CGE) in alleviating ovarian functional disorders of female rats with exposure to BPA and the underlying possible ...

  7. Predatory blue crabs induce stronger nonconsumptive effects in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica than scavenging blue crabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery E. Scherer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available By influencing critical prey traits such as foraging or habitat selection, predators can affect entire ecosystems, but the nature of cues that trigger prey reactions to predators are not well understood. Predators may scavenge to supplement their energetic needs and scavenging frequency may vary among individuals within a species due to preferences and prey availability. Yet prey reactions to consumers that are primarily scavengers versus those that are active foragers have not been investigated, even though variation in prey reactions to scavengers or predators might influence cascading nonconsumptive effects in food webs. Oysters Crassostrea virginica react to crab predators by growing stronger shells. We exposed oysters to exudates from crabs fed live oysters or fed aged oyster tissue to simulate scavenging, and to controls without crab cues. Oysters grew stronger shells when exposed to either crab exudate, but their shells were significantly stronger when crabs were fed live oysters. The stronger response to predators than scavengers could be due to inherent differences in diet cues representative of reduced risk in the presence of scavengers or to degradation of conspecific alarm cues in aged treatments, which may mask risk from potential predators subsisting by scavenging.

  8. Growth and Survival of the American OysterCrassostrea virginicain Jamaica Bay, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarinsky, Gary; Carroll, Margaret A; Nduka, Ebere; Catapane, Edward J

    2005-01-01

    Jamaica Bay is a major inlet opening to the Atlantic Ocean. It was abundant with oysters until early 1900's. Over-harvesting, pressure from predators, parasitic invasion and declining water quality often are cited as causes. Despite actions to arrest and reverse the pollution, oysters are not reestablished. We are studying factors relating to the rehabitation of Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay to determine if the water quality and environmental conditions are suitable for their survival. Oysters placed in Jamaica Bay grew well when housed in protective containers and growth was influenced by placement near the sediment as compared to the surface. Oysters placed 1 foot above the sediment grew larger that those suspended 1 foot below the surface. Water temperature, pH, turbidity, salinity, conductivity, chlorophyll-a and dissolved O 2 were taken to compare water quality at each site. To study growth and survival in a more natural condition, oyster seed and adults were placed just off the bottom in unprotected containers and photographed. After 1 year they are growing and surviving well and there has been evidence of reproduction. Thus far there are no serious signs of predation by crabs or starfish. The study shows that Jamaica Bay water quality is suitable for oyster growth under the various conditions of our experiments.

  9. The modulation role of serotonin in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in response to air exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjing; Liu, Zhaoqun; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Weilin; Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Xiudan; Li, Yiqun; Xin, Lusheng; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2017-03-01

    Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a critical neurotransmitter in the neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network and involved in regulation of the stress response in vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, serotonin was found to be widely distributed in the tissues of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, including haemolymph, gonad, visceral ganglion, mantle, gill, labial palps and hepatopancreas, and its concentration increased significantly in haemolymph and mantle after the oysters were exposed to air for 1 d. The apoptosis rate of haemocytes was significantly declined after the oysters received an injection of extra serotonin, while the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in haemolymph increased significantly. After the stimulation of serotonin during air exposure, the apoptosis rate of oyster haemocytes and the concentration of H 2 O 2 in haemolymph were significantly decreased, while the SOD activity was significantly elevated. Furthermore, the survival rate of oysters from 4 th to 6 th d after injection of serotonin was higher than that of FSSW group and air exposure group. The results clearly indicated that serotonin could modulate apoptotic effect and redox during air exposure to protect oysters from stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Growth and reproductive investment of introduced Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas in southern European waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Joana F. M. F.; Peralta, Nelson R. E.; Machado, Jorge P.; van der Veer, Henk W.

    2013-02-01

    Growth and reproductive investment of cultured Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas were studied in two south-western European estuaries: the Ría de Ribadeo in Spain and the Ria Formosa in Portugal. Developing gonads were found in individuals >23.5 mm shell length in the Ria Formosa and >27.5 mm shell length in the Ría de Ribadeo. Although the amount of gonadal mass in relation to total body mass was higher in the Ría de Ribadeo, oysters from this location did not spawn completely. In contrast, oysters from the Ria Formosa completely emptied their gonad during spawning. Reproduction and, consequently, the maximum potential for population expansion may be constrained in both areas: in the Ría de Ribadeo due to suboptimal spawning threshold temperatures and in the Ria Formosa due to higher metabolic costs caused by warmer winter temperatures. Nevertheless, in comparison to northern oyster populations, Portuguese and Spanish populations have higher reproductive output. If suitable environmental conditions are met, expansion of Portuguese and Spanish populations will most likely occur. In the Ria Formosa, where environmental conditions for growth and reproduction are favourable, wild oysters are already observed. In order to follow the dynamics of oyster populations and predict possible negative effects on the ecosystems, it is important to continue monitoring the physiological performance of C. gigas in these areas.

  11. Uptake of cadmium from Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) in British Columbia oyster growers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copes, Ray; Clark, Nina Annika; Rideout, Karen; Palaty, Jan; Teschke, Kay

    2008-01-01

    Background: Pacific oysters along the North American coast from Washington to Alaska contain concentrations of cadmium (Cd) that are high by comparison with Atlantic oysters, frequently exceeding 2 μg/g wet weight, but it is unclear whether this Cd is absorbed by consumers. Objectives: To determine the effect of oyster consumption on Cd in blood and urine among a group with high oyster consumption. Methods: Sixty-one non-smoking oyster growers and family members with a mean age of 47.3±7.6 years (range 33-64) were interviewed by telephone to assess their oyster consumption and other sources of Cd exposure at present and 5 years prior to the start of oyster farming. Their blood and urine Cd concentrations were measured. Results: The geometric mean Cd concentration in blood was 0.83 μg/L and in urine was 0.76 μg/g creatinine. Thirty-six percent of participants had urinary Cd levels above 1 μg/g creatinine and 5% were above 2 μg/g creatinine. Recent (last 12 months) and long-term oyster consumptions were positive predictors of blood Cd but did not directly predict urinary Cd. The optimal model for predicting the variance in blood Cd included recent intake of oyster-derived Cd, serum iron concentration and recent ketchup consumption (R 2 =0.34, p=0.00004), with the latter two variables showing a protective effect. The factors found to predict urinary Cd were blood Cd concentration and duration of oyster farming. A rise in blood Cd was observed after 12 years of farming oysters, likely caused by higher consumption of oysters during this period. Conclusions: Oyster-derived Cd is bioavailable and affects body stores of the metal

  12. Transcriptional changes in oysters Crassostrea brasiliana exposed to phenanthrene at different salinities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacchi, Flávia Lucena; Lima, Daína; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício de [Laboratory of Biomarkers of Aquatic Contamination and Immunochemistry − LABCAI, Federal University Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Mattos, Jacó Joaquim [Aquaculture Pathology Research Center – NEPAQ, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Lüchmann, Karim Hahn [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology – LBBM, Fishery Engineering Department, Santa Catarina State University, Laguna (Brazil); Araújo de Miranda Gomes, Carlos Henrique [Laboratory of Marine Mollusks – LMM, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Bícego, Márcia Caruso; Taniguchi, Satie; Sasaki, Silvio Tarou [Laboratory of Marine Organic Chemistry – LABQOM, Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Dias Bainy, Afonso Celso, E-mail: afonso.bainy@ufsc.br [Laboratory of Biomarkers of Aquatic Contamination and Immunochemistry − LABCAI, Federal University Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Salinity effect on Crassostrea brasiliana exposed to phenanthrene. • Higher transcription of biotransformation genes under hyposmotic condition. • Elevated transcription of oxidative stress-related genes under hyposmotic condition. • Amino acid metabolism-related genes changes according to salinity. • Phenanthrene does not affect amino acid metabolism-related genes. - Abstract: Euryhaline animals from estuaries, such as the oyster Crassostrea brasiliana, show physiological mechanisms of adaptation to tolerate salinity changes. These ecosystems receive constant input of xenobiotics from urban areas, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as phenanthrene (PHE). In order to understand the influence of salinity on the molecular responses of C. brasiliana exposed to PHE, oysters were acclimatized to different salinities (35, 25 and 10) for 15 days and then exposed to 100 μg L{sup −1} PHE for 24 h and 96 h. Control groups were kept at the same salinities without PHE. Oysters were sampled for chemical analysis and the gills were excised for mRNA quantification by qPCR. Transcript levels of different genes were measured, including some involved in oxidative stress pathways, phases I and II of the xenobiotic biotransformation systems, amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator putative gene. Higher transcript levels of Sulfotransferase-like gene (SULT-like) were observed in oysters exposed to PHE at salinity 10 compared to control (24 h and 96 h); cytochrome P450 isoforms (CYP2AU1, CYP2-like1) were more elevated in oysters exposed for 24 h and CYP2-like2 after 96 h of oysters exposed to PHE at salinity 10 compared to control. These results are probably associated to an enhanced Phase I biotransformation activity required for PHE detoxification under hyposmotic stress. Higher transcript levels of CAT-like, SOD-like, GSTm-like (96 h) and GSTΩ-like (24 h) in oysters kept at

  13. Transcriptional changes in oysters Crassostrea brasiliana exposed to phenanthrene at different salinities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacchi, Flávia Lucena; Lima, Daína; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício de; Mattos, Jacó Joaquim; Lüchmann, Karim Hahn; Araújo de Miranda Gomes, Carlos Henrique; Bícego, Márcia Caruso; Taniguchi, Satie; Sasaki, Silvio Tarou; Dias Bainy, Afonso Celso

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Salinity effect on Crassostrea brasiliana exposed to phenanthrene. • Higher transcription of biotransformation genes under hyposmotic condition. • Elevated transcription of oxidative stress-related genes under hyposmotic condition. • Amino acid metabolism-related genes changes according to salinity. • Phenanthrene does not affect amino acid metabolism-related genes. - Abstract: Euryhaline animals from estuaries, such as the oyster Crassostrea brasiliana, show physiological mechanisms of adaptation to tolerate salinity changes. These ecosystems receive constant input of xenobiotics from urban areas, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as phenanthrene (PHE). In order to understand the influence of salinity on the molecular responses of C. brasiliana exposed to PHE, oysters were acclimatized to different salinities (35, 25 and 10) for 15 days and then exposed to 100 μg L −1 PHE for 24 h and 96 h. Control groups were kept at the same salinities without PHE. Oysters were sampled for chemical analysis and the gills were excised for mRNA quantification by qPCR. Transcript levels of different genes were measured, including some involved in oxidative stress pathways, phases I and II of the xenobiotic biotransformation systems, amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator putative gene. Higher transcript levels of Sulfotransferase-like gene (SULT-like) were observed in oysters exposed to PHE at salinity 10 compared to control (24 h and 96 h); cytochrome P450 isoforms (CYP2AU1, CYP2-like1) were more elevated in oysters exposed for 24 h and CYP2-like2 after 96 h of oysters exposed to PHE at salinity 10 compared to control. These results are probably associated to an enhanced Phase I biotransformation activity required for PHE detoxification under hyposmotic stress. Higher transcript levels of CAT-like, SOD-like, GSTm-like (96 h) and GSTΩ-like (24 h) in oysters kept at salinity 10

  14. Effects of heavy metals on the oyster (Crassostrea virginica at Mandinga Lagoon, Veracruz, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X Guzmán-García

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Mandinga Lagoon in the Mexican State of Veracruz is an important ecological zone that produces 32% of the oyster output in the state of Veracruz, the main oyster producer in Mexico. Samples of water, sediment, and oysters were collected in 2003 and 2004 to study heavy metal pollution. Metal concentrations were determined in water, soil, and oyster tissues from fresh and detoxified Crassostrea virginica, and histology samples were analyzed. Metal (Cr, Cd, and Pb concentrations in water were within the Mexican legal limits. The recorded values in sediments corresponded to those not producing biological effects (ERL. In the tissues, the highest concentrations corresponded to Pb, above 5.84 μgg-1 dry weight (d.w.; Cd was of 2.23 μgg-1 d.w., and Cr above 6 μgg-1 d.w. The metal levels detected in oysters exceeded the maximum permissible limits (MPL for Cd and Pb, and oysters were unable to eliminate the concentrations of the bioaccumulated metals during the detoxification stage. The histopathological analysis revealed lesions in the digestive gland, edema, atrophy of epithelia in the digestive tubules, the presence of brown vesicles, hemocytic reaction, and necrosis. During detoxification, a higher number of epithelia were observed in the tubules, as well as an increase in brown vesicles and hemocytic reaction. Forty seven percent of oysters presented histopathological lesions related to metal concentrations. It is important to monitor metal concentrations, to detect the source of pollution, andto evaluate the effects on organisms to establish culture areas and adequate criteria for the exploitation of such an important fishery resource. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (4: 955-962. Epub 2009 December 01.

  15. Isolation of vibrio spp. In oysters (crassostrea rhizophorea) caught in the ‘de la virgen’ swamp

    OpenAIRE

    López Gutiérrez, Lercy; Autor; Manjarrez Pava, Ganiveth; Autor; Herrera Rodríguez, Lilibeth; Autor; Montes Payares, Ana Elena; Autor; Olascuaga Ruíz, Yuranis Paola; Autor; Ortega Quiroz, Rolando José; Autor

    2015-01-01

    Objective:  To establish contamination by Vibrio in oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) caught in De La Virgen Swamp, in order to alert entities in charge or protecting consumer health in Cartagena city. Methods: Between February and April 2006, 67 oysters from 5 strategic sites along De La Virgen Swamp, were analyzed. Insulation and identification of Vibrio was performed through a culture and biochemical tests.Results.  Predominant species were V. alginolyticus (23%),V fluvialis  (20%),V. para...

  16. High pressure treatment changes spoilage characteristics and shelf life of Pacific oysters ( Crassostrea gigas) during refrigerated storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rong; Zhao, Ling; Liu, Qi

    2017-04-01

    The effects of high pressure (HP) treatment on spoilage characteristic and shelf life extension of Pacific oysters ( Crassostrea gigas) during refrigerated storage were studied. Results showed that HP treatment of 275 MPa for 3 min or 300 MPa for 2 min could achieve 100% full release of oyster adductor muscle, pressures higher than 350 MPa caused excessive release as the shells of oysters were broken, thus use of higher pressures should be cautious in oyster processing industry because of its adverse impact on the appearance of shells. HP treatment (300 MPa, 2 min) was proper for the shucking of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) in China. This treatment caused no organoleptic disadvantage. Moreover, HP treatment resulted in obvious differences in biochemical spoilage indicators (pH, TVB-N and TBARS) changes and volatile compounds profile determined by electronic nose during storage. HP treatment (300 MPa, 2 min) also led to a reduction of aerobic bacterial count (APC) by 1.27 log cycles. Furthermore, the APC values of oysters treated by HP were always lower than those of the control samples during storage. Based on the organoleptic, biochemical and microbiological indicators, shelf life of 6-8 d for control and 12 d for HP-treated oysters could be expected. HP treatment showed great potential in oyster processing and preservation.

  17. Uniquely high turnover of nickel in contaminated oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis: Biokinetics and subcellular distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qijun; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2018-01-01

    Despite the environmental concerns regarding nickel (Ni) especially in China, it has received little attention in aquatic animals due to its comparatively weak toxicity. In the present study, we explored the bioaccumulation, biokinetics, and subcellular distribution of Ni in an estuarine oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis. We demonstrated that Ni represented a new pattern of bioaccumulation in oysters characterized by rapid elimination and low dissolved uptake. The waterborne uptake rate constant and dietary assimilation efficiency were 0.036L/g/h and 28%, respectively, and dissolved uptake was the predominant exposure route. The efflux rate constant was positively related to tissue Ni concentration, with the highest efflux of 0.155d -1 . Such high elimination resulted in a high Ni turnover and steady-state condition reached rapidly, as shown with a 4-week waterborne exposure experiment at different Ni concentrations. Ni in oysters was mainly sequestered in metallothionein-like protein (MTLP), metal-rich granule, and cellular debris. MTLP was the most important binding fraction during accumulation and depuration, and played a dynamic role leading to rapid Ni elimination. Pre-exposure to Ni significantly reduced the dissolved uptake, probably accompanied by depressed filtration activity. Overall, the high turnover and regulation of Ni in oysters were achieved by enhanced efflux, suppressed uptake, and sequestration of most Ni into the detoxified pool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. How annual course of photoperiod shapes seasonal behavior of diploid and triploid oysters, Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Laura; Sow, Mohamedou; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Ciret, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we study if ploidy (i.e. number of copies of chromosomes) in the oyster Crassostrea gigas may introduce differences in behavior and in its synchronization by the annual photoperiod. To answer to the question about the effect of the seasonal course of the photoperiod on the behavior of C. gigas according to its ploidy, we quantified valve activity by HFNI valvometry in situ for 1 year in both diploid and triploid oysters. Chronobiological analyses of daily, tidal and lunar rhythms were performed according the annual change of the photoperiod. In parallel, growth and gametogenesis status were measured and spawning events were detected by valvometry. The results showed that triploids had reduced gametogenesis, without spawning events, and approximately three times more growth than diploids. These differences in physiological efforts could explain the result that photoperiod (daylength and/or direction of daylength) differentially drives and modulates seasonal behavior of diploid and triploid oysters. Most differences were observed during long days (spring and summer), where triploids showed longer valve opening duration but lower opening amplitude, stronger daily rhythm and weaker tidal rhythm. During this period, diploids did major gametogenesis and spawning whereas triploids did maximal growth. Differences were also observed in terms of moonlight rhythmicity and neap-spring tidal cycle rhythmicity. We suggest that the seasonal change of photoperiod differentially synchronizes oyster behavior and biological rhythms according to physiological needs based on ploidy. PMID:29020114

  19. Radiosensitivity of Salmonella spp and Vibrio parahaemolyticus artificially incorporated by oysters (Crassostrea brasiliana)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakabi, Miyoko

    2001-01-01

    Irradiation is considered one of the most efficient technological process to reduce the number of microorganisms in food. It can be used to improve the safety of food products as well as their shelf life. Oysters are considered one of the most important vehicle of pathogenic bacteria due to their feeding characteristic and because they are usually ingested raw. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of gamma radiation process on high levels of Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Infantis and Vibrio parahaemolyticus incorporated by oysters (Crassostrea brasiliana) as well as on the survival of the animals and sensory attributes. The oysters were submitted to gamma radiation treatment ( 60 Co) with doses ranging from 0.5 kGy to 3.0 kGy. At least four trials were conducted for each serotype. The dose of 3.0 kGy was, generally, sufficient to reduce the level of Salmonella serotypes in 6 log while for V.parahaemolyticus the dose as 1.o kGy. Animals were not killed and sensory attributes were not changed by the highest irradiation dose. Therefore, 3.0 kGy is a dose that is effective on the inactivation of Salmonella spp and V.parahaemolyticus in oysters without changing their odour, flavour and appearance. (author)

  20. Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to native bivalve hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedknegt, M.A.; Schuster, A.-K.; Buschbaum, C.; Gergs, R.; Jung, A.S.; Luttikhuizen, P.C.; van der Meer, J.; Troost, K.; Wegner, K.M.; Thieltges, D.W.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts) and

  1. Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to native bivalve hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedknegt, M.A.; Schuster, Anne Karin; Buschbaum, Christian; Gergs, René; Jung, A.S.; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Meer, van der Jaap; Troost, Karin; Wegner, K.M.; Thieltges, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts)

  2. RAPID TETRAZOLIUM DYE REDUCTION ASSAY TO ASSESS THE BACTERICIDAL ACTIVITY OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTES AGAINST VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    An assay was developed to assess the ability of oyster, Crassostrea virginica, hemocytes to kill the human pathogenic bacterium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus (ATCC 17802). Bacterial killing was estimated colorimetrically by the enzymatic reduction of a tetrazolium dye, 3-(4,5-dimethyl...

  3. DNA methylation patterns provide insight into epigenetic regulation in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavery Mackenzie R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism with important regulatory functions in animals. While the mechanism itself is evolutionarily ancient, the distribution and function of DNA methylation is diverse both within and among phylogenetic groups. Although DNA methylation has been well studied in mammals, there are limited data on invertebrates, particularly molluscs. Here we characterize the distribution and investigate potential functions of DNA methylation in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas. Results Methylation sensitive PCR and bisulfite sequencing PCR approaches were used to identify CpG methylation in C. gigas genes and demonstrated that this species possesses intragenic methylation. In silico analysis of CpGo/e ratios in publicly available sequence data suggests that DNA methylation is a common feature of the C. gigas genome, and that specific functional categories of genes have significantly different levels of methylation. Conclusions The Pacific oyster genome displays intragenic DNA methylation and contains genes necessary for DNA methylation in animals. Results of this investigation suggest that DNA methylation has regulatory functions in Crassostrea gigas, particularly in gene families that have inducible expression, including those involved in stress and environmental responses.

  4. Detection of Perkinsus marinus in the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae in southern Bahia by proteomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Ramos Pinto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the presence of the pathogen Perkinsus marinus, notifiable to the World Organization for Animal Health (Office International des Èpizooties = OIE in the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae in southern Bahia via proteomic analysis. We analyzed Crassostrea brasiliana from a long-line cultivation system and C. rhizophorae from an adjacent mangrove in Porto do Campo, Camamu Bay, Bahia, Brazil. The collections (n = 100 were performed in October 2012. In the laboratory, the oysters were measured and opened to remove the meat, which was steeped in dry ice. For extraction of proteins, adaptation of a protocol used for mussels was used, after which separation in the first dimension was taken by isoelectric focusing (IEF. The peptides were transferred to a Mass Spectrometer. The obtained spectra were analyzed with the ProteinLynx Global Server 4.2 software tool and also by MASCOT (Matrix Science and compared to the databases of the SWISSPROT and NCBI, respectively. The identification was evidenced by beta-tubulin, Perkinsus marinus ATCC 50983 and protein homology code in the database NCBI = gi | 294889481. This is the first record of P. marinus in Bahia and the fourth in Brazil.

  5. Crassostrea gigas OYSTERS SMOKING: THE HOT AND WITH LIQUID SMOKE DEFUMAÇÃO DE OSTRAS Crassostrea gigas: A QUENTE E COM FUMAÇA LÍQUIDA

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Luiza de Rodrigues de Souza; Maurício Gustavo Coelho Emerenciano; Nilson do Prado Franco

    2007-01-01

    The present study had as objective evaluates two techniques of traditional smoking the hot and with use of the liquid smoke, tends as control the Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas cooked. They were appraised the sensorial characteristics and revenue of the processing. The animals were distributed in three treatments and the experimental design was completely randomized, with nine repetitions. For the sensorial analysis 30 fitting room were used, where each one was considered a block. There wa...

  6. Transcriptomic responses to salinity stress in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelin Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low salinity is one of the main factors limiting the distribution and survival of marine species. As a euryhaline species, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is considered to be tolerant to relative low salinity. The genes that regulate C. gigas responses to osmotic stress were monitored using the next-generation sequencing of whole transcriptome with samples taken from gills. By RNAseq technology, transcript catalogs of up- and down-regulated genes were generated from the oysters exposed to low and optimal salinity seawater. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Through Illumina sequencing, we reported 1665 up-regulated transcripts and 1815 down-regulated transcripts. A total of 45771 protein-coding contigs were identified from two groups based on sequence similarities with known proteins. As determined by GO annotation and KEGG pathway mapping, functional annotation of the genes recovered diverse biological functions and processes. The genes that changed expression significantly were highly represented in cellular process and regulation of biological process, intracellular and cell, binding and protein binding according to GO annotation. The results highlighted genes related to osmoregulation, signaling and interactions of osmotic stress response, anti-apoptotic reactions as well as immune response, cell adhesion and communication, cytoskeleton and cell cycle. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Through more than 1.5 million sequence reads and the expression data of the two libraries, the study provided some useful insights into signal transduction pathways in oysters and offered a number of candidate genes as potential markers of tolerance to hypoosmotic stress for oysters. In addition, the characterization of C. gigas transcriptome will not only provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms about the response to osmotic stress of the oysters, but also facilitate research into biological processes to find underlying physiological

  7. Transcriptional changes in Crassostrea gigas oyster spat following a parental exposure to the herbicide diuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondon, R; Akcha, F; Alonso, P; Menard, D; Rouxel, J; Montagnani, C; Mitta, G; Cosseau, C; Grunau, C

    2016-06-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is the main oyster species produced in the world, and a key coastal economic resource in France. High mortalities affect Pacific oysters since 2008 in France and Europe. Their origins have been attributed to a combination of biotic and abiotic factors, underlining the importance of environment quality. The impact of water pollution has been pointed out and one of the pollutants, the genotoxic herbicide diuron, occurs at high concentrations all along the French coasts. Previous work has revealed that a parental exposure to diuron had a strong impact on hatching rates and offspring development even if spats were not exposed to diuron themselves. In this study, we explored for the first time the transcriptional changes occurring in oyster spats (non exposed) originating from genitors exposed to an environmentally relevant concentration of diuron during gametogenesis using the RNAseq methodology. We identified a transcriptomic remodeling revealing an effect of the herbicide. Different molecular pathways involved in energy production, translation and cell proliferation are particularly disturbed. This analysis revealed modulated candidate genes putatively involved in response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in offspring of genitors exposed to diuron. Complementary measures of the activity of enzymes involved in these latter processes corroborate the results obtained at the transcriptomic level. In addition, our results suggested an increase in energy production and mitotic activity in 5-month-spats from diuron-exposed genitors. These results could correspond to a "catch-up growth" phenomenon allowing the spats from diuron-exposed genitors, which displayed a growth delay at 3 months, to gain a normal size when they reach the age of 6 months. These results indicate that exposure to a concentration of diuron that is frequently encountered in the field during the oyster's gametogenesis stage can impact the next generation

  8. Parental diuron-exposure alters offspring transcriptome and fitness in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachère, Evelyne; Barranger, Audrey; Bruno, Roman; Rouxel, Julien; Menard, Dominique; Piquemal, David; Akcha, Farida

    2017-08-01

    One of the primary challenges in ecotoxicology is to contribute to the assessment of the ecological status of ecosystems. In this study, we used Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to explore the effects of a parental exposure to diuron, a herbicide frequently detected in marine coastal environments. The present toxicogenomic study provides evidence that exposure of oyster genitors to diuron during gametogenesis results in changes in offspring, namely, transcriptomic profile alterations, increased global DNA methylation levels and reduced growth and survival within the first year of life. Importantly, we highlighted the limitations to identify particular genes or gene expression signatures that could serve as biomarkers for parental herbicide-exposure and further for multigenerational and transgenerational effects of specific chemical stressors. By analyzing samples from two independent experiments, we demonstrated that, due to complex confounding effects with both tested solvent vehicles, diuron non-specifically affected the offspring transcriptome. These original results question the potential development of predictive genomic tools for detecting specific indirect impacts of contaminants in environmental risk assessments. However, our results indicate that chronic environmental exposure to diuron over several generations may have significant long term impacts on oyster populations with adverse health outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggestive of functionally relevant promoter DNA methylation in invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is evolutionarily conserved. Vertebrates exhibit high, widespread DNA methylation whereas invertebrate genomes are less methylated, predominantly within gene bodies. DNA methylation in invertebrates is associated with transcription level, alternative splicing, and genome evolution, but functional outcomes of DNA methylation remain poorly described in lophotrochozoans. Recent genome-wide approaches improve understanding in distant taxa such as molluscs, where the phylogenetic position, and life traits of Crassostrea gigas make this bivalve an ideal model to study the physiological and evolutionary implications of DNA methylation. We review the literature about DNA methylation in invertebrates and focus on DNA methylation features in the oyster. Indeed, though our MeDIP-seq results confirm predominant intragenic methylation, the profiles depend on the oyster's developmental and reproductive stage. We discuss the perspective that oyster DNA methylation could be biased toward the 5′-end of some genes, depending on physiological status, suggesting important functional outcomes of putative promoter methylation from cell differentiation during early development to sustained adaptation of the species to the environment. PMID:24778620

  10. Integrated application of transcriptomics and metabolomics provides insights into glycogen content regulation in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Busu; Song, Kai; Meng, Jie; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2017-09-11

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important marine fishery resource, which contains high levels of glycogen that contributes to the flavor and the quality of the oyster. However, little is known about the molecular and chemical mechanisms underlying glycogen content differences in Pacific oysters. Using a homogeneous cultured Pacific oyster family, we explored these regulatory networks at the level of the metabolome and the transcriptome. Oysters with the highest and lowest natural glycogen content were selected for differential transcriptome and metabolome analysis. We identified 1888 differentially-expressed genes, seventy-five differentially-abundant metabolites, which are part of twenty-seven signaling pathways that were enriched using an integrated analysis of the interaction between the differentially-expressed genes and the differentially-abundant metabolites. Based on these results, we found that a high expression of carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2), indicative of increased fatty acid degradation, is associated with a lower glycogen content. Together, a high level of expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and high levels of glucogenic amino acids likely underlie the increased glycogen production in high-glycogen oysters. In addition, the higher levels of the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase (HK) and pyruvate kinase (PK), as well as of the TCA cycle enzymes malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), imply that there is a concomitant up-regulation of energy metabolism in high-glycogen oysters. High-glycogen oysters also appeared to have an increased ability to cope with stress, since the levels of the antioxidant glutathione peroxidase enzyme 5 (GPX5) gene were also increased. Our results suggest that amino acids and free fatty acids are closely related to glycogen content in oysters. In addition, oysters with a high glycogen content have a greater energy production capacity and a greater ability to cope with

  11. Candidate Gene Polymorphisms and their Association with Glycogen Content in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zhicai; Li, Li; Qi, Haigang; Song, Kai; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important cultivated shellfish that is rich in nutrients. It contains high levels of glycogen, which is of high nutritional value. To investigate the genetic basis of this high glycogen content and its variation, we conducted a candidate gene association analysis using a wild population, and confirmed our results using an independent population, via targeted gene resequencing and mRNA expression analysis. Results We validated 295 SNPs in the 90 candidate genes surveyed for association with glycogen content, 86 of were ultimately genotyped in all 144 experimental individuals from Jiaonan (JN). In addition, 732 SNPs were genotyped via targeted gene resequencing. Two SNPs (Cg_SNP_TY202 and Cg_SNP_3021) in Cg_GD1 (glycogen debranching enzyme) and one SNP (Cg_SNP_4) in Cg_GP1 (glycogen phosphorylase) were identified as being associated with glycogen content. The glycogen content of individuals with genotypes TT and TC in Cg_SNP_TY202 was higher than that of individuals with genotype CC. The transcript abundance of both glycogen-associated genes was differentially expressed in high glycogen content and low glycogen content individuals. Conclusions This study identified three polymorphisms in two genes associated with oyster glycogen content, via candidate gene association analysis. The transcript abundance differences in Cg_GD1 and Cg_GP1 between low- and the high-glycogen content individuals suggests that it is possible that transcript regulation is mediated by variations of Cg_SNP_TY202, Cg_SNP_3021, and Cg_SNP_4. These findings will not only provide insights into the genetic basis of oyster quality, but also promote research into the molecular breeding of oysters. PMID:25951187

  12. Reactive oxygen species in unstimulated hemocytes of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: a mitochondrial involvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Donaghy

    Full Text Available The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is a sessile bivalve mollusc whose homeostasis relies, at least partially, upon cells circulating in hemolymph and referred to as hemocytes. Oyster's hemocytes have been reported to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, even in absence of stimulation. Although ROS production in bivalve molluscs is mostly studied for its defence involvement, ROS may also be involved in cellular and tissue homeostasis. ROS sources have not yet been described in oyster hemocytes. The objective of the present work was to characterize the ROS sources in unstimulated hemocytes. We studied the effects of chemical inhibitors on the ROS production and the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m of hemocytes. First, this work confirmed the specificity of JC-10 probe to measure Δψ(m in oyster hemocytes, without being affected by ΔpH, as reported in mammalian cells. Second, results show that ROS production in unstimulated hemocytes does not originate from cytoplasmic NADPH-oxidase, nitric oxide synthase or myeloperoxidase, but from mitochondria. In contrast to mammalian cells, incubation of hemocytes with rotenone (complex I inhibitor had no effect on ROS production. Incubation with antimycin A (complex III inhibitor resulted in a dose-dependent ROS production decrease while an over-production is usually reported in vertebrates. In hemocytes of C. gigas, the production of ROS seems similarly dependent on both Δψ(m and ΔpH. These findings point out differences between mammalian models and bivalve cells, which warrant further investigation about the fine characterization of the electron transfer chain and the respective involvement of mitochondrial complexes in ROS production in hemocytes of bivalve molluscs.

  13. Radiation resistances and decontamination of common pathogenic bacteria contaminated in white scar oyster (Crassostrea belcheri) in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thupila, Nunticha; Ratana-arporn, Pattama; Wilaipun, Pongtep

    2011-01-01

    In Thailand, white scar oyster (Crassostrea belcheri) was ranked for premium quality, being most expensive and of high demand. This oyster is often eaten raw, hence it may pose health hazards to consumers when contaminated with food-borne pathogens. As limited alternative methods are available to sterilize the oyster while preserving the raw characteristic, irradiation may be considered as an effective method for decontamination. In this study, the radiation resistance of pathogenic bacteria commonly contaminating the oyster and the optimum irradiation doses for sterilization of the most radiation resistant bacteria were investigated. The radiation decimal reduction doses (D 10 ) of Salmonella Weltevreden DMST 33380, Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802 and Vibrio vulnificus DMST 5852 were determined in broth culture and inoculated oyster homogenate. The D 10 values of S. Weltevreden, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in broth culture were 0.154, 0.132 and 0.059 kGy, while those of inoculated oyster homogenate were 0.330, 0.159 and 0.140 kGy, respectively. It was found that among the pathogens tested, S. Weltevreden was proved to be the most resistant species. An irradiation dose of 1.5 kGy reduced the counts of 10 5 CFU/g S. Weltevreden inoculated in oyster meat to an undetectable level. The present study indicated that a low-dose irradiation can improve the microbial quality of oyster and further reduce the risks from the food-borne pathogens without adversely affecting the sensory attributes.

  14. Radiation resistances and decontamination of common pathogenic bacteria contaminated in white scar oyster ( Crassostrea belcheri) in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thupila, Nunticha; Ratana-arporn, Pattama; Wilaipun, Pongtep

    2011-07-01

    In Thailand, white scar oyster ( Crassostrea belcheri) was ranked for premium quality, being most expensive and of high demand. This oyster is often eaten raw, hence it may pose health hazards to consumers when contaminated with food-borne pathogens. As limited alternative methods are available to sterilize the oyster while preserving the raw characteristic, irradiation may be considered as an effective method for decontamination. In this study, the radiation resistance of pathogenic bacteria commonly contaminating the oyster and the optimum irradiation doses for sterilization of the most radiation resistant bacteria were investigated. The radiation decimal reduction doses ( D10) of Salmonella Weltevreden DMST 33380, Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802 and Vibrio vulnificus DMST 5852 were determined in broth culture and inoculated oyster homogenate. The D10 values of S. Weltevreden, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in broth culture were 0.154, 0.132 and 0.059 kGy, while those of inoculated oyster homogenate were 0.330, 0.159 and 0.140 kGy, respectively. It was found that among the pathogens tested, S. Weltevreden was proved to be the most resistant species. An irradiation dose of 1.5 kGy reduced the counts of 10 5 CFU/g S. Weltevreden inoculated in oyster meat to an undetectable level. The present study indicated that a low-dose irradiation can improve the microbial quality of oyster and further reduce the risks from the food-borne pathogens without adversely affecting the sensory attributes.

  15. Causes and effects of a highly successful marine invasion: Case-study of the introduced Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in continental NW European estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, K.

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1960's, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has been introduced for mariculture at several locations within NW Europe. The oyster established itself everywhere and expanded rapidly throughout the receiving ecosystems, forming extensive and dense reef structures. It became clear that the

  16. Causes and effects of a highly successful marine invasion : Case-study of the introduced Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in continental NW European estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1960's, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has been introduced for mariculture at several locations within NW Europe. The oyster established itself everywhere and expanded rapidly throughout the receiving ecosystems, forming extensive and dense reef structures. It became clear that the

  17. Antioxidant responses in gills and digestive gland of oyster Crassostrea madrasensis (Preston) under lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenai-Tirodkar, Prachi S; Gauns, Mangesh U; Mujawar, Mohammad Wassim A; Ansari, Zakir A

    2017-08-01

    Crassostrea are ecologically and economically important bivalves and provide a good livelihood for coastal regions of many countries, including India. This study aims at evaluating the response of the antioxidant defense system in oyster Crassostrea madrasensis against lead (Pb) exposure under laboratory conditions. Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione-s-transferase (GST) and oxidative damage parameter lipid peroxidation (LPO) were measured in the gills and digestive glands of oysters exposed to 1-50µg/l of Pb (NO 3 ) 2 over a period of 8 days. LPO index increased progressively with increase in Pb concentration (1, 10, 25 and 50µg/l) in both tissues, gills and digestive gland. Although CAT and SOD activities induced together in the initial phase (upto 6th day), their activities decreased at a later stage of the experiment. However, GST activity increased on 8th day in both the tissues at concentration 10, 25 and 50µg/l indicates the compensatory defense mechanism against oxidative stress. The induced antioxidant responses recorded at 25 and 50µg/l of Pb concentrations suggest the presence of Pb-induced oxidative stress at these concentrations. The results of this work also indicate that LPO, SOD, and GST could be used as biomarkers to assess the impact of Pb on the C. madrasensis. This study concludes that any high level of dissolved Pb concentration (>10µg/l) in surrounding seawater could be harmful to the physiology of the C. madrasensis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sex Ratio and Sex Reversal in Two-year-old Class of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Bivalvia: Ostreidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Jun; Kim, Hyejin; Kang, Seung Wan; An, Cheul Min; Lee, Sung-Ho; Gye, Myung Chan; Lee, Jung Sick

    2012-01-01

    The sex ratio (F:M) in the same population of oyster, Crassostrea gigas at the commencement of the study (2007) was 1:1.0, but changed to 1:2.8 by the end of the study (2008). The sex reversal rate in two-year-old oysters was 40.2%. Specifically, female to male sex reversal rate was 66.1%, which is higher than the male to female sex reversal rate of 21.1%. The sex reversal pattern of C. gigas appears to go from male?female?male, and as such is determined to be rhythmical hermaphroditism.

  19. Sex Ratio and Sex Reversal in Two-year-old Class of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Jun; Kim, Hyejin; Kang, Seung Wan; An, Cheul Min; Lee, Sung-Ho; Gye, Myung Chan; Lee, Jung Sick

    2012-12-01

    The sex ratio (F:M) in the same population of oyster, Crassostrea gigas at the commencement of the study (2007) was 1:1.0, but changed to 1:2.8 by the end of the study (2008). The sex reversal rate in two-year-old oysters was 40.2%. Specifically, female to male sex reversal rate was 66.1%, which is higher than the male to female sex reversal rate of 21.1%. The sex reversal pattern of C. gigas appears to go from male⇒female⇒male, and as such is determined to be rhythmical hermaphroditism.

  20. Effect of age and environment on the summer mortality in cupped oyster Crassostrea gigas during the first two years

    OpenAIRE

    Degremont, Lionel; Boudry, Pierre; Soletchnik, Patrick; Bedier, Edouard; Ropert, Michel; Samain, Jean-francois

    2005-01-01

    Three successive generations were produced between 2001 and 2003 to assess to what extent genetic variability exists for this trait in juvenile oysters Crassostrea gigas. For each generation, two groups were selected for their high ("R" for resistant) and low ("S" for susceptible) survival. Significant differences of mortality were observed during the first year in Rivière d'Auray (RA) (Brittany-France). However, low and similar mortality were observed for both groups, with no significant ...

  1. Effects of age and environment on the summer mortality in cupped oyster Crassostrea gigas during the first two years

    OpenAIRE

    Degremont, Lionel; Boudry, Pierre; Soletchnik, Patrick; Bedier, Edouard; Ropert, Michel; Samain, Jean-francois

    2005-01-01

    Three successive generations were produced between 2001 and 2003 to assess to what extent genetic variability exists for survival in juvenile oysters Crassostrea gigas. For each generation, two groups were selected for their high ("R" for resistant) and low ("S" for susceptible) survival. Significant differences in mortality were observed during the first year in Riviere d'Auray (RA) (Brittany-France). However, low and similar mortality were observed for both groups, with no significant diffe...

  2. Identification and Functional Characterization of the Glycogen Synthesis Related Gene Glycogenin in Pacific Oysters (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Busu; Meng, Jie; Li, Li; Liu, Sheng; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Guofan

    2017-09-06

    High glycogen levels in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) contribute to its flavor, quality, and hardiness. Glycogenin (CgGN) is the priming glucosyltransferase that initiates glycogen biosynthesis. We characterized the full sequence and function of C. gigas CgGN. Three CgGN isoforms (CgGN-α, β, and γ) containing alternative exon regions were isolated. CgGN expression varied seasonally in the adductor muscle and gonadal area and was the highest in the adductor muscle. Autoglycosylation of CgGN can interact with glycogen synthase (CgGS) to complete glycogen synthesis. Subcellular localization analysis showed that CgGN isoforms and CgGS were located in the cytoplasm. Additionally, a site-directed mutagenesis experiment revealed that the Tyr200Phe and Tyr202Phe mutations could affect CgGN autoglycosylation. This is the first study of glycogenin function in marine bivalves. These findings will improve our understanding of glycogen synthesis and accumulation mechanisms in mollusks. The data are potentially useful for breeding high-glycogen oysters.

  3. Long-lasting antiviral innate immune priming in the Lophotrochozoan Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafont, Maxime; Petton, Bruno; Vergnes, Agnès; Pauletto, Marianna; Segarra, Amélie; Gourbal, Benjamin; Montagnani, Caroline

    2017-10-13

    In the last decade, a paradigm shift has emerged in comparative immunology. Invertebrates can no longer be considered to be devoid of specific recognition and immune memory. However, we still lack a comprehensive view of these phenomena and their molecular mechanisms across phyla, especially in terms of duration, specificity, and efficiency in a natural context. In this study, we focused on a Lophotrochozoan/virus interaction, as antiviral priming is mostly overlooked in molluscs. Juvenile Crassostrea gigas oysters experience reoccurring mass mortalities events from Ostreid herpes virus 1 with no existing therapeutic treatment. Our results showed that various nucleic acid injections can prime oysters to trigger an antiviral state ultimately protecting them against a subsequent viral infection. Focusing on poly(I:C) as elicitor, we evidenced that it protected from an environmental infection, by mitigating viral replication. That protection seemed to induce a specific antiviral response as poly(I:C) fails to protect against a pathogenic bacteria. Finally, we showed that this phenomenon was long-lasting, persisting for at least 5 months thus suggesting for the first time the existence of innate immune memory in this invertebrate species. This study strengthens the emerging hypotheses about the broad conservation of innate immune priming and memory mechanisms in Lophotrochozoans.

  4. Epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggestive of functionally relevant promoter DNA methylation in invertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume eRiviere

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is evolutionarily conserved. Vertebrates exhibit high, widespread DNA methylation whereas invertebrate genomes are less methylated, predominantly within gene bodies. DNA methylation in invertebrates is associated with transcription level, alternative splicing and genome evolution, but functional outcomes of DNA methylation remain poorly described in lophotrochozoans. Recent genome-wide approaches improve understanding in distant taxa such as molluscs, where the phylogenetic position and life traits of Crassostrea gigas make this bivalve an ideal model to study the physiological and evolutionary implications of DNA methylation. We review the literature about DNA methylation in invertebrates and focus on DNA methylation features in the oyster. Indeed, though our MeDIP-seq results confirm predominant intragenic methylation, the profiles depend on the oyster’s developmental and reproductive stage. We discuss the perspective that oyster DNA methylation could be biased toward the 5’-end of some genes, depending on physiological status, suggesting important functional outcomes of putative promoter methylation from cell differentiation during early development to sustained adaptation of the species to the environment.

  5. Metals concentrations in sediments and oyster Crassostrea gigas from La Pitahaya lagoon, Sinaloa, NW Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna Varela, R.; Muñoz Sevilla, N.; Campos Villegas, L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, P.; Gongora Gomez, A.; MP, J.

    2013-05-01

    This present study was performed in a culture of Crassostrea gigas in La Pitahaya, Sinaloa, México. The main objective is to identify the enrichment pattern of trace elements (Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, Hg, As, V) also was determine concentrations thereof in oyster. Four sampling sites were selected, two smaller channels which connect the lagoon directly , the region of culture and connection with the sea ; and each sampling consisted of 4 sample sediments and 50 oysters of commercial size per mounth . Concentrations of trace metals were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The higher concentration of elements in certain samples clearly suggests that they are directly fed by the smaller channels which connect the lagoon directly. These small channels often carry the contaminants which are absorbed and deposited in the sediments. The results were also compared with the Effect Range Low (ERL) and Effect Range Medium (ERM) of NOAA and it indicates that Ni is above the ERL values. Cadmium, lead, chrome and copper concentrations exceeded the limits permissible of bivalbe mollusks established by the sanitary regulations

  6. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-Xia; Yu, Wen-Chao; Cai, Zhong-Qiang; He, Cheng; Wei, Na; Wang, Xiao-Tong; Yue, Xi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The shell of the pearl oyster ( Pinctada fucata ) mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas ) is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM) is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM) and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization.

  7. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Xia Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization.

  8. Transcriptional changes in Crassostrea gigas oyster spat following a parental exposure to the herbicide diuron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rondon, R.; Akcha, F.; Alonso, P.; Menard, D.; Rouxel, J.; Montagnani, C.; Mitta, G.; Cosseau, C.; Grunau, C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Remodeling of the transcriptome of the offspring of oysters exposed to diuron (838 gene which expression is modulated). • Functions related to cytoskeleton organization, translation, ATP synthesis were activated. • Functions linked to transcription and protein degradation were altered. • Up-regulation of genes involved in energy production, protein synthesis and mitosis. • Catch-up growth phenomenon could allow the spats to compensate for slower growth. - Abstract: The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is the main oyster species produced in the world, and a key coastal economic resource in France. High mortalities affect Pacific oysters since 2008 in France and Europe. Their origins have been attributed to a combination of biotic and abiotic factors, underlining the importance of environment quality. The impact of water pollution has been pointed out and one of the pollutants, the genotoxic herbicide diuron, occurs at high concentrations all along the French coasts. Previous work has revealed that a parental exposure to diuron had a strong impact on hatching rates and offspring development even if spats were not exposed to diuron themselves. In this study, we explored for the first time the transcriptional changes occurring in oyster spats (non exposed) originating from genitors exposed to an environmentally relevant concentration of diuron during gametogenesis using the RNAseq methodology. We identified a transcriptomic remodeling revealing an effect of the herbicide. Different molecular pathways involved in energy production, translation and cell proliferation are particularly disturbed. This analysis revealed modulated candidate genes putatively involved in response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in offspring of genitors exposed to diuron. Complementary measures of the activity of enzymes involved in these latter processes corroborate the results obtained at the transcriptomic level. In addition, our results suggested an

  9. Transcriptional changes in Crassostrea gigas oyster spat following a parental exposure to the herbicide diuron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondon, R. [Ifremer, IHPE UMR 5244, Univ. Perpignan Via Domitia, CNRS, Univ. Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Univ. Perpignan Via Domitia, IHPE UMR 5244, CNRS, IFREMER, Univ. Montpellier, F-66860 Perpignan (France); Akcha, F. [Ifremer, Department of Biogeochemistry and Ecotoxicology, Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Rue de l’ile d’Yeu, BP 21105, 44311 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Alonso, P. [CNRS, IHPE UMR 5244, Univ. Perpignan Via Domitia, IFREMER, Univ. Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Menard, D.; Rouxel, J. [Ifremer, Department of Biogeochemistry and Ecotoxicology, Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Rue de l’ile d’Yeu, BP 21105, 44311 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Montagnani, C., E-mail: cmontagn@ifremer.fr [Ifremer, IHPE UMR 5244, Univ. Perpignan Via Domitia, CNRS, Univ. Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Mitta, G.; Cosseau, C.; Grunau, C. [Univ. Perpignan Via Domitia, IHPE UMR 5244, CNRS, IFREMER, Univ. Montpellier, F-66860 Perpignan (France)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Remodeling of the transcriptome of the offspring of oysters exposed to diuron (838 gene which expression is modulated). • Functions related to cytoskeleton organization, translation, ATP synthesis were activated. • Functions linked to transcription and protein degradation were altered. • Up-regulation of genes involved in energy production, protein synthesis and mitosis. • Catch-up growth phenomenon could allow the spats to compensate for slower growth. - Abstract: The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is the main oyster species produced in the world, and a key coastal economic resource in France. High mortalities affect Pacific oysters since 2008 in France and Europe. Their origins have been attributed to a combination of biotic and abiotic factors, underlining the importance of environment quality. The impact of water pollution has been pointed out and one of the pollutants, the genotoxic herbicide diuron, occurs at high concentrations all along the French coasts. Previous work has revealed that a parental exposure to diuron had a strong impact on hatching rates and offspring development even if spats were not exposed to diuron themselves. In this study, we explored for the first time the transcriptional changes occurring in oyster spats (non exposed) originating from genitors exposed to an environmentally relevant concentration of diuron during gametogenesis using the RNAseq methodology. We identified a transcriptomic remodeling revealing an effect of the herbicide. Different molecular pathways involved in energy production, translation and cell proliferation are particularly disturbed. This analysis revealed modulated candidate genes putatively involved in response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in offspring of genitors exposed to diuron. Complementary measures of the activity of enzymes involved in these latter processes corroborate the results obtained at the transcriptomic level. In addition, our results suggested an

  10. Antioxidant deficit in gills of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) exposed to chlorodinitrobenzene increases menadione toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevisan, Rafael; Arl, Miriam; Sacchet, Cássia Lopes; Engel, Cristiano Severino; Danielli, Naissa Maria; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Brocardo, Caroline; Maris, Angelica Francesca; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances in antioxidant defenses decrease cellular protection against oxidative stress and jeopardize cellular homeostasis. To knock down the antioxidant defenses of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, animals were pre-treated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and further challenged with pro-oxidant menadione (MEN). CDNB pre-treatment (10 μM for 18 h) was able to consume cellular thiols in gills, decreasing GSH (53%) and decrease protein thiols (25%). CDNB pre-treatment also disrupted glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase activity in the gills, but likewise strongly induced glutathione S-transferase activity (270% increase). Surprisingly, hemocyte viability was greatly affected 24 h after CDNB removal, indicating a possible vulnerability of the oyster immune system to electrophilic attack. New in vivo approaches were established, allowing the identification of higher rates of GSH–CDNB conjugate export to the seawater and enabling the measurement of the organic peroxide consumption rate. CDNB-induced impairment in antioxidant defenses decreased the peroxide removal rate from seawater. After showing that CDNB decreased gill antioxidant defenses and increased DNA damage in hemocytes, oysters were further challenged with 1 mM MEN over 24 h. MEN treatment did not affect thiol homeostasis in gills, while CDNB pre-treated animals recovered GSH and PSH to the control level after 24 h of depuration. Interestingly, MEN intensified GSH and PSH loss and mortality in CDNB-pre-treated animals, showing a clear synergistic effect. The superoxide-generating one-electron reduction of MEN was predominant in gills and may have contributed to MEN toxicity. These results support the idea that antioxidant-depleted animals are more susceptible to oxidative attack, which can compromise survival. Data also corroborate the idea that gills are an important detoxifying organ, able to dispose of organic peroxides, induce phase II enzymes, and efficiently export GSH

  11. Antioxidant deficit in gills of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) exposed to chlorodinitrobenzene increases menadione toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevisan, Rafael; Arl, Miriam [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Sacchet, Cassia Lopes [Universidade do Oeste do Estado de Santa Catarina, 89600-000 Joacaba, SC (Brazil); Engel, Cristiano Severino; Danielli, Naissa Maria; Mello, Danielle Ferraz [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Brocardo, Caroline [Universidade do Oeste do Estado de Santa Catarina, 89600-000 Joacaba, SC (Brazil); Maris, Angelica Francesca [Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genetica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Dafre, Alcir Luiz, E-mail: alcir@ccb.ufsc.br [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-02-15

    Disturbances in antioxidant defenses decrease cellular protection against oxidative stress and jeopardize cellular homeostasis. To knock down the antioxidant defenses of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, animals were pre-treated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and further challenged with pro-oxidant menadione (MEN). CDNB pre-treatment (10 {mu}M for 18 h) was able to consume cellular thiols in gills, decreasing GSH (53%) and decrease protein thiols (25%). CDNB pre-treatment also disrupted glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase activity in the gills, but likewise strongly induced glutathione S-transferase activity (270% increase). Surprisingly, hemocyte viability was greatly affected 24 h after CDNB removal, indicating a possible vulnerability of the oyster immune system to electrophilic attack. New in vivo approaches were established, allowing the identification of higher rates of GSH-CDNB conjugate export to the seawater and enabling the measurement of the organic peroxide consumption rate. CDNB-induced impairment in antioxidant defenses decreased the peroxide removal rate from seawater. After showing that CDNB decreased gill antioxidant defenses and increased DNA damage in hemocytes, oysters were further challenged with 1 mM MEN over 24 h. MEN treatment did not affect thiol homeostasis in gills, while CDNB pre-treated animals recovered GSH and PSH to the control level after 24 h of depuration. Interestingly, MEN intensified GSH and PSH loss and mortality in CDNB-pre-treated animals, showing a clear synergistic effect. The superoxide-generating one-electron reduction of MEN was predominant in gills and may have contributed to MEN toxicity. These results support the idea that antioxidant-depleted animals are more susceptible to oxidative attack, which can compromise survival. Data also corroborate the idea that gills are an important detoxifying organ, able to dispose of organic peroxides, induce phase II enzymes, and efficiently export GSH

  12. Evolution and functional analysis of the Pif97 gene of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong WANG, Xiaorui SONG, Tong WANG, Qihui ZHU, Guoying MIAO, Yuanxin CHEN, Xiaodong FANG, Huayong QUE, Li LI, Guofan ZHANG

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mollusc shell matrix proteins (SMPs are important functional components embedded in the shell and play a role in shell formation. A SMP (Pif177 was identified previously from the nacreous layer of the Japanese pearl oyster Pinctada fucata, and its cleavage products (named pfPif97 and pfPif80 proteins were found to bind to the chitin framework and induce aragonite crystal formation and orient the c axis. In this study, a homologue of pfPif177 was cloned from the mantle of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, containing the homologue of pfPif97 only and not pfPif80. This finding hints at the large divergence in gene structure between the two species. This homologue (cgPif97 shares characteristics with pfPif97, and suggests that the biological functions of these two proteins may be similar. The expression pattern of cgPif97 in different tissues and development stages indicates that it may play an important role in shell formation of the adult oyster. The morphology of the inner shell surface was affected by injected siRNA of cgPif97 and the calcite laths of the shell became thinner and narrower when the siRNA dose increased, suggesting that the cgPif97 gene plays an important role in calcite shell formation in C. gigas. In conclusion, we found evidence that the Pif177 gene evolved very fast but still retains a similar function among species [Current Zoology 59 (1: 109–115, 2013].

  13. Crassostrea gigas OYSTERS SMOKING: THE HOT AND WITH LIQUID SMOKE DEFUMAÇÃO DE OSTRAS Crassostrea gigas: A QUENTE E COM FUMAÇA LÍQUIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza de Rodrigues de Souza

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study had as objective evaluates two techniques of traditional smoking the hot and with use of the liquid smoke, tends as control the Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas cooked. They were appraised the sensorial characteristics and revenue of the processing. The animals were distributed in three treatments and the experimental design was completely randomized, with nine repetitions. For the sensorial analysis 30 fitting room were used, where each one was considered a block. There was not significant difference among the independent of the applied technique smoky oysters (T1 = 8.42% and T2 = 7.61%, but they differed of the control (T3 = 16.25%.In agreement with the applied methodology and with the results obtained in the sensorial analysis, the smoke oysters (independent of the applied technique are products with great acceptability and increased your sensorial characteristics. KEY-WORDS: Crassostrea gigas, oysters, hot smoking, liquid smoke. valiaram-se duas técnicas de defumação – tradicional a quente e com utilização da fumaça líquida –, tendo testemunha o cozimento de ostras do Pacífico Crassostrea gigas. Para tanto, examinaram-se as características sensoriais e rendimento do processamento. Distribuíram-se animais aleatoriamente, em três tratamentos, com delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado e nove repetições. Para a análise sensorial, empregaram-se trinta provadores, considerando-se cada um deles um bloco. Não houve diferença significativa de rendimento entre as ostras defumadas, independentemente da técnica aplicada (T1 = 8,42% e T2 = 7,61%, mas elas diferiram da testemunha (T3 = 16,25%. De acordo com a metodologia aplicada e com os resultados obtidos nas análises sensoriais, as ostras defumadas (independentemente da técnica aplicada constituíram os produtos com maior aceitabilidade e houve incremento de suas características sensoriais. PALAVRAS-CHAVES: Crassostrea gigas, defumação a

  14. The Cholinergic and Adrenergic Autocrine Signaling Pathway Mediates Immunomodulation in Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoqun Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that neurotransmitters impose direct influence on regulation of the immune process. Recently, a simple but sophisticated neuroendocrine–immune (NEI system was identified in oyster, which modulated neural immune response via a “nervous-hemocyte”-mediated neuroendocrine immunomodulatory axis (NIA-like pathway. In the present study, the de novo synthesis of neurotransmitters and their immunomodulation in the hemocytes of oyster Crassostrea gigas were investigated to understand the autocrine/paracrine pathway independent of the nervous system. After hemocytes were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation, acetylcholine (ACh, and norepinephrine (NE in the cell supernatants, both increased to a significantly higher level (2.71- and 2.40-fold, p < 0.05 comparing with that in the control group. The mRNA expression levels and protein activities of choline O-acetyltransferase and dopamine β-hydroxylase in hemocytes which were involved in the synthesis of ACh and NE were significantly elevated at 1 h after LPS stimulation, while the activities of acetylcholinesterase and monoamine oxidase, two enzymes essential in the metabolic inactivation of ACh and NE, were inhibited. These results demonstrated the existence of the sophisticated intracellular machinery for the generation, release and inactivation of ACh and NE in oyster hemocytes. Moreover, the hemocyte-derived neurotransmitters could in turn regulate the mRNA expressions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF genes, the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and lysosome, and hemocyte phagocytosis. The phagocytic activities of hemocytes, the mRNA expressions of TNF and the activities of key immune-related enzymes were significantly changed after the block of ACh and NE receptors with different kinds of antagonists, suggesting that autocrine/paracrine self-regulation was mediated by transmembrane receptors on hemocyte. The present study proved that

  15. Proteomic and metabolomic responses of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to elevated pCO2 exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lei; Wang, Qing; Wu, Huifeng; Ji, Chenglong; Zhao, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    The gradually increased atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) has thrown the carbonate chemistry off balance and resulted in decreased seawater pH in marine ecosystem, termed ocean acidification (OA). Anthropogenic OA is postulated to affect the physiology of many marine calcifying organisms. However, the susceptibility and metabolic pathways of change in most calcifying animals are still far from being well understood. In this work, the effects of exposure to elevated pCO2 were characterized in gills and hepatopancreas of Crassostrea gigas using integrated proteomic and metabolomic approaches. Metabolic responses indicated that high CO2 exposure mainly caused disturbances in energy metabolism and osmotic regulation marked by differentially altered ATP, glucose, glycogen, amino acids and organic osmolytes in oysters, and the depletions of ATP in gills and the accumulations of ATP, glucose and glycogen in hepatopancreas accounted for the difference in energy distribution between these two tissues. Proteomic responses suggested that OA could not only affect energy and primary metabolisms, stress responses and calcium homeostasis in both tissues, but also influence the nucleotide metabolism in gills and cytoskeleton structure in hepatopancreas. This study demonstrated that the combination of proteomics and metabolomics could provide an insightful view into the effects of OA on oyster C. gigas. The gradually increased atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) has thrown the carbonate chemistry off balance and resulted in decreased seawater pH in marine ecosystem, termed ocean acidification (OA). Anthropogenic OA is postulated to affect the physiology of many marine calcifying organisms. However, the susceptibility and metabolic pathways of change in most calcifying animals are still far from being understood. To our knowledge, few studies have focused on the responses induced by pCO2 at both protein and metabolite levels. The pacific oyster C. gigas, widely distributed

  16. Prevalence and infection intensity of the ovarian parasite Marteilioides chungmuensis during an annual reproductive cycle of the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thao T T; Berthe, Franck C J; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2003-10-24

    The occurrence of Marteilioides chungmuensis, a protozoan paramyxean parasite in the reproductive system of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, was observed at Gosung Bay, Korea. Seasonal variation in gonad development was investigated in a suspended cultured oyster population. Gametogenesis began in February and first-spawning was observed between mid and late June when surface water temperature reached 22 to 25 degrees C. Spawning activity extended from mid June to late September, with 2 marked spawning peaks in June and August. Histological examination indicated that gonad development paralleled seasonal fluctuations in water temperature. Spawning in late June was partly associated with a sudden drop in salinity due to large freshwater inputs to the Bay with the summer monsoon. M. chungmuensis occurred in developing and fully mature eggs of spawning oysters in late June to January, but were not observed from February to May. Monthly mean infection intensity was high in late June when most oysters had their first spawning period. The infection level was also relatively high in late August and November, when oysters were spawning or had completed spawning. Several oysters collected in November (11.4%) and December (16.3%) carried a large quantity of ripe but M. chungmuensis-infected eggs, suggesting that infection also causes spawning failure by delaying spawning and destroying ripe oocytes.

  17. D1 dopamine receptor is involved in shell formation in larvae of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Yan, Yunchen; Zheng, Yan; Ge, Wenjing; Li, Meijia; Wang, Weilin; Song, Xiaorui; Song, Linsheng

    2018-07-01

    Dopamine (DA), a significant member of catecholamines, is reported to induce biomineralization of calcium carbonate vaterite microspheres via dopamine receptor (DR) in bivalves, implying the modulation of dopaminergic system on shell formation during larval development. In this research, a homologue of D1 type DR (CgD1DR-1) was identified from oyster Crassostrea gigas, whose full length cDNA was 1197 bp. It was widely expressed in various tissues of C. gigas, with the significantly higher levels in hepatopancreas, mantle, muscle and gill. During developmental stages, the mRNA transcripts of CgD1DR-1 in D-shape larvae were obviously higher (p < 0.05) than those in trochophore and umbo larvae, and CO 2 exposure could inhibit the synthesis of DA and mRNA expression of CgD1DR-1. After cell transfection and DA treatment, intracellular cAMP in cells with the expression of CgD1DR-1 increased significantly (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the incubation with SCH 23390 for the blockage of CgD1DR-1 significantly restrained the expressions of six shell formation-related genes including CgTyrosinase-1, CgTyrosinase-3, CgChitinaseLP, CgAMC, CgBMP and CgBMPR in trochophore and D-shape larvae. These results jointly suggested that DA together with its receptor CgD1DR-1 might be involved in shell formation during oyster larval development from trochophore to D-shape larvae, and CO 2 -induced ocean acidification (OA) might influence marine bivalves by inhibiting the DA-D1DR pathway to prohibit their shell formation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of cadmium on aneuploidy and hemocyte parameters in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouilly, Karine [IFREMER, Laboratoire de Genetique et Pathologie, La Tremblade 17390 (France); Gagnaire, Beatrice [IFREMER, Laboratoire de Genetique et Pathologie, La Tremblade 17390 (France); Bonnard, Marc [IFREMER, Laboratoire de Genetique et Pathologie, La Tremblade 17390 (France); Thomas-Guyon, Helene [Laboratoire de Biologie et Environnement Marins, FRE-CNRS, 2727, Universite de La Rochelle, 22 Avenue Michel Crepeau, La Rochelle 17042 (France); Renault, Tristan [IFREMER, Laboratoire de Genetique et Pathologie, La Tremblade 17390 (France); Miramand, Pierre [Laboratoire de Biologie et Environnement Marins, FRE-CNRS, 2727, Universite de La Rochelle, 22 Avenue Michel Crepeau, La Rochelle 17042 (France); Lapegue, Sylvie [IFREMER, Laboratoire de Genetique et Pathologie, La Tremblade 17390 (France)]. E-mail: slapegue@ifremer.fr

    2006-06-15

    Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, are commonly reared in estuaries where they are exposed to anthropogenic pollution. Much research has been made on the toxicity of cadmium to aquatic organisms because the compound recurrently contaminates their environment. Our study examined the influence of cadmium on aneuploidy level (lowered chromosome number in a percentage of somatic cells) and hemocyte parameters in C. gigas at different stages of life. Adults and juveniles were exposed to two different concentrations of cadmium. The first concentration applied was equivalent to a peak value found in Marennes-Oleron bay (Charente-Maritime, France; 50 ng L{sup -1}) and the second was 10 times higher (500 ng L{sup -1}). Exposure to 50 ng L{sup -1} cadmium caused a significant decrease in the survival time of C. gigas, but exposure to 500 ng L{sup -1} surprisingly affected the survival time positively. Significant differences in aneuploidy level were observed between the cadmium treatments and the control in adults but not in juveniles or the offspring of the adult groups. The effects of cadmium on hemocyte parameters were analyzed by flow cytometry. Several hemocyte parameters increased significantly after 21 days of cadmium exposure and subsequently decreased. Phenoloxidase-like activity, evaluated by spectrophotometry, varied over the time of the experiment and increased after 66 days of contact with 500 ng L{sup -1} cadmium. Taken together, cadmium at environmentally relevant concentrations seems to have only moderate effects on aneuploidy and hemocyte parameters.

  19. New insights from the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae on bivalve circulating hemocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro de Freitas Rebelo

    Full Text Available Hemocytes are the first line of defense of the immune system in invertebrates, but despite their important role and enormous potential for the study of gene-environment relationships, research has been impeded by a lack of consensus on their classification. Here we used flow cytometry combined with histological procedures, histochemical reactions and transmission electron microscopy to characterize the hemocytes from the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae. Transmission electron microscopy revealed remarkable morphological characteristics, such as the presence of membranous cisternae in all mature cells, regardless of size and granulation. Some granular cells contained many cytoplasmic granules that communicated with each other through a network of channels, a feature never previously described for hemocytes. The positive reactions for esterase and acid phosphatase also indicated the presence of mature cells of all sizes and granule contents. Flow cytometry revealed a clear separation in complexity between agranular and granular populations, which could not be differentiated by size, with cells ranging from 2.5 to 25 µm. Based on this evidence we suggest that, at least in C. rhizophorae, the different subpopulations of hemocytes may in reality be different stages of one type of cell, which accumulates granules and loses complexity (with no reduction in size as it degranulates in the event of an environmental challenge.

  20. Toxic effects of heavy metal Cu2+ on the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ceng; Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Xiumei; Tang, Xuexi

    2017-05-01

    The effects of different concentrations of heavy metal ions on the survival of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas were studied by using experimental ecology method in 96 h. The results showed that the LC50 of copper ion was 21.748mg/L and the safe concentration was 2.1748mg/L mg/L. Under the condition of laboratory, under laboratory conditions, the research of Cu2+ Stress on the C. gigas gill and digestive gland and adductor muscle tissue SOD, GPx and the induction of CAT activity. The results showed that the activities of SOD, GPx and CAT in the C. gigas were significantly changed by copper ion + stress. The results showed that in the low concentration Cu2+ treatment could induce the three kinds of enzymes, in the high concentration Cu2+ treatment group, SOD and CAT and GPx on the inhibition of the effect. The sensitivity of the three antioxidant enzymes to copper ion showed a certain difference. The sensitivity of the three kinds of tissue enzymes to Cu2+ treatment was digestive gland> fascia> gill. The experimental results show that the single factor for copper in water pollutants, the C. gigas digestive gland tissue SOD, GPX and CAT activity has certain significance to it, but will it as index applied to the actual water need further study.

  1. Effects of cadmium on aneuploidy and hemocyte parameters in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouilly, Karine; Gagnaire, Beatrice; Bonnard, Marc; Thomas-Guyon, Helene; Renault, Tristan; Miramand, Pierre; Lapegue, Sylvie

    2006-01-01

    Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, are commonly reared in estuaries where they are exposed to anthropogenic pollution. Much research has been made on the toxicity of cadmium to aquatic organisms because the compound recurrently contaminates their environment. Our study examined the influence of cadmium on aneuploidy level (lowered chromosome number in a percentage of somatic cells) and hemocyte parameters in C. gigas at different stages of life. Adults and juveniles were exposed to two different concentrations of cadmium. The first concentration applied was equivalent to a peak value found in Marennes-Oleron bay (Charente-Maritime, France; 50 ng L -1 ) and the second was 10 times higher (500 ng L -1 ). Exposure to 50 ng L -1 cadmium caused a significant decrease in the survival time of C. gigas, but exposure to 500 ng L -1 surprisingly affected the survival time positively. Significant differences in aneuploidy level were observed between the cadmium treatments and the control in adults but not in juveniles or the offspring of the adult groups. The effects of cadmium on hemocyte parameters were analyzed by flow cytometry. Several hemocyte parameters increased significantly after 21 days of cadmium exposure and subsequently decreased. Phenoloxidase-like activity, evaluated by spectrophotometry, varied over the time of the experiment and increased after 66 days of contact with 500 ng L -1 cadmium. Taken together, cadmium at environmentally relevant concentrations seems to have only moderate effects on aneuploidy and hemocyte parameters

  2. Molecular Analysis of Atypical Family 18 Chitinase from Fujian Oyster Crassostrea angulata and Its Physiological Role in the Digestive System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bingye; Zhang, Mingming; Li, Lingling; Pu, Fei; You, Weiwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    Chitinolytic enzymes have an important physiological significance in immune and digestive systems in plants and animals, but chitinase has not been identified as having a role in the digestive system in molluscan. In our study, a novel chitinase homologue, named Ca-Chit, has been cloned and characterized as the oyster Crassostrea angulate. The 3998bp full-length cDNA of Ca-Chit consisted of 23bp 5-UTR, 3288 ORF and 688bp 3-UTR. The deduced amino acids sequence shares homologue with the chitinase of family 18. The molecular weight of the protein was predicted to be 119.389 kDa, with a pI of 6.74. The Ca-Chit protein was a modular enzyme composed of a glycosyl hydrolase family 18 domain, threonine-rich region profile and a putative membrane anchor domain. Gene expression profiles monitored by quantitative RT-PCR in different adult tissues showed that the mRNA of Ca-Chit expressed markedly higher visceral mass than any other tissues. The results of the whole mount in-situ hybridization displayed that Ca-Chit starts to express the visceral mass of D-veliger larvae and then the digestive gland forms a crystalline structure during larval development. Furthermore, the adult oysters challenged by starvation indicated that the Ca-Chit expression would be regulated by feed. All the observations made suggest that Ca-Chit plays an important role in the digestive system of the oyster, Crassostrea angulate.

  3. The enkephalinergic nervous system and its immunomodulation on the developing immune system during the ontogenesis of oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Lingling; Song, Xiaorui; Chen, Hao; Wang, Weilin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Song, Linsheng

    2015-08-01

    Enkephalinergic neuroendocrine-immune regulatory system is one of the most important neuroendocrine-immune systems in both vertebrates and invertebrates for its significant role in the immune regulation. In the present study, the early onset of enkephalinergic nervous system and its immunomodulation on the developing immune system during the ontogenesis of oyster Crassostrea gigas were investigated to illustrate the function of neural regulation on the innate immune system in oyster larvae. [Met(5)]-enkephalin (Met-ENK) was firstly observed on the marginal of the dorsal half of D-hinged larvae. Six immune-related molecules, including four PRRs (CgCTL-1, CgCTL-2, CgCTL-4, CgNatterin-3) and two immune effectors (CgTNF-1 and CgEcSOD) were detected in the early developmental stages of trochophore, D-hinged and umbo larvae of oyster. After incubated with [Met(5)]-enkephalin, the mRNA expression level of all the PRRs changed significantly (p immune effectors were up-regulated significantly at 3 h and 6 h in trochophore larvae (p system of oyster was firstly appeared in D-hinged larvae, while the primitive immune defense system existed in the region of prototroch in trochophore larvae and developed maturely after D-hinged larvae. The developing immune system could be regulated by the neurotransmitter [Met(5)]-enkephalin released by the neuroendocrine system in oyster C. gigas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High polymorphism in big defensin gene expression reveals presence-absence gene variability (PAV) in the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rafael D; Alonso, Pascal; Santini, Adrien; Vergnes, Agnès; Bachère, Evelyne

    2015-04-01

    We report here the first evidence in an invertebrate, the oyster Crassostrea gigas, of a phenomenon of Presence-Absence Variation (PAV) affecting immune-related genes. We previously evidenced an extraordinary interindividual variability in the basal mRNA abundances of oyster immune genes including those coding for a family of antimicrobial peptides, the big defensins (Cg-BigDef). Cg-BigDef is a diverse family composed of three members: Cg-BigDef1 to -3. Here, we show that besides a high polymorphism in Cg-BigDef mRNA expression, not all individual oysters express simultaneously the three Cg-BigDefs. Moreover, in numerous individuals, no expression of Cg-BigDefs could be detected. Further investigation at the genomic level revealed that in individuals in which the transcription of one or all Cg-BigDefs was absent the corresponding Cg-bigdef gene was missing. In our experiments, no correlation was found between Cg-bigdef PAV and oyster capacity to survive Vibrio infections. The discovery of P-A immune genes in oysters leads to reconsider the role that the immune system plays in the individual adaptation to survive environmental, biotic and abiotic stresses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. ABCB1 and ABCC1-like transporters in immune system cells from sea urchins Echinometra lucunter and Echinus esculentus and oysters Crassostrea gasar and Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Santos, Luis Fernando; Hégaret, Hélène; Lima-Santos, Leonardo; Queiroga, Fernando Ramos; da Silva, Patricia Mirella

    2017-11-01

    ABC transporters activity and expression have been associated with the multixenobiotic resistance phenotype (MXR). The activity of these proteins leads to a reduction in the intracellular concentration of several xenobiotics, thus reducing their toxicity. However, little attention has been given to the expression of ABC transporters in marine invertebrates and few studies have investigated their role in immune system cells of sea urchins and shellfish bivalves. The aim of the present study was to investigate the activity of the ABC transporters ABCB1 and ABCC1 in immune system cells of sea urchins (coelomocytes) and oysters (hemocytes) from different climatic regions (Brazil and France). Sea urchins and oysters were collected at Paraíba coast; Brazil (Echinometra lucunter and Crassostrea gasar) and Rade of Brest; France (Echinus esculentus and Crassostrea gigas). Coelomocytes and hemocytes were stained with the ABC transporter substrate calcein-AM and dye accumulation analyzed under flow cytometry. Reversin 205 (ABCB1 transporter blocker) and MK571 (ABCC1 transporter blocker) were used as pharmacological tools to investigate ABC transporter activity. A different pattern of calcein accumulation was observed in coelomocytes: phagocytes > colorless spherulocytes > vibrate cells > red spherulocytes. The treatment with MK571 increased calcein fluorescence levels in coelomocytes from both species. However, reversin 205 treatment was not able to increase calcein fluorescence in E. esculentus coelomocytes. These data suggest that ABCC1-like transporter activity is present in both sea urchin species, but ABCB1-like transporter activity might only be present in E. lucunter coelomocytes. The activity of ABCC1-like transporter was observed in all cell types from both bivalve species. However, reversin 205 only increased calcein accumulation in hyalinocytes of the oyster C. gasar, suggesting the absence of ABCB1-like transporter activity in all other cell types

  6. Effects of chronic exposure to ionising radiation in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fievet, B.; Devos, A.; Voiseux, C.; Leconte-Pradines, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete' Nucleaire (France); Dallas, L.; Jha, A. [University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    The Cotentin peninsula (Normandy, France) hosts nuclear industry facilities which operate with controlled discharges of radionuclides in the marine environment. Compared to natural radioactivity, the increase by artificial radionuclides is small but constant. As a consequence, marine species are chronically exposed to low additional doses of ionizing radiation (IR). The effects of chronic exposure to radionuclides were investigated in early stages of development of the Japanese oyster Crassostrea gigas. On the basis of literature, mollusks are expected to be particularly resistant to acute IR (UNSCEAR, 1996. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. Report to the General Assembly, with Scientific Annex. 86 p). Two different chronic exposure conditions consisted in external ({sup 137}Cs) and internal ({sup 241}Am) irradiation for two weeks. Biological endpoints were analyzed in parallel at both the integrated (growth) and molecular (target stress gene expression) levels. To identify potential biological targets of IR, oysters were first exposed to very high dose rates and radionuclide activities with the perspective to reduce the levels and to derive dose-response curves. Although the initial exposure levels ({sup 137}Cs 30 000 μGy.h{sup -1}; {sup 241}Am 57 000 Bq.L{sup -1}) were many orders of magnitude higher than those encountered in the natural environment, no significant change in the measured parameters was observed. This result was surprising because data from the literature showed that exposure of mussel Mytilus edulis to {sup 3}H at lower doses rates (10-100 μGy.h{sup -1}) induced DNA damage in hemocytes (Jha et al., 2005. Impact of low doses of tritium on the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis: Genotoxic effects and tissue-specific bioconcentration. Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis 586, 47-57). To understand this apparent discrepancy between those two filtering bivalves, a new experiment was performed to compare the response

  7. Gametogenesis in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas: A Microarrays-Based Analysis Identifies Sex and Stage Specific Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M.; Lelong, Christophe; Huvet, Arnaud; Kellner, Kristell; Dubos, Marie-Pierre; Riviere, Guillaume; Boudry, Pierre; Favrel, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Lophotrochozoa) is an alternative and irregular protandrous hermaphrodite: most individuals mature first as males and then change sex several times. Little is known about genetic and phenotypic basis of sex differentiation in oysters, and little more about the molecular pathways regulating reproduction. We have recently developed and validated a microarray containing 31,918 oligomers (Dheilly et al., 2011) representing the oyster transcriptome. The application of this microarray to the study of mollusk gametogenesis should provide a better understanding of the key factors involved in sex differentiation and the regulation of oyster reproduction. Methodology/Principal Findings Gene expression was studied in gonads of oysters cultured over a yearly reproductive cycle. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering showed a significant divergence in gene expression patterns of males and females coinciding with the start of gonial mitosis. ANOVA analysis of the data revealed 2,482 genes differentially expressed during the course of males and/or females gametogenesis. The expression of 434 genes could be localized in either germ cells or somatic cells of the gonad by comparing the transcriptome of female gonads to the transcriptome of stripped oocytes and somatic tissues. Analysis of the annotated genes revealed conserved molecular mechanisms between mollusks and mammals: genes involved in chromatin condensation, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and meiosis regulation, transcription, translation and apoptosis were expressed in both male and female gonads. Most interestingly, early expressed male-specific genes included bindin and a dpy-30 homolog and female-specific genes included foxL2, nanos homolog 3, a pancreatic lipase related protein, cd63 and vitellogenin. Further functional analyses are now required in order to investigate their role in sex differentiation in oysters. Conclusions

  8. Inheritance of 15 microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: segregation and null allele identification for linkage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Guo, Ximing; Zhang, Guofan

    2009-02-01

    Microsatellites were screened in a backcross family of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Fifteen microsatellite loci were distinguishable and polymorphic with 6 types of allele-combinations. Null alleles were detected in 46.7% of loci, accounting for 11.7% of the total alleles. Four loci did not segregate in Mendelian Ratios. Three linkage groups were identified among 7 of the 15 segregating loci. Fluorescence-based automated capillary electrophoresis (ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer) that used to detect the microsatellite loci, has been proved a fast, precise, and reliable method in microsatellite genotyping.

  9. Proximate composition and fatty acid content of the mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae along the year seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cavalcanti Martino

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove oysters, Crassostrea rhizophorae were collected at the mangrove of "Barra de Guaratiba" district, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with the aim to determine the proximate composition and fatty acid content. Along the year seasons no statistical (P>0.05 difference was observed in the values of moisture, crude protein, crude lipid and ash. They were 82.0%; 9.7%; 1.7%; 3.2%, in average, respectively. However, glycogen was significantly (PCom o objetivo de determinar a composição centesimal e de ácidos graxos da ostra de mangue Crassostrea rhizophorae, amostras foram coletadas durante um ano no manguezal localizado na Barra de Guaratiba, na cidade do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. Nenhuma diferença estatística (P>0,05 foi observada para os valores de umidade, proteína bruta, lipídio bruto e cinza, que foram em média: 82%; 9,7%; 1,7% e 3,2%, respectivamente. Por outro lado, os valores encontrados para o glicogênio foram significativamente diferentes (P<0,05 para as amostras de primavera (4,4% e inverno (4,2% do que para as amostras de verão (2,7% e outono (2,9%. Os ácidos graxos saturados e poliinsaturados foram respectivamente, os principais grupos de ácidos graxos das ostras, sendo que o ácido palmítico (16:0 foi o ácido graxo mais abundante em todos as amostras de ostras coletadas. O presente estudo demonstrou que esta espécie é caracterizada tanto por uma baixa concentração de lipídios (< 2,0% como também, por uma elevada concentração dos ácidos eicosapentaenóico (20:5n-3, EPA e docosahexaenóico (22:6n-3, DHA. Portanto, baseado no presente resultado é possível concluir que em termos de lipídios e de ácidos graxos a composição nutricional da C.rhizophorae é recomendável para o consumo humano.

  10. The effect of algae diets (Skeletonema costatum and Rhodomonas baltica) on the biochemical composition and sensory characteristics of Pacific cupped oysters (Crassostrea gigas) during land-based refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houcke, Jasper; Medina, Isabel; Maehre, Hanne K; Cornet, Josiane; Cardinal, Mireille; Linssen, Jozef; Luten, Joop

    2017-10-01

    Oyster refinement, a common practice in France, is aimed at increasing the weight of oyster tissue and influencing the taste properties of the refined oysters. Refinement usually takes place in land-based systems where the oysters are fed with relatively high concentrations of microalgae. In this study the impact of feeding Skeletonema costatum and Rhodomonas baltica on the biochemical composition and sensory characteristics of Pacific cupped oysters (Crassostrea gigas) from the Eastern Scheldt during land-based refinement was studied. After a feeding period of four and seven weeks market-sized oysters were sampled for the analysis of fatty acids, free amino acids and volatile organic compounds and for a sensory evaluation by consumers and an expert panel. The algae Skeletonema costatum showed a lower ∑PUFA, ∑n-3, ∑n-6, C18:2n6, C18:3n3, C18:4n3, C22:6n3 content as compared with Rhodomonas baltica. These differences were also reflected in the fatty acid profile of the oysters fed with the corresponding algae diets. Furthermore, general linear model and principal component analysis showed marked differences in free amino acids and volatile organic compound content between Skeletonema, Rhodomonas fed oysters and reference oysters. For example, threonine, glutamine, leucine, histidine, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2octenal, (E)-2-octen-1-ol, (E,E)-2,4-octadien-1-ol, (E,Z)-3,6-nonadien-1-ol and (Z,E)-2,6-nonadienal contents were higher in Skeletonema fed oysters compared to Rhodomonas fed oysters. Sensory differences between the experimental oyster groups were shown. Skeletonema fed Pacific cupped oysters were characterized by a stronger seaweed flavor, higher perceived sweetness and a firmer texture in comparison with Rhodomonas fed oysters. Naïve consumers were only able to differentiate between Rhodomonas fed oysters and reference oysters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Purification and characterization of a salt-tolerant cellulase from the mangrove oyster, Crassostrea rivularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Tianchen; Dong, Zhu; Lv, Junchen; Liu, Yujun; Wang, Manchuriga; Wei, Shuangshuang; Song, Yanting; Zhang, Yingxia; Deng, Shiming

    2015-04-01

    A cellulase with wide range of pH resistance and high salt tolerance was isolated from the digestive gland of the oyster Crassostrea rivularis living in mangrove forests. The 27 kDa cellulase named as CrCel was purified 40.6 folds by anion exchange chromatography and extraction from the gel after non-reducing sodium dodecylsufate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The specific activity of the purified cellulase was 23.4 U/mg against carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of CrCel was determined to be NQKCQANSRV. CrCel preferably hydrolyzes β-1,4-glucosidic bonds in the amorphous parts of cellulose materials and displays degradation activity toward xylan. The Km and Vmax values of CrCel for CMC were determined to be 2.1% ± 0.4% and 73.5 ± 3.3 U mg(-1), respectively. The optimal pH value and temperature of CrCel were 5.5 and 40°C, respectively. The enzyme was stable in a wide range of pH, retaining over 60% activity after incubation for 80 min in the pH range of 3.0-9.0. In addition, CrCel showed remarkable tolerance to salt and remained active at high NaCl concentrations, but also retained over 70% activity after incubation in 0.5-2 M NaCl for up to 24 h. On the basis of the N-terminal sequence alignment and its similar properties to other animal cellulases, CrCel was regarded as a member of glycosyl hydrolase family 45 β-1,4-glucanases. CrCel is the first reported cellulase isolated from mangrove invertebrates, which suggests that it may participate in the assimilation of cellulolytic materials derived from the food sources of the oyster and contribute to the consumption of mangrove primary production. The unique properties of this enzyme make it a potential candidate for further industrial application. © The Author 2015. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  12. Tissue analysis of the oyster Crassostrea virginica after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarine, D.; Roopnarine, P. D.; Anderson, L.; Chung, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon accident (DWH) of April 20th, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) released crude oil into the ocean column for 4 months. An estimated 685,000 tons of crude oil was released, making DWH spill the largest accidental spill in maritime history. The immediate impacts of the spill were evident, including oil slicks, fouled beaches and fouled, often dead wildlife. Longer-term impacts are less understood, and reliance on studies of past spills, e.g. Exxon Valdez, may not be applicable given the substantially greater magnitude of DWH (Valdez spilled 37,000 tons) and different environmental settings (predominantly rocky shorelines vs. saltmarsh-dominated coastlines). Many molluscan species exhibit responses to oil spills or other hydrocarbon contamination. Bivalved molluscs are commonly used as bioindicator organisms in part because they concentrate both metals and organic contaminants in their soft tissues. We used the American oyster Crassostrea virginica to measure exposure to and impact of the spill as the abnormal transformation of soft-tissues, or metaplasia. Metaplasia is the reversible transformation of one cell type into another. Molluscan metaplasia has been associated with exposure to petroleum contamination. While oyster epithelium is normally stratified columnar and ciliated, experimental exposures often result in metaplasia of gill, digestive and renal tissues. The occurrence and frequency of metaplasia may also be an indication of the longevity of a spill's impact. For example, individuals of the mussel Mytilus trossulus in Prince William Sound continued to exhibit metaplasia of the digestive gland more than 5 years after the Exxon Valdez spill, with an occurrence directly related to concentrations of PAHs in the animals. We focused on the hypothesis that DWH spill exposure resulted in metaplasia of gill and digestive epithelial tissues, both during and after the spill. Those transformations are eventually reversible, although on an unknown

  13. Molecular taxonomy of cupped oysters (Crassostrea, Saccostrea, and Striostrea) in Thailand based on COI, 16S, and 18S rDNA polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinbunga, S; Khamnamtong, B; Puanglarp, N; Jarayabhand, P; Yoosukh, W; Menasveta, P

    2005-01-01

    Genetic diversity of oysters Crassostrea belcheri (Sowerby, 1871), C. iredalei (Faustino, 1932), Saccostrea cucullata (Born, 1778), S. forskali (Gmelin, 1791), and Striostrea (Parastriostrea) mytiloides (Lamarck, 1819) (Ostreoida, Mollusca) was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of 16S ribosomal DNA with AcsI, AluI, DdeI, DraI, RsaI, and TaqI, 18S ribosomal DNA with HinfI, and cytochrome oxidase subunit I with AcsI, DdeI and MboI. A total of 54 composite haplotypes were observed. Species-diagnostic markers were specifically found in C. belcheri, C. iredalei, and S. cucullata, but not in S. forskali and Striostrea mytiloides, which shared common composite haplotypes. Neighbor-joining trees constructed from genetic distances between pairs of composite haplotypes and species indicated large genetic differences between Crassostrea and Saccostrea (including Striostrea mytiloides), but closer relationships were observed within each genus. Four groups of unidentified oysters (Crassostrea sp. and Saccostrea sp. groups 1, 2, and 3) were also genetically analyzed. Fixed RFLP markers were found in Crassostrea sp. and Saccostrea sp. group 2, but not in Saccostrea sp. groups 1 and 3. Phylogenetic and genetic heterogeneity analyses indicated that Crassostrea sp. and Saccostrea sp. group 2 should be considered as newly unidentified oyster species in Thailand.

  14. Rapid expansion of the invasive oyster Crassostrea gigas at its northern distribution limit in Europe: Naturally dispersed or introduced?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc B Anglès d'Auriac

    Full Text Available The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, was introduced to Europe for aquaculture purposes, and has had a rapid and unforeseen northward expansion in northern Europe. The recent dramatic increase in number of C. gigas populations along the species' northern distribution limit has questioned the efficiency of Skagerrak as a dispersal barrier for transport and survival of larvae. We investigated the genetic connectivity and possible spreading patterns between Pacific oyster populations on the southern Norwegian coast (4 localities and Swedish and Danish populations by means of DNA microsatellite analysis of adult oysters, and by simulating larvae drift. In the simulations we used a 3D oceanographic model to explore the influence of recent climate change (1990-2010 on development, survival, and successful spreading of Danish and Swedish Pacific oyster larvae to Norwegian coastal waters. The simulations indicated adequate temperature conditions for development, survival, and settlement of larvae across the Skagerrak in warm years since 2000. However, microsatellite genotyping revealed genetic differences between the Norwegian populations, and between the Norwegian populations and the Swedish and Danish populations, the latter two populations being more similar. This patchwork pattern of genetic dissimilarity among the Norwegian populations points towards multiple local introduction routes rather than the commonly assumed unidirectional entry of larvae drifted from Denmark and Sweden. Alternative origins of introduction and implications for management, such as forecasting and possible mitigation actions, are discussed.

  15. Exploitable Lipids and Fatty Acids in the Invasive Oyster Crassostrea gigas on the French Atlantic Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flore Dagorn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Economic exploitation is one means to offset the cost of controlling invasive species, such as the introduced Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg on the French Atlantic coast. Total lipid and phospholipid (PL fatty acids (FAs and sterols were examined in an invasive population of C. gigas in Bourgneuf Bay, France, over four successive seasons, with a view to identify possible sources of exploitable substances. The total lipid level (% dry weight varied from 7.1% (winter to 8.6% (spring. Of this, PLs accounted for 28.1% (spring to 50.4% (winter. Phosphatidylcholine was the dominant PL throughout the year (up to 74% of total PLs in winter. Plasmalogens were identified throughout the year as a series of eleven dimethylacetals (DMAs with chain lengths between C16 and C20 (up to 14.5% of PL FAs + DMAs in winter. Thirty-seven FAs were identified in the PL FAs. Eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3 EPA/7.53% to 14.5% and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3 DHA/5.51% to 9.5% were the dominant polyunsaturated FAs in all seasons. Two non-methylene-interrupted dienoic (NMID FAs were identified in all seasons: 7,13-docosadienoic and 7,15-docosadienoic acids, the latter being present at relatively high levels (up to 9.6% in winter. Twenty free sterols were identified, including cholesterol at 29.9% of the sterol mixture and about 33% of phytosterols. C. gigas tissues thus contained exploitable lipids for health benefits or as a potential source of high-quality commercial lecithin.

  16. Effect of carbonate chemistry alteration on the early embryonic development of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Gazeau

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification, due to anthropogenic CO₂ absorption by the ocean, may have profound impacts on marine biota. Calcareous organisms are expected to be particularly sensitive due to the decreasing availability of carbonate ions driven by decreasing pH levels. Recently, some studies focused on the early life stages of mollusks that are supposedly more sensitive to environmental disturbances than adult stages. Although these studies have shown decreased growth rates and increased proportions of abnormal development under low pH conditions, they did not allow attribution to pH induced changes in physiology or changes due to a decrease in aragonite saturation state. This study aims to assess the impact of several carbonate-system perturbations on the growth of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas larvae during the first 3 days of development (until shelled D-veliger larvae. Seawater with five different chemistries was obtained by separately manipulating pH, total alkalinity and aragonite saturation state (calcium addition. Results showed that the developmental success and growth rates were not directly affected by changes in pH or aragonite saturation state but were highly correlated with the availability of carbonate ions. In contrast to previous studies, both developmental success into viable D-shaped larvae and growth rates were not significantly altered as long as carbonate ion concentrations were above aragonite saturation levels, but they strongly decreased below saturation levels. These results suggest that the mechanisms used by these organisms to regulate calcification rates are not efficient enough to compensate for the low availability of carbonate ions under corrosive conditions.

  17. A new non-phagocytic TLR6 with broad recognition ligands from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weilin; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Lingling; Xu, Jiachao; Li, Meijia; Zhang, Anguo; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-12-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are evolutionarily prevalent recognition molecules in the Animalia and Plantae kingdom, which play vital roles in immune defense and homeostasis maintenance. Recently, the expansion of TLRs has been reported in invertebrate genomes, but the characters and immune functions of these expanded TLRs were still not well known. In the present study, a new member of TLR family with five LRR domains was identified in Crassostrea gigas (designated CgTLR6). It shared homology with TLRs from other organisms with the closest phylogenic relationship with molluscan TLRs. The recombinant protein of CgTLR6 (rCgTLR6) displayed direct bind activity to gram-negative bacteria Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio splendidus, gram-positive bacteria Staphylococci aureus and Micrococcus luteus, and fungi Pichia pastoris, but not to fungi Yarrowia lipolytica. It also exhibited affinity to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN), while no affinity to mannan (MAN). The mRNA of CgTLR6 was mainly detected in hemocytes and hepatopancreas, and was significantly induced (p < 0.01) in hemocytes after the oyster was stimulated with LPS, PGN or bacteria V. splendidus. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that CgTLR6 was mainly located at the membrane of hemocytes. The blockage of CgTLR6 by anti-rCgTLR6 antibody did not significantly inhibit the phagocytic rates of hemocytes toward recognized gram-negative bacteria V. anguillarum and V. splendidus, and unrecognized fungi Y. lipolytica. These results collectively implied that CgTLR6 was a novel non-phagocytic receptor of C. gigas to mediate humoral immune response by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns on the invaders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of carbonate chemistry alteration on the early embryonic development of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazeau, Frédéric; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Greaves, Mervyn; Elderfield, Henry; Peene, Jan; Heip, Carlo H R; Middelburg, Jack J

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification, due to anthropogenic CO₂ absorption by the ocean, may have profound impacts on marine biota. Calcareous organisms are expected to be particularly sensitive due to the decreasing availability of carbonate ions driven by decreasing pH levels. Recently, some studies focused on the early life stages of mollusks that are supposedly more sensitive to environmental disturbances than adult stages. Although these studies have shown decreased growth rates and increased proportions of abnormal development under low pH conditions, they did not allow attribution to pH induced changes in physiology or changes due to a decrease in aragonite saturation state. This study aims to assess the impact of several carbonate-system perturbations on the growth of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae during the first 3 days of development (until shelled D-veliger larvae). Seawater with five different chemistries was obtained by separately manipulating pH, total alkalinity and aragonite saturation state (calcium addition). Results showed that the developmental success and growth rates were not directly affected by changes in pH or aragonite saturation state but were highly correlated with the availability of carbonate ions. In contrast to previous studies, both developmental success into viable D-shaped larvae and growth rates were not significantly altered as long as carbonate ion concentrations were above aragonite saturation levels, but they strongly decreased below saturation levels. These results suggest that the mechanisms used by these organisms to regulate calcification rates are not efficient enough to compensate for the low availability of carbonate ions under corrosive conditions.

  19. Commercially-cultured oysters (Crassostrea gigas) exert top-down control on intertidal pelagic resources in Willapa Bay, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, Elizabeth; Ruesink, Jennifer L.

    2013-08-01

    The capacity of filter feeders to reduce seston and phytoplankton concentrations in the water column has important implications for restoration and management of coastal ecosystems. We directly measured changes in chlorophyll a concentration on commercially stocked intertidal oyster beds (Crassostrea gigas) in Willapa Bay, Washington, USA by recording water properties near small drifters as they tracked parcels of water across tide flats. Chlorophyll declined 9.6% per half hour in water passing on-bottom adult oysters and 41% for longline adult oysters, whereas chlorophyll concentrations increased as water flowed across tide flats without adult oysters. Field filtration rates, which were fit to exponential declines in chlorophyll and accounted for oyster density and water depth, averaged 0.35 L g- 1 h- 1 (shucked dry weight) for on-bottom aquaculture and 0.73 L g- 1 h- 1 for longline culture, compared to values of 2.5-12 L g- 1 h- 1 reported from laboratory studies of C. gigas. Field filtration rates may be lower than laboratory rates due to unfavorable field conditions (e.g., low initial chlorophyll concentrations) or masked by resuspension of benthic microalgae. In addition to distinctions among on-bottom, longline, and no-oyster habitats, Akaike's Information Criterion analysis showed temperature, initial chlorophyll concentration, and depth related to chlorophyll decline. This research corroborates mathematical models suggesting that benthic suspension feeders are exerting top-down control of pelagic production in this estuary, with strong patterns in chlorophyll emerging across extensive tideflats populated by C. gigas despite low field filtration rates.

  20. Surveillance of Enteric Viruses and Microbial Indicators in the Eastern Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and Harvest Waters along Louisiana Gulf Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Naim; Maite, Morgan; Liu, Da; Cormier, Jiemin; Landry, Matthew; Shackleford, John; Lampila, Lucina E; Achberger, Eric C; Janes, Marlene E

    2015-05-01

    Noroviruses are the most common causative agent of viral gastroenteritis in humans, and are responsible for major foodborne illnesses in the United States. Filter-feeding molluscan shellfish exposed to sewage-contaminated waters bioaccumulate viruses, and if consumed raw, transmit the viruses to humans and cause illness. We investigated the occurrence of norovirus GI and GII and microbial indicators of fecal contamination in the eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and water from commercial harvesting areas along the Louisiana Gulf Coast (January to November of 2013). Microbial indicators (aerobic plate count, enterococci, fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, male-specific coliphages, and somatic coliphages) were detected at the densities lower than public health concerns. Only one oyster sample was positive for norovirus GII at 3.5 ± 0.2 log10 genomic equivalent copies/g digestive tissues. A stool specimen obtained from an infected individual associated with a norovirus outbreak and the suspected oysters (Cameron Parish, La., area 30, January 2013) were also analyzed. The norovirus strain in the stool belonged to GII.4 Sydney; however, the oysters were negative and could not be linked. In general, no temporal trend was observed in the microbial indicators. Low correlation among bacterial indicators was observed in oysters. Strongest correlations among microbial indicators were observed between enterococci and fecal coliforms (r = 0.63) and between enterococci and E. coli (r = 0.64) in water (P 0.05). Our results emphasize the need for regular monitoring of pathogenic viruses in commercial oyster harvesting areas to reduce the risks of viral gastroenteritis incidences. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Ostreid herpesvirus OsHV-1 μVar in Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg 1793) of the Wadden Sea, a UNESCO world heritage site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gittenberger, A.; Voorbergen-Laarman, M.A.; Engelsma, M.Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is an extensive wetland area, recognized as UNESCO world heritage site of international importance. Since the mid-1990s, the invasive Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg 1793) population in the area has grown exponentially, having a distinct impact on the ecosystem. The

  2. Coexistence of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793) and blue mussels Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 on a sheltered intertidal bivalve bed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, M.W.; Davids, J.K.; Dolmer, Per

    2016-01-01

    The invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793 was introduced in Denmark for aquaculture in the 1970s. Presently, feral populations are found in many parts of the country, with the largest populations established on existing beds of blue mussel, Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758...

  3. Aeromonas spp. isolated from oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorea from a natural oyster bed, Ceará, Brazil Aeromonas spp. isoladas de ostras (Crassostrea rhizophorea coletadas em um criadouro natural, Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma S. Evangelista-Barreto

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Between April and October 2002, thirty fortnightly collections of oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorea from a natural oyster bed at the Cocó River estuary in the Sabiaguaba region (Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil were carried out, aiming to isolate Aeromonas spp. strains. Oyster samples were submitted to the direct plating (DP and the presence/absence (P/A methods. Aeromonas were identified in 15 (50% samples analyzed by the DP method and in 13 (43% analyzed by the P/A method. A. caviae, A. eucrenophila, A. media, A. sobria, A. trota, A. veronii bv. sobria, A. veronii bv. veronii and Aeromonas sp. were isolated. The predominant species was A. veronii (both biovars, which was identified in 13 (43% samples, followed by A. media in 11 (37% and A. caviae in seven (23%. From the 59 strains identified, 28 (48% presented resistance to at least one of the eight antibiotics tested.Foram realizadas 30 coletas quinzenais, entre abril e outubro de 2002, de ostras (Crassostrea rhizophorea de um criadouro natural, no estuário do rio Cocó (Fortaleza/Ceará/Brasil, objetivando-se isolar cepas de Aeromonas spp. As amostras de ostras foram submetidas aos métodos de plaqueamento direto (PD e presença/ausência (P/A. Foram identificadas Aeromonas em 15 (50% amostras analisadas pelo método PD e em 13 (43% pelo método P/A. Foram isoladas: A. caviae, A. eucrenophila, A. media, A. sobria, A. trota, A. veronii bv. sobria, A. veronii bv. veronii e Aeromonas sp. A espécie predominate foi A. veronii (ambos biovars, identificada em 13 (43% amostras, seguida de A. media em 11 (37% e A. caviae em 7 (23%. Das 59 cepas identificadas, 28 (48% apresentaram resistência a pelo menos um, dos oitos antibióticos testados.

  4. Bioaccumulation of arsenic and other heavy metals in the oyster crassostrea virginica: a radiotracer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Batista, M.; Alonso Hernandez, M. C.; Metian, A.; Buschiazzo, E.; Teyssie, J. L.; Cotret, O.; Fowler, S.W.; Warnau, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cienfuegos Bay, situated in the Southern part of Cuba, is a semi enclosed bay of important as natural resource for the country, due to industrial and artesian fishing activities, maritime transport, tourism industry and natural parks. During the last decade important economic and social development, around the bay has resulted in a significant increase in inputs of industrial and domestic wastes to its waters. Regarding arsenic, direct input occurred through the Nitrogen Fertilizer Factory, which was operating until 1989 and where two important accidental spills took place, in 1979 and 2001. Therefore, understanding the behaviour and fate of As in this region is of prime importance in order to be able to develop coastal zone monitoring programs and improve local marine resource protection and management. The objective of this work was to investigate the bioaccumulation behaviour of As and other co occurring metals in the edible oyster Crassostrea virginica, a specie that is abundant, widely distributed in the bay, and frequently eaten by local populations. Seven different metals (As, Ag, Cr, Co, Cd, Mn and Zn) were considered and their bioconcentration was studied using γ emitting radiotracers ( 73 As, 110m Ag, 51 Cr, 57 Co, 109 Cd, 54 Mn and 65 Zn). The organisms were exposed for 14 d to background concentrations of the seven metals via seawater and then held for 21 d under non contaminated conditions. During these periods, uptake and loss kinetics of the metal radiotracers were determined in whole body individuals. In addition, tissue distribution of the metals was determined at the end of both exposure and depuration periods. In another experiment, C. virginica was exposed to four increasing concentrations of As dissolved in seawater in order to determine possible differences in As bioaccumulation according to ambient contamination level. Uptake kinetics were expressed as the variation of the concentration factor (CF, ratio between radioactivity in the organism

  5. Evidence for accumulation of Synechococcus elongatus (Cyanobacteria: Cyanophyceae) in the tissues of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Torres-Ariño, Alejandra; Girón-Cruz, Diego Ademir; Cuevas-Aguirre, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Cyanobacteria appear to have direct relations with mollusks in several aspects. This is the first time, distinguishing Gram-negative cyanoprokaryotic Synechococcus elongatus as bright yellow-gold autofluorescence by Lillie's and Hiss' staining methods on paraffin-embedded tissues of Crassostrea gigas. Three diets: cyanoprokaryotes, cyanoprokaryotes with microalgae, and only microalgae were evaluated. Cyanoprokaryotes were intact, densely bundled, and immersed in the cytosol of the digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad of C. gigas, revealing an accumulation systemic without tissue damage observed by histology. Unexpectedly, cyanoprokaryotes were slightly most accumulated with microalgae diet by each of the tissues of the C. gigas than with any other diets. Cyanoprokaryotes tend to be in mean slightly higher in the digestive gland than in any other tissues respectively for each diet, although these values are closely similar to connective tissue. A possible order of exposure of the oyster tissues to accumulation of cyanoprokaryotes was digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad. Thereby, the digestive gland could be the major target tissue for the accumulation. Our observations provide a valuable insight regarding the ability of cyanoprokaryotes to penetrate, spread, and remain inside the oyster tissues, suggesting for S. elongatus: (1) a pre-accumulation in oyster tissues from the natural environment, (2) a phagocytosis and/or endocytosis process rather than ingestion and extracellular digestion, (3) an apparent cellular division in the cytosol of oyster tissues, (4) an apparent inter-tissue movement, and (5) a possible endosymbiosis between C. gigas and S. elongatus. Hereby, it is possible that S. elongatus have a well-developed host-endobiont relationship with oysters, and thereby support future work toward a description of the escape and spreading mechanisms of S. elongatus inside the tissues of mollusks, and put forward questions as

  6. Evaluation of the concentration of heavy metals in sea water, silt and rock oysters, Crassostrea iridescens, from Manzanillo bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero Carbajal, Y.C.

    1993-01-01

    Some essential metals such as Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn were evaluated by X-ray spectroscopy in water, soil and rock oyster Crassostrea iridescens from Manzanillo Bay. Four samplings were taken every two months during 1991. Concentration range on liofilized oysters for Fe was determined between 76 and 172 μ g/g dry weight, Ni 9-21 μ g/g dry weight, Cu 21-123 μ g/g dry weight and Zn 216-885 μ g/g dry weight. Ni concentration was above the toxicological tolerance level for crustaceans (5 μ g/g); Cu was above maxima permission limited (MPL) from FAO for molluscs (70 μ g/g); Zn was below MPL for oysters (1000 μ g/g). For Fe there is no MPL for oyster or any other aquatic organisms. Concentration and accumulation factors for the elements measured suggested the filtration oyster activity. Fe concentration range in water was 27-2266 μ g/l. This value is above the ecological aquatic life criteria in Mexico (50 μ g/l). For Cu the concentration range was 4-536 μ g/l., which is above the MPL for Mexican Legislation (5 μ g/l). Chemical elements detected in soil were the essential metal mentioned before. However, the heavy metals concentrations for soil, from Manzanillo Bay, were higher than those reported in other polluted regions in both Mexican coasts. Concentration range for Fe was 30661-76332 μ g/g, Ni 19-180 μ g/g, Cu 56-270 μ g/g and Zn 33-1377 μ g/g. Contamination problem in Manzanillo Bay must be considered as an evidence of potential risk, since the essential metals are reaching levels that could endanger aquatic life. (Author). 87 refs, 20 figs, 6 tabs

  7. Development of a Medium Density Combined-Species SNP Array for Pacific and European Oysters (Crassostrea gigas and Ostrea edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro P. Gutierrez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available SNP arrays are enabling tools for high-resolution studies of the genetic basis of complex traits in farmed and wild animals. Oysters are of critical importance in many regions from both an ecological and economic perspective, and oyster aquaculture forms a key component of global food security. The aim of our study was to design a combined-species, medium density SNP array for Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas and European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis, and to test the performance of this array on farmed and wild populations from multiple locations, with a focus on European populations. SNP discovery was carried out by whole-genome sequencing (WGS of pooled genomic DNA samples from eight C. gigas populations, and restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq of 11 geographically diverse O. edulis populations. Nearly 12 million candidate SNPs were discovered and filtered based on several criteria, including preference for SNPs segregating in multiple populations and SNPs with monomorphic flanking regions. An Affymetrix Axiom Custom Array was created and tested on a diverse set of samples (n = 219 showing ∼27 K high quality SNPs for C. gigas and ∼11 K high quality SNPs for O. edulis segregating in these populations. A high proportion of SNPs were segregating in each of the populations, and the array was used to detect population structure and levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD. Further testing of the array on three C. gigas nuclear families (n = 165 revealed that the array can be used to clearly distinguish between both families based on identity-by-state (IBS clustering parental assignment software. This medium density, combined-species array will be publicly available through Affymetrix, and will be applied for genome-wide association and evolutionary genetic studies, and for genomic selection in oyster breeding programs.

  8. Radiation sensitivity of poliovirus, a model for norovirus, inoculated in oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and culture broth under different conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Pil-Mun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Seok [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul 122-704 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Gyu; Park, Jae-Nam; Han, In-Jun; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Min [Atomic Energy Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Gwacheon 427-715 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Jin [Department of Food and Nutrition, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sjwlee@kaeri.re.kr

    2009-07-15

    Poliovirus is a recognized surrogate for norovirus, pathogen in water and food, due to the structural and genetic similarity. Although radiation sensitivity of poliovirus in water or media had been reported, there has been no research in food model such as shellfish. In this study, oyster (Crassostrea gigas) was incubated in artificial seawater contaminated with poliovirus, and thus radiation sensitivity of poliovirus was determined in inoculated oyster. The effects of ionizing radiation on the sensitivity of poliovirus were also evaluated under different conditions such as pH (4-7) and salt concentration (1-15%) in culture broth, and temperature during irradiation. The D{sub 10} value of poliovirus in PBS buffer, virus culture broth and oyster was determined to 0.46, 2.84 and 2.94 kGy, respectively. The initial plaque forming unit (PFU) of poliovirus in culture broth was slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration, but radiation sensitivity was not affected by pH and salt contents. However, radiation resistance of poliovirus was increased at frozen state. These results provide the basic information for the inactivation of pathogenic virus in foods by using irradiation.

  9. Inheritance mode of microsatellite loci and their use for kinship analysis in the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ruihai

    2008-08-01

    Five full-sib families of the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) larvae were used to study the mode of inheritance at eight microsatellite loci, and the feasibility of these markers for kinship estimate was also examined. All eight microsatellite loci were compatible with Mendelian inheritance. Neither evidence of sex-linked barriers to transmission nor evidence of major barriers to fertilization between gametes from the parents was shown. Three of the eight loci showed the presence of null alleles in four families, demonstrating the need to conduct comprehensive species-specific inheritance studies for microsatellite loci used in population genetic studies. Although the null allele heterozygotes were considered as homozygotes in the calculation of genetic distance, offspring from five full-sib families were unambiguously discriminated in the neighbor-joining dendrogram. This result indicates that the microsatellite markers may be capable of discriminating between related and unrelated oyster larvae in the absence of pedigree information, and is applicable to the investigation of the effective number of parents contributing to the hatchery population of the Pacific oyster.

  10. The Kinome of Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas, Its Expression during Development and in Response to Environmental Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboin, Yanouk; Quintric, Laure; Guévélou, Eric; Boudry, Pierre; Pichereau, Vianney; Corporeau, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Oysters play an important role in estuarine and coastal marine habitats, where the majority of humans live. In these ecosystems, environmental degradation is substantial, and oysters must cope with highly dynamic and stressful environmental constraints during their lives in the intertidal zone. The availability of the genome sequence of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas represents a unique opportunity for a comprehensive assessment of the signal transduction pathways that the species has developed to deal with this unique habitat. We performed an in silico analysis to identify, annotate and classify protein kinases in C. gigas, according to their kinase domain taxonomy classification, and compared with kinome already described in other animal species. The C. gigas kinome consists of 371 protein kinases, making it closely related to the sea urchin kinome, which has 353 protein kinases. The absence of gene redundancy in some groups of the C. gigas kinome may simplify functional studies of protein kinases. Through data mining of transcriptomes in C. gigas, we identified part of the kinome which may be central during development and may play a role in response to various environmental factors. Overall, this work contributes to a better understanding of key sensing pathways that may be central for adaptation to a highly dynamic marine environment.

  11. The Kinome of Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas, Its Expression during Development and in Response to Environmental Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanouk Epelboin

    Full Text Available Oysters play an important role in estuarine and coastal marine habitats, where the majority of humans live. In these ecosystems, environmental degradation is substantial, and oysters must cope with highly dynamic and stressful environmental constraints during their lives in the intertidal zone. The availability of the genome sequence of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas represents a unique opportunity for a comprehensive assessment of the signal transduction pathways that the species has developed to deal with this unique habitat. We performed an in silico analysis to identify, annotate and classify protein kinases in C. gigas, according to their kinase domain taxonomy classification, and compared with kinome already described in other animal species. The C. gigas kinome consists of 371 protein kinases, making it closely related to the sea urchin kinome, which has 353 protein kinases. The absence of gene redundancy in some groups of the C. gigas kinome may simplify functional studies of protein kinases. Through data mining of transcriptomes in C. gigas, we identified part of the kinome which may be central during development and may play a role in response to various environmental factors. Overall, this work contributes to a better understanding of key sensing pathways that may be central for adaptation to a highly dynamic marine environment.

  12. Two Perkinsus spp. infect Crassostrea gasar oysters from cultured and wild populations of the Rio São Francisco estuary, Sergipe, northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Patricia Mirella; Scardua, Marcos Paiva; Vianna, Rogério Tubino; Mendonça, Raoani Cruz; Vieira, Cairé Barreto; Dungan, Christopher F; Scott, Gail P; Reece, Kimberly S

    2014-06-01

    Brazilian production of bivalve molluscs is small but expanding, especially in the northeastern region where the native oysters Crassostrea rhizophorae and C. gasar are abundant, and tropical weather promotes their rapid growth. Studies on bivalve pathology are scarce in Brazil, with only a few employing techniques for detecting protozoan pathogens listed by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). In 2008, a Perkinsus sp. was reported for the first time in Brazil, infecting C. rhizophorae oysters from a wild population in Ceará state, NE Brazil. Recently P. marinus was detected in the same oyster species in nearby Paraíba state. These findings highlighted the need to expand knowledge on the presence and impacts of Perkinsus spp. on Brazilian oyster populations. The current investigation evaluated Perkinsus sp. infections among wild and cultured C. gasar mangrove oysters from the estuary of the Rio São Francisco, Sergipe state, NE Brazil. Our results show that Perkinsus sp. infections occurred commonly in oysters of both groups, at prevalences that were frequently higher among cultured oysters. Prevalences varied seasonally, with maximum values during summer (January) of 57% and 80% for wild and cultured oysters respectively, and minimum values during winter (July). Results of DNA sequencing, in situ hybridization assays, and phylogenetic analyses showed dual- and single-pathogen infections by P. marinus and/or P. olseni in the tested oysters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Vibrio mexicanus sp. nov., isolated from a cultured oyster Crassostrea corteziensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castillo, Adrián; Enciso-Ibarrra, Julissa; Bolán-Mejia, M Carmen; Balboa, Sabela; Lasa, Aide; Romalde, Jesús L; Cabanillas-Beltrán, Hector; Gomez-Gil, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    A bacterial strain was taxonomically characterised by means of a genomic approach comprising 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), the DNA G+C content, whole genome analyses (ANI and GGDC) and phenotypic characterisation. The strain CAIM 1540(T) was isolated from a cultured oyster Crassostrea corteziensis in La Cruz, Sinaloa state, México. The isolate was found to be catalase and oxidase positive, cells were observed to be motile, O/129-sensitive and facultatively anaerobic. The almost-complete 16S rRNA gene sequence placed this strain within the genus Vibrio; the closest related species were found to be Vibrio aestivus, Vibrio marisflavi, Vibrio maritimus and Vibrio variabilis with similarity values of 99.02, 97.05, 96.70, and 96.59 % respectively. MLSA of four housekeeping genes (ftsZ, gapA, recA, and topA) was performed with the closely related species. A draft genome sequence of strain CAIM 1540(T) was obtained. The DNA G+C content of this strain was determined to be 43.7 mol%.The ANI values with V. aestivus were 89.6 % (ANIb), 90.6 % (ANIm) and a GGDC value of 39.5 ± 2.5 % was obtained; with V. marisflavi the genomic similarities were 71.5 % (ANIb), 85.5 % (ANIm) and 20.2 ± 2.3 % (GGDC); with V. maritimus 72.6 % (ANIb), 85.7 % (ANIm) and 22.0 ± 2.0 % (GGDC); and with V. variabilis 72.6 % (ANIb), 85.8 % (ANIm) and 21.6 ± 1.6 % (GGDC). These ANI and GGDC values are below the threshold for the delimitation of prokaryotic species, i.e. 95-96 and 70 %, respectively. Phenotypic characters also showed differences with the closest related species analysed. The results presented here support the description of a novel species, for which the name Vibrio mexicanus sp. nov. is proposed, with strain CAIM 1540(T) (= CECT 8828(T), = DSM 100338(T)) as the type strain. In addition, we found that the recently described species Vibrio thalassae and Vibrio madracius might be a single species because the values of ANIb 95.8 %, ANIm 96.6 % and

  14. Vibrio sonorensis sp. nov. isolated from a cultured oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castillo, Adrián; Enciso-Ibarra, Julissa; Dubert, Javier; Romalde, Jesús L; Gomez-Gil, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Strain CAIM 1076 T was isolated from a cultured oyster Crassostrea gigas in Puerto Peñasco, Sonora state, México. The strain was taxonomically characterised by means of a genomic approach, comprising 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), the DNA G+C content and whole genome analyses (ANI and GGDC), and by phenotypic characterisation. Strain CAIM 1076 T was found to be catalase and oxidase positive, and cells were observed to be motile and facultative anaerobic. Analysis of the almost-complete 16S rRNA gene sequence placed this strain within the genus Vibrio; closely related species were Vibrio maritimus, Vibrio variabilis, Vibrio proteolyticus, and Vibrio nigripulchritudo with similarity values of 98.9, 98.5, 98.1, and 98.0 %, respectively. MLSA of six housekeeping genes (ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, recA, rpoA and topA) was performed with the closely related species. A draft genome sequence of strain CAIM 1076 T was obtained. The DNA G+C content of this strain was determined to be 44.5 mol %. The genomic similarity values with V. maritimus were 71.6 % (ANIb), 85.1 % (ANIm) and a GGDC value of 20.3 ± 2.3 %; with V. variabilis the genomic similarities were 71.8 % (ANIb), 85.4 % (ANIm) and 20.0 ± 2.3 % (GGDC); with V. proteolyticus, 71.6 % (ANIb), 84.1 % (ANIm) and 18.8 ± 2.2 % (GGDC); and with V. nigripulchritudo, 70.8 % (ANIb), 84.9 % (ANIm) and 20.5 ± 2.3 % (GGDC). These ANI and GGDC values are below the thresholds for the delimitation of prokaryotic species, i.e., 95-96 and 70 %, respectively. Phenotypic characters also showed differences with the closely related species analysed. The results presented here support the description of a novel species, for which the name Vibrio sonorensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain CAIM 1076 T (=CECT 9100 T , =DSM 102190 T ) as the type strain.

  15. Effects of cadmium exposure on expression and activity of P-glycoprotein in eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica Gmelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanina, Anna V.; Sokolova, Inna M.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a worldwide problem, and cadmium (Cd) is one of the most noxious pollutants in aquatic environments. We studied P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression and function in control and Cd exposed (50 μg L -1 Cd, 30-40 days) oysters Crassostrea virginica as a possible mechanism of cell protection against Cd. Our data show that P-gp is expressed on cell membrane and in mitochondria of oyster gills and hepatopancreas. Inhibitor studies with verapamil, cyclosporine A and JS-2190 suggest that in the gills, mitochondrial P-gp pumps substrates from cytosol into the mitochondria, while cell membrane P-gp pumps substrates from cytosol out of the cell. Cd exposure resulted in a 2-2.5-fold increase in P-gp protein expression in cell membranes and a 3.5-7-fold increase in transport activity measured as the inhibitor-sensitive rhodamine B extrusion rate. In contrast, p-gp mRNA levels were similar in control and Cd-exposed oysters. No difference in P-gp protein expression was observed between mitochondria of control and Cd-exposed oysters but the apparent transport activity was higher in mitochondria from Cd-exposed oysters. Overall, a stronger increase in substrate transport activity in Cd-exposed oysters compared to a relatively weaker change in P-gp protein levels suggests that P-gp activity is post-translationally regulated. Our data show that direct determination of P-gp transport activity may be the best measure of the xenobiotic-resistant phenotype, whereas p-gp mRNA levels are not a good marker due to the likely involvement of multiple post-transcriptional regulatory steps. Cd exposure resulted in a significantly elevated rate of oxygen consumption of isolated oyster gills by 46%. Specific inhibitors of ATPase function of P-gp (cyclosporine A and JS-2190) had no significant effect on tissue oxygen consumption indicating that P-gp contribution to energy budget is negligible and supporting indirect estimates based on the ATP stoichiometry of substrate

  16. Gametogenesis in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: a microarrays-based analysis identifies sex and stage specific genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolwenn M Dheilly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Lophotrochozoa is an alternative and irregular protandrous hermaphrodite: most individuals mature first as males and then change sex several times. Little is known about genetic and phenotypic basis of sex differentiation in oysters, and little more about the molecular pathways regulating reproduction. We have recently developed and validated a microarray containing 31,918 oligomers (Dheilly et al., 2011 representing the oyster transcriptome. The application of this microarray to the study of mollusk gametogenesis should provide a better understanding of the key factors involved in sex differentiation and the regulation of oyster reproduction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression was studied in gonads of oysters cultured over a yearly reproductive cycle. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering showed a significant divergence in gene expression patterns of males and females coinciding with the start of gonial mitosis. ANOVA analysis of the data revealed 2,482 genes differentially expressed during the course of males and/or females gametogenesis. The expression of 434 genes could be localized in either germ cells or somatic cells of the gonad by comparing the transcriptome of female gonads to the transcriptome of stripped oocytes and somatic tissues. Analysis of the annotated genes revealed conserved molecular mechanisms between mollusks and mammals: genes involved in chromatin condensation, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and meiosis regulation, transcription, translation and apoptosis were expressed in both male and female gonads. Most interestingly, early expressed male-specific genes included bindin and a dpy-30 homolog and female-specific genes included foxL2, nanos homolog 3, a pancreatic lipase related protein, cd63 and vitellogenin. Further functional analyses are now required in order to investigate their role in sex differentiation in oysters

  17. Assessment of ecosystem health disturbance in mangrove-lined Caribbean coastal systems using the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae as sentinel species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Rubí, J; Luna-Acosta, A; Ortiz-Zarragoitia, M; Zaldibar, B; Izagirre, U; Ahrens, M J; Villamil, L; Marigómez, I

    2018-03-15

    This investigation was aimed at contributing to develop a suitable multi-biomarker approach for pollution monitoring in mangrove-lined Caribbean coastal systems using as sentinel species, the mangrove cupped oyster, Crassostrea rhizophorae. A pilot field study was carried out in 8 localities (3 in Nicaragua; 5 in Colombia), characterized by different environmental conditions and subjected to different levels and types of pollution. Samples were collected in the rainy and dry seasons of 2012-2013. The biological effects at different levels of biological complexity (Stress-on-Stress response, reproduction, condition index, tissue-level biomarkers and histopathology) were determined as indicators of health disturbance, integrated as IBR/n index, and compared with tissue burdens of contaminants in order to achieve an integrative biomonitoring approach. Though modulated by natural variables and confounding factors, different indicators of oyster health, alone and in combination, were related to the presence of different profiles and levels of contaminants present at low-to-moderate levels. Different mixtures of persistent (As, Cd, PAHs) and emerging chemical pollutants (musk fragrances), in combination with different levels of organic and particulate matter resulting from seasonal oceanographic variability and sewage discharges, and environmental factors (salinity, temperature) elicited a different degree of disturbance in ecosystem health condition, as reflected in sentinel C. rhizophorae. As a result, IBR/n was correlated with pollution indices, even though the levels of biological indicators of health disturbance and pollutants were low-to-moderate, and seasonality and the incidence of confounding factors were remarkable. Our study supports the use of simple methodological approaches to diagnose anomalies in the health status of oysters from different localities and to identify potential causing agents and reflect disturbances in ecosystem health. Consequently, the

  18. Transcriptomic profiling of gametogenesis in triploid Pacific Oysters Crassostrea gigas: towards an understanding of partial sterility associated with triploidy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolwenn M Dheilly

    Full Text Available Triploidy can occur in many animal species but is often lethal. Among invertebrates, amphibians and fishes, triploids are viable although often sterile or infertile. Most triploids of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas are almost sterile (named "3nβ" yet a low but significant proportion show an advanced gametogenesis (named "3nα". These oysters thus constitute an interesting model to study the effect of triploidy on germ cell development. We used microarrays to compare the gonad transcriptomes of diploid 2n and the abovementioned triploid 3nβ and 3nα male and female oysters throughout gametogenesis.All triploids displayed an upregulation of genes related to DNA repair and apoptosis and a downregulation of genes associated with cell division. The comparison of 3nα and 3nβ transcriptomes with 2n revealed the likely involvement of a cell cycle checkpoint during mitosis in the successful but delayed development of gonads in 3nα individuals. In contrast, a disruption of sex differentiation mechanisms may explain the sterility of 3nβ individuals with 3nβ females expressing male-specific genes and 3nβ males expressing female-specific genes.The disruption of sex differentiation and mitosis may be responsible for the impaired gametogenesis of triploid Pacific oysters. The function of the numerous candidate genes identified in our study should now be studied in detail in order to elucidate their role in sex determination, mitosis/meiosis control, pachytene cell cycle checkpoint, and the control of DNA repair/apoptosis.

  19. Nuclear microprobe and Raman investigation of the chemistry of the shell of the pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwitz, A.; Gauldie, R.W.; Pithie, J.; Sharma, S.K.; Jamieson, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear microscopy was used to study the layered structure in the shell of the pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. In cross section, the layers appear as opaque white zones and clearer translucent zones. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the zones consist of alternating layers of the aragonite and calcite morphs of calcium carbonate, the mineral constituent of the shell. The chemistry of the shell varies from individual to individual but generally the predominant metal ion is Ca, with varying amounts of Si, Cl, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, Sb, Ni, Fe, As and Sr. Two dimensional maps of these major, minor and trace elements were measured in many shells with nuclear microscopy to identify the patterns of Zn and Sr deposition reflecting the calcite and aragonite layers. The significant difference in the patterns identified by ion beam analyses are possibly a result of isostructural exclusion of these metal ions between the different aragonite and calcite polymorphic forms of calcium carbonate. (author)

  20. Comparative transcriptome analysis of two oysters, Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea hongkongensis provides insights into adaptation to hypo-osmotic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelin Zhao

    Full Text Available Environmental salinity creates a key barrier to limit the distribution of most aquatic organisms. Adaptation to osmotic fluctuation is believed to be a factor facilitating species diversification. Adaptive evolution often involves beneficial mutations at more than one locus. Bivalves hold great interest, with numerous species living in waters, as osmoconformers, who maintain the osmotic pressure balance mostly by free amino acids. In this study, 107,076,589 reads from two groups of Crassostrea hongkongensis were produced and the assembled into 130,629 contigs. Transcripts putatively involved in stress-response, innate immunity and cell processes were identified according to Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses. Comparing with the transcriptome of C. gigas to characterize the diversity of transcripts between species with osmotic divergence, we identified 182,806 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for C. hongkongensis, and 196,779 SNPs for C. gigas. Comparison of 11,602 pairs of putative orthologs allowed for identification of 14 protein-coding genes that experienced strong positive selection (Ka/Ks>1. In addition, 45 genes that may show signs of moderate positive selection (1 ≥ Ka/Ks>0.5 were also identified. Based on Ks ratios and divergence time between the two species published previously, we estimated a neutral transcriptome-wide substitution mutation rate of 1.39 × 10(-9 per site per year. Several genes were differentially expressed across the control and treated groups of each species. This is the first time to sequence the transcriptome of C. hongkongensis and provide the most comprehensive transcriptomic resource available for it. The increasing amount of transcriptome data on Crassostrea provides an excellent resource for phylogenetic analysis. A large number of SNPs identified in this work are expected to provide valuable resources for future marker and genotyping assay development. The analysis of natural

  1. Chemical contamination assessment in mangrove-lined Caribbean coastal systems using the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae as biomonitor species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Rubí, Javier R; Luna-Acosta, Andrea; Etxebarría, Nestor; Soto, Manu; Espinoza, Félix; Ahrens, Michael J; Marigómez, Ionan

    2017-05-24

    This paper aims to contribute to the use of mangrove cupped oyster, Crassostrea rhizophorae, as a biomonitor species for chemical contamination assessment in mangrove-lined Caribbean coastal systems. Sampling was carried out in eight localities (three in Nicaragua and five in Colombia) with different types and levels of contamination. Oysters were collected during the rainy and dry seasons of 2012-2013 and the tissue concentrations of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were determined. Low tissue concentrations of metals (except Hg) and PAHs; moderate-to-high tissue concentrations of Hg, hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), and dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethanes (DDTs); detectable levels of chlorpyrifos, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (mainly CB28, CB118, CB138 and CB 153) and brominated diphenyl ethers 85 (BDE85); and negligible levels of musks were recorded in Nicaraguan oysters. A distinct profile of POPs was identified in Colombia, where the tissue concentrations of PCBs and synthetic musk fragrances were low to moderate, and Ag, As, Cd, Pb, and PAHs ranged from moderate to extremely high. Overall, the values recorded for HCHs, DDTs and PCBs in Nicaraguan mangrove cupped oysters greatly exceeded the reference values in tissues of C. rhizophorae from the Wider Caribbean Region, whereas only the levels of PCBs were occasionally surpassed in Colombia. Different contaminant profiles were distinguished between oysters from Nicaragua and Colombia in radar plots constructed using the main groups of contaminants (metals, PAHs, musks, PCBs, and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs)). Likewise, integrated pollution indices revealed differences in the levels of contaminants. Moreover, the profiles and levels in oyster tissues also varied with season. Thus, principal component analysis clearly discriminated Nicaraguan and Colombian localities and, especially in Colombia, seasonal trends in chemical contamination and differences

  2. Embryotoxic and genotoxic effects of heavy metals and pesticides on early life stages of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Huong; Cachot, Jérôme; Brune, Justine; Geffard, Oliver; Belles, Angel; Budzinski, Hélène; Morin, Bénédicte

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated embryotoxicity and genotoxicity of two dissolved metals copper and cadmium (Cu and Cd) and two pesticides (metolachlor and irgarol) occurring in Arcachon Bay (SW France) in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae and investigated the relationship between those two endpoints. Embryotoxicity was measured by calculating the percentage of abnormal D-shaped larvae and genotoxicity was evaluated with DNA strand breaks using the comet assay. After 24h exposure, significant increases of the percentage of abnormal D-larvae and the DNA strand breaks were observed from 0.1 μg L⁻¹ for Cu, 10 μg L⁻¹ for Cd and 0.01 μg L⁻¹ for both irgarol and metolachlor in comparison with the controls. A strong positive relationship between embryotoxicity and genotoxicity was recorded for Cu, Cd and metolachlor. The current study suggests that copper, irgarol and metolachlor can induce larval abnormalities and DNA damage in a population of exposed oysters at environmentally relevant concentrations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Temperature Effect Study on Growth and Survival of Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Jinjiang Oyster (Crassostrea rivularis with Rapid Count Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus in oysters during postharvest storage increases the possibility of its infection in humans. In this work, to investigate the growth or survival profiles in different media, pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in APW, Jinjiang oyster (JO, Crassostrea rivularis slurry, and live JO were studied under different temperatures. All the strain populations were counted through our double-layer agar plate (DLAP method. In APW, the pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus showed continuous growth under 15, 25, and 35°C, while a decline in behavior was displayed under 5°C. The similar survival trend of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in JO slurry and live JO was observed under 5, 25, and 35°C, except the delayed growth or decline profile compared to APW. Under 15°C, they displayed decline and growth profile in JO slurry and live JO, respectively. These results indicate the different sensitivity of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in these matrices to temperature variation. Furthermore, nonpathogenic V. parahaemolyticus displayed little difference in survival profiles when inoculated in live JO under corresponding temperatures. The results indicate that inhibition or promotion effect could be regulated under different storage temperature for both pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. Besides, the DLAP method showed the obvious quickness and efficiency during the bacteria count.

  4. Probing for heavy element impurities in the shell of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, with nuclear microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwitz, A.; Barry, B.; Gauldie, R.W.; Roberts, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear microscopy was performed on shells of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, to probe for heavy element impurities. For the studies 14 shells from the Auckland and the Marlborough Sounds region were chosen. In sections, the shells appear as opaque with white and grey zones, which are related to alternating layers of calcite and aragonite. Raster scans with 2.5 MeV protons over the sections (scan area 5 x 5 mm) were used in the experiment to measure trace elements in the ppm region using proton induced X-ray spectroscopy. Two dimensional maps and line scans revealed the presence of bromine in all shells investigated. Bromine was found to be related with the pattern of calcium. Hot spots of iron proved to be a common feature in the shells as well. In some shells, copper and zinc were also measured in hot spots of a few micrometers in diameter. Spatially resolved results on the micrometer level indicate the usefulness of nuclear microscopy for the detection of heavy elements in shells of the Pacific oyster

  5. Ostreid herpesvirus OsHV-1 μVar in Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg 1793) of the Wadden Sea, a UNESCO world heritage site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittenberger, A; Voorbergen-Laarman, M A; Engelsma, M Y

    2016-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is an extensive wetland area, recognized as UNESCO world heritage site of international importance. Since the mid-1990s, the invasive Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg 1793) population in the area has grown exponentially, having a distinct impact on the ecosystem. The recent spread of the emerging oyster pathogen Ostreid herpesvirus OsHV-1 μVar worldwide and specifically in the oyster culture areas in the south of the Netherlands raised the question whether the virus may also be present in the Wadden Sea. In the summer of 2012 juvenile Pacific oysters were collected from five locations in the Dutch Wadden Sea. The virus was shown to be present in three of the five locations by real-time PCR and sequencing. It was concluded that OsHV-1 μVar has settled itself in Pacific oyster reefs in the Wadden Sea. These results and the recent discoveries of OsHV-1 microvariants in Australia and Korea indicate that OsHV-1 μVar and related variants might be more widespread than can be deduced from current literature. In particular in regions with no commercial oyster culture, similar to the Wadden Sea, the virus may go undetected as wild beds with mixed age classes hamper the detection of mortality among juvenile oysters. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Impact of Ocean Acidification on Energy Metabolism of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas—Changes in Metabolic Pathways and Thermal Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bock

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Climate change with increasing temperature and ocean acidification (OA poses risks for marine ecosystems. According to Pörtner and Farrell [1], synergistic effects of elevated temperature and CO2-induced OA on energy metabolism will narrow the thermal tolerance window of marine ectothermal animals. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of an acute temperature rise on energy metabolism of the oyster, Crassostrea gigas chronically exposed to elevated CO2 levels (partial pressure of CO2 in the seawater ~0.15 kPa, seawater pH ~ 7.7. Within one month of incubation at elevated PCO2 and 15 °C hemolymph pH fell (pHe = 7.1 ± 0.2 (CO2-group vs. 7.6 ± 0.1 (control and PeCO2 values in hemolymph increased (0.5 ± 0.2 kPa (CO2-group vs. 0.2 ± 0.04 kPa (control. Slightly but significantly elevated bicarbonate concentrations in the hemolymph of CO2-incubated oysters ([HCO-3]e = 1.8 ± 0.3 mM (CO2-group vs. 1.3 ± 0.1 mM (control indicate only minimal regulation of extracellular acid-base status. At the acclimation temperature of 15 °C the OA-induced decrease in pHe did not lead to metabolic depression in oysters as standard metabolism rates (SMR of CO2-exposed oysters were similar to controls. Upon acute warming SMR rose in both groups, but displayed a stronger increase in the CO2-incubated group. Investigation in isolated gill cells revealed a similar temperature-dependence of respiration between groups. Furthermore, the fraction of cellular energy demand for ion regulation via Na+/K+-ATPase was not affected by chronic hypercapnia or temperature. Metabolic profiling using 1H-NMR spectroscopy revealed substantial changes in some tissues following OA exposure at 15 °C. In mantle tissue alanine and ATP levels decreased significantly whereas an increase in succinate levels was observed in gill tissue. These findings suggest shifts in metabolic pathways following OA-exposure. Our study confirms that OA affects energy metabolism in oysters and

  7. Determination of Cesium - 137 in the Oyster (Crassostrea belcheri) Meat and Seawater Samples from the Lower Gulf of Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakkong, P.; Phaopeng, N.; Tumnoi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Cs-137 radioactivity was determined in the oyster (Crassostrea belcheri) meat samples which were collected on October 2010 and August 2011. The seawater samples were collected in 3 different provinces of the Lower Gulf of Thailand. The oyster meat samples were prepared as oven dried at 80±C. The seawater samples were prepared with AMP precipitation technique. The results of Cs-137 radioactivity in oyster meat samples in October 2010 were 3.179±2.2929, 3.1797±2.2929 and 3.1797±2.2929 mBq/kg-ww respectively and in August 2011 were 2.5437±2.2029, 1.9078±2.1091 and 3.1797±2.2929 mBq/kg-ww respectively. The Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of oyster meat samples were estimated to be 10.4723 mBq/kg-ww. Statistic calculation of critical limit (Lc) values of 2.9634mBq/kg-ww was used to confirm the value of Cs-137 radioactivity in oyster meat samples. The Cs-137 radioactivity in seawater samples which had been collected on October 2010 were 4.7806±0.1113, 3.7161±0.0868 and 3.19330.0745 mBq/L, respectively and the average of MDA was 0.4562 mBq/L, on March 2011 were 3.2213±0.0756, 2.7824±0.0653 and 1.9566±0.0462 mBq/L respectively and the average of MDA was 0.3142 mBq/L. The third collection of seawater samples on August 2011 after Fukushima Daiichi crisis accident were 4.9673±0.1155, 3.8469±0.0897 and 3.5294±0.0826 mBq/L respectively and the average of MDA was 0.4793 mBq/L) The results from calculation of radiation dose assessment for general public consumption were found lower than the accepted value (1 mSv/y).

  8. Thiol oxidation of hemolymph proteins in oysters Crassostrea brasiliana as markers of oxidative damage induced by urban sewage exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Rafael; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício; Dolores, Euler S; Mattos, Jacó J; Piazza, Clei E; Sasaki, Sílvio T; Taniguchi, Satie; Montone, Rosalinda C; Bícego, Márcia C; Dos Reis, Isis M M; Zacchi, Flávia L; Othero, Bárbara N M; Bastolla, Camila L V; Mello, Danielle F; Fraga, Ana Paula M; Wendt, Nestor; Toledo-Silva, Guilherme; Razzera, Guilherme; Dafre, Alcir L; de Melo, Cláudio M R; Bianchini, Adalto; Marques, Maria R F; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2017-07-01

    Urban sewage is a concerning issue worldwide, threatening both wildlife and human health. The present study investigated protein oxidation in mangrove oysters (Crassostrea brasiliana) exposed to seawater from Balneário Camboriú, an important tourist destination in Brazil that is affected by urban sewage. Oysters were exposed for 24 h to seawater collected close to the Camboriú River (CAM1) or 1 km away (CAM2). Seawater from an aquaculture laboratory was used as a reference. Local sewage input was marked by higher levels of coliforms, nitrogen, and phosphorus in seawater, as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), and fecal steroid in sediments at CAM1. Exposure of oysters to CAM1 caused marked bioaccumulation of LABs and decreased PAH and PCB concentrations after exposure to both CAM1 and CAM2. Protein thiol oxidation in gills, digestive gland, and hemolymph was evaluated. Lower levels of reduced protein thiols were detected in hemolymph from CAM1, and actin, segon, and dominin were identified as targets of protein thiol oxidation. Dominin susceptibility to oxidation was confirmed in vitro by exposure to peroxides and hypochlorous acid, and 2 cysteine residues were identified as potential sites of oxidation. Overall, these data indicate that urban sewage contamination in local waters has a toxic potential and that protein thiol oxidation in hemolymph could be a useful biomarker of oxidative stress in bivalves exposed to contaminants. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1833-1845. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  9. Effects of Antifouling Biocides on Molecular and Biochemical Defense System in the Gill of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Seon; Kim, Young Dae; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kim, Youn-Jung; Kim, Jang Kyun; Rhee, Jae-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Antifouling biocides such as organotin compounds and their alternatives are potent toxicants in marine ecosystems. In this study, we employed several molecular and biochemical response systems of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to understand a potential mode of action of antifouling biocides (i.e. tributyltin (TBT), diuron and irgarol) after exposure to different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, and 1 μg L-1) for 96 h. As a result, all the three antifouling biocides strongly induced the antioxidant defense system. TBT reduced both enzymatic activity and mRNA expression of Na+/K+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Lower levels of both Na+/K+-ATPase activity and AChE mRNA expression were observed in the diuron-exposed oysters compared to the control, while the irgarol treatment reduced only the transcriptional expression of AChE gene. We also analyzed transcript profile of heat shock protein (Hsp) superfamily in same experimental conditions. All antifouling biocides tested in this study significantly modulated mRNA expression of Hsp superfamily with strong induction of Hsp70 family. Taken together, overall results indicate that representative organotin TBT and alternatives have potential hazardous effects on the gill of C. gigas within relatively short time period. Our results also suggest that analyzing a series of molecular and biochemical parameters can be a way of understanding and uncovering the mode of action of emerging antifouling biocides. In particular, it was revealed that Pacific oysters have different sensitivities depend on the antifouling biocides. PMID:28006823

  10. Pesticide residues, heavy metals, and DNA damage in sentinel oysters Crassostrea gigas from Sinaloa and Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Boucard, Celia; Anguiano-Vega, Gerardo; Mercier, Laurence; Rojas del Castillo, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides and heavy metals were analyzed in sentinel Crassostrea gigas oysters placed in six aquaculture sites close to a contaminated agricultural region. Each site was sampled twice. Tests revealed the presence of organochlorine (OC) pesticides in the oysters at concentrations varying from 31.8 to 72.5 μg/kg for gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH); from 1.2 to 3.1 μg/kg for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4-DDE); from 1.6 to 2.3 μg/kg for endosulfan I; and from 1.4 to 41.2 μg/kg for endosulfan II, as well as heavy metals in concentrations that exceeded Mexican tolerance levels (405.5 to 987.8 μg/g for zinc; 4.2 to 7.3 μg/g for cadmium; and 7.2 to 9.9 μg/g for lead). Significant levels of DNA damage in oyster hemocytes were also detected. There was a significant, positive correlation between genotoxic damage and concentration of nickel or the presence of endosulfan II. Cellular viability evaluated by cytotoxic analyses was found to be high at 80%. Marked inhibition in activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE ) and induction of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was noted. Data demonstrated a significant relation between AChE activity inhibition and presence of endosulfan II, γ-HCH, copper, lead, and 4,4-DDE, as well as between AChE and GST activity at different sites.

  11. Bioaccumulation of trace metals in farmed pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas from SW Gulf of California coast, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan, M P; Muñoz-Sevilla, N P; Góngora-Gómez, Andrés Martin; Luna Varela, Raquel Gabriela; Sujitha, S B; Escobedo-Urías, D C; Rodríguez-Espinosa, P F; Campos Villegas, Lorena Elizabeth

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the bioavailability of trace metals (Chromium, Copper, Nickel, Lead, Zinc, Cadmium, Arsenic, and Mercury) in the commercially consumed Crassostrea gigas oysters collected over a 12-month growth period (2011-12) from an experimental cultivation farm in La Pitahaya, Sinaloa State, Mexico. Sediment and water samples were also collected from four different zones adjacent to the cultivation area to identify the concentration patterns of metals. The results revealed that sewage disposals, fertilizers used for agricultural practices and shrimp culture are the major sources for the enrichment of certain toxic metals. The metal concentrations in oysters presented a decreasing order of abundance (all values in mg Kg -1 ): Zn (278.91 ± 93.03) > Cu (63.13 ± 31.72) > Cr (22.29 ± 30.23) > Cd (14.54 ± 4.28) > Ni (9.41 ± 11.33) > Pb (2.22 ± 1.33) > As (0.58 ± 0.91) > Hg (0.04 ± 0.06). Bioconcentration Factor (BCF) and Biota Sediment Accumulation Factor (BSAF) exhibited that C. gigas in the region are strong accumulators for Zn and Cd respectively. Thus, the present study proves to fulfill the gap in understanding the rate of bioaccumulation of metals in C. gigas which is regarded as the most sought after oyster species globally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of cadmium exposure on critical temperatures of aerobic metabolism in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin, 1791)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagwe, Rita [Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC (United States); Great Basin College, Pahrump Valley Center, Elko, NV (United States); Beniash, Elia [Department of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Sokolova, Inna M., E-mail: isokolov@uncc.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Effects of Cd exposure on thermal tolerance of oysters were studied. • Temperature rise (20–36 °C) led to transition to partial anaerobiosis at critical temperature T{sub c}II. • Exposure to Cd reduced thermal tolerance indicated by a downward shift of T{sub c}II. • Cellular energy status was maintained but oxidative stress occurred at extreme temperatures. • Onset of anaerobiosis is a sensitive biomarker of temperature- and Cd-induced energetic stress. - Abstract: Cadmium (Cd) and elevated temperatures are common stressors in estuarine and coastal environments. Elevated temperature can sensitize estuarine organisms to the toxicity of metals such as Cd and vice versa, but the physiological mechanisms of temperature–Cd interactions are not well understood. We tested a hypothesis that interactive effects of elevated temperature and Cd stress involve Cd-induced reduction of the aerobic scope of an organism thereby narrowing the thermal tolerance window of oysters. We determined the effects of prolonged Cd exposure (50 μg Cd l{sup −1} for 30 days) on the upper critical temperature of aerobic metabolism (assessed by accumulation of anaerobic end products L-alanine, succinate and acetate), cellular energy status (assessed by the tissue levels of adenylates, phosphagen/aphosphagen and glycogen and lipid reserves) and oxidative damage during acute temperature rise (20–36 °C) in the eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica. The upper critical temperature (T{sub c}II) was shifted to lower values (from 28 to 24 °C) in Cd-exposed oysters in spring and was lower in both control and Cd-exposed groups in winter (24 and <20 °C, respectively). This indicates a reduction of thermal tolerance of Cd-exposed oysters associated with a decrease of the aerobic scope of the organism and early transition to partial anaerobiosis. Acute warming had no negative effects on tissue energy reserves or parameters of cellular energy status of oysters (except a

  13. THE EFFECT OF PCBS ON GLYCOGEN RESERVES IN THE EASTERN OYSTER CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA. (R825349)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent declines in Chesapeake Bay oyster populations have been attributed to disease, and reduced water quality from pollution. The stress associated with pollutant exposure may reduce energy available for growth and reproduction. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are lipophilic c...

  14. The depuration dynamics of oysters (Crassostrea gigas artificially contaminated with hepatitis A virus and human adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Abreu Corrêa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the country of Brazil, Santa Catarina is a major shellfish producer. Detection of viral contamination is an important step to ensure production quality and consumer safety during this process. In this study, we used a depuration system and ultraviolet (UV disinfection to eliminate viral pathogens from artificially infected oysters and analysed the results. Specifically, the oysters were contaminated with hepatitis A virus (HAV or human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5. After viral infection, the oysters were placed into a depuration tank and harvested after 48, 72 and 96 h. After sampling, various oyster tissues were dissected and homogenised and the viruses were eluted with alkaline conditions and precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The oyster samples were evaluated by cell culture methods, as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR and quantitative-PCR. Moreover, at the end of the depuration period, the disinfected seawater was collected and analysed by PCR. The molecular assays showed that the HAdV5 genome was present in all of the depuration time samples, while the HAV genome was undetectable after 72 h of depuration. However, viral viability tests (integrated cell culture-PCR and immunofluorescence assay indicated that both viruses were inactivated with 96 h of seawater recirculation. In conclusion, after 96 h of UV treatment, the depuration system studied in this work purified oysters that were artificially contaminated with HAdV5 and HAV.

  15. Hemocyte parameters of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas a year after the Hebei Spirit oil spill off the west coast of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Ludovic; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Lee, Hee-Jung; Jun, Je-Cheon; Park, Young-Je; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2010-12-01

    In marine bivalves, hemocytes support various physiological functions, including immune defense, nutrient transport, shell repair, and homeostatic maintenance. Although the effects of marine contaminants on the immunological functions of bivalves have been extensively investigated, the impacts of oil spills are not well understood. Therefore, we investigated hemocyte parameters in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas 13 months after the Hebei Spirit oil spill (December 2007) off the west coast of Korea. The parameters studied included hemocyte concentration and mortality, relative proportion of hemocyte populations, and immunological functions such as phagocytosis and oxidative activity using flow cytometry. These immune-related parameters in oysters damaged by the oil spill were also compared to control oysters that were collected from an area unaffected by the spill. The flow cytometry study indicated that granulocyte population, phagocytic capacity, and reactive oxygen species production in oysters exposed to crude oil 13 months prior were depressed compared to the unexposed control oysters. Our data suggest that immunocompetence in oysters affected by the oil spill had not fully recovered 1 year after the accident, although more detailed studies on the physiology and disease resistance should be performed.

  16. Oyster condition index in Crassostrea rhizophorae (Guilding, 1828 from a heavy-metal polluted coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Rebelo

    Full Text Available The condition index (CI of oysters represents an ecophysiological approach to estimate meat quality and yield in cultured bivalve mollusks. In the present study, the CI of oysters from a heavy-metal polluted bay was analyzed with respect to Zn and Cd contamination in soft tissues, spawning, and polychaete infestation. The CI was calculated through a new technique based on molds made to measure the volume of oyster-shell internal cavities. The higher CI values (over 9 in the dry season were probably related availability of suspended particles rich in organic matter in the bay, while the rapid reduction in the CI from one season to the next at some stations suggests the effect of spawning. Polychaete infestation was considered low (18.7% and produced no clear CI effects. The Cd in the oyster tissue collected during the rainy season was weak, although still significantly correlated with the CI (r = -0.36; p < 0.05. All other comparisons of CI and metal concentrations demonstrated a non-significant correlation. The CI variations observed on the temporal and spatial scale were likely to have been caused by availability of organic matter and spawning, rather than spionid infestation or metal body burdens.

  17. Cloning and expression patterns of two Smad genes during embryonic development and shell formation of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Huan, Pin; Liu, Baozhong

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling pathways play many important roles in the early development of mollusks. However, limited information is known concerning their detailed mechanisms. Here, we describe the identification, cloning and characterization of two Smad genes, the key components of TGF-β signaling pathways, from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Sequence analysis of the two genes, designated as cgi-smad1/ 5/ 8 and cgi-smad4, revealed conserved functional characteristics. The two genes were widely expressed in embryos and larvae, suggesting multiple roles in the early development of C. gigas. The mRNA of the two genes aggregated in the D quadrant and cgi-smad4 was highly expressed on the dorsal side of the gastrula, indicating that TGF-β signaling pathways may be involved in dorsoventral patterning in C. gigas. Furthermore, high expression levels of the two genes in the shell fields of embryos at different stages suggested important roles for TGF-β signaling pathways in particular phases of shell development, including the formation of the initial shell field and the biomineralization of larval shells. The results of this study provide fundamental support for elucidating how TGF-β signaling pathways participate in the early development of bivalve mollusks, and suggest that further work is warranted to this end.

  18. Genetic variation assessed with microsatellites in mass selection lines of the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xubo; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng

    2016-12-01

    Four successive mass selection lines of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, selected for faster growth in breeding programs in China were examined at ten polymorphic microsatellite loci to assess the level of allelic diversity and estimate the effective population size. These data were compared with those of their base population. The results showed that the genetic variation of the four generations were maintained at high levels with an average allelic richness of 18.8-20.6, and a mean expected heterozygosity of 0.902-0.921. They were not reduced compared with those of their base population. Estimated effective population sizes based on temporal variances in microsatellite frequencies were smaller to that of sex ratio-corrected broodstock count estimates. Using a relatively large number of broodstock and keeping an equal sex ratio in the broodstock each generation may have contributed to retaining the original genetic diversity and maintaining relatively large effective population size. The results obtained in this study showed that the genetic variation was not affected greatly by mass selection progress and high genetic variation still existed in the mass selection lines, suggesting that there is still potential for increasing the gains in future generations of C. gigas. The present study provided important information for future genetic improvement by selective breeding, and for the design of suitable management guidelines for genetic breeding of C. gigas.

  19. Gonad Transcriptome Analysis of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Identifies Potential Genes Regulating the Sex Determination and Differentiation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chenyang; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong

    2018-04-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is a commercially important bivalve in aquaculture worldwide. C. gigas has a fascinating sexual reproduction system consisting of dioecism, sex change, and occasional hermaphroditism, while knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of sex determination and differentiation is still limited. In this study, the transcriptomes of male and female gonads at different gametogenesis stages were characterized by RNA-seq. Hierarchical clustering based on genes differentially expressed revealed that 1269 genes were expressed specifically in female gonads and 817 genes were expressed increasingly over the course of spermatogenesis. Besides, we identified two and one gene modules related to female and male gonad development, respectively, using weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA). Interestingly, GO and KEGG enrichment analysis showed that neurotransmitter-related terms were significantly enriched in genes related to ovary development, suggesting that the neurotransmitters were likely to regulate female sex differentiation. In addition, two hub genes related to testis development, lncRNA LOC105321313 and Cg-Sh3kbp1, and one hub gene related to ovary development, Cg-Malrd1-like, were firstly investigated. This study points out the role of neurotransmitter and non-coding RNA regulation during gonad development and produces lists of novel relevant candidate genes for further studies. All of these provided valuable information to understand the molecular mechanisms of C. gigas sex determination and differentiation.

  20. Identification two novel nacrein-like proteins involved in the shell formation of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Xiaotong; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-07-01

    Nacrein-like proteins have carbonic anhydrase (CA)-like domains, but their coding regions are flanked by inserted repeat sequence, such as Gly-X-Asn. Reportedly, nacrein-like proteins show the highest similarity to human carbonic anhydrase 1(α-CA1), possess CA catalytic functions, and play a key role in shell biomineralization. In the present study, two novel nacrein-like proteins were firstly identified from the shell-forming mantle of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. With numerous analyses, it was identified and characterized that both the nacrein-like proteins F1 and F2 were secreted and most closely related to the nacrein-like protein of California mussel Mytilus californianus via phylogenetic analysis. RT-PCR analysis showed that the nacrein-like proteins F1 and F2 were expressed in multiple tissues and the expression levels remarkably rose after entering the spat stage, which were basically consistent with the increase of calcite fractions in the total shell volume. Surprisingly, the Gly-X-Asn repeat domain, which is distinctive in most nacrein-like proteins, was absent in the two newly identified nacrein-like proteins in C. gigas and replaced with a series of acidic amino acids (D/E). Regardless, nacrein-like proteins in mollusks seem to be vital to the deposition of calcium carbonate and likely perform diverse functions.

  1. Isostructural exclusion of elements between aragonite and calcite layers in the shell of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwitz, A.; Gauldie, R.W.; Trompetter, W.J.; Pithie, J.; Jamieson, D.N.; Sharma, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    Sections of the shell of the farmed Pacific oyster 'Crassostrea gigas' that are available commercially in Wellington, New Zealand, showed a distinct alternating pattern in the shell mineral when observed by reflected light. The layers were identified by Raman scattering as alternating bands of the calcite and aragonite mineral forms of calcium carbonate using the micro-Raman facility at the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology. The differences in the unit cell structure of calcite and aragonite favour different trace elements in the two minerals. Aragonite is isostructural with Strontianite SrCO 3 , and calcite is isostructural with Smithsonite ZnCO 3 . As a result, Sr deposition should be favoured in the aragonite layer and is excluded from the calcite layer; and, conversely, Zn deposition should be favoured in the calcite layer and is excluded from the aragonite layer. However, up to today, significant differences in the pattern of Sr and Zn in microprobe scans are not discovered. By ion microprobe analysis, it was shown that differences in the unit cell structure of calcite and aragonite favor different trace elements in the two minerals

  2. A semiquantitative PCR assay for assessing Perkinsus marinus infections in the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, A G; Gauthier, J D; Vasta, G R

    1995-08-01

    A 3.2-kb fragment of Perkinsus marinus DNA was cloned and sequenced. A noncoding domain was identified and targeted for the development of a semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the presence of P. marinus in eastern oyster tissues. The assay involves extracting total DNA from oyster hemolymph and using 1 microgram of that DNA as template in a stringent PCR amplification with oligonucleotide primers that are specific for the P. marinus 3.2-kb fragment. With this assay, we can detect 10 pg of total P. marinus DNA per 1 microgram of oyster hemocyte DNA with ethidium bromide (EtBr) staining of agarose gels, 100 fg total P. marinus DNA with Southern blot autoradiography, and 10 fg of total P. marinus DNA with dot-blot hybridizations. We have used the sensitivity of the PCR assay to develop a method for estimating the level of P. marinus DNA in oyster hemolymph and have successfully applied this technique to gill tissues. Our semiquantitative assay uses a dilution series to essentially titrate the point at which a P. marinus DNA target is no longer amplified in a sample. We refer to this technique as "dilution endpoint" PCR. Using hemocytes obtained by withdrawing a 1-ml sample of hemolymph, this assay provides a nondestructive methodology for rapidly screening large numbers of adult oysters for the presence and quantification of P. marinus infection levels. This technique is applicable to other tissues (gills) and could potentially be applied to DNA extracts of whole larvae or spat.

  3. Trace element occurrence in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas from coastal marine ecosystems in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burioli, E A V; Squadrone, S; Stella, C; Foglini, C; Abete, M C; Prearo, M

    2017-11-01

    The Pacific oyster is one of the world's most widespread bivalves and a suitable species for biomonitoring trace elements in marine environments thanks to its bioaccumulation ability. As it is also an edible mollusc, concentrations of harmful elements in its tissues must be monitored. For these purposes, 464 wild individuals were collected from 12 sites along the Italian coasts. The concentration of fourteen trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sn, Tl, and Zn) in their tissues was quantified. Among the three heavy metals, cadmium, lead, and mercury, none exceeded the maximum limit for in food set by European Union regulations but Cd in one sample from the Varano Lagoon resulted extremely close to this value. Contamination by Hg of the northern Adriatic and Orbetello Lagoons was also observed. Moreover, there was a positive association between the lagoon's environmental conditions and the bioaccumulation of this element in oysters. Despite the ban instituted 15 years ago on the use of Sn in antifouling paints, this element is still present in several marine environments, as demonstrated in the oysters sampled from harbour areas. Samples collected from harbours also showed very high concentrations of Cu and Zn due to the ability of oysters to accumulate these elements, which have replaced Sn in antifouling paints. Analysis of the samples from most sites indicated a low risk of human exposure to harmful elements through oyster consumption; nonetheless, chemical sanitary controls should focus primarily on Cd, Cu, and Zn. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Survival, growth and reproduction of cryopreserved larvae from a marine invertebrate, the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Suquet

    Full Text Available This study is the first demonstration of successful post-thawing development to reproduction stage of diploid cryopreserved larvae in an aquatic invertebrate. Survival, growth and reproductive performances were studied in juvenile and adult Pacific oysters grown from cryopreserved embryos. Cryopreservation was performed at three early stages: trochophore (13±2 hours post fertilization: hpf, early D-larvae (24±2 hpf and late D-larvae (43±2 hpf. From the beginning (88 days at the end of the ongrowing phase (195 days, no mortality was recorded and mean body weights did not differ between the thawed oysters and the control. At the end of the growing-out phase (982 days, survival of the oysters cryopreserved at 13±2 hpf and at 43±2 hpf was significantly higher (P<0.001 than those of the control (non cryopreserved larvae. Only the batches cryopreserved at 24±2 hpf showed lower survival than the control. Reproductive integrity of the mature oysters, formely cryopreserved at 13±2 hpf and 24±2 hpf, was estimated by the sperm movement and the larval development of their offspring in 13 crosses gamete pools (five males and five females in each pool. In all but two crosses out of 13 tested (P<0.001, development rates of the offspring were not significantly different between frozen and unfrozen parents. In all, the growth and reproductive performances of oysters formerly cryopreserved at larval stages are close to those of controls. Furthermore, these performances did not differ between the three initial larval stages of cryopreservation. The utility of larvae cryopreservation is discussed and compared with the cryopreservation of gametes as a technique for selection programs and shellfish cryobanking.

  5. Generation and analysis of ESTs from the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica Gmelin and identification of microsatellite and SNP markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace Richard

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin 1791, is an economically important species cultured in many areas in North America. It is also ecologically important because of the impact of its filter feeding behaviour on water quality. Populations of C. virginica have been threatened by overfishing, habitat degradation, and diseases. Through genome research, strategies are being developed to reverse its population decline. However, large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST resources have been lacking for this species. Efficient generation of EST resources from this species has been hindered by a high redundancy of transcripts. The objectives of this study were to construct a normalized cDNA library for efficient EST analysis, to generate thousands of ESTs, and to analyze the ESTs for microsatellites and potential single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Results A normalized and subtracted C. virginica cDNA library was constructed from pooled RNA isolated from hemocytes, mantle, gill, gonad and digestive tract, muscle, and a whole juvenile oyster. A total of 6,528 clones were sequenced from this library generating 5,542 high-quality EST sequences. Cluster analysis indicated the presence of 635 contigs and 4,053 singletons, generating a total of 4,688 unique sequences. About 46% (2,174 of the unique ESTs had significant hits (E-value ≤ 1e-05 to the non-redundant protein database; 1,104 of which were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO terms. A total of 35 microsatellites were identified from the ESTs, with 18 having sufficient flanking sequences for primer design. A total of 6,533 putative SNPs were also identified using all existing and the newly generated EST resources of the eastern oysters. Conclusion A high quality normalized cDNA library was constructed. A total of 5,542 ESTs were generated representing 4,688 unique sequences. Putative microsatellite and SNP markers were identified. These genome resources provide the

  6. Use of Antibacterial Agents To Elucidate the Etiology of Juvenile Oyster Disease (JOD) in Crassostrea virginica and Numerical Dominance of an α-Proteobacterium in JOD-Affected Animals†

    OpenAIRE

    Boettcher, Katherine J.; Barber, Bruce J.; Singer, John T.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1988, juvenile oyster disease (JOD) has resulted in high seasonal losses of cultured Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in the Northeast. Although the cause of JOD remains unknown, most evidence is consistent with either a bacterial or a protistan etiology. For the purpose of discerning between these hypotheses, the antibacterial antibiotics norfloxacin and sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim (Romet-B) were tested for the ability to delay the onset of JOD mortality and/or reduce the JOD mo...

  7. Field clearance of an intertidal bivalve bed: relative significance of the co-occurring blue mussel Mytilus edulis and Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vismann, Bent; Holm, Mark Wejlemann; Davids, Jens

    2016-01-01

    At an approximately 12 000 m2 sheltered intertidal bivalve bed in the western part of the Limfjord, Denmark, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas co-occurs with the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. The relative significance of the impact of the 2 species on phytoplankton density during a tidal cycle...... was estimated by combining field measurements of clearance rates and modelling of the bivalve bed (topography, biomass distribution, temporal and spatial water coverage and depth). The average density of C. gigas and M. edulis was 35 ± 36 and 1001 ± 685 ind. m−2, respectively. The water volume cleared during...

  8. Mangrove oyster (Crassostrea rhizophorae) (Guilding, 1928) farming areas as artificial reefs for fish: A case study in the State of Ceará, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, Luiz Eduardo Lima de; Feitosa, Caroline Vieira; Araújo, Maria Elisabeth de

    2006-01-01

    A type of platform, known as a table, is now being used for mangrove oyster farming. In Fortim, Ceará, Brazil, this activity was begun in June 2000 and covers an area of 50 m² overlying a sand-clay substrate. The present study has the following main objectives: to identify and catalogue the ichthyofauna colonizing the Crassostrea rhizophorae farming platforms; to evaluate ecological aspects, such as the possible correlation between the physical and chemical variables for water quality and the...

  9. Mangrove oyster (Crassostrea spp. (Sacco, 1897 extractivism in Cananéia estuary (São Paulo, Brazil from 1999 to 2006: capture and management evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JT. Mendonça

    Full Text Available The oyster Crassostrea spp. is one of the main fisheries resources in the southern portion of São Paulo State. This paper aims to evaluate the extractivism of that resource, supplying subsidies to the implementation of management regulations. This study was developed in Cananéia, from February 1999 to December 2006. The oyster production data in dozens was obtained through weekly or monthly interviews. The annual and average CPUE in dozens per day was analysis to verify significant differences along years. There are no regulations that limit the fishing effort or organize the admission in the fishermen. The admission is controlled by the condition of the market and there is a risk of increasing the fishing effort above the sustainable yield, which demands measures that control the number of fishermen enganged in the activity. Those measures, to be effective, must be created in discussion with the fisheries sector, based on technical information.

  10. Mangrove oyster (Crassostrea spp.) (Sacco, 1897) extractivism in Cananéia estuary (São Paulo, Brazil) from 1999 to 2006: capture and management evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, J T; Machado, I C

    2010-02-01

    The oyster Crassostrea spp. is one of the main fisheries resources in the southern portion of São Paulo State. This paper aims to evaluate the extractivism of that resource, supplying subsidies to the implementation of management regulations. This study was developed in Cananéia, from February 1999 to December 2006. The oyster production data in dozens was obtained through weekly or monthly interviews. The annual and average CPUE in dozens per day was analysis to verify significant differences along years. There are no regulations that limit the fishing effort or organize the admission in the fishermen. The admission is controlled by the condition of the market and there is a risk of increasing the fishing effort above the sustainable yield, which demands measures that control the number of fishermen engaged in the activity. Those measures, to be effective, must be created in discussion with the fisheries sector, based on technical information.

  11. Heavy metals in the rock oyster Crassostrea iridescens (Filibranchia: Ostreidae from Mazatlan, Sinaloa, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín G Frías-Espericueta

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Two populations of Crassostrea iridescens were sampled off Mazatlan and in a zone free of anthropogenic activity. The bivalves were collected from February 1992 to February 1993. Concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Annual mean values in the sampling zone off Mazatlan were higher in Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn than in the sampling zone free of anthropogenic activity; however, differences were not statistically significant at 95% confidence level. Urban discharges in the coastal zone in front of Mazatlan city, have little or no heavy metal concentrations dissolved or particulated.Dos poblaciones de Crassostrea iridescens fueron muestreadas en la zona costera de la ciudad de Mazatlan y en una zona libre de actividad antropogénica. Los bivalvos fueron colectados de febrero de 1992 a febrero de 1993. Concentraciones de Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni y Zn fueron determinados por espectrofotometría de absorción atómica. Los valores medios anuales en la estación de muestreo de la ciudad de Mazatlán fueron mayores en Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni y Zn que los determinados en la zona libre de actividad antropogénica; sin embargo, las diferencias no fueron significativas al nivel de confianza del 95%. Una conclusión es que las descargas urbanas en la zona costera en frente de Mazatlán no tiene, o tiene, bajas concentraciones de metales pesados disueltos o particulados.

  12. The hematopoiesis in gill and its role in the immune response of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas against secondary challenge with Vibrio splendidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiqun; Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Weilin; Wang, Lingling; Yi, Qilin; Jiang, Shuai; Jia, Zhihao; Du, Xinyu; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2017-06-01

    Increasing evidences have demonstrated that the invertebrate gill is a predominant tissue participating in the immune response during pathogen challenge. In the present study, the hematopoiesis and immune activities in gill of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas were investigated. Stem-like cells with big nuclei and thin cytoplasm were found in the tubules of gill filaments, where DNA synthesis is active and hemocytes production are exuberant. The oysters primarily stimulated by formaldehyde-killed Vibrio splendidus exhibited stronger immune responses and enhanced cell regeneration in gill when they encountered the secondary challenge of live V. splendidus. After the secondary stimulation with V. splendidus, the expression levels of CgClec-4 and CgIFN in the gill of oysters pre-stimulated with formaldehyde-killed V. splendidus were significantly higher (p immune-related protein CgEcSOD in gill increased apparently after the secondary challenge with V. splendidus. ROS production was also enhanced (p response than that pre-stimulated with filter-sterilized sea water. These results collectively showed that the immune parameters in gill were apparently enhanced after secondary challenge with live V. splendidus, indicating that hematopoiesis might participate in immune priming in Pacific oyster C. gigas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Parental exposure to the herbicide diuron results in oxidative DNA damage to germinal cells of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranger, Audrey; Heude-Berthelin, Clothilde; Rouxel, Julien; Adeline, Béatrice; Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Burgeot, Thierry; Akcha, Farida

    2016-02-01

    Chemical pollution by pesticides has been identified as a possible contributing factor to the massive mortality outbreaks observed in Crassostrea gigas for several years. A previous study demonstrated the vertical transmission of DNA damage by subjecting oyster genitors to the herbicide diuron at environmental concentrations during gametogenesis. This trans-generational effect occurs through damage to genitor-exposed gametes, as measured by the comet-assay. The presence of DNA damage in gametes could be linked to the formation of DNA damage in other germ cells. In order to explore this question, the levels and cell distribution of the oxidized base lesion 8-oxodGuo were studied in the gonads of exposed genitors. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV and electrochemical detection analysis showed an increase in 8-oxodGuo levels in both male and female gonads after exposure to diuron. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the presence of 8-oxodGuo at all stages of male germ cells, from early to mature stages. Conversely, the oxidized base was only present in early germ cell stages in female gonads. These results indicate that male and female genitors underwent oxidative stress following exposure to diuron, resulting in DNA oxidation in both early germ cells and gametes, such as spermatozoa, which could explain the transmission of diuron-induced DNA damage to offspring. Furthermore, immunostaining of early germ cells seems indicates that damages caused by exposure to diuron on germ line not only affect the current sexual cycle but also could affect future gametogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Larval settlement and spat recovery rates of the oyster Crassostrea brasiliana (Lamarck, 1819) using different systems to induce metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, R C; Silva, F C; Gomes, C H M; Ferreira, J F; Melo, C M R

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed at the assessment, in the laboratory, of the larval settlement and spat recovery rates of oysters of the species Crassostrea brasiliana using plastic collectors, epinephrine (C9H13NO3 C4H6O6) and shell powder in settlement tanks. Polypropylene was used attached to bamboo frames. The material was chosen due to its pliability--that favours the spat detachment. Two experiments were carried out; the first between February and April 2008, and the second between November and December 2008 at the Marine Mussel Laboratory of Santa Catarina Federal University (Laboratório de Moluscos Marinhos da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina). In the first experiment, the scratched plastic collectors were tested consorting them with shell powder; on the second, the plastic collectors were tested consorted with shell powder, only shell powder and epinephrine as the metamorphosis stimulator. The quantification was carried out of the larvae settled in the plastic collectors, and of the recovery and integrity of the spats after their detachment. The first experiment has shown a recovery rate of 48.83% of the spats in comparison with the D larvae used. From this percentage, 4.9% settled in the plastic collectors and 43.93% in shell powder. The second experiment revealed 55.78% regarding the settled spats in comparison with the total of larvae used (using epinephrine), 78.62% in the treatment with the collector plus shell powder and 58.33% in the treatment only with shell powder. Thus, the use of the collector plus shell powder resulted in a greater spat recovery when compared to the other treatments.

  15. Larval and post-larval stages of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) are resistant to elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginger, Ko W K; Vera, Chan B S; R, Dineshram; Dennis, Choi K S; Adela, Li J; Yu, Ziniu; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen

    2013-01-01

    The average pH of surface oceans has decreased by 0.1 unit since industrialization and is expected to decrease by another 0.3-0.7 units before the year 2300 due to the absorption of anthropogenic CO2. This human-caused pH change is posing serious threats and challenges to the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), especially to their larval stages. Our knowledge of the effect of reduced pH on C. gigas larvae presently relies presumptively on four short-term (filtration rates at the time of metamorphosis, along with the juvenile shell growth and structure of the C. gigas, were examined in this study. The mean survival and growth rates were not affected by pH. The metabolic, feeding and metamorphosis rates of pediveliger larvae were similar, between pH 8.1 and 7.7. The pediveligers at pH 7.4 showed reduced weight-specific metabolic and filtration rates, yet were able to sustain a more rapid post-settlement growth rate. However, no evidence suggested that low pH treatments resulted in alterations to the shell ultrastructures (SEM images) or elemental compositions (i.e., Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios). Thus, larval and post-larval forms of the C. gigas in the Yellow Sea are probably resistant to elevated CO2 and decreased near-future pH scenarios. The pre-adapted ability to resist a wide range of decreased pH may provide C. gigas with the necessary tolerance to withstand rapid pH changes over the coming century.

  16. Larval and post-larval stages of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas are resistant to elevated CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko W K Ginger

    Full Text Available The average pH of surface oceans has decreased by 0.1 unit since industrialization and is expected to decrease by another 0.3-0.7 units before the year 2300 due to the absorption of anthropogenic CO2. This human-caused pH change is posing serious threats and challenges to the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas, especially to their larval stages. Our knowledge of the effect of reduced pH on C. gigas larvae presently relies presumptively on four short-term (<4 days survival and growth studies. Using multiple physiological measurements and life stages, the effects of long-term (40 days exposure to pH 8.1, 7.7 and 7.4 on larval shell growth, metamorphosis, respiration and filtration rates at the time of metamorphosis, along with the juvenile shell growth and structure of the C. gigas, were examined in this study. The mean survival and growth rates were not affected by pH. The metabolic, feeding and metamorphosis rates of pediveliger larvae were similar, between pH 8.1 and 7.7. The pediveligers at pH 7.4 showed reduced weight-specific metabolic and filtration rates, yet were able to sustain a more rapid post-settlement growth rate. However, no evidence suggested that low pH treatments resulted in alterations to the shell ultrastructures (SEM images or elemental compositions (i.e., Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios. Thus, larval and post-larval forms of the C. gigas in the Yellow Sea are probably resistant to elevated CO2 and decreased near-future pH scenarios. The pre-adapted ability to resist a wide range of decreased pH may provide C. gigas with the necessary tolerance to withstand rapid pH changes over the coming century.

  17. Spatial genetic features of eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin) in the Gulf of Mexico: northward movement of a secondary contact zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joel D; Karel, William J; Mace, Christopher E; Bartram, Brian L; Hare, Matthew P

    2014-05-01

    The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin) is an economically and ecologically valuable marine bivalve occurring in the Gulf of Mexico. This study builds upon previous research that identified two divergent populations of eastern oysters in the western Gulf of Mexico. Allelic and genotypic patterns from 11 microsatellite markers were used to assess genetic structure and migration between the previously described oyster populations in Texas. The main findings are as follows: (1) there are two distinct populations (F ST = 0.392, P < 0.001) of oysters that overlap in the Corpus Christi/Aransas Bay estuarine complex in Texas, (2) the distribution of genotypes among individuals in the contact zone suggests limited hybridization between populations, (3) the variables of salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and depth are not correlated with allele frequencies on reefs in the contact zone or when analyzed across Texas, and (4) there is little evidence of directional selection acting on the loci assayed here, although patterns at four markers suggested the influence of balancing selection based on outlier analyses. These results are consistent with long-term historical isolation between populations, followed by secondary contact. Recent hydrological changes in the area of secondary contact may be promoting migration in areas that were previously inhospitable to eastern oysters, and observed differences in the timing of spawning may limit hybridization between populations. Comparison of these findings with the results of an earlier study of oysters in Texas suggests that the secondary contact zone has shifted approximately 27 km north, in as little as a 23-year span.

  18. Study of the impact of radionuclides discharges from nuclear industry in the northern Cotentin area on the oyster Crassostrea gigas: expression of cellular stress molecular markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farcy, E.

    2006-11-01

    This thesis explores the potential radiological impact of radionuclide discharges from the nuclear industry on the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. One of the major goals of this research was to identify markers that could be used to monitor the effects of low-level chronic irradiation. We decided to focalize on the expression of stress-induced genes involved in the regulation of cellular stress, focusing on transcription. First, homology cloning was used to identify four new cDNAs encoding stress markers. Then data collected at various sites enabled to evidence that mRNA levels for each of the genes of interest naturally vary to a significant degree, based on individual differences and seasonal factors. Comparing oysters from exposed sites with those from a reference site located on the Atlantic coast did not suggest any relationship between mRNA levels changes and the oysters exposure to liquid radioactive waste from the A.R.E.V.A. reprocessing plant. In the environment, we found that those radionuclide releases resulted in a very small increase in radioactivity in oysters, especially compared with their natural radioactivity. In the laboratory, by exposing the oysters to higher radionuclide concentrations than those found in the environment, we were able to identify two genes as potential candidates for studying the effects of chronic exposure to low doses of ionizing radiations in the oyster: genes encoding MT and MXR. We confirmed that transcriptional induction of these two genes occurs in response to high doses of acute irradiation. Finally, the comparison between environmental results and the laboratory results underlined the complementarity of these two approaches. In particular, it revealed that seasonal variations in mRNA levels probably have a significant effect on the stress response. (author)

  19. The effects of x-ray treatments on bioaccumulated murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) and survivability, inherent microbiota, color, and firmness of Atlantic oysters (Crassostrea virginica) during storage at 5°C for 20 days

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we investigated the inactivation of human norovirus (HuNoV) surrogate Murine norovirus (MNV-1) by X-ray in whole-shell Atlantic oysters (Crassostrea virginica). We also investigated the effects of X-ray treatments on the survivability, inherent microbiota, color, and firmness of treat...

  20. Use of Antibacterial Agents To Elucidate the Etiology of Juvenile Oyster Disease (JOD) in Crassostrea virginica and Numerical Dominance of an α-Proteobacterium in JOD-Affected Animals†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Katherine J.; Barber, Bruce J.; Singer, John T.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1988, juvenile oyster disease (JOD) has resulted in high seasonal losses of cultured Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in the Northeast. Although the cause of JOD remains unknown, most evidence is consistent with either a bacterial or a protistan etiology. For the purpose of discerning between these hypotheses, the antibacterial antibiotics norfloxacin and sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim (Romet-B) were tested for the ability to delay the onset of JOD mortality and/or reduce the JOD mortality of cultured juvenile C. virginica. Hatchery-produced C. virginica seed were exposed in triplicate groups of 3,000 animals each to either norfloxacin, sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim, or filter-sterilized seawater (FSSW) and deployed in floating trays on the Damariscotta River of Maine on 17 July 1997. Each week thereafter, a subset of animals from each group was reexposed to the assigned treatment. Repeated immersion in either a sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim or a norfloxacin solution resulted in a delay in the onset of JOD mortality in treated animals and reduced weekly mortality rates. Weekly treatments with either norfloxacin or sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim also resulted in a statistically significant reduction in cumulative mortality (55 and 67% respectively) compared to animals treated weekly with FSSW (81%) or those that had received only a single treatment with either norfloxacin, sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim, or FSSW (77, 84, and 82%, respectively). Bacteriological analyses revealed a numerically dominant bacterium in those animals with obvious signs of JOD. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from these bacteria indicates that they are a previously undescribed species of marine α-proteobacteria. PMID:10347039

  1. Use of antibacterial agents To elucidate the etiology of juvenile oyster disease (JOD) in Crassostrea virginica and numerical dominance of an alpha-proteobacterium in JOD-affected animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, K J; Barber, B J; Singer, J T

    1999-06-01

    Since 1988, juvenile oyster disease (JOD) has resulted in high seasonal losses of cultured Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in the Northeast. Although the cause of JOD remains unknown, most evidence is consistent with either a bacterial or a protistan etiology. For the purpose of discerning between these hypotheses, the antibacterial antibiotics norfloxacin and sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim (Romet-B) were tested for the ability to delay the onset of JOD mortality and/or reduce the JOD mortality of cultured juvenile C. virginica. Hatchery-produced C. virginica seed were exposed in triplicate groups of 3,000 animals each to either norfloxacin, sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim, or filter-sterilized seawater (FSSW) and deployed in floating trays on the Damariscotta River of Maine on 17 July 1997. Each week thereafter, a subset of animals from each group was reexposed to the assigned treatment. Repeated immersion in either a sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim or a norfloxacin solution resulted in a delay in the onset of JOD mortality in treated animals and reduced weekly mortality rates. Weekly treatments with either norfloxacin or sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim also resulted in a statistically significant reduction in cumulative mortality (55 and 67% respectively) compared to animals treated weekly with FSSW (81%) or those that had received only a single treatment with either norfloxacin, sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim, or FSSW (77, 84, and 82%, respectively). Bacteriological analyses revealed a numerically dominant bacterium in those animals with obvious signs of JOD. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from these bacteria indicates that they are a previously undescribed species of marine alpha-proteobacteria.

  2. Effects of Co-Varying Diel-Cycling Hypoxia and pH on Growth in the Juvenile Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppel, Andrew G.; Breitburg, Denise L.; Burrell, Rebecca B.

    2016-01-01

    Shallow water provides important habitat for many species, but also exposes these organisms to daily fluctuations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH caused by cycles in the balance between photosynthesis and respiration that can contribute to repeated, brief periods of hypoxia and low pH (caused by elevated pCO2). The amplitude of these cycles, and the severity and duration of hypoxia and hypercapnia that result, can be increased by eutrophication, and are predicted to worsen with climate change. We conducted laboratory experiments to test the effects of both diel-cycling and constant low DO and pH (elevated pCO2) on growth of the juvenile eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), an economically and ecologically important estuarine species. Severe diel-cycling hypoxia (to 0.5 mg O2 L-1) reduced shell growth in juvenile oysters, as did constant hypoxia (1.2 and 2.0 mg O2 L-1), although effects varied among experiments, oyster ages, and exposure durations. Diel-cycling pH reduced growth only in experiments in which calcite saturation state cycled to ≤0.10 and only during the initial weeks of these experiments. In other cases, cycling pH sometimes led to increased growth rates. Comparisons of treatment effects across multiple weeks of exposure, and during a longer post-experiment field deployment, indicated that juvenile oysters can acclimate to, and in some cases compensate for initial reductions in growth. As a result, some ecosystem services dependent on juvenile oyster growth rates may be preserved even under severe cycling hypoxia and pH. PMID:27548256

  3. Iodothyronine deiodinase gene analysis of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas reveals possible conservation of thyroid hormone feedback regulation mechanism in mollusks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen; Xu, Fei; Qu, Tao; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-07-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinase catalyzes the initiation and termination of thyroid hormones (THs) effects, and plays a central role in the regulation of thyroid hormone level in vertebrates. In non-chordate invertebrates, only one deiodinase has been identified in the scallop Chlamys farreri. Here, two deiodinases were cloned in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas ( CgDx and CgDy). The characteristic in-frame TGA codons and selenocysteine insertion sequence elements in the oyster deiodinase cDNAs supported the activity of them. Furthermore, seven orthologs of deiodinases were found by a tblastn search in the mollusk Lottia gigantea and the annelid Capitella teleta. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the deiodinase gene originated from an common ancestor and a clade-specific gene duplication occurred independently during the differentiation of the mollusk, annelid, and vertebrate lineages. The distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns implied functional divergence of the two deiodinases. The expression of CgDx and CgDy was influenced by L-thyroxine T4, and putative thyroid hormone responsive elements were found in their promoters, which suggested that the oyster deiodinases were feedback regulated by TH. Epinephrine stimulated the expression level of CgDx and CgDy, suggesting an interaction effect between different hormones. This study provides the first evidence for the existence of a conserved TH feedback regulation mechanism in mollusks, providing insights into TH evolution.

  4. Gene expression correlated with delay in shell formation in larval Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) exposed to experimental ocean acidification provides insights into shell formation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wit, Pierre; Durland, Evan; Ventura, Alexander; Langdon, Chris J

    2018-02-22

    Despite recent work to characterize gene expression changes associated with larval development in oysters, the mechanism by which the larval shell is first formed is still largely unknown. In Crassostrea gigas, this shell forms within the first 24 h post fertilization, and it has been demonstrated that changes in water chemistry can cause delays in shell formation, shell deformations and higher mortality rates. In this study, we use the delay in shell formation associated with exposure to CO 2 -acidified seawater to identify genes correlated with initial shell deposition. By fitting linear models to gene expression data in ambient and low aragonite saturation treatments, we are able to isolate 37 annotated genes correlated with initial larval shell formation, which can be categorized into 1) ion transporters, 2) shell matrix proteins and 3) protease inhibitors. Clustering of the gene expression data into co-expression networks further supports the result of the linear models, and also implies an important role of dynein motor proteins as transporters of cellular components during the initial shell formation process. Using an RNA-Seq approach with high temporal resolution allows us to identify a conceptual model for how oyster larval calcification is initiated. This work provides a foundation for further studies on how genetic variation in these identified genes could affect fitness of oyster populations subjected to future environmental changes, such as ocean acidification.

  5. Suppression substractive hybridisation (SSH) and real time PCR reveal differential gene expression in the Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, challenged with Ostreid herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, T; Faury, N; Barbosa-Solomieu, V; Moreau, K

    2011-07-01

    Virus-induced genes were identified using suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) from Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, haemocytes challenged by OsHV-1. A total of 304 clones from SSH forward library were sequenced. Among these sequences, some homologues corresponded to (i) immune related genes (macrophage express protein, IK cytokine, interferon-induced protein 44 or multicopper oxidase), (ii) apoptosis related genes (Bcl-2) and (iii) cell signalling and virus receptor genes (glypican). Molecular characterization and phylogenic analysis of 3 immune-related genes (macrophage expressed protein, multicopper oxidase and immunoglobulin domain cell adhesion molecule) were performed. Finally, quantitative PCR revealed significant changes in the expression of immune related genes (multicopper oxidase, macrophage expressed protein, myeloid differentiation factor 88 and interferon-induced protein 44) in oysters experimentally challenged with OsHV-1. These findings provide a first basis for studying the role of innate immunity in response to viruses in bivalves and identified genes may serve as markers of interest in breeding programs in order to obtain selected oysters presenting OsHV-1 resistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Gills are an initial target of zinc oxide nanoparticles in oysters Crassostrea gigas, leading to mitochondrial disruption and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevisan, Rafael; Delapedra, Gabriel; Mello, Danielle F.; Arl, Miriam [Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Schmidt, Éder C. [Department of Cell Biology, Embryology and Genetic, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88049-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Meder, Fabian; Monopoli, Marco [Centre for Bionano Interactions, University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo [Federal Institute of Santa Catarina, Campus Garopaba, Laboratory of Histological Markers, 88495-000 Garopaba, SC (Brazil); Bouzon, Zenilda L. [Department of Cell Biology, Embryology and Genetic, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88049-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Fisher, Andrew S. [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, PL4 8AA Plymouth (United Kingdom); Sheehan, David [Department of Biochemistry, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Dafre, Alcir L., E-mail: alcir.dafre@ufsc.br [Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • ZnONP exposure causes an initial accumulation of zinc in gills and later in digestive gland. • Zinc burden occurs by ZnONP endocytosis or uptake of ionic zinc after dissociation. • ZnONP exposure disrupts mitochondrial ultrastructure in both tissues. • Mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress are major features of ZnONP acute toxicity. - Abstract: The increasing industrial use of nanomaterials during the last decades poses a potential threat to the environment and in particular to organisms living in the aquatic environment. In the present study, the toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP) was investigated in Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. The nanoscale of ZnONP, in vehicle or ultrapure water, was confirmed, presenting an average size ranging from 28 to 88 nm. In seawater, aggregation was detected by TEM and DLS analysis, with an increased average size ranging from 1 to 2 μm. Soluble or nanoparticulated zinc presented similar toxicity, displaying a LC{sub 50} (96 h) around 30 mg/L. High zinc dissociation from ZnONP, releasing ionic zinc in seawater, is a potential route for zinc assimilation and ZnONP toxicity. To investigate mechanisms of toxicity, oysters were treated with 4 mg/L ZnONP for 6, 24 or 48 h. ZnONP accumulated in gills (24 and 48 h) and digestive glands (48 h). Ultrastructural analysis of gills revealed electron-dense vesicles near the cell membrane and loss of mitochondrial cristae (6 h). Swollen mitochondria and a more conspicuous loss of mitochondrial cristae were observed after 24 h. Mitochondria with disrupted membranes and an increased number of cytosolic vesicles displaying electron-dense material were observed 48 h post exposure. Digestive gland showed similar changes, but these were delayed relative to gills. ZnONP exposure did not greatly affect thiol homeostasis (reduced and oxidized glutathione) or immunological parameters (phagocytosis, hemocyte viability and activation and total

  7. Removal of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus fecalis, coliphage MS2, poliovirus, and hepatitis A virus from oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and hard shell clams (Mercinaria mercinaria) by depuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, David C; Lovelace, Greg L; Sobsey, Mark D

    2010-10-15

    Filter-feeding bivalve mollusks (shellfish) can bioaccumulate pathogenic microorganisms in up to 1000-fold higher levels than overlying waters, and therefore disease risks are associated with consuming raw or partially cooked shellfish. Many of these shellfish-borne diseases are due to enteric bacteria and viruses associated with fecal contamination. To control shellfish-borne diseases, guidelines for shellfish harvest waters and shellfish meat have been devised, which include cleansing of contaminated shellfish by depuration in controlled systems, heat pasteurization, or relay to clean waters. This study examines the depuration of oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and hard shell clams (Mercinaria mercinaria) in a flow-through depuration system under variable temperature (12 °C, 18 °C, and 25 °C), salinity (8 ppt, 18 ppt, and 28 ppt), turbidity (parameters of water temperature improved E. coli, MS2, poliovirus and HAV depuration, and optimized salinity improved E. coli, E. faecalis, and MS2 depuration rates. In hard shell clams, salinity improved E. coli and E. faecalis depuration rates. Adjusting turbidity, pH or algae did not improve microorganism depuration in either oysters or hard shell clams, with the exception of turbidity on E. faecalis in hard shell clams. Microorganism depuration rates in oysters from greatest to least were: MS2>E. coli>E. faecalis>poliovirus>HAV, and in clams depuration rates from greatest to least were: E. coli>E. faecalis>HAV>MS2>poliovirus. Because E. coli and E. faecalis were removed at faster rates than HAV and poliovirus, these fecal bacteria appear to be poor process indicators of the virological quality of depurated oysters and hard shell clams. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Growth of the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) in a high-turbidity environment: Comparison of model simulations based on scope for growth and dynamic energy budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillé, Laurent; Lerouxel, Astrid; Dutertre, Mickaël; Haure, Joël; Barillé, Anne-Laure; Pouvreau, Stéphane; Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne

    2011-11-01

    We compared growth simulations by dynamic energy budget (DEB) and scope for growth (SFG) models of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, cultivated in Bourgneuf Bay on the French Atlantic coast. This bay is located at a latitude in the middle of the European range of the species, and is characterized by high concentrations of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and a marked gradient between high-turbidity sites in the north (daily SPM > 500 mg L - 1 ) and intermediate-turbidity sites in the south. The models use two forcing variables: seawater temperature and food density. We tested two indices of food availability: chlorophyll a and microalgal concentrations. In the SFG model, food intake is simulated by a type-II Holling functional response, as in the DEB formulation, and the effect of turbidity in both models is therefore taken into account principally through the half-saturation coefficient for this functional response. Chlorophyll a concentrations were three to four times higher at the high-turbidity site, but oyster growth rates were significantly lower at this site than at the intermediate-turbidity site. A comparison of observed and simulated values showed that the DEB model performed better than the SFG model if microalgal concentration was used as an index of food availability, with the SFG model underestimating oyster growth in summer and autumn. However, the SFG model was much more efficient if chlorophyll a concentrations were used, with the DEB model systematically overestimating summer and autumn growth. This comparison suggests that both SFG and DEB simulations could be improved, to give a more accurate description of oyster growth in a turbid environment, and that the pre-ingestive selection mechanisms used by suspension feeders in turbid environments should probably be included in the formulation of feeding processes.

  9. GREATER HEMOCYTE BACTERICIDAL ACTIVITY IN OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) FROM A RELATIVELY CONTAMINATED SITE IN PENSACOLA BAY, FLORIDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivalve mollusks such as Crassostrea virginica inhabiting polluted estuaries and coastal areas may bioaccumulate high concentrations of contaminants without apparent ill effects. However, changes in putative internal defense activities have been associated with contaminant accumu...

  10. Uptake of heavy metals and PAHs from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill by soft tissues and shells of the coastal oyster Crassostrea virginica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarine, P. D.; Roopnarine, D.; Gillikin, D. P.; Anderson, L. C.; Ballester, M.; Goodwin, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which dumped more than 600,000 tons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) between April and August 2010 is the largest accidental spill in history. While immediate environmental impacts of the spill, such as direct and fatal fouling of wildlife and the physical contamination of coastal areas were easily observed, any long-term effects of the spill are still being determined. Here we examined the incorporation of spill components into the shells and soft tissues of the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Specifically, we searched for evidence that heavy metals or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in the carbonate shell (metals only) or various tissues of the oyster. Crassostrea virginica is a species of great economic significance, and is also an important basal primary consumer in the coastal GOM food web. Preliminary evidence presented in 2010 compared shells of specimens from the GOM collected in the 20th century, May 2010 prior to landfall of Deepwater oil on the Louisiana coast, and August 2010. Those results indicated that specimens collected in August 2010 had relatively higher concentrations of vanadium (V) and lead (Pb) in their shells compared to historical and May 2010 specimens. Those results have now been confirmed, and we show that specimens collected in August 2010, after exposure to the spill, have significantly higher concentrations of V, Pb and chromium (Cr) in their shells. Furthermore, examination of soft tissues shows that V, Pb and cobalt (Co) are present in significantly higher concentrations in gill and muscle tissues of August 2010 specimens. Analyses of PAH concentrations are currently being conducted on the soft tissues of specimens collected in May and August 2010, as well as specimens collected outside of spill-affected areas in the GOM. Ultimately, compilation of contaminant occurrences and concentrations coupled with food web models will allow us to predict the potential for

  11. Ecological studies on the seasonal production of the edible oyster, Crassostrea madrasensis (Preston) in Cochin Backwater, Kerala

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Purushan, K.S.; Gopalan, U.K.; Rao, T.S.S.

    the intertidal ones, but as regards percentage meat weight the latter out-weighed the former. Among environmental variables, salinity seemed to be the foremost factor in influencing the production of oysters. A large majority (90-98%) of the intertidal oysters...

  12. A Preliminary Study on the Pattern, the Physiological Bases and the Molecular Mechanism of the Adductor Muscle Scar Pigmentation in Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Yu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The melanin pigmentation of the adductor muscle scar and the outer surface of the shell are among attractive features and their pigmentation patterns and mechanism still remains unknown in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. To study these pigmentation patterns, the colors of the adductor muscle scar vs. the outer surface of the shell on the same side were compared. No relevance was found between the colors of the adductor muscle scars and the corresponding outer surface of the shells, suggesting that their pigmentation processes were independent. Interestingly, a relationship between the color of the adductor muscle scars and the dried soft-body weight of Pacific oysters was found, which could be explained by the high hydroxyl free radical scavenging capacity of the muscle attached to the black adductor muscle scar. After the transcriptomes of pigmented and unpigmented adductor muscles and mantles were studied by RNAseq and compared, it was found that the retinol metabolism pathway were likely to be involved in melanin deposition on the adductor muscle scar and the outer surface of the shell, and that the different members of the tyrosinase or Cytochrome P450 gene families could play a role in the independent pigmentation of different organs.

  13. Heavy metal concentrations in diploid and triploid oysters (Crassostrea gigas) from three farms on the north-central coast of Sinaloa, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Sevilla, Norma Patricia; Villanueva-Fonseca, Brenda Paulina; Góngora-Gómez, Andrés Martin; García-Ulloa, Manuel; Domínguez-Orozco, Ana Laura; Ortega-Izaguirre, Rogelio; Campos Villegas, Lorena Elizabeth

    2017-10-03

    The concentrations of Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, and Hg in diploid and triploid oysters from three farms (Guasave, Ahome, and Navolato) on the north-central coast of Sinaloa, Mexico, were assessed based on samples recovered during a single culture cycle 2013-2014. Metal burdens were more strongly correlated (p  Cu > Cd > Pb > Hg. For all three farms, the mean concentrations of Cd and Pb in Crassostrea gigas were high, ranging from 2.52 to 7.98 μg/g wet weight for Cd and from 0.91 to 2.83 μg/g wet weight for Pb. Diploid and triploid oysters from the Guasave farm contained high levels of Cu (76.41 and 68.97 μg/g wet weight, respectively). Cu, Cd, and Zn were highly correlated (p < 0.05), and their concentrations may be influenced by agrochemical inputs. The mean levels of Cu for the Guasave farm and of Cd and Pb for all three farms exceeded permissible limits and represented a threat to human health during the sampling period (July 2014 to July 2014).

  14. A restoration suitability index model for the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica in the Mission-Aransas Estuary, TX, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Beseres Pollack

    Full Text Available Oyster reefs are one of the most threatened marine habitats on earth, with habitat loss resulting from water quality degradation, coastal development, destructive fishing practices, overfishing, and storm impacts. For successful and sustainable oyster reef restoration efforts, it is necessary to choose sites that support long-term growth and survival of oysters. Selection of suitable sites is critically important as it can greatly influence mortality factors and may largely determine the ultimate success of the restoration project. The application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS provides an effective methodology for identifying suitable sites for oyster reef restoration and removes much of the uncertainty involved in the sometimes trial and error selection process. This approach also provides an objective and quantitative tool for planning future oyster reef restoration efforts. The aim of this study was to develop a restoration suitability index model and reef quality index model to characterize locations based on their potential for successful reef restoration within the Mission-Aransas Estuary, Texas, USA. The restoration suitability index model focuses on salinity, temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and depth, while the reef quality index model focuses on abundance of live oysters, dead shell, and spat. Size-specific Perkinsus marinus infection levels were mapped to illustrate general disease trends. This application was effective in identifying suitable sites for oyster reef restoration, is flexible in its use, and provides a mechanism for considering alternative approaches. The end product is a practical decision-support tool that can be used by coastal resource managers to improve oyster restoration efforts. As oyster reef restoration activities continue at small and large-scales, site selection criteria are critical for assisting stakeholders and managers and for maximizing long-term sustainability of oyster resources.

  15. Integrating the effects of salinity on the physiology of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, in the northern Gulf of Mexico through a Dynamic Energy Budget model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaud, Romain; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Casas, Sandra M.; Bacher, C.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2017-01-01

    We present a Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model for the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, which enables the inclusion of salinity as a third environmental variable, on top of the standard foodr and temperature variables. Salinity changes have various effects on the physiology of oysters, potentially altering filtration and respiration rates, and ultimately impacting growth, reproduction and mortality. We tested different hypotheses as to how to include these effects in a DEB model for C. virginica. Specifically, we tested two potential mechanisms to explain changes in oyster shell growth (cm), tissue dry weight (g) and gonad dry weight (g) when salinity moves away from the ideal range: 1) a negative effect on filtration rate and 2) an additional somatic maintenance cost. Comparative simulations of shell growth, dry tissue biomass and dry gonad weight in two monitored sites in coastal Louisiana experiencing salinity from 0 to 28 were statistically analyzed to determine the best hypothesis. Model parameters were estimated through the covariation method, using literature data and a set of specifically designed ecophysiological experiments. The model was validated through independent field studies in estuaries along the northern Gulf of Mexico. Our results suggest that salinity impacts C. virginica’s energy budget predominantly through effects on filtration rate. With an overwhelming number of environmental factors impacting organisms, and increasing exposure to novel and extreme conditions, the mechanistic nature of the DEB model with its ability to incorporate more than the standard food and temperature variables provides a powerful tool to verify hypotheses and predict individual organism performance across a range of conditions.

  16. Fight back and adapt: Industry perspectives on the management of the invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in the Limfjord, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dan Dodensig; Hegland, Troels Jacob

    2018-01-01

    further in Scandinavia. Of particular concern in the Limfjord, the strait separating the northern part of the Jutland peninsula from the rest, is the fact that Pacific oyster competes with blue mussels, Mytilus Edulis, (as well as European oyster) for food and space (Troost 2010). This article aims 1...... by means of stakeholder input from the mussel fishery industry. The article is concluded with a discussion of a possible multi-faceted strategy for simultaneously fighting the spread of Pacific oyster and adapting to it as a new resource....

  17. Genetic parameters of resistance to Vibrio aestuarianus, and OsHV-1 infections in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, at three different life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azéma, Patrick; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Boudry, Pierre; Renault, Tristan; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Dégremont, Lionel

    2017-02-15

    In France, two main diseases threaten Pacific oyster production. Since 2008, Crassostrea gigas spat have suffered massive losses due to the ostreid herpesvirus OsHV-1, and since 2012, significant mortalities in commercial-size adults have been related to infection by the bacterium Vibrio aestuarianus. The genetic basis for resistance to V. aestuarianus and OsHV-1 and the nature of the genetic correlation between these two traits were investigated by using 20 half-sib sire families, each containing two full-sib families. For each disease, controlled infectious challenges were conducted using naïve oysters that were 3 to 26 months old. In addition, siblings were tested under field, pond and raceway conditions to determine whether laboratory trials reflected mortality events that occur in the oyster industry. First, we estimated the genetic basis of resistance to V. aestuarianus in C. gigas. Susceptibility to the infection was low for oysters in spat stage but increased with later life stages. Second, we confirmed a strong genetic basis of resistance to OsHV-1 infection at early stages and demonstrated that it was also strong at later stages. Most families had increased resistance to OsHV-1 infection from the spat to adult stages, while others consistently showed low or high mortality rates related to OsHV-1 infection, regardless of the life stage. Our third main finding was the absence of genetic correlations between resistance to OsHV-1 infection and resistance to V. aestuarianus infection. Selective breeding to enhance resistance to OsHV-1 infection could be achieved through selective breeding at early stages and would not affect resistance to V. aestuarianus infection. However, our results suggest that the potential to select for improved resistance to V. aestuarianus is lower. Selection for dual resistance to OsHV-1 and V. aestuarianus infection in C. gigas might reduce the impact of these two major diseases by selecting families that have the highest

  18. Non-additive effects of ocean acidification in combination with warming on the larval proteome of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harney, Ewan; Artigaud, Sébastien; Le Souchu, Pierrick; Miner, Philippe; Corporeau, Charlotte; Essid, Hafida; Pichereau, Vianney; Nunes, Flavia L D

    2016-03-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide results in ocean acidification and warming, significantly impacting marine invertebrate larvae development. We investigated how ocean acidification in combination with warming affected D-veliger larvae of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Larvae were reared for 40h under either control (pH8.1, 20 °C), acidified (pH7.9, 20 °C), warm (pH8.1, 22 °C) or warm acidified (pH7.9, 22 °C) conditions. Larvae in acidified conditions were significantly smaller than in the control, but warm acidified conditions mitigated negative effects on size, and increased calcification. A proteomic approach employing two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was used to quantify proteins and relate their abundance to phenotypic traits. In total 12 differentially abundant spots were identified by nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. These proteins had roles in metabolism, intra- and extra-cellular matrix formations, stress response, and as molecular chaperones. Seven spots responded to reduced pH, four to increased temperature, and six to acidification and warming. Reduced abundance of proteins such as ATP synthase and GAPDH, and increased abundance of superoxide dismutase, occurred when both pH and temperature changes were imposed, suggesting altered metabolism and enhanced oxidative stress. These results identify key proteins that may be involved in the acclimation of C. gigas larvae to ocean acidification and warming. Increasing atmospheric CO2 raises sea surface temperatures and results in ocean acidification, two climatic variables known to impact marine organisms. Larvae of calcifying species may be particularly at risk to such changing environmental conditions. The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is ecologically and commercially important, and understanding its ability to acclimate to climate change will help to predict how aquaculture of this species is likely to be impacted. Modest, yet realistic changes in pH and

  19. Bioavailability of cadmium, copper, mercury, lead, and zinc in subtropical coastal lagoons from the southeast Gulf of California using mangrove oysters (Crassostrea corteziensis and Crassostrea palmula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Osuna, Federico; Osuna-Martínez, Carmen C

    2015-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were assessed in the edible tissues of Crassrotrea corteziensis oysters collected during the rainy and dry seasons in 27 sites from 8 coastal lagoons of the southeast Gulf of California. In addition, C. palmula oysters were sampled at 9 sites from the same mangrove roots where C. corteziensis oysters were collected. Metal analyses were performed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Cd, Cu, and Zn), graphite furnace (Pb), and cold vapor detection (Hg). The obtained mean levels were (µg g(-1) dry weight) as follows: Cd 6.05 ± 2.77, Cu 60.0 ± 33.4, Hg 0.38 ± 0.17, Pb 1.11 ± 0.63, and Zn 777 ± 528 µg g(-1). For all metals except Hg, the concentrations were greater during dry season than during rainy seasons. The high levels, particularly that for Cd, were related to upwelling along the eastern Gulf of California. High Hg levels in the rainy season were associated with the transport of materials from the watershed to the lagoon. Shrimp farming, agriculture, and other sources were considered as potential sources to explain the differences in metal bioavailability in the 8 lagoons. The mean concentrations of Cd (Santa María-La Reforma lagoon), Cu [San Ignacio-Navachiste-El Macapule (SINM), Urías (URI), and Altata-Ensenada del Pabellón lagoons], and zinc (Zn) (URI, Santa María-Ohuira-Topolobampo, El Colorado, and SINM lagoons) during the dry season were greater than the maximum permissible limits. C. palmula collected in 8 sites where they were present simultaneously with C. corteziensis had consistently greater metal levels than C. corteziensis, but correlation analyses showed a high and significant (P < 0.05) correlation between metal concentrations in both species. The correlation equations obtained are useful where the same species is not distributed and is necessary to compare results from distinct regions.

  20. Feeding traits of the European flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, and the invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Hansen, Benni Winding; Vismann, Bent

    2017-01-01

    °C and a salinity of 25. The CR of O. edulis was one to three times lower than that of C. gigas for the three smaller algal species (5−15 µm) but not different for the two larger algae. Algae in the size range 7−32 µm were retained with 100% RE by both oysters, but the smallest alga was retained...

  1. Larvae of the Commercial Tropical Oyster Crassostrea belcheri (Sowerby) are induced to settle by Pheromones from the Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussarawit, Somchai; Cedhagen, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    other species within the same genus or from a different genus. Settling frequency was increased by the presence of living oysters together with soaked spatfall collectors in commercial aquaculture. The fact that larvae are induced to settle by pheromones released from the adults is an important...

  2. First evidence of a potential antibacterial activity involving a laccase-type enzyme of the phenoloxidase system in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas haemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Acosta, Andrea; Saulnier, Denis; Pommier, Mylène; Haffner, Philippe; De Decker, Sophie; Renault, Tristan; Thomas-Guyon, Hélène

    2011-12-01

    Phenoloxidases (POs) are a group of copper proteins including tyrosinase, catecholase and laccase. In several insects and crustaceans, antibacterial substances are produced through the PO cascade, participating in the direct killing of invading microorganisms. However, although POs are widely recognised as an integral part of the invertebrate immune defence system, experimental evidence is lacking that these properties are conserved in molluscs, and more particularly in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. In the present study, Vibrio splendidus LGP32 and Vibrio aestuarianus 02/041 growths were affected, after being treated with C. gigas haemocyte lysate supernatant (HLS), and either a common substrate of POs, l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), to detect catecholase-type PO activity, or a specific substrate of laccase, p-phenylenediamine (PPD), to detect laccase-type PO activity. Interestingly, a higher bacterial growth inhibition was observed in the presence of PPD than in the presence of L-DOPA. These effects were suppressed when the specific PO inhibitor, phenylthiourea (PTU), was added to the medium. Results of the present study suggest, for the first time in a mollusc species, that antibacterial activities of HLS from C. gigas potentially involve POs, and more particularly laccase catalysed reactions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ocean acidification stimulates alkali signal pathway: A bicarbonate sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase from oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates physiological changes induced by CO2 exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiudan; Wang, Mengqiang; Jia, Zhihao; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Shuai; Chen, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) has been demonstrated to have severe effects on marine organisms, especially marine calcifiers. However, the impacts of OA on the physiology of marine calcifiers and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an acid-base sensor in response to [HCO 3 - ] and an intracellular source of cyclic AMP (cAMP). In the present study, an ortholog of sAC was identified from pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated as CgsAC) and the catalytic region of CgsAC was cloned and expressed. Similar to the native CgsAC from gill tissues, the recombinant CgsAC protein (rCgsAC) exhibited [HCO 3 - ] mediated cAMP-forming activity, which could be inhibited by a small molecule KH7. After 16days of CO 2 exposure (pH=7.50), the mRNA transcripts of CgsAC increased in muscle, mantle, hepatopancreas, gill, male gonad and haemocytes, and two truncated CgsAC forms of 45kD and 20kD were produced. Cytosolic CgsAC could be translocated from the cytoplasm and nuclei to the membrane in response to CO 2 exposure. Besides, CO 2 exposure could increase the production of cAMP and intracellular pH of haemocytes, which was regulated by CgsAC (pocean acidification on marine calcifiers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of Thyroid Hormones and Functional Characterization of Thyroid Hormone Receptor in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Provide Insight into Evolution of the Thyroid Hormone System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen; Xu, Fei; Qu, Tao; Zhang, Rui; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play important roles in development, metamorphosis, and metabolism in vertebrates. During the past century, TH functions were regarded as a synapomorphy of vertebrates. More recently, accumulating evidence has gradually convinced us that TH functions also occur in invertebrate chordates. To date, however, TH-related studies in non-chordate invertebrates have been limited. In this study, THs were qualitatively detected by two reliable methods (HPLC and LC/MS) in a well-studied molluscan species, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Quantitative measurement of THs during the development of C. gigas showed high TH contents during embryogenesis and that oyster embryos may synthesize THs endogenously. As a first step in elucidating the TH signaling cascade, an ortholog of vertebrate TH receptor (TR), the most critical gene mediating TH effects, was cloned in C. gigas. The sequence of CgTR has conserved DNA-binding and ligand-binding domains that normally characterize these receptors. Experimental results demonstrated that CgTR can repress gene expression through binding to promoters of target genes and can interact with oyster retinoid X receptor. Moreover, CgTR mRNA expression was activated by T4 and the transcriptional activity of CgTR promoter was repressed by unliganded CgTR protein. An atypical thyroid hormone response element (CgDR5) was found in the promoter of CgTR, which was verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). These results indicated that some of the CgTR function is conserved. However, the EMSA assay showed that DNA binding specificity of CgTR was different from that of the vertebrate TR and experiments with two dual-luciferase reporter systems indicated that l-thyroxine, 3,3',5-triiodothyronine, and triiodothyroacetic acid failed to activate the transcriptional activity of CgTR. This is the first study to functionally characterize TR in mollusks. The presence of THs and the functions of CgTR in mollusks contribute

  5. Impacts of ocean acidification on gene expression and biomineralisation in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagusche, F.; Pouvreau, S.; Trueman, C.; Long, S.; Hauton, C.

    2012-04-01

    The published evidence of impacts of ocean acidification and on marine calcifiers has emphasized the need to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomineralisation. Crassostrea gigas is an ideal organism to examine these processes as: 1) the hatchery rearing of larval stages is well constrained, 2) studies have established an ontogenetic switch in deposition of carbonate polymorphs from aragonite in larval shells to calcite in adults and 3) it is a globally-important commercial species. Research summarized in this presentation will identify some of the molecular mechanisms involved in calcification processes during ontogeny of Crassostrea gigas, as well as possible impacts of changes in environmental conditions such as temperature and pH. Data will be presented from a quantitative real-time PCR study of the changes in gene expression during development in different environments. Additionally scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy analyses of shell microstructures and composition will be summarised to correlate changes in gene expression with end-point differences in shell structure. Preliminary results suggest that changes in the environmental conditions lead to differences in expression patterns of genes involved in biomineralisation processes. The combined effects of ambient seawater temperature and low pH show the greatest negative effect on larval shell development, identified as malformations, eroded shell surfaces and a significant decrease in shell size. However, the effect of higher seawater temperature seems to amend the effects of ocean acidification on larval shell development.

  6. Recovery of wild Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas in terms of reproduction and gametogenesis two-years after the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill Accident off the West Coast of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondol, Mostafizur Rahman; Keshavmurthy, Shashank; Lee, Hee-Jung; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Park, Heung-Sik; Park, Sang-Rul; Kang, Chang-Keun; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2015-12-01

    The Hebei Spirit oil spill in December 2007 at Taean off the west coast of Korea was the largest oil tanker accident in Korea. However, the impact of the spill on physiology of benthic animals remains largely unknown. Two-years after the accident, we compared reproductive effort and annual gametogenesis of the wild Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, residing at oil spill site with a control oyster population in Incheon Bay, North-West coast of Korea. Results showed that the oyster sampled from the oil spill site showed a significantly higher (279.0 mg standard animal-1, P<0.05) growth by tissue dry weight to that of the control population (228.0 mg standard animal-1, P<0.05). Histology revealed that there was no significant difference in the annual gametogenic pattern between the two populations, and most of the females of both populations spawned between August and September. During spawning season, egg mass of oysters determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) in the oil spill area was significantly higher (136.3 mg standard animal-1, P<0.05) than the control population (120.5 mg standard animal-1, P<0.05). The tissue protein level in the oysters at the contaminated area was significantly higher (102.6 mg standard animal-1, P<0.05) than the level measured from the control oysters (81.4 mg standard animal-1, P<0.05). The observed better biological performances of oysters at the contaminated site suggested their recovery of the physiological status to normal level after two years of the oil spill accident.

  7. Enterococcus spp. Resistant to Multiple Antimicrobial Drugs and Determination of Fecal Contamination Levels in Mangrove Oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Annes Rubião

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine and compare the Most Probable Number (MPN of Total Coliforms (TC, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. and to characterize the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Enterococcus spp. isolated from oysters collected in the Barra de Guaratiba Mangrove, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The enumeration of E. coli has been used to indicate fecal contamination and hygienic-sanitary conditions of bivalve molluscs. Enterococci are capable to transfer several antimicrobial resistance genes to pathogenic bacteria, including those from Gram-negative group. The oysters were bought from local fishermen and a total of 123 individuals were analyzed. The TC, E. coli and Enterococcus spp. MPN mean were 26,300/100 g, 3,260/100 g and 2,820/100 g, respectively. The only correlation found was between TC and E. coli. Two strains of Enterococcus spp. were resistant to three different antimicrobial categories, including a high level resistance to streptomycin. One strain presented intermediate resistance to vancomycin. The E. coli levels exceeded the limits established by international legislation. This microbiological contamination in oysters reflects the water pollution and indicates a probable contamination of other seafood species from this mangrove, which can represent a risk for consumers and a threat to the environment and public health.

  8. Temporal variations in metallothionein concentration and subcellular distribution of metals in gills and digestive glands of the oyster Crassostrea angulata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Trombini

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The metallothionein levels and metal concentrations in whole body, digestive gland and gills of Crassostrea angulata were analyzed in field samples collected from the River Guadalquivir estuary over several years following a mining waste spill upstream. The subcellular distribution of metals was analyzed to determine the mechanisms involved in the detoxification process. The highest metallothionein levels were reported in the digestive gland shortly after the mining contamination event. In this organ, metals are stored preferentially in the non-cytosolic fraction when increased bioaccumulation takes place. In the cytosol of the gills, metals are associated with metallothionein, whereas in the digestive gland, the distribution of metals between metallothioneins and high molecular weight proteins is similar. Metallothionein variation cannot be explained by metals alone; other abiotic factors must be taken into account. In order to use metallothionein as a metal exposure biomarker in field studies, natural variability needs to be taken into account for the correct interpretation of results.

  9. Characterization of reference genes for qPCR analysis in various tissues of the Fujian oyster Crassostrea angulata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fei; Yang, Bingye; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-07-01

    Accurate quantification of transcripts using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) depends on the identification of reliable reference genes for normalization. This study aimed to identify and validate seven reference genes, including actin-2 ( ACT-2), elongation factor 1 alpha ( EF-1α), elongation factor 1 beta ( EF-1β), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase ( GAPDH), ubiquitin ( UBQ), β-tubulin ( β-TUB), and 18S ribosomal RNA, from Crassostrea angulata, a valuable marine bivalve cultured worldwide. Transcript levels of the candidate reference genes were examined using qPCR analysis and showed differential expression patterns in the mantle, gill, adductor muscle, labial palp, visceral mass, hemolymph and gonad tissues. Quantitative data were analyzed using the geNorm software to assess the expression stability of the candidate reference genes, revealing that β-TUB and UBQ were the most stable genes. The commonly used GAPDH and 18S rRNA showed low stability, making them unsuitable candidates in this system. The expression pattern of the G protein β-subunit gene ( Gβ) across tissue types was also examined and normalized to the expression of each or both of UBQ and β-TUB as internal controls. This revealed consistent trends with all three normalization approaches, thus validating the reliability of UBQ and β-TUB as optimal internal controls. The study provides the first validated reference genes for accurate data normalization in transcript profiling in Crassostrea angulata, which will be indispensable for further functional genomics studies in this economically valuable marine bivalve.

  10. Environmental concentrations of irgarol, diuron and S-metolachlor induce deleterious effects on gametes and embryos of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Huong; Morin, Bénédicte; Pardon, Patrick; Gonzalez, Patrice; Budzinski, Hélène; Cachot, Jérôme

    2013-08-01

    Irgarol and diuron are the most representative "organic booster biocides" that replace organotin compounds in antifouling paints, and metolachlor is one of the most extensively used chloroacetamide herbicides in agriculture. The toxicity of S-metolachlor, irgarol and diuron was evaluated in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) gametes or embryos exposed to concentrations of pesticides ranging from 0.1× to 1000×, with 1× corresponding to environmental concentrations of the three studied pesticides in Arcachon Bay (France). Exposures were performed on (1) spermatozoa alone (2) oocytes alone and (3) both spermatozoa and oocytes, and adverse effects on fertilization success and offspring development were recorded. The results showed that the fertilizing capacity of spermatozoa was significantly affected after gamete exposure to pesticide concentrations as low as 1× of irgarol and diuron and 10× of metolachlor. The offspring obtained from pesticide-exposed spermatozoa displayed a dose-dependent increase in developmental abnormalities. In contrast, treating oocytes with pesticide concentrations up to 10× did not alter fertilization rate and offspring quality. However, a significant decline in fertilization success and increase in abnormal D-larvae prevalence were observed at higher concentrations 10× (0.1 μg L(-1)) for S-metolachlor and 100× for irgarol (1.0 μg L(-1)) and diuron (4.0 μg L(-1)). Irgarol, diuron and S-metolachlor also induced a dose-dependent increase in abnormal D-larvae prevalence when freshly fertilized embryos were treated with pesticide concentrations as low as concentration of 1× (0.01 μg L(-1) for irgarol or S-metolachlor, and 0.04 μg L(-1) for diuron). The two bioassays on C. gigas spermatozoa and embryos displayed similar sensitivities to the studied pesticides while oocytes were less sensitive. Diuron, irgarol and S-metolachlor induced spermiotoxicity and embryotoxicity at environmentally relevant concentrations and therefore might be

  11. The effect of algae diets (Skeletonema costatum and Rhodomonas baltica) on the biochemical composition and sensory characteristics of Pacific cupped oysters (Crassostrea gigas) during land-based refinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houcke, van Jasper; Medina, Isabel; Maehre, Hanne K.; Cornet, Josiane; Cardinal, Mireille; Linssen, Jozef; Luten, Joop

    2017-01-01

    Oyster refinement, a common practice in France, is aimed at increasing the weight of oyster tissue and influencing the taste properties of the refined oysters. Refinement usually takes place in land-based systems where the oysters are fed with relatively high concentrations of microalgae. In this

  12. Effects of Florida Red Tides on histone variant expression and DNA methylation in the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Romero, Rodrigo; Suarez-Ulloa, Victoria [Environmental Epigenetics Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Rodriguez-Casariego, Javier [Environmental Epigenetics Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment Laboratory, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Garcia-Souto, Daniel [Departamento de Bioquimica, Xenetica e Inmunoloxia, Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Diaz, Gabriel [Environmental Epigenetics Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Smith, Abraham [Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment Laboratory, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Pasantes, Juan Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Xenetica e Inmunoloxia, Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Rand, Gary [Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment Laboratory, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Eirin-Lopez, Jose M., E-mail: jeirinlo@fiu.edu [Environmental Epigenetics Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Massive algal proliferations known as Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) represent one of the most important threats to coastal areas. Among them, the so-called Florida Red Tides (FRTs, caused by blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis and associated brevetoxins) are particularly detrimental in the southeastern U.S., causing high mortality rates and annual losses in excess of $40 million. The ability of marine organisms to cope with environmental stressors (including those produced during HABs) is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter resulting in phenotypic changes caused by heritable modifications in gene expression, without involving changes in the genetic (DNA) sequence. Yet, studies examining cause-effect relationships between environmental stressors, specific epigenetic mechanisms and subsequent responses are still lacking. The present work contributes to increase this knowledge by investigating the effects of Florida Red Tides on two types of mechanisms participating in the epigenetic memory of Eastern oysters: histone variants and DNA methylation. For that purpose, a HAB simulation was conducted in laboratory conditions, exposing oysters to increasing concentrations of K. brevis. The obtained results revealed, for the first time, the existence of H2A.X, H2A.Z and macroH2A genes in this organism, encoding histone variants potentially involved in the maintenance of genome integrity during responses to the genotoxic effect of brevetoxins. Additionally, an increase in H2A.X phosphorylation (γH2A.X, a marker of DNA damage) and a decrease in global DNA methylation were observed as the HAB simulation progressed. Overall, the present work provides a basis to better understand how epigenetic mechanisms participate in responses to environmental stress in marine invertebrates, opening new avenues to incorporate environmental epigenetics approaches into management and conservation programs.

  13. Effects of Florida Red Tides on histone variant expression and DNA methylation in the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Romero, Rodrigo; Suarez-Ulloa, Victoria; Rodriguez-Casariego, Javier; Garcia-Souto, Daniel; Diaz, Gabriel; Smith, Abraham; Pasantes, Juan Jose; Rand, Gary; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M

    2017-05-01

    Massive algal proliferations known as Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) represent one of the most important threats to coastal areas. Among them, the so-called Florida Red Tides (FRTs, caused by blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis and associated brevetoxins) are particularly detrimental in the southeastern U.S., causing high mortality rates and annual losses in excess of $40 million. The ability of marine organisms to cope with environmental stressors (including those produced during HABs) is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter resulting in phenotypic changes caused by heritable modifications in gene expression, without involving changes in the genetic (DNA) sequence. Yet, studies examining cause-effect relationships between environmental stressors, specific epigenetic mechanisms and subsequent responses are still lacking. The present work contributes to increase this knowledge by investigating the effects of Florida Red Tides on two types of mechanisms participating in the epigenetic memory of Eastern oysters: histone variants and DNA methylation. For that purpose, a HAB simulation was conducted in laboratory conditions, exposing oysters to increasing concentrations of K. brevis. The obtained results revealed, for the first time, the existence of H2A.X, H2A.Z and macroH2A genes in this organism, encoding histone variants potentially involved in the maintenance of genome integrity during responses to the genotoxic effect of brevetoxins. Additionally, an increase in H2A.X phosphorylation (γH2A.X, a marker of DNA damage) and a decrease in global DNA methylation were observed as the HAB simulation progressed. Overall, the present work provides a basis to better understand how epigenetic mechanisms participate in responses to environmental stress in marine invertebrates, opening new avenues to incorporate environmental epigenetics approaches into management and conservation programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Florida Red Tides on histone variant expression and DNA methylation in the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Romero, Rodrigo; Suarez-Ulloa, Victoria; Rodriguez-Casariego, Javier; Garcia-Souto, Daniel; Diaz, Gabriel; Smith, Abraham; Pasantes, Juan Jose; Rand, Gary; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M.

    2017-01-01

    Massive algal proliferations known as Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) represent one of the most important threats to coastal areas. Among them, the so-called Florida Red Tides (FRTs, caused by blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis and associated brevetoxins) are particularly detrimental in the southeastern U.S., causing high mortality rates and annual losses in excess of $40 million. The ability of marine organisms to cope with environmental stressors (including those produced during HABs) is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter resulting in phenotypic changes caused by heritable modifications in gene expression, without involving changes in the genetic (DNA) sequence. Yet, studies examining cause-effect relationships between environmental stressors, specific epigenetic mechanisms and subsequent responses are still lacking. The present work contributes to increase this knowledge by investigating the effects of Florida Red Tides on two types of mechanisms participating in the epigenetic memory of Eastern oysters: histone variants and DNA methylation. For that purpose, a HAB simulation was conducted in laboratory conditions, exposing oysters to increasing concentrations of K. brevis. The obtained results revealed, for the first time, the existence of H2A.X, H2A.Z and macroH2A genes in this organism, encoding histone variants potentially involved in the maintenance of genome integrity during responses to the genotoxic effect of brevetoxins. Additionally, an increase in H2A.X phosphorylation (γH2A.X, a marker of DNA damage) and a decrease in global DNA methylation were observed as the HAB simulation progressed. Overall, the present work provides a basis to better understand how epigenetic mechanisms participate in responses to environmental stress in marine invertebrates, opening new avenues to incorporate environmental epigenetics approaches into management and conservation programs.

  15. Study of the impact of radionuclides discharges from nuclear industry in the northern Cotentin area on the oyster Crassostrea gigas: expression of cellular stress molecular markers; Etude de l'impact des radionucleides rejetes par les installations nucleaires du Nord Cotentin sur l'huitre creuse Crassostrea gigas: analyse de l'expression de marqueurs moleculaires de stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farcy, E

    2006-11-15

    This thesis explores the potential radiological impact of radionuclide discharges from the nuclear industry on the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. One of the major goals of this research was to identify markers that could be used to monitor the effects of low-level chronic irradiation. We decided to focalize on the expression of stress-induced genes involved in the regulation of cellular stress, focusing on transcription. First, homology cloning was used to identify four new cDNAs encoding stress markers. Then data collected at various sites enabled to evidence that mRNA levels for each of the genes of interest naturally vary to a significant degree, based on individual differences and seasonal factors. Comparing oysters from exposed sites with those from a reference site located on the Atlantic coast did not suggest any relationship between mRNA levels changes and the oysters exposure to liquid radioactive waste from the A.R.E.V.A. reprocessing plant. In the environment, we found that those radionuclide releases resulted in a very small increase in radioactivity in oysters, especially compared with their natural radioactivity. In the laboratory, by exposing the oysters to higher radionuclide concentrations than those found in the environment, we were able to identify two genes as potential candidates for studying the effects of chronic exposure to low doses of ionizing radiations in the oyster: genes encoding MT and MXR. We confirmed that transcriptional induction of these two genes occurs in response to high doses of acute irradiation. Finally, the comparison between environmental results and the laboratory results underlined the complementarity of these two approaches. In particular, it revealed that seasonal variations in mRNA levels probably have a significant effect on the stress response. (author)

  16. The first invertebrate RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) homolog gene in the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Yu, Feng; Li, Jun; Tong, Ying; Zhang, Yuehuan; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-10-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) is a pivotal receptor that detects numerous RNA and DNA viruses and mediates the innate induction of interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines upon viral infection. In the present study, we cloned and characterized the first RIG-I gene in a marine mollusk, Crassostrea gigas, and designated it as CgRIG-I. The full-length CgRIG-I cDNA is 3436 bp, including 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of 93 bp and 286 bp, respectively, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 3057 bp. The gene encodes a 1018 amino acid polypeptide with an estimated molecular mass of 116.5 kDa. SMART analysis showed that the CgRIG-I protein had the typical conserved domains, including the caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs), the RNA helicase domain and the C-terminal regulatory domain (RD). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that CgRIG-I was grouped into the clade of its vertebrate homologs. Moreover, CgRIG-I expression could be specifically increased after stimulation by poly(I:C) rather than by other PAMPs such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) and heat-killed Vibrio alginolyticus (HKVA). Meanwhile, six IRF, three STAT and one NF-κB predicted sites were identified in the CgRIG-I promoter, which was consistent with its high responsiveness to poly(I:C). In summary, this report provides the first CgRIG-I sequence of a mollusk, but its function in the antiviral immune response requires further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mangrove oyster (Crassostrea rhizophorae (Guilding, 1928 farming areas as artificial reefs for fish: A case study in the State of Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Lima de Freitas

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A type of platform, known as a table, is now being used for mangrove oyster farming. In Fortim, Ceará, Brazil, this activity was begun in June 2000 and covers an area of 50 m² overlying a sand-clay substrate. The present study has the following main objectives: to identify and catalogue the ichthyofauna colonizing the Crassostrea rhizophorae farming platforms; to evaluate ecological aspects, such as the possible correlation between the physical and chemical variables for water quality and the occurrence of the ichthyofauna; and to observe the differences in the fish species found during tidal variations. Specimens were identified and quantified using the linear-transect, visual census methodology. The ichthyofauna observed comprised 3,030 individuals belonging to 28 species and 20 families. Of the 28 species found in the area studied, 14 were marine transients, 12 marine dependent, and only 2 permanent residents. A significant association was observed between the abundance of 11 species and the physical and chemical variables studied. Based on these results, it may be concluded that the platforms act as artificial reefs for the ichthyofauna, being colonized by at least 28 species, and providing protection from predators as well as a source of food and a reproductive substrate.Um tipo de plataforma, conhecido como mesas, estão sendo utilizadas para o cultivo de ostras. Em Fortim, Ceará, este cultivo teve início em junho de 2000 e abrange uma área total de 50m² sobre um substrato argilo-arenoso. A presente pesquisa tem como objetivo identificar e catalogar a ictiofauna colonizadora das mesas de cultivo de ostras do mangue (Crassostrea rhizophorae, avaliar aspectos ecológicos tais como as possíveis correlações de parâmetros físico-químicos da água com a ocorrência da ictiofauna, além de observar as diferenças na composição da mesma durante as variações de marés. Os exemplares foram identificados visualmente e quantificados

  18. Characterization of CgHIFα-Like, a Novel bHLH-PAS Transcription Factor Family Member, and Its Role under Hypoxia Stress in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wang

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, a critical member of the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH-containing Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS protein family, is a master transcription factor involved in maintaining oxygen homeostasis. In the present study, we isolated and characterized a novel bHLH-PAS family member, CgHIFα-like gene, from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and determined its importance during hypoxia stress. The 3020-bp CgHIFα-like cDNA encoded a protein of 888 amino acids. The predicted CgHIFα-like amino acid sequence was conserved in the N-terminal bHLH, PAS, and PAC domains (but not in the C-terminal domain and was most closely related to the HIF family in the bHLH-PAS protein phylogenic tree. Similar to the mammalian HIF-1α, CgHIFα-like could be expressed as four mRNA isoforms containing alternative 5'-untranslated regions and different translation initiation codons. At the mRNA level, these isoforms were expressed in a tissue-specific manner and showed increased transcription to varying degrees under hypoxic conditions. Additionally, the western blot analysis demonstrated that CgHIFα-like was induced by hypoxia. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that CgHIFα-like could bind to the hypoxia responsive element (HRE, whereas dual-luciferase reporter analysis demonstrated that CgHIFα-like could transactivate the reporter gene containing the HREs. In addition to CgHIFα-like, we identified CgARNT from the C. gigas, analyzed its expression pattern, and confirmed its interaction with CgHIFα-like using a yeast two-hybrid assay. In conclusion, this is the first report on the cloning and characterization of a novel hypoxia transcription factor in mollusks, which could accumulate under hypoxia and regulate hypoxia related gene expression by binding to HRE and dimerizing with CgARNT. As only one member of HIF has been identified in invertebrates to date, our results provide new insights into the unique mechanisms of hypoxia tolerance in

  19. Estimates of Heritability for Growth and Shell Color Traits and Their Genetic Correlations in the Black Shell Strain of Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lan; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng

    2017-10-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has been introduced widely and massively and became an economically important aquaculture species on a global scale. We estimated heritabilities of growth and shell color traits and their genetic correlations in black shell strain of C. gigas. Analyses were performed on 22 full-sib families in a nested mating design including 410 individuals at harvest (24 months of age). The parentage assignment was inferred based on four panels of multiplex PCR markers including 10 microsatellite loci and 94.9% of the offspring were unambiguously assigned to single parent pairs. The Spearman correlation test (r = - 0.992, P shell pigmentation (SP) and L* and their same efficacy in shell color measurements. The narrow-sense heritability estimated under the animal model analysis was 0.18 ± 0.12 for shell height, 0.25 ± 0.16 for shell length, 0.10 ± 0.09 for shell width, 0.42 ± 0.20 for total weight, 0.32 ± 0.18 for shell weight, and 0.68 ± 0.16 for L*, 0.69 ± 0.16 for shell pigmentation, respectively. The considerable additive genetic variation in growth and shell color traits will make it feasible to produce genetic improvements for these traits in selective breeding program. High genetic and phenotypic correlations were found among growth traits and among shell color traits. To optimize a selection strategy for both fast growth and pure dark shell strain of C. gigas, it is proposed to take both total weight and black shell as joint objective traits in selective breeding program. Our study offers an important reference in the process of selective breeding in black shell color stain of C. gigas and will facilitate to develop favorable breeding strategies of genetic improvements for this economically important strain.

  20. A new lysozyme from the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and a possible evolutionary pathway for i-type lysozymes in bivalves from host defense to digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Lysozymes are enzymes that lyse bacterial cell walls, an activity widely used for host defense but also modified in some instances for digestion. The biochemical and evolutionary changes between these different functional forms has been well-studied in the c-type lysozymes of vertebrates, but less so in the i-type lysozymes prevalent in most invertebrate animals. Some bivalve molluscs possess both defensive and digestive lysozymes. Results We report a third lysozyme from the oyster Crassostrea virginica, cv-lysozyme 3. The chemical properties of cv-lysozyme 3 (including molecular weight, isoelectric point, basic amino acid residue number, and predicted protease cutting sites) suggest it represents a transitional form between lysozymes used for digestion and immunity. The cv-lysozyme 3 protein inhibited the growth of bacteria (consistent with a defensive function), but semi-quantitative RT-PCR suggested the gene was expressed mainly in digestive glands. Purified cv-lysozyme 3 expressed maximum muramidase activity within a range of pH (7.0 and 8.0) and ionic strength (I = 0.005-0.01) unfavorable for either cv-lysozyme 1 or cv-lysozyme 2 activities. The topology of a phylogenetic analysis of cv-lysozyme 3 cDNA (full length 663 bp, encoding an open reading frame of 187 amino acids) is also consistent with a transitional condition, as cv-lysozyme 3 falls at the base of a monophyletic clade of bivalve lysozymes identified from digestive glands. Rates of nonsynonymous substitution are significantly high at the base of this clade, consistent with an episode of positive selection associated with the functional transition from defense to digestion. Conclusion The pattern of molecular evolution accompanying the shift from defensive to digestive function in the i-type lysozymes of bivalves parallels those seen for c-type lysozymes in mammals and suggests that the lysozyme paralogs that enhance the range of physiological conditions for lysozyme activity may provide

  1. A new lysozyme from the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and a possible evolutionary pathway for i-type lysozymes in bivalves from host defense to digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itoh Naoki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysozymes are enzymes that lyse bacterial cell walls, an activity widely used for host defense but also modified in some instances for digestion. The biochemical and evolutionary changes between these different functional forms has been well-studied in the c-type lysozymes of vertebrates, but less so in the i-type lysozymes prevalent in most invertebrate animals. Some bivalve molluscs possess both defensive and digestive lysozymes. Results We report a third lysozyme from the oyster Crassostrea virginica, cv-lysozyme 3. The chemical properties of cv-lysozyme 3 (including molecular weight, isoelectric point, basic amino acid residue number, and predicted protease cutting sites suggest it represents a transitional form between lysozymes used for digestion and immunity. The cv-lysozyme 3 protein inhibited the growth of bacteria (consistent with a defensive function, but semi-quantitative RT-PCR suggested the gene was expressed mainly in digestive glands. Purified cv-lysozyme 3 expressed maximum muramidase activity within a range of pH (7.0 and 8.0 and ionic strength (I = 0.005-0.01 unfavorable for either cv-lysozyme 1 or cv-lysozyme 2 activities. The topology of a phylogenetic analysis of cv-lysozyme 3 cDNA (full length 663 bp, encoding an open reading frame of 187 amino acids is also consistent with a transitional condition, as cv-lysozyme 3 falls at the base of a monophyletic clade of bivalve lysozymes identified from digestive glands. Rates of nonsynonymous substitution are significantly high at the base of this clade, consistent with an episode of positive selection associated with the functional transition from defense to digestion. Conclusion The pattern of molecular evolution accompanying the shift from defensive to digestive function in the i-type lysozymes of bivalves parallels those seen for c-type lysozymes in mammals and suggests that the lysozyme paralogs that enhance the range of physiological conditions for

  2. Mortalities of eastern and pacific oyster larvae caused by the pathogens Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio tubiashii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibrio tubiashii is reported to be a bacterial pathogen of larval Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and has been associated with major hatchery crashes, causing shortages in seed oysters for commercial shellfish producers. Another bacterium, Vibrio cora...

  3. Spatial and temporal variations in cadmium concentrations and burdens in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) sampled from the Pacific north-west

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendell, Leah I.; Feng, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Oysters from the north-west coast of Canada contain high levels of cadmium, a toxic metal, in amounts that exceed food safety guidelines for international markets. A first required step to determine the sources of cadmium is to identify possible spatial and temporal trends in the accumulation of cadmium by the oyster. To meet this objective, rather than sample wild and cultured oysters of unknown age and origin, an oyster 'grow-out' experiment was initiated. Cultured oyster seed was suspended in the water column up to a depth of 7 m and the oyster seed allowed to mature a period of 3 years until market size. Oysters were sampled bimonthly and at time of sampling, temperature, chlorophyll-a, turbidity and salinity were measured. Oyster total shell length, dry tissue weights, cadmium concentrations (μg g -1 ) and burdens (μg of cadmium oyster -1 ) were determined. Oyster cadmium concentrations and burdens were then interpreted with respect to the spatial and temporal sampling design as well as to the measured physio-chemical and biotic variables. When expressed as a concentration, there was a marked seasonality with concentrations being greater in winter as compared in summer; however no spatial trend was evident. When expressed as a burden which corrects for differences in tissue mass, there was no seasonality, however cadmium oyster burdens increased from south to north. Comparison of cadmium accumulation rates oyster -1 among sites indicated three locations, Webster Island, on the west side of Vancouver Island, and two within Desolation Sound, Teakerne Arm and Redonda Bay, where point sources of cadmium which are not present at all other sampling locations may be contributing to overall oyster cadmium burdens. Of the four physio-chemical factors measured only temperature and turbidity weakly correlated with tissue cadmium concentrations (r 2 = -0.13; p < 0.05). By expressing oyster cadmium both as concentration and burden, regional and temporal patterns were

  4. Concentrations of heavy metals in commercially important Oysters from Goa, Central-West coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenai-Tirodkar, P.S.; Gauns, M.; Ansari, Z.A.

    The major beds of oyster along the central-west coast of India are exposed to different anthropogenic activities and are severely exploited for human consumption. In this viewpoint, tissues of oyster Crassostrea madrasensis, C. gryphoides...

  5. Economic Values Associated With Construction of Oyster Reefs by the Corps of Engineers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henderson, Jim

    2003-01-01

    .... That template includes a community model for the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) which can be used to quantify the ecological benefits of an oyster reef in an ecosystem restoration project...

  6. Bacteria of fecal origin in mangrove oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae in the Cocó River estuary, Ceará State, Brazil Bactérias de origem fecal contaminantes de ostra Crassostrea rhizophorae, oriundas do estuário do Rio Cocó, Estado do Ceará, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I.M. Silva

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at evaluating the microbiological quality of mangrove oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae, collected at a natural oyster bed in the estuary of Cocó river (Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. MPN values were used for estimating the total (TC and fecal (FC coliforms and Enterococcus spp. TC and FC MPN values in the whole muscle and intervalve liquid ranged from 1,600/g and from 1,100/g. No correlation was found between the physico-chemical parameters (temperature, salinity and pH of the surrounding water and the bacteriological contamination levels found in the tested oysters. The only correlation found was between TC and FC values. Enterococcus spp. strains were isolated and subjected to biochemical tests for species identification. The capacity of those strains for production of a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance was tested using the Escherichia coli strain ATCC 25922 as a testing organism. Only one, E. faecalis, out of 121 Enterococcus strains tested, presented the inhibitory activity.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a qualidade microbiológica da ostra de mangue (Crassostrea rhizophorae originária de um criadouro natural no estuário do Rio Cocó, Fortaleza, Ceará, Brasil. Para isso, foram realizadas as estimativas do Número Mais Provável (NMP de Coliformes Totais (CT e de Fecais (CF e de Enterococcus spp. Os valores encontrados para CT e CF no músculo (com líquido intervalvar variaram de 1.600 e 1.100/g. Não houve correlação entre os parâmetros físico-químicos (temperatura, salinidade e pH da água na área do criadouro e os níveis de contaminação encontrados nas ostras. Somente houve correlação entre os valores de CT e CF. Cepas de Enterococcus spp. foram isoladas e submetidas a testes bioquímicos para identificação das espécies e, posteriormente, foram testadas para verificar a produção de substância inibitória semelhante à bacteriocina utilizando a cepa-teste Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. De um

  7. Condition index of Crassostrea madrasensis preston (Ostreoida, Ostreidae) and C. Gryphoides schlotheim (Ostreoida, Ostreidae) and its percentage edibility in populations associated with selected mangrove habitats from Goa, India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nagi, H.M.; Jagtap, T.

    Oyster samples of Crassostrea madrasensis (Preston) and C. gryphoides (Schlotheim) were collected, on monthly basis, during the period from August 2005 to July 2006. Observations have revealed uncontrolled exploitation of oyster beds, which may lead...

  8. Effects of a bio-invasion of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793) in five shallow water habitats in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stein; Bodvin, Torjan; Strand, Åsa

    2017-01-01

    mediated vectors and by natural dispersal. The species is now spreading in Scandinavia. In order to optimize the management of the oyster, including targeted monitoring and mitigation activities, knowledge on the present and future distribution and impact on the ecosystem is important. The development...... of climate change in a long-term IPCC climate scenario (A1B). We conclude that Littoral biogenic reefs are at risk to obtain the highest expected increase,while all other habitats are at risk of low to moderate development of the oyster populations. Accordingly, Littoral Biogenic reefs was assessed...... as the habitat type at risk of the largest ecosystem effects as high densities of oysters already exist in these areas, and the densities are expected to increase rapidly until reaching a threshold density. Low energy rock and Littoral sandand mud were assessed as being subjected to moderate to high ecosystem...

  9. Effects of a bio-invasion of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793) in five shallow water habitats in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stein; Bodvin, Torjan; Strand, Åsa

    2017-01-01

    mediated vectors and by natural dispersal. The species is now spreading in Scandinavia. In order to optimize the management of the oyster, including targeted monitoring and mitigation activities, knowledge on the present and future distribution and impact on the ecosystem is important. The development...

  10. A Carbonic Anhydrase Serves as an Important Acid-Base Regulator in Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Exposed to Elevated CO2: Implication for Physiological Responses of Mollusk to Ocean Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiudan; Wang, Mengqiang; Jia, Zhihao; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Anguo; Song, Linsheng

    2017-02-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have been demonstrated to play an important role in acid-base regulation in vertebrates. However, the classification and modulatory function of CAs in marine invertebrates, especially their responses to ocean acidification remain largely unknown. Here, a cytosolic α-CA (designated as CgCAII-1) was characterized from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and its molecular activities against CO 2 exposure were investigated. CgCAII-1 possessed a conserved CA catalytic domain, with high similarity to invertebrate cytoplasmic or mitochondrial α-CAs. Recombinant CgCAII-1 could convert CO 2 to HCO 3 - with calculated activity as 0.54 × 10 3  U/mg, which could be inhibited by acetazolamide (AZ). The mRNA transcripts of CgCAII-1 in muscle, mantle, hepatopancreas, gill, and hemocytes increased significantly after exposure to elevated CO 2 . CgCAII-1 could interact with the hemocyte membrane proteins and the distribution of CgCAII-1 protein became more concentrated and dense in gill and mantle under CO 2 exposure. The intracellular pH (pHi) of hemocytes under CO 2 exposure increased significantly (p ocean acidification and participate in acid-base regulation. Such cytoplasmic CA-based physiological regulation mechanism might explain other physiological responses of marine organisms to OA.

  11. Differences in extreme low salinity timing and duration differentially affect eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) size class growth and mortality in Breton Sound, LA

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Eberline, Benjamin S.; Soniat, Thomas M.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how different life history stages are impacted by extreme or stochastic environmental variation is critical for predicting and modeling organism population dynamics. This project examined recruitment, growth, and mortality of seed (25–75 mm) and market (>75 mm) sized oysters along a salinity gradient over two years in Breton Sound, LA. In April 2010, management responses to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill resulted in extreme low salinity (25 °C) significantly and negatively impacted oyster recruitment, survival and growth in 2010, while low salinity (25 °C). With increasing management of our freshwater inputs to estuaries combined with predicted climate changes, how extreme events affect different life history stages is key to understanding variation in population demographics of commercially important species and predicting future populations.

  12. Multidimensional assessment of sustainability extractivism of mangrove oyster Crassostrea spp. in the estuary of Cananéia, São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, I C; Fagundes, L; Henriques, M B

    2015-08-01

    This study was carried out with groups of extractivists of mangrove oysters in the estuary of Cananéia, São Paulo State, Brazil, between the years 1999 and 2007 with the objective to evaluate and compare trends in the sustainability of this activity, in a multidimensional and integrated way, in social, economic, ecological, technological and ethical dimensions, using the method RAPFISH. The different groups had distinct trends related to sustainability and the social, technological and ethical dimensions had more influence on trends in sustainability than the ecological and economic dimensions. The group with the best performance in the sustainability assessment was Mandira, due to advances promoted by local social organization. On the other hand, the Porto Cubatão group showed the worst performance, once this is very recent group in the extractivism of oysters. The RAPFISH proved to be a useful tool for data assessment.

  13. Multidimensional assessment of sustainability extractivism of mangrove oyster Crassostrea spp. in the estuary of Cananéia, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IC Machado

    Full Text Available AbstractThis study was carried out with groups of extractivists of mangrove oysters in the estuary of Cananéia, São Paulo State, Brazil, between the years 1999 and 2007 with the objective to evaluate and compare trends in the sustainability of this activity, in a multidimensional and integrated way, in social, economic, ecological, technological and ethical dimensions, using the method RAPFISH. The different groups had distinct trends related to sustainability and the social, technological and ethical dimensions had more influence on trends in sustainability than the ecological and economic dimensions. The group with the best performance in the sustainability assessment was Mandira, due to advances promoted by local social organization. On the other hand, the Porto Cubatão group showed the worst performance, once this is very recent group in the extractivism of oysters. The RAPFISH proved to be a useful tool for data assessment.

  14. Sub-lethal effects of a glyphosate-based commercial formulation and adjuvants on juvenile oysters (Crassostrea gigas) exposed for 35days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séguin, Alexis; Mottier, Antoine; Perron, Carole; Lebel, Jean Marc; Serpentini, Antoine; Costil, Katherine

    2017-04-15

    Glyphosate-based herbicides include active matter and adjuvants (e.g. polyethoxylated tallow amines, POEAs). In addition to a previous investigation on the effect of glyphosate on oysters, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of sub-chronic exposures (35days) to three concentrations (0.1, 1 and 100μgL -1 ) of Roundup Express® (R EX ) and POEAs on oysters belonging to the same age group. Low mortality rates were calculated, and only few significant differences (i.e. shell length) between exposure conditions were observed at a given date. However, when comparing the biomarker's temporal variations, some different patterns (e.g. condition index, reproduction, parameters of oxidative stress) were observed depending on the molecules and concentrations. These results suggest that a longer exposure to an environmental concentration (0.1μgL -1 ) of R EX and POEAs could induce harmful effects on oysters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcription factor CgMTF-1 regulates CgZnT1 and CgMT expression in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) under zinc stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Jie; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Li; Li, Chunyan; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CgMTF-1 and CgZnT1 were first identified in oysters. • CgMTF-1 localized in cell nucleus under unstressed conditions. • CgMTF-1 proteins could bind with the typical MRE motif. • CgMTF-1 activated CgZnT1, CgMT1 and CgMT4 promoters and regulated their expressions under zinc exposure. - Abstract: Oysters accumulate zinc at high tissue concentrations, and the metal response element (MRE)-binding transcription factor (MTF) functions as the cellular zinc sensor that coordinates the expression of genes involved in zinc efflux and storage, as well as those that protect against metal toxicity. In this study, we cloned MTF-1 in oysters and examined its regulation mechanism for its classic target genes, including MTs and ZnT1 under zinc exposure conditions. We cloned CgMTF-1 and determined the subcellular locations of its protein product in HEK293 cells. CgMTF-1 has a 2826 bp open reading frame that encodes a predicted polypeptide with 707 amino acid residues, showing six well-conserved zinc finger domains that are required for metal binding. In HEK293 cell lines, CgMTF-1 primarily localizes in the cell nucleus under unstressed conditions and nuclear translocation was not critical for the activation of this gene. We searched for CgMTF-1-regulated genes in oysters using RNA interference. Decreased expression levels of CgMT1, CgMT4, and CgZnT1 were observed after CgMTF-1 interference (>70% inhibition) under zinc exposure, indicating the critical role of CgMTF-1 in the regulation of these genes. We searched for a direct regulation mechanism involving CgMTF-1 for CgMT1, CgMT4, and CgZnT1 in vitro. EMSA experiments indicated that CgMTF-1 can bind with the MREs found in the CgZnT1, CgMT1 and CgMT4 promoter regions. Additionally, luciferase reporter gene experiments indicated that CgMTF-1 could activate the CgMT1, CgMT4, and CgZnT1 promoters. Overall, our results suggest that CgMTF-1 directly coordinates the regulation of CgMTs and CgZnT1 expression and plays

  16. Proteomic approach for identifying gonad differential proteins in the oyster (Crassostrea angulata) following food-chain contamination with HgCl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Hong; Huang, Lin; Zhang, Yong; Ke, Cai-Huan; Huang, He-Qing

    2013-12-06

    Hg discharged into the environmental waters can generally be bioaccumulated, transformed and transmited by living organisms, thus resulting in the formation of Hg-toxicity food chains. The pathway and toxicology of food chain contaminated with environmental Hg are rarely revealed by proteomics. Here, we showed that differential proteomics had the potential to understand reproduction toxicity mechanism in marine molluscs through the Hg-contaminated food chain. Hg bioaccumulation was found in every link of the HgCl2-Chlorella vulgaris-oyster-mice food chain. Morphological observations identified the lesions in both the oyster gonad and the mice ovary. Differential proteomics was used to study the mechanisms of Hg toxicity in the oyster gonad and to find some biomarkers of Hg contamination in food chain. Using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, we identified 13 differential protein spots, of which six were up-regulated, six were down-regulated, while one was undecided. A portion of these differential proteins was further confirmed using real-time PCR and western blotting methods. Their major functions involved binding, protein translocation, catalysis, regulation of energy metabolism, reproductive functioning and structural molecular activity. Among these proteins, 14-3-3 protein, GTP binding protein, arginine kinase (AK) and 71kDa heat shock connate protein (HSCP 71) are considered to be suitable biomarkers of environmental Hg contamination. Furthermore, we established the gene correspondence, responding to Hg reproductive toxicity, between mouse and oyster, and then used real-time PCR to analyze mRNA differential expression of the corresponding genes in mice. The results indicated that the mechanism of Hg reproductive toxicity in mouse was similar to that in oyster. We suggest that the proteomics would be further developed in application research of food safety including toxicological mechanism. It is well known that mercury (Hg) is one of the best toxic metal elements in

  17. Biodisponibilidade de zinco de ostras (Crassostrea gigas cultivadas em fl orianópolis / SC
    bioavailability of oysters (crassostrea gigas cultivated in Florianopólis / SC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. CAETANO

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a biodisponibilidade do zinco presente nas ostras Crassostrea gigas cultivadas na região de Florianópolis, SC em ratas adultas (Rattus norvegicus, pois nessa região as ostras são fontes de zinco biodisponível. Foi realizado ensaio biológico durante 49 dias, sendo que os 24 animais foram distribuídos em três grupos: G1: dieta controle (AIN-93M, G2: dieta isenta de zinco (AIN-93M modifi cada; G3: dieta isenta de zinco e acrescida de ostras. Ao fi nal do experimento foram coletados os fêmures dos animais para análise do teor de zinco, por espectrofotometria de absorção atômica. As ostras in natura apresentaram 4,38mg% de zinco. Quanto ao teor de zinco no fêmur, os grupos G1 (246,62 ± 9,97μg Zn/g osso e G3 (221,41 ± 15,80 μg apresentaram elevadas concentrações (p < 0,05 quando comparados ao grupo G0 (155,0 ± 32,80 μg e G2 (110,12 ± 32,88 μg.

  18. Invertebrate Encrustations On The Mangrove Swamp Oyster And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mangrove swamp oyster Crassostrea tulipa demonstrates a symbiotic relationship with the barnacle. Balnus sp and other encrusting invertebrates. It is inferred that the latter militate against predatory drilling on the oyster by Thais califera as well as prevent algal infestation and the consequent bioerosion by herbivorous ...

  19. INFLUENCE OF SEASONAL FACTORS ON OYSTER HEMOCYTE KILLING OF VIBRIO PARAHEMOLYTICUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seasonal variation of cellular defenses of oyster Crassostrea virginica against Vibrio parahaemolyticus were examined from June 1997 to December 1998 using a recently developed bactericidal assay that utilizes a tetrazolium dye. Mean hemocyte numbers, plasma lysozyme, and P. mari...

  20. CREEK Project's Oyster Biomass Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before -...

  1. Hyperspectral remote sensing of wild oyster reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bris, Anthony; Rosa, Philippe; Lerouxel, Astrid; Cognie, Bruno; Gernez, Pierre; Launeau, Patrick; Robin, Marc; Barillé, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    The invasion of the wild oyster Crassostrea gigas along the western European Atlantic coast has generated changes in the structure and functioning of intertidal ecosystems. Considered as an invasive species and a trophic competitor of the cultivated conspecific oyster, it is now seen as a resource by oyster farmers following recurrent mass summer mortalities of oyster spat since 2008. Spatial distribution maps of wild oyster reefs are required by local authorities to help define management strategies. In this work, visible-near infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral and multispectral remote sensing was investigated to map two contrasted intertidal reef structures: clusters of vertical oysters building three-dimensional dense reefs in muddy areas and oysters growing horizontally creating large flat reefs in rocky areas. A spectral library, collected in situ for various conditions with an ASD spectroradiometer, was used to run Spectral Angle Mapper classifications on airborne data obtained with an HySpex sensor (160 spectral bands) and SPOT satellite HRG multispectral data (3 spectral bands). With HySpex spectral/spatial resolution, horizontal oysters in the rocky area were correctly classified but the detection was less efficient for vertical oysters in muddy areas. Poor results were obtained with the multispectral image and from spatially or spectrally degraded HySpex data, it was clear that the spectral resolution was more important than the spatial resolution. In fact, there was a systematic mud deposition on shells of vertical oyster reefs explaining the misclassification of 30% of pixels recognized as mud or microphytobenthos. Spatial distribution maps of oyster reefs were coupled with in situ biomass measurements to illustrate the interest of a remote sensing product to provide stock estimations of wild oyster reefs to be exploited by oyster producers. This work highlights the interest of developing remote sensing techniques for aquaculture applications in coastal

  2. ANTIOXIDANT ENZYMES, POTENTIAL VIRULENT FACTORS, IN DIFFERENT STRAINS OF THE OYSTER PROTOZOAN PARASITE, PERKINSUS MARINUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The oyster protozoan parasite, Perkinsus marinus, is one of the two important parasites causing severe mortality in the eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) on the US east coast. Our recent study suggests that P. marinus cells and its extracellular products (ECP) could scaveng...

  3. The eastern oyster genome: A resource for comparative genomics in shellfish aquaculture species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyster aquaculture is an important sector of world food production. As such, it is imperative to develop a high quality reference genome for the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, to assist in the elucidation of the genomic basis of commercially important traits. All genetic, gene expression and...

  4. The oyster genome reveals stress adaptation and complexity of shell formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guofan; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Ximing

    2012-01-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas belongs to one of the most species-rich but genomically poorly explored phyla, the Mollusca. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the oyster genome using short reads and a fosmid-pooling strategy, along with transcriptomes of development and stress re...... and their exosomes. The oyster genome sequence fills a void in our understanding of the Lophotrochozoa....

  5. Molecular evidence of the protozoan parasite Marteilia refringens in Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea corteziensis from the Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Grijalva-Chon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The search for exotic pathogens related to the outbreaks and in surveillance samplings of the Mexican oyster farms, is a recent activity achieved by academic institutions and state committees for Aquatic Animal Health, with remarkable results. In samples of Crassostrea gigas collected through December 2009, January 2010 and November 2010, and of C. corteziensis in September 2011, the protozoan Marteilia refringens was detected for the first time in the Gulf of California. The carrier oysters were from cultures without abnormal mortality rates, whereby, the use of histology, in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy studies are necessary to determine if M. refringens has become established in the Gulf of California oyster cultures. Detection of M. refringens is of great concern to the global oyster farming industry.

  6. Genetic variation in anti-parasite behavior in oysters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behavioral avoidance of disease-causing parasites provides a first line of defense against the threat of infection, particularly when hosts are exposed to free-living parasite stages in the external environment. We report that suspension-feeding oysters (Crassostrea virginica) respond to the presenc...

  7. Accumulation of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxins in the oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) poses a significant threat to the safe consumption of shellfish in the southern Benguela ecosystem. The accumulation of DSP toxins was investigated in two cultivated bivalve species, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the mussel Choromytilus meridionalis, suspended from a ...

  8. CREEK Project: RUI: the Role of Oyster Reefs in the Structure and Function of Tidal Creeks. A Project Overview: 1996-2000.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before - After...

  9. CREEK Project's Oyster Growth and Survival Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1999.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated...

  10. Oyster Electrophysiology: Electrocardiogram Signal Recognition and Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico M. Batista

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available After 100 years of published recording traces pertaining to the oyster electrocardiogram (ECG, we revisited the original experiments of Eiger (1913, using state-of-the-art electrophysiology recorders. Our aim was to confirm that a recordable ECG, similar to that of higher vertebrates, is present in the oyster heart. Portuguese oysters Crassostrea angulata, collected from the Guadiana estuary, Portugal, were used. The oysters were drilled through the right valve to reveal the pericardium. Gold and silver electrodes were placed through the hole and electrophysiological recordings were obtained. Stimulation of the oyster heart was performed in vivo and in vitro using a constant current power supply. Placement of electrodes around the heart revealed a trace that very closely matched the published ECG of Eiger (1913. However, we were unable to confirm that the recording was an ECG of the oyster heart. Moreover, measurements on isolated oyster hearts revealed a low conductivity (0.10 S m‒1. We did, however, record a depolarization signal from what we believe to be the visceral ganglia, and this preceded contractions of the oyster heart. Our findings indicate that so-called ECGs, previously recorded by [2] in Ostrea edulis, but also the “ECG” recorded by [4] in C. virginica from oyster hearts, are in fact an artifact arising from relative movement of the recording electrodes, giving rise to a baseline shift that mimics in some ways the P and QRS features of a typical ECG. Nevertheless, such recordings provide information pertaining to heart rate and are not without importance.

  11. Nutritional quality in terms of lipid content and fatty acid composition of neutral and polar lipids in the adductor muscle of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1794 farmed in the Bizert lagoon (Tunisia in relation with sexual cycle and environmental settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Dridi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Monthly variations of fatty acid composition of the two fractions polar lipids (PL and neutral lipids (NL in the adductor muscle of cupped oyster Crassostrea gigas, were studied from May 2005 until June 2006 in the Bizert lagoon, related to environmental parameters and reproductive events. C. gigas showed a clear cycle of energy storage and utilization in the site of study. Total PL and NL content varied significantly during the year and showed a negative and significant correlation with the gametogenic condition index which can be explained by transfer of fatty acids from the adductor muscle to gonads to support the gametogenic cycle. Nevertheless, PL and NL have no significant correlations either with temperature or chlorophyll a registered in the site of study. The adductor muscle proved to be less influenced by chlorophyll a richness of the farming environment. The dominance of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs over the saturated fatty acids (SFAs and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs in both PL and NL fractions was established throughout the period of study. Oysters analyzed were characterized by high levels of PUFAs n−3 and high n−3/n−6 PUFAs ratio in both PL and NL fractions. PUFAs n−3 and SFAs of PL and PUFAs and SFAs of NL, showed a negative and significant correlation between them. In fact, low temperature values produce generally an increase in the PUFAs percentages in order to maintain the fluidity of cell membranes. We deduce that annual variations of fatty acids content in PL and NL fractions of the adductor muscle of C. gigas seem to be in relation with the reproductive events. According to our results, the adductor muscle tissues were relatively poor in fatty acids (maximum values (% of dry weight of PL and NL respectively were 2.04 ± 0.33 and 1.75 ± 0.9. Lipids fluctuations were not pronounced all over the period of study in the site of sampling due to low effects of the environment richness and phases of

  12. Additional Evidence that Juvenile Oyster Disease Is Caused by a Member of the Roseobacter Group and Colonization of Nonaffected Animals by Stappia stellulata-Like Strains†

    OpenAIRE

    Boettcher, Katherine J.; Barber, Bruce J.; Singer, John T.

    2000-01-01

    Juvenile oyster disease (JOD) causes significant annual mortalities of hatchery-produced Eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, cultured in the Northeast. We have reported that a novel species of the α-proteobacteria Roseobacter group (designated CVSP) was numerically dominant in JOD-affected animals sampled during the 1997 epizootic on the Damariscotta River, Maine. In this study we report the isolation of CVSP bacteria from JOD-affected oysters during three separate epizootics in 1998. The...

  13. Trade-off between increased survival and reduced growth for blue mussels living on Pacific oyster reefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eschweiler, Nina; Christensen, Helle Torp

    2011-01-01

    Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg 1793) have been introduced into the Wadden Sea (North Sea, Germany) in the mid of the 1980s and have invaded native blue mussel Mytilus edulis (L.) beds. The latter turned into oyster reefs where mussels seem to be relegated to the bottom in between...... the much larger oysters. By combining field and laboratory experiments, we reveal how mussels react to cohabitation with the invasive oysters. Mussels subjected to direct contact with crabs Carcinus maenas migrate from top to bottom positions between oysters in both field and laboratory experiments within...... 22days. Shell growth was significantly reduced for mussels placed on the bottom compared to mussels at the top of an oyster reef. Condition index was lower for mussels on the bottom of the reef irrespective of whether placed between dead or living oysters. We conclude that mussels experience a trade...

  14. Paleoenvironmental and sclerochronological reconstruction of Crassostrea gryphoides Miocene biostromes from Crete island (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskeridou, E.; Agiadi, K.

    2012-04-01

    The mangrove oyster Crassostrea gasar (Adanson, 1757) is a keystone species mainly along the African Atlantic coasts. It forms biostromes on muddy coasts and typically associated with river mouths in the intertidal zone in depths of 0.60 up to 1 m1. Similarly, many biostrome structures of the fossilized Crassostrea gryphoides are found within Cenozoic deposits of Greece2. Since Crassostrea gasar is the phyllogenetically corresponding species of Crassostrea gryphoides, it is investigated whether the fossil biostromes formed under environmental conditions similar to those favored by modern Crassostrea gasar and if growth rate and longevity are comparable. A biostrome from the Tortonian of Heraklion district, Crete island (southern Greece) was studied to investigate the paleoenvironmental conditions and the life history of these oysters. The shells are big, ranging up to 40 cm in length, thick and positioned mainly horizontally. The biostrome is approximately 2 m in thickness and a few meters in length. Individual oysters, associated fauna and lithologic samples were collected. Paleoenvironmental interpretation was based on the analysis of the oyster taphonomy, the associated fauna and the sclerochronology/stable isotopic geochemistry of the oyster shells. The biostrome is observed in sandy marl which laterally contains Veneridae, Melongena, Terebralia bidentata and oligospecific microfossils, mainly Ammonia beccarii and Miliolids. Borings by many ichnotaxa occur on the external and internal surface of the oyster shells during the pre and /or post-mortem. Using a micromill, successive samples were taken along the hinge/ligament region of an oyster for isotopic analyses. The δ18O values ranged from -2.9 to 0.1. The wide range of values supports the interpretation of changing environmental conditions. The δ13C values ranged from -2.6 to -0.1. A correlation between δ18O and δ13C was observed. The profiles exhibit cyclicity with respect to isotopic and Sr/Ca ratios

  15. Habitat change by the formation of alien Crassostrea-reefs in the Wadden Sea and its role as feeding sites for waterbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markert, Alexandra; Esser, Wiebke; Frank, Dietrich; Wehrmann, Achim; Exo, Klaus-Michael

    2013-10-01

    Non-indigenous Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) have been invading the central Wadden Sea since 1998, predominantly settling on intertidal blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) beds which are increasingly transformed into Crassostrea-reefs. Pacific oysters are strong ecosystem engineers and the habitat change is considered to be a threat for waterbirds losing important feeding sites in the intertidal of the Wadden Sea. This study has increased our understanding of the use of foraging habitats by birds according to changing food resources. During the spring and autumn migration period in 2007, we recorded bird densities at two reef types varying in Pacific oyster density and at the adjacent sand flat as a reference site. We also recorded feeding behaviour, choice of prey and assessed peck and intake rate of three target species: Eurasian oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus, Eurasian curlew Numenius arquata and European herring gull Larus argentatus. To evaluate the use of the Crassostrea-reef in the central Wadden Sea, we compared bird densities of the target species at different intertidal feeding habitats in various regions and compared the biomass intake of Eurasian oystercatcher feeding on different prey species. We show that Eurasian oystercatcher and Eurasian curlew have adapted to the new situation and learned to exploit the food supply offered by Crassostrea-reefs. While foraging mainly on Pacific oysters, Eurasian oystercatchers attained sustainable intake rates even though food resource at dense reef during autumn was very poor due to a lack in harvestable oysters. Consolidation of reefs limits the accessibility of prey for Eurasian oystercatchers whereas a successful recruitment of Pacific oysters enhances the suitability of the habitat. Eurasian curlew was promoted by the engineering effects of the Pacific oyster while feeding extensively on shore crabs at the reefs. In contrast, European herring gulls appear hampered in foraging during low tide and hereby

  16. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  17. Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedknegt, M.A.; Schuster, A.-K.; Buschbaum, C.; Gergs, R.; Jung, A.; Luttikhuizen, P.C.; Van der Meer, J.; Troost, K.; Wegner, K.M.; Thieltges, D.W.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts) and

  18. Rising water temperatures, reproduction and recruitment of an invasive oyster, , on the French Atlantic coast

    OpenAIRE

    Dutertre, Mickaël; Beninger, Peter G.; Barillé, Laurent; Papin, Mathias; Haure, Joël

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The recent appearance and invasion of feral oysters (Crassostrea gigas) along the northern European Atlantic coast, underscores the necessity to investigate the relationship between environmental variables, reproductive physiology, larval development and recruitment. We studied these relationships at both high (HT) and intermediate (IT) ? turbidity sites, through historical data on water temperatures, multi-parameter environmental probes, histological analyses, and field c...

  19. Use of side-scan sonar for estimations of Crassostrea brasiliana (Lamarck, 1819 stocks in subtidal banks on the south coast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Geraldine Castilho Westphal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Uncontrolled extractivism has led to a worldwide reduction in oyster stocks. The use of new and more efficient management tools for impacted environments must increase. The application of such tools requires previous biological and environmental knowledge of the resident populations of these bivalve mollusks. Technical difficulties are usually associated with studies of submerged oyster banks, and these difficulties result in a considerable lack of biological data on the oysters that inhabit subtidal zones. This study aimed to survey Crassostrea brasiliana (also known as C. gasar stocks in submerged banks and to evaluate a method with which to measure the extent of the banks and identify and quantify the oysters in the banks with the use of side-scan sonar. This study was conducted on 10 oysters banks located in the subtidal zone of Guaratuba Bay, on the south coast of Brazil. The prospection of all these banks was later validated by diving, and oyster samples (n = 20/bank were collected for species identification with a molecular method. Only one bank contained oysters that were generically classified as Crassostrea sp.; those in the remaining banks being identified as C. brasiliana. The prospected banks contained oysters of various sizes (average 1.5 m, n = 1,107 that were heterogeneously scattered in the riverbeds. The total number of oysters in the 10 sampled banks was estimated to be 21,159.13 oysters or 1 oyster/4.5 m², which represents a low oyster density in the study site. The results validate the use of side-scan sonar as an efficient means with which to prospect for oysters in banks located within subtidal zones.

  20. Vibrio parahaemolyticus produtores de urease isolados a partir de ostras (Crassostrea rizophorae coletadas in natura em restaurantes e mexilhões (Perna perna de banco natural Vibrio parahaemolyticus urease positive isolated from in natura oysters (Crassostrea rizophorae collected at restaurants and mussels (Perna perna harvested from natural habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chistiane Soares Pereira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A presença de Vibrio parahaemolyticus foi avaliada em 50 amostras de moluscos bivalves marinhos compostas por 40 amostras de ostras coletadas em 15 restaurantes do Rio de Janeiro e 10 amostras de mexilhões capturados de banco natural em Ponta de Itaipú - Niterói. Foram empregadas a técnica do Número Mais Provável (NMP para a enumeração de V. parahaemolyticus utilizando Caldo Glicosado Salgado com Teepol (GSTB e Água Peptonada Alcalina (APA com 3% de cloreto de sódio (NaCl. Paralelamente foi realizada técnica de enriquecimento em APA com 1 e 3% de NaCl. Decorrido o período de incubação de ambas as técnicas, foi realizado plaqueamento em ágar TCBS (Tiossulfato Citrato Bile Sacarose. Todas as cepas de V. parahaemolyticus isoladas através das duas técnicas foram testadas para o fenômeno de Kanagawa e, quanto à produção de urease. Do total de 141 cepas de V. parahaemolyticus isoladas, 62% revelaram-se urease positivas e, dentre estas, os sorotipos predominantes foram O10:K?, O11:K? e O3:K57 dentre o total de 24 sorotipos urease positivos identificados. Embora todas as cepas de V. parahaemolyticus tenham sido Kanagawa negativas, os resultados apontam elevada incidência desta espécie em ostras comercializadas em restaurantes.The presence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were detected in 50 marine bivalve mollusks composed by 40 oysters samples collected at 15 restaurants in Rio de Janeiro City and 10 wild mussels' samples harvested in Ponta de Itaipu-Niterói. The Most Probable Number (MPN technique was employed for the enumeration of V. parahaemolyticus, using glucose salt teepol broth (GSTB and alcaline peptone water (APW with 3% NaCl. At the same time, the samples were submitted on direct plating with APW added 1 and 3% NaCl. Both techniques were followed by plating onto TCBS agar. All the V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated were tested for Kanagawa phenomenon and they were also tested for the presence of urease. A total of 141 V

  1. Millennial-scale sustainability of the Chesapeake Bay Native American oyster fishery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, Torben C; Reeder-Myers, Leslie A; Hofman, Courtney A; Breitburg, Denise; Lockwood, Rowan; Henkes, Gregory; Kellogg, Lisa; Lowery, Darrin; Luckenbach, Mark W; Mann, Roger; Ogburn, Matthew B; Southworth, Melissa; Wah, John; Wesson, James; Hines, Anson H

    2016-06-07

    Estuaries around the world are in a state of decline following decades or more of overfishing, pollution, and climate change. Oysters (Ostreidae), ecosystem engineers in many estuaries, influence water quality, construct habitat, and provide food for humans and wildlife. In North America's Chesapeake Bay, once-thriving eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) populations have declined dramatically, making their restoration and conservation extremely challenging. Here we present data on oyster size and human harvest from Chesapeake Bay archaeological sites spanning ∼3,500 y of Native American, colonial, and historical occupation. We compare oysters from archaeological sites with Pleistocene oyster reefs that existed before human harvest, modern oyster reefs, and other records of human oyster harvest from around the world. Native American fisheries were focused on nearshore oysters and were likely harvested at a rate that was sustainable over centuries to millennia, despite changing Holocene climatic conditions and sea-level rise. These data document resilience in oyster populations under long-term Native American harvest, sea-level rise, and climate change; provide context for managing modern oyster fisheries in the Chesapeake Bay and elsewhere around the world; and demonstrate an interdisciplinary approach that can be applied broadly to other fisheries.

  2. Growth of Crassostrea gasar cultured in marine and estuary environments in Brazilian waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ruschel Lopes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the growth of the mangrove oyster Crassostrea gasar cultured in marine and estuarine environments. Oysters were cultured for 11 months in a longline system in two study sites - São Francisco do Sul and Florianópolis -, in the state of Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil. Water chlorophyll-α concentration, temperature, and salinity were measured weekly. The oysters were measured monthly (shell size and weight gain to assess growth. At the end of the culture period, the average wet flesh weight, dry flesh weight, and shell weight were determined, as well as the distribution of oysters per size class. Six nonlinear models (logistic, exponential, Gompertz, Brody, Richards, and Von Bertalanffy were adjusted to the oyster growth data set. Final mean shell sizes were higher in São Francisco do Sul than in Florianópolis. In addition, oysters cultured in São Francisco do Sul were more uniformly distributed in the four size classes than those cultured in Florianópolis. The highest average values of wet flesh weight and shell weight were observed in São Francisco do Sul, whereas dry flesh weight did not differ between the sites. The estuary environment is more promising for the cultivation of oysters.

  3. Interspecific hybridization between Crassostrea angulata and C. ariakensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tuo; Zhang, Yuehuan; Yan, Xiwu; Wang, Zhaoping; Li, Dongchun; Su, Jiaqi; Yu, Ruihai

    2015-08-01

    Interspecific hybridization can generate heterosis, which is proven to be a useful tool in selective breeding programs for oyster culture. Crassostrea angulata and C. ariakensis are two important economic shellfish species in China. We conducted 2 × 2 reciprocal crosses to determine whether these two species can cross-fertilize and their hybrids can hatch, survive and perform heterosis. Fertilization was found symmetrical without delay. The rate of fertilization success of C. angulata ♀ × C. ariakensis ♂ was lower than that of C. ariakensis ♀ × C. angulata ♂, and the success rate of both hybridizations was lower than that of two intraspecific crosses each. During the planktonic period, survival rate of the progeny was lower in the hybrid crosses than in the intraspecific crosses. On day 360, mean shell height of the progeny of C. angulata ♀ × C. angulata ♂ was highest, which was followed by that of C. angulata ♀ × C. ariakensis ♂, C. ariakensis ♀ × C. ariakensis ♂ and C. ariakensis ♀ × C. angulata ♂ in a descending order. Morphology of adults produced by the hybrid crosses was similar to that of C. angulata. Both hybrids underwent normal gonad development and produced mature gametes in the mating season. This study provided new insights into the quantitative traits in interspecific crosses of Crassostrea species, thus being of guidance value for selective breeding of oyster.

  4. d13C vs d15N of co-occurring molluscs within a community dominated by Crassostrea gigas and Crepidula fornicata (Oosterschelde, The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riera, P.; Stal, L.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, by use of d13C and d15N, the diet of co-occurring intertidal molluscs species within a community dominated by the oyster Crassostrea gigas and its epibiont, the common Atlantic slipper limpet Crepidula fornicata. The results showed that the d13C versus d15N

  5. Quantitative validation of a habitat suitability index for oyster restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth eTheuerkauf

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Habitat suitability index (HSI models provide spatially explicit information on the capacity of a given habitat to support a species of interest, and their prevalence has increased dramatically in recent years. Despite caution that the reliability of HSIs must be validated using independent, quantitative data, most HSIs intended to inform terrestrial and marine species management remain unvalidated. Furthermore, of the eight HSI models developed for eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica restoration and fishery production, none has been validated. Consequently, we developed, calibrated, and validated an HSI for the eastern oyster to identify optimal habitat for restoration in a tributary of Chesapeake Bay, the Great Wicomico River (GWR. The GWR harbors a high density, restored oyster population, and therefore serves as an excellent model system for assessing the validity of the HSI. The HSI was derived from GIS layers of bottom type, salinity, and water depth (surrogate for dissolved oxygen, and was tested using live adult oyster density data from a survey of high vertical relief reefs (HRR and low vertical relief reefs (LRR in the sanctuary network. Live adult oyster density was a statistically-significant sigmoid function of the HSI, which validates the HSI as a robust predictor of suitable oyster reef habitat for rehabilitation or restoration. In addition, HRR had on average 103-116 more adults m^−2 than LRR at a given level of the HSI. For HRR, HSI values ≥0.3 exceeded the accepted restoration target of 50 live adult oysters m^−2. For LRR, the HSI was generally able to predict live adult oyster densities that meet or exceed the target at HSI values ≥0.3. The HSI indicated that there remain large areas of suitable habitat for restoration in the GWR. This study provides a robust framework for HSI model development and validation, which can be refined and applied to other systems and previously developed HSIs to improve the efficacy of

  6. Characterization of adhesive from oysters: A structural and compositional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Erik

    The inability for man-made adhesives to set in wet or humid environments is an ongoing challenging the design of biomedical and marine adhesive materials. However, we see that nature has already overcome this challenge. Mussels, barnacles, oysters and sandcastle worms all have unique mechanisms by which they attach themselves to surfaces. By understanding what evolution has already spent millions of years perfecting, we can design novel adhesive materials inspired by nature's elegant designs. The well-studied mussel is currently the standard for design of marine inspired biomimetic polymers. In the work presented here, we aim to provide new insights into the adhesive produced by the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Unlike the mussel, which produces thread-like plaques comprised of DOPA containing-protein, the oyster secretes an organic-inorganic hybrid adhesive as it settles and grows onto a surface. This form of adhesion renders the oyster to be permanently fixed in place. Over time, hundreds of thousands of oyster grow and agglomerate to form extensive reef structures. These reefs are not only essential to survival of the oyster, but are also vital to intertidal ecosystems. While the shell of the oyster has been extensively studied, curiously, only a few conflicting insights have been made into the nature of the adhesive and contact zone between shell and substrate, and even lesfs information has been ascertained on organic and inorganic composition. In this work, we provide microscopy and histochemical studies to characterize the structure and composition of the adhesive, using oyster in the adult and juvenile stages of life. Preliminary work on extracting and characterizing organic components through collaborative help with solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and proteomics are also detailed here. We aim to provide a full, comprehensive characterization of oyster adhesive so that in the future, we may apply what we learn to the design of new materials.

  7. The sense of hearing in the Pacific oyster, Magallana gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charifi, Mohcine; Sow, Mohamedou; Ciret, Pierre; Benomar, Soumaya

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing concern that anthropogenic noise could have a significant impact on the marine environment, but there is still insufficient data for most invertebrates. What do they perceive? We investigated this question in oysters Magallana gigas (Crassostrea gigas) using pure tone exposures, accelerometer fixed on the oyster shell and hydrophone in the water column. Groups of 16 oysters were exposed to quantifiable waterborne sinusoidal sounds in the range of 10 Hz to 20 kHz at various acoustic energies. The experiment was conducted in running seawater using an experimental flume equipped with suspended loudspeakers. The sensitivity of the oysters was measured by recording their valve movements by high-frequency noninvasive valvometry. The tests were 3 min tone exposures including a 70 sec fade-in period. Three endpoints were analysed: the ratio of responding individuals in the group, the resulting changes of valve opening amplitude and the response latency. At high enough acoustic energy, oysters transiently closed their valves in response to frequencies in the range of 10 to <1000 Hz, with maximum sensitivity from 10 to 200 Hz. The minimum acoustic energy required to elicit a response was 0.02 m∙s-2 at 122 dBrms re 1 μPa for frequencies ranging from 10 to 80 Hz. As a partial valve closure cannot be differentiated from a nociceptive response, it is very likely that oysters detect sounds at lower acoustic energy. The mechanism involved in sound detection and the ecological consequences are discussed. PMID:29069092

  8. Comparative and quantitative proteomics reveal the adaptive strategies of oyster larvae to ocean acidification

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, R.

    2015-10-28

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Decreasing pH due to anthropogenic CO2 inputs, called ocean acidification (OA), can make coastal environments unfavorable for oysters. This is a serious socioeconomical issue for China which supplies >70% of the world\\'s edible oysters. Here, we present an iTRAQ-based protein profiling approach for the detection and quantification of proteome changes under OA in the early life stage of a commercially important oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis. Availability of complete genome sequence for the pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) enabled us to confidently quantify over 1500 proteins in larval oysters. Over 7% of the proteome was altered in response to OA at pHNBS 7.6. Analysis of differentially expressed proteins and their associated functional pathways showed an upregulation of proteins involved in calcification, metabolic processes, and oxidative stress, each of which may be important in physiological adaptation of this species to OA. The downregulation of cytoskeletal and signal transduction proteins, on the other hand, might have impaired cellular dynamics and organelle development under OA. However, there were no significant detrimental effects in developmental processes such as metamorphic success. Implications of the differentially expressed proteins and metabolic pathways in the development of OA resistance in oyster larvae are discussed. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD002138 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002138).

  9. Impact on bird fauna of a non-native oyster expanding into blue mussel beds in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waser, A.M.; Deuzeman, S.; wa Kangeri, A.K.; van Winden, E.; Postma, J.; de Boer, Peter; van der Meer, J.; Ens, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    Intertidal mussel beds are important for intertidal ecosystems, because they feature a high taxonomic diversity and abundance of benthic organisms and are important foraging grounds for many avian species. After the introduction of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) into the European Wadden Sea,

  10. Impact on bird fauna of a non-native oyster expanding into blue mussel beds in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waser, Andreas M.; Deuzeman, Symen; Kangeri, Arno K.W.; Winden, van Erik; Postma, Jelle; Boer, de Peter; Meer, van der Jaap; Ens, Bruno J.

    2016-01-01

    Intertidal mussel beds are important for intertidal ecosystems, because they feature a high taxonomic diversity and abundance of benthic organisms and are important foraging grounds for many avian species. After the introduction of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) into the European Wadden

  11. Impact on bird fauna of a non-native oyster expanding into blue mussel beds in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waser, A.M.; Deuzeman, S.; wa Kangeri, A.K.; van Winden, E.; Postma, J.; De Boer, P.; Van der Meer, J.; Ens, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    Intertidal mussel beds are important for intertidal ecosystems, because they feature a high taxonomic diversityand abundance of benthic organisms and are important foraging grounds for many avian species. After the introductionof the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) into the EuropeanWadden

  12. Observations of Crassostrea virginica cultured in the heated effluent and discharged radionuclides of a nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, A.H.; Hess, C.T.; Smith, C.W.

    1976-06-01

    American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were rafted for 26 months at four sites in the effluent waters near Maine Yankee Nuclear Power Reactor in Montsweag Bay and at a control site in the adjacent Damariscotta River. In an evaluation of the thermal effluent for aquaculture, comparisons are made among the sites of the effects of heated effluent on oyster growth and condition, and the uptake and retention of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides. Growth and uptake of radionuclides were observed to be accelerated at the warmer water sites. Both experimental results and calculations for 58 Co and 54 Mn are presented

  13. Observations of Crassostrea virginica cultured in the heated effluent and discharged radionuclides of a nuclear power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, A.H.; Hess, C.T.; Smith, C.W.

    1976-06-01

    American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were rafted for 26 months at four sites in the effluent waters near Maine Yankee Nuclear Power Reactor in Montsweag Bay and at a control site in the adjacent Damariscotta River. In an evaluation of the thermal effluent for aquaculture, comparisons are made among the sites of the effects of heated effluent on oyster growth and condition, and the uptake and retention of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides. Growth and uptake of radionuclides were observed to be accelerated at the warmer water sites. Both experimental results and calculations for /sup 58/Co and /sup 54/Mn are presented.

  14. Decontamination of Cuban oysters using irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisneros Despaigne, E.; Leyva Castillo, V.; Martinez, L.L.; Lara Ortiz, C.; Castillo Rodriguez, E.

    2001-01-01

    Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) collected on the Cuban coast near Havana were examined for contamination with Vibrio cholerae and other potentially pathogenic Vibrio species. The strains thus isolated were characterized and identified to species following standard methods, and their radiation resistance (D 10 ) was determined in pure culture. The Vibrio species most often isolated were V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus and V. Alginolyticus. Representative cultures from each species were later used to inoculate shucked oysters to determine the optimal radiation dose that would ensure elimination of 10 8 colony forming units (CFU)/g. The highest proportion of isolates were identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. algynoliticus. Non-O1 strains of Vibrio cholerae were isolated from 50% of samples, but no V. cholerae O1 was identified. D 10 values calculated for the various strains were low in relation to those in the literature. The radiation dose for decontaminating heavily inoculated (10 8 CFU/g) oysters was 1.2 kGy. (author)

  15. Análisis cariotípico y variabilidad de los Ag-NOR en Crassostrea angulata (Lamarck, 1819)

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, I.; Vega, L.; Rebordinos, L.

    2002-01-01

    Genetic characterization of oyster species is the basis of future breeding programmes by chromosome manipulation. We determined the karyotype of Crassostrea angulata (Lamarck, 1819), and found some differences with regard to previously published reports. The nucleolus organizer regions (NOR), visualized using the silver stain method, were located on chromosome pair number 10, although NORs were occasionally detected on some other chromosomes, which had not been described before for this speci...

  16. Energy and antioxidant responses of pacific oyster exposed to trace levels of pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboin, Yanouk; Quéré, Claudie; Pernet, Fabrice; Pichereau, Vianney; Corporeau, Charlotte

    2015-09-21

    Here, we assess the physiological effects induced by environmental concentrations of pesticides in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Oysters were exposed for 14 d to trace levels of metconazole (0.2 and 2 μg/L), isoproturon (0.1 and 1 μg/L), or both in a mixture (0.2 and 0.1 μg/L, respectively). Exposure to trace levels of pesticides had no effect on the filtration rate, growth, and energy reserves of oysters. However, oysters exposed to metconazole and isoproturon showed an overactivation of the sensing-kinase AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα), a key enzyme involved in energy metabolism and more particularly glycolysis. In the meantime, these exposed oysters showed a decrease in hexokinase and pyruvate kinase activities, whereas 2-DE proteomic revealed that fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (F-1,6-BP), a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis, was up-regulated. Activities of antioxidant enzymes were higher in oysters exposed to the highest pesticide concentrations. Both pesticides enhanced the superoxide dismutase activity of oysters. Isoproturon enhanced catalase activity, and metconazole enhanced peroxiredoxin activity. Overall, our results show that environmental concentrations of metconazole or isoproturon induced subtle changes in the energy and antioxidant metabolisms of oysters.

  17. Performance of oyster ( Crassostrea tulipa ) spat cultured at different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance of spat was measured in terms of growth (increase in shell height), survival and dry meat weight production at the various densities. The results indicate that growth declined with increasing stocking density, but differences in growth rates were not significant. Survival and dry meat yields, however, did not show ...

  18. Evaluation of buffering potency of oyster ( Crassostrea gasar ) shells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) shells on acidic borehole water for fish farming. Eighteen (18), 100-litre shaded plastic tanks (3/4- filled, pH 4.0) of three replicates per treatment of 270 g buffer agent were used. There were four trials of six treatments (T) namely control (C) ...

  19. Evaluating Ecosystem effects of oyster restoration in the Mississippi Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klutse, C. K.; Milroy, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    Oyster reefs along the northern Gulf of Mexico are primarily formed by the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and are among the few biogenic natural habitats in the region. The increasing awareness of ecosystem services that habitat-forming bivalves provide, and the decline of the native species' population has led to a myriad of restoration efforts which have yielded varying results. Successful reef restoration efforts requires a deeper understanding of how variations in the timing and scales of environmental stressors control the survival, growth, and recruitment of reef associated species like oysters, shrimps, pelagic and benthic fish species. A modeling approach has been designed for exploring optimal growth conditions for oysters, studying the effect of seasonal trends in environmental stressors on the growth and survival of reef-associated species, and performing scenario testing for alternative restoration plans in the Mississippi Sound. The model uses a carbon budget approach, accounts for different functional groups within the trophic network on the reef, and operates on daily temporal resolution. Preliminary results indicate that restoration efforts may maximize benefits from the interactions between different salinity regimes and growth as well as mortality of oysters at three different class sizes of sacks, seeds, and spats. The study also seeks to evaluate the effects of different restoration efforts on promotion and recruitments in oyster populations as well as other reef-associated fishes and invertebrates. The current capabilities of the model can be scaled up to include evaluating changes in ecosystem goods and assessing their contributions to human well-being, the results of which will inform management decisions. Keywords: ecosystem modeling, oyster ecology, ecosystem-based management.

  20. Antimicrobial histones and DNA traps in invertebrate immunity: evidences in Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Aurore C; Schmitt, Paulina; Rosa, Rafael D; Vanhove, Audrey S; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Rubio, Tristan P; Charrière, Guillaume M; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2014-09-05

    Although antimicrobial histones have been isolated from multiple metazoan species, their role in host defense has long remained unanswered. We found here that the hemocytes of the oyster Crassostrea gigas release antimicrobial H1-like and H5-like histones in response to tissue damage and infection. These antimicrobial histones were shown to be associated with extracellular DNA networks released by hemocytes, the circulating immune cells of invertebrates, in response to immune challenge. The hemocyte-released DNA was found to surround and entangle vibrios. This defense mechanism is reminiscent of the neutrophil extracellular traps (ETs) recently described in vertebrates. Importantly, oyster ETs were evidenced in vivo in hemocyte-infiltrated interstitial tissues surrounding wounds, whereas they were absent from tissues of unchallenged oysters. Consistently, antimicrobial histones were found to accumulate in oyster tissues following injury or infection with vibrios. Finally, oyster ET formation was highly dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species by hemocytes. This shows that ET formation relies on common cellular and molecular mechanisms from vertebrates to invertebrates. Altogether, our data reveal that ET formation is a defense mechanism triggered by infection and tissue damage, which is shared by relatively distant species suggesting either evolutionary conservation or convergent evolution within Bilateria. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Bioaccumulation factor of tritium in oyster and tilapia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, T.Y.; Juan, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports on the bioaccumulation factor as well as the residence time of tritium in marine organisms such as tilapia fish (Tilapia mossambica) and oyster (Crassostrea iredalei) reared under laboratory conditions. The organisms were submerged in aquarium water containing tritium with specific activity of 1.0 nCi/ml. The samples were analyzed for tissue-free water tritium (TFWT) by freeze drying and for tissue-bound tritium (TBT) by combustion methods. Tritiated water collected was assayed using the liquid scintillation counting technique. (author)

  2. PECTINIDS AND OYSTERS FROM THE PLIOCENE LORETO BASIN (BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR, MEXICO)

    OpenAIRE

    PIAZZA, MICHELE; ROBBA, ELIO

    2017-01-01

    Fourteen pectinid and oyster species from the Pliocene Loreto Basin (Baja California Sur, Mexico) are recorded and discussed with regard to their relationships with closely related taxa. The whole assemblage points toward a Pliocene age. Aequipecten dallasi and Argopecten abietis abietis resulted to be the most useful biostratigraphic taxa, being restricted to Pliocene. The bulk of the considered species were confined within southern regions during the Pliocene. Crassostrea californica osunai...

  3. Multibiomarker assessment of three Brazilian estuaries using oysters as bioindicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdez Domingos, F.X.; Azevedo, M.; Silva, M.D.; Randi, M.A.F.; Freire, C.A.; Silva de Assis, H.C.; Oliveira Ribeiro, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Oysters have been largely employed as bioindicators of environmental quality in biomonitoring studies. Crassostrea rhizophorae was selected to evaluate the health status of three estuarine areas impacted by anthropogenic activities along the Brazilian coast, in three estuarine complexes, ranging in latitude from 7 to 25 deg. S. In each estuary three sites were sampled in Winter and in Summer: a site considered as reference, and two sites next to contamination sources. Condition index was similar at all sites and estuaries, with the highest values found for Itamaraca oysters in Summer. Necrosis, hyperplasia, mucocyte hypertrophy and fusion of ordinary filaments were the main histopathological lesions observed. Muscle cholinesterase activity was overall similar, but with a strong seasonal effect. Inhibition or activation of branchial total ATPase and Na,K-ATPase activities at the contaminated sites was observed. The health status of these estuarine areas is quite similar, and the combined use of biomarkers is recommended

  4. Persistence, Seasonal Dynamics and Pathogenic Potential of Vibrio Communities from Pacific Oyster Hemolymph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Carolin C.; Batista, Frederico M.; Wegner, K. Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Vibrio occur at a continuum from free-living to symbiotic life forms, including opportunists and pathogens, that can contribute to severe diseases, for instance summer mortality events of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. While most studies focused on Vibrio isolated from moribund oysters during mortality outbreaks, investigations of the Vibrio community in healthy oysters are rare. Therefore, we characterized the persistence, diversity, seasonal dynamics, and pathogenicity of the Vibrio community isolated from healthy Pacific oysters. In a reciprocal transplant experiment we repeatedly sampled hemolymph from adult Pacific oysters to differentiate population from site-specific effects during six months of in situ incubation in the field. We characterized virulence phenotypes and genomic diversity based on multilocus sequence typing in a total of 70 Vibrio strains. Based on controlled infection experiments we could show that strains with the ability to colonize healthy adult oysters can also have the potential to induce high mortality rates on larvae. Diversity and abundance of Vibrio varied significantly over time with highest values during and after spawning season. Vibrio communities from transplanted and stationary oysters converged over time, indicating that communities were not population specific, but rather assemble from the surrounding environment forming communities, some of which can persist over longer periods. PMID:24728233

  5. Satellite remote sensing reveals a positive impact of living oyster reefs on microalgal biofilm development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Echappé

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite remote sensing (RS is routinely used for the large-scale monitoring of microphytobenthos (MPB biomass in intertidal mudflats and has greatly improved our knowledge of MPB spatio-temporal variability and its potential drivers. Processes operating on smaller scales however, such as the impact of benthic macrofauna on MPB development, to date remain underinvestigated. In this study, we analysed the influence of wild Crassostrea gigas oyster reefs on MPB biofilm development using multispectral RS. A 30-year time series (1985–2015 combining high-resolution (30 m Landsat and SPOT data was built in order to explore the relationship between C. gigas reefs and MPB spatial distribution and seasonal dynamics, using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI. Emphasis was placed on the analysis of a before–after control-impact (BACI experiment designed to assess the effect of oyster killing on the surrounding MPB biofilms. Our RS data reveal that the presence of oyster reefs positively affects MPB biofilm development. Analysis of the historical time series first showed the presence of persistent, highly concentrated MPB patches around oyster reefs. This observation was supported by the BACI experiment which showed that killing the oysters (while leaving the physical reef structure, i.e. oyster shells, intact negatively affected both MPB biofilm biomass and spatial stability around the reef. As such, our results are consistent with the hypothesis of nutrient input as an explanation for the MPB growth-promoting effect of oysters, whereby organic and inorganic matter released through oyster excretion and biodeposition stimulates MPB biomass accumulation. MPB also showed marked seasonal variations in biomass and patch shape, size and degree of aggregation around the oyster reefs. Seasonal variations in biomass, with higher NDVI during spring and autumn, were consistent with those observed on broader scales in other European mudflats. Our

  6. Satellite remote sensing reveals a positive impact of living oyster reefs on microalgal biofilm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echappé, Caroline; Gernez, Pierre; Méléder, Vona; Jesus, Bruno; Cognie, Bruno; Decottignies, Priscilla; Sabbe, Koen; Barillé, Laurent

    2018-02-01

    Satellite remote sensing (RS) is routinely used for the large-scale monitoring of microphytobenthos (MPB) biomass in intertidal mudflats and has greatly improved our knowledge of MPB spatio-temporal variability and its potential drivers. Processes operating on smaller scales however, such as the impact of benthic macrofauna on MPB development, to date remain underinvestigated. In this study, we analysed the influence of wild Crassostrea gigas oyster reefs on MPB biofilm development using multispectral RS. A 30-year time series (1985-2015) combining high-resolution (30 m) Landsat and SPOT data was built in order to explore the relationship between C. gigas reefs and MPB spatial distribution and seasonal dynamics, using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Emphasis was placed on the analysis of a before-after control-impact (BACI) experiment designed to assess the effect of oyster killing on the surrounding MPB biofilms. Our RS data reveal that the presence of oyster reefs positively affects MPB biofilm development. Analysis of the historical time series first showed the presence of persistent, highly concentrated MPB patches around oyster reefs. This observation was supported by the BACI experiment which showed that killing the oysters (while leaving the physical reef structure, i.e. oyster shells, intact) negatively affected both MPB biofilm biomass and spatial stability around the reef. As such, our results are consistent with the hypothesis of nutrient input as an explanation for the MPB growth-promoting effect of oysters, whereby organic and inorganic matter released through oyster excretion and biodeposition stimulates MPB biomass accumulation. MPB also showed marked seasonal variations in biomass and patch shape, size and degree of aggregation around the oyster reefs. Seasonal variations in biomass, with higher NDVI during spring and autumn, were consistent with those observed on broader scales in other European mudflats. Our study provides the

  7. Antiviral Defense and Innate Immune Memory in the Oyster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is becoming a valuable model for investigating antiviral defense in the Lophotrochozoa superphylum. In the past five years, improvements to laboratory-based experimental infection protocols using Ostreid herpesvirus I (OsHV-1) from naturally infected C. gigas combined with next-generation sequencing techniques has revealed that oysters have a complex antiviral response involving the activation of all major innate immune pathways. Experimental evidence indicates C. gigas utilizes an interferon-like response to limit OsHV-1 replication and spread. Oysters injected with a viral mimic (polyI:C) develop resistance to OsHV-1. Improved survival following polyI:C injection was found later in life (within-generational immune priming) and in the next generation (multi-generational immune priming). These studies indicate that the oyster’s antiviral defense system exhibits a form of innate immune-memory. An important priority is to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon. This knowledge will motivate the development of practical and cost-effective treatments for improving oyster health in aquaculture. PMID:29547519

  8. 78 FR 62293 - Safety Zone, Oyster Festival 30th Anniversary Fireworks Display, Oyster Bay; Oyster Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    ... Safety Zone, Oyster Festival 30th Anniversary Fireworks Display, Oyster Bay; Oyster Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast... zone on the navigable waters of Oyster Bay near Oyster Bay, NY for the Oyster Festival 30th Anniversary... Oyster Festival 30th Anniversary Fireworks Display is scheduled for October 19, 2013 and is one of...

  9. Environmental factors responsible for the incidence of antibiotic resistance genes in pristine Crassostrea virginica reefs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkovskii, Andrei L.; Thomas, Michael; Hurley, Dorset; Teems, Clifford

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Estuary was the major source of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) for tidal creeks. ► Watersheds were the secondary source of ARG for tidal creeks. ► Watershed contribution corresponded to the degree of its anthropogenic disturbance. ► ARG in tidal creeks were carried by native hosts preferring low termohaline niches. ► ARG incidence was the highest in oysters implying ARG bioaccumulation/proliferation. - Abstract: The occurrence of tetracycline resistance (TRG) and integrase (INT) genes were monitored in Crassostrea virginica oyster reefs of three pristine creeks (SINERR, Georgia, USA). Their profiles revealed 85% similarity with the TRG/INT profiles observed in the adjacent to the SINERR and contaminated Altamaha River estuary (Barkovskii et al., 2010). The TRG/INT spectra and incidence frequencies corresponded to the source of oceanic input and to run-offs from creeks’ watersheds. The highest incidence frequencies and concentrations were observed in oysters. TRG/INT incidences correlated positively (Spearman Rank = 0.88), and negatively correlated (−0.63 to −0.79) with creek salinity, conductivity, dissolved solids, and temperature. Coliform incidence positively correlated with temperature, and not with the TRG/INT incidence. The Altamaha River estuary was the primary TRG/INT source for the reefs with contributions from creek’s watersheds. TRG/INT were carried by non-coliforms with a preference for low-to-temperate thermohaline environments coupled with bioaccumulation by oysters.

  10. Oysters and Vibrios as a Model for Disease Dynamics in Wild Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Frédérique; Wegner, K Mathias; Polz, Martin F

    2016-07-01

    Disease dynamics in the wild are influenced by a number of ecological and evolutionary factors not addressed by traditional laboratory-based characterization of pathogens. Here we propose the oyster, Crassostrea gigas, as a model for studying the interaction of the environment, bacterial pathogens, and the host in disease dynamics. We show that an important first step is to ask whether the functional unit of pathogenesis is a bacterial clone, a population, or a consortium in order to assess triggers of disease outbreaks and devise appropriate monitoring tools. Moreover, the development of specific-pathogen-free (SPF) oysters has enabled assessment of the infection process under natural conditions. Finally, recent results show the importance of microbial interactions and host genetics in determining oyster health and disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Let the oyster reefs tell their story- a novel approach to reconstructing coastal environmental histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalowska, A. M.; McKee, B. A.; Rodriguez, A. B.; Ridge, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    Intertidal oyster reefs (Crassostrea virginica) are a vital part of coastal ecosystems around the world, providing habitat for marine life and improving water quality. These integral parts of coastal landscapes also dissipate wave energy, reducing estuarine shoreline erosion. Within the last century, oyster reefs across the world have decreased in abundance and areal extent due to anthropogenic and environmental changes, such as harvesting, pollution, climate change and disease. However, previous studies of restored oyster reefs—based on direct measurements of oyster-reef growth over a decade—have shown the ability of intertidal reefs to outpace sea-level rise via vertical accretion. In this study we present a novel application of 210Pb geochronology (Constant Rate of Supply Model) combined with radiocarbon dating applied to two natural intertidal oyster reefs in North Carolina, USA. Our findings show that within the last 560 years, the oyster reef located on an open mudflat consistently grew at the rate of sea-level rise (SLR). The second examined reef was located in a sandy tidal channel and initially formed around 700 years ago. Reef sediments recorded a disturbance associated with a large storm event, Hurricane Barbara (1953). Our new application of the 210Pb geochronology method, combined with radiocarbon dating, analyses of shell condition and size, and grain size, opens the possibilities to explore the historical record of oyster-reef health and growth rate to evaluate its sensitivity or resilience to sea-level rise, sediment supply, storms and anthropogenic disturbances. Identifying periods and conditions of optimal growth for oyster-reef habitats will provide vital information for restoration efforts. Additionally, oyster reefs may contain a detailed and well-preserved record of local sea level in their sediments.

  12. FLOAT Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.; Aarup, Bendt

    The objective of the FLOAT project is to study the reliability of high-performance fibre-reinforced concrete, also known as Compact Reinforced Composite (CRC), for the floats of wave energy converters. In order to reach a commercial breakthrough, wave energy converters need to achieve a lower price...

  13. Crassostrea gigas mortality in France: the usual suspect, a herpes virus, may not be the killer in this polymicrobial opportunistic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno ePetton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Successive disease outbreaks in oyster (Crassostrea gigas beds in France have resulted in dramatic losses in production, and subsequent decline in the oyster-farming industry. Deaths of juvenile oysters have been associated with the presence of a herpes virus (OsHV-1 µvar and bacterial populations of the genus Vibrio. Although the pathogenicity of OsHV-1 µvar, as well as several strains of Vibrio has been demonstrated by experimental infections, our understanding of the complexity of infections occurring in the natural environment remains limited. In the present study, we use specific-pathogen-free (SPF oysters infected in an estuarine environment to study the diversity and dynamics of cultured microbial populations during disease expression. We observe that rapid Vibrio colonization followed by viral replication precedes oyster death. No correlation was found between the vibrio concentration and viral load in co-infected animals. We show that the quantity of viral DNA is a predictor of mortality, however, in the absence of bacteria, a high load of herpes virus is not sufficient to induce the full expression of the disease. In addition, we demonstrate that juvenile mortalities can occur in the absence of herpes virus, indicating that the herpes virus appears neither essential nor sufficient to cause juvenile deaths; whereas bacteria are necessary for the disease. Finally, we demonstrate that oysters are a reservoir of putative pathogens, and that the geographic origin, age, and cultivation method of oysters influence disease expression.

  14. Single or dual experimental infections with Vibrio aestuarianus and OsHV-1 in diploid and triploid Crassostrea gigas at the spat, juvenile and adult stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azéma, Patrick; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Dégremont, Lionel

    2016-09-01

    French production of the Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is currently threatened by two pathogens, OsHV-1 and V. aestuarianus. While oysters selected for their higher resistance to OsHV-1 are now available for the industry, the impact of V. aestuarianus on such oysters is unknown, especially for triploids. In addition, experimental infection has used the virus or the bacteria alone, but there have been no investigations of dual exposure to these pathogens. This study is the first report of single or dual exposure in spat (Spat1 and Spat2), juvenile and adult naïve oysters. For each of the two stocks evaluated, unselected oysters and oysters selected for their higher resistance to OsHV-1 infection were tested, as well as their triploid siblings of the selected oysters produced using cytochalasin B. We confirmed that resistance to OsHV-1 infection and susceptibility to V. aestuarianus increased with age and size, although selected oysters were not significantly impacted by OsHV-1 whatever their ploidy, size or age. We found different mortality patterns depending on the pathogen tested. The mortality pattern was similar for oysters exposed to OsHV-1 or to both pathogens in the Spat1 trial (4months old and 1.9g). The mortality pattern was similar for oysters exposed to V. aestuarianus or to both pathogens in the Adult trial (25months old and 63.1g). Surprisingly, mortality was much higher (ranging from 75.9% to 100%), in particular for the selected oysters, for the Spat2 (8months old/3.9g) and Juvenile trials (16months old/18.4g) given a dual exposure, regardless of the level of selection for OsHV-1 and the ploidy state. Our findings highlight an important threat for oyster farmers: oysters exposed to both pathogens could experience dramatic mortality rates, even in oysters selected for their higher resistance to OsHV-1. Finally, our study demonstrated for the first time that triploid oysters were more susceptible to experimental challenges with V

  15. Oyster and mussel farming

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The article discusses the oyster and mussel culture practices in western Visayas, Philippines. Spat collection, culture methods and management, and harvesting technique are discussed. The article also discusses mussel culture in New Zealand.

  16. Shotgun proteomics reveals physiological response to ocean acidification in Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins-Schiffman, Emma; Coffey, William D; Hua, Wilber; Nunn, Brook L; Dickinson, Gary H; Roberts, Steven B

    2014-11-03

    Ocean acidification as a result of increased anthropogenic CO2 emissions is occurring in marine and estuarine environments worldwide. The coastal ocean experiences additional daily and seasonal fluctuations in pH that can be lower than projected end-of-century open ocean pH reductions. In order to assess the impact of ocean acidification on marine invertebrates, Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) were exposed to one of four different p CO2 levels for four weeks: 400 μatm (pH 8.0), 800 μatm (pH 7.7), 1000 μatm (pH 7.6), or 2800 μatm (pH 7.3). At the end of the four week exposure period, oysters in all four p CO2 environments deposited new shell, but growth rate was not different among the treatments. However, micromechanical properties of the new shell were compromised by elevated p CO2. Elevated p CO2 affected neither whole body fatty acid composition, nor glycogen content, nor mortality rate associated with acute heat shock. Shotgun proteomics revealed that several physiological pathways were significantly affected by ocean acidification, including antioxidant response, carbohydrate metabolism, and transcription and translation. Additionally, the proteomic response to a second stress differed with p CO2, with numerous processes significantly affected by mechanical stimulation at high versus low p CO2 (all proteomics data are available in the ProteomeXchange under the identifier PXD000835). Oyster physiology is significantly altered by exposure to elevated p CO2, indicating changes in energy resource use. This is especially apparent in the assessment of the effects of p CO2 on the proteomic response to a second stress. The altered stress response illustrates that ocean acidification may impact how oysters respond to other changes in their environment. These data contribute to an integrative view of the effects of ocean acidification on oysters as well as physiological trade-offs during environmental stress.

  17. Organic Stable Isotopes in Ancient Oyster Shell Trace Pre-colonial Nitrogen Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, E. S.; Carmichael, R. H.; Andrus, C. F. T.; Jackson, H. E.

    2016-02-01

    Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were an important food resource for native peoples of the northern Gulf of Mexico, who harvested oysters and deposited waste shell and other artifacts in middens. Shell δ15N is a proxy for oyster tissue δ15N that reflects nitrogen (N) in food sources of bivalves. We tested the use of shell δ15N as a paleo proxy of ancient N sources, which to our knowledge has not been previously done for archeological bivalve specimens. To determine δ15N of the very low-N and high-carbonate ancient specimens, we tested established and modified acidification techniques developed for modern clams and oysters to decalcify organic shell matrix and extract sufficient N for analyses. Centrifugation following acidification better concentrated N from ancient shells for stable isotope analysis. Careful screening was required to detect effects of diagenesis, incomplete acidification, and sample contamination. Modern oyster shells did not require acidification and bulk shell material was directly analyzed for δ15N using an EA-IRMS coupled to a CO2 trap. δ15N values in ancient oyster shells did not differ from modern oyster shells from the same sites, but %N and % organic carbon (C) were lower in ancient than in modern shells. Organic δ13C in ancient shells had a significant negative relationship with shell age, possibly due to an effect of sea level rise increasing marine suspended particulate matter (SPM) sources to oysters. In modern oysters, δ15N had a significant relationship with soft tissue δ15N, and predicted by SPM δ15N, water column nitrate, and water column dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations, demonstrating the effectiveness of oyster shell δ15N to identify N sources to bivalves such as oysters. Our study has demonstrated the usefulness of δ15N from midden oyster shells as a proxy for N sources in an estuary that has undergone relatively light impacts from human land-use change through the past 2000 years.

  18. Oral bioaccessibility of toxic metals in contaminated oysters and relationships with metal internal sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shi; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2014-12-01

    The Hong Kong oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis are widely farmed in the estuarine waters of Southern China, but they accumulate Cu and Zn to alarmingly high concentrations in the soft tissues. Health risks of seafood consumption are related to contaminants such as toxic metals which are bioaccessible to humans. In the present study, we investigated the oral bioaccessibility of five toxic metals (Ag, Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn) in contaminated oysters collected from different locations of a large estuary in southern China. In all oysters, total Zn concentration was the highest whereas total Pb concentration was the lowest. Among the five metals, Ag had the lowest oral bioaccessibility (38.9-60.8%), whereas Cu and Zn had the highest bioaccessibility (72.3-93.1%). Significant negative correlation was observed between metal bioaccessibility and metal concentration in the oysters for Ag, Cd, and Cu. We found that the oral bioaccessibility of the five metals was positively correlated with their trophically available metal fraction (TAM) in the oyster tissues, and negatively correlated with metal distribution in the cellular debris. Thus, metal partitioning in the TAM and cellular debris controlled the oral bioaccessibility to humans. Given the dependence of oral bioaccessibility on tissue metal contamination, bioaccessibility needs to be incorporated in the risk assessments of contaminated shellfish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Occurrence of Proteus mirabilis associated with two species of venezuelan oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; Contreras, Monica; García-Amado, María Alexandra; Gueneau, Pulchérie; Suárez, Paula

    2007-01-01

    The fecal contamination of raw seafood by indicators and opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms represents a public health concern. The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of enteric bacteria colonizing oysters collected from a Venezuelan touristic area. Oyster samples were collected at the northwestern coast of Venezuela and local salinity, pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen of seawater were recorded. Total and fecal coliforms were measured for the assessment of the microbiological quality of water and oysters, using the Multiple Tube Fermentation technique. Analyses were made using cultures and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Diverse enrichment and selective culture methods were used to isolate enteric bacteria. We obtained pure cultures of Gram-negative straight rods with fimbriae from Isognomon alatus and Crassostrea rhizophorae. Our results show that P. mirabilis was predominant under our culture conditions. We confirmed the identity of the cultures by biochemical tests, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and data analysis. Other enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli, Morganella morganii and Klebsiella pneumoniae were also isolated from seawater and oysters. The presence of pathogenic bacteria in oysters could have serious epidemiological implications and a potential human health risk associated with consumption of raw seafood.

  20. Determination of coliforms in the water and soft tissue of oysters extracted in Cananéia, São Paulo, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Doi, Sonia Assami; Oliveira, Ana Julia Fernandes Cardoso de; Barbieri, Edison

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the microbiological quality of water from the various locations where specimens of the oysters Crassostrea sp. were harvested in Cananéia estuary, as well as of the bivalve itself, through values of coliforms based on the Multiple Tube Technique. During the period from 2005 to 2011, samples of water were collected at ten points. The water analysis presented a geometric mean of thermotolerant coliforms of 24.67 MPN 100 mL-1 and, in the soft tissues of the oysters,...

  1. Oyster larvae settle in response to habitat-associated underwater sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Ashlee; Eggleston, David B; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R

    2013-01-01

    Following a planktonic dispersal period of days to months, the larvae of benthic marine organisms must locate suitable seafloor habitat in which to settle and metamorphose. For animals that are sessile or sedentary as adults, settlement onto substrates that are adequate for survival and reproduction is particularly critical, yet represents a challenge since patchily distributed settlement sites may be difficult to find along a coast or within an estuary. Recent studies have demonstrated that the underwater soundscape, the distinct sounds that emanate from habitats and contain information about their biological and physical characteristics, may serve as broad-scale environmental cue for marine larvae to find satisfactory settlement sites. Here, we contrast the acoustic characteristics of oyster reef and off-reef soft bottoms, and investigate the effect of habitat-associated estuarine sound on the settlement patterns of an economically and ecologically important reef-building bivalve, the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Subtidal oyster reefs in coastal North Carolina, USA show distinct acoustic signatures compared to adjacent off-reef soft bottom habitats, characterized by consistently higher levels of sound in the 1.5-20 kHz range. Manipulative laboratory playback experiments found increased settlement in larval oyster cultures exposed to oyster reef sound compared to unstructured soft bottom sound or no sound treatments. In field experiments, ambient reef sound produced higher levels of oyster settlement in larval cultures than did off-reef sound treatments. The results suggest that oyster larvae have the ability to respond to sounds indicative of optimal settlement sites, and this is the first evidence that habitat-related differences in estuarine sounds influence the settlement of a mollusk. Habitat-specific sound characteristics may represent an important settlement and habitat selection cue for estuarine invertebrates and could play a role in driving

  2. Oyster larvae settle in response to habitat-associated underwater sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee Lillis

    Full Text Available Following a planktonic dispersal period of days to months, the larvae of benthic marine organisms must locate suitable seafloor habitat in which to settle and metamorphose. For animals that are sessile or sedentary as adults, settlement onto substrates that are adequate for survival and reproduction is particularly critical, yet represents a challenge since patchily distributed settlement sites may be difficult to find along a coast or within an estuary. Recent studies have demonstrated that the underwater soundscape, the distinct sounds that emanate from habitats and contain information about their biological and physical characteristics, may serve as broad-scale environmental cue for marine larvae to find satisfactory settlement sites. Here, we contrast the acoustic characteristics of oyster reef and off-reef soft bottoms, and investigate the effect of habitat-associated estuarine sound on the settlement patterns of an economically and ecologically important reef-building bivalve, the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica. Subtidal oyster reefs in coastal North Carolina, USA show distinct acoustic signatures compared to adjacent off-reef soft bottom habitats, characterized by consistently higher levels of sound in the 1.5-20 kHz range. Manipulative laboratory playback experiments found increased settlement in larval oyster cultures exposed to oyster reef sound compared to unstructured soft bottom sound or no sound treatments. In field experiments, ambient reef sound produced higher levels of oyster settlement in larval cultures than did off-reef sound treatments. The results suggest that oyster larvae have the ability to respond to sounds indicative of optimal settlement sites, and this is the first evidence that habitat-related differences in estuarine sounds influence the settlement of a mollusk. Habitat-specific sound characteristics may represent an important settlement and habitat selection cue for estuarine invertebrates and could play a

  3. The effects of storage temperature on the growth of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and organoleptic properties in oysters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meshack eMudoh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During harvesting and storage, microbial pathogens and natural spoilage flora may grow, negatively affecting the composition and texture of oysters and posing a potential health threat to susceptible consumers. A solution to these problems would mitigate associated damaging effects on the seafood industry. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of storage temperature on growth of Vibrios as well as other microbial, sensory and textural characteristics of post-harvest shellstock Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica. Oysters harvested from the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, during summer months (June, July, and August, 2010 were subjected to three storage temperatures (5, 10, and 20ºC over a 10 day period. At selected time intervals (0, 1, 3, 7, 10 days two separate samples of 6 oysters each were homogenated and analyzed for pH, halophilic plate counts (HPC, total Vibrios, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp. Oyster meats shucked after storage were also organoleptically evaluated (acceptability, appearance, and odor. Texture analysis was performed using a texture analyzer on meats shucked from oysters held under the same conditions. The pH of the oyster homogenates showed no consistent pattern with storage time and temperature. The HPC (4.5 to 9.4log CFU/g were highest on day 7 at 20C while olfactory acceptance reduced with time and increasing storage temperatures. The Vp counts increased over time from 3.5 to7.5 log MPN/g by day10. Loss of freshness as judged by appearance and odor was significant over time (p

  4. Oyster Fisheries App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Guerrero, Geraldo A.; Armstrong, Duane; Underwood, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    This project is creating a cloud-enabled, HTML 5 web application to help oyster fishermen and state agencies apply Earth science to improve the management of this important natural and economic resource. The Oyster Fisheries app gathers and analyzes environmental and water quality information, and alerts fishermen and resources managers about problems in oyster fishing waters. An intuitive interface based on Google Maps displays the geospatial information and provides familiar interactive controls to the users. Alerts can be tailored to notify users when conditions in specific leases or public fishing areas require attention. The app is hosted on the Amazon Web Services cloud. It is being developed and tested using some of the latest web development tools such as web components and Polymer.

  5. Faunal community use of enhanced and natural oyster reefs in Delaware Bay: A field study and classroom inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, Jenny L.

    In addition to its value as a fisheries resource, the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, is a reef building, cornerstone species that provides ecosystem services to the environment. Oysters provide habitat for associated resident and transient species. With widespread declines in oyster populations, restoration efforts have focused on improving oyster stocks and enhancing the ecosystem services they provide. Community-based oyster restoration programs engage the public and local community in planning, construction and/or monitoring of restoration projects. Since 2007, a K-12 student centered community-based restoration venture, Project PORTS, Promoting Oyster Restoration Through Schools, has been working to educate students, promote stewardship values, and enhance oyster habitat in the Delaware Bay. The overarching goals of the present study were to (1) assess fish and macroinvertebrate utilization on the Project PORTS community-created, subtidal, low-relief oyster restoration area in the Delaware Bay, and (2) convert the data collected into a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) activity that can be implemented in the classroom. I examined six subtidal natural oyster reefs of varying oyster densities and one community-based restoration reef as habitat for fishes and invertebrates. Sampling methods on these low-relief reefs consisted of otter trawl tows and benthic habitat tray collections. Results revealed that the enhancement area supported a diverse faunal community consistent with nearby, natural oyster habitats. Data collected during the field study were then transformed into an educational lesson plan, "One Fish, Two Fish-Assessing Habitat Value of Restored Oyster Reefs", that fulfilled national and state (NJ) curriculum standards. The lesson was piloted in a middle school classroom and student learning was evaluated through summative assessments pre and post-participation in the activity. Results of the assessments indicated that

  6. A developmental and energetic basis linking larval oyster shell formation to acidification sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbusser, George G.; Brunner, Elizabeth L.; Haley, Brian A.; Hales, Burke; Langdon, Christopher J.; Prahl, Frederick G.

    2013-05-01

    Acidified waters are impacting commercial oyster production in the U.S. Pacific Northwest, and favorable carbonate chemistry conditions are predicted to become less frequent. Within 48 h of fertilization, unshelled Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae precipitate roughly 90% of their body weight as calcium carbonate. We measured stable carbon isotopes in larval shell and tissue and in algal food and seawater dissolved inorganic carbon in a longitudinal study of larval development and growth. Using these data and measured biochemical composition of larvae, we show that sensitivity of initial shell formation to ocean acidification results from diminished ability to isolate calcifying fluid from surrounding seawater, a limited energy budget and a strong kinetic demand for calcium carbonate precipitation. Our results highlight an important link between organism physiology and mineral kinetics in larval bivalves and suggest the consideration of mineral kinetics may improve understanding winners and losers in a high CO2 world.

  7. Levels of PCBs in Oysters Coming from Galicia Coast: Comparison to Mussels from the Same Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, N; García, I; Ignacio, M; Mouteira, A

    2016-05-01

    PCBs were analyzed in two species of oyster (Crassostrea gigas and Ostrea edulis) cultured in intertidal beds and rafts coming from the Galician Rías during the period 2011-2014. PCBs were also analyzed in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected in the same Rías during 2011. The main objective of this work is to investigate the distribution of PCBs in Galician oysters and to study their suitability as bioindicator in comparison to mussels. The levels of ΣPCBs (ten congeners) ranged from 5.58 to 179.49 ng g(-1) d.w. The effect of biological parameters (shell length, lipid content and condition index) on bioaccumulation of PCBs was also evaluated. ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference between species for higher chlorinated biphenyls (CBs 153 and 138). The spatial patterns were investigated. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed differences between geographical areas (Rías Altas, Centrales and Baixas) in the distribution of PCBs.

  8. A crucial role in fertility for the oyster angiotensin-converting enzyme orthologue CgACE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Riviere

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE is a highly conserved metallopeptidase. In mammals, the somatic isoform governs blood pressure whereas the germinal isoform (tACE is required for fertility. In Ecdysozoans, ACE-like enzymes are implicated in reproduction. Despite ACE orthologues being present from bacteria to humans, their function(s remain(s unknown in distant organisms such as Lophotrochozoans. In silico analysis of an oyster (Crassostrea gigas EST library suggested the presence of an ACE orthologue in molluscs. Primer walking and 5'-RACE revealed that the 1.9 kb cDNA encodes CgACE, a 632 amino acid protein displaying a conserved single active site and a putative C-terminal transmembrane anchor, thus resembling human tACE, as supported by molecular modelling. FRET activity assays and Maldi-TOF spectrometry indicated that CgACE is a functional dipeptidyl-carboxypeptidase which is active on Angiotensin I and sensitive to ACE inhibitors and chloride ion concentration. Immunocytochemistry revealed that, as its human counterpart, recombinant CgACE is synthesised as a transmembrane enzyme. RT-qPCR, in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry shed light on a tissue, and development stage, specific expression pattern for CgACE, which is increased in the gonad during spermatogenesis. The use of ACE inhibitors in vivo indicates that the dipeptidase activity of CgACE is crucial for the oyster fertilization. Our study demonstrates that a transmembrane active ACE is present in the oyster Crassostrea gigas, and for the first time ascribes a functional role for ACE in Lophotrochozoans. Its biological function in reproduction is conserved from molluscs to humans, a finding of particular evolutionary interest especially since oysters represent the most important aquaculture resource worldwide.

  9. Dangerous Raw Oysters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-05

    Dr. Duc Vugia, chief of the Infectious Diseases Branch at the California Department of Public Health, discusses the dangers of eating raw oysters.  Created: 8/5/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/7/2013.

  10. Oyster Fauna of Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussarawit, Somchai; Cedhagen, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe 16 species of true oysters from Thai waters. They are widely distributed on various intertidal and subtidal substrates in the Gulf of Thailand and in the Andaman Sea. The different species were identified on the basis of their shell morphology, and their characteristic features...... with asterisk were recorded for the first time in Thailand....

  11. Ingestion of Nanoplastics and Microplastics by Pacific Oyster Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew; Galloway, Tamara S

    2015-12-15

    Plastic debris is a prolific contaminant effecting freshwater and marine ecosystems across the globe. Of growing environmental concern are "microplastics"and "nanoplastics" encompassing tiny particles of plastic derived from manufacturing and macroplastic fragmentation. Pelagic zooplankton are susceptible to consuming microplastics, however the threat posed to larvae of commercially important bivalves is currently unknown. We exposed Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae (3-24 d.p.f.) to polystyrene particles spanning 70 nm-20 μm in size, including plastics with differing surface properties, and tested the impact of microplastics on larval feeding and growth. The frequency and magnitude of plastic ingestion over 24 h varied by larval age and size of polystyrene particle (ANOVA, P plastic, with aminated particles ingested and retained more frequently (ANOVA, P plastic consumption and plastic load per organism was identified (Spearmans, r = 0.95, P micro- and nanoplastics were readily ingested by oyster larvae, exposure to plastic concentrations exceeding those observed in the marine environment resulted in no measurable effects on the development or feeding capacity of the larvae over the duration of the study.

  12. Assessment of health status of oysters (Crassostreagigas) exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of Ag and Cu in brackish waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rementeria, Ane; Mikolaczyk, Mathilde; Peña, Ainhize; Lanceleur, Laurent; Blanc, Gérard; Soto, Manu; Schäfer, Jörg; Zaldibar, Beñat

    2017-12-01

    Human activities have altered estuarine environments leading to increased presence of different pollutants including metals. Although the implementation of new environmental policies has caused a considerable decrease in trace metal concentrations in estuaries around the Bay of Biscay, some elements such as copper (Cu) and silver (Ag) are still present in relatively high concentrations. Oysters have been widely used in environmental biomonitoring programs as sentinel organisms. Oysters Crassostrea gigas from an uncontaminated estuary were exposed to sublethal, environmentally relevant concentrations of Cu (2000 ng Cu/L) and Ag (500 ng Ag/L) during 14 days in brackish water (S = 18). A battery of cell and tissue level (exposure) biomarkers at different levels of biological complexity was applied and integrated into the Integrative Biological Response (IBR) index including: metallothionein contents, intralysosomal metal accumulation, digestive gland atrophy and digestive gland tissue integrity. Condition Index (CI) was incorporated into the IBR index as a complementary parameter that reflects the general physiological condition of oysters (organism level). Results indicated an increase in intralysosomal metal accumulation after 7 and 14 days of exposure to Ag together with an increase in the digestive epithelium atrophy and lipofuscin content after 7 days of exposure to Ag. The responses detected with the aid of biomarkers integrated in the IBR index showed higher toxicity in oysters exposed to Ag, inducing the clear onset of detoxification processes which also occurred, to a lower extent, in Cu-exposed oysters.

  13. Surveying a fossil oyster reef using terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring, A.; Exner, U.; Harzhauser, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Korneuburg Basin, situated north-west of Vienna, is well known to contain a rich variety of fossils from the Early Miocene (16.5 ma) and therefore has been investigated extensively by scientists in the past decades. An exceptional discovery was made in 2005: a large fossil oyster reef has been excavated and documented carefully during the last years. Aside from the giant-sized oyster (Crassostrea gryphoides), the excavation site contains numerous species of molluscs along with teeth of sharks and rays and even isolated bones of sea cows. The oysters, having lengths of up to 80 cm, are protruding from the ground surface, which is more or less a tilted plane (25˚ ) with a size of about 300 m2. The entire site is crosscut by a network of geological faults, often also offsetting individual oyster shells. Displacements along the normal faults do not exceed ~ 15 cm. The faulted fossils offer a unique opportunity to measure displacement distribution along the faults in great detail and provide insight in deformation mechanisms in porous, barely lithified sediments. In order to get a precise 3D model of the oyster reef, the terrestrial laser scanner system Leica HDS 6000 is used. It is a phase-based laser scanner, i.e. the distance measurement is performed using the phase-shift principle. Compared to the time-of-flight principle, this method is generally more appropriate to projects like this one, where the distances to be measured are relatively small (aligned randomly or if they show a systematic alignment, in order to draw conclusions on the ocean currents at that time. For data processing, we use the 3D modeling software Geomagic Studio and the DTM (Digital Terrain Model) software SCOP++. The entire site has also been systematically documented by a large number of digital photographs. The obtained texture information allows a visual interpretation of the underlying surface. We discuss in how far such a 3D model derived from terrestrial laser scanner data may be

  14. 3D CENTRAL LINE EXTRACTION OF FOSSIL OYSTER SHELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Djuricic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Photogrammetry provides a powerful tool to digitally document protected, inaccessible, and rare fossils. This saves manpower in relation to current documentation practice and makes the fragile specimens more available for paleontological analysis and public education. In this study, high resolution orthophoto (0.5 mm and digital surface models (1 mm are used to define fossil boundaries that are then used as an input to automatically extract fossil length information via central lines. In general, central lines are widely used in geosciences as they ease observation, monitoring and evaluation of object dimensions. Here, the 3D central lines are used in a novel paleontological context to study fossilized oyster shells with photogrammetric and LiDAR-obtained 3D point cloud data. 3D central lines of 1121 Crassostrea gryphoides oysters of various shapes and sizes were computed in the study. Central line calculation included: i Delaunay triangulation between the fossil shell boundary points and formation of the Voronoi diagram; ii extraction of Voronoi vertices and construction of a connected graph tree from them; iii reduction of the graph to the longest possible central line via Dijkstra’s algorithm; iv extension of longest central line to the shell boundary and smoothing by an adjustment of cubic spline curve; and v integration of the central line into the corresponding 3D point cloud. The resulting longest path estimate for the 3D central line is a size parameter that can be applied in oyster shell age determination both in paleontological and biological applications. Our investigation evaluates ability and performance of the central line method to measure shell sizes accurately by comparing automatically extracted central lines with manually collected reference data used in paleontological analysis. Our results show that the automatically obtained central line length overestimated the manually collected reference by 1.5% in the test set, which

  15. Selection of reference genes for expression analysis of Kumamoto and Portuguese oysters and their hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lulu; Su, Jiaqi; Wang, Zhaoping; Yan, Xiwu; Yu, Ruihai

    2017-12-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a rapid and reliable technique which has been widely used to quantifying gene transcripts (expression analysis). It is also employed for studying heterosis, hybridization breeding and hybrid tolerability of oysters, an ecologically and economically important taxonomic group. For these studies, selection of a suitable set of housekeeping genes as references is crucial for correct interpretation of qRT-PCR data. To identify suitable reference genes for oysters during low temperature and low salinity stresses, we analyzed twelve genes from the gill tissue of Crassostrea sikamea (SS), Crassostrea angulata (AA) and their hybrid (SA), which included three ribosomal genes, 28S ribosomal protein S5 ( RPS5), ribosomal protein L35 ( RPL35), and 60S ribosomal protein L29 ( RPL29); three structural genes, tubulin gamma ( TUBγ), annexin A6 and A7 ( AA6 and AA7); three metabolic pathway genes, ornithine decarboxylase ( OD), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase ( GAPDH) and glutathione S-transferase P1 ( GSP); two transcription factors, elongation factor 1 alpha and beta ( EF1α and EF1β); and one protein synthesis gene (ubiquitin ( UBQ). Primers specific for these genes were successfully developed for the three groups of oysters. Three different algorithms, geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper, were used to evaluate the expression stability of these candidate genes. BestKeeper program was found to be the most reliable. Based on our analysis, we found that the expression of RPL35 and EF1α was stable under low salinity stress, and the expression of OD, GAPDH and EF1α was stable under low temperature stress in hybrid (SA) oyster; the expression of RPS5 and GAPDH was stable under low salinity stress, and the expression of RPS5, UBQ, GAPDH was stable under low temperature stress in SS oyster; the expression of RPS5, GAPDH, EF1β and AA7 was stable under low salinity stress, and the expression of RPL35, EF1α, GAPDH

  16. Effects of an environmentally relevant concentration of diuron on oyster genitors during gametogenesis: responses of early molecular and cellular markers and physiological impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcha, F; Barranger, A; Bachère, E; Berthelin, C Heude; Piquemal, D; Alonso, P; Sallan, R Rondon; Dimastrogiovanni, G; Porte, C; Menard, D; Szczybelski, A; Benabdelmouna, A; Auffret, M; Rouxel, J; Burgeot, T

    2016-04-01

    Genitors of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas were submitted during gametogenesis to a short pulse exposure to the herbicide diuron at a realistic environmental concentration. Histological analysis showed no effect of diuron on gametogenesis course, sex ratio and reproductive effort. A non-significant increase in testosterone and progesterone levels was observed in genitors exposed to the herbicide. At cell level, diuron exposure was shown to modulate the phagocytic activity of circulating hemocytes. The results of a transcriptional analysis showed that diuron affected the expression of genes belonging to functions known to play a major role during oyster gametogenesis such as gene transcription regulation, DNA replication and repair, DNA methylation and cytokinesis. Taking into account the results we previously obtained on the same genitors, this study showed a negative effect of diuron on oyster reproduction by inducing both structural and functional modifications of the DNA.

  17. Impact of Hurricane Irene on Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus concentrations in surface water, sediment, and cultured oysters in the Chesapeake Bay, MD, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kristi S; Jacobs, John M; Crump, Byron C

    2014-01-01

    To determine if a storm event (i.e., high winds, large volumes of precipitation) could alter concentrations of Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in aquacultured oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and associated surface water and sediment, this study followed a sampling timeline before and after Hurricane Irene impacted the Chesapeake Bay estuary in late August 2011. Aquacultured oysters were sampled from two levels in the water column: surface (0.3 m) and near-bottom (just above the sediment). Concentrations of each Vibrio spp. and associated virulence genes were measured in oysters with a combination of real-time PCR and most probable number (MPN) enrichment methods, and in sediment and surface water with real-time PCR. While concentration shifts of each Vibrio species were apparent post-storm, statistical tests indicated no significant change in concentration for either Vibrio species by location (surface or near bottom oysters) or date sampled (oyster tissue, surface water, and sediment concentrations). V. vulnificus in oyster tissue was correlated with total suspended solids (r = 0.41, P = 0.04), and V. vulnificus in sediment was correlated with secchi depth (r = -0.93, P Chesapeake Bay.

  18. Seawater detection and biological assessments regarding transmission of the oyster parasite Mikrocytos mackini using qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polinski, Mark P; Meyer, Gary R; Lowe, Geoffrey J; Abbott, Cathryn L

    2017-10-18

    Mikrocytos mackini is an intracellular parasite of oysters and causative agent of Denman Island disease in Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. Although M. mackini has been investigated for decades, its natural mode of transmission, mechanism for host entry, and environmental stability are largely unknown. We explored these biological characteristics of M. mackini using a recently described quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay. We detected M. mackini in the flow-through tank water of experimentally infected oysters and during disease remission in host tissues following 6 wk of elevated water temperature. Waterborne exposure of oysters to M. mackini further confirmed the potential for extracellular seawater transmission of this parasite and also identified host gill to have the highest early and continued prevalence for M. mackini DNA compared to stomach, mantle, labial palps, or adductor muscle samples. However, infections following waterborne challenge were slow to develop despite a substantial exposure (>106 M. mackini l-1 for 24 h), and further investigation demonstrated that M. mackini occurrence and infectivity severely declined following extracellular seawater incubation of more than 24 h. This study demonstrates a potential for using qPCR to monitor M. mackini in wild or farmed oyster populations during periods of disease remission or from environmental seawater samples. This work also suggests that gill tissues may provide a primary site for waterborne entry and possibly shedding of M. mackini in oysters. Further, although extracellular seawater transmission of M. mackini was possible, poor environmental stability and infection efficiency likely restricts the geographic transmission of M. mackini between oysters in natural environs and may help to explain localized areas of infection.

  19. Effects of cyanobacteria Synechocystis spp. in the host-parasite model Crassostrea gasar–Perkinsus marinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroga, Fernando Ramos [Laboratório de Imunologia e Patologia de Invertebrados (LABIPI), Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-900, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Marques-Santos, Luis Fernando [Laboratório de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento (LABID), Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-900, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Hégaret, Hélène [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement Marin (LEMAR), UMR 6539 CNRS UBO IRD IFREMER, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, 29280, Plouzané (France); Sassi, Roberto [Laboratório de Ambientes Recifais e Biotecnologia de Microalgas (LARBIM), Departamento de Sistemática e Ecologia, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-900, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Farias, Natanael Dantas; Santana, Lucas Nunes [Laboratório de Imunologia e Patologia de Invertebrados (LABIPI), Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-900, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); and others

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Synechocystis cyanobacteria cause functional weakness of oysters haemocytes. • Synechocystis cyanobacteria cause a strengthening of Perkinsus marinus. • Synechocystis cyanobacteria may contribute to an imbalance of P. marinus–Crassostrea gasar relationship. - Abstract: Perkinsosis is a disease caused by protozoan parasites from the Perkinsus genus. In Brazil, two species, P. beihaiensis and P. marinus, are frequently found infecting native oysters (Crassostrea gasar and C. rhizophorae) from cultured and wild populations in several states of the Northeast region. The impacts of this disease in bivalves from Brazil, as well as the interactions with environmental factors, are poorly studied. In the present work, we evaluated the in vitro effects of the cyanobacteria Synechocystis spp. on trophozoites of P. marinus and haemocytes of C. gasar. Four cyanobacteria strains isolated from the Northeast Brazilian coast were used as whole cultures (WCs) and extracellular products (ECPs). Trophozoites of P. marinus were exposed for short (4 h) and long (48 h and 7 days, the latter only for ECPs) periods, while haemocytes were exposed for a short period (4 h). Cellular and immune parameters, i.e. cell viability, cell count, reactive oxygen species production (ROS) and phagocytosis of inert (latex beads) and biological particles (zymosan and trophozoites of P. marinus) were measured by flow cytometry. The viability of P. marinus trophozoites was improved in response to WCs of Synechocystis spp., which could be a beneficial effect of the cyanobacteria providing nutrients and reducing reactive oxygen species. Long-term exposure of trophozoites to ECPs of cyanobacteria did not modify in vitro cell proliferation nor viability. In contrast, C. gasar haemocytes showed a reduction in cell viability when exposed to WCs, but not to ECPs. However, ROS production was not altered. Haemocyte ability to engulf latex particles was reduced when exposed mainly to ECPs of

  20. Effects of cyanobacteria Synechocystis spp. in the host-parasite model Crassostrea gasar–Perkinsus marinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroga, Fernando Ramos; Marques-Santos, Luis Fernando; Hégaret, Hélène; Sassi, Roberto; Farias, Natanael Dantas; Santana, Lucas Nunes

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Synechocystis cyanobacteria cause functional weakness of oysters haemocytes. • Synechocystis cyanobacteria cause a strengthening of Perkinsus marinus. • Synechocystis cyanobacteria may contribute to an imbalance of P. marinus–Crassostrea gasar relationship. - Abstract: Perkinsosis is a disease caused by protozoan parasites from the Perkinsus genus. In Brazil, two species, P. beihaiensis and P. marinus, are frequently found infecting native oysters (Crassostrea gasar and C. rhizophorae) from cultured and wild populations in several states of the Northeast region. The impacts of this disease in bivalves from Brazil, as well as the interactions with environmental factors, are poorly studied. In the present work, we evaluated the in vitro effects of the cyanobacteria Synechocystis spp. on trophozoites of P. marinus and haemocytes of C. gasar. Four cyanobacteria strains isolated from the Northeast Brazilian coast were used as whole cultures (WCs) and extracellular products (ECPs). Trophozoites of P. marinus were exposed for short (4 h) and long (48 h and 7 days, the latter only for ECPs) periods, while haemocytes were exposed for a short period (4 h). Cellular and immune parameters, i.e. cell viability, cell count, reactive oxygen species production (ROS) and phagocytosis of inert (latex beads) and biological particles (zymosan and trophozoites of P. marinus) were measured by flow cytometry. The viability of P. marinus trophozoites was improved in response to WCs of Synechocystis spp., which could be a beneficial effect of the cyanobacteria providing nutrients and reducing reactive oxygen species. Long-term exposure of trophozoites to ECPs of cyanobacteria did not modify in vitro cell proliferation nor viability. In contrast, C. gasar haemocytes showed a reduction in cell viability when exposed to WCs, but not to ECPs. However, ROS production was not altered. Haemocyte ability to engulf latex particles was reduced when exposed mainly to ECPs of

  1. Integrating Larval Dispersal, Permitting, and Logistical Factors Within a Validated Habitat Suitability Index for Oyster Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon J. Puckett

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Habitat suitability index (HSI models are increasingly used to guide ecological restoration. Successful restoration is a byproduct of several factors, including physical and biological processes, as well as permitting and logistical considerations. Rarely are factors from all of these categories included in HSI models, despite their combined relevance to common restoration goals such as population persistence. We developed a Geographic Information System (GIS-based HSI for restoring persistent high-relief subtidal oyster (Crassostrea virginica reefs protected from harvest (i.e., sanctuaries in Pamlico Sound, North Carolina, USA. Expert stakeholder input identified 17 factors to include in the HSI. Factors primarily represented physical (e.g., salinity and biological (e.g., larval dispersal processes relevant to oyster restoration, but also included several relevant permitting (e.g., presence of seagrasses and logistical (e.g., distance to restoration material stockpile sites considerations. We validated the model with multiple years of oyster density data from existing sanctuaries, and compared HSI output with distributions of oyster reefs from the late 1800's. Of the 17 factors included in the model, stakeholders identified four factors—salinity, larval export from existing oyster sanctuaries, larval import to existing sanctuaries, and dissolved oxygen—most critical to oyster sanctuary site selection. The HSI model provided a quantitative scale over which a vast water body (~6,000 km2 was narrowed down by 95% to a much smaller suite of optimal (top 1% HSI and suitable (top 5% HSI locations for oyster restoration. Optimal and suitable restoration locations were clustered in northeast and southwest Pamlico Sound. Oyster density in existing sanctuaries, normalized for time since reef restoration, was a positive exponential function of HSI, providing validation for the model. Only a small portion (10–20% of historical reef locations

  2. Copper-induced metabolic variation of oysters overwhelmed by salinity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2017-05-01

    In estuarine environments, Cu (copper) contamination is simultaneously coupled with salinity variation. In this study, 1 H NMR was applied to investigate the metabolic disturbance of estuarine oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis under both Cu and salinity stresses. Oysters were exposed to dissolved Cu (50 μg L -1 ) at different salinities (10, 15 and 25 psu) for six weeks, and the Cu accumulation in the oyster tissues was higher at lowered salinity. Based on the NMR-metabolomics results, disturbances induced by Cu and salinity was mainly related to osmotic regulation, energy metabolism and glycerophospholipid metabolism, as indicated by the alteration of important metabolic biomarkers such as alanine, citrate, glucose, glycogen, betaine, taurine, hypotaurine and homarine in the gills. At lower salinity, oysters accumulated higher energy related compounds (e.g., glucose and glycogen) and amino acids (e.g., aspartate, dimethylglycine and lysine), with the enhancement of ATP/ADP production and accumulation of oxidizable amino acids catabolized from protein breakdown. With Cu exposure, the synthesis from glycine to dimethylglycine was observed to cope with severe osmotic stress, together with the elevation of lysine and homarine. The effects induced by Cu were much similar for each salinity treatment, but the combination of Cu and salinity turned out to be consistent with the singular salinity effects. Therefore, salinity played a dominant role in affecting the metabolites of oysters when combined with Cu exposure. This study indicated that salinity should be taken into consideration in order to predict the Cu toxicity in estuarine organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Collapse of a historic oyster fishery: diagnosing causes and identifying paths toward increased resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward V. Camp

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosing causal factors of change at the ecosystem level is challenging because multiple drivers often interact at various spatial and temporal scales. We employ an integrated natural and social science approach to assess potential mechanisms leading to the collapse of an estuarine social-ecological system, and recommend future paths to increased system resilience. Our case study is the collapse of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica fishery in Apalachicola Bay, Florida, USA, and the associated impacts on local resource dependent communities. The oyster fishery collapse is the most recent in a series of environmental stressors to this region, which have included hurricanes and tropical storms, drought, and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We found it likely that the oyster collapse was not related to contamination from the recent oil spill, but rather to factors affecting oyster recruitment and survival, which may have been mediated by both human, e.g., fishing-related habitat alteration, and environmental, e.g., increased natural mortality from predators and disease, factors. The relative impact of each of these factors is likely to increase in the future because of changing climate and increased demand for fishery, water, and petroleum resources. Successful restoration and persistence of a viable oyster fishery will depend on: (1 implementation of some minimal best management practices, e.g., extensive habitat restoration via shell addition, and some spatial closures to harvest, (2 improving environmental knowledge and promoting episodic learning through enhanced monitoring and experimental management, and (3 continued community engagement necessary to produce adaptable governance suitable to responding to future unexpected challenges.

  4. Long-term records of cadmium and silver contamination in sediments and oysters from the Gironde fluvial-estuarine continuum - evidence of changing silver sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanceleur, Laurent; Schäfer, Jörg; Chiffoleau, Jean-François; Blanc, Gérard; Auger, Dominique; Renault, Sophie; Baudrimont, Magalie; Audry, Stéphane

    2011-11-01

    The Gironde fluvial estuarine system is impacted by historic metal pollution (e.g. Cd, Zn, Hg) and oysters (Crassostrea gigas) from the estuary mouth have shown extremely high Cd concentrations for decades. Based on recent work (Chiffoleau et al., 2005) revealing anomalously high Ag concentrations (up to 65 mg kg(-1); dry weight) in Gironde oysters, we compared long-term (~1955-2001) records of Ag and Cd concentrations in reservoir sediment with the respective concentrations in oysters collected between 1979 and 2010 to identify the origin and historical trend of the recently discovered Ag anomaly. Sediment cores from two reservoirs upstream and downstream from the main metal pollution source provided information on (i) geochemical background (upstream; Ag: ~0.3 mg kg(-1); Cd: ~0.8 mg kg(-1)) and (ii) historical trends in Ag and Cd pollution. The results showed parallel concentration-depth profiles of Ag and Cd supporting a common source and transport. Decreasing concentrations since 1986 (Cd: from 300 to 11 mg kg(-1); Ag: from 6.7 to 0.43 mg kg(-1)) reflected the termination of Zn ore treatment in the Decazeville basin followed by remediation actions. Accordingly, Cd concentrations in oysters decreased after 1988 (from 109 to 26 mg kg(-1), dry weight (dw)), while Ag bioaccumulation increased from 38 up to 116 mg kg(-1), dw after 1993. Based on the Cd/Ag ratio (Cd/Ag~2) in oysters sampled before the termination of zinc ore treatment (1981-1985) and assuming that nearly all Cd in oysters originated from the metal point source, we estimated the respective contribution of Ag from this source to Ag concentrations in oysters. The evolution over the past 30 years clearly suggested that the recent, unexplained Ag concentrations in oysters are due to increasing contributions (>70% after 1999) by other sources, such as photography, electronics and emerging Ag applications/materials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Extreme ocean acidification reduces the susceptibility of eastern oyster shells to a polydorid parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, J C; Bourque, D; McLaughlin, J; Stephenson, M; Comeau, L A

    2017-11-01

    Ocean acidification poses a threat to marine organisms. While the physiological and behavioural effects of ocean acidification have received much attention, the effects of acidification on the susceptibility of farmed shellfish to parasitic infections are poorly understood. Here we describe the effects of moderate (pH 7.5) and extreme (pH 7.0) ocean acidification on the susceptibility of Crassostrea virginica shells to infection by a parasitic polydorid, Polydora websteri. Under laboratory conditions, shells were exposed to three pH treatments (7.0, 7.5 and 8.0) for 3- and 5-week periods. Treated shells were subsequently transferred to an oyster aquaculture site (which had recently reported an outbreak of P. websteri) for 50 days to test for effects of pH and exposure time on P. websteri recruitment to oyster shells. Results indicated that pH and exposure time did not affect the length, width or weight of the shells. Interestingly, P. websteri counts were significantly lower under extreme (pH 7.0; ~50% reduction), but not moderate (pH 7.5; ~20% reduction) acidification levels; exposure time had no effect. This study suggests that extreme levels - but not current and projected near-future levels - of acidification (∆pH ~1 unit) can reduce the susceptibility of eastern oyster shells to P. websteri infections. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A New Zealand outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis linked to the consumption of imported raw Korean oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Greg; Garbutt, Claire; Hewitt, Joanne; Greening, Gail

    2007-10-26

    To investigate an outbreak of gastroenteritis that occurred following an international rugby test at Eden Park (Auckland, New Zealand) on 17 June 2006. 387 patrons were interviewed. Cases were defined as those from one of four hospitality areas who consumed food or beverage at Eden Park on the evening of 17 June 2006 and subsequently suffered from diarrhoea or vomiting; or, stomach cramps and nausea. A case-control study was conducted and food and beverage items associated with illness were identified. Clinical specimens were requested from patrons and food handlers, and leftover foods were analysed for pathogens. A food safety assessment was conducted at the implicated catering premises. A total of 115 cases were identified. Attack rates varied between the four hospitality areas from 8% to 47%. Predominant symptoms among cases included nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach cramps, fever, and chills. The consumption of several foods was associated with an increased risk of illness but the strongest was for raw oysters consumed in Hospitality Area 1 (Risk Ratio 11.9; 95%CI 3.9-36.1; prate 65%. Norovirus (genogroups I and II) was detected in samples provided by four of the cases and three unopened packets of implicated batches of imported Korean Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) linked to the outbreak. This outbreak resulted from consumption of raw imported Korean oysters contaminated by norovirus. Labelling recommending cooking prior to consumption failed to prevent the outbreak.

  7. Distribution of Georgia Oyster Reefs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The feature class in this ESRI Geodatabase contains polygons representing oyster reefs along the Georgia coastal waterways from Chatham County south to Glynn County....

  8. Interactive effects of ocean acidification, elevated temperature, and reduced salinity on early-life stages of the pacific oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ginger W K; Dineshram, R; Campanati, Camilla; Chan, Vera B S; Havenhand, Jon; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen

    2014-09-02

    Ocean acidification (OA) effects on larvae are partially attributed for the rapidly declining oyster production in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. This OA effect is a serious concern in SE Asia, which produces >80% of the world's oysters. Because climate-related stressors rarely act alone, we need to consider OA effects on oysters in combination with warming and reduced salinity. Here, the interactive effects of these three climate-related stressors on the larval growth of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, were examined. Larvae were cultured in combinations of temperature (24 and 30 °C), pH (8.1 and 7.4), and salinity (15 psu and 25 psu) for 58 days to the early juvenile stage. Decreased pH (pH 7.4), elevated temperature (30 °C), and reduced salinity (15 psu) significantly delayed pre- and post-settlement growth. Elevated temperature lowered the larval lipid index, a proxy for physiological quality, and negated the negative effects of decreased pH on attachment and metamorphosis only in a salinity of 25 psu. The negative effects of multiple stressors on larval metamorphosis were not due to reduced size or depleted lipid reserves at the time of metamorphosis. Our results supported the hypothesis that the C. gigas larvae are vulnerable to the interactions of OA with reduced salinity and warming in Yellow Sea coastal waters now and in the future.

  9. Natural and cultured populations of the mangrove oyster Saccostrea palmula from Sinaloa, Mexico, infected by Perkinsus marinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Martínez, Jorge; Ortega, Mauricio García; Vásquez-Yeomans, Rebeca; García, Teresa de Jesús Pineda; Stokes, Nancy A; Carnegie, Ryan B

    2012-07-01

    The mangrove oyster Saccostrea palmula coexists with the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis in coastal lagoons of northwest Mexico. Recent discovery of Perkinsus marinus infecting the pleasure oyster in the region prompted evaluation of S. palmula as an alternative P. marinus host. An analysis to determine the possible presence of P. marinus in natural and cultured populations of S. palmula at four coastal lagoons in Sinaloa, Mexico was carried out during October-November 2010. Tissues from apparently healthy S. palmula were evaluated using Ray's fluid thioglycollate method (RFTM), which revealed a Perkinsus sp. to be present in all four locations at 6.7-20.0% prevalence. Histopathological analysis of these specimens showed tissue alterations and parasite forms consistent with moderate P. marinus infection, which was confirmed by ribosomal non-transcribed spacer (NTS)-based PCR assays on DNA samples from oysters positive by RFTM and histology. DNA sequencing of amplified NTS fragments (307 bp) produced a sequence 98-100% similar to GenBank-deposited sequences of the NTS from P. marinus. Fluorescent in situ hybridization for Perkinsus spp. and P. marinus corroborated the PCR results, showing clear hybridization of P. marinus in host tissues. This is the first record of P. marinus infecting a species from genus Saccostrea and the first record of the parasite from coastal lagoons in Sinaloa, Mexico. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Predicting the impacts of Mississippi River diversions and sea-level rise on spatial patterns of eastern oyster growth rate and production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongqing; Chen, Qin; La Peyre, Megan K.; Hu, Kelin; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2017-01-01

    There remains much debate regarding the perceived tradeoffs of using freshwater and sediment diversions for coastal restoration in terms of balancing the need for wetland restoration versus preserving eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) production. Further complicating the issue, climate change-induced sea-level rise (SLR) and land subsidence are also expected to affect estuarine water quality. In this study, we developed a process-based numerical modeling system that couples hydrodynamic, water quality, and oyster population dynamics. We selected Breton Sound Estuary (BSE) (∼2740 km2) in the eastern Mississippi River Deltaic Plain since it is home to several of the largest public oyster seed grounds and private leases for the Gulf coast. The coupled oyster population model was calibrated and validated against field observed oyster growth data. We predicted the responses of oyster population in BSE to small- (142 m3 s−1) and large-scale (7080 m3 s−1) river diversions at the Caernarvon Freshwater Diversion structure planned in the 2012 Coastal Master Plan (Louisiana) under low (0.38 m) and high (1.44 m) relative sea-level rise (RSLR = eustatic SLR + subsidence) compared to a baseline condition (Year 2009). Model results showed that the large-scale diversion had a stronger negative impact on oyster population dynamics via freshening of the entire estuary, resulting in reduced oyster growth rate and production than RSLR. Under the large-scale diversion, areas with optimal oyster growth rates (>15 mg ash-free dry weight (AFDW) oyster−1 wk−1) and production (>500 g AFDW m−2 yr−1) would shift seaward to the southeastern edge of the estuary, turning the estuary into a very low oyster production system. RSLR however played a greater role than the small-scale diversion on the magnitude and spatial pattern of oyster growth rate and production. RSLR would result in an overall estuary-wide decrease in oyster growth rate and production as a

  11. Bioaccumulation and Tissue Distribution of Arsenic, Cadmium, Copper and Zinc in Crassostrea virginica Grown at Two Different Depths in Jamaica Bay, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney, Eric; Herrera, Pedro; Luxama, Juan; Boykin, Mark; Crawford, Alisa; Carroll, Margaret A; Catapane, Edward J

    2007-01-01

    Historically, Jamaica Bay was a site of extensive oyster beds and shellfish culture leases that supported a significant oyster fishery in the New York area. The industrial and urban expansion of the early 1900's led to over-harvesting and a deterioration in water and bay sediment quality that coincided with shellfish decline and the ultimate disappearance of oysters from the bay. Over the past 50 years, efforts to arrest and reverse the pollution problems of Jamaica Bay have been undertaken but the area still contains metals and other pollutants at levels higher than NYS Water Quality Standards. Previous we showed that Crassostrea virginica seed transplanted to the bay had excellent growth and survival despite the bay's pollution problems. In this study we measured the one-year bioaccumulation and tissue distribution of four metals in C. virginica seed that were transplanted to the bay at two different depths: one foot from the surface and one foot above the sediment. Tissues of C. virginica were dissected, dried and digested in nitric acid. Arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc levels were measured using electrothermal vaporization with deuterium lamp background correction in an atomic absorption spectrophotometer fitted with a THGA graphite furnace. Metals were distributed in the various tissues in μg/g dry weight amounts, which correlate well with published values for whole oysters grown in other polluted areas. Metal distributions were not homogeneous throughout the animals and in most of the tissues tested, oysters grown near the surface accumulated more metal than those positioned near bay sediment.

  12. Sustainable exploitation and management of autogenic ecosystem engineers: application to oysters in Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilberg, Michael J; Wiedenmann, John R; Robinson, Jason M

    2013-06-01

    Autogenic ecosystem engineers are critically important parts of many marine and estuarine systems because of their substantial effect on ecosystem services. Oysters are of particular importance because of their capacity to modify coastal and estuarine habitats and the highly degraded status of their habitats worldwide. However, models to predict dynamics of ecosystem engineers have not previously included the effects of exploitation. We developed a linked population and habitat model for autogenic ecosystem engineers undergoing exploitation. We parameterized the model to represent eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) in upper Chesapeake Bay by selecting sets of parameter values that matched observed rates of change in abundance and habitat. We used the model to evaluate the effects of a range of management and restoration options including sustainability of historical fishing pressure, effectiveness of a newly enacted sanctuary program, and relative performance of two restoration approaches. In general, autogenic ecosystem engineers are expected to be substantially less resilient to fishing than an equivalent species that does not rely on itself for habitat. Historical fishing mortality rates in upper Chesapeake Bay for oysters were above the levels that would lead to extirpation. Reductions in fishing or closure of the fishery were projected to lead to long-term increases in abundance and habitat. For fisheries to become sustainable outside of sanctuaries, a substantial larval subsidy would be required from oysters within sanctuaries. Restoration efforts using high-relief reefs were predicted to allow recovery within a shorter period of time than low-relief reefs. Models such as ours, that allow for feedbacks between population and habitat dynamics, can be effective tools for guiding management and restoration of autogenic ecosystem engineers.

  13. Influence of storage methods, refrigeration or freezing, on the toxicity of wastewater samples to oyster embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libralato, G; Avezzù, F; Losso, C; Volpi Ghirardini, A

    2009-05-01

    One of the main concerns in wastewater whole effluent assessment is the sampling phase and the sample chain of custody before any toxicity evaluation. The major problem is related to establishing the correct method for sample storage in order to perform toxicity bioassays. The toxicity of some domestic and glass factory industrial wastewater samples stored both by refrigeration at 4 +/- 1 degrees C for no more than three days, and freezing at -18 +/- 1 degrees C for no more than one month was compared via the embryo larval development bioassay with the oyster Crassostrea gigas. The results showed no significant differences between the toxicities of refrigerated and frozen wastewater samples. The wastewater classification, according to a score based on four toxicity classes, showed that the preservation methods did not alter the toxicity classification of the samples. In particular, it was demonstrated that the samples considered as 'not acutely toxic' after refrigeration were also found to have this classification after freezing.

  14. Fluxomics of the Eastern Oyster for Environmental Stress Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey P. Tikunov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of 2-13C/15N-glycine and U-13C-glucose was determined in four tissue blocks (adductor muscle, stomach and digestive gland, mantle, and gills of the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica using proton (1H and carbon-13 (13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The oysters were treated in aerated seawater with three treatments (5.5 mM U-13C-glucose, 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine, and 5.5 mM U-13C-glucose plus 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine and the relative mass balance and 13C fractional enrichments were determined in the four tissue blocks. In all tissues, glycine was metabolized by the glycine cycle forming serine exclusively in the mitochondria by the glycine cleavage system forming 2,3-13C-serine. In muscle, a minor amount of serine-derived pyruvate entered the Krebs cycle as substantiated by detection of a trace of 2,3-13C-aspartate. In all tissues, U-13C-glucose formed glycogen by glycogen synthesis, alanine by glycolysis, and glutamate and aspartate through the Krebs cycle. Alanine was formed exclusively from glucose via alanine transaminase and not glycine via alanine-glyoxylate transaminase. Based on isotopomer analysis, pyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate dehydrogenase appeared to be equal points for pyruvate entry into the Krebs cycle. In the 5.5 mM U-13C-glucose plus 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine emergence treatment used to simulate 12 h of “low tide”, oysters accumulated more 13C-labeled metabolites, including both anaerobic glycolytic and aerobic Krebs cycle intermediates. The aerobic metabolites could be the biochemical result of the gaping behavior of mollusks during emergence. The change in tissue distribution and mass balance of 13C-labeled nutrients (U-13C-glucose and 2-13C/15N-glycine provides the basis for a new quantitative fluxomic method for elucidating sub-lethal environmental effects in marine organisms called whole body mass balance phenotyping (WoMBaP.

  15. Crassostrea gigas exposure to the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima: Histological and gene expression effects on the digestive gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Geraldo, Reyna de Jesús; García-Lagunas, Norma; Hernández-Saavedra, Norma Yolanda

    2016-09-01

    Bivalve mollusks bioaccumulate toxins via ingestion of toxic dinoflagellates. In this study, Crassostrea gigas was used to investigate the effects related to Prorocentrum lima exposure. Oysters were fed with three diets Isochrysis galbana (2 × 10(6) cell mL(-1)) control treatment; algal mix of I. galbana (2 × 10(6)) and P. lima (3 × 10(3) cell mL(-1)); and P. lima alone (3 × 10(3) cell mL(-1)). Feeding behavior changes, histopathological alterations, and expression patterns changes of genes involved in cell cycle (p21, cafp55, p53), cytoskeleton (tub, act), and inflammatory process (casp1) were evaluated. Results indicated that the presence of diarrheic shellfish poisoning by P. lima cells decreased the clearance rate (p < 0.05), induced structural loss, significantly decreased tubule area of the digestive gland (p < 0.05), and up-regulated in expression all gene (p < 0.05), suggesting that toxic cells might trigger inflammatory tissue process, disturb cell cycle and cytoskeleton representing a risk to oysters integrity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of branding Gulf oysters on consumers willingness to pay

    OpenAIRE

    Acquah, Sarah; Petrolia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Using a choice experiment this study found that raw oyster consumers are more likely to buy oysters harvested from their region over those harvested outside the region. Consumers are more likely to buy wild-caught oysters over cultivated oysters. Non-Gulf consumers are more likely to buy medium or large size oysters over small size.

  17. FACTORS INFLUENCING IN VITRO KILLING OF BACTERIA BY HEMOCYTES OF THE EASTERN OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains altered in motility or colonial morphology (opaque versus translucent), Listeria monocytogenes mutants lacking catalase, superoxide dismutase, hemolysin, or phospholipase activities, and Vibrio vulnificus strains, possessing and lacking capsules we...

  18. Effect of carbonate chemistry alteration on the early embryonic development of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazeau, F.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Greaves, M.; Elderfield, H.; Peene, J.; Heip, C.H.R.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification, due to anthropogenic CO2 absorption by the ocean, may have profound impacts on marine biota. Calcareous organisms are expected to be particularly sensitive due to the decreasing availability of carbonate ions driven by decreasing pH levels. Recently, some studies focused on

  19. Effect of carbonate chemistry alteration on the early embryonic development of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    OpenAIRE

    Gazeau Frédéric; Gattuso Jean-Pierre; Greaves Mervyn; Elderfield Henry; Peene J; Heip Carlo H R; Middelburg Jack J

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification, due to anthropogenic CO(2) absorption by the ocean, may have profound impacts on marine biota. Calcareous organisms are expected to be particularly sensitive due to the decreasing availability of carbonate ions driven by decreasing pH levels. Recently, some studies focused on the early life stages of mollusks that are supposedly more sensitive to environmental disturbances than adult stages. Although these studies have shown decreased growth rates and increased proportion...

  20. Moderate establishment success of Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, on a sheltered intertidal mussel bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, M.W.; Davids, J.K.; Dolmer, Per

    2015-01-01

    . Here, C. gigas use beds of Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) as primary habitat. The mean abundance (±1 SD) of C. gigas was unchanged during our study (45±2indv.m-2), while it increased for M. edulis from 2010 to 2011 (934±610 to 1434±750indv.m-2, respectively). In 2009, a newly settled cohort of C...

  1. The Giant Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) as a modern analogue for fossil ostreoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Böhm, Florian; Rickaby, Rosalind E.M.

    2013-01-01

    Modern analogues are an essential part of palaeoclimate studies, because they provide the basis for the understanding of geochemical signatures of fossils. Ostreoids are common in many sedimentary sequences and because of their fast growth, high temporal resolution sampling of past seasonal...

  2. Antioxidant responses in gills and digestive gland of oyster Crassostrea madrasensis (Preston) under lead exposure

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenai-Tirodkar, P.S.; Gauns, M.; Mujawar, M.W.A.; Ansari, Z.A.

    the compensatory defense mechanism against oxidative stress. The induced antioxidant responses recorded at 25 and 50 �g/l of Pb concentrations suggest the presence of Pb-induced oxidative stress at these concentrations. The results of this work also indicate...

  3. Induction of gynogenetic haploidy in oyster Crassostrea gigas, using ultra violet irradiated sperms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, U.

    for chromosomal ploidy, rate of fertilization, developmental and chromosomal abnormalities. The gynogenetic haploid larvae first made their appearance in the 30 and 50 sec group exposed to 3644 and 6074 ergs mm/2 UV. The maximum number was found in the 90 sec...

  4. Cloning, characterization and chromosomal location of a satellite DNA from the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Clabby; Goswami; Flavin; Wilkins; Houghton, J.A.; Powell, R.

    content; sequence analysis; heterochromatic location) Catherine Clabby a, Usha Goswami c, Fiona Flavin a'*, Noel P. Wilkins b, James A. Houghton a and Richard Powell a aDepartment of Microbiology, University College Galway, Galway, Ireland; bDepartment...- trast to the higher homologies (average 95%) between monomers of an ApaI repeat found in the common mussel, Mytilus edulis (Ruiz-Lara et al., 1992). No significant direct or inverted repeats were revealed by computer analysis (GCG, Wisconsin Package...

  5. Shellfish face uncertain future in high CO2 world: influence of acidification on oyster larvae calcification and growth in estuaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Whitman Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human activities have increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide by 36% during the past 200 years. One third of all anthropogenic CO(2 has been absorbed by the oceans, reducing pH by about 0.1 of a unit and significantly altering their carbonate chemistry. There is widespread concern that these changes are altering marine habitats severely, but little or no attention has been given to the biota of estuarine and coastal settings, ecosystems that are less pH buffered because of naturally reduced alkalinity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address CO(2-induced changes to estuarine calcification, veliger larvae of two oyster species, the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica, and the Suminoe oyster (Crassostrea ariakensis were grown in estuarine water under four pCO(2 regimes, 280, 380, 560 and 800 microatm, to simulate atmospheric conditions in the pre-industrial era, present, and projected future concentrations in 50 and 100 years respectively. CO(2 manipulations were made using an automated negative feedback control system that allowed continuous and precise control over the pCO(2 in experimental aquaria. Larval growth was measured using image analysis, and calcification was measured by chemical analysis of calcium in their shells. C. virginica experienced a 16% decrease in shell area and a 42% reduction in calcium content when pre-industrial and end of 21(st century pCO(2 treatments were compared. C. ariakensis showed no change to either growth or calcification. Both species demonstrated net calcification and growth, even when aragonite was undersaturated, a result that runs counter to previous expectations for invertebrate larvae that produce aragonite shells. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that temperate estuarine and coastal ecosystems are vulnerable to the expected changes in water chemistry due to elevated atmospheric CO(2 and that biological responses to acidification, especially calcifying

  6. Environmental parameters influence on the dynamics of total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus densities in Crassostrea virginica harvested from Mexico’s Gulf coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Hernández, Karla M.; Pardío-Sedas, Violeta T.; Lizárraga-Partida, Leonardo; Williams, José de J.; Martínez-Herrera, David; Flores-Primo, Argel; Uscanga-Serrano, Roxana; Rendón-Castro, Karla

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • V. parahaemolyticus densities in oysters were isolated in spring and winter seasons. • Pathogenic genes abundances varied with environmental parameters seasonal changes. • Water temperature modulated V. parahaemolyticus abundance during reduced salinities. • V. parahaemolyticus with potentially pathogenic genes raises important health issues. - Abstract: The influence of environmental parameters on the total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus seasonal densities in American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) was evaluated for 1 year. Harvesting site A yielded the highest mean densities of V. parahaemolyticus tlh+, tdh+/trh−, tdh−/trh+ and tdh+/trh+ during spring season at 2.57, 1.74, 0.36, and −0.40 log 10 MPN/g, respectively, and tdh+/orf8+ during winter season (0.90 log 10 MPN/g). V. parahaemolyticus tlh+ densities were associated to salinity (R 2 = 0.372, P < 0.022), tdh+/trh+ to turbidity (R 2 = 0.597, P < 0.035), and orf8+ to temperature, salinity, and pH (R 2 = 0.964, P < 0.001). The exposure to salinity and temperature conditions during winter and spring seasons regulated the dynamics of V. parahaemolyticus harboring potentially pathogenic genotypes within the oyster. The adaptive response of V. parahaemolyticus to seasonal environmental changes may lead to an increase in survival and virulence, threatening the seafood safety and increasing the risk of illness

  7. Impact of Hurricane Irene on Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus concentrations in surface water, sediment and cultured oysters in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi S Shaw

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To determine if a storm event (i.e., high winds, large volumes of precipitation could alter concentrations of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in aquacultured oysters (Crassostrea virginica and associated surface water and sediment, this study followed a sampling timeline before and after Hurricane Irene impacted the Chesapeake Bay estuary in late August 2011. Aquacultured oysters were sampled from two levels in the water column: surface 0.3 m and near-bottom just above the sediment. Concentrations of each Vibrio spp. and associated virulence genes were measured in oysters with a combination of real-time PCR and most probable number enrichment methods, and in sediment and surface water with real-time PCR. While concentration shifts of each Vibrio species were apparent post-storm, statistical tests indicated no significant change in concentration change for either Vibrio species by location (surface or near bottom oysters or date sampled (oyster tissue, surface water and sediment concentrations. V. vulnificus in oyster tissue was correlated with total suspended solids (r=0.41, p=0.04, and V. vulnificus in sediment was correlated with secchi depth (r=-0.93, p< 0.01, salinity (r=-0.46, p=0.02, tidal height (r=-0.45, p=0.03, and surface water V. vulnificus (r=0.98, p< 0.01. V. parahaemolyticus in oyster tissue did not correlate with environmental measurements, but V. parahaemolyticus in sediment and surface water correlated with several measurements including secchi depth (r=-0.48, p=0.02[sediment]; r=-0.97 p< 0.01[surface water] and tidal height (r=-0.96. p< 0.01[sediment], r=-0.59,p< 0.01 [surface water]. The concentrations of Vibrio spp. were higher in oysters relative to other studies (average V. vulnificus 4x105 MPN g-1, V. parahaemolyticus 1x105 MPN g-1, and virulence-associated genes were detected in most oyster samples. This study provides a first estimate of storm-related Vibrio density changes in oyster tissues, sediment and

  8. The influence of different microalgal diets on Crassostrea angulata (Lamarck, 1819 broodstock conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Anjos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Portuguese oyster Crassostrea angulata shows great potential in oyster farming. In Europe, pure populations of this species were observed only in the southern coasts of Portugal and Spain, namely in Rio Sado, Rio Mira and Guadalquivir. The conservation of C. angulata populations is important in the context of production diversification and biodiversity preservation. In this way the zootechnological development for seed hatchery production is extremely important. Broodstock conditioning is a key step in the process of rearing bivalve in hatchery. Many factors regulate the reproductive cycle, being food the most important. However the influence of the nutritional quality of different phytoplankton on sexual maturation has been poorly explored. To evaluate the effects of different diets on C. angulata sexual maturity, broodstock were conditioned with different food regimes: Diet 1: bi-specific combination of Pavlova lutheri and Isochrysis galbana clone T-ISO (1:1; Diet 2: tri-specific combination of P. lutheri, I galbana clone T-ISO and Skeletonema constatum (1:1:1; Diet 3: bi-specific combination of S. constatum and Chaetoceros calcitrans (1:1 and Diet 4: tri-specific combination of P. lutheri, S. constatum and C. calcitrans (1:1:1. During conditioning, condition index and gonad histological analysis were performed. Results showed heterogeneity between diets. At the beginning of conditioning 60% of individuals were in resting (stage 0, 30% were males in early gametogenesis (stage I and 10% were females in mature stage (stage III. At the end of the conditioning, the most effective diet was the Diet 3 (60 % of mature oysters with a mean condition index value of 2.83±0.95. Whereas those fed with Diet 1 have an unsuccessfully gonadic development, with 80% of individuals in resting stage. Indeed, the condition index, in Diet 1 decreased during the conditioning period. The results obtained in this study reinforce the idea that the diatom microalgae

  9. Vibriosis induced by experimental cohabitation in Crassostrea gigas: evidence of early infection and down-expression of immune-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Decker, Sophie; Saulnier, Denis

    2011-02-01

    The understanding of reciprocal interactions between Crassostrea gigas and Vibrio sp., whether these be virulent or avirulent, is vital for the development of methods to improve the health status of cultured oysters. We describe an original non-invasive experimental infection technique using cohabitation, designed to explore these interactions. Using real-time PCR techniques we examined the dynamics of virulent and avirulent Vibrio sp. in oyster hemolymph and tank seawater, and made a parallel study of the expression of four genes involved in oyster immune defense: Cg-BPI, Cg-EcSOD, Cg-IκB, Cg-TIMP. No mortality occurred in control animals, but oysters put in cohabitation for 2-48 h with animals previously infected by two Vibrio pathogens suffered mortalities from 2 to 16 days post-cohabitation. Our results show that virulent Vibrio infect healthy individuals after only 2 h of cohabitation, with values ranging from 4.5 x 10² to 2 x 10⁴ cells ml⁻¹ hemolymph. Simultaneously, an approximate ten-fold increase of the total Vibrio population was observed in control animals, with a 6.6-78.5-fold up-expression of targeted genes. In contrast, oysters exposed to harmful bacteria had mean expression levels strongly down-regulated by a factor of 9.2-29 (depending on the gene) compared with control animals. Although oysters were still found to be infected by virulent Vibrio after 6-48 h of cohabitation, no significant differences were noted when comparing levels of each transcript in control and infected oysters at the same sampling times during this period: the important differences were noted before 6 h cohabitation. Taken together, our data support (1) the hypothesis that virulent Vibrio disturbs the immune response of this invertebrate host both rapidly and significantly, although this occurs specifically during an early and transient period during the first 6 h of cohabitation challenge, and that (2) expression of targeted genes is not correlated with vibriosis

  10. Positive feedback loop between introductions of non-native marine species and cultivation of oysters in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineur, Frederic; Le Roux, Auguste; Maggs, Christine A; Verlaque, Marc

    2014-12-01

    With globalization, agriculture and aquaculture activities are increasingly affected by diseases that are spread through movement of crops and stock. Such movements are also associated with the introduction of non-native species via hitchhiking individual organisms. The oyster industry, one of the most important forms of marine aquaculture, embodies these issues. In Europe disease outbreaks affecting cultivated populations of the naturalized oyster Crassostrea gigas caused a major disruption of production in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Mitigation procedures involved massive imports of stock from the species' native range in the northwestern Pacific from 1971 to 1977. We assessed the role stock imports played in the introduction of non-native marine species (including pathogens) from the northwestern Pacific to Europe through a methodological and critical appraisal of record data. The discovery rate of non-native species (a proxy for the introduction rate) from 1966 to 2012 suggests a continuous vector activity over the entire period. Disease outbreaks that have been affecting oyster production since 2008 may be a result of imports from the northwestern Pacific, and such imports are again being considered as an answer to the crisis. Although successful as a remedy in the short and medium terms, such translocations may bring new diseases that may trigger yet more imports (self-reinforcing or positive feedback loop) and lead to the introduction of more hitchhikers. Although there is a legal framework to prevent or reduce these introductions, existing procedures should be improved. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Field chronobiology of a molluscan bivalve: how the moon and sun cycles interact to drive oyster activity rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Damien; Nadau, Arnaud; Durrieu, Gilles; Ciret, Pierre; Parisot, Jean-Paul; Massabuau, Jean-Charles

    2011-05-01

    The present study reports new insights into the complexity of environmental drivers in aquatic animals. The focus of this study was to determine the main forces that drive mollusc bivalve behavior in situ. To answer this question, the authors continuously studied the valve movements of permanently immersed oysters, Crassostrea gigas, during a 1-year-long in situ study. Valve behavior was monitored with a specially build valvometer, which allows continuously recording of up to 16 bivalves at high frequency (10 Hz). The results highlight a strong relationship between the rhythms of valve behavior and the complex association of the sun-earth-moon orbital positions. Permanently immersed C. gigas follows a robust and strong behavior primarily driven by the tidal cycle. The intensity of this tidal driving force is modulated by the neap-spring tides (i.e., synodic moon cycle), which themselves depend of the earth-moon distance (i.e., anomalistic moon cycle). Light is a significant driver of the oysters' biological rhythm, although its power is limited by the tides, which remain the predominant driver. More globally, depending where in the world the bivalves reside, the results suggest their biological rhythms should vary according to the relative importance of the solar cycle and different lunar cycles associated with tide generation. These results highlight the high plasticity of these oysters to adapt to their changing environment.

  12. Floating offshore turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tande, John Olav Giæver; Merz, Karl; Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Floating wind turbines enable harvesting the offshore wind resources over deep sea. About 20 concepts are under development, at varying stages of maturity. Two concepts are demonstrated in full scale; these are HyWind and WindFloat. Both employ a standard on-shore wind turbine with only minor...... modifications, but on a spar and a semi-submersible floater, respectively. Other concepts suggest new types of turbines, e.g., the DeepWind concept consisting of a vertical axis turbine and a subsea generator. The three concepts represent different approaches: HyWind and WindFloat are already in a demonstration...... metric of energy production per unit steel mass. Floating offshore wind turbines represent a promising technology. The successful operation of HyWind and WindFloat in full scale demonstrates a well advanced technology readiness level, where further development will go into refining the concepts, cost...

  13. High pressure inactivation of HAV within oysters: comparison of shucked oysters with whole in shell meats

    Science.gov (United States)

    High pressure inactivation of hepatitis A virus (HAV) within oysters bioaccumulated under simulated natural conditions to levels >106 PFU/oyster has been evaluated. Five min treatments at 20C were administered at 350, 375, and 400 MegaPascals (MPa). Shucked and whole-in-shell oysters were directly...

  14. Parental exposure to environmental concentrations of diuron leads to aneuploidy in embryos of the Pacific oyster, as evidenced by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barranger, Audrey, E-mail: audrey.barranger@ifremer.fr [Ifremer, SG2M, Laboratory of Genetics and Pathology of Marine Molluscs, Avenue de Mus du Loup, 17390 La Tremblade (France); Ifremer, Department of Biogeochemistry and Ecotoxicology, Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Rue de l’Ile d’Yeu, BP 21105, 44311 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Benabdelmouna, Abdellah, E-mail: abdellah.benabdelmouna@ifremer.fr [Ifremer, SG2M, Laboratory of Genetics and Pathology of Marine Molluscs, Avenue de Mus du Loup, 17390 La Tremblade (France); Dégremont, Lionel [Ifremer, SG2M, Laboratory of Genetics and Pathology of Marine Molluscs, Avenue de Mus du Loup, 17390 La Tremblade (France); Burgeot, Thierry; Akcha, Farida [Ifremer, Department of Biogeochemistry and Ecotoxicology, Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Rue de l’Ile d’Yeu, BP 21105, 44311 Nantes Cedex 03 (France)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • FISH was realized on oyster embryos from diuron-exposed genitors. • rDNA genes were used as probes on the interphase nuclei of embryo preparations. • Higher aneuploidy level was observed in embryos from diuron-exposed genitors. • Hypo- and hyperdiploid (triploid) nuclei were detected. - Abstract: Changes in normal chromosome numbers (i.e. aneuploidy) due to abnormal chromosome segregation may arise either spontaneously or as a result of chemical/radiation exposure, particularly during cell division. Coastal ecosystems are continuously subjected to various contaminants originating from urban, industrial and agricultural activities. Genotoxicity is common to several families of major environmental pollutants, including pesticides, which therefore represent a potential important environmental hazard for marine organisms. A previous study demonstrated the vertical transmission of DNA damage by subjecting oyster genitors to short-term exposure to the herbicide diuron at environmental concentrations during gametogenesis. In this paper, Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to further characterize diuron-induced DNA damage at the chromosomal level. rDNA genes (5S and 18-5.8-28S), previously mapped onto Crassostrea gigas chromosomes 4, 5 and 10, were used as probes on the interphase nuclei of embryo preparations. Our results conclusively show higher aneuploidy (hypo- or hyperdiploidy) level in embryos from diuron-exposed genitors, with damage to the three studied chromosomal regions. This study suggests that sexually developing oysters are vulnerable to diuron exposure, incurring a negative impact on reproductive success and oyster recruitment.

  15. Parental exposure to environmental concentrations of diuron leads to aneuploidy in embryos of the Pacific oyster, as evidenced by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranger, Audrey; Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Dégremont, Lionel; Burgeot, Thierry; Akcha, Farida

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • FISH was realized on oyster embryos from diuron-exposed genitors. • rDNA genes were used as probes on the interphase nuclei of embryo preparations. • Higher aneuploidy level was observed in embryos from diuron-exposed genitors. • Hypo- and hyperdiploid (triploid) nuclei were detected. - Abstract: Changes in normal chromosome numbers (i.e. aneuploidy) due to abnormal chromosome segregation may arise either spontaneously or as a result of chemical/radiation exposure, particularly during cell division. Coastal ecosystems are continuously subjected to various contaminants originating from urban, industrial and agricultural activities. Genotoxicity is common to several families of major environmental pollutants, including pesticides, which therefore represent a potential important environmental hazard for marine organisms. A previous study demonstrated the vertical transmission of DNA damage by subjecting oyster genitors to short-term exposure to the herbicide diuron at environmental concentrations during gametogenesis. In this paper, Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to further characterize diuron-induced DNA damage at the chromosomal level. rDNA genes (5S and 18-5.8-28S), previously mapped onto Crassostrea gigas chromosomes 4, 5 and 10, were used as probes on the interphase nuclei of embryo preparations. Our results conclusively show higher aneuploidy (hypo- or hyperdiploidy) level in embryos from diuron-exposed genitors, with damage to the three studied chromosomal regions. This study suggests that sexually developing oysters are vulnerable to diuron exposure, incurring a negative impact on reproductive success and oyster recruitment

  16. Additional Evidence that Juvenile Oyster Disease Is Caused by a Member of the Roseobacter Group and Colonization of Nonaffected Animals by Stappia stellulata-Like Strains†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Katherine J.; Barber, Bruce J.; Singer, John T.

    2000-01-01

    Juvenile oyster disease (JOD) causes significant annual mortalities of hatchery-produced Eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, cultured in the Northeast. We have reported that a novel species of the α-proteobacteria Roseobacter group (designated CVSP) was numerically dominant in JOD-affected animals sampled during the 1997 epizootic on the Damariscotta River, Maine. In this study we report the isolation of CVSP bacteria from JOD-affected oysters during three separate epizootics in 1998. These bacteria were not detected in nonaffected oysters at the enzootic site, nor in animals raised at a JOD-free site. Animals raised at the JOD enzootic site that were unaffected by JOD were stably and persistently colonized by Stappia stellulata-like strains. These isolates (designated M1) inhibited the growth of CVSP bacteria in a disk-diffusion assay and thus may have prevented colonization of these animals by CVSP bacteria in situ. Laboratory-maintained C. virginica injected with CVSP bacteria experienced statistically significant elevated mortalities compared to controls, and CVSP bacteria were recovered from these animals during the mortality events. Together, these results provide additional evidence that CVSP bacteria are the etiological agent of JOD. Further, there are no other descriptions of specific marine α-proteobacteria that have been successfully cultivated from a defined animal host. Thus, this system presents an opportunity to investigate both bacterial and host factors involved in the establishment of such associations and the role of the invertebrate host in the ecology of these marine α-proteobacteria. PMID:10966410

  17. Additional evidence that juvenile oyster disease is caused by a member of the Roseobacter group and colonization of nonaffected animals by Stappia stellulata-like strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, K J; Barber, B J; Singer, J T

    2000-09-01

    Juvenile oyster disease (JOD) causes significant annual mortalities of hatchery-produced Eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, cultured in the Northeast. We have reported that a novel species of the alpha-proteobacteria Roseobacter group (designated CVSP) was numerically dominant in JOD-affected animals sampled during the 1997 epizootic on the Damariscotta River, Maine. In this study we report the isolation of CVSP bacteria from JOD-affected oysters during three separate epizootics in 1998. These bacteria were not detected in nonaffected oysters at the enzootic site, nor in animals raised at a JOD-free site. Animals raised at the JOD enzootic site that were unaffected by JOD were stably and persistently colonized by Stappia stellulata-like strains. These isolates (designated M1) inhibited the growth of CVSP bacteria in a disk-diffusion assay and thus may have prevented colonization of these animals by CVSP bacteria in situ. Laboratory-maintained C. virginica injected with CVSP bacteria experienced statistically significant elevated mortalities compared to controls, and CVSP bacteria were recovered from these animals during the mortality events. Together, these results provide additional evidence that CVSP bacteria are the etiological agent of JOD. Further, there are no other descriptions of specific marine alpha-proteobacteria that have been successfully cultivated from a defined animal host. Thus, this system presents an opportunity to investigate both bacterial and host factors involved in the establishment of such associations and the role of the invertebrate host in the ecology of these marine alpha-proteobacteria.

  18. Restoration of oyster reefs in an estuarine lake: population dynamics and shell accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Sandra M.; La Peyre, Jerome F.; La Peyre, Megan K.

    2015-01-01

    Restoration activities inherently depend on understanding the spatial and temporal variation in basic demographic rates of the species of interest. For species that modify and maintain their own habitat such as the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, understanding demographic rates and their impacts on population and habitat success are crucial to ensuring restoration success. We measured oyster recruitment, density, size distribution, biomass, mortality and Perkinsus marinus infection intensity quarterly for 3 yr on shallow intertidal reefs created with shell cultch in March 2009. All reefs were located within Sister Lake, LA. Reefs were placed in pairs at 3 different locations within the lake; pairs were placed in low and medium energy sites within each location. Restored reefs placed within close proximity (14.6 kg m-2) at the end of 3 yr. Shell accretion, on average, exceeded estimated rates required to keep pace with local subsidence and shell loss. Variation in recruitment, growth and survival drives local site-specific population success, which highlights the need to understand local water quality, hydrodynamics, and metapopulation dynamics when planning restoration.

  19. Bilateral Floating Hip and Floating Knee: a Rare Complex Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a rare complex injury of a 45-year-old man who sustained a bilateral floating hip and floating knee and hospitalised in our service six days after a traffic accident. The floating knees were open type III and II of Cauchoix score in phase of suppuration. He also presented with a floating ankle on the right side.

  20. Interactive effects of elevated temperature and CO2 levels on energy metabolism and biomineralization of marine bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanina, Anna V; Dickinson, Gary H; Matoo, Omera B; Bagwe, Rita; Dickinson, Ashley; Beniash, Elia; Sokolova, Inna M

    2013-09-01

    The continuing increase of carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere leads to increases in global temperatures and partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) in surface waters, causing ocean acidification. These changes are especially pronounced in shallow coastal and estuarine waters and are expected to significantly affect marine calcifiers including bivalves that are ecosystem engineers in estuarine and coastal communities. To elucidate potential effects of higher temperatures and PCO2 on physiology and biomineralization of marine bivalves, we exposed two bivalve species, the eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica and the hard clams Mercenaria mercenaria to different combinations of PCO2 (~400 and 800μatm) and temperatures (22 and 27°C) for 15weeks. Survival, bioenergetic traits (tissue levels of lipids, glycogen, glucose and high energy phosphates) and biomineralization parameters (mechanical properties of the shells and activity of carbonic anhydrase, CA) were determined in clams and oysters under different temperature and PCO2 regimes. Our analysis showed major inter-species differences in shell mechanical traits and bioenergetics parameters. Elevated temperature led to the depletion of tissue energy reserves indicating energy deficiency in both species and resulted in higher mortality in oysters. Interestingly, while elevated PCO2 had a small effect on the physiology and metabolism of both species, it improved survival in oysters. At the same time, a combination of high temperature and elevated PCO2 lead to a significant decrease in shell hardness in both species, suggesting major changes in their biomineralization processes. Overall, these studies show that global climate change and ocean acidification might have complex interactive effects on physiology, metabolism and biomineralization in coastal and estuarine marine bivalves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. FLOAT Project - Task 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchalot, Tanguy; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The objective of the FLOAT project is to study the reliability of high-performance fibre-reinforced concrete, also known as Compact Reinforced Composite (CRC), for the floats of wave energy converters. In order to reach commercial breakthrough, wave energy converters need to achieve a lower price.......com, 2011). CRC floats could be a very cost-effective technology with enhanced loading capacity and environmental resistance, and very low maintenance requirements, affecting directly the final energy price. The project involves DEXA Wave Energy Ltd, Wave Star A/S, Aalborg University and Hi-Con A...

  2. Heavy metals in sediments, mussels and oysters from Trinidad and Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas Astudillo, L. de; Chang Yen, I.; Bekele, I.

    2005-01-01

    The Gulf of Paria is bordered by both Trinidad and Venezuela, from which various metallic pollutants and other contaminants can originate. The Gulf is still a significant source of fish, crabs and shellfish for human consumption to both countries, where concerns over the quality of this marine environment have been long expressed but never properly addressed. In addition, the circulatory current patterns in the Gulf ensure that contaminants originating from either country are likely to affect both countries eventually. Heavy metals were determined in oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae and C. virginica), green mussels (Perna viridis) and sediments from the Gulf of Paria. Samples were obtained at four sites in Trinidad and three sites in Venezuela in the Gulf of Paria, in addition to comparative samples collected from three sites on the north coast of Venezuela. Edible tissues of twelve shellfish from each location were blended and aliquots digested with concentrated nitric acid, for extraction of cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel and zinc. The solutions were analysed by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Mercury was extracted with a mixture of nitric, hydrochloric and sulphuric acids and determined by cold vapour atomic absorption. Sediments were oven-dried at 60 0 C, before being similarly extracted. Results showed that mercury in sediments at all sites in Trinidad and Venezuela exceeded NOAA and Canadian sediment quality guidelines, while cadmium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc also exceeded these guidelines at several sites. Heavy metal levels in oysters and green mussels varied widely with location. However, oysters from the Gulf of Paria contained significantly higher mean levels of cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc than those from the north coast of Venezuela, but this difference was not apparent in mussels. Cadmium, mercury and zinc in sediments were significantly correlated with those of mussels, but not of oysters, in which copper and zinc at several

  3. Present levels of heavy metals in some molluscs of the Upper Gulf of Thailand. [Pernia viridis; Crassostrea commercialis; Anadara granosa; Paphia undulata; Amusium pleuronectes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungspreugs, M.; Yuangthong, C.

    1984-05-01

    This investigation was carried out as part of Thailand's participation in the global 'Mussel Watch' program. The levels of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the green mussel, Perna viridis, oyster, Crassostrea commercialis, and the cockle, Anadara granosa, were studied from July 1982 to November 1982. Comparison was made with the previous study in August 1981 which also included the short necked clam, Paphia undulata and moon scallop, Amusium pleuronectes. It was found that the metal levels were sufficiently low that the molluscs could be consumed without any danger to health. The salinity of the water appeared to influence the uptake as higher levels of metals were found during the flood season when salinity was lower.

  4. Mapping Oyster Reef Habitats in Mobile Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Oyster reefs around the world are declining rapidly, and although they haven t received as much attention as coral reefs, they are just as important to their local ecosystems and economies. Oyster reefs provide habitats for many species of fish, invertebrates, and crustaceans, as well as the next generations of oysters. Oysters are also harvested from many of these reefs and are an important segment of many local economies, including that of Mobile Bay, where oysters rank in the top five commercial marine species both by landed weight and by dollar value. Although the remaining Mobile Bay oyster reefs are some of the least degraded in the world, projected climate change could have dramatic effects on the health of these important ecosystems. The viability of oyster reefs depends on water depth and temperature, appropriate pH and salinity levels, and the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water. Projected increases in sea level, changes in precipitation and runoff patterns, and changes in pH resulting from increases in the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in the oceans could all affect the viability of oyster reefs in the future. Human activities such as dredging and unsustainable harvesting practices are also adversely impacting the oyster reefs. Fortunately, several projects are already under way to help rebuild or support existing or previously existing oyster reefs. The success of these projects will depend on the local effects of climate change on the current and potential habitats and man s ability to recognize and halt unsustainable harvesting practices. As the extent and health of the reefs changes, it will have impacts on the Mobile Bay ecosystem and economy, changing the resources available to the people who live there and to the rest of the country, since Mobile Bay is an important national source of seafood. This project identified potential climate change impacts on the oyster reefs of Mobile Bay, including the possible addition of newly viable

  5. Alternative substrates for cultivating oyster mushrooms ( Pleurotus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wheat straw has generally been used as the main substrate for cultivating oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus); however, in South Africa it is becoming expensive for small-scale farmers to utilise. Therefore, the main objective of the study was to investigate the use of alternative, but suitable substrates for planting oyster ...

  6. Oyster spat recruitment in Espírito Santo State, Brazil, using recycled materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosebel C. Nalesso

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluated the effectiveness of four types of oyster spat collectors, made with recycled materials, in the recruitment of the mangrove oyster Crassostrea spp. at five sites in the Benevente river estuary, Anchieta District and on two islands in Piúma District, both in Espírito Santo State. The collectors were made of: 1- oyster shells, 2- PET bottles, 3- car tires and 4- tiles, all of them suspended by ropes and tied to roots of Rhizophora mangle or mussel long-lines. The number of spat recruited on each collector and their shell lengths were registered bimonthly, as well as the physico-chemical-trophic parameters of the water: salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, particulate organic matter and chlorophyll a, which were correlated (by Spearman's correlation with the number of spat recruited. Spat settlement was significantly higher on oyster shell, tile and tire collectors, mainly at points with higher salinities, such as Praia do Coqueiro in Anchieta and on Meio and Cabrito Islands in Piúma (Kruskal-Wallis: H= 10.01; 3 d.f.; p 0.05. The number of oyster spat was positively correlated with the salinity (ρs= 0.331; p Este trabalho avaliou a eficiência de quatro tipos de coletores de sementes no recrutamento de ostras Crassostrea sp., em cinco pontos do estuário do Rio Benevente, município de Anchieta, e em duas ilhas no município de Piúma, estado do Espírito Santo. Foram utilizados quatro tipos de coletores: 1-conchas de ostras, 2- garrafas PET, 3-tiras de pneu e 4- telhas, todos suspensos por cordas e amarrados em rizóforos de Rhizophora mangle ou em "long-lines" de mexilhões. Bimensalmente, as sementes recrutadas foram contadas e medidas quanto à altura, determinando-se os parâmetros físico-químicos-tróficos da água: salinidade, temperatura, oxigênio dissolvido, matéria orgânica particulada e clorofila-a, que foram correlacionados com o número de sementes nos coletores (através de correlações de Spearman

  7. Preliminary assessment of the potential for mangrove oyster cultivation in Piraquê-açu river estuary (Aracruz, ES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Alvarenga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available At Piraquê-açu river estuary, Aracruz, ES, the technical viability of Crassostrea rhizophorae cultivation was determined through monthly measures in shell length and weight. Seeds of C. rhizophorae were put in cages and suspended in rafts. Increase in height and weight (flesh and dry of the oysters was measured. During ten months (July/98 to May/99, oyster shell reached an average of 37.6 mm in shell height and 3.0 g in flesh weight (the whole animal. High mortality rates were registered and could be related to the high salinity water and to high predation observed, especially by flatworms Stylochophana divae and snails Cymatium parthenopeum, as well as fouling organisms such as barnacles, Serpulidae polychaetes and seed of the same species.No estuário do Rio Piraquê-açu, município de Aracruz, ES, foi avaliada a viabilidade técnica da implantação do cultivo de ostras Crassostrea rhizophorae em lanternas suspensas numa balsa de cultivo, através da estimativa de crescimento e ganho de peso fresco e seco das ostras. Verificou-se que, durante os dez meses de cultivo (junho/98 a maio/99, as ostras atingiram, em média, 37,6 mm de altura e 3,0 g no peso total. Foi registrada uma alta taxa de mortalidade, que poderia ser atribuída aos altos valores de salinidade na água e também aos predadores observados como planárias Stylochoplana divae e gastrópodos Cymatium parthenopeum, além de incrustantes como cracas, poliquetos Serpulidae e principalmente sementes da própria ostra.

  8. Resistance to OsHV-1 infection in Crassostrea gigas larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel eDégremont

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ostreid herpesvirus (OsHV-1 is one of the major diseases that affect the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Selective breeding programs were recently shown to improve resistance easily to OsHV-1 infections in spat, juvenile and adult oysters. Nevertheless, this resistance has never been investigated in larvae, whereas this developmental stage has crucial importance for the production of commercial hatcheries, as well as explaining the abundance of spatfall. A first trial tested several viral suspensions at several concentrations using contaminated water with OsHV-1 in four-day-old and ten-day-old larvae that were produced from an unselected broodstock. In follow up on the results, one viral suspension at a final concentration of 10+6 OsHV-1 DNA copies per L was used to assess resistance to OsHV-1 infection in C. gigas larvae that were produced from selected and unselected broodstock. A second trial evaluated OsHV-1 resistance in larvae from both broodstocks in trials 2a, 2b and 2c with 4, 10 and 16-day-old larvae for 7 days, which corresponded to post D larvae, umbo larvae and eyed larvae, respectively. The mortality of unchallenged larvae for both stocks were low (<15% at day 7 in trials 2a and 2b, whereas it ranged from 48 to 56% in trial 2c. More interestingly, selected larvae had significantly lower mortality than unselected larvae when exposed to OsHV-1 in all of the trials. Thus, the mortality was 11% and 49% for the selected larvae at day 7 post-exposure in trials 2a and 2c, respectively, in comparison with 84% and 97% for the unselected larvae. Although this difference in mortality was observed at day 5 in trial 2b, it was reduced at day 7, to 86% and 98% for the selected and unselected larvae, respectively. For the first time in the literature, the difference in mortality or the delayed onset of mortality between selected and unselected larvae have indicated a genetic resistance to OsHV-1 infection at the larval stage. Such finding

  9. Sensory Qualities of Oysters Unaltered by a Short Exposure to Combined Elevated pCO2 and Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaëlle J. Lemasson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Reliance on the marine environment for the provision of food is ever-increasing, but future climate change threatens production. Despite this concern, the impact on seafood quality and success of the seafood industry is unknown. Using a short-term study, we test these concerns using a major aquaculture species—Crassostrea gigas—exposing them to three acidification and warming scenarios: (1 ambient pCO2 (~400 ppm & control temperature (15°C, (2 ambient pCO2 (~400 ppm & elevated temperature (20°C, (3 elevated pCO2 (~1,000 ppm & elevated temperature (20°C. Oyster quality was assessed by scoring appearance, aroma, taste, and overall acceptability. A panel of five experts was asked to score nine oysters—three from each treatment—according to agreed criteria. Results indicate that these levels of acidification and warming did not significantly alter the sensory properties of C. gigas, and notably the overall acceptability remained unchanged. Non-statistically supported trends suggest that several sensory attributes—opacity, mouthfeel, aspect of meat, shininess, meat resistance, meat texture, and creaminess—may improve under acidification and warming scenarios. These findings can be considered positive for the future of the aquaculture and food sectors. Crassostrea gigas therefore is expected to remain a key species for food security that is resilient to climate change, whilst retaining its valuable attributes.

  10. Levels of Platinum Group Metals in Selected Species (Sarotherodon melanotheron, Chonophorus lateristriga, Macrobrachium vollenhovenii and Crassostrea tulipa in Some Estuaries and Lagoons Along the Coast of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Essumang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of some biota as bioindicators of heavy metal pollution has been demonstrated as particularly adequate due to their capacity of bioconcentration. This study evaluated the levels of platinum group metals (PGMs in some selected species along the coastal belt of Ghana, using the neutron activation analysis (NAA method. The result was processed to evaluate pollution indices in order to map the distribution of the metals in those species in the lagoons and estuaries along the costal belt of Ghana. The analysis showed significant levels of all PGMs in blackchin tilapia (Sarotherodon melanotheron Cichlidae, brown goby (Chonophorus lateristriga Gobiidae, shrimp (Macrobrachium vollenhovenii Palaemonidae, and mangrove oysters (Crassostrea tulipa Ostreidae in the lagoons and river Pra estuary. However, the oysters showed an elevated mean concentration of 0.13 μ/g (dry weight Pd. From the pollution indices, most of the sampling sites registered mean contamination factor (CF values between 1.20 and 3.00 for Pt, Pd, and Rh. The pollution load index (PLI conducted also gave an average pollution index between 0.79 and 2.37, indicating progressive contamination levels. The results revealed that anthropogenic sources, industrial and hospital effluent, etc., together with vehicular emissions, could be the contributing factors to the deposition of PGMs along the Ghanaian coast.

  11. Expression profile of eight glutathione S-transferase genes in Crassostrea ariakensis after exposure to DSP toxins producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ying; Wei, Xiao-Meng; Weng, Hui-Wen; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2015-10-01

    In this study, changes in eight GSTs mRNA level including GST-α, GST-σ, GST-ω, GST-π, GST-μ, GST-ρ, GST-θ and microsomal GST (mGST) in the oyster Crassostrea ariakensis after exposure to Prorocentrum lima have been evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. Additionally, the contents of five GST isoforms were detected by ELISA. After exposure to P. lima at density of 2 × 10(5) cells/L, mGST mRNA significantly increased in gill, while GST-σ was induced in digestive gland. After exposure to P. lima at density of 2 × 10(6) cells/L, GST-ω and mGST expressions increased in gill, whereas GST-α and GST-σ were induced in digestive gland. The GST content and activity in oysters exposed to P. lima also showed a different pattern when the different isoforms and organs were compared. After exposure to P. lima (2 × 10(6) cell/L), GST-π increased in gill but decreased in digestive gland. The total GST enzyme activity increased in gill, while remained unchanged in digestive gland. These various regulation of GST gene expressions indicated that the GSTs isoenzymes might play divergent physiological roles in the detoxification of DSP toxins in C. ariakensis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The floating knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz Vives, Josep; Bel, Jean-Christophe; Capel Agundez, Arantxa

    2016-01-01

    In 1975, Blake and McBryde established the concept of 'floating knee' to describe ipsilateral fractures of the femur and tibia.1This combination is much more than a bone lesion; the mechanism is usually a high-energy trauma in a patient with multiple injuries and a myriad of other lesions...

  13. The floating water bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Elmar C; Woisetschlaeger, Jakob; Gatterer, Karl; Maier, Eugen; Pecnik, Rene; Holler, Gert; Eisenkoelbl, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    When high voltage is applied to distilled water filled in two glass beakers which are in contact, a stable water connection forms spontaneously, giving the impression of a floating water bridge. A detailed experimental analysis reveals static and dynamic structures as well as heat and mass transfer through this bridge

  14. The floating knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz Vives, Josep; Bel, Jean-Christophe; Capel Agundez, Arantxa

    2016-01-01

    fixation when both fractures (femoral and tibial) are extra-articular.Plates are the 'standard of care' in cases with articular fractures.A combination of implants are required by 40% of floating knees.Associated ligamentous and meniscal lesions are common, but may be irrelevant in the case of an intra...

  15. Parental exposure to environmental concentrations of diuron leads to aneuploidy in embryos of the Pacific oyster, as evidenced by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranger, Audrey; Benabdelmouna, Abdellah; Dégremont, Lionel; Burgeot, Thierry; Akcha, Farida

    2015-02-01

    Changes in normal chromosome numbers (i.e. aneuploidy) due to abnormal chromosome segregation may arise either spontaneously or as a result of chemical/radiation exposure, particularly during cell division. Coastal ecosystems are continuously subjected to various contaminants originating from urban, industrial and agricultural activities. Genotoxicity is common to several families of major environmental pollutants, including pesticides, which therefore represent a potential important environmental hazard for marine organisms. A previous study demonstrated the vertical transmission of DNA damage by subjecting oyster genitors to short-term exposure to the herbicide diuron at environmental concentrations during gametogenesis. In this paper, Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to further characterize diuron-induced DNA damage at the chromosomal level. rDNA genes (5S and 18-5.8-28S), previously mapped onto Crassostrea gigas chromosomes 4, 5 and 10, were used as probes on the interphase nuclei of embryo preparations. Our results conclusively show higher aneuploidy (hypo- or hyperdiploidy) level in embryos from diuron-exposed genitors, with damage to the three studied chromosomal regions. This study suggests that sexually developing oysters are vulnerable to diuron exposure, incurring a negative impact on reproductive success and oyster recruitment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of in vitro exposure to diarrheic toxin producer Prorocentrum lima on gene expressions related to cell cycle regulation and immune response in Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesús Romero-Geraldo, Reyna; García-Lagunas, Norma; Hernández-Saavedra, Norma Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Crassostrea gigas accumulates diarrheic shellfish toxins (DSP) associated to Prorocentrum lima of which Okadaic acid (OA) causes specific inhibitions of serine and threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A. Its toxic effects have been extensively reported in bivalve mollusks at cellular and physiological levels, but genomic approaches have been scarcely studied. Acute and sub-chronic exposure effects of P. lima were investigated on farmed juvenile C. gigas (3-5 mm). The Pacific oysters were fed with three dinoflagellate concentrations: 0.3, 3, and 30 ×10(3) cells mL-1 along with a nontoxic control diet of Isochrysis galbana. The effects of P. lima on C. gigas were followed by analyzing expression levels of a total of four genes, three involved in cell cycle regulation and one in immune response by polymerase chain reaction and real time quantitative PCR, where changes in time and cell concentration were found. The highest expression levels were found in oysters fed 3 × 10(3) cells mL-1 at 168 h for the cycle regulator p21 protein (9 fold), chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (8 fold), elongation factor 2 (2 fold), and lipopolysaccharide/β-1, 3 glucan binding protein (13 fold above base line). Additionally, the transcript level of all the genes decreased in oysters fed wich the mixed diet 30 × 10(3) cells mL-1 of dinoflagellate after 72 h and was lowest in the chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (0.9 fold below baseline). On C. gigas the whole cell ingestion of P lima caused a clear mRNA modulation expression of the genes involved in cell cycle regulation and immune system. Over-expression could be related to DNA damage, disturbances in cell cycle continuity, probably a genotoxic effect, as well as an activation of its innate immune system as first line of defense.

  17. Effects of in vitro exposure to diarrheic toxin producer Prorocentrum lima on gene expressions related to cell cycle regulation and immune response in Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna de Jesús Romero-Geraldo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crassostrea gigas accumulates diarrheic shellfish toxins (DSP associated to Prorocentrum lima of which Okadaic acid (OA causes specific inhibitions of serine and threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A. Its toxic effects have been extensively reported in bivalve mollusks at cellular and physiological levels, but genomic approaches have been scarcely studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Acute and sub-chronic exposure effects of P. lima were investigated on farmed juvenile C. gigas (3-5 mm. The Pacific oysters were fed with three dinoflagellate concentrations: 0.3, 3, and 30 ×10(3 cells mL-1 along with a nontoxic control diet of Isochrysis galbana. The effects of P. lima on C. gigas were followed by analyzing expression levels of a total of four genes, three involved in cell cycle regulation and one in immune response by polymerase chain reaction and real time quantitative PCR, where changes in time and cell concentration were found. The highest expression levels were found in oysters fed 3 × 10(3 cells mL-1 at 168 h for the cycle regulator p21 protein (9 fold, chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (8 fold, elongation factor 2 (2 fold, and lipopolysaccharide/β-1, 3 glucan binding protein (13 fold above base line. Additionally, the transcript level of all the genes decreased in oysters fed wich the mixed diet 30 × 10(3 cells mL-1 of dinoflagellate after 72 h and was lowest in the chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (0.9 fold below baseline. CONCLUSIONS: On C. gigas the whole cell ingestion of P lima caused a clear mRNA modulation expression of the genes involved in cell cycle regulation and immune system. Over-expression could be related to DNA damage, disturbances in cell cycle continuity, probably a genotoxic effect, as well as an activation of its innate immune system as first line of defense.

  18. Genomics study of the exposure effect of Gymnodinium catenatum, a paralyzing toxin producer, on Crassostrea gigas' defense system and detoxification genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma García-Lagunas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crassostrea gigas accumulates paralytic shellfish toxins (PST associated with red tide species as Gymnodinium catenatum. Previous studies demonstrated bivalves show variable feeding responses to toxic algae at physiological level; recently, only one study has reported biochemical changes in the transcript level of the genes involved in C. gigas stress response. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that 24 h feeding on toxic dinoflagellate cells (acute exposure induced a significant decrease in clearance rate and expression level changes of the genes involved in antioxidant defense (copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, Cu/Zn-SOD, cell detoxification (glutathione S-transferase, GST and cytochrome P450, CPY450, intermediate immune response activation (lipopolysaccharide and beta glucan binding protein, LGBP, and stress responses (glutamine synthetase, GS in Pacific oysters compared to the effects with the non-toxic microalga Isochrysis galbana. A sub-chronic exposure feeding on toxic dinoflagellate cells for seven and fourteen days (30×10³ cells mL⁻¹ showed higher gene expression levels. A significant increase was observed in Cu/Zn-SOD, GST, and LGBP at day 7 and a major increase in GS and CPY450 at day 14. We also observed that oysters fed only with G. catenatum (3×10³ cells mL⁻¹ produced a significant increase on the transcription level than in a mixed diet (3×10³ cells mL⁻¹ of G. catenatum+0.75×10⁶ cells mL⁻¹ I. galbana in all the analyzed genes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide gene expression data of PST producer dinoflagellate G. catenatum toxic effects on C. gigas, a commercially important bivalve. Over expressed genes indicate the activation of a potent protective mechanism, whose response depends on both cell concentration and exposure time against these toxic microalgae. Given the importance of dinoflagellate blooms in coastal environments, these results provide a more comprehensive overview of how oysters respond to

  19. Genomics study of the exposure effect of Gymnodinium catenatum, a paralyzing toxin producer, on Crassostrea gigas' defense system and detoxification genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Lagunas, Norma; Romero-Geraldo, Reyna; Hernández-Saavedra, Norma Y

    2013-01-01

    Crassostrea gigas accumulates paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) associated with red tide species as Gymnodinium catenatum. Previous studies demonstrated bivalves show variable feeding responses to toxic algae at physiological level; recently, only one study has reported biochemical changes in the transcript level of the genes involved in C. gigas stress response. We found that 24 h feeding on toxic dinoflagellate cells (acute exposure) induced a significant decrease in clearance rate and expression level changes of the genes involved in antioxidant defense (copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, Cu/Zn-SOD), cell detoxification (glutathione S-transferase, GST and cytochrome P450, CPY450), intermediate immune response activation (lipopolysaccharide and beta glucan binding protein, LGBP), and stress responses (glutamine synthetase, GS) in Pacific oysters compared to the effects with the non-toxic microalga Isochrysis galbana. A sub-chronic exposure feeding on toxic dinoflagellate cells for seven and fourteen days (30×10³ cells mL⁻¹) showed higher gene expression levels. A significant increase was observed in Cu/Zn-SOD, GST, and LGBP at day 7 and a major increase in GS and CPY450 at day 14. We also observed that oysters fed only with G. catenatum (3×10³ cells mL⁻¹ produced a significant increase on the transcription level than in a mixed diet (3×10³ cells mL⁻¹ of G. catenatum+0.75×10⁶ cells mL⁻¹ I. galbana) in all the analyzed genes. Our results provide gene expression data of PST producer dinoflagellate G. catenatum toxic effects on C. gigas, a commercially important bivalve. Over expressed genes indicate the activation of a potent protective mechanism, whose response depends on both cell concentration and exposure time against these toxic microalgae. Given the importance of dinoflagellate blooms in coastal environments, these results provide a more comprehensive overview of how oysters respond to stress generated by toxic dinoflagellate exposure.

  20. Interactive effects of elevated temperature and CO(2) levels on metabolism and oxidative stress in two common marine bivalves (Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoo, Omera B; Ivanina, Anna V; Ullstad, Claus; Beniash, Elia; Sokolova, Inna M

    2013-04-01

    Marine bivalves such as the hard shell clams Mercenaria mercenaria and eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica are affected by multiple stressors, including fluctuations in temperature and CO2 levels in estuaries, and these stresses are expected to be exacerbated by ongoing global climate change. Hypercapnia (elevated CO2 levels) and temperature stress can affect survival, growth and development of marine bivalves, but the cellular mechanisms of these effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated whether oxidative stress is implicated in cellular responses to elevated temperature and CO2 levels in marine bivalves. We measured the whole-organism standard metabolic rate (SMR), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and levels of oxidative stress biomarkers in the muscle tissues of clams and oysters exposed to different temperatures (22 and 27°C) and CO2 levels (the present day conditions of ~400ppm CO2 and 800ppm CO2 predicted by a consensus business-as-usual IPCC emission scenario for the year 2100). SMR was significantly higher and the antioxidant capacity was lower in oysters than in clams. Aerobic metabolism was largely temperature-independent in these two species in the studied temperature range (22-27°C). However, the combined exposure to elevated temperature and hypercapnia led to elevated SMR in clams indicating elevated costs of basal maintenance. No persistent oxidative stress signal (measured by the levels of protein carbonyls, and protein conjugates with malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal) was observed during the long-term exposure to moderate warming (+5°C) and hypercapnia (~800ppm CO2). This indicates that long-term exposure to moderately elevated CO2 and temperature minimally affects the cellular redox status in these bivalve species and that the earlier observed negative physiological effects of elevated CO2 and temperature must be explained by other cellular mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 21 CFR 161.136 - Olympia oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION FISH AND SHELLFISH Requirements for Specific Standardized Fish and Shellfish § 161.136 Olympia... and conform to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for oysters in § 161.130. ...

  2. Interactive effects of CO₂ and trace metals on the proteasome activity and cellular stress response of marine bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Götze, Sandra [Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar, Marine Research, Functional Ecology, 27570 Bremerhaven (Germany); Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Matoo, Omera B. [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Beniash, Elia [Department of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Saborowski, Reinhard [Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar, Marine Research, Functional Ecology, 27570 Bremerhaven (Germany); Sokolova, Inna M., E-mail: isokolov@uncc.edu [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Elevated PCO₂ enhanced accumulation of Cu and Cd in the gills of mollusks. • The proteasome activities were affected by metals but robust to elevated PCO₂. • Exposure to Cd and Cu had opposite effects on the proteasome activity. • Combined exposure to Cu and elevated PCO₂ negatively affected energy status. - Abstract: Increased anthropogenic emission of CO₂ changes the carbonate chemistry and decreases the pH of the ocean. This can affect the speciation and the bioavailability of metals in polluted habitats such as estuaries. However, the effects of acidification on metal accumulation and stress response in estuarine organisms including bivalves are poorly understood. We studied the interactive effects of CO₂ and two common metal pollutants, copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd), on metal accumulation, intracellular ATP/ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, stress response and energy metabolism in two common estuarine bivalves—Crassostrea virginica (eastern oyster) and Mercenaria mercenaria (hard shell clam). Bivalves were exposed for 4–5 weeks to clean seawater (control) and to either 50 μg L⁻¹ Cu or 50 μg L⁻¹ Cd at one of three partial pressures of CO₂ PCO₂ ~395, ~800 and ~1500 μatm) representative of the present-day conditions and projections of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) for the years 2100 and 2250, respectively. Clams accumulated lower metal burdens than oysters, and elevated PCO₂ enhanced the Cd and Cu accumulation in mantle tissues in both species. Higher Cd and Cu burdens were associated with elevated mRNA expression of metal binding proteins metallothionein and ferritin. In the absence of added metals, proteasome activities of clams and oysters were robust to elevated PCO₂, but PCO₂ modulated the proteasome response to metals. Cd exposure stimulated the chymotrypsin-like activity of the oyster proteasome

  3. Interactive effects of CO₂ and trace metals on the proteasome activity and cellular stress response of marine bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Sandra; Matoo, Omera B; Beniash, Elia; Saborowski, Reinhard; Sokolova, Inna M

    2014-04-01

    Increased anthropogenic emission of CO2 changes the carbonate chemistry and decreases the pH of the ocean. This can affect the speciation and the bioavailability of metals in polluted habitats such as estuaries. However, the effects of acidification on metal accumulation and stress response in estuarine organisms including bivalves are poorly understood. We studied the interactive effects of CO2 and two common metal pollutants, copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd), on metal accumulation, intracellular ATP/ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, stress response and energy metabolism in two common estuarine bivalves-Crassostrea virginica (eastern oyster) and Mercenaria mercenaria (hard shell clam). Bivalves were exposed for 4-5 weeks to clean seawater (control) and to either 50 μg L(-1) Cu or 50 μg L(-1) Cd at one of three partial pressures of CO2 ( [Formula: see text] ∼ 395, ∼ 800 and ∼ 1500 μatm) representative of the present-day conditions and projections of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) for the years 2100 and 2250, respectively. Clams accumulated lower metal burdens than oysters, and elevated [Formula: see text] enhanced the Cd and Cu accumulation in mantle tissues in both species. Higher Cd and Cu burdens were associated with elevated mRNA expression of metal binding proteins metallothionein and ferritin. In the absence of added metals, proteasome activities of clams and oysters were robust to elevated [Formula: see text] , but [Formula: see text] modulated the proteasome response to metals. Cd exposure stimulated the chymotrypsin-like activity of the oyster proteasome at all CO2 levels. In contrast, trypsin- and caspase-like activities of the oyster proteasome were slightly inhibited by Cd exposure in normocapnia but this inhibition was reversed at elevated [Formula: see text] . Cu exposure inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity of the oyster proteasome regardless of the exposure [Formula: see text] . The effects of metal exposure on

  4. Quantifying salinity and season effects on eastern oyster clearance and oxygen consumption rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, S.M.; Lavaud, Romain; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Comeau, L. A.; Filgueira, R.; LaPeyre, Jerome F.

    2018-01-01

    There are few data on Crassostrea virginica physiological rates across the range of salinities and temperatures to which they are regularly exposed, and this limits the applicability of growth and production models using these data. The objectives of this study were to quantify, in winter (17 °C) and summer (27 °C), the clearance and oxygen consumption rates of C. virginica from Louisiana across a range of salinities typical of the region (3, 6, 9, 15 and 25). Salinity and season (temperature and reproduction) affected C. virginica physiology differently; salinity impacted clearance rates with reduced feeding rates at low salinities, while season had a strong effect on respiration rates. Highest clearance rates were found at salinities of 9–25, with reductions ranging from 50 to 80 and 90 to 95% at salinities of 6 and 3, respectively. Oxygen consumption rates in summer were four times higher than in winter. Oxygen consumption rates were within a narrow range and similar among salinities in winter, but varied greatly among individuals and salinities in summer. This likely reflected varying stages of gonad development. Valve movements measured at the five salinities indicated oysters were open 50–60% of the time in the 6–25 salinity range and ~ 30% at a salinity of 3. Reduced opening periods, concomitant with narrower valve gap amplitudes, are in accord with the limited feeding at the lowest salinity (3). These data indicate the need for increased focus on experimental determination of optimal ranges and thresholds to better quantify oyster population responses to environmental changes.

  5. Effects of Non-Indigenous Oysters on Microbial Diversity and Ecosystem Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Dannielle S.; Boots, Bas; Crowe, Tasman P.

    2012-01-01

    Invasive ecosystem engineers can physically and chemically alter the receiving environment, thereby affecting biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, invasive throughout much of the world, can establish dense populations monopolising shorelines and possibly altering ecosystem processes including decomposition and nutrient cycling. The effects of increasing cover of invasive C. gigas on ecosystem processes and associated microbial assemblages in mud-flats were tested experimentally in the field. Pore-water nutrients (NH4+ and total oxidised nitrogen), sediment chlorophyll content, microbial activity, total carbon and nitrogen, and community respiration (CO2 and CH4) were measured to assess changes in ecosystem functioning. Assemblages of bacteria and functionally important microbes, including methanogens, methylotrophs and ammonia-oxidisers were assessed in the oxic and anoxic layers of sediment using terminal restriction length polymorphism of the bacterial 16S rRNA, mxaF, amoA and archaeal mcrA genes respectively. At higher covers (40 and 80%) of oysters there was significantly greater microbial activity, increased chlorophyll content, CO2 (13 fold greater) and CH4 (6 fold greater) emission from the sediment compared to mud-flats without C. gigas. At 10% cover, C. gigas increased the concentration of total oxidised nitrogen and altered the assemblage structure of ammonia-oxidisers and methanogens. Concentrations of pore-water NH4+ were increased by C. gigas regardless of cover. Invasive species can alter ecosystem functioning not only directly, but also indirectly, by affecting microbial communities vital for the maintenance of ecosystem processes, but the nature and magnitude of these effects can be non-linear, depending on invader abundance. PMID:23144762

  6. Effects of non-indigenous oysters on microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannielle S Green

    Full Text Available Invasive ecosystem engineers can physically and chemically alter the receiving environment, thereby affecting biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, invasive throughout much of the world, can establish dense populations monopolising shorelines and possibly altering ecosystem processes including decomposition and nutrient cycling. The effects of increasing cover of invasive C. gigas on ecosystem processes and associated microbial assemblages in mud-flats were tested experimentally in the field. Pore-water nutrients (NH(4(+ and total oxidised nitrogen, sediment chlorophyll content, microbial activity, total carbon and nitrogen, and community respiration (CO(2 and CH(4 were measured to assess changes in ecosystem functioning. Assemblages of bacteria and functionally important microbes, including methanogens, methylotrophs and ammonia-oxidisers were assessed in the oxic and anoxic layers of sediment using terminal restriction length polymorphism of the bacterial 16S rRNA, mxaF, amoA and archaeal mcrA genes respectively. At higher covers (40 and 80% of oysters there was significantly greater microbial activity, increased chlorophyll content, CO(2 (13 fold greater and CH(4 (6 fold greater emission from the sediment compared to mud-flats without C. gigas. At 10% cover, C. gigas increased the concentration of total oxidised nitrogen and altered the assemblage structure of ammonia-oxidisers and methanogens. Concentrations of pore-water NH(4(+ were increased by C. gigas regardless of cover. Invasive species can alter ecosystem functioning not only directly, but also indirectly, by affecting microbial communities vital for the maintenance of ecosystem processes, but the nature and magnitude of these effects can be non-linear, depending on invader abundance.

  7. Potentially harmful cyanobacteria in oyster banks of Términos lagoon, southeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Poot-Delgado

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria inhabit hypersaline, marine and freshwater environments. Some toxic and non-toxic species can form harmful blooms. The aim of this study was to identify potentially harmful cyanobacterial species in the oyster banks of Términos Lagoon, the southeastern Gulf of Mexico. Six sample sites (up to 2-m depth were monitored monthly from August 2012 to September 2013. Water temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen saturation (% DO, inorganic nutrients and abundance of cyanobacteria were determined. Temperature and salinity were characterized by marked seasonal differences (26.8 to 30.6 °C and 6.1 to 19.5, respectively. The pH values (ranging from 7.1 to 8.4 and the % DO (88.4 to 118.2 % suggest a predominance of photosynthetic activity in the windy season (October-February. Elevated nutrient contents are associated with the period of increased river discharge, determined by water circulation and biogeochemical processes. Fourteen taxa were identified, of which Anabaena sp., Merismopedia sp., Oscillatoria sp. and Cylindrospermopsis cuspis produced blooms. Cyanobacterial abundances were on the order of magnitude of 106 cells L-1 in October 2012 at stations S1-S6, with an average value of 3.2x105 cells L-1 and a range of 2000 to 3.1x106 cells L-1 throughout the study period; however, they showed a remarkable absence during the windy season (October to January. Anabaena sp. and C. cuspis reached abundances of 1.9x106 and 1.3x106 cells L-1, respectively. The latter caused the temporary closure of oyster Crassostrea virginica harvesting for 15 days in October 2012.

  8. Floating self adjusting skimmer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titus, P.E.; Hanson, J.R.

    1972-09-05

    A skimming mechanism is designed to remove all or part of a layer of oil floating on the surface of water. A pivoted receptable having a weir is buoyed to position the weir adjacent to the interface of the liquids. Liquids accumulating in the receptacle are withdrawn for disposal. A stabilizing member extends around a substantial portion of the periphery of the skimmer to prevent submergence of the weir due to wave or current movement of the liquids. (9 claims)

  9. Quantifying early 17th century changes in Chesapeake Bay estuarine carbon dynamics from James River, VA oyster geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, B. L.; Spero, H. J.; Harding, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The first successful European colonization of North America occurred in 1607 following the arrival of English settlers at Jamestown, Virginia. Within a few decades, land use changes and clear-cutting farming practices dramatically altered the terrestrial landscape and removed the overlying canopy and stabilizing root network of the previously-dominant hardwood forests. The Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, has inhabited the Chesapeake Bay since the end of the last deglaciation. During the start of the Jamestown Colony, an extensive drought (1606-1612) shifted James River salinity zones upriver, expanding the available oyster habitat to the vicinity of Jamestown. This allowed the colonists to collect and eat oysters from areas near the colony down to the river's entry into the bay, and later discard the shells in wells and trash pits that have recently been excavated. The oysters' calcium carbonate shells discovered in these deposits act as multi-year stationary recorders preserving the local environmental chemistry throughout their life until collection. Here we present δ13C, δ18O, and radiocarbon data from historical oyster shell hinge transects that encompass the time period between ~1609 and the early 1700s. Samples include shells from the 1609 Jamestown freshwater well and five additional sites, as well as modern shells collected in 2006. Because shell δ13C and radiocarbon (14C) reflect James River δ13CDIC, it is possible to document carbon source changes during this period of land use change. Our preliminary data suggest a decrease in ambient δ13CDIC of approximately 2‰ between just prior to 1609 conditions and the modern estuary. This is most likely due to an increase in isotopically light organic carbon loading into the river as water moves more rapidly through the terrestrial system. Radiocarbon reservoir ages will also be presented to better constrain carbon flow through the system during this period of disturbance. δ18O measurements from the

  10. A single-use site selection technique, using GIS, for aquaculture planning: choosing locations for mangrove oyster raft culture in Margarita Island, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago, Joaquín; Rada, Martín; Hernández, Hernando; Buitrago, Esperanza

    2005-05-01

    Oyster culture has a potential to generate income for coastal communities and to lessen pressure on natural overexploited populations. A project to transfer mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae raft culture technology to selected coastal communities in Margarita Island, Venezuela is being developed, and an optimum location selection technique was devised. To pick the variables or factors that determine site suitability, a bibliographic database was made, aspects of interest chosen, and the most comprehensive ones singled out, eliminating redundant ones. Twenty variables were grouped in criteria based on the way they influence the project. Variables were classified as intrinsic environmental, environmental extrinsic, logistic, and socioeconomic criteria. Thirty-five experts were asked to evaluate the factors and to score each according to their suitability weight. Logistic criterion received the highest values, followed by environmental extrinsic issues. A Geographic Information System using a base map compiled from 1:25,000 scale maps was developed. A thematic map for each factor was completed, dividing graphically the 3896-km2 study area into polygons of equal weight for each factor. The Multi-Criteria Evaluation (MCE) was used to combine the variables. Resultant vectors in thematic maps were added to obtain smaller polygons with the same value sum. Finally, MCE was used to generate a final output: the optimum sites for oyster aquaculture resulting from the added values of over 3000 polygons in the maps, for the 20 criteria. Higher scores were reached in 13 areas covering 4.1 km2, those places having the optimum conditions for oyster raft aquaculture in the region. Additional locations meeting 75% to 70% of the demanded criteria for a final suitable selection cover 137 sites encompassing 37.5 km2.

  11. Studies on seasonal pollution of heavy metals in water, sediment, fish and oyster from the Meiliang Bay of Taihu Lake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeshkumar, Sivakumar; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Xiangyang; Ravikumar, Boopalan; Bai, Ge; Li, Xiaoyu

    2018-01-01

    The present study, seasonal pollution of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr and Cu) in water, sediment, tissues of fish Carassius carassius and oyster Crassostrea gigas were determined at seven sampling sites from Meiliang Bay, Taihu Lake during one year calendar, 2016. The total heavy metal concentrations in water samples were higher in winter and summer than in spring and autumn season, whereas in sediment they were higher in winter and summer seasons, respectively. The trend of metal mean contents found in the fish and oyster were in decreasing order of Pb > Cu > Cr > Cd and Pb > Cu > Cr > Cd, respectively. The tissues of fish and oyster captured during winter and summer accumulated a higher significant different amount of metals relative to other season, which was attributed to a higher influx of agricultural waste, sewage and sludge by heavy rainfall and floods. In addition, the pollution load index (PLI) values were above one (>1), indicating an advanced decline of the sediment quality, and contamination factor (CF) confirmed that the sediment samples were moderate to high contamination by Pb and Cr. Thus, comparative studies with seasonal pollution of heavy metals in Meiliang Bay of Lake Taihu regions indicate considerable heavy metal enrichment in water, sediments as well as in various organs of fish and oyster. Finally, our results indicated that the metal concentration values increased statistically significant different related to season (p heavy metal stress biomarkers in fish along with seasonal variations may serve as a convenient approach during pollution bio-monitoring programme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Adaptation to enemy shifts: rapid resistance evolution to local Vibrio spp. in invasive Pacific oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Carolin C; Wegner, K Mathias

    2015-04-07

    One hypothesis for the success of invasive species is reduced pathogen burden, resulting from a release from infections or high immunological fitness of invaders. Despite strong selection exerted on the host, the evolutionary response of invaders to newly acquired pathogens has rarely been considered. The two independent and genetically distinct invasions of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas into the North Sea represent an ideal model system to study fast evolutionary responses of invasive populations. By exposing both invasion sources to ubiquitous and phylogenetically diverse pathogens (Vibrio spp.), we demonstrate that within a few generations hosts adapted to newly encountered pathogen communities. However, local adaptation only became apparent in selective environments, i.e. at elevated temperatures reflecting patterns of disease outbreaks in natural populations. Resistance against sympatric and allopatric Vibrio spp. strains was dominantly inherited in crosses between both invasion sources, resulting in an overall higher resistance of admixed individuals than pure lines. Therefore, we suggest that a simple genetic resistance mechanism of the host is matched to a common virulence mechanism shared by local Vibrio strains. This combination might have facilitated a fast evolutionary response that can explain another dimension of why invasive species can be so successful in newly invaded ranges. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Adaptation to enemy shifts: rapid resistance evolution to local Vibrio spp. in invasive Pacific oysters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Carolin C.; Wegner, K. Mathias

    2015-01-01

    One hypothesis for the success of invasive species is reduced pathogen burden, resulting from a release from infections or high immunological fitness of invaders. Despite strong selection exerted on the host, the evolutionary response of invaders to newly acquired pathogens has rarely been considered. The two independent and genetically distinct invasions of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas into the North Sea represent an ideal model system to study fast evolutionary responses of invasive populations. By exposing both invasion sources to ubiquitous and phylogenetically diverse pathogens (Vibrio spp.), we demonstrate that within a few generations hosts adapted to newly encountered pathogen communities. However, local adaptation only became apparent in selective environments, i.e. at elevated temperatures reflecting patterns of disease outbreaks in natural populations. Resistance against sympatric and allopatric Vibrio spp. strains was dominantly inherited in crosses between both invasion sources, resulting in an overall higher resistance of admixed individuals than pure lines. Therefore, we suggest that a simple genetic resistance mechanism of the host is matched to a common virulence mechanism shared by local Vibrio strains. This combination might have facilitated a fast evolutionary response that can explain another dimension of why invasive species can be so successful in newly invaded ranges. PMID:25716784

  14. Efecto de bacterias probióticas en el cultivo larvario del ostión de placer Crassostrea corteziensis (Bivalvia: Ostreidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Isidro Campa-Córdova

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available El ostión de placer u ostra del Cortés (Crassostrea corteziensis se considera como una especie con potencial para ser cultivada en gran escala. Sin embargo, al igual que en otros bivalvos, la alta mortalidad que se presenta durante la etapa larvaria y juvenil, es el principal problema que limita el desarrollo del cultivo en el laboratorio. Un método que está ganando aceptación en la acuicultura es el uso de bacterias probióticas para controlar patógenos microbianos. Este estudio analiza el efecto de estas bacterias en la supervivencia y talla final de larvas de ostión de placer Crassostrea corteziensis. Se utilizó una cepa de bacterias ácido lácticas (cepa NS61 aisladas N. subnodosus, así como de bacilos aislados de L. vannamei (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, cepa YC58 y de C. corteziensis (Burkholderia cepacia, cepa Y021. Las cepas se evaluaron por inmersión en cultivos larvarios de C. corteziensis a dos concentraciones diferentes, hasta completar el estadio pediveliger. Los organismos se trataron con bacterias ácido lácticas (Lb, una mezcla de bacilos (Lb en proporción 1:1 y un grupo control. La concentración de 1x10(4UFC/ml registró una mayor supervivencia con Lb y Mb respecto al grupo control. La supervivencia con Mb a una concentración de 1x10(5UFC/ml fue mayor que la del grupo control y del grupo tratado con Lb. Los resultados mostraron que las larvas de C. corteziensis tratadas con probióticos no incrementaron significativamente su talla respecto a las larvas del grupo control. Mientras que las tratadas con Lb a la concentración mayor, 1x10(5UFC/ml, mostraron una disminución de la supervivencia respecto a las tratadas con 1x10(4UFC/ml. Este estudio demostró el efecto benéfico de cepas probióticas utilizadas individualmente o en mezcla en el cultivo larvario de C. corteziensis.Effect of probiotic bacteria on survival and growth of Cortez oyster larvae, Crassostrea corteziensis (Bivalvia: Ostreidae. Disease control

  15. Floating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindt, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    This article examines the legal regime for floating nuclear power plants (FNPs), in view of the absence of specific US legislation and the very limited references to artificial islands in the Law of the Sea Convention. The environmental impacts of FNPs are examined and changes in US regulation following the Three Mile Island accident and recent US court decisions are described. References in the Law of the Sea Convention relevant to FNPs are outlined and the current status of international law on the subject is analysed. (author)

  16. Evidence of exceptional oyster-reef resilience to fluctuations in sea level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Justin T; Rodriguez, Antonio B; Fodrie, F Joel

    2017-12-01

    Ecosystems at the land-sea interface are vulnerable to rising sea level. Intertidal habitats must maintain their surface elevations with respect to sea level to persist via vertical growth or landward retreat, but projected rates of sea-level rise may exceed the accretion rates of many biogenic habitats. While considerable attention is focused on climate change over centennial timescales, relative sea level also fluctuates dramatically (10-30 cm) over month-to-year timescales due to interacting oceanic and atmospheric processes. To assess the response of oyster-reef ( Crassostrea virginica ) growth to interannual variations in mean sea level (MSL) and improve long-term forecasts of reef response to rising seas, we monitored the morphology of constructed and natural intertidal reefs over 5 years using terrestrial lidar. Timing of reef scans created distinct periods of high and low relative water level for decade-old reefs ( n  = 3) constructed in 1997 and 2000, young reefs ( n  = 11) constructed in 2011 and one natural reef (approximately 100 years old). Changes in surface elevation were related to MSL trends. Decade-old reefs achieved 2 cm/year growth, which occurred along higher elevations when MSL increased. Young reefs experienced peak growth (6.7 cm/year) at a lower elevation that coincided with a drop in MSL. The natural reef exhibited considerable loss during the low MSL of the first time step but grew substantially during higher MSL through the second time step, with growth peaking (4.3 cm/year) at MSL, reoccupying the elevations previously lost. Oyster reefs appear to be in dynamic equilibrium with short-term (month-to-year) fluctuations in sea level, evidencing notable resilience to future changes to sea level that surpasses other coastal biogenic habitat types. These growth patterns support the presence of a previously defined optimal growth zone that shifts correspondingly with changes in MSL, which can help guide oyster-reef conservation and

  17. Risk factors associated with increased mortality of farmed Pacific oysters in Ireland during 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Tracy A; Morrissey, Teresa; Geoghegan, Fiona; Martin, S Wayne; Lyons, Kieran; Ashe, Seán; More, Simon J

    2014-02-01

    The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, plays a significant role in the aquaculture industry in Ireland. Episodes of increased mortality in C. gigas have been described in many countries, and in Ireland since 2008. The cause of mortality events in C. gigas spat and larvae is suspected to be multifactorial, with ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1, in particular OsHV-1μvar) considered a necessary, but not sufficient, cause. The objectives of the current study were to describe mortality events that occurred in C. gigas in Ireland during the summer of 2011 and to identify any associated environmental, husbandry and oyster endogenous factors. A prospective cohort study was conducted during 2010-2012, involving 80 study batches, located at 24 sites within 17 bays. All 17 bays had previously tested positive for OsHV-1μvar. All study farmers were initially surveyed to gather relevant data on each study batch, which was then tracked from placement in the bay to first grading. The outcome of interest was cumulative batch-level mortality (%). Environmental data at high and low mortality sites were compared, and a risk factor analysis, using a multiple linear regression mixed effects model, was conducted. Cumulative batch mortality ranged from 2% to 100% (median=16%, interquartile range: 10-34%). The final multivariable risk factor model indicated that batches imported from French hatcheries had significantly lower mortalities than non-French hatcheries; sites which tested negative for OsHV-1μvar during the study had significantly lower mortalities than sites which tested positive and mortalities increased with temperature until a peak was reached. There were several differences between the seed stocks from French and non-French hatcheries, including prior OsHV-1μvar exposure and ploidy. A range of risk factors relating to farm management were also considered, but were not found significant. The relative importance of prior OsHV-1μvar infection and ploidy will become clearer

  18. Generation time and the stability of sex-determining alleles in oyster populations as deduced using a gene-based population dynamics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Eric N; Klinck, John M; Hofmann, Eileen E

    2011-02-21

    Crassostrea oysters are protandrous hermaphrodites. Sex is thought to be determined by a single gene with a dominant male allele M and a recessive protandrous allele F, such that FF animals are protandrous and MF animals are permanent males. We investigate the possibility that a reduction in generation time, brought about for example by disease, might jeopardize retention of the M allele. Simulations show that MF males have a significantly lessened lifetime fecundity when generation time declines. The allele frequency of the M allele declines and eventually the M allele is lost. The probability of loss is modulated by population abundance. As abundance increases, the probability of M allele loss declines. Simulations suggest that stabilization of the female-to-male ratio when generation time is long is the dominant function of the M allele. As generation time shortens, the raison d'être for the M allele also fades as mortality usurps the stabilizing role. Disease and exploitation have shortened oyster generation time: one consequence may be to jeopardize retention of the M allele. Two alternative genetic bases for protandry also provide stable sex ratios when generation time is long; an F-dominant protandric allele and protandry restricted to the MF heterozygote. In both cases, simulations show that FF individuals become rare in the population at high abundance and/or long generation time. Protandry restricted to the MF heterozygote maintains sex ratio stability over a wider range of generation times and abundances than the alternatives, suggesting that sex determination based on a male-dominant allele (MM/MF) may not be the optimal solution to the genetic basis for protandry in Crassostrea. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Floating microspheres: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagtap Yogesh Mukund

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastric emptying is a complex process, one that is highly variable and that makes in vivo performance of drug delivery systems uncertain. A controlled drug delivery system with prolonged residence time in the stomach can be of great practical importance for drugs with an absorption window in the upper small intestine. The main limitations are attributed to the inter- and intra-subject variability of gastro-intestinal (GI transit time and to the non-uniformity of drug absorption throughout the alimentary canal. Floating or hydrodynamically controlled drug delivery systems are useful in such applications. Various gastroretentive dosage forms are available, including tablets, capsules, pills, laminated films, floating microspheres, granules and powders. Floating microspheres have been gaining attention due to the uniform distribution of these multiple-unit dosage forms in the stomach, which results in more reproducible drug absorption and reduced risk of local irritation. Such systems have more advantages over the single-unit dosage forms. The present review briefly addresses the physiology of the gastric emptying process with respect to floating drug delivery systems. The purpose of this review is to bring together the recent literature with respect to the method of preparation, and various parameters affecting the performance and characterization of floating microspheres.O esvaziamento gástrico é um processo complexo, com elevada variabilidade e responsável pela incerteza do desempenho dos medicamentos in vivo. Dessa forma, os sistemas de liberação modificada de fármacos, com tempo de residência prolongado no estômago, em especial, considerando aqueles fármacos com janela de absorção na porção superior do intestino delgado, apresentam fundamental importância. As principais limitações relativas à absorção do fármaco são, no geral, atribuídas à variabilidade inter e intra-paciente do tempo de trânsito gastro-intestinal (GI e

  20. Wave attenuation charcteristics of tethered float system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.

    that the system performs well when it is just submerged. As float velocity decreases with increase in float size, transmission coefficient increases with increase in float size. The influence of wave period on wave attenuation is remarkable compared to other... characteristics of floating breakwaters. Seymour and Isaacs (1974), Agerton et al. (1976) and Seymour and Hanes (1979) studied the performance of a tethered float breakwater (tethered float system), assuming that drag is the major contributor-factor for wave...

  1. Oyster leases in Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, LOSCO (1997) [oyster_leases_USACE_1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set indicates the locations of oyster leases in Louisiana. The lease areas should be polygons, however, the source data has very poor topology including...

  2. Calculation of Oyster Benefits with a Bioenergetics Model of the Virginia Oyster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    than 105 m3 of runoff enters the system from the watershed . During the same interval, 8.4 x 106 m3 of water is exchanged with Chesapeake Bay through...the Chesapeake Bay Program Watershed Model (WSM, Shenk and Linker 2013). Since the WSM applica- tion period did not correspond to the study interval...Virginia oysters in Chesapeake Bay (Cerco and Noel 2005). The description and parameterization provided here are specific to Virginia oysters, but the

  3. Development of twenty-six microsatellite loci from Crassostrea ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    required for the sustainable development of C. hongkongen- sis cultivation industry. Since microsatellites are very useful in oyster stock analysis and genetic studies, the development of microsatellite markers is highly desirable for these pur- poses (Li et al. 2003; Sekino et al. 2003; Wang et al. 2008;. ∗For correspondence.

  4. Transcriptomics Analysis of Crassostrea hongkongensis for the Discovery of Reproduction-Related Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Tong

    Full Text Available The reproductive mechanisms of mollusk species have been interesting targets in biological research because of the diverse reproductive strategies observed in this phylum. These species have also been studied for the development of fishery technologies in molluscan aquaculture. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the reproductive process have been well studied in animal models, the relevant information from mollusks remains limited, particularly in species of great commercial interest. Crassostrea hongkongensis is the dominant oyster species that is distributed along the coast of the South China Sea and little genomic information on this species is available. Currently, high-throughput sequencing techniques have been widely used for investigating the basis of physiological processes and facilitating the establishment of adequate genetic selection programs.The C.hongkongensis transcriptome included a total of 1,595,855 reads, which were generated by 454 sequencing and were assembled into 41,472 contigs using de novo methods. Contigs were clustered into 33,920 isotigs and further grouped into 22,829 isogroups. Approximately 77.6% of the isogroups were successfully annotated by the Nr database. More than 1,910 genes were identified as being related to reproduction. Some key genes involved in germline development, sex determination and differentiation were identified for the first time in C.hongkongensis (nanos, piwi, ATRX, FoxL2, β-catenin, etc.. Gene expression analysis indicated that vasa, nanos, piwi, ATRX, FoxL2, β-catenin and SRD5A1 were highly or specifically expressed in C.hongkongensis gonads. Additionally, 94,056 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 1,699 simple sequence repeats (SSRs were compiled.Our study significantly increased C.hongkongensis genomic information based on transcriptomics analysis. The group of reproduction-related genes identified in the present study constitutes a new tool for research on bivalve

  5. Floating Silicon Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  6. Effect of Carbonate Chemistry Alteration on the Early Embryonic Development of the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    OpenAIRE

    Gazeau, F.; Gattuso, J.P.; Greaves, M.; Elderfield, H.; Peene, J.; Heip, C.H.R.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification, due to anthropogenic CO(2) absorption by the ocean, may have profound impacts on marine biota. Calcareous organisms are expected to be particularly sensitive due to the decreasing availability of carbonate ions driven by decreasing pH levels. Recently, some studies focused on the early life stages of mollusks that are supposedly more sensitive to environmental disturbances than adult stages. Although these studies have shown decreased growth rates and increased proportion...

  7. Antinociceptive effect of Pleurotus ostreatus (Oyster Mushroom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antinociceptive is reducing sensitivity to painful stimuli for the individual. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive potentials of graded doses of Pleurotus ostreatus (Oyster Mushroom) aqueous extract in Rattus norvegicus (Albino Rats) and its chemical pattern by comparing it with a standard drug and a ...

  8. OYSTER POPULATUION ESTIMATION IN SUPPORT OF THE TEN-YEAR GOAL FOR OYSTER RESOTRATION IN THE CHESAPEAKE BAY: DEVELOPING STRATEGIES FOR RESTORING AND MANAGING THE EASTERN OYSTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Roger, Steve Jordan, Gary Smith, Kennedy Paynter, James Wesson, Mary Christman, Jessica Vanisko, Juliana Harding, Kelly Greenhawk and Melissa Southworth. 2003. Oyster Population Estimation in Support of the Ten-Year Goal for Oyster Restoration in the Chesapeake Bay: Develop...

  9. Chronic Exposure of Early Stages of Development of Japanese Oyster to Contaminants from the Industry in the English Channel. Stress Markers at Integrated and Molecular Level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devos, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the effects of pollutants from the industry in the English Channel, in particular radionuclides, on the early stages of development of the Japanese oyster Crassostrea gigas. Original experimental devices were designed to study in laboratory controlled conditions the growth of a large number of larvae and spats. Emphasis was given to a joint use of stress markers at integrated and molecular levels. First exposures to non-radioactive pollutants revealed a highly sensitive response of the growth of juveniles exposed to a metal (zinc). Thereafter, juveniles were exposed for several weeks to dose rates of ionizing radiation and radionuclide activities several orders of magnitude higher than the levels likely to be encountered in the marine environment. An eco-geno-toxicological approach contributed to the understanding of the effects of ionizing radiations on DNA. The results strongly suggest that biochemical mechanisms act efficiently against radio-induced damages as early as the first days of life of the Japanese oyster. It still remains a lack of information about the long-term effects of DNA damages to higher level of biological organization. (author) [fr

  10. Large floating structures technological advances

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, BT

    2015-01-01

    This book surveys key projects that have seen the construction of large floating structures or have attained detailed conceptual designs. This compilation of key floating structures in a single volume captures the innovative features that mark the technological advances made in this field of engineering, and will provide a useful reference for ideas, analysis, design, and construction of these unique and emerging urban projects to offshore and marine engineers, urban planners, architects and students.

  11. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  12. Floating wind turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viterna, Larry A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A floating wind turbine system with a tower structure that includes at least one stability arm extending therefrom and that is anchored to the sea floor with a rotatable position retention device that facilitates deep water installations. Variable buoyancy for the wind turbine system is provided by buoyancy chambers that are integral to the tower itself as well as the stability arm. Pumps are included for adjusting the buoyancy as an aid in system transport, installation, repair and removal. The wind turbine rotor is located downwind of the tower structure to allow the wind turbine to follow the wind direction without an active yaw drive system. The support tower and stability arm structure is designed to balance tension in the tether with buoyancy, gravity and wind forces in such a way that the top of the support tower leans downwind, providing a large clearance between the support tower and the rotor blade tips. This large clearance facilitates the use of articulated rotor hubs to reduced damaging structural dynamic loads. Major components of the turbine can be assembled at the shore and transported to an offshore installation site.

  13. Population-specific genotype x genotype x environment interactions in bacterial disease of early life stages of Pacific oyster larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Carolin C; Fabritzek, Armin G; Wegner, K Mathias

    2017-04-01

    The consequences of emerging marine diseases on the evolutionary trajectories of affected host populations in the marine realm are largely unexplored. Evolution in response to natural selection depends on the genetic variation of the traits under selection and the interaction of these traits with the environment (GxE). However, in the case of diseases, pathogen genotypes add another dimension to this interaction. Therefore, the study of disease resistance needs to be extended to the interaction of host genotype, pathogen genotype and environment (GxGxE). In this study, we used a full-sib breeding design crossing two genetically differentiated populations of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793), to determine the influence of host genotype, pathogen genotype and temperature on disease resistance. Based on a controlled infection experiment on two early life stages, that is, D-larvae and Pediveliger larvae at elevated and ambient water temperatures, we estimated disease resistance to allopatric and sympatric Vibrio sp . by measuring survival and growth within and between genetically differentiated oyster populations. In both populations, survival was higher upon infection with sympatric Vibrio sp ., indicating that disease resistance has a genetic basis and is dependent on host genotype. In addition, we observed a significant GxGxE effect in D-larvae, where contrary to expectations, disease resistance was higher at warm than at cold temperatures. Using thermal reaction norms, we could further show that disease resistance is an environment dependent trait with high plasticity, which indicates the potential for a fast acclimatization to changing environmental conditions. These population-specific reaction norms disappeared in hybrid crosses between both populations which demonstrates that admixture between genetically differentiated populations can influence GxGxE interactions on larger scales.

  14. Eating oysters without risk of vibriosis: application of a bacteriophage against Vibrio parahaemolyticus in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyoun Joong; Yun, Sae Kil; Chai, Ji Young; Park, Se Chang

    2014-10-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a major cause of foodborne illness and related with the consumption of raw contaminated seafood, especially oysters. To evaluate the effectiveness of various applications of a bacteriophage (phage), pVp-1, against a multiple-antibiotic-resistant V. parahaemolyticus pandemic strain (CRS 09-17), we designed artificial contamination models that are most likely to be encountered during oyster processing. When live oysters were treated with bath immersion with pVp-1 after CRS 09-17 challenge, the growth of bacterial strain was significantly reduced. After 72h of phage application with bath immersion, bacterial growth reduction was observed to be 8.9×10(6)CFU/ml (control group) to 1.4×10CFU/ml (treatment group). When pVp-1 was surface-applied on the flesh of oysters after CRS 09-17 inoculation, bacterial growth was properly inhibited. After 12h of phage application on the surface of oysters, bacterial growth inhibition was revealed to be 1.44×10(6)CFU/ml (control group) to 1.94CFU/ml (treatment group). This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, of oyster surface-application of a phage against a multiple-antibiotic-resistant V. parahaemolyticus pandemic strain, and our successful phage application to various situations emphasizes the potential use of the phage to avoid V. parahaemolyticus infection from aquaculture to consumption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Heavy metals in sediments,mussels and oysters from Trinidad and Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Rojas de Astudillo

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The Gulf of Paria is bordered by both Trinidad and Venezuela,from which various metallic pollutants and other contaminants can originate.The Gulf is still a significant source of fish,crabs and shellfish for human consumption to both countries,where concerns over the quality of this marine environment have been long expressed but never properly addressed.In addition,the circulatory current patterns in the Gulf ensure that contaminants originating from either country are likely to affect both countries eventually.Heavy metals were determined in oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae and C.virginica ,green mussels (Perna viridis and sediments from the Gulf of Paria.Samples were obtained at four sites in Trinidad and three sites in Venezuela in the Gulf of Paria,in addition to comparative samples collected from three sites on the north coast of Venezuela.Edible tissues of twelve shellfish from each location were blended and aliquots digested with concentrated nitric acid, for extraction of cadmium,chromium,copper,lead,nickel and zinc.The solutions were analysed by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy.Mercury was extracted with a mixture of nitric,hydrochloric and sulphuric acids and determined by cold vapour atomic absorption.Sediments were oven-dried at 60°C, before being similarly extracted.Results showed that mercury in sediments at all sites in Trinidad and Venezuela exceeded NOAA and Canadian sediment quality guidelines,while cadmium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc also exceeded these guidelines at several sites.Heavy metal levels in oysters and green mussels varied widely with location. However,oysters from the Gulf of Paria contained significantly higher mean levels of cadmium,copper,nickel and zinc than those from the north coast of Venezuela, but this difference was not apparent in mussels.Cadmium, mercury and zinc in sediments were significantly correlated with those of mussels,but not of oysters,in which copper and zinc at several sites in the

  16. Molecular detection of Mikrocytos mackini in Pacific oysters using quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polinski, Mark; Lowe, Geoff; Meyer, Gary; Corbeil, Serge; Colling, Axel; Caraguel, Charles; Abbott, Cathryn L

    2015-01-01

    Mikrocytos mackini is an internationally regulated pathogen and causative agent of Denman Island disease in Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. Recent phylogenetic breakthroughs have placed this parasite within a highly divergent and globally distributed eukaryotic lineage that has been designated a new taxonomic order, Mikrocytida. The discovery of this new radiation of parasites is accompanied by a heightened awareness of the many knowledge gaps that exist with respect to the general biology, epizootiology, and potential impact of mikrocytid parasites on hosts, ecosystems, and commercial fisheries. It has also highlighted current shortcomings regarding our ability to detect these organisms. In this study, we developed a species-specific, sensitive, and quantitative method for detecting M. mackini DNA from host tissues using probe-based real-time qPCR technology. A limit of sensitivity between 2 and 5 genome copy equivalents was achieved in a reaction matrix containing ≥ 40 ng/μL host gDNA without inhibition. This detection proved superior to existing methods based on conventional PCR, histology or gross pathology and is the first species-specific diagnostic test for M. mackini. Quantitative assessment of parasite DNA using this assay remained accurate to between 10 and 50 copies identifying that during infection, M. mackini DNA was significantly more prevalent in hemolymph, labial palp, and mid-body cross-sections compared to mantle or adductor muscle. DNA extracted from a mid-body cross-section also provided the highest likelihood for detection during diagnostic screening of infected oysters. Taken together, these findings provide strong analytical evidence for the adoption of qPCR as the new reference standard for detecting M. mackini and give preliminary insight into the distribution of the parasite within host tissues. Standardised operating methodologies for sample collection and qPCR testing are provided to aid in the international regulatory diagnosis of

  17. Traditional exploitation of edible freshwater oyster Etheria elliptica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... they also targeted each year the same sites regardless rotation planning. Finally, oyster`s shell, a main substrate for larval settlement and bed restoration, were left on riverbanks after exploitation, reducing stocks reconstitution potential. Appropriate measures were suggested to Reserve staff for sustainable management.

  18. Microcontroller based automatic temperature control for oyster mushroom plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihombing, P.; Astuti, T. P.; Herriyance; Sitompul, D.

    2018-03-01

    In the cultivation of Oyster Mushrooms need special treatment because oyster mushrooms are susceptible to disease. Mushroom growth will be inhibited if the temperature and humidity are not well controlled because temperature and inertia can affect mold growth. Oyster mushroom growth usually will be optimal at temperatures around 22-28°C and humidity around 70-90%. This problem is often encountered in the cultivation of oyster mushrooms. Therefore it is very important to control the temperature and humidity of the room of oyster mushroom cultivation. In this paper, we developed an automatic temperature monitoring tool in the cultivation of oyster mushroom-based Arduino Uno microcontroller. We have designed a tool that will control the temperature and humidity automatically by Android Smartphone. If the temperature increased more than 28°C in the room of mushroom plants, then this tool will turn on the pump automatically to run water in order to lower the room temperature. And if the room temperature of mushroom plants below of 22°C, then the light will be turned on in order to heat the room. Thus the temperature in the room oyster mushrooms will remain stable so that the growth of oyster mushrooms can grow with good quality.

  19. Evaluation of Tea Wastes as an Alternative Substrate for Oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    leaves, corn cob and coconut coir, among others (Kang, 2004). Substrates used for cultivating oyster mushrooms should provide all the necessary nutrients for growth. Cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin are the main sources of nutrition for oyster mushroom which requires high carbon and lower nitrogen input, thus ...

  20. Shell Games. VORTEX: Virginia's Oyster Reef Teaching EXperience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Juliana M.; Mann, Roger; Clark, Vicki P.

    This document introduces Virginia's Oyster Reef Teaching EXperience (VORTEX), which is an interdisciplinary program focusing on the importance of oyster reef communities in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The VORTEX program uses field and laboratory experiences supported by multimedia instruction. This document presents an overview on the biology of…

  1. Evaluation of Tea Wastes as an Alternative Substrate for Oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sajor caju) is locally cultivated on sugarcane bagasse substrate. Due to decreasing supply of bagasse, there was an urgent need to identify alternative substrates. The aim of this study was to evaluate tea wastes as an alternative substrate for oyster mushroom cultivation. The first step was to ...

  2. Cultivation of oyster mushroom ( Pleurotus spp.) on palm oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oyster mushroom is a popular mushroom due to its nutritional, medicinal and potential commercial value. In Malaysia, the fungus is currently cultivated on sawdust and rice husk. In this study, the efficiency of cultivating oyster mushroom was assessed using palm oil mesocarp fibre as a substrate. The experiment consisted ...

  3. Resource potential and status of pearl oyster fishery in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole; Parulekar, A.H.

    Many cultivable species of pearl oysters are known to occur in the Indo-Australian Archipelago which is an important region in the world distribution of pearl oysters. An account of the development of Indian pearl fisheries that took place over...

  4. Artisanal fishing net float loss and a proposal for a float design solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo de Tarso Chaves

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plastic floats from fishing nets are commonly found washed up on beaches in southern Brazil. They are usually broken and show signs of having been repaired. Characteristics of floats and interviews with fishermen suggest two main causes of float loss. First, collisions between active gear, bottom trawl nets for shrimp, and passive gear, drift nets for fish, destroy nets and release fragments of them, including floats. Second, the difficulty with which floats are inserted on the float rope of the nets when they are used near the surface. Floats are inserted to replace damaged or lost floats, or they may be removed if it is desired that the nets be used in deeper waters. Floats may thus be poorly fixed to the cables and lost. Here a new float design that offers greater safety in use and for the replacement of floats is described and tested.

  5. Quantitative analysis of oyster larval proteome provides new insights into the effects of multiple climate change stressors

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, Ramadoss

    2016-03-19

    The metamorphosis of planktonic larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) underpins their complex life-history strategy by switching on the molecular machinery required for sessile life and building calcite shells. Metamorphosis becomes a survival bottleneck, which will be pressured by different anthropogenically induced climate change-related variables. Therefore, it is important to understand how metamorphosing larvae interact with emerging climate change stressors. To predict how larvae might be affected in a future ocean, we examined changes in the proteome of metamorphosing larvae under multiple stressors: decreased pH (pH 7.4), increased temperature (30 °C), and reduced salinity (15 psu). Quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS identified more than 1300 proteins. Decreased pH had a negative effect on metamorphosis by down-regulating several proteins involved in energy production, metabolism, and protein synthesis. However, warming switched on these down-regulated pathways at pH 7.4. Under multiple stressors, cell signaling, energy production, growth, and developmental pathways were up-regulated, although metamorphosis was still reduced. Despite the lack of lethal effects, significant physiological responses to both individual and interacting climate change related stressors were observed at proteome level. The metamorphosing larvae of the C. gigas population in the Yellow Sea appear to have adequate phenotypic plasticity at the proteome level to survive in future coastal oceans, but with developmental and physiological costs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Strength Tests on Hulls and Floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaes, K

    1942-01-01

    The present report deals with strength tests on hulls and floats intended in part for the collection of construction data for the design of these components and in part for the stress analysis of the finished hulls and floats.

  7. Estimating the impact of oyster restoration scenarios on transient fish production

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Elizabeth; Borrett, Stuart R.; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Peterson, Bradley J.

    2017-01-01

    Oyster reef restoration projects are increasing in number both to enhance oyster density and to retain valuable ecosystem services provided by oyster reefs. Although some oyster restoration projects have demonstrated success by increasing density and biomass of transient fish, it still remains a challenge to quantify the effects of oyster restoration on transient fish communities. We developed a bioenergetics model to assess the impact of selected oyster reef restoration scenarios on associated transient fish species. We used the model to analyze the impact of changes in (1) oyster population carrying capacity; (2) oyster population growth rate; and (3) diet preference of transient fish on oyster reef development and associated transient fish species. Our model results indicate that resident fish biomass is directly affected by oyster restoration and oyster biomass, and oyster restoration can have cascading impacts on transient fish biomass. Furthermore, the results highlight the importance of a favorable oyster population growth rate during early restoration years, as it can lead to rapid increases in mean oyster biomass and biomass of transient fish species. The model also revealed that a transient fish's diet solely dependent on oyster reef-derived prey could limit the biomass of transient fish species, emphasizing the importance of habitat connectivity in estuarine areas to enhance transient fish species biomass. Simple bioenergetics models can be developed to understand the dynamics of a system and make qualitative predictions of management and restoration scenarios.

  8. Occurrence of Proteus mirabilis associated with two species of venezuelan oysters Ocorrência de Proteus mirabilis associado a duas espécies de ostras venezuelanas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagro Fernández-Delgado

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The fecal contamination of raw seafood by indicators and opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms represents a public health concern. The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of enteric bacteria colonizing oysters collected from a Venezuelan touristic area. Oyster samples were collected at the northwestern coast of Venezuela and local salinity, pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen of seawater were recorded. Total and fecal coliforms were measured for the assessment of the microbiological quality of water and oysters, using the Multiple Tube Fermentation technique. Analyses were made using cultures and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Diverse enrichment and selective culture methods were used to isolate enteric bacteria. We obtained pure cultures of Gram-negative straight rods with fimbriae from Isognomon alatus and Crassostrea rhizophorae. Our results show that P. mirabilis was predominant under our culture conditions. We confirmed the identity of the cultures by biochemical tests, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and data analysis. Other enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli, Morganella morganii and Klebsiella pneumoniae were also isolated from seawater and oysters. The presence of pathogenic bacteria in oysters could have serious epidemiological implications and a potential human health risk associated with consumption of raw seafood.A contaminação fecal de frutos do mar crus por microrganismos oportunistas patogênicos representa problema de saúde pública. O objetivo deste estudo é investigar a presença de bactérias entéricas que colonizam ostras coletadas em área turística da Venezuela. Amostras de ostras foram coletadas na costa noroeste da Venezuela e foram registrados a salinidade local, pH, temperatura e o oxigênio dissolvido na água do mar. O total de coliformes fecais foi medido para a avaliação da qualidade microbiológica da água e das ostras, usando a técnica de fermentação em tubos múltiplos. An

  9. Floating Microparticulate Oral Diltiazem Hydrochloride Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To formulate and evaluate floating microparticulate oral diltiazem delivery system for possible delivery to the heart. Method: Floating microspheres were prepared using cellulose acetate and Eudragit RS100 polymers by emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The dried floating microspheres were evaluated for ...

  10. Green oysters occurring in an industrial harbor in Central Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tien-Hsi; Dai, Shi-Yan

    2017-11-30

    Green oysters were found within the Mailiao industrial harbor (MIH) located in Central Taiwan. The metal concentrations in seawater (dissolved and particulate phases), sediment and oyster samples collected within the MIH were analyzed to examine the green oysters. The dissolved and particulate metal concentrations ranged within 0.008-1.47μgl -1 and 0.97-799.2mgkg -1 , respectively. The Cu concentration in seawater was dominated in the dissolved phase. In contrast, Cr, Pb and Zn in seawater were chiefly present in the particulate phase. The metal concentrations in sediment and oyster samples ranged within 0.02-148.4mgkg -1 and 0.18-1238mgkg -1 (dry W.), respectively. No anomalous values were found in the analyzed samples, except the Cu content in the oyster samples ranged within 274-1238mgkg -1 . The relatively high bioconcentration factor of Cu in oyster and the longer exposure time induced the green oysters occurred within the MIH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Drought Increases Consumer Pressure on Oyster Reefs in Florida, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna G Garland

    Full Text Available Coastal economies and ecosystems have historically depended on oyster reefs, but this habitat has declined globally by 85% because of anthropogenic activities. In a Florida estuary, we investigated the cause of newly reported losses of oysters. We found that the oyster reefs have deteriorated from north to south and that this deterioration was positively correlated with the abundance of carnivorous conchs and water salinity. In experiments across these gradients, oysters survived regardless of salinity if conchs were excluded. After determining that conchs were the proximal cause of oyster loss, we tested whether elevated water salinity was linked to conch abundance either by increasing conch growth and survivorship or by decreasing the abundance of a predator of conchs. In field experiments across a salinity gradient, we failed to detect spatial variation in predation on conchs or in conch growth and survivorship. A laboratory experiment, however, demonstrated the role of salinity by showing that conch larvae failed to survive at low salinities. Because this estuary's salinity increased in 2006 in response to reduced inputs of freshwater, we concluded that the ultimate cause of oyster decline was an increase in salinity. According to records from 2002 to 2012, oyster harvests have remained steady in the northernmost estuaries of this ecoregion (characterized by high reef biomass, low salinity, and low conch abundance but have declined in the southernmost estuaries (characterized by lower reef biomass, increases in salinity, and increases in conch abundance. Oyster conservation in this ecoregion, which is probably one of the few that still support viable oyster populations, may be undermined by drought-induced increases in salinity causing an increased abundance of carnivorous conchs.

  12. Drought Increases Consumer Pressure on Oyster Reefs in Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Hanna G; Kimbro, David L

    2015-01-01

    Coastal economies and ecosystems have historically depended on oyster reefs, but this habitat has declined globally by 85% because of anthropogenic activities. In a Florida estuary, we investigated the cause of newly reported losses of oysters. We found that the oyster reefs have deteriorated from north to south and that this deterioration was positively correlated with the abundance of carnivorous conchs and water salinity. In experiments across these gradients, oysters survived regardless of salinity if conchs were excluded. After determining that conchs were the proximal cause of oyster loss, we tested whether elevated water salinity was linked to conch abundance either by increasing conch growth and survivorship or by decreasing the abundance of a predator of conchs. In field experiments across a salinity gradient, we failed to detect spatial variation in predation on conchs or in conch growth and survivorship. A laboratory experiment, however, demonstrated the role of salinity by showing that conch larvae failed to survive at low salinities. Because this estuary's salinity increased in 2006 in response to reduced inputs of freshwater, we concluded that the ultimate cause of oyster decline was an increase in salinity. According to records from 2002 to 2012, oyster harvests have remained steady in the northernmost estuaries of this ecoregion (characterized by high reef biomass, low salinity, and low conch abundance) but have declined in the southernmost estuaries (characterized by lower reef biomass, increases in salinity, and increases in conch abundance). Oyster conservation in this ecoregion, which is probably one of the few that still support viable oyster populations, may be undermined by drought-induced increases in salinity causing an increased abundance of carnivorous conchs.

  13. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Peyre, Megan K; Serra, Kayla; Joyner, T Andrew; Humphries, Austin

    2015-01-01

    Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed) and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y(-1). Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  14. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan K. La Peyre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y−1. Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  15. Phylogeny and Species Diversity of Gulf of California Oysters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset of DNA sequence data from two mitochondrial loci (COI and 16S) used to infer the phylogeny of oysters in the genus Ostrea along the Pacific coast of North...

  16. Cadmium uptake in oyster isognomon alatus under laboratory condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayon Saed; Ahmad Ismail; Missri Kusnan; Hishamuddin Omar

    1999-01-01

    The uptake of cadmium in Flat tree oyster Isognomon alatus was investigated under controlled laboratory conditions for two weeks. Oysters were exposed to 100 μg 1'-1 cadmium and the accumulation of cadmium in the tissues was measured for every two days. Soft tissues of oyster were digested in concentrated acid and cadmium concentrations were determined by using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The accumulation of cadmium in the soft tissues of oysters was increased during the first six days from 0.73 μg g- 1 to 10.77 μg g'-1, and remaining constant for four days at average level of 10.96 μg g'-1. The Cl concentrations was increased to 32.70 μg g'-1 until the end of experiment. There was no sign of cadmium accumulation approaching saturation for the period of exposure. (author)

  17. Status of windowpane oyster Placuna placenta (Linnaeus) population in Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Clemente, S.

    The ecological status of windowpane oyster Placuna placenta (Linnaeus) has been discussed along with its potential for commercial exploitation in Goa. P. placenta is one of the important constituents of the molluscan resources of the Indian waters...

  18. National survey of foodborne viruses in Australian oysters at production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torok, Valeria; Hodgson, Kate; McLeod, Catherine; Tan, Jessica; Malhi, Navreet; Turnbull, Alison

    2018-02-01

    Internationally human enteric viruses, such as norovirus (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV), are frequently associated with shellfish related foodborne disease outbreaks, and it has been suggested that acceptable NoV limits based on end-point testing be established for this high risk food group. Currently, shellfish safety is generally managed through the use of indicators of faecal contamination. Between July 2014 and August 2015, a national prevalence survey for NoV and HAV was done in Australian oysters suitable for harvest. Two sampling rounds were undertaken to determine baseline levels of these viruses. Commercial Australian growing areas, represented by 33 oyster production regions in New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania and Queensland, were included in the survey. A total of 149 and 148 samples were collected during round one and two of sampling, respectively, and tested for NoV and HAV by quantitative RT-PCR. NoV and HAV were not detected in oysters collected in either sampling round, indicating an estimated prevalence for these viruses in Australian oysters of viruses in Australian oysters was consistent with epidemiological evidence, with no oyster-related foodborne viral illness reported during the survey period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Predicting the effects of proposed Mississippi River diversions on oyster habitat quality; application of an oyster habitat suitability index model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soniat, Thomas M.; Conzelmann, Craig P.; Byrd, Jason D.; Roszell, Dustin P.; Bridevaux, Joshua L.; Suir, Kevin J.; Colley, Susan B.

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to decelerate the rate of coastal erosion and wetland loss, and protect human communities, the state of Louisiana developed its Comprehensive Master Plan for a Sustainable Coast. The master plan proposes a combination of restoration efforts including shoreline protection, marsh creation, sediment diversions, and ridge, barrier island, and hydrological restoration. Coastal restoration projects, particularly the large-scale diversions of fresh water from the Mississippi River, needed to supply sediment to an eroding coast potentially impact oyster populations and oyster habitat. An oyster habitat suitability index model is presented that evaluates the effects of a proposed sediment and freshwater diversion into Lower Breton Sound. Voluminous freshwater, needed to suspend and broadly distribute river sediment, will push optimal salinities for oysters seaward and beyond many of the existing reefs. Implementation and operation of the Lower Breton Sound diversion structure as proposed would render about 6,173 ha of hard bottom immediately east of the Mississippi River unsuitable for the sustained cultivation of oysters. If historical harvests are to be maintained in this region, a massive and unprecedented effort to relocate private leases and restore oyster bottoms would be required. Habitat suitability index model results indicate that the appropriate location for such efforts are to the east and north of the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet.

  20. Determination and Quantification of metals in the shells of Crassostrea virginica after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill utilizing Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarine, D.; Patel, S.; Roopnarine, P.; Giarikos, D.; Anderson, L. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil rig explosion on April 20, 2010 resulted in the release of 685,000 tons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) over a period of three months. There were obvious immediate effects, but the long-term ramifications are still being studied. The primary constituent of crude oil is hydrocarbons with other organic compounds containing nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. There are also a number of trace metals with the most abundant frequently being iron, nickel, copper and vanadium. These do not degrade like organic materials. However, the exact composition varies among the production sites. The oil from the DWH rig was classified as light crude which is moderately volatile. Natural oil seeps occur in the environment, but the DWH spill represented an acute impact. Trace amounts of heavy metals are a normal part of the composition of marine organisms, but can be toxic in high concentrations. Bivalved molluscs bioaccumulate heavy metals in their tissues and shells, and are therefore often useful as monitors of environmental pollution. We thus used the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica to determine the impact of the spill by measuring the concentrations of metals in the shells utilizing flame emission atomic absorption spectrometry. We focused on the hypothesis that DWH spill exposure resulted in an increase in metal uptake into the shells. Specimens spanned the years 2010 to 2014 and ranged from Grand Isle, LA to Apalachicola Bay, Fl. Vanadium had the greatest concentration in the shells, and along with copper, cadmium, zinc and iron displayed an upward trend of increase from 2010 to 2013, with a decline in 2014. However there was unexpected variability, as the specimens from Apalachicola Bay, Fl had higher levels of vanadium when compared to those from Grand Isle, LA. Ongoing work includes an increase of sample sizes from the same geographic localities and time period.

  1. 14 CFR 29.753 - Main float design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 29.753 Section 29.753... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 29.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure differential...

  2. 14 CFR 27.753 - Main float design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 27.753 Section 27.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure differential...

  3. [Assessment of concomitant floating knees injuries severity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eone, Daniel Handy; Lamah, Léopold; Bayiha, Jean Emile; Ondoa, Danielle Larissa Essomba; Nonga, Bernadette Ngo; Ibrahima, Farikou; Bahebeck, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Floating knee is caused by high-energy trauma, whose genesis is suggestive of extensive locoregional and general damages. Referring to multiple trauma. The aim of our study was to collect data on all concomitant floating knee injuries in our practice environment and to evaluate their severity. We conducted a descriptive and retrospective study over a period of 14 years and 9 months. Our sample consisted of 75 floating knees, the average age was 35 years. Sixty six patients had an ISS≥16 (classified as polytrauma). Head traumas, chest and abdominal injuries associated with floating knee injuries require adequate resuscitation.

  4. Wave drag on floating bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David; Raphaël, Élie; Chevy, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    We measure the deceleration of liquid nitrogen drops floating at the surface of a liquid bath. On water, the friction force is found to be about 10 to 100 times larger than on a solid substrate, which is shown to arise from wave resistance. We investigate the influence of the bath viscosity and show that the dissipation decreases as the viscosity is increased, owing to wave damping. The measured resistance is well predicted by a model imposing a vertical force (i.e., the drop weight) on a finite area, as long as the wake can be considered stationary. PMID:21876186

  5. Implementing floating-point DSP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kadlec, Jiří; Chappel, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2006), s. 12-14 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400750406; GA MŠk 1M0567 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 027611 - AETHER Program:FP6 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : PicoBlaze * floating point * FPGA Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software http://www.xilinx.com/publications/magazines/emb_03/xc_pdf/p12-14_3emb-point.pdf

  6. History of the Virginia Oyster Fishery, Chesapeake Bay, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Schulte

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oyster populations in Virginia's waters of Chesapeake Bay were lightly exploited until the early 1800s, when industrial fishery vessels first arrived, driven south from New England due to the collapse of northeastern oyster fisheries. Early signs of overexploitation and habitat degradation were evident by the 1850s. The public fishery, where oyster fishers harvest on state-owned bottom, rapidly developed after the Civil War and peaked in the early 1880s. Declines were noted by the late 1880s and eventually prompted the creation of Virginia's shell-planting and oyster-seed (young-of-the-year, YOY moving repletion program in the 1920s. Despite management and increasing repletion efforts, the public fishery collapsed (annual landings <10% of peak historical landings by the early 1960s. The private leasehold fishery, in which individuals rent areas outside the public grounds to plant shells and oysters for their own private use, surpassed the public fishery by the late 1920s, which partly masked this decline due to overfishing, habitat degradation, and diseases until both public and private fisheries completely collapsed in the mid-1980s after a third disease outbreak. This disease outbreak was likely related to warming waters. Overfishing and concomitant habitat loss followed a pattern of sequential population collapses observed in wild oyster fisheries along the Coastlines of the United States and worldwide. In recent years, expanding hatchery-produced seed oysters and aquaculture significantly increased leasehold landings. The wild fishery has also increased as disease resistance is developing naturally in the wild stocks, but remains ~5% of peak landings. Improved management has assisted in this recent limited recovery, improving these efforts further by enhancing stock recovery via large no-take sanctuaries, among other actions, could assist in stock recovery.

  7. Oyster reproduction is affected by exposure to polystyrene microplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussarellu, Rossana; Suquet, Marc; Thomas, Yoann; Lambert, Christophe; Fabioux, Caroline; Pernet, Marie Eve Julie; Le Goïc, Nelly; Quillien, Virgile; Mingant, Christian; Epelboin, Yanouk; Corporeau, Charlotte; Guyomarch, Julien; Robbens, Johan; Paul-Pont, Ika; Soudant, Philippe; Huvet, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Plastics are persistent synthetic polymers that accumulate as waste in the marine environment. Microplastic (MP) particles are derived from the breakdown of larger debris or can enter the environment as microscopic fragments. Because filter-feeder organisms ingest MP while feeding, they are likely to be impacted by MP pollution. To assess the impact of polystyrene microspheres (micro-PS) on the physiology of the Pacific oyster, adult oysters were experimentally exposed to virgin micro-PS (2 and 6 µm in diameter; 0.023 mg·L−1) for 2 mo during a reproductive cycle. Effects were investigated on ecophysiological parameters; cellular, transcriptomic, and proteomic responses; fecundity; and offspring development. Oysters preferentially ingested the 6-µm micro-PS over the 2-µm-diameter particles. Consumption of microalgae and absorption efficiency were significantly higher in exposed oysters, suggesting compensatory and physical effects on both digestive parameters. After 2 mo, exposed oysters had significant decreases in oocyte number (−38%), diameter (−5%), and sperm velocity (−23%). The D-larval yield and larval development of offspring derived from exposed parents decreased by 41% and 18%, respectively, compared with control offspring. Dynamic energy budget modeling, supported by transcriptomic profiles, suggested a significant shift of energy allocation from reproduction to structural growth, and elevated maintenance costs in exposed oysters, which is thought to be caused by interference with energy uptake. Molecular signatures of endocrine disruption were also revealed, but no endocrine disruptors were found in the biological samples. This study provides evidence that micro-PS cause feeding modifications and reproductive disruption in oysters, with significant impacts on offspring. PMID:26831072

  8. Oyster reproduction is affected by exposure to polystyrene microplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussarellu, Rossana; Suquet, Marc; Thomas, Yoann; Lambert, Christophe; Fabioux, Caroline; Pernet, Marie Eve Julie; Le Goïc, Nelly; Quillien, Virgile; Mingant, Christian; Epelboin, Yanouk; Corporeau, Charlotte; Guyomarch, Julien; Robbens, Johan; Paul-Pont, Ika; Soudant, Philippe; Huvet, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    Plastics are persistent synthetic polymers that accumulate as waste in the marine environment. Microplastic (MP) particles are derived from the breakdown of larger debris or can enter the environment as microscopic fragments. Because filter-feeder organisms ingest MP while feeding, they are likely to be impacted by MP pollution. To assess the impact of polystyrene microspheres (micro-PS) on the physiology of the Pacific oyster, adult oysters were experimentally exposed to virgin micro-PS (2 and 6 µm in diameter; 0.023 mg·L(-1)) for 2 mo during a reproductive cycle. Effects were investigated on ecophysiological parameters; cellular, transcriptomic, and proteomic responses; fecundity; and offspring development. Oysters preferentially ingested the 6-µm micro-PS over the 2-µm-diameter particles. Consumption of microalgae and absorption efficiency were significantly higher in exposed oysters, suggesting compensatory and physical effects on both digestive parameters. After 2 mo, exposed oysters had significant decreases in oocyte number (-38%), diameter (-5%), and sperm velocity (-23%). The D-larval yield and larval development of offspring derived from exposed parents decreased by 41% and 18%, respectively, compared with control offspring. Dynamic energy budget modeling, supported by transcriptomic profiles, suggested a significant shift of energy allocation from reproduction to structural growth, and elevated maintenance costs in exposed oysters, which is thought to be caused by interference with energy uptake. Molecular signatures of endocrine disruption were also revealed, but no endocrine disruptors were found in the biological samples. This study provides evidence that micro-PS cause feeding modifications and reproductive disruption in oysters, with significant impacts on offspring.

  9. Bacteriological quality of fresh and smoke-dried oysters sold in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial isolates found in fresh oyster were Klebsiella sp. Escherichia sp., Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter sp., Micrococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Staphylococccus sp. and Serratia sp. while E. coli, Streptococcus sp., Staphylococcus sp. and B. cereus predominated in dried oysters. The oyster meats did not meet the standards of ...

  10. Environmental studies on mangrove cover changes in Goa and its resident Crassostrea population

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nagi, H.M.H.

    runoff, while removed through biological productivity and denitrification (De Sousa et al., 1981). Nutrients values tend to be higher where effects of land drainage remain more pronounced and depth is less (Goswami and Singbal, 1974). Qasim and Sen... in evaluating the quality of the oyster population as food source and determining the population health (Lucas and Beninger, 1985). The length-weight relationship in oysters helps in establishing the yield and converting one variable into the other...

  11. Cloning retinoid and peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors of the Pacific oyster and in silico binding to environmental chemicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Vogeler

    Full Text Available Disruption of nuclear receptors, a transcription factor superfamily regulating gene expression in animals, is one proposed mechanism through which pollution causes effects in aquatic invertebrates. Environmental pollutants have the ability to interfere with the receptor's functions through direct binding and inducing incorrect signals. Limited knowledge of invertebrate endocrinology and molecular regulatory mechanisms, however, impede the understanding of endocrine disruptive effects in many aquatic invertebrate species. Here, we isolated three nuclear receptors of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas: two isoforms of the retinoid X receptor, CgRXR-1 and CgRXR-2, a retinoic acid receptor ortholog CgRAR, and a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ortholog CgPPAR. Computer modelling of the receptors based on 3D crystal structures of human proteins was used to predict each receptor's ability to bind to different ligands in silico. CgRXR showed high potential to bind and be activated by 9-cis retinoic acid and the organotin tributyltin (TBT. Computer modelling of CgRAR revealed six residues in the ligand binding domain, which prevent the successful interaction with natural and synthetic retinoid ligands. This supports an existing theory of loss of retinoid binding in molluscan RARs. Modelling of CgPPAR was less reliable due to high discrepancies in sequence to its human ortholog. Yet, there are suggestions of binding to TBT, but not to rosiglitazone. The effect of potential receptor ligands on early oyster development was assessed after 24h of chemical exposure. TBT oxide (0.2μg/l, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA (0.06 mg/L and perfluorooctanoic acid (20 mg/L showed high effects on development (>74% abnormal developed D-shelled larvae, while rosiglitazone (40 mg/L showed no effect. The results are discussed in relation to a putative direct (TBT disruption effect on nuclear receptors. The inability of direct binding of ATRA to CgRAR suggests

  12. Floating liquid bridge charge dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Omar; Soares, David Mendez; Gomes, Whyllerson Evaristo; Valente Filho, Juracyr Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of liquid with electric fields is investigated in a configuration where up to 13 kV are applied between electrodes resulting in a 106 V/m electric field in the capillaries and where there is the formation of a free-standing fluid bridge in the interelectrode gap. The Mott-Gurney equation was fitted to the measured ionization current vs applied voltage curve which indicates that the ionization rate at the high-voltage anode electrode dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) interface and space charging in the interelectrode gap determine the floating liquid bridge current for a given cathode-to-anode voltage. Space charge effects were measured in the cathode becker and also at the liquid bridge since the ionized charges at the anode migrate to the bridge outer surface and decrease the interfacial tension from 43 mJ/m2 to 29 mJ/m2. Two distinct structural regions then form the bridge, a charged plastic (bulk modulus ˜100 MPa) conducting outer layer with a surface conductivity of ˜10-9 Ω-1, which shapes and supports the floating fluid structure, and an inner liquid cylinder, where DMSO molecules flow.

  13. Nuclear floating power desalination complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, Y.K.; Polunichev, V.I.; Zverev, K.V.

    1998-01-01

    Russia is a single country in the world which possesses a powerful ice-breaker transport fleet that allows a solution of important social-economic tasks of the country's northern regions by maintaining a year-round navigation along the Arctic sea route. A total operating record of the marine nuclear reactors up until till now exceeds 150 reactor-years, with their main equipment operating life reacting 120 thousand hours. Design and constructional progresses have been made continuously during forty years of nuclear-powered ships construction in Russia. Well proven technology of all components experienced in the marine nuclear reactors give grounds to recommend marine NSSSs of KLT-40 type as energy sources for the heat and power co-generation plants and the sea water desalination complexes, particularly as a floating installation. Co-generation stations are considered for deployment in the extreme Northern Region of Russia. Nuclear floating desalination complexes can be used for drinkable water production in the coastal regions of Northern Africa, the Near East, India etc. (author)

  14. Novel Floating General Element Simulators Using CBTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. E. Ayten

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel floating frequency dependent negative resistor (FDNR, floating inductor, floating capacitor and floating resistor simulator circuit employing two CBTAs and three passive components is proposed. The presented circuit can realize floating FDNR, inductor, capacitor or resistor depending on the passive component selection. Since the passive elements are all grounded, this circuit is suitable for fully integrated circuit design. The circuit does not require any component matching conditions, and it has a good sensitivity performance with respect to tracking errors. Moreover, the proposed FDNR, inductance, capacitor and resistor simulator can be tuned electronically by changing the biasing current of the CBTA or can be controlled through the grounded resistor or capacitor. The high-order frequency dependent element simulator circuit is also presented. Depending on the passive component selection, it realizes high-order floating circuit defining as V(s = snAI(s or V(s = s-nBI(s. The proposed floating FDNR simulator circuit and floating high-order frequency dependent element simulator circuit are demonstrated by using PSPICE simulation for 0.25 μm, level 7, TSMC CMOS technology parameters.

  15. Formulation and Characterization of Sustained Release Floating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rouge N, Cale ET, Doelker E, Buri P. Buoyancy and drug release patterns of floating minitablets containing piretanide and atenolol as model drugs. Pharm. Dev. Technol. 1998; 3: 73-84. 6. Lee JH, Park TG, Choi HK. Development of oral drug delivery system using floating microspheres. J. Microencapsul. 1999; 16: 715-729 ...

  16. Vertical pump with free floating check valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, M.

    1980-01-01

    A vertical pump is described which has a bottom discharge with a free floating check valve disposed in the outlet plenum thereof. The free floating check valve comprises a spherical member with a hemispherical cage-like member attached thereto which is capable of allowing forward or reverse flow under appropriate conditions while preventing reverse flow under inappropriate conditions

  17. Formulation of Nimesulide Floating Microparticles Using Low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nimesulide release was faster in simulated intestinal fluid (pH 6.8) than in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) and distilled water (pH 6.5). Conclusion: Coacervation non-solvent addition is a suitable technique for preparing floating microparticles of nimesulide using low-viscosity HPMC. Keywords: Floating microparticles ...

  18. Comparative feeding on chlorophyll - rich versus remaining organic matter in bivalve shellfish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawkins, A.; Pascoe, P.L.; Parry, H.; Brinsley, M.; Cacciatore, F.; Black, K.; Fang, J.; Smaal, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Filter feeding was compared in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, Chinese pleated oyster Crassostrea plicatula, Chinese scallop Chlamys farreri,Manila clam Tapes phillipinarum, razor clam Sinonvacula constricta, and blood

  19. Shell extracts of the edible mussel and oyster induce an enhancement of the catabolic pathway of human skin fibroblasts, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latire, Thomas; Legendre, Florence; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Marin, Frédéric; Carreiras, Franck; Rigot-Jolivet, Muriel; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Galéra, Philippe; Serpentini, Antoine

    2017-10-01

    Mollusc shells are composed of more than 95% calcium carbonate and less than 5% organic matrix consisting mostly of proteins, glycoproteins and polysaccharides. In this study, we investigated the effects of matrix macromolecular components extracted from the shells of two edible molluscs of economic interest, i.e., the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The potential biological activities of these organic molecules were analysed on human dermal fibroblasts in primary culture. Our results demonstrate that shell extracts of the two studied molluscs modulate the metabolic activities of the cells. In addition, the extracts caused a decrease of type I collagen and a concomitant increase of active MMP-1, both at the mRNA and the protein levels. Therefore, our results suggest that shell extracts from M. edulis and C. gigas contain molecules that promote the catabolic pathway of human dermal fibroblasts. This work emphasises the potential use of these shell matrices in the context of anti-fibrotic strategies, particularly against scleroderma. More generally, it stresses the usefulness to valorise bivalve shells that are coproducts of shellfish farming activity.

  20. Growing halophytes floating at sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Radulovich

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater shortages are increasingly limiting both irrigated and rainfed agriculture. To expand possibilities for controlled plant production without using land nor freshwater, we cultivated potted halophytes floating at sea that were provided with rain- and seawater. Plantlets of two mangroves (Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle and plants of two herbaceous species, sea purslane (Sesuvium portulacastrum and salt couch grass (Sporobolus virginicus were grown in near-coastal tropical Pacific waters of Costa Rica for 733 days. There were a total of 504 rainless days, including two dry periods of ca. 150 d long each, evidencing prolonged and exclusive reliance on seawater. Pots with a sandy soil mixture and the transplanted plants were placed on low-cost wooden floating rafts with their lower end perforated and immersed for capillary rise of water. Free seawater entry and exit through the bottom from bobbing with waves, which also occasionally added water from the top, effectively controlled soil salinity build-up even during the rainless seasons. Continuous leaching made necessary frequent fertilizer addition. No water deficit symptoms were observed and midday canopy temperature during rainless periods was not significantly different between species or from air temperature. With all-year-round growth, height increase of mangrove plantlets ranged from 208.1 to 401.5 mm yr−1. Fresh biomass production of sea purslane and the grass was 10.9 and 3.0 kg m−2 yr−1 respectively. High yield, edibility and protein content of 10.2% dry weight established sea purslane as a potential crop. While further research is needed, the method evidenced to be a viable plant production option of potentially far-reaching applications.

  1. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Oyster Leases, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_oyster_lease_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) oyster leases data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which...

  2. Genotoxicity of diuron and glyphosate in oyster spermatozoa and embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcha, F; Spagnol, C; Rouxel, J

    2012-01-15

    We investigated the effects of genotoxicant exposure in gametes and embryos to find a possible link between genotoxicity and reproduction/developmental impairment, and explore the impact of chemical genotoxicity on population dynamics. Our study focused on the genotoxic effects of two herbicides on oyster gametes and embryos: glyphosate (both as an active substance and in the Roundup formulation) and diuron. France is Europe's leading consumer of agrochemical substances and as such, contamination of France's coastal waters by pesticides is a major concern. Glyphosate and diuron are among the most frequently detected herbicides in oyster production areas; as oyster is a specie with external reproduction, its gametes and embryos are in direct contact with the surrounding waters and are hence particularly exposed to these potentially dangerous substances. In the course of this study, differences in genotoxic and embryotoxic responses were observed in the various experiments, possibly due to differences in pollutant sensitivity between the tested genitor lots. Glyphosate and Roundup had no effect on oyster development at the concentrations tested, whereas diuron significantly affected embryo-larval development from the lowest tested concentration of 0.05 μg L⁻¹, i.e. an environmentally realistic concentration. Diuron may therefore have a significant impact on oyster recruitment rates in the natural environment. Our spermiotoxicity study revealed none of the tested herbicides to be cytotoxic for oyster spermatozoa. However, the alkaline comet assay showed diuron to have a significant genotoxic effect on oyster spermatozoa at concentrations of 0.05 μg L⁻¹ upwards. Conversely, no effects due to diuron exposure were observed on sperm mitochondrial function or acrosomal membrane integrity. Although our initial results showed no negative effect on sperm function, the possible impact on fertilization rate and the consequences of the transmission of damaged DNA for

  3. Flow-sediment-oyster interaction around degraded, restored, and reference oyster reefs in Florida's Indian River Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsikoudis, V.; Kibler, K. M.; Spiering, D. W.

    2017-12-01

    This study analyzes flow patterns and sediment distributions around three oyster reefs in a bar-built estuarine lagoon. We studied a degraded reef, a recently restored reef, and a reference condition reef with a healthy live oyster community. The restored reef had been regraded and restored with oyster shell mats to aid in recruitment of oyster spat, with the goal of reestablishing a healthy oyster community. Despite the fact that flow-biota-sediment interaction constitutes a blossoming research field, actual field data are sparse and current knowledge emanates from flume studies and numerical modeling. Moreover, the hydraulic effect of restored oyster reefs has not been thoroughly investigated and it is not clear if the flow field and sediment erosion/deposition are similar or diverge from natural reefs. Instantaneous three-dimensional flow velocities were collected on reefs using a Nortek Vectrino Profiler and an acoustic Doppler current profiler (Nortek Aquadopp). The former measured a 2 - 3 cm velocity profile above the oyster bed, while the latter quantified incoming velocities across the flow profile approximately 10 m from the edge of the reef. Flow measurements were conducted during rising tides and are coupled with simultaneous wind speed and direction data. In addition, 20 cm deep sediment cores were retrieved on and off the investigated reefs. Sediment grain size distributions were determined after individual cores were processed for loss on ignition. Incoming flow velocities were as high as 10 cm/s, relatively higher than those recorded close to reefs. Mean and turbulent flow velocities close to the reefs, varied among the investigated sites, despite the similar wind flow conditions offshore. For instance, the measurements at the degraded reef showed decreased wave attenuation and augmented flow velocities compared to the other sites. Boat wakes exhibited a very distinct signal in the flow velocity time-series and significantly increased the approaching

  4. 14 CFR 23.753 - Main float design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 23.753 Section 23.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 23.753 Main float design. Each seaplane main float must meet the requirements of § 23.521. [Doc...

  5. Floating terminal as an alternative to shore terminals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terenzio, M. [CoeClerici Logistics S.p.A. (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    Transfer vessels, floating terminals, catamaran type or Floating Transfer Stations (FTSs) are some of the latest alternative solutions to standard floating cranes. The CoeClerici 'Bulkwayuu' and 'Boca Grande' floating terminals are described and their advantages over shore-based structures are itemised. The text is accompanied by 17 overhead/slides. 1 fig.

  6. Cholecystosonographic findings of clonorchiasis: Floating echogenic foci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Kyun

    1989-01-01

    Author analysed cholecystosonographic findings in 22 patients with clonorchiasis, suspected prospectively by ultrasound and proved subsequently by demonstration of eggs in the stools. Fifteen gallbladders had nonshadowing, fusiform, discrete echogenic foci measuring 3∼6 mm in the lumen. Among these, the echogenic foci floated spontaneously in three cases, while in twelve cases they floated by position change or a light blow by the transducer. In the rest of the seven gallbladders, the echogenic foci were at the dependent portion. In the in vitro study with a worm suspension in saline in a surgical glove, the same echogenic foci as those seen in the gallbladders were demonstrated. The echogenic foci were precipitated in the dependent portion but float with a light blow on the glove. Author conclude that the floating echogenic foci in the lumen of the gallbladder are due to adult worms of clonorchis sinensis

  7. Quantitative analysis of oyster larval proteome provides new insights into the effects of multiple climate change stressors, supplement to: Dineshram, R; Chandramouli, K; Ko, W K Ginger; Zhang, Huoming; Qian, Pei Yuan; Ravasi, Timothy; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen (2016): Quantitative analysis of oyster larval proteome provides new insights into the effects of multiple climate change stressors. Global Change Biology, 22(6), 2054-2068

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, R

    2016-01-01

    The metamorphosis of planktonic larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) underpins their complex life-history strategy by switching on the molecular machinery required for sessile life and building calcite shells. Metamorphosis becomes a survival bottleneck, which will be pressured by different anthropogenically induced climate change-related variables. Therefore, it is important to understand how metamorphosing larvae interact with emerging climate change stressors. To predict how larvae might be affected in a future ocean, we examined changes in the proteome of metamorphosing larvae under multiple stressors: decreased pH (pH 7.4), increased temperature (30 °C), and reduced salinity (15 psu). Quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS identified more than 1300 proteins. Decreased pH had a negative effect on metamorphosis by down-regulating several proteins involved in energy production, metabolism, and protein synthesis. However, warming switched on these down-regulated pathways at pH 7.4. Under multiple stressors, cell signaling, energy production, growth, and developmental pathways were up-regulated, although metamorphosis was still reduced. Despite the lack of lethal effects, significant physiological responses to both individual and interacting climate change related stressors were observed at proteome level. The metamorphosing larvae of the C. gigas population in the Yellow Sea appear to have adequate phenotypic plasticity at the proteome level to survive in future coastal oceans, but with developmental and physiological costs.

  8. Dynamic Response of a Floating Bridge Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Viuff, Thomas; Leira, Bernt Johan; Øiseth, Ole; Xiang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical overview of the stochastic dynamic analysis of a floating bridge structure is presented. Emphasis is on the wave-induced response and the waves on the sea surface are idealized as a zero mean stationary Gaussian process. The first-order wave load processes are derived using linear potential theory and the structural idealization is based on the Finite Element Method. A frequency response calculation is presented for a simplified floating bridge structure example emphasising the ...

  9. Performance of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2012-05-08

    May 8, 2012 ... The present study was conducted to evaluate different substrates for establishment of yield performance of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus). The substrates were prepared from single or mixture of different agricultural waste materials supplemented with lime and water as additive to each substrate.

  10. Heavy metal pollution levels in water and oysters, Saccostrea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heavy metal (cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, lead and zinc) concentrations in mangrove forests were investigated in water, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and oyster samples from the Mzinga Creek and Ras Dege mangrove stands, Tanzania, using Inductively Coupled Plasma–Atomic Emission Spectroscopy.

  11. Removal of Arsenic with Oyster Shell: Experimental Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Atiqur Rahman, , and

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Oyster shell has tremendous potential as a remediation material for the removal of arsenic from groundwater. A single arsenic removal system was developed with oyster shell for tube well water containing arsenic. The system removes arsenic from water by adsorption through fine oyster shell. Various conditions that affect the adsorption/desorption of arsenic were investigated. Adsorption column methods showed the removal of As(III under the following conditions: initial As concentration, 100 µg /L; oyster shell amount, 6 g; particle size, <355µm ; treatment flow rate, 1.7 mL/min; and pH 6.5. Arsenic concentration of the treated water were below the Bangladesh drinking water standard of 50 µg/L for As. The desorption efficiencies with 2M of KOH after the treatment of groundwater were in the range of 80-83%. A combination of techniques was used to measure the pH, conductivity, cations and anions. The average concentrations of other inorganic constituents of health concern (Na, K, Ca, Mg and Fe in treated water were below their respective WHO guideline for drinking. The present study might provide new avenues to achieve the arsenic concentrations required for drinking water recommended by Bangladesh and the World Health Organization (WHO.

  12. Characterisation of Oyster Shell for Neutralisation of Bio-leached ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterisation studies of Oyster Shell (Mercenera mercenera) collected from coastal towns of Ghana and its neutralising effect on bio-leached effluent has been studied using XRF, XRD, Zeta Meter, BET and SEM/EDX. The study confirmed that OS contains high calcium equivalent to about 54% CaO. The OS consists ...

  13. Episodic recruitment of the rock oyster Saccostrea cucullata (Born ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An exceptionally good recruitment of the rock oyster Saccostrea cucullata is reported from the Transkei coast. Prior to 1989 individuals smaller than 20 mm accounted for less than 3% of the population. New recruits now account for between 25% and 48% of standing stock. This single recruitment, which is 6 to 31 times the ...

  14. Episodic recruitment of the rock oyster Saccostrea cucullata (Born ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-10-03

    Oct 3, 1989 ... An exceptionally good recruitment of the rock oyster Saccostrea cucullata is reported from the Transkei coast. Prior to 1989 individuals smaller than 20 mm accounted for less than 3% of the population. New recruits now account for between 25% and 48% of standing stock. This single recruitment, which is 6 ...

  15. Effect of Depuration on Microbial Content of Mangrove Oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mangrove oysters and water samples collected from Benya lagoon, located at Elmina in the Central Region of Ghana were investigated for microbial contamination. A total of nine fungal isolates were identified. These were Aspergilus niger, A. sulphurus, species of Penicillium, Rhizopus, Trichoderma, Fusarium, ...

  16. Carbon And Nitrogen Requirements For The Cultivation Of Oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbon and Nitrogen requirements for the cultivation of (Pleurotus sajor-caju) oyster mushroom were studied. It was found that under these experimental conditions, the carbon compounds supported growth except ribose, starch and dextrin. Cellulose was the most utilized carbon followed by glucose and mannose.

  17. Effect of oyster mushroom ( Pleurotus ostreatus ) mycelia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study on the mycoremediation effect of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) mycelia on petroleum-hydrocarbon-contaminated substrate was carried out in the mushroom unit of the Faculty of Agriculture Demonstration Farm, located in the University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The study aimed at determining ...

  18. Performance of oyster mushroom ( Pleurotus ostreatus ) in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to evaluate different substrates for establishment of yield performance of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus). The substrates were prepared from single or mixture of different agricultural waste materials supplemented with lime and water as additive to each substrate. A total of eight ...

  19. Bioeconomic analysis of Maryland's Chesapeake Bay oyster fishery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present paper deals with the surplus production models of Verhulst-Schaefer and Gompertz-Fox that are applied to the Maryland's Chesapeake Bay oyster fishery to investigate the sustainability properties of the stock and management of the fishery. The basic objective of this paper is to illustrate the way in which long ...

  20. Molecular and Antibacterial Profile of Edible Oyster Mushrooms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012r

    2014-09-24

    Sep 24, 2014 ... Phenol/Chloroform DNA extraction protocol and the DNA was purified using an ... activities. Oyster mushrooms modulate the immune system, inhibit tumour growth and inflammation, have hypoglycaemic and antithrombotic activities, lower blood lipid .... accessibility of this technology. Singh et al. (2006) ...

  1. Yield performances and nutritional contents of three oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine nutritive value and yield performance of the three types of oyster mushroom; Pleurotus eryngii (Dc. Ex Fr.) quel), Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) Kumm.) and. Pleurotus sajor-caju (Fr.) Singer, cultivated on wheat stalk. The total fresh mushroom yields obtained with 100 g material (70% ...

  2. High protein complementation with high fiber substrates for oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural residues have been world widely accepted for oyster mushroom culture. In this study, we used wheat straw, barley straw, maize stem residue, and lawn residue as substrates coupled with wheat bran, rice bran and soybean powder as complements for the growth of Pleurotus florida and Pleurotus ostreatus as ...

  3. Performance of oysters in reciprocal transplants between two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oyster spat were reciprocally transplanted between Benya Lagoon at Elmina and Nakwa Lagoon at Nakwa and grown on cultches. Shell growth, dry meat weight, and survival of the transplants were monitored for at least six months and compared with their counterparts at their new locations as well as their places of origin.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of floating offshore wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro-Santos, Laura; Diaz-Casas, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Develop a sensitivity analysis of a floating offshore wind farm. • Influence on the life-cycle costs involved in a floating offshore wind farm. • Influence on IRR, NPV, pay-back period, LCOE and cost of power. • Important variables: distance, wind resource, electric tariff, etc. • It helps to investors to take decisions in the future. - Abstract: The future of offshore wind energy will be in deep waters. In this context, the main objective of the present paper is to develop a sensitivity analysis of a floating offshore wind farm. It will show how much the output variables can vary when the input variables are changing. For this purpose two different scenarios will be taken into account: the life-cycle costs involved in a floating offshore wind farm (cost of conception and definition, cost of design and development, cost of manufacturing, cost of installation, cost of exploitation and cost of dismantling) and the most important economic indexes in terms of economic feasibility of a floating offshore wind farm (internal rate of return, net present value, discounted pay-back period, levelized cost of energy and cost of power). Results indicate that the most important variables in economic terms are the number of wind turbines and the distance from farm to shore in the costs’ scenario, and the wind scale parameter and the electric tariff for the economic indexes. This study will help investors to take into account these variables in the development of floating offshore wind farms in the future

  5. Latitudinal gradients in ecosystem engineering by oysters vary across habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Dominic; Cole, Victoria J; Bishop, Melanie J

    2016-04-01

    Ecological theory predicts that positive interactions among organisms will increase across gradients of increasing abiotic stress or consumer pressure. This theory has been supported by empirical studies examining the magnitude of ecosystem engineering across environmental gradients and between habitat settings at local scale. Predictions that habitat setting, by modifying both biotic and abiotic factors, will determine large-scale gradients in ecosystem engineering have not been tested, however. A combination of manipulative experiments and field surveys assessed whether along the east Australian coastline: (1) facilitation of invertebrates by the oyster Saccostrea glomerata increased across a latitudinal gradient in temperature; and (2) the magnitude of this effect varied between intertidal rocky shores and mangrove forests. It was expected that on rocky shores, where oysters are the primary ecosystem engineer, they would play a greater role in ameliorating latitudinal gradients in temperature than in mangroves, where they are a secondary ecosystem engineer living under the mangrove canopy. On rocky shores, the enhancement of invertebrate abundance in oysters as compared to bare microhabitat decreased with latitude, as the maximum temperatures experienced by intertidal organisms diminished. By contrast, in mangrove forests, where the mangrove canopy resulted in maximum temperatures that were cooler and of greater humidity than on rocky shores, we found no evidence of latitudinal gradients of oyster effects on invertebrate abundance. Contrary to predictions, the magnitude by which oysters enhanced biodiversity was in many instances similar between mangroves and rocky shores. Whether habitat-context modifies patterns of spatial variation in the effects of ecosystem engineers on community structure will depend, in part, on the extent to which the environmental amelioration provided by an ecosystem engineer replicates that of other co-occurring ecosystem engineers.

  6. Detection, quantification and genotyping of noroviruses in oysters implicated in disease outbreaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haefeli, Deborah; Gantenbein-Demarchi, Corinne; Böttiger, Blenda

    2012-01-01

    . While GI and GII have often been verified as causative agents of oyster-transmitted illness, GIV is rarely detected and has so far not been confirmed in outbreaks related to oysters. The aim of this study was to determine whether NoVs from oysters implicated in a disease outbreak were linked to the GI......Noroviruses (NoVs) are a major cause of foodborne outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Transmission of NoV is commonly linked to the consumption of oysters as they accumulate viruses through filter feeding in faecal-contaminated water. The NoV genogroups (G)I, GII and GIV infect humans...... due to the contamination of the oysters with multiple strains discharged with sewage. To our knowledge, this is the first study characterising NoV GIV in outbreak related oysters. Our results confirm the inherent challenges of establishing the linkage between NoV strains in patients and foods...

  7. Variation in heavy metals concentration in the edible oyster Crassostrea madrasensis, clam Polymesoda erosa and grey mullet Liza aurata from coastline of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gawade, L.; Chari, N.V.H.; Sarma, V.V.; Ingole, B.S.

    .discovery.org.in http://www.discovery.org.in/ijs.htm © 2013 Discovery Publication. All Rights Reserved 60 bioavailability from water column. L.aurata and C.madrasensis are two abundant species in the estuary and are most preferred sea food diet of the locals... concentrations in muscle and liver tissues of fishes from the Erren River, southwestern Taiwan, after the restoration in 2000. Journal of Food and Drug Analysis 2004, 12,358-366 9. De Mora S, Fowler SW, Wyse E, Azemard S (2004). Distribution of heavy metals...

  8. Increased temperatures combined with lowered salinities differentially impact oyster size class growth and mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Rybovich, Molly; Hall, Steven G.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the timing and interaction of seasonal high temperatures and low salinities as predicted by climate change models could dramatically alter oyster population dynamics. Little is known explicitly about how low salinity and high temperature combinations affect spat (75mm) oyster growth and mortality. Using field and laboratory studies, this project quantified the combined effects of extremely low salinities (30°C) on growth and survival of spat, seed, andmarket-sized oysters. In 2012 and 2013, hatchery-produced oysters were placed in open and closed cages at three sites in Breton Sound, LA, along a salinity gradient that typically ranged from 5 to 20. Growth and mortality were recorded monthly. Regardless of size class, oysters at the lowest salinity site (annualmean = 4.8) experienced significantly highermortality and lower growth than oysters located in higher salinity sites (annual means = 11.1 and 13.0, respectively); furthermore, all oysters in open cages at the two higher salinity sites experienced higher mortality than in closed cages, likely due to predation. To explicitly examine oyster responses to extreme low salinity and high temperature combinations, a series of laboratory studies were conducted. Oysters were placed in 18 tanks in a fully crossed temperature (25°C, 32°C) by salinity (1, 5, and 15) study with three replicates, and repeated at least twice for each oyster size class. Regardless of temperature, seed and market oysters held in low salinity tanks (salinity 1) experienced 100% mortality within 7 days. In contrast, at salinity 5, temperature significantly affected mortality; oysters in all size classes experienced greater than 50%mortality at 32°C and less than 40%mortality at 25°C. At the highest salinity tested (15), only market-sized oysters held at 32°C experienced significant mortality (>60%). These studies demonstrate that high water temperatures (>30°C) and low salinities (<5) negatively impact oyster growth and survival

  9. Native and exotic oysters in Brazil: Comparative tolerance to hypercapnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Anthony; Figueira, Etelvina; Pecora, Iracy L; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Freitas, Rosa

    2018-02-01

    Environmental hypercapnia in shallow coastal marine ecosystems can be exacerbated by increasing levels of atmospheric CO 2 . In these ecosystems organisms are expected to become increasingly subjected to pCO 2 levels several times higher than those inhabiting ocean waters (e.g.: 10,000µatm), but still our current understanding on different species capacity to respond to such levels of hypercapnia is limited. Oysters are among the most important foundation species inhabiting these coastal ecosystems, although natural oyster banks are increasingly threatened worldwide. In the present study we studied the effects of hypercapnia on two important oyster species, the pacific oyster C. gigas and the mangrove oyster C. brasiliana, to bring new insights on different species response mechanisms towards three hypercapnic levels (ca. 1,000; 4,000; 10,000 µatm), by study of a set of biomarkers related to metabolic potential (electron transport system - ETS), antioxidant capacity (SOD, CAT, GSH), cellular damage (LPO) and energetic fitness (GLY), in two life stages (juvenile and adult) after 28 days of exposure. Results showed marked differences between each species tolerance capacity to hypercapnia, with contrasting metabolic readjustment strategies (ETS), different antioxidant response capacities (SOD, CAT, GSH), which generally allowed to prevent increased cellular damage (LPO) and energetic impairment (GLY) in both species. Juveniles were more responsive to hypercapnia stress in both congeners, and are likely to be most sensitive to extreme hypercapnia in the environment. Juvenile C. gigas presented more pronounced biochemical alterations at intermediate hypercapnia (4,000µatm) than C. brasiliana. Adult C. gigas showed biochemical alterations mostly in response to high hypercapnia (10,000µatm), while adult C. brasiliana were less responsive to this environmental stressor, despite presenting decreased metabolic potential. Our data bring new insights on the biochemical

  10. Dispersion measurements from Sofar floats on the Iberian Abyssal plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.M.; Gmitrowicz, M.

    1989-01-01

    Tracks of SOFAR floats launched on the Iberian Abyssal Plain are presented. The floats were launched in two groups in early October 1984 and mid-February 1985 to a nominal depth of 2500 m. Of these floats, 4 from the first deployment and 2 from the second functioned properly. Float signals were recorded by four autonomous listening stations at a depth of 1900 m. These preliminary results show the tracks of floats up to July 1986 and represent 3600 float days of information. The main task of the experiment was to especially study the dispersion of radioactive substances

  11. Coupled analysis of floating production systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, D.L. [Stress Engineering Services, Houston, TX (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Fully coupled global analysis of Floating Production Systems, including the vessel, the mooring system and the riser system is described. Design of the system can be a daunting task, involving more than 1000 load cases for global analysis. The primary driver for the mooring system and for the riser system is motion of the vessel. Vessel motions are driven by environmental forces, but are restrained by forces from the mooring and riser systems. Numerical models and procedures that provide accurate and efficient global modeling of the Floating Production System are presented. Both Time Domain and Frequency Domain procedures are included. The accuracy and efficiency of the procedures are illustrated in an example: a large semi with 16 mooring lines and 20 risers. The procedures provide the accuracy and efficiency for use of fully coupled analysis in design of Floating Production Systems from concept selection to final design, installation and operation. (Author)

  12. From oysters to cockles at Hjarnø Sund

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Johan Sandvang; Philippsen, Bente; Skriver, Claus

    2018-01-01

    charcoal samples from the two layers indicates that these are chronologically consecutive (separated by as little as 0 to 157 years (95.4%) and that the oyster-to-cockle shift dated between ~5500-5300 cal BC and ~5300-5200 cal BC (around or just after the Kongemose / Ertebølle transition). The shell midden...... at Hjarnø Sund is, thus, one of the oldest-known in Denmark, demonstrating that intensive shellfish exploitation was a hallmark of the Ertebølle culture from its inception. Our study suggests that oyster-to-cockle shifts also occurred at times other than the Mesolithic-Neolithic Transition and that they may...

  13. Effects of Electrolyte on Floating Water Bridge

    OpenAIRE

    Hideo Nishiumi; Fumitaka Honda

    2009-01-01

    Fuchs found phenomena that when high voltage is applied to deionized water filled in two contacted beakers, a floating water bridge forms spontaneously. In this paper, we examined flow direction of water bridge and what effects the addition of electrolytes such as NaCl, NaOH, and N H 4 C l to the floating water bridge would give. We found that ionization degree reduced the length of water bridge though insoluble electrolyte A l 2 O 3 had no effect on the length of water bridge.

  14. Block floating point for radar data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Lintz

    1999-01-01

    Integer, floating point, and block floating point (BFP) data formats are analyzed and compared in order to establish the mathematical tools for selection of an optimal format which fulfils the demands of high resolution radar (SAR) data to large dynamic range and adequate S/N. The analysis takes...... quantization noise and saturation distortion into account and concludes that it is preferred to use small blocks and a (new) modified BFP format applying fractional exponents. Data from the EMISAR radar system are applied to illustrate the merits of the different schemes....

  15. Floating plant can get uranium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    A floating plant has been designed to extract uranium from seawater using solid adsorbents. Ore is removed from the adsorbent material by means of a solvent and concentrated in ion exchangers. Seawater is supplied to the adsorbent inside by wave energy and is based on the principle that waves will rush up a sloping plane that is partly submerged and fill a reservoir to a level higher than the still water level in the sea. The company projects that an offshore plant for recovering 600 tons of uranium/yr would comprise 22 floating concrete units, each measuring 430 x 75 meters

  16. Ge /Si heteronanocrystal floating gate memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bei; Liu, Jianlin; Liu, G. F.; Yarmoff, J. A.

    2007-09-01

    Metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor memories with Ge /Si heteronanocrystals (HNCs) as floating gate were fabricated and characterized. Ge /Si HNCs with density of 5×1011cm-2 were grown on n-type Si (100) substrate with thin tunnel oxide on the top. Enhanced device performances including longer retention time, faster programming speed, and higher charge storage capability are demonstrated compared with Si nanocrystal (NC) memories. The erasing speed and endurance performance of Ge /Si HNC memories are similar to that of Si NC devices. The results suggest that Ge /Si HNCs may be an alternative to make further floating gate memory scaling down possible.

  17. FLOAT2 WP4: Development of Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Aarup, Bendt

    This report refers to complementary material testing to support the design and production of UHPC floaters for installation in the Wave Star Machine under FLOAT2 project. The main objective of WP4 is the characterization of mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced UHPC.......This report refers to complementary material testing to support the design and production of UHPC floaters for installation in the Wave Star Machine under FLOAT2 project. The main objective of WP4 is the characterization of mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced UHPC....

  18. Factors affecting the uptake and retention of Vibrio vulnificus in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froelich, Brett A; Noble, Rachel T

    2014-12-01

    Vibrio vulnificus, a bacterium ubiquitous in oysters and coastal water, is capable of causing ailments ranging from gastroenteritis to grievous wound infections or septicemia. The uptake of these bacteria into oysters is often examined in vitro by placing oysters in seawater amended with V. vulnificus. Multiple teams have obtained similar results in studies where laboratory-grown bacteria were observed to be rapidly taken up by oysters but quickly eliminated. This technique, along with suggested modifications, is reviewed here. In contrast, the natural microflora within oysters is notoriously difficult to eliminate via depuration. The reason for the transiency of exogenous bacteria is that those bacteria are competitively excluded by the oyster's preexisting microflora. Evidence of this phenomenon is shown using in vitro oyster studies and a multiyear in situ case study. Depuration of the endogenous oyster bacteria occurs naturally and can also be artificially induced, but both of these events require extreme conditions, natural or otherwise, as explained here. Finally, the "viable but nonculturable" (VBNC) state of Vibrio is discussed. This bacterial torpor can easily be confused with a reduction in bacterial abundance, as bacteria in this state fail to grow on culture media. Thus, oysters collected from colder months may appear to be relatively free of Vibrio but in reality harbor VBNC cells that respond to exogenous bacteria and prevent colonization of oyster matrices. Bacterial-uptake experiments combined with studies involving cell-free spent media are detailed that demonstrate this occurrence, which could explain why the microbial community in oysters does not always mirror that of the surrounding water. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. 75 FR 65373 - Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit/Environmental Impact Statement, Point Reyes National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... National Park Service Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit/Environmental Impact Statement, Point... Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit... Statement (EIS) for the Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit, Point Reyes National Seashore...

  20. Floating Inductance and FDNR Using Positive Polarity Current Conveyors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pal

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A generalized circuit based on five positive polarity second-generation current conveyors is introduced. The circuit simulates a floating inductance, capacitor floatation circuit and floating fdnr. All these circuits use grounded capacitors.

  1. Argo Float Data from the APDRC DAPPER Server, 1995-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The floats are designed to drift at a fixed pressure (usually 1000 dbar) for 10 days. After this period, the floats move to a profiling pressure (usually between...

  2. Electrical stimulation in white oyster mushroom (Pleurotus florida) production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshita, I.; Nurfazira, K. M. P.; Fern, C. Shi; Ain, M. S. Nur

    2017-09-01

    White oyster mushroom (Pleurotus florida) is an edible mushroom that gained popularity due to its nutritional values, low production cost and ease of cultivation. There are several research reported on the mushroom fruiting bodies which were actively developed when applying electrical shock treatment. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of different electrical voltages on the growth and yield of white oyster mushroom (Pleurotus florida). Five different electrical voltages had been applied during spawning period which were 6V, 9V, 12V, 15V and mushroom bags without any treatment served as control. Treatment at 6V showed the highest rate for mycelium growth while 15V took the shortest time for fruiting body formation. However, no significant different (P>0.05) among all the treatments was observed for the time taken for the mycelium to fill-up the bag and pinhead emergence. The total fresh weight and percentage of biological efficiency for treatment at 9V showed higher values compared to control. Treatment at 9V also showed the largest pileus diameter and the most firm in the pileus texture. Meanwhile, treatment at 6V showed the highest a* value (redness). In addition, different electrical voltage treatments applied did not show any significant effect on substrate utilization efficiency, colour L* and b* values. In conclusion, among all the electrical treatments applied, 9V could be considered as the best treatment to enhance the yield of white oyster mushroom.

  3. Oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau boatwhistle call detection and patterns within a large-scale oyster restoration site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon W Ricci

    Full Text Available During May 2015, passive acoustic recorders were deployed at eight subtidal oyster reefs within Harris Creek Oyster Sanctuary in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland USA. These sites were selected to represent both restored and unrestored habitats having a range of oyster densities. Throughout the survey, the soundscape within Harris Creek was dominated by the boatwhistle calls of the oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau. A novel, multi-kernel spectral correlation approach was developed to automatically detect these boatwhistle calls using their two lowest harmonic bands. The results provided quantitative information on how call rate and call frequency varied in space and time. Toadfish boatwhistle fundamental frequency ranged from 140 Hz to 260 Hz and was well correlated (r = 0.94 with changes in water temperature, with the fundamental frequency increasing by ~11 Hz for every 1°C increase in temperature. The boatwhistle call rate increased from just a few calls per minute at the start of monitoring on May 7th to ~100 calls/min on May 10th and remained elevated throughout the survey. As male toadfish are known to generate boatwhistles to attract mates, this rapid increase in call rate was interpreted to mark the onset of spring spawning behavior. Call rate was not modulated by water temperature, but showed a consistent diurnal pattern, with a sharp decrease in rate just before sunrise and a peak just after sunset. There was a significant difference in call rate between restored and unrestored reefs, with restored sites having nearly twice the call rate as unrestored sites. This work highlights the benefits of using automated detection techniques that provide quantitative information on species-specific call characteristics and patterns. This type of non-invasive acoustic monitoring provides long-term, semi-continuous information on animal behavior and abundance, and operates effectively in settings that are otherwise difficult to sample.

  4. 14 CFR 25.753 - Main float design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 25.753 Section 25.753 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 25.753 Main float design...

  5. associated injuries and complications in floating knee management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Associated injuries, complications, Floating knee, Management. INTRODUCTION. Floating knee refers to ipsilateral fractures of femur and tibia. Road accidents with high-energy trauma are the most frequent aetiology leading to that type of injury. In the management of floating knee, the lower limb deformation ...

  6. Validation of salinity data from ARGO floats: Comparison between the older ARGO floats and that of later deployments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Youn, Y.-H.; Lee, H.; Chang, Y.-S.; Pankajakshan, T.

    Continued observation of ARGO floats or years (about 4 years) makes the conductivity sensor more vulnerable to fouling by marine life and associated drift in salinity measurements. In this paper, we address this issue by making use of floats...

  7. Oysters as vectors of marine aliens, with notes on four introduced ...

    African Jou